Science.gov

Sample records for film materials processes

  1. Electronic processes in thin-film PV materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.C.; Chen, D.; Chen, S.L.

    1998-07-01

    The electronic and optical processes in an important class of thin-film PV materials, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, have been investigated using several experimental techniques designed for thin-film geometries. The experimental techniques include various magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopies and combinations of these two spectroscopies. Two-step optical excitation processes through the manifold of silicon dangling bond states have been identifies as important at low excitation energies. Local hydrogen motion has been studied using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and found to be much more rapid than long range diffusion as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. A new metastable effect has been found in a-Si:H films alloyed with sulfur. Spin-one optically excited states have been unambiguously identified using optically detected electron spin resonance. Local hydrogen bonding in microcrystalline silicon films has been studied using NMR.

  2. Thin film hydrogen sensors: A materials processing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Raviprakash

    results. Also the geometry of the resistors did not have any effect on the sensor sensitivity or response. Mass spectroscopy and ion energy distribution function (IEDF) analysis are important tools for characterizing processing plasmas. In this work, the sputter discharges were studied using energy and quadrupole mass spectrometer from Hiden. The IEDF of pulsed DC sputter discharges indicated a higher energy peak (˜65eV) and a broad distribution in addition to the low energy peak (˜5eV). The high energy peak was absent from the DC sputter discharge. This high energy peak was correlated to the pulsing of the DC source and was found to be independent of the target material.

  3. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Organic and Polymeric Thin Film Materials of Potential for Microgravity Processing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin; Witherow, William K.; Bank, Curtis; Shields, Angela; Hicks, Rosline; Ashley, Paul R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we will take a closer look at the state of the art of polydiacetylene, and metal-free phthalocyanine films, in view of the microgravity impact on their optical properties, their nonlinear optical properties and their potential advantages for integrated optics. These materials have many attractive features with regard to their use in integrated optical circuits and optical switching. Thin films of these materials processed in microgravity environment show enhanced optical quality and better molecular alignment than those processed in unit gravity. Our studies of these materials indicate that microgravity can play a major role in integrated optics technology. Polydiacetylene films are produced by UV irradiation of monomer solution through an optical window. This novel technique of forming polydiacetylene thin films has been modified for constructing sophisticated micro-structure integrated optical patterns using a pre-programmed UV-Laser beam. Wave guiding through these thin films by the prism coupler technique has been demonstrated. The third order nonlinear parameters of these films have been evaluated. Metal-free phthalocyanine films of good optical quality are processed in our laboratories by vapor deposition technique. Initial studies on these films indicate that they have excellent chemical, laser, and environmental stability. They have large nonlinear optical parameters and show intrinsic optical bistability. This bistability is essential for optical logic gates and optical switching applications. Waveguiding and device making investigations of these materials are underway.

  4. Chemical-bath deposition of ZnSe thin films: Process and material characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Dona, J.M.; Herrero, J.

    1995-03-01

    Chemical-bath deposition of ZnSe thin films from NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 2}-NH{sub 2}/SeC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}/ZnSO{sub 4} solutions has been studied. The effect of various process parameters on the growth and the film quality is presented. A first approach to a mechanistic interpretation of the chemical process, based on the influence of the process parameters on the film growth rate, is reported. The structural, optical, chemical, and electrical properties of the ZnSe thin-films deposited by this method have been studied. The electron diffraction (EDS) analysis shows that the films are microcrystalline with mixed cubic and hexagonal structure. EDS analysis has demonstrated that the films are highly stoichiometric. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the ZnSe thin films deposited by this method show that the films are continuous and homogeneous. Optical measurements have allowed the authors to detect the presence of the spin-orbit splitting effect in this material. Electrical conductivity measurements have shown the highly resistive nature of these films ({rho} {approximately} 10{sup 9} {Omega} cm).

  5. A process to recycle thin film PV materials

    SciTech Connect

    Goozner, R.E.; Drinkard, W.F.; Long, M.O.; Byrd, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    The wide scale interest in the commercial potential of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic modules is tempered by the use of toxic metals such as cadmium and selenium in their manufacture. Drinkard Metalox has adapted hydrometallurgical technology to recycle CdTe cells. The process will remove all the Cd and Te while, enabling reuse of substrates. Downstream processing recovers Te as metal from the lixivant, and removal of the lixivant leaves behind a pure Cd product. This process can also be utilized to process CIS cells. The lixivant will remove all the photoactive metals from the substrate of scrap CIS cells. A metallic stream of mixed Cu and Se metal is removed from the leachate by electrochemical methods. Subsequent processing will win purified Se.

  6. Composite film fabricated on biomedical material with corona streamer plasma processing to mitigate bacterial adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhamarneh, Ibrahim; Pedrow, Patrick; Eskhan, Asma; Abu-Lail, Nehal

    2011-10-01

    Composite films might control bacterial adhesion and concomitant biofouling that afflicts biomedical materials. Different size molecules of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with nominal molecular weights 600, 2000, and 20000 g/mol were used to synthesize composite films with plasma processing and dip-coating procedures on surgical-grade 316L stainless steel. Before dip-coating, the substrate was pre-coated with plasma-polymerized di(ethylene glycol) vinyl ether (pp-EO2V) in an atmospheric pressure corona streamer plasma reactor. The PEG dip-coating step followed immediately in the same chamber due to the finite lifetime of radicals associated with freshly deposited pp-EO2V. Morphology of the composite film was investigated with an ESEM. FTIR confirmed incorporation of pp-EO2V and PEG species into the composite film. More investigations on the composite film were conducted by XPS measurements. Adhesion of the composite film was evaluated with a standard peel-off test. Stability of the composite film in buffer solution was evaluated by AFM. AFM was also used to measure the film roughness and thickness. Polar and non-polar contact angle measurements were included.

  7. Historical film processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi; Suter, David

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes work using historical film material, including what is believed to be the world's first feature length film. The digital processing of historical film material permits many new facilities: digital restoration, electronic storage, automated indexing, and electronic delivery to name a few. Although the work aims ultimately to support all of the previously mentioned facilities, this paper concentrated upon automatic scene change detection, brightness correction, and frame registration. These processes are fundamental to a more complete and complex processing system, but, by themselves, could be immediately used in computer-assisted film cataloging.

  8. Modeling of plume dynamics in laser ablation processes for thin film deposition of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Chen, K.R.; Donato, J.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    The transport dynamics of laser-ablated neutral/plasma plumes are of significant interest for film growth by pulsed-laser deposition of materials since the magnitude and kinetic energy of the species arriving at the deposition substrate are key processing parameters. Dynamical calculations of plume propagation in vacuum and in background gas have been performed using particle-in-cell hydrodynamics, continuum gas dynamics, and scattering models. Results from these calculations are presented and compared with experimental observations.

  9. Thin films for material engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasa, Kiyotaka

    2016-07-01

    Thin films are defined as two-dimensional materials formed by condensing one by one atomic/molecular/ionic species of matter in contrast to bulk three-dimensional sintered ceramics. They are grown through atomic collisional chemical reaction on a substrate surface. Thin film growth processes are fascinating for developing innovative exotic materials. On the basis of my long research on sputtering deposition, this paper firstly describes the kinetic energy effect of sputtered adatoms on thin film growth and discusses on a possibility of room-temperature growth of cubic diamond crystallites and the perovskite thin films of binary compound PbTiO3. Secondly, high-performance sputtered ferroelectric thin films with extraordinary excellent crystallinity compatible with MBE deposited thin films are described in relation to a possible application for thin-film MEMS. Finally, the present thin-film technologies are discussed in terms of a future material science and engineering.

  10. Growth of thin films of organic nonlinear optical materials by vapor growth processes - An overview and examination of shortfalls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Penn, B. G.; Witherow, W. K.; Paley, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    Research on the growth of second- and third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) organic thin film by vapor deposition is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the experimental methods for growing thin films of p-chlorophenylurea, diacetylenes, and phthalocyanines; characteristics of the resulting films; and approaches for advancing thin film technology. It is concluded that the growth of NLO thin films by vapor processes is a promising method for the fabrication of planar waveguides for nonlinear optical devices. Two innovative approaches are proposed including a method of controlling the input beam frequency to maximize nonlinear effects in thin films and single crystals, and the alternate approach to the molecular design of organic NLO materials by increasing the transition dipole moment between ground and excited states of the molecule.

  11. Using iridium films to compensate for piezo-electric materials processing stresses in adjustable x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, A.; Bruni, R.; Cotroneo, V.; Johnson-Wilke, R.; Kester, T.; Reid, P.; Romaine, S.; Tolier-McKinstry, S.; Wilke, R. H. T.

    2015-09-01

    Adjustable X-ray optics represent a potential enabling technology for simultaneously achieving large effective area and high angular resolution for future X-ray Astronomy missions. The adjustable optics employ a bimorph mirror composed of a thin (1.5 μm) film of piezoelectric material deposited on the back of a 0.4 mm thick conical mirror segment. The application of localized electric fields in the piezoelectric material, normal to the mirror surface, result in localized deformations in mirror shape. Thus, mirror fabrication and mounting induced figure errors can be corrected, without the need for a massive reaction structure. With this approach, though, film stresses in the piezoelectric layer, resulting from deposition, crystallization, and differences in coefficient of thermal expansion, can distort the mirror. The large relative thickness of the piezoelectric material compared to the glass means that even 100MPa stresses can result in significant distortions. We have examined compensating for the piezoelectric processing related distortions by the deposition of controlled stress chromium/iridium films on the front surface of the mirror. We describe our experiments with tuning the product of the chromium/iridium film stress and film thickness to balance that resulting from the piezoelectric layer. We also evaluated the repeatability of this deposition process, and the robustness of the iridium coating.

  12. Analysis and assessment of film materials and associated manufacturing processes for a solar sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradbury, E. J.; Jakobsen, R. J.; Sliemers, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Candidate resin manufacturers and film producers were surveyed to determine the availability of key materials and to establish the capabilities of fabricators to prepare ultrathin films of these materials within the capacity/cost/time constraints of the Halley program. Infrared spectra of three candidate samples were obtained by pressing each sample against an internal reflection crystal with the polymer sandwiched between the crystal and the metal backing. The sample size was such that less than one-fourth of the surface of the crystal was covered with the sample. This resulted in weak spectra requiring a six-fold expansion. Internal reflection spectra of the three samples were obtained using both a KRS-5 and a Ge internal reflection crystal. Subtracted infrared spectra of the three samples are presented.

  13. Process for forming planarized films

    DOEpatents

    Pang, Stella W.; Horn, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    A planarization process and apparatus which employs plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to form plarnarization films of dielectric or conductive carbonaceous material on step-like substrates.

  14. First principles-based multiparadigm, multiscale strategy for simulating complex materials processes with applications to amorphous SiC films

    SciTech Connect

    Naserifar, Saber; Goddard, William A.; Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2015-05-07

    Progress has recently been made in developing reactive force fields to describe chemical reactions in systems too large for quantum mechanical (QM) methods. In particular, ReaxFF, a force field with parameters that are obtained solely from fitting QM reaction data, has been used to predict structures and properties of many materials. Important applications require, however, determination of the final structures produced by such complex processes as chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, and formation of ceramic films by pyrolysis of polymers. This requires the force field to properly describe the formation of other products of the process, in addition to yielding the final structure of the material. We describe a strategy for accomplishing this and present an example of its use for forming amorphous SiC films that have a wide variety of applications. Extensive reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to simulate the pyrolysis of hydridopolycarbosilane. The reaction products all agree with the experimental data. After removing the reaction products, the system is cooled down to room temperature at which it produces amorphous SiC film, for which the computed radial distribution function, x-ray diffraction pattern, and the equation of state describing the three main SiC polytypes agree with the data and with the QM calculations. Extensive MD simulations have also been carried out to compute other structural properties, as well the effective diffusivities of light gases in the amorphous SiC film.

  15. Atomic layer epitaxy of group 4 materials: Surface processes, thin films, devices and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert F.; Bedair, S.; El-Masry, N. A.; Glass, J. T.; King, S.

    1994-12-01

    Residual surface contaminants were removed from vicinal 6H-SiC(0001) surfaces in UHV via high temperature annealing in SiH4. Characterization via AES, EELS, LEED, XPS, and UPS was conducted. At T greater than 850 C, the surface oxide was rapidly removed. Exposure to approx. 400 Langmuir (10(exp -6) Torr(dot)liter/s) of SiH4 resulted in complete surface oxide removal and a nearly stoichiometric (l x l) 6H-SiC surface suitable for ALE of SiC. Further exposure resulted in a (3 x 3)R30 deg Si-rich reconstructed surface. Subsequent annealing in UHV resulted in a (square root of 3 x square root of 3)R30 deg Si deficient/graphitic reconstructed surface. The first set of wafers containing HBT device structures were fabricated on SiC films grown via ALE. No transistor activity was detected. Electrical characterization and SEM showed the most likely fault to be inaccurate etching of the SiC emitter. Nucleation and growth of oriented diamond particles on seeded, group of zone axes (0001) oriented single crystal Co substrates was achieved via multi-step, hot-filament CVD process involving seeding, annealing, nucleation and growth. Diamond particles oriented group of zone axes (111) were obtained. Micro-Raman showed a FWHM of 4.3/cm. A very weak graphitic peak was observed on regions of the substrate not covered by the diamond particles. A nucleation model has been proposed. Initial results showed that CeO2 film grows epitaxially on (111) Si substrates. The CeO2 films had density of interfacial traps and fixed oxide charge values comparable to that of amorphous SiO2/Si.

  16. Processing Film, Processing Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkowski, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents are at a ripe age to make meaning and think abstractly (Kerlavage, 1998); yet, they are not "born knowing how to get ideas into materials, or how materials can be manipulated to shape ideas and meaning" (Burton, 2012, p. 14). Adolescents need guidance in understanding abstract concepts, and art teachers play an important role…

  17. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Bowen, H. K.; Kenney, G. B.

    1980-01-01

    The goals and activities of the center are discussed. The center activities encompass all engineering materials including metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials, composites, superconductors, and thin films. Processes include crystallization, solidification, nucleation, and polymer synthesis.

  18. MATERIAL AND PROCESS DEVELOPMENT LEADING TO ECONOMICAL HIGH-PERFORMANCE THIN-FILM SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Guan; Nguyen Minh

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of the work conducted under the program: ''Material and Process Development Leading to Economical High-Performance Thin-Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cells'' under contract number DE-AC26-00NT40711. The program goal is to advance materials and processes that can be used to produce economical, high-performance solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) capable of achieving extraordinary high power densities at reduced temperatures. Under this program, anode-supported thin electrolyte based on lanthanum gallate (LSMGF) has been developed using tape-calendering process. The fabrication parameters such as raw materials characteristics, tape formulations and sintering conditions have been evaluated. Dense anode supported LSGMF electrolytes with thickness range of 10-50 micron have been fabricated. High performance cathode based on Sr{sub 0.5}Sm{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3} (SSC) has been developed. Polarization of {approx}0.23 ohm-cm{sup 2} has been achieved at 600 C with Sr{sub 0.5}Sm{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3}cathode. The high-performance SSC cathode and thin gallate electrolyte have been integrated into single cells and cell performance has been characterized. Tested cells to date generally showed low performance because of low cell OCVs and material interactions between NiO in the anode and lanthanum gallate electrolyte.

  19. Micro-materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. G.; Kaplan, R. A.; Arthurs, E. G.

    1982-06-01

    A model analysis of the absorption of laser energy in the millijoule range by a thin film on a substrate is presented to illustrate the underlying physical mechanism of laser micro-materials processing. The analysis is followed by a discussion of several applications from the electronics and semiconductor industries, including resistor trimming, laserscribing, laser damage gettering, laser marking, ablation of metal films, and mask repair. Finally, several uses of lasers in the diamond industry, such as removal of flaws from gemstone diamonds, diamond sawing, and diamond inscription, are briefly reviewed.

  20. FEASIBILITY OF MAGNETIC PARTICLE FILMS FOR CURIE TEMPERATURE-CONTROLLED PROCESSING OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using magnetic particulate susceptor materials for induction heating during bonding of polymer matrix composite materials is investigated. If properly designed, these systems should rapidly heat to the particulate material Curie temperature and dwell at that te...

  1. Superconducting materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, John S.; Karikari, Emmanuel K.; Hiamang, S. O.; Danjaji, M.; Bassey, Affiong; Morgan, Andre

    1995-01-01

    The effects of materials processing on the properties and behavior of high temperature yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) superconductors were investigated. Electrical, magnetic, and structural characteristics of thin films (300 nm) YBA2CU3O(delta) structures grown by pulsed laser deposition on LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 substrates were used to evaluate processing. Pole projection and thin film diffraction measurements were used to establish grain orientation and verify structural integrity of the samples. Susceptibility magnetization, and transport measurements were used to evaluate the magnetic and electrical transport properties of the samples. Our results verified that an unfortunate consequence of processing is inherent changes to the internal structure of the material. This effect translates into modifications in the properties of the materials, and undesired feature that makes it very difficult to consistently predict material behavior. The results show that processing evaluation must incorporate a comprehensive understanding of the properties of the materials. Future studies will emphasize microstructural characteristics of the materials, in particular, those microscopic properties that map macroscopic behavior.

  2. An improved thick-film piezoelectric material by powder blending and enhanced processing parameters.

    PubMed

    Torah, Russel; Beeby, Steve P; White, Neil M

    2005-01-01

    This paper details improvements of the d33 co-efficient for thick-film lead zirconate titanate (PZT) layers. In particular, the effect of blending ball and attritor milled powders has been investigated. Mathematical modeling of the film structure has produced initial experimental values for powder combination percentages. A range of paste formulations between 8:1 and 2:1 ball to attritor milled PZT powders by weight have been mixed into a screen-printable paste. Each paste contains 10% by weight of lead borosilicate glass and an appropriate quantity of solvent to formulate a screen printable thixotropic paste. A d33 of 63.5 pC/N was obtained with a combination of 4:1 ball milled to attritor milled powder by weight. The improved paste combines the high d33 values of ball and the consistency of attritor milled powder. The measured d33 coefficient was further improved to 131 pC/N by increasing the furnace firing profile to 1000 degrees C, increasing the poling temperature to 200 degrees C, and using gold cermet and polymer electrodes that avoid silver migration effects and repeated firing of the PZT film. PMID:15742558

  3. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  4. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Raoul B.

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  5. Nanoscaled tin dioxide films processed from organotin-based hybrid materials: an organometallic route toward metal oxide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Renard, Laetitia; Babot, Odile; Saadaoui, Hassan; Fuess, Hartmut; Brötz, Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander; Arveux, Emmanuel; Klein, Andreas; Toupance, Thierry

    2012-11-01

    Nanocrystalline tin dioxide (SnO(2)) ultra-thin films were obtained employing a straightforward solution-based route that involves the calcination of bridged polystannoxane films processed by the sol-gel process from bis(triprop-1-ynylstannyl)alkylene and -arylene precursors. These films have been thoroughly characterized by FTIR, contact angle measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force (AFM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Annealing at a high temperature gave 30-35 nm thick cassiterite SnO(2) films with a mean crystallite size ranging from 4 to 7 nm depending on the nature of the organic linker in the distannylated compound used as a precursor. In the presence of H(2) and CO gases, these layers led to highly sensitive, reversible and reproducible responses. The sensing properties were discussed in regard to the crystallinity and porosity of the sensing body that can be tuned by the nature of the precursor employed. Organometallic chemistry combined with the sol-gel process therefore offers new possibilities toward metal oxide nanostructures for the reproducible and sensitive detection of combustible and toxic gases. PMID:23011110

  6. Film stacking architecture for immersion lithography process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tomohiro; Sanada, Masakazu; Miyagi, Tadashi; Shigemori, Kazuhito; Kanaoka, Masashi; Yasuda, Shuichi; Tamada, Osamu; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    In immersion lithography process, film stacking architecture will be necessary due to film peeling. However, the architecture will restrict lithographic area within a wafer due to top side EBR accuracy In this paper, we report an effective film stacking architecture that also allows maximum lithographic area. This study used a new bevel rinse system on RF3 for all materials to make suitable film stacking on the top side bevel. This evaluation showed that the new bevel rinse system allows the maximum lithographic area and a clean wafer edge. Patterning defects were improved with suitable film stacking.

  7. Telerobotic electronic materials processing experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, Stanford

    1991-01-01

    The Office of Commercial Programs (OCP), working in conjunction with NASA engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center, is supporting research efforts in robot technology and microelectronics materials processing that will provide many spinoffs for science and industry. The Telerobotic Materials Processing Experiment (TRMPX) is a Shuttle-launched materials processing test payload using a Get Away Special can. The objectives of the project are to define, develop, and demonstrate an automated materials processing capability under realistic flight conditions. TRMPX will provide the capability to test the production processes that are dependent on microgravity. The processes proposed for testing include the annealing of amorphous silicon to increase grain size for more efficient solar cells, thin film deposition to demonstrate the potential of fabricating solar cells in orbit, and the annealing of radiation damaged solar cells.

  8. Process for producing dispersed particulate composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Hirth, John P.

    1995-01-01

    This invention is directed to a process for forming noninterwoven dispersed particulate composite products. In one case a composite multi-layer film product comprises a substantially noninterwoven multi-layer film having a plurality of discrete layers. This noninterwoven film comprises at least one discrete layer of a first material and at least one discrete layer of a second material. In another case the first and second materials are blended together with each other. In either case, the first material comprises a metalloid and the second material a metal compound. At least one component of a first material in one discrete layer undergoes a solid state displacement reaction with at least one component of a second material thereby producing the requisite noninterwoven composite film product. Preferably, the first material comprises silicon, the second material comprises Mo.sub.2 C, the third material comprises SiC and the fourth material comprises MoSi.sub.2.

  9. Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Heberlein, Joachim, V.R.; Pfender, Emil; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2005-02-28

    Plasma Processing of Advanced Materials The project had the overall objective of improving our understanding of the influences of process parameters on the properties of advanced superhard materials. The focus was on high rate deposition processes using thermal plasmas and atmospheric pressure glow discharges, and the emphasis on superhard materials was chosen because of the potential impact of such materials on industrial energy use and on the environment. In addition, the development of suitable diagnostic techniques was pursued. The project was divided into four tasks: (1) Deposition of superhard boron containing films using a supersonic plasma jet reactor (SPJR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (2) Deposition of superhard nanocomposite films in the silicon-nitrogen-carbon system using the triple torch plasma reactor (TTPR), and the characterization of the deposition process. (3) Deposition of films consisting of carbon nanotubes using an atmospheric pressure glow discharge reactor. (4) Adapting the Thomson scattering method for characterization of atmospheric pressure non-uniform plasmas with steep spatial gradients and temporal fluctuations. This report summarizes the results.

  10. Films and Film Sources for Materials Science and Engineering Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Edward B.

    1972-01-01

    A selected list of films that are suitable for secondary schools through universities. They cover all phases of materials science and engineering. The films may be obtained, usually free of charge, for listed sources. (DF)

  11. Materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility and possible advantages of processing materials in a nongravitational field are considered. Areas of investigation include biomedical applications, the processing of inorganic materials, and flight programs and funding.

  12. Thin film phase transition materials development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, W. E.

    1985-04-01

    A number of application concepts have emerged based on the idea that a phase transition thin film such as vanadium dioxide provides a high resolution, two-dimensional format for switching, recording, and processing optical signals. These applications range from high density optical disk recording systems and optical data processing to laser protection devices, infrared FLIRS and seekers, laser radar systems and IR scene simulators. All application candidates have a potential for providing either a totally new capability, an improved performance, a lower cost, or combinations of the three. Probably of greatest significance is the emergence of agile sensor concepts arising out of some of the film's special properties. These are represented by the above FLIRs, seekers and laser radar systems. A three year research program has been completed to advance the state-of-the-art in the preparation and characterization of selected thin film phase transition materials. The objectives of the program were: (1) to expand the data base and improve operational characteristics of Vought prepared vanadium dioxide thin films, (2) to evolve process chemistry and subsequently characterize several new program materials, including rare-earth chalcogenides, organic semiconductor charge complexes, alloys of transition metal oxides, and metal-insulator cermets, and (3) to spin-off new applications and concepts.

  13. Atomic layer epitaxy Group IV materials: Surface processes, thin films, devices and their characterization. Annual report, 1 January 1992-31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.F.; Bedair, S.; El-Masry, N.; Glass, J.T.

    1992-12-01

    An integrated growth and surface characterization system containing a hot filament reactor, sample transfer station, ESD and XPS has been established to investigate the ALE of diamond films. Complementary experiments concerned with the nucleation of diamond on molten surfaces, e. g., Al and Ge have also been conducted. Formation of GeO2 or an aluminum carbide and the degradation of the diamond by the molten material inhibited nucleation on the melted area. Monocrystalline thin films of Beta-SiC have been achieved in the temperature range of 850 deg -980 deg C by atomic layer-by-layer deposition of Si and C species via sequential exposures of Si(100) substrates to Si2H6 and C2H4. A UHV analytical system containing TPD, AES and XPS is being constructed in concert with the SiC ALE studies to determine the reaction chemistry important to this process. An eximer laser ablation system for the ALE of CeO2 has been completed and employed to successfully deposit films of this material on Si(100).... Atomic layer epitaxy(ALE), Diamond, Silicon carbide, Cerium dioxide.

  14. Automated Composites Processing Technology: Film Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulcher, A. Bruce

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a technology that combines a film/adhesive laydown module with fiber placement technology to enable the processing of composite prepreg tow/tape and films, foils or adhesives on the same placement machine. The development of this technology grew out of NASA's need for lightweight, permeation-resistant cryogenic propellant tanks. Autoclave processing of high performance composites results in thermally-induced stresses due to differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion of the fiber and matrix resin components. These stresses, together with the reduction in temperature due to cryogen storage, tend to initiate microcracking within the composite tank wall. One way in which to mitigate this problem is to introduce a thin, crack-resistant polymer film or foil into the tank wall. Investigation into methods to automate the processing of thin film or foil materials into composites led to the development of this technology. The concept employs an automated film supply and feed module that may be designed to fit existing fiber placement machines, or may be designed as integral equipment to new machines. This patent-pending technology can be designed such that both film and foil materials may be processed simultaneously, leading to a decrease in part build cycle time. The module may be designed having a compaction device independent of the host machine, or may utilize the host machine's compactor. The film module functions are controlled by a dedicated system independent of the fiber placement machine controls. The film, foil, or adhesive is processed via pre-existing placement machine run programs, further reducing operational expense.

  15. Materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, R. D.; Criswell, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Processing-refining of raw materials from extraterrestrial sources is detailed for a space materials handling facility. The discussion is constrained to those steps necessary to separate desired components from raw or altered input ores, semi-purified feedstocks, or process scrap and convert the material into elements, alloys, and consumables. The materials are regarded as originating from dead satellites and boosters, lunar materials, and asteroids. Strong attention will be given to recycling reagent substances to avoid the necessity of transporting replacements. It is assumed that since no aqueous processes exist on the moon, the distribution of minerals will be homogeneous. The processing-refining scenario will include hydrochemical, pyrochemical, electrochemical, and physical techniques selected for the output mass rate/unit plant mass ratio. Flow charts of the various materials processing operations which could be performed with lunar materials are provided, noting the necessity of delivering several alloying elements from the earth due to scarcities on the moon.

  16. Attachment of lead wires to thin film thermocouples mounted on high temperature materials using the parallel gap welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Pencil, Eric; Groth, Mary; Danzey, Gerald A.

    1990-01-01

    Parallel gap resistance welding was used to attach lead wires to sputtered thin film sensors. Ranges of optimum welding parameters to produce an acceptable weld were determined. The thin film sensors were Pt13Rh/Pt thermocouples; they were mounted on substrates of MCrAlY-coated superalloys, aluminum oxide, silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The entire sensor system is designed to be used on aircraft engine parts. These sensor systems, including the thin-film-to-lead-wire connectors, were tested to 1000 C.

  17. Effect of Process Temperature and Reaction Cycle Number on Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 Thin Films Using TiCl4 and H2O Precursors: Correlation Between Material Properties and Process Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappim, W.; Testoni, G. E.; de Lima, J. S. B.; Medeiros, H. S.; Pessoa, Rodrigo Sávio; Grigorov, K. G.; Vieira, L.; Maciel, H. S.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of process temperature and reaction cycle number on atomic layer-deposited TiO2 thin films onto Si(100) using TiCl4 and H2O precursors was investigated in order to discuss the correlation between the growth per cycle (GPC), film structure (crystallinity), and surface roughness as well as the dependence of some of these properties with gas phase environment such as HCl by-product. In this work, these correlations were studied for two conditions: (i) process temperatures in the range of 100-500 °C during 1000 reaction cycles and (ii) number of cycles in the range of 100-2000 for a fixed temperature of 250 °C. To investigate the material properties, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used. Mass spectrometry technique was used to investigate the time evolution of gas phase species HCl and H2O during ALD process. Results indicate that the GPC does not correlate well with film crystallinity and surface roughness for the evaluated process parameters. Basically, the film crystallinity relies solely on grain growth kinetics of the material. This occurs due to higher HCl by-product content during each purge step. Furthermore, for films deposited at variable cycle number, the evolution of film thickness and elemental composition is altered from an initial amorphous structure to a near stoichiometric TiO2-x and, subsequently, becomes fully stoichiometric TiO2 at 400 cycles or above. At this cycle value, the GIXRD spectrum indicates the formation of (101) anatase orientation.

  18. Magnetic cassette for radiographic film material

    SciTech Connect

    Dallas, D.

    1985-03-26

    A radiographic film cassette having a plurality of magnet components integral with the cassette holder for adhering the cassette to ferrous material in X-raying for defects in welds or fissures in shipyards, pipe lines, or the like. What is provided is a substantially flexible cassette envelope comprising first and second layers of radiographic intensifying screens with a sheet of radiographic film positioned therebetween. The cassette would be a cassette envelope constructed of waterproof fabric or other suitable material providing a light-free environment, and having the ability to flex around the curvature of the surface of a pipe or the like to be x-rayed. There is further provided a plurality of magnet components, preferably situated in each corner of the cassette envelope and flexibly attached thereto for overall adherence of the envelope to the surface of the pipe or the like to be x-rayed during the process.

  19. Laser Processing Architecture for Improved Material Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, Frank E.; Helvajian, Henry

    This chapter presents a novel architecture and software-hardware design system for materials processing techniques that are widely applicable to laser direct-write patterning tools. This new laser material processing approach has been crafted by association with the genome and genotype concepts, where predetermined and prescribed laser pulse scripts are synchronously linked with the tool path geometry, and each concatenated pulse sequence is intended to induce a specific material transformation event and thereby express a particular material attribute. While the experimental approach depends on the delivery of discrete amplitude modulated laser pulses to each focused volume element with high fidelity, the architecture is highly versatile and capable of more advanced functionality. The capabilities of this novel architecture fall short of the coherent spatial control techniques that are now emerging, but can be readily applied to fundamental investigations of complex laser-material interaction phenomena, and easily integrated into commercial and industrial laser material processing applications. Section 9.1 provides a brief overview of laser-based machining and materials processing, with particular emphasis on the advantages of controlling energy deposition in light-matter interactions to subtly affect a material's thermodynamic properties. This section also includes a brief discussion of conventional approaches to photon modulation and process control. Section 9.2 comprehensively describes the development and capabilities of our novel laser genotype pulse modulation technique that facilitates the controlled and precise delivery of photons to a host material during direct-write patterning. This section also reviews the experimental design setup and synchronized photon control scheme, along with performance tests and diagnostic results. Section 9.3 discusses selected applications of the new laser genotype processing technique, including optical property variations

  20. LTCC Thick Film Process Characterization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Girardi, M. A.; Peterson, K. A.; Vianco, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) technology has proven itself in military/space electronics, wireless communication, microsystems, medical and automotive electronics, and sensors. The use of LTCC for high frequency applications is appealing due to its low losses, design flexibility and packaging and integration capability. Moreover, we summarize the LTCC thick film process including some unconventional process steps such as feature machining in the unfired state and thin film definition of outer layer conductors. The LTCC thick film process was characterized to optimize process yields by focusing on these factors: 1) Print location, 2) Print thickness, 3) Drying of tapes and panels,more » 4) Shrinkage upon firing, and 5) Via topography. Statistical methods were used to analyze critical process and product characteristics in the determination towards that optimization goal.« less

  1. Material properties of novel polymeric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gene

    This dissertation will study the material properties of two types of novel polymer films (polyelectrolyte multilayer films and photolithographic polymer films). The formation of polylelectrolyte multilayer films onto functionalized aluminum oxide surfaces and functionalized poly(ethylene terephthaltate) (PET) were studied. Functionalization of the aluminum oxide surfaces was achieved via silane coupling. Functionalization of PET surfaces was achieved via hydrolysis and amidation. Surface characterization techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic contact angle measurements were used to monitor the polyelectrolyte multilayer formation. Mechanical properties of the aluminum oxide supported polyelectrolyte multilayer films were tested using a simplified peel test. XPS was used to analyze the surfaces before and after peel. Single lap shear joint specimens were constructed to test the adhesive shear strength of the PET-supported polyelectrolyte multilayer film samples with the aid of a cyanoacrylate adhesive. The adhesive shear strength and its relation with the type of functionalization, number of polyelectrolyte layers, and the effect of polyelectrolyte conformation using added salt were explored. Also, characterization on the single lap joints after adhesive failure was carried out to determine the locus of failure within the multilayers by using XPS and SEM. Two types of photolithographic polymers were formulated and tested. These two polymers (photocrosslinkable polyacrylate (PUA), and a photocrosslinkable polyimide (HRP)) were used to investigate factors that would affect the structural integrity of these particular polymers under environmental variables such as processing (time, UV cure, pressure, and temperature) and ink exposure. Thermomechanical characterization was carried out to see the behavior of these two polymers under these environmental variables. Microscopic techniques were employed to study the morphological behavior of

  2. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.N.; Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1992-10-01

    Results of Phase II of a research program on polycrystalline thin film heterojunction solar cells are presented. Relations between processing, materials properties and device performance were studied. The analysis of these solar cells explains how minority carrier recombination at the interface and at grain boundaries can be reduced by doping of windows and absorber layers, such as in high efficiency CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} based solar cells. The additional geometric dimension introduced by the polycrystallinity must be taken into consideration. The solar cells are limited by the diode current, caused by recombination in the space charge region. J-V characteristics of CuInSe{sub 2}/(CdZn)S cells were analyzed. Current-voltage and spectral response measurements were also made on high efficiency CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells prepared by vacuum evaporation. Cu-In bilayers were reacted with Se and H{sub 2}Se gas to form CuInSe{sub 2} films; the reaction pathways and the precursor were studied. Several approaches to fabrication of these thin film solar cells in a superstrate configuration were explored. A self-consistent picture of the effects of processing on the evolution of CdTe cells was developed.

  3. Femtosecond Laser Materials Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P.S.; Stuart, B.C.; Komashko, A.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    2000-03-06

    The use of femtosecond lasers allows materials processing of practically any material with extremely high precision and minimal collateral damage. Advantages over conventional laser machining (using pulses longer than a few tens of picoseconds) are realized by depositing the laser energy into the electrons of the material on a time scale short compared to the transfer time of this energy to the bulk of the material, resulting in increased ablation efficiency and negligible shock or thermal stress. The improvement in the morphology by using femtosecond pulses rather than nanosecond pulses has been studied in numerous materials from biologic materials to dielectrics to metals. During the drilling process, we have observed the onset of small channels which drill faster than the surrounding material.

  4. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B. C., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    Femtosecond lasers enable materials processing of most any material with extremely high precision and negligible shock or thermal loading to the surrounding area Applications ranging from drilling teeth to cutting explosives to making high-aspect ratio cuts in metals with no heat-affected zone are made possible by this technology For material removal at reasonable rates, we developed a fully computer-controlled 15-Watt average power, 100-fs laser machining system.

  5. Preface: Thin films of molecular organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraxedas, J.

    2008-03-01

    /substrate systems (also called heterostructures) based on the physical properties of the bulk materials, usually in the form of single crystals. However, in recent years the thin films community has been continually growing, helping the field to mature. In my opinion two main aspects have advanced the thin molecular films field. The first is the different applications with optical and electrical devices such as OFETs (organic field-effect transistors) and OLEDs (organic light emitting diodes), applications that could not have been achieved with single crystals because of limited size, difficult processability and mechanical fragility. The second is the involvement of the surface science community with their overwhelming arsenal of experimental techniques. From the synthesis point of view, the preparation of thin films is being regarded as a complementary synthesis route. The different externally accessible variables involved in the preparation process (temperature, pressure, molecular flux, distance, time, concentration, solvent, substrate, etc.), which define the so-called parameter hyperspace, can be so diverse when comparing competing synthesis routes (e.g. solution versus vapour growth) that we should not be surprised if different crystallographic phases with different morphologies are obtained, even if metastable. We should not forget here that the amazingly large number of available molecules is due to the longstanding and innovative work of synthesis chemists, a task that has not been sufficiently recognized (laymen in the domain of synthesis of organic molecules tend to believe that almost any molecule can be synthesized). In summary, one of the goals of this issue is to highlight the emerging importance of the field of thin molecular organic films by giving selected examples. It is clear that some important examples are missing, which are due in part to space limitation and to the understandable reluctance of highly-ranked specialists to contribute because of work overload

  6. Extraterrestrial materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    The first year results of a multi-year study of processing extraterrestrial materials for use in space are summarized. Theoretically, there are potential major advantages to be derived from the use of such materials for future space endeavors. The types of known or postulated starting raw materials are described including silicate-rich mixed oxides on the Moon, some asteroids and Mars; free metals in some asteroids and in small quantities in the lunar soil; and probably volatiles like water and CO2 on Mars and some asteroids. Candidate processes for space materials are likely to be significantly different from their terrestrial counterparts largely because of: absence of atmosphere; lack of of readily available working fluids; low- or micro-gravity; no carbon-based fuels; readily available solar energy; and severe constraints on manned intervention. The extraction of metals and oxygen from lunar material by magma electrolysis or by vapor/ion phase separation appears practical.

  7. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, Thomas T.; Han, Qingyou; Jian, Xiaogang; Xu, Hanbing

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of a new breakthrough technology, ultrasonic processing, on various industries, including steel, aluminum, metal casting, and forging. The specific goals of the project were to evaluate core principles and establish quantitative bases for the ultrasonc processing of materials, and to demonstrate key applications in the areas of grain refinement of alloys during solidification and degassing of alloy melts. This study focussed on two classes of materials - aluminum alloys and steels - and demonstrated the application of ultrasonic processing during ingot casting.

  8. Laser processing for thin-film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compaan, Alvin D.

    1995-04-01

    Over the past decade major advances have occurred in the field of thin- film photovoltaics (PV) with many of them a direct consequence of the application of laser processing. Improved cell efficiencies have been achieved in crystalline and polycrystalline Si, in hydrogenated amorphous silicon, and in two polycrystalline thin-film materials. The use of lasers in photovoltaics includes laser hole drilling for emitter wrap-through, laser trenching for buried bus lines, and laser texturing of crystalline and polycrystalline Si cells. In thin-film devices, laser scribing is gaining increased importance for module interconnects. Pulsed laser recrystallization of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon is used to form highly conductive p-layers in p-i-n amorphous silicon cells and in thin-film transistors. Optical beam melting appears to be an attractive method for forming metal semiconductor alloys for contact formation. Finally, pulsed lasers are used for deposition of the entire semiconductor absorber layer in two types of polycrystalline thin-film cells-those based on copper indium diselenide and those based on cadmium telluride. In our lab we have prepared and studied heavily doped polycrystalline silicon thin films and also have used laser physical vapor deposition (LPVD) to prepare 'all-LPVD' CdS/CdTe solar cells on glass with efficiencies tested at NREL at 10.5%. LPVD is highly flexible and ideally suited for prototyping PV cells using ternary or quaternary alloys and for exploring new dopant combinations.

  9. Thin film dielectric composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Jia, Quanxi; Gibbons, Brady J.; Findikoglu, Alp T.; Park, Bae Ho

    2002-01-01

    A dielectric composite material comprising at least two crystal phases of different components with TiO.sub.2 as a first component and a material selected from the group consisting of Ba.sub.1-x Sr.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.3 to 0.7, Pb.sub.1-x Ca.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.4 to 0.7, Sr.sub.1-x Pb.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, Ba.sub.1-x Cd.sub.x TiO.sub.3 where x is from 0.02 to 0.1, BaTi.sub.1-x Zr.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.2 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Sn.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.15 to 0.3, BaTi.sub.1-x Hf.sub.x O.sub.3 where x is from 0.24 to 0.3, Pb.sub.1-1.3x La.sub.x TiO.sub.3+0.2x where x is from 0.23 to 0.3, (BaTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFeo.sub.0.5 Nb.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.75 to 0.9, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.- (PbCo.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.1 to 0.45, (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbMg.sub.0.5 W.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0.2 to 0.4, and (PbTiO.sub.3).sub.x (PbFe.sub.0.5 Ta.sub.0.5 O.sub.3).sub.1-x where x is from 0 to 0.2, as the second component is described. The dielectric composite material can be formed as a thin film upon suitable substrates.

  10. Synthesis of ultra-nano-carbon composite materials with extremely high conductivity by plasma post-treatment process of ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Manoharan, Divinah; Chang, Hsin-Tzer; Lin, I-Nan

    2015-08-24

    Needle-like diamond grains encased in nano-graphitic layers are an ideal granular structure of diamond films to achieve high conductivity and superior electron field emission (EFE) properties. This paper describes the plasma post-treatment (ppt) of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films at low substrate temperature to achieve such a unique granular structure. The CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} plasma ppt-processed films exhibit high conductivity of σ = 1099 S/cm as well as excellent EFE properties with turn-on field of E{sub 0} = 2.48 V/μm (J{sub e} = 1.0 mA/cm{sup 2} at 6.5 V/μm). The ppt of UNCD film is simple and robust process that is especially useful for device applications.

  11. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qingyou

    2015-08-01

    Irradiation of high-energy ultrasonic vibration in metals and alloys generates oscillating strain and stress fields in solids, and introduces nonlinear effects such as cavitation, acoustic streaming, and radiation pressure in molten materials. These nonlinear effects can be utilized to assist conventional material processing processes. This article describes recent research at Oak Ridge National Labs and Purdue University on using high-intensity ultrasonic vibrations for degassing molten aluminum, processing particulate-reinforced metal matrix composites, refining metals and alloys during solidification process and welding, and producing bulk nanostructures in solid metals and alloys. Research results suggest that high-intensity ultrasonic vibration is capable of degassing and dispersing small particles in molten alloys, reducing grain size during alloy solidification, and inducing nanostructures in solid metals.

  12. Processing of lunar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisl, W. Howard; Fabes, B. D.

    1994-07-01

    A variety of products made from lunar resources will be required for a lunar outpost. These products might be made by adapting existing processing techniques to the lunar environment, or by developing new techniques unique to the moon. In either case, processing techniques used on the moon will have to have a firm basis in basic principles of materials science and engineering, which can be used to understand the relationships between composition, processing, and properties of lunar-derived materials. These principles can also be used to optimize the properties of a product, once a more detailed knowledge of the lunar regolith is obtained. Using three types of ceramics (monolithic glasses, glass fibers, and glass-ceramics) produced from lunar simulants, we show that the application of materials science and engineering priciples is useful in understanding and optimizing the mechanical properties of ceramics on the moon. We also demonstrate that changes in composition and/or processing can have a significant effect on the strength of these materials.

  13. Processing Materials in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, L. K.

    1982-01-01

    Suggested program of material processing experiments in space described in 81 page report. For each experiment, report discusses influence of such gravitational effects as convection, buoyancy, sedimentation, and hydrostatic pressure. Report contains estimates of power and mission duration required for each experiment. Lists necessary equipment and appropriate spacecraft.

  14. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.C.

    1997-02-01

    The use femtosecond pulses for materials processing results in very precise cutting and drilling with high efficiency. Energy deposited in the electrons is not coupled into the bulk during the pulse, resulting in negligible shock or thermal loading to adjacent areas.

  15. Laser material processing system

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos

    2015-04-28

    A laser material processing system and method are provided. A further aspect of the present invention employs a laser for micromachining. In another aspect of the present invention, the system uses a hollow waveguide. In another aspect of the present invention, a laser beam pulse is given broad bandwidth for workpiece modification.

  16. Deposition of thin films of multicomponent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Composite films of multicomponent materials, such as oxides and nitrides, e.g., lead zirconate titanate, are deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, employing a rotating substrate holder, which rotates relative to a plurality of targets, one target for each metal element of the multicomponent material. The sputtering is carried out in a reactive atmosphere. The substrates on which the layers are deposited are at ambient temperature. Following deposition of the composite film, the film is heated to a temperature sufficient to initiate a solid state reaction and form the final product, which is substantially single phase and substantially homogeneous.

  17. Film/Adhesive Processing Module for Fiber-Placement Processing of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulcher, A. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    An automated apparatus has been designed and constructed that enables the automated lay-up of composite structures incorporating films, foils, and adhesives during the automated fiber-placement process. This apparatus, denoted a film module, could be used to deposit materials in film or thin sheet form either simultaneously when laying down the fiber composite article or in an independent step.

  18. Silicon film solar cell process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. B.; Mcneely, J. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The most promising way to reduce the cost of silicon in solar cells while still maintaining performance is to utilize thin films (10 to 20 microns thick) of crystalline silicon. The method of solution growth is being employed to grow thin polycrystalline films of silicon on dissimilar substrates. The initial results indicate that, using tin as the solvent, this growth process only requires operating temperatures in the range of 800 C to 1000 C. Growth rates in the range of 0.4 to 2.0 microns per minute and grain sizes in the range of 20 to 100 microns were achieved on both quartz and coated steel substrates. Typically, an aspect ratio of two to three between the width and the Si grain thickness is seen. Uniform coverage of Si growth on quartz over a 2.5 x 2.5 cm area was observed.

  19. Innovative industrial materials processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.; Abarcar, R.; Hauser, S.G.; Williams, T.A.

    1983-08-01

    This paper reviews innovative industrial materials processes that have the potential for significant improvements in energy use, yet require long-term research to achieve that potential. Potential revolutionary alternatives are reviewed for the following industries: iron and steel; aluminum; petroleum refining; paper and pulp; food and kindred products; stone, clay and glass; textiles; and chemicals. In total, 45 candidate processes were identified. Examples of these processes include direct steelmaking and ore-to-powder systems that potentially require 30% and 40% less energy, respectively, than conventional steelmaking systems; membrane separations and freeze crystallization that offer up to 90% reductions in energy use when compared with distillation; cold processing of cement that offers a 50% reduction in energy requirements; and dry forming of paper that offers a 25% reduction in the energy needed for papermaking.

  20. Surface engineering of glazing materials and structures using plasma processes

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Monteiro, Othon R.

    2003-04-10

    A variety of coatings is commercially produced on a very large scale, including transparent conducting oxides and multi-layer silver-based low-emissivity and solar control coatings. A very brief review of materials and manufacturing process is presented and illustrated by ultrathin silver films and chevron copper films. Understanding the close relation between manufacturing processes and bulk and surface properties of materials is crucial for film growth and self-assembly processes.

  1. Lunar materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The paper surveys current information, describes some important unknowns about lunar materials, and discusses ways to gain more scientific and engineering knowledge concerning the industrial processes that could be used on the moon for the production of products useful in future enterprises in space. Lunar rocks and soils are rich in oxygen, but it is mostly chemically bound in silicates, so that chemical or thermal energy must be supplied to recover it. Iron and titanium are abundant and, in some of their known forms, readily recoverable; aluminum is plentiful but harder to extract. Methods for recovering lunar oxygen and metals fall into three classes: chemical, electrolytic, and dissociative, broadly characterized by their respective process temperatures. Examples of these methods are briefly discussed.

  2. Tungsten-doped thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Hauyee; Gao, Chen; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Schultz, Peter G.

    2003-12-09

    A dielectric thin film material for high frequency use, including use as a capacitor, and having a low dielectric loss factor is provided, the film comprising a composition of tungsten-doped barium strontium titanate of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0. Also provided is a method for making a dielectric thin film of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3 and doped with W, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0, a substrate is provided, TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr are deposited on the substrate, and the substrate containing TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr is heated to form a low loss dielectric thin film.

  3. Color Imaging management in film processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremeau, Alain; Konik, Hubert; Colantoni, Philippe

    2003-12-01

    The latest research projects in the laboratory LIGIV concerns capture, processing, archiving and display of color images considering the trichromatic nature of the Human Vision System (HSV). Among these projects one addresses digital cinematographic film sequences of high resolution and dynamic range. This project aims to optimize the use of content for the post-production operators and for the end user. The studies presented in this paper address the use of metadata to optimise the consumption of video content on a device of user's choice independent of the nature of the equipment that captured the content. Optimising consumption includes enhancing the quality of image reconstruction on a display. Another part of this project addresses the content-based adaptation of image display. Main focus is on Regions of Interest (ROI) operations, based on the ROI concepts of MPEG-7. The aim of this second part is to characterize and ensure the conditions of display even if display device or display media changes. This requires firstly the definition of a reference color space and the definition of bi-directional color transformations for each peripheral device (camera, display, film recorder, etc.). The complicating factor is that different devices have different color gamuts, depending on the chromaticity of their primaries and the ambient illumination under which they are viewed. To match the displayed image to the aimed appearance, all kind of production metadata (camera specification, camera colour primaries, lighting conditions) should be associated to the film material. Metadata and content build together rich content. The author is assumed to specify conditions as known from digital graphics arts. To control image pre-processing and image post-processing, these specifications should be contained in the film's metadata. The specifications are related to the ICC profiles but need additionally consider mesopic viewing conditions.

  4. Process to form mesostructured films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Anderson, Mark T.; Ganguli, Rahul; Lu, Yunfeng

    1999-01-01

    This invention comprises a method to form a family of supported films film with pore size in the approximate range 0.8-20 nm exhibiting highly ordered microstructures and porosity derived from an ordered micellar or liquid-crystalline organic-inorganic precursor structure that forms during film deposition. Optically transparent, 100-500-nm thick films exhibiting a unique range of microstructures and uni-modal pore sizes are formed in seconds in a continuous coating operation. Applications of these films include sensors, membranes, low dielectric constant interlayers, anti-reflective coatings, and optical hosts.

  5. Processing and characterization of extruded zein-based biodegradable films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying

    The objectives of this study were to prepare biodegradable zein films by extrusion processing and to evaluate relevant physical properties of resulting films with respect to their potential as packaging materials. The manufacture of protein-based packaging films by extrusion has remained a challenge. In this study, a zein resin was prepared by combining zein and oleic acid. This resin was formed into films by blown extrusion at the bench-top scale. Resin moisture content and extruder barrel temperature profile were identified as major parameters controlling the process. The optimum temperature of the blowing head was determined to be 40--45°C, while optimum moisture at film collection was 14--15%. Physico-chemical properties of the extruded products were characterized. Extruded products exhibited plastic behavior and ductility. Morphology characterization by SEM showed micro voids in extruded zein sheets, caused by entrapped air bubbles or water droplets. DSC characterization showed that zein was effectively plasticized by oleic acid as evidenced by the lowered glass transition temperature of zein films. X-ray scattering was used to investigate changes in zein molecular aggregation during processing. It was observed that higher mechanical energy treatment progressively disrupted zein molecular aggregates, resulting in a more uniform distribution of individual zein molecules. With the incorporation of oleic acid as plasticizer and monoglycerides as emulsifier, zein formed structures with long-range periodicity which varied depending on the formulation and processing methods. Processing methods for film formation affected the binding of oleic acid to zein with higher mechanical energy treatment resulting in better interaction between the two components. The moisture sorption capacity of extruded zein films was reduced due to the compact morphology caused by extrusion. Plasticization with oleic acid further reduced moisture sorption of zein films. The overall

  6. Chemical processing of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.; Waldron, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The paper highlights recent work on the general problem of processing lunar materials. The discussion covers lunar source materials, refined products, motivations for using lunar materials, and general considerations for a lunar or space processing plant. Attention is given to chemical processing through various techniques, including electrolysis of molten silicates, carbothermic/silicothermic reduction, carbo-chlorination process, NaOH basic-leach process, and HF acid-leach process. Several options for chemical processing of lunar materials are well within the state of the art of applied chemistry and chemical engineering to begin development based on the extensive knowledge of lunar materials.

  7. Physical Properties of Thin Film Semiconducting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouras, N.; Djebbouri, M.; Outemzabet, R.; Sali, S.; Zerrouki, H.; Zouaoui, A.; Kesri, N.

    2005-10-01

    The physics and chemistry of semiconducting materials is a continuous question of debate. We can find a large stock of well-known properties but at the same time, many things are not understood. In recent years, porous silicon (PS-Si), diselenide of copper and indium (CuInSe2 or CIS) and metal oxide semiconductors like tin oxide (SnO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have been subjected to extensive studies because of the rising interest their potential applications in fields such as electronic components, solar panels, catalysis, gas sensors, in biocompatible materials, in Li-based batteries, in new generation of MOSFETS. Bulk structure and surface and interface properties play important roles in all of these applications. A deeper understanding of these fundamental properties would impact largely on technological application performances. In our laboratory, thin films of undoped and antimony-doped films of tin oxide have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition. Spray pyrolysis was used for ZnO. CIS was prepared by flash evaporation or close-space vapor transport. Some of the deposition parameters have been varied, such as substrate temperature, time of deposition (or anodization), and molar concentration of bath preparation. For some samples, thermal annealing was carried out under oxygen (or air), under nitrogen gas and under vacuum. Deposition and post-deposition parameters are known to strongly influence film structure and electrical resistivity. We investigated the influence of film thickness and thermal annealing on structural optical and electrical properties of the films. Examination of SnO2 by x-ray diffraction showed that the main films are polycrystalline with rutile structure. The x-ray spectra of ZnO indicated a hexagonal wurtzite structure. Characterizations of CIS films with compositional analysis, x-ray diffraction, scanning microscopy, spectrophotometry, and photoluminescence were carried out.

  8. Fundamental Materials Research and Advanced Process Development for Thin-Film CIS-Based Photovoltaics: Final Technical Report, 2 October 2001 - 30 September 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T. J.; Li, S. S.; Crisalle, O. D.; Craciun, V.

    2006-09-01

    The objectives for this thin-film copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) solar cell project cover the following areas: Develop and characterize buffer layers for CIS-based solar cell; grow and characterize chemical-bath deposition of Znx Cd1-xS buffer layers grown on CIGS absorbers; study effects of buffer-layer processing on CIGS thin films characterized by the dual-beam optical modulation technique; grow epitaxial CuInSe2 at high temperature; study the defect structure of CGS by photoluminescence spectroscopy; investigate deep-level defects in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells by deep-level transient spectroscopy; conduct thermodynamic modeling of the isothermal 500 C section of the Cu-In-Se system using a defect model; form alpha-CuInSe2 by rapid thermal processing of a stacked binary compound bilayer; investigate pulsed non-melt laser annealing on the film properties and performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells; and conduct device modeling and simulation of CIGS solar cells.

  9. Process to form mesostructured films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C.J.; Anderson, M.T.; Ganguli, R.; Lu, Y.F.

    1999-01-12

    This invention comprises a method to form a family of supported films with pore size in the approximate range 0.8-20 nm exhibiting highly ordered microstructures and porosity derived from an ordered micellar or liquid-crystalline organic-inorganic precursor structure that forms during film deposition. Optically transparent, 100-500-nm thick films exhibiting a unique range of microstructures and uni-modal pore sizes are formed in seconds in a continuous coating operation. Applications of these films include sensors, membranes, low dielectric constant interlayers, anti-reflective coatings, and optical hosts. 12 figs.

  10. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, B. N.; Birkmire, R. W.; Phillips, J. E.; Shafarman, W. N.; Hegedus, S. S.; McCandless, B. E.

    1991-11-01

    Results and conclusions of Phase 1 of a multi-year research program on polycrystalline thin film solar cells are presented. The research comprised investigation of the relationships among processing, materials properties and device performance of both CuInSe2 and CdTe solar cells. The kinetics of the formation of CuInSe2 by selenization with hydrogen selenide was investigated and a CuInSe2/Cds solar cell was fabricated. An alternative process involving the reaction of deposited copper-indium-selenium layers was used to obtain single phase CuInSe2 films and a cell efficiency of 7 percent. Detailed investigations of the open circuit voltage of CuInSe2 solar cells showed that a simple Shockley-Read-Hall recombination mechanism can not account for the limitations in open circuit voltage. Examination of the influence of CuInSe2 thickness on cell performance indicated that the back contact behavior has a significant effect when the CuInSe2 is less than 1 micron thick. CdTe/CdS solar cells with efficiencies approaching 10 percent can be repeatedly fabricated using physical vapor deposition and serial post deposition processing. The absence of moisture during post deposition was found to be critical. Improvements in short circuit current of CdTe solar cells to levels approaching 25 mA/cm(exp 2) are achievable by making the CdS window layer thinner. Further reductions in the CdS window layer thickness are presently limited by interdiffusion between the CdS and the CdTe. CdTe/CdS cells stored without protection from the atmosphere were found to degrade. The degradation was attributed to the metal contact. CdTe cells with ZnTe:Cu contacts to the CdTe were found to be more stable than cells with metal contacts. Analysis of current-voltage and spectral response of CdTe/CdS cells indicates the cell operates as a p-n heterojunction with the diode current dominated by SRH recombination in the junction region of the CdTe.

  11. Research on resistance properties of conductive layer materials of microchannel plate film dynode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ling-ling; Duanmu, Qingduo; Yang, Ji-kai; Wang, Guo-zheng

    2015-03-01

    Silicon Microchannel Plate - MCP - is a new image multiplier devices based semiconductor process technology. Compared with the traditional glass MCP, Silicon MCP has an advantage in technology that the dynode materials and the substrate materials are separate. At the same time, the dynode preparation process and the microchannel arrays are also separate. Two different dynode conductive layer films are prepared: polysilicon conductive films prepared by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) and AZO thin films coated by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The conductive films coated by ALD are superior to dynode conductive films prepared by LPCVD. By comparing the resistivity of conductive polysilicon thin film and AZO thin film of different Al concentrations doped, AZO thin film of different Al concentrations doped is a more suitable conductive layer dynode material to satisfy the MCP conductive layer resistivity requirements.

  12. Dynamic Characterization of Thin Film Magnetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wei

    A broadband dynamic method for characterizing thin film magnetic material is presented. The method is designed to extract the permeability and linewidth of thin magnetic films from measuring the reflection coefficient (S11) of a house-made and short-circuited strip line testing fixture with or without samples loaded. An adaptive de-embedding method is applied to remove the parasitic noise of the housing. The measurements were carried out with frequency up to 10GHz and biasing magnetic fields up to 600 Gauss. Particular measurement setup and 3-step experimental procedures are described in detail. The complex permeability of a 330nm thick continuous FeGaB, 435nm thick laminated FeGaB film and a 100nm thick NiFe film will be induced dynamically in frequency-biasing magnetic field spectra and compared with a theoretical model based on Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations and eddy current theories. The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) phenomenon can be observed among these three magnetic materials investigated in this thesis.

  13. Thick-film materials for silicon photovoltaic cell manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, M. B.

    1977-01-01

    Thick film technology is applicable to three areas of silicon solar cell fabrication; metallization, junction formation, and coating for protection of screened ohmic contacts, particularly wrap around contacts, interconnection and environmental protection. Both material and process parameters were investigated. Printed ohmic contacts on n- and p-type silicon are very sensitive to the processing parameters of firing time, temperature, and atmosphere. Wrap around contacts are easily achieved by first printing and firing a dielectric over the edge and subsequently applying a low firing temperature conductor. Interconnection of cells into arrays can be achieved by printing and cofiring thick film metal pastes, soldering, or with heat curing conductive epoxies on low cost substrates. Printed (thick) film vitreous protection coatings do not yet offer sufficient optical uniformity and transparency for use on silicon. A sprayed, heat curable SiO2 based resin shows promise of providing both optical matching and environmental protection.

  14. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    DOEpatents

    Bharacharya, Raghuthan; Parilla, Philip A.; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material.

  15. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    DOEpatents

    Bharacharya, R.; Parilla, P.A.; Blaugher, R.D.

    1995-12-19

    A process is disclosed for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material. 3 figs.

  16. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, G.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Watkin, D.C.; Walton, D.G.

    1998-05-12

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the ``body-filled panel.`` Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials. 4 figs.

  17. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Watkin, David C.; Walton, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the "body-filled panel". Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials.

  18. Characterization of diamond thin films and related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKindra, Travis Kyle

    Thin carbon films including sputtered deposited graphite and CO 2 laser-assisted combustion-flame deposited graphite and diamond thin films were characterized using optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Amorphous carbon thin films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering using Ar/O2 gases. The film morphology changed with the oxygen content. The deposition rate decreased as the amount of oxygen increased due to oxygen reacting with the growing film. The use of oxygen in the working gas enhanced the crystalline nature of the films. Graphite was deposited on WC substrates by a CO2 laser-assisted O2/C2H2 combustion-flame method. Two distinct microstructural areas were observed; an inner core of dense material surrounded by an outer shell of lamellar-like material. The deposits were crystalline regardless of the laser power and deposition times of a few minutes. Diamond films were deposited by a CO2 laser-assisted O 2/C2H2/C2H4 combustion-flame method with the laser focused parallel to the substrate surface. The laser enhanced diamond growth was most pronounced when deposited with a 10.532 microm CO2 laser wavelength tuned to the CH2-wagging vibrational mode of the C2H4 molecule. Nucleation of diamond thin films deposited with and without using a CO 2 laser-assisted combustion-flame process was investigated. With no laser there was nucleation of a sub-layer of grains followed by irregular grain growth. An untuned laser wavelength yielded nucleation of a sub-layer then columnar grain growth. The 10.532 microm tuned laser wavelength caused growth of columnar grains.

  19. Transparent materials processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hetherington, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    A zero gravity processing furnace system was designed that will allow acquisition of photographic or other visual information while the sample is being processed. A low temperature (30 to 400 C) test model with a flat specimen heated by quartz-halide lamps was constructed. A high temperature (400 to 1000 C) test model heated by resistance heaters, utilizing a cylindrical specimen and optics, was also built. Each of the test models is discussed in detail. Recommendations are given.

  20. Advanced Materials and Processing 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Su, Chun Wei; Xia, Hui; Xiao, Pengfei

    2011-06-01

    Strain sensors made from MWNT/polymer nanocomposites / Gang Yin, Ning Hu and Yuan Li -- Shear band evolution and nanostructure formation in titanium by cold rolling / Dengke Yang, Peter D. Hodgson and Cuie Wen -- Biodegradable Mg-Zr-Ca alloys for bone implant materials / Yuncang Li ... [et al.] -- Hydroxyapatite synthesized from nanosized calcium carbonate via hydrothermal method / Yu-Shiang Wu, Wen-Ku Chang and Min Jou -- Modeling of the magnetization process and orthogonal fluxgate sensitivity of ferromagnetic micro-wire arrays / Fan Jie ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of silicon oxide nanowires on Ni coated silicon substrate by simple heating process / Bo Peng and Kwon-Koo Cho -- Deposition of TiOxNy thin films with various nitrogen flow rate: growth behavior and structural properties / S.-J. Cho ... [et al.] -- Observation on photoluminescence evolution in 300 KeV self-ion implanted and annealed silicon / Yu Yang ... [et al.] -- Facile synthesis of lithium niobate from a novel precursor H[symbol] / Meinan Liu ... [et al.] -- Effects of the buffer layers on the adhesion and antimicrobial properties of the amorphous ZrAlNiCuSi films / Pai-Tsung Chiang ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of ZnO nanorods by electrochemical deposition process and its photovoltaic properties / Jin-Hwa Kim ... [et al.] -- Cryogenic resistivities of NbTiAlVTaLax, CoCrFeNiCu and CoCrFeNiAl high entropy alloys / Xiao Yang and Yong Zhang -- Modeling of centrifugal force field and the effect on filling and solidification in centrifugal casting / Wenbin Sheng, Chunxue Ma and Wanli Gu -- Electrochemical properties of TiO[symbol] nanotube arrays film prepared by anodic oxidation / Young-Jin Choi ... [et al.] -- Effect of Ce additions on high temperature properties of Mg-5Sn-3Al-1Zn alloy / Byoung Soo Kang ... [et al.] -- Sono-electroless plating of Ni-Mo-P film / Atsushi Chiba, Masato Kanou and Wen-Chang Wu -- Diameter dependence of giant magneto-impedance effect in co-based melt extracted amorphous

  1. Advanced composite materials and processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baucom, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Composites are generally defined as two or more individual materials, which, when combined into a single material system, results in improved physical and/or mechanical properties. The freedom of choice of the starting components for composites allows the generation of materials that can be specifically tailored to meet a variety of applications. Advanced composites are described as a combination of high strength fibers and high performance polymer matrix materials. These advanced materials are required to permit future aircraft and spacecraft to perform in extended environments. Advanced composite precursor materials, processes for conversion of these materials to structures, and selected applications for composites are reviewed.

  2. Extrusion process optimization for toughness in balloon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantor, K. M.; Harrison, I. R.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental optimization process for blown film extrusion is described and examined in terms of the effects of the technique on the toughness of balloon films. The optimization technique by Cantor (1990) is employed which involves the identification of key process variables including screw speed, nip speed, bubble diameter, and frost-line height for analysis to optimize the merit function. The procedure is employed in the extrusion of a low-density polyethylene polymer, and the resulting optimized materials are toughness- and puncture-tested. Balloon toughness is optimized in the analytical relationship, and the process parameters are modified to attain optimal toughness. The film produced is shown to have an average toughness of 24.5 MPa which is a good value for this key property of balloon materials for high-altitude flights.

  3. Cibachrome testing. [photographic processing and printing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The use of Cibachrome products as a solution to problems encountered when contact printing Kodak film type SO-397 onto Kodak Ektrachrome color reversal paper type 1993 is investigated. A roll of aerial imagery consisting of Kodak film types SO-397 and 2443 was contact printed onto Cibachrome and Kodak materials and compared in terms of color quality, resolution, cost, and compatibility with existing equipment and techniques. Objective measurements are given in terms of resolution and sensitometric response. Comparison prints and transparencies were viewed and ranked according to overall quality and aesthetic appeal. It is recommended that Cibachrome Print material be used in place of Kodak Ektachrome paper because it is more easily processed, the cost is equivalent, and it provides improved resolution, color quality, and image fade resistance.

  4. Advanced Materials and Processing 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Su, Chun Wei; Xia, Hui; Xiao, Pengfei

    2011-06-01

    Strain sensors made from MWNT/polymer nanocomposites / Gang Yin, Ning Hu and Yuan Li -- Shear band evolution and nanostructure formation in titanium by cold rolling / Dengke Yang, Peter D. Hodgson and Cuie Wen -- Biodegradable Mg-Zr-Ca alloys for bone implant materials / Yuncang Li ... [et al.] -- Hydroxyapatite synthesized from nanosized calcium carbonate via hydrothermal method / Yu-Shiang Wu, Wen-Ku Chang and Min Jou -- Modeling of the magnetization process and orthogonal fluxgate sensitivity of ferromagnetic micro-wire arrays / Fan Jie ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of silicon oxide nanowires on Ni coated silicon substrate by simple heating process / Bo Peng and Kwon-Koo Cho -- Deposition of TiOxNy thin films with various nitrogen flow rate: growth behavior and structural properties / S.-J. Cho ... [et al.] -- Observation on photoluminescence evolution in 300 KeV self-ion implanted and annealed silicon / Yu Yang ... [et al.] -- Facile synthesis of lithium niobate from a novel precursor H[symbol] / Meinan Liu ... [et al.] -- Effects of the buffer layers on the adhesion and antimicrobial properties of the amorphous ZrAlNiCuSi films / Pai-Tsung Chiang ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of ZnO nanorods by electrochemical deposition process and its photovoltaic properties / Jin-Hwa Kim ... [et al.] -- Cryogenic resistivities of NbTiAlVTaLax, CoCrFeNiCu and CoCrFeNiAl high entropy alloys / Xiao Yang and Yong Zhang -- Modeling of centrifugal force field and the effect on filling and solidification in centrifugal casting / Wenbin Sheng, Chunxue Ma and Wanli Gu -- Electrochemical properties of TiO[symbol] nanotube arrays film prepared by anodic oxidation / Young-Jin Choi ... [et al.] -- Effect of Ce additions on high temperature properties of Mg-5Sn-3Al-1Zn alloy / Byoung Soo Kang ... [et al.] -- Sono-electroless plating of Ni-Mo-P film / Atsushi Chiba, Masato Kanou and Wen-Chang Wu -- Diameter dependence of giant magneto-impedance effect in co-based melt extracted amorphous

  5. Materials availability for thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Yunosuke

    1997-04-01

    Materials availability is one of the most important factors when we consider the mass-production of next generation photovoltaic devices. "In (indium)" is a vital element to produce high efficient thin film solar cells such as InP and CuIn(Ga)Se2 but its lifetime as a natural resource is suggested to be of order of 10˜15 years. The lifetime of a specific natural resource as an element to produce useful device substances is directly related with its abundance in the earth's crust, consumption rate and recycling rate (if recycling is economically meaningful). The chemical elements having long lifetime as a natural resource are those existing in the atmosphere such as N (nitrogen) and O (oxygen); the rich elements in the earth's crust such as Si, Ca, Sr and Ba; the mass-used metals such as Fe (iron), Al (aluminum) and Cu (copper) that reached the stage of large-scale recycling. We here propose a new paradigm of semiconductor material-science for the future generation thin film solar cells in which only abundant chemical elements are used. It is important to remark that these abundant chemical elements are normally not toxic and are fairly friendly to the environment. β-FeSi2 is composed of two most abundant and nontoxic chemical elements. This material is one of the most promising device materials for future generation energy devices (solar cells and thermoelectric device that is most efficient at temperature range of 700-900 °C). One should remind of the versatility of β-FeSi2 that this material can be used not only as energy devices but also as photodetector, light emitting diode and/or laser diode at the wavelength of 1.5 μm that can be monolithically integrated on Si substrates due to the relatively small lattice mismatch.

  6. Electrochromic materials, devices and process of making

    DOEpatents

    Richardson, Thomas J.

    2003-11-11

    Thin films of transition metal compositions formed with magnesium that are metals, alloys, hydrides or mixtures of alloys, metals and/or hydrides exhibit reversible color changes on application of electric current or hydrogen. Thin films of these materials are suitable for optical switching elements, thin film displays, sun roofs, rear-view mirrors and architectural glass.

  7. PROCESS OF FORMING POWDERED MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Glatter, J.; Schaner, B.E.

    1961-07-14

    A process of forming high-density compacts of a powdered ceramic material is described by agglomerating the powdered ceramic material with a heat- decompossble binder, adding a heat-decompossble lubricant to the agglomerated material, placing a quantity of the material into a die cavity, pressing the material to form a compact, pretreating the compacts in a nonoxidizing atmosphere to remove the binder and lubricant, and sintering the compacts. When this process is used for making nuclear reactor fuel elements, the ceramic material is an oxide powder of a fissionsble material and after forming, the compacts are placed in a cladding tube which is closed at its ends by vapor tight end caps, so that the sintered compacts are held in close contact with each other and with the interior wall of the cladding tube.

  8. Thermoplastic processing of proteins for film formation--a review.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Izquierdo, V M; Krochta, J M

    2008-03-01

    Increasing interest in high-quality food products with increased shelf life and reduced environmental impact has encouraged the study and development of edible and/or biodegradable polymer films and coatings. Edible films provide the opportunity to effectively control mass transfer among different components in a food or between the food and its surrounding environment. The diversity of proteins that results from an almost limitless number of side-chain amino-acid sequential arrangements allows for a wide range of interactions and chemical reactions to take place as proteins denature and cross-link during heat processing. Proteins such as wheat gluten, corn zein, soy protein, myofibrillar proteins, and whey proteins have been successfully formed into films using thermoplastic processes such as compression molding and extrusion. Thermoplastic processing can result in a highly efficient manufacturing method with commercial potential for large-scale production of edible films due to the low moisture levels, high temperatures, and short times used. Addition of water, glycerol, sorbitol, sucrose, and other plasticizers allows the proteins to undergo the glass transition and facilitates deformation and processability without thermal degradation. Target film variables, important in predicting biopackage performance under various conditions, include mechanical, thermal, barrier, and microstructural properties. Comparisons of film properties should be made with care since results depend on parameters such as film-forming materials, film formulation, fabrication method, operating conditions, testing equipment, and testing conditions. Film applications include their use as wraps, pouches, bags, casings, and sachets to protect foods, reduce waste, and improve package recyclability. PMID:18298745

  9. Thermochromic Materials Research For Optical Switching Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, G. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1985-12-01

    A dual-ion-beam-sputtering (DIBS) deposition system is used to deposit doped vanadium dioxide (V1-xMx02), where M is a dopant that decreases the transition temperature (Tt) from that of stoichiometric V02. The objective is to synthesize a material that will passively switch between a heat- transmitting-and a heat-reflecting-state at specific design temperatures. The technique is reactive ion beam sputtering of vanadium and a dopant (separate beams) in a well controlled atmosphere of Ar with a partial pressure of O2. The films are deposited at elevated temperature (>700K) onto glass and sapphire substrates for spectrophotometric evaluation above and below Tt. The longer range goals of this research are to develop the material for: (1) thin film application to building glazings and (2) pigments for opaque wall coatings. The glazings will transmit and the walls will absorb solar energy when the V1-xMxO2 temperature (T) is low (TTt, both glazings and walls will reflect the solar infrared.

  10. Extraterrestrial materials processing and construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of available terrestrial skills to the gathering of lunar materials and the processing of raw lunar materials into industrial feed stock were investigated. The literature on lunar soils and rocks was reviewed and the chemical processes by which major oxides and chemical elements can be extracted were identified. The gathering of lunar soil by means of excavation equipment was studied in terms of terrestrial experience with strip mining operations on earth. The application of electrostatic benefication techniques was examined for use on the moon to minimize the quantity of materials requiring surface transport and to optimize the stream of raw materials to be transported off the moon for subsequent industrial use.

  11. Discrete component bonding and thick film materials study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinser, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The results are summarized of an investigation of discrete component bonding reliability and a fundamental study of new thick film resistor materials. The component bonding study examined several types of solder bonded components with some processing variable studies to determine their influence upon bonding reliability. The bonding reliability was assessed using the thermal cycle: 15 minutes at room temperature, 15 minutes at +125 C 15 minutes at room temperature, and 15 minutes at -55 C. The thick film resistor materials examined were of the transition metal oxide-phosphate glass family with several elemental metal additions of the same transition metal. These studies were conducted by preparing a paste of the subject composition, printing, drying, and firing using both air and reducing atmospheres. The resulting resistors were examined for adherence, resistance, thermal coefficient of resistance, and voltage coefficient of resistance.

  12. Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors

    DOEpatents

    Perdieu, Louisa H.

    2000-09-09

    A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

  13. Processing dependent thermal conductivity of nanoporous silica xerogel films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anurag; Rogojevic, Svetlana; Ponoth, Shom; Gill, William N.; Plawsky, Joel L.; Simonyi, Eva; Chen, Shyng-Tsong; Ho, P. S.

    2002-03-01

    Sintered xerogel films (porous SiO2) show a much higher thermal conductivity than other low dielectric constant (low-K) materials available for the same value of K. The thermal conductivity of xerogels which we have processed using different methods is compared with that of other low-K materials such as silica hybrid (silsesquioxanes) and polymeric low-K materials. The methods used were: (1) single solvent (ethanol) method, (2) binary solvent (mixture of ethanol and ethylene glycol) method, (3) sintering. For the xerogel films, we show that process history is as important as the chemistry of the solid matrix or the porosity in determining the thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity, measured by the 3-ω method or the photothermal deflection method, is affected by phonon scattering, which in turn is effected by the size and distribution of pores and particles and the presence of imperfections such as interfaces, substituted chemical species, impurities, microcracks, and microporosity. The thermal conductivity extrapolated to zero porosity for porous sintered xerogel films approaches that of thermally grown SiO2 indicating the least phonon scattering of all processing methods. For these films, the elastic modulus is proportional to thermal conductivity squared, in agreement with theories developed for materials with few defects and a connected matrix.

  14. Support Assembly for Composite Laminate Materials During Roll Press Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catella, Luke A.

    2011-01-01

    A composite laminate material is supported during the roll press processing thereof by an assembly having: first and second perforated films disposed adjacent to first and second opposing surfaces of a mixture of uncured resin and fibers defining the composite laminate material, a gas permeable encasement surrounding the mixture and the first and second films, a gas impervious envelope sealed about the gas permeable encasement, and first and second rigid plates clamped about the gas impervious envelope.

  15. Processes for treating cellulosic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladisch, Michael R. (Inventor); Kohlman, Karen L. (Inventor); Westgate, Paul L. (Inventor); Weil, Joseph R. (Inventor); Yang, Yiqi (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed are processes for pretreating cellulosic materials in liquid water by heating the materials in liquid water at a temperature at or above their glass transition temperature but not substantially exceeding 220.degree. C., while maintaining the pH of the reaction medium in a range that avoids substantial autohydrolysis of the cellulosic materials. Such pretreatments minimize chemical changes to the cellulose while leading to physical changes which substantially increase susceptibility to hydrolysis in the presence of cellulase.

  16. Laser Material Processing in Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marshall

    2014-03-01

    This presentation will address some of the past, present, and potential uses of lasers for material processing in manufacturing. Laser processing includes welding, drilling, cutting, cladding, etc. The U.S. was the hot bed for initial uses of lasers for material processing in the past with Europe, especially Germany, presently leading the way. The future laser processing leader may still be Germany. Selected uses, past and present, of lasers within GE will also be highlighted as seen in such business units as Aviation, Lighting, Power and Water, Healthcare, and Transportation.

  17. Energy Implications of Materials Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Earl T.

    1976-01-01

    Processing of materials could become energy-limited rather than resource-limited. Methods to extract metals, industrial minerals, and energy materials and convert them to useful states requires more than one-fifth of the United States energy budget. Energy accounting by industries must include a total systems analysis of costs to insure net energy…

  18. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  19. Nonlinear Optical Image Processing with Bacteriorhodopsin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Deiss, Ron (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The transmission properties of some bacteriorhodopsin film spatial light modulators are uniquely suited to allow nonlinear optical image processing operations to be applied to images with multiplicative noise characteristics. A logarithmic amplitude transmission feature of the film permits the conversion of multiplicative noise to additive noise, which may then be linearly filtered out in the Fourier plane of the transformed image. The bacteriorhodopsin film displays the logarithmic amplitude response for write beam intensities spanning a dynamic range greater than 2.0 orders of magnitude. We present experimental results demonstrating the principle and capability for several different image and noise situations, including deterministic noise and speckle. Using the bacteriorhodopsin film, we successfully filter out image noise from the transformed image that cannot be removed from the original image.

  20. Novel solutions for thin film layer deposition for organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiper, Dietmar; Long, Michael; Schwambera, Markus; Gersdorff, Markus; Kreis, Juergen; Heuken, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Innovative systems for carrier-gas enhanced vapor phase deposition of organic layers offer advanced methods for the precise deposition of complex thin-film layer stacks. The approach inherently avoids potential short-comings from solvent-based polymer deposition and offers new opportunities. The process operates at low pressure (thus avoiding complex vacuum setups), and, by employing AIXTRON's extensive experience in freely scalable solutions, can be adapted to virtually any production process and allows for R&D and production systems alike. Deposition of organic layers and stacks recommends the approach for a wide range of organic small molecule and polymer materials (including layers with gradual change of the composition), for conductive layers, for dielectric layers, for barrier systems, for OLED materials, and surface treatments such as oleophobic / hydrophobic coatings. With the combination of other vapor phase deposition solutions, hybrid systems combining organic and inorganic materials and other advanced stacks can be realized.

  1. Thin film resistive materials: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherian Lukose, C.; Zoppi, G.; Birkett, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the key developments in thin film resistive materials for use in the fabrication of discrete precision resistors. Firstly an introduction to the preparation of thin films and their fundamental properties is given with respect to well established systems such as NiCr, TaN and CrSiO. The effect of doping these systems in both solid and gaseous forms to further refine their structural and electrical properties is then discussed before the performance of more recent materials systems such as CuAlMo and MmAgCuN are reviewed. In addition to performance of the materials themselves, the effect of varying processing parameters such as deposition pressure and temperature and subsequent annealing environment, as well as laser trimming energy and geometry are also studied. It is shown how these parameters can be systematically controlled to produce films of the required properties for varying applications such as high precision, long term stability and high power pulse performance.

  2. A superior process for forming titanium hydrogen isotopic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Process forms stoichiometric, continuous, strongly bonded titanium hydrogen isotopic films. Films have thermal and electrical conductivities approximately the same as bulk pure titanium, ten times greater than those of usual thin films.

  3. Hyperthermal neutral beam sources for material processing (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, S. J.; Kim, D. C.; Joung, M.; Kim, J. S.; Lee, B. J.; Oh, K. S.; Kim, K. U.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, Y. W.; Choi, S. W.; Son, H. J.; Park, Y. C.; Jang, J.-N.; Hong, M. P.

    2008-02-15

    Hyperthermal neutral beams have a great potential for material processes, especially for etching and thin film deposition for semiconductor and display fabrication as well as deposition for various thin film applications. Plasma-induced damage during plasma etching is a serious problem for manufacturing deep submicron semiconductor devices and is expected to be a problem for future nanoscale devices. Thermal and plasma-induced damage is also problematic for thin film depositions such as transparent conductive oxide films on organic light emitting diodes or flexible displays due to high temperature processes in plasma environments. These problems can be overcome by damage-free and low-temperature processes with hyperthermal neutral beams. We will present the status of the hyperthermal neutral beam development and the applications, especially, in semiconductor and display fabrication and introduce potential applications of thin film growing for optoelectronic devices such as light emitting diodes.

  4. Plasma characterization studies for materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1995-12-31

    New applications for plasma processing of materials require a more detailed understanding of the fundamental processes occurring in the processing reactors. We have developed reactors offering specific advantages for materials processing, and we are using modeling and diagnostic techniques for the characterization of these reactors. The emphasis is in part set by the interest shown by industry pursuing specific plasma processing applications. In this paper we report on the modeling of radio frequency plasma reactors for use in materials synthesis, and on the characterization of the high rate diamond deposition process using liquid precursors. In the radio frequency plasma torch model, the influence of specific design changes such as the location of the excitation coil on the enthalpy flow distribution is investigated for oxygen and air as plasma gases. The diamond deposition with liquid precursors has identified the efficient mass transport in form of liquid droplets into the boundary layer as responsible for high growth, and the chemical properties of the liquid for the film morphology.

  5. New materials and new processes. Volume 3. 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    New materials and processes in electronic surface and electrochemical technologies are discussed. Among the specific technologies considered are: organic electronic materials; polyoxymethane whiskers; and thin film SAW devices. Consideration is also given to: multipurpose corrosion inhibitors for naval aerospace applications; methods of improving lead-acid battery performance; graphite intercalation compounds; and molybdenum metal coatings. Addditional topics discussed include: electrolytic processes; sensors; and biomedical materials.

  6. Heat for film processing from solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes solar water heating system for laboratory in Mill Valley, California. System furnishes 59 percent of hot water requirements for photographic film processing. Text of report discusses system problems and modifications, analyzes performance and economics, and supplies drawings and operation/maintenance manual.

  7. Acoustic Techniques for Thin Film Thickness Measurement in Semiconductor Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Sanjay

    In modern semiconductor manufacturing, process monitoring and control are important issues limited at the present time by a lack of sensors and instrumentation capable of measuring process parameters like film thickness. In order to address this problem, two novel systems for thin film thickness measurement in semiconductor processing based upon contacting acoustic techniques have been developed. Both of these systems couple acoustic energy into the wafer via a nondestructive Hertzian contact and achieve high resolution by exciting and receiving ultrasonic signals from a ZnO transducer with microwave frequency electronics. The basic physical mechanism for film thickness determination is to analyze reflected waves due to acoustic impedance mismatches between various material layers on a silicon substrate. The first system requires frontside contacting of a sapphire buffer rod to an opaque film deposited on a silicon wafer and involves the use of broadband, high frequency pulse-echo electronics in the 0.5-5 GHz range. With this system, ex-situ measurements of aluminum and gold thin films on a silicon substrate have been done in the 0.25-2.5 mum. range with 3-6% accuracy as compared to surface profilometer measurements. Possible applications for this system include using it as a post -deposition process monitor, generating film thickness contour maps, or examining multilayer structures. The second system requires backside contacting of a sapphire buffer rod to a silicon wafer, which is in a vacuum station, and involves monitoring the changes in phase of CW 1-2 GHz acoustic waves as a function of frontside film growth. Using this technique, in-situ indium and aluminum film thickness monitoring has been done in both evaporator and sputtering environments with a resolution of 40 A. Temperature experiments in an oven have shown a resolution of 0.05 K for the sapphire buffer rod. Finally, multistep processing has been done and a multilayer film structure has been measured

  8. Color infrared film as a negative material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pease, Robert W.

    1970-01-01

    Original problems encountered in endeavors to use color infraredfilm as a negative material have been overcome by a simple modification in processing. This makes more feasible the production of infrared color prints for field use and yields an infrared counterpart to Aero-Neg.

  9. Boundary film for structural ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-05-01

    Structural ceramic materials, like metals, will require lubrication if they are to be used extensively for tribological applications. The use of thin soft metallic coatings (specifically Ag) as a boundary film during mineral oil lubrication of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) ceramic materials was investigated in this study. With a pin-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding, the steady friction coefficient was reduced by a factor of 2 (0.14 {minus}0.16 vs. 0.06--0.07) when the flats were coated with Ag. Also, with Ag coatings the wear of pins was reduced to an unmeasurable level, whereas, in the absence of Ag coatings specific wear rates of {approx}2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} -- 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} mm{sup 3}/Nm and {approx}7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} -- 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mm{sup 3}/Nm were measured for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 2} pins respectively. In addition to preventing direct contact between pins and flats, thereby reducing wear, the Ag coatings also act as a solid lubricant, help dissipate flash heating, and accelerate modification of the {lambda} ratio.

  10. Boundary film for structural ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-05-01

    Structural ceramic materials, like metals, will require lubrication if they are to be used extensively for tribological applications. The use of thin soft metallic coatings (specifically Ag) as a boundary film during mineral oil lubrication of silicon nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) and zirconia (ZrO[sub 2]) ceramic materials was investigated in this study. With a pin-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding, the steady friction coefficient was reduced by a factor of 2 (0.14 [minus]0.16 vs. 0.06--0.07) when the flats were coated with Ag. Also, with Ag coatings the wear of pins was reduced to an unmeasurable level, whereas, in the absence of Ag coatings specific wear rates of [approx]2 [times] 10[sup [minus]9] -- 4 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] mm[sup 3]/Nm and [approx]7 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] -- 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]7] mm[sup 3]/Nm were measured for Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] and ZrO[sub 2] pins respectively. In addition to preventing direct contact between pins and flats, thereby reducing wear, the Ag coatings also act as a solid lubricant, help dissipate flash heating, and accelerate modification of the [lambda] ratio.

  11. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, Lawrence S.; Felter, Thomas E.; Talin, Alec; Ohlberg, Douglas; Fox, Ciaran; Han, Sung

    1999-01-01

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/.mu.m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 .mu.m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceeded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material.

  12. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, L.S.; Felter, T.E.; Talin, A.; Ohlberg, D.; Fox, C.; Han, S.

    1999-01-12

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/{micro}m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 {micro}m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material. 2 figs.

  13. The materials processing sciences glovebox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traweek, Larry

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Processing Sciences Glovebox is a rack mounted workstation which allows on orbit sample preparation and characterization of specimens from various experiment facilities. It provides an isolated safe, clean, and sterile environment for the crew member to work with potentially hazardous materials. It has to handle a range of chemicals broader than even PMMS. The theme is that the Space Station Laboratory experiment preparation and characterization operations provide the fundamental glovebox design characteristics. Glovebox subsystem concepts and how internal material handling operations affect the design are discussed.

  14. Microwave processing of polymide thin films for electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.A.; LaMaire, S.J.; Viehbeck, A.

    1995-12-31

    Microwave energy was utilized to quickly and efficiently cure polyimide thin films as interlayer dielectrics in high performance multi-chip modules. The process results in a 33% reduction in raw process time for a 4 level electrical structure (8 levels of dielectric) and an even greater reduction in the manufacturing cycle time, since single part processing reduces the effect of batching for curing cycles. As a part of the feasibility study, a test vehicle was successfully completed using microwave processing for all curing steps. Materials retained the necessary mechanical properties after microwave processing and there were no problems due to the effects of the metal wiring, either in the glass ceramic substrate or in the thin film structure.

  15. Residual stresses in material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then adresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  16. Failure processes unidirectional composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Failure processes in unidirectional composite materials subjected to quasi-static tensile load along the fiber direction are investigated. The emphasis in this investigation is to identify the physical processes taking place during the evolution of failure in these materials. An extensive literature review is conducted and the information relevant to the present topic is summarized. The nature of damage growth in five different commercially available composite systems are studied. In-situ scanning electron microscopy is employed for identifying the failure events taking place at the microscopic level. Acoustic emission monitoring is used for estimating the rate of damage growth on a global scale and determining the size of individual failure events. Results show the important roles of the matrix material and the interphase in determining the tensile strength of unidirectional composite materials. Several failure modes occurring at the microscopic scale are revealed for the first time. Further, the results indicate that dynamic fracture participates to a significant extent in determining the failure process in these materials. Based on the results the influence of various parameters in determining the composite strength is described.

  17. FNAS materials processing and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golben, John P.

    1991-01-01

    Research on melt-sintered high temperature superconducting materials is presented. The vibrating sample magnetometer has become a useful characterization tool for the study of high temperature superconductors. Important information regarding the superconducting properties of a sample can be obtained without actually making contact with the sample itself. A step toward microgravity processing of high temperature superconductors was taken. In the future, the samples need to be optimized prior to this processing of the sample before the specific effects of the microgravity environment can be isolated. A series of melt-sintered samples show that bulk processing of high temperature superconductors is getting better.

  18. Space processing of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.; Kaye, S.

    1975-01-01

    Materials and processes for the testing of aluminum-base fiber and particle composites, and of metal foams under extended-time low-g conditions were investigated. A wetting and dispersion technique was developed, based on the theory that under the absence of a gas phase all solids are wetted by liquids. The process is characterized by a high vacuum environment and a high temperature cycle. Successful wetting and dispersion experiments were carried out with sapphire fibers, whiskers and particles, and with fibers of silicon carbide, pyrolytic graphite and tungsten. The developed process and facilities permit the preparation of a precomposite which serves as sample material for flight experiments. Low-g processing consists then merely in the uniform redistribution of the reinforcements during a melting cycle. For the preparation of metal foams, gas generation by means of a thermally decomposing compound was found most adaptable to flight experiments. For flight experiments, the use of compacted mixture of the component materials limits low-g processing to a simple melt cycle.

  19. The materials processing research base of the Materials Processing Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latanision, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    An annual report of the research activities of the Materials Processing Center of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is given. Research on dielectrophoresis in the microgravity environment, phase separation kinetics in immiscible liquids, transport properties of droplet clusters in gravity-free fields, probes and monitors for the study of solidification of molten semiconductors, fluid mechanics and mass transfer in melt crystal growth, and heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification are discussed.

  20. Materials processing in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The final report of the Materials Processing in Low Gravity Program in which The University of Alabama in Huntsville designed, fabricated and performed various low gravity experiments in materials processing from November 7, 1989 through November 6, 1990 is presented. The facilities used in these short duration low gravity experiments include the Drop Tube and Drop Tower at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the KC-135 aircraft at Ellington Field. During the performance of this contract, the utilization of these ground-based low gravity facilities for materials processing experiments have been instrumental in providing the opportunity to determine the feasibility of performing a number of experiments in the microgravity of Space, without the expense of a space-based experiment. Since the KC-135 was out for repairs during the latter part of the reporting period, a number of the KC-135 activities concentrated on repair and maintenance of the equipment that normally is flown on the aircraft. A number of periodic reports were given to the TCOR during the course of this contract, hence this final report is meant only to summarize the many activities performed and not redundantly cover materials already submitted.

  1. Process for buried metallization in diamond film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Max L.; Ting, Jyh-Ming; Lagounov, Alex; Tang, Chi

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate methods of combining chemical vapor deposition diamond growth techniques with state-of-the-art physical vapor deposition or ion beam enhanced deposition to produce buried metallization of polycrystalline diamond films. The mechanical and electrical integrity of both the insulating and conducting elements following metallization and diamond overgrowth was shown. Both methods were shown to have bonding strength sufficient to withstand tape lift-off, which is regarded to be a good indication of strength needed for die attachment and wire bonding. Diamond overgrowth was also shown, thus enabling buried metallized layers to be created. Electrical resistivity property measurements on metallized layers and between metallization separated by diamond films were shown to be sufficient to allow the use of diamond as an insulating inter-layer material for multi-layer circuit boards.

  2. Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul A.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Danzinger, James L.; England, Craig D.

    1992-01-01

    The surface oxidation processes of thin films of magneto-optic materials, such as the rare-earth transition metal alloys have been studied, starting in ultrahigh vacuum environments, using surface analysis techniques, as a way of modeling the oxidation processes which occur at the base of a defect in an overcoated material, at the instant of exposure to ambient environments. Materials examined have included FeTbCo alloys, as well as those same materials with low percentages of added elements, such a Ta, and their reactivities to both O2 and H2O compared with materials such as thin Fe films coated with ultrathin adlayers of Ti. The surface oxidation pathways for these materials is reviewed, and XPS data presented which indicates the type of oxides formed, and a critical region of Ta concentration which provides optimum protection.

  3. Environmentally compatible solder materials for thick film hybrid assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.; Hernandez, C.L.

    1997-02-01

    New soldering materials and processes have been developed over the last several years to address a variety of environmental issues. One of the primary efforts by the electronics industry has involved the development of alternative solders to replace the traditional lead-containing alloys. Sandia National Laboratories is developing such alternative solder materials for printed circuit board and hybrid microcircuit (HMC) applications. This paper describes the work associated with low residue, lead-free soldering of thick film HMC`s. The response of the different materials to wetting, aging, and mechanical test conditions was investigated. Hybrid test vehicles were designed and fabricated with a variety of chip capacitors and leadless ceramic chip carriers to conduct thermal, electrical continuity, and mechanical evaluations of prototype joints. Microstructural development along the solder and thick film interface, after isothermal solid state aging over a range of elevated temperatures and times, was quantified using microanalytical techniques. Flux residues on soldered samples were stressed (temperature-humidity aged) to identify potential corrosion problems. Mechanical tests also supported the development of a solder joint lifetime prediction model. Progress of this effort is summarized.

  4. Process for preparing energetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L.; Lee, Ronald S.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Swansiger, Rosalind W.; Fox, Glenn A.

    2011-12-13

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  5. Metal containing material processing on coater/developer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Shinichiro; Mizunoura, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Koichi; Hontake, Koichi; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimura, Satoru; Enomoto, Masashi

    2016-03-01

    Challenges of processing metal containing materials need to be addressed in order apply this technology to Behavior of metal containing materials on coater/developer processing including coating process, developer process and tool metal contamination is studied using CLEAN TRACKTM LITHIUS ProTM Z (Tokyo Electron Limited). Through this work, coating uniformity and coating film defectivity were studied. Metal containing material performance was comparable to conventional materials. Especially, new dispense system (NDS) demonstrated up to 80% reduction in coating defect for metal containing materials. As for processed wafer metal contamination, coated wafer metal contamination achieved less than 1.0E10 atoms/cm2 with 3 materials. After develop metal contamination also achieved less than 1.0E10 atoms/cm2 with 2 materials. Furthermore, through the metal defect study, metal residues and metal contamination were reduced by developer rinse optimization.

  6. 27 CFR 18.51 - Processing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Processing material. 18.51... material. (a) General. A proprietor may produce processing material or receive processing material produced elsewhere. Fermented processing material may not be used in the manufacture of concentrate....

  7. 27 CFR 18.51 - Processing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Processing material. 18.51... material. (a) General. A proprietor may produce processing material or receive processing material produced elsewhere. Fermented processing material may not be used in the manufacture of concentrate....

  8. Thermoelastic response of thin metal films and their adjacent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, J.; Kim, W.

    2013-01-14

    A pulsed laser beam applied to a thin metal film is capable of launching an acoustic wave due to thermal expansion. Heat transfer from the thin metal film to adjacent materials can also induce thermal expansion; thus, the properties of these adjacent materials (as well as the thin metal film) should be considered for a complete description of the thermoelastic response. Here, we show that adjacent materials with a small specific heat and large thermal expansion coefficient can generate an enhanced acoustic wave and we demonstrate a three-fold increase in the peak pressure of the generated acoustic wave on substitution of parylene for polydimethylsiloxane.

  9. Electrodeposited polymer encapsulated nickel sulphide thin films: frequency switching material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Sumanta; Mukherjee, Nillohit; Chakraborty, Biswajit; Mitra, Bibhas Chandra; Mondal, Anup

    2014-05-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) encapsulated nickel sulfide (NiS) thin films have been synthesized electrochemically from aqueous solution of hydrated nickel chloride (NiCl2, 6H2O), thioacetamide (CH3C(S) NH2) (TAA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Surface modification of nickel sulfide (NiS) thin films was achieved by this polymer encapsulation. X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Energy dispersive X-radiation (EDAX) techniques were used for the characterization of thin films. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) confirmed the formation of polymer encapsulated semiconductor. Frequency switching generation study shows that the encapsulated material could be used as a frequency switching device that generates a frequency ∼ 50 Hz under 1 Sun illumination. Encapsulation with PVP causes surface modification that reduces the surface states and barrier height. As a result, the width of the depletion region decreases. So the number of electron-hole pairs increases. Consequently, the number of excitons and exciton related emission increases and this leads to reduction of recombination process and shows photo induced frequency switching phenomenon.

  10. High throughput growth and characterization of thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Samuel S.

    2013-09-01

    It usually takes more than 10 years for a new material from initial research to its first commercial application. Therefore, accelerating the pace of discovery of new materials is critical to tackling challenges in areas ranging from clean energy to national security. As discovery of new materials has not kept pace with the product design cycles in many sectors of industry, there is a pressing need to develop and utilize high throughput screening and discovery technologies for the growth and characterization of new materials. This article presents two distinctive types of high throughput thin film material growth approaches, along with a number of high throughput characterization techniques, established in the author's group. These approaches include a second-generation "discrete" combinatorial semiconductor discovery technology that enables the creation of arrays of individually separated thin film semiconductor materials of different compositions, and a "continuous" high throughput thin film material screening technology that enables the realization of ternary alloy libraries with continuously varying elemental ratios.

  11. Process for making dense thin films

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2005-07-26

    Provided are low-cost, mechanically strong, highly electronically conductive porous substrates and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, techniques for forming these structures, and devices incorporating the structures. The invention provides solid state electrochemical device substrates of novel composition and techniques for forming thin electrode/membrane/electrolyte coatings on the novel or more conventional substrates. In particular, in one embodiment the invention provides techniques for firing of device substrate to form densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick. In another embodiment, densified electrolyte/membrane films 5 to 20 microns thick may be formed on a pre-sintered substrate by a constrained sintering process. In some cases, the substrate may be a porous metal, alloy, or non-nickel cermet incorporating one or more of the transition metals Cr, Fe, Cu and Ag, or alloys thereof.

  12. Thermal plasma processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1992-02-01

    Emphasis has been on plasma synthesis of fine powders, plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), on related diagnostics, and on modeling work. Since plasma synthesis as well as plasma CVD make frequent use of plasma jets, the beginning has been devoted of plasma jets and behavior of particulates injected into such plasma jets. Although most of the construction of the Triple-Torch Plasma Reactor (TTPR) has already been done, modifications have been made in particular modifications required for plasma CVD of diamond. A new reactor designed for Counter-Flow Liquid Injection Plasma Synthesis (CFLIPS) proved to be an excellent tool for synthesis of fine powders as well as for plasma CVD. An attempt was made to model flow and temperature fields in this reactor. Substantial efforts were made to single out those parameters which govern particle size, size distribution, and powder quality in our plasma synthesis experiments. This knowledge is crucial for controlling the process and for meaningful diagnostics and modeling work. Plasma CVD of diamond films using both reactors has been very successful and we have been approached by a number of companies interested in using this technology for coating of tools.

  13. Solution processed silver sulfide thin films for filament memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shong

    Filament Memories based on resistive switching have been attracting attention in recent years as a potential replacement for flash memory in CMOS technology and as a potential candidate memory for low-cost, large-area electronics. These memories operate at low voltages with fast switching speeds. These devices are based on ionic conduction through an electrolyte layer and differ fundamentally in operation from conventional flash memory, which is based on the field effect transistor. To facilitate development of this technology, effects of film structure on ionic and electronic conducting properties and the filament formation processes must be studied. In this work, silver sulfide, a mixed ionic-electronic conductor, is used as a model material for studying the solution processing of filament memories, and to study the impact of film structure on conducting and switching properties. Three different solution processing methods are investigated for depositing silver sulfide: sulfidation of elemental silver films, and sintering of two types of silver sulfide nanoparticles. Effects of nanoparticle sintering conditions on electrolyte structured and mixed conducting properties are investigated by a combination of X-ray diffraction, electrical impedance spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Impact of forming voltage and time on filament morphology is examined to provide an overall view of the impact of electrical and material parameters on device operation.

  14. Thin films of energetic materials by physical vapor deposition: TATB and LLM-105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, David; Gymer, Sue; O'Conner, Colum; Hazelwood, Adam; Jardine, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Thin films of energetic materials enable a diverse range of characterization measurements: structure, surface energy and adhesion, and even reactivity. Here we present a method to grow thin films by a physical vapor deposition method (sublimation) using a dedicated instrument which can operate at ultra-high vacuum. The approach enables fabrication of thin films of energetic materials that are otherwise difficult to process by traditional methods, for example because of their low solubility. The intention is to use this instrument as a platform for studying pure materials and co-deposited materials grown either as multi-layers or as co-crystals. Examples of TATB and LLM-105 film morphologies grown using this technique are presented.

  15. Computational Material Processing in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Working with Professor David Matthiesen at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) a computer model of the DPIMS (Diffusion Processes in Molten Semiconductors) space experiment was developed that is able to predict the thermal field, flow field and concentration profile within a molten germanium capillary under both ground-based and microgravity conditions as illustrated. These models are coupled with a novel nonlinear statistical methodology for estimating the diffusion coefficient from measured concentration values after a given time that yields a more accurate estimate than traditional methods. This code was integrated into a web-based application that has become a standard tool used by engineers in the Materials Science Department at CWRU.

  16. Reaction-Diffusion Processes in Ultrathin Films of Photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Ginusha; Stein, Gila

    2011-03-01

    Projection lithography is the primary technology used for patterning semiconductor devices. High-throughput manufacturing requires imaging materials (resists) that are highly sensitive to radiation, and this demand is satisfied through a process termed chemical amplification (CA). CA resists are comprised of a polymer resin (reactant) and photoacid generator (catalyst); a coupled reaction-diffusion mechanism drives image formation, where image resolution is limited by slow diffusion of the acid catalyst. There is evidence that thin film reaction rates deviate from the bulk behavior, and current models for image formation do not capture such effects. We demonstrate that X-Ray Diffraction can measure spatial extent-of-reaction in ultrathin films of a nanopatterned poly(4-hydroxystyrene-co-tertbutylacrylate) CA resist. The feedback acquired is used to construct predictive models for the coupled reaction-diffusion processes that incorporate the physics of confined polymers. Funded by NSF ECCS 0927147.

  17. Thick film laser induced forward transfer for deposition of thermally and mechanically sensitive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattamis, Nicholas T.; Purnick, Priscilla E.; Weiss, Ron; Arnold, Craig B.

    2007-10-01

    Laser forward transfer processes incorporating thin absorbing films can be used to deposit robust organic and inorganic materials but the deposition of more delicate materials has remained elusive due to contamination and stress induced during the transfer process. Here, we present the approach to high resolution patterning of sensitive materials by incorporating a thick film polymer absorbing layer that is able to dissipate shock energy through mechanical deformation. Multiple mechanisms for transfer as a function of incident laser energy are observed and we show viable and contamination-free deposition of living mammalian embryonic stem cells.

  18. Thick film laser induced forward transfer for deposition of thermally and mechanically sensitive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kattamis, Nicholas T.; Purnick, Priscilla E.; Weiss, Ron; Arnold, Craig B.

    2007-10-22

    Laser forward transfer processes incorporating thin absorbing films can be used to deposit robust organic and inorganic materials but the deposition of more delicate materials has remained elusive due to contamination and stress induced during the transfer process. Here, we present the approach to high resolution patterning of sensitive materials by incorporating a thick film polymer absorbing layer that is able to dissipate shock energy through mechanical deformation. Multiple mechanisms for transfer as a function of incident laser energy are observed and we show viable and contamination-free deposition of living mammalian embryonic stem cells.

  19. Liquid-Phase Processing of Barium Titanate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Thomas

    Processing of thin films introduces strict limits on the thermal budget due to substrate stability and thermal expansion mismatch stresses. Barium titanate serves as a model system for the difficulty in producing high quality thin films because of sensitivity to stress, scale, and crystal quality. Thermal budget restriction leads to reduced crystal quality, density, and grain growth, depressing ferroelectric and nonlinear dielectric properties. Processing of barium titanate is typically performed at temperatures hundreds of degrees above compatibility with metalized substrates. In particular integration with silicon and other low thermal expansion substrates is desirable for reductions in costs and wider availability of technologies. In bulk metal and ceramic systems, sintering behavior has been encouraged by the addition of a liquid forming second phase, improving kinetics and promoting densification and grain growth at lower temperatures. This approach is also widespread in the multilayer ceramic capacitor industry. However only limited exploration of flux processing with refractory thin films has been performed despite offering improved dielectric properties for barium titanate films at lower temperatures. This dissertation explores physical vapor deposition of barium titanate thin films with addition of liquid forming fluxes. Flux systems studied include BaO-B2O3, Bi2O3-BaB2O 4, BaO-V2O5, CuO-BaO-B2O3, and BaO-B2O3 modified by Al, Si, V, and Li. Additions of BaO-B2O3 leads to densification and an increase in average grain size from 50 nm to over 300 nm after annealing at 900 °C. The ability to tune permittivity of the material improved from 20% to 70%. Development of high quality films enables engineering of ferroelectric phase stability using residual thermal expansion mismatch in polycrystalline films. The observed shifts to TC match thermodynamic calculations, expected strain from the thermal expansion coefficients, as well as x-ray diffract measurements

  20. Solution processed chalcogenide films and micro-patterns via self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Radhakant; Sachan, Priyanka; Dwivedi, Prabhat K.; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    Chalcogenide (ChG) are the choice materials for IR applications due to their high refractive index, mid IR transparency and high nonlinear optical properties. In this work, we study the characteristics of solution processed Chalcogenide films, As2S3 prepared by various amine solvents, for possible pattern fabrications. Since solution processed ChG films tend to contain solvent related defects, it is important to optimize the process parameters to create defect free films, structurally similar to bulk ChG. We have studied the physical integrity and morphology of solution processed ChG films as a function of annealing conditions and film thickness. Optical and morphological characterizations of these films are carried out in order to fabricate defect free, optically useful micro-structures.

  1. Processes and Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Marshall

    The field of organic photovoltaics is driven by the desire for better and cheaper solar cells. While showing much promise, current generations of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices do not exhibit properties that are suited for wide scale commercialization. While much research has been dedicated towards this goal, more yet needs to be done before it can be clear whether this is an achievable goal. This thesis describes new materials investigations for higher efficiency better stability organic photovoltaics, as well as new processes that broaden the application and fabrication space for these devices. The application of electro-polymerization, a deposition process, towards organic thin-film fabrication is discussed. This novel process for OPVs is followed by an analysis of new and interesting materials for OPV devices, including a higher efficiency hole-transporting material, and two hole-transporting molecules that exhibit self-assembly during OPV fabrication. The results of these investigations indicate the possibility for increased fabrication freedom and control, molecular species design that could allow higher efficiency devices, as well as indications of the role that molecular interactions in OPV heterojunctions play. In addition, the possibilities of integrating graphene, the two-dimensional form of carbon, into OPV architectures is discussed. A new process for graphene transfer that allows the integration of graphene into chemically and physically more fragile systems including those composed of small molecule semiconductors is described and experimentally verified. Graphene is then integrated as a cathode in OPVs, and a modeling and experimental investigation is performed to evaluate the potential for integrating graphene as a recombination layer in tandem OPVs. Based on this investigation, the integration of graphene into tandem OPVs could enable higher efficiency devices and significantly broadened architectural freedom for tandem fabrication.

  2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the nucleation processes and chemistry of CdS thin films deposited by sublimation on different solar cell substrate materials

    SciTech Connect

    Espinos, J.P.; Martin-Concepcion, A.I.; Mansilla, C.; Yubero, F.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

    2006-07-15

    Cadmium sulfide has been deposited by evaporation on five different substrates: CdTe, ZnO, Ag, TiO{sub 2}, and partially reduced titanium oxide (i.e., TiO{sub 1.73}). The deposition rate and the evolution of the Cd/S ratio on the different substrates have been determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The growth mode of the films has been also studied by analyzing the shape of the backgrounds behind the photoemission peaks (peak shape analysis). It has been found that, under completely equivalent conditions, the deposition efficiency (i.e., sticking coefficient) is large on CdTe and TiO{sub 1.73}, but very small on ZnO and TiO{sub 2}. Silver constitutes an intermediate situation characterized by a long induction period where the deposition rate is small and a later increase in deposition efficiency comparable to that on CdTe. For the initial stages of deposition, below an equivalent monolayer, it has been also found that the Cd/S ratio is smaller than unity on TiO{sub 1.73} and ZnO but larger than unity on CdTe and Ag substrates. For sufficiently long deposition times the Cd/S ratio on the surface reaches unity. Except for silver substrate, cadmium appears as Cd{sup 2+} and sulfur as S{sup -2} species at the initial stages of deposition. On the silver surface, cadmium adsorbs as Cd{sup 0} at low coverage. Peak shape analysis has shown that cadmium sulfide grows according to layer-by-layer mechanism (Frank-van de Merwe model) when the substrates are CdTe and TiO{sub 1.73}, but large particles are formed that do not cover the surface for ZnO and Ag substrates (Volmer-Weber growth model). These results are consistent with the different chemical affinities of the substrate towards the atoms of cadmium and sulfur produced during the evaporation of the cadmium sulfide.

  3. Laser processing of thin films for industrial packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzi, Michele; Lutey, Adrian H. A.; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Selleri, Stefano; Molari, Pier Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    Single layer thin-film materials such as aluminum, polyethylene, polypropylene, and their multi-layer combinations such as aluminum-paper have been exposed to different laser radiation. A wide number of samples have been processed with 10 - 12.5 ns IR and Green, and 500 - 800 ps IR laser radiation at different translating speeds ranging from 50 mm/s to 1 m/s. High quality incisions have been obtained for all tested materials within the experimental conditions. The presented results provide the necessary parameters for an efficient cut and processing of the tested materials, for the employment of pulsed laser sources in the packaging industry, allowing the laser to prevail in lieu of more costly and energy intensive methods.

  4. Scrounge data processing film products for the thematic mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Information on the format of the film product and type of film used for the LANDSAT-4 scrounge processed thematic mapper data is presented. Image gray scale, annotation field, and general layout are described.

  5. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  6. Integrated lunar materials manufacturing process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Michael A. (Inventor); Knudsen, Christian W. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A manufacturing plant and process for production of oxygen on the moon uses lunar minerals as feed and a minimum of earth-imported, process materials. Lunar feed stocks are hydrogen-reducible minerals, ilmenite and lunar agglutinates occurring in numerous, explored locations mixed with other minerals in the pulverized surface layer of lunar soil known as regolith. Ilmenite (FeTiO.sub.3) and agglutinates contain ferrous (Fe.sup.+2) iron reducible by hydrogen to yield H.sub.2 O and metallic Fe at about 700.degree.-1,200.degree. C. The H.sub.2 O is electrolyzed in gas phase to yield H.sub.2 for recycle and O.sub.2 for storage and use. Hydrogen losses to lunar vacuum are minimized, with no net hydrogen (or any other earth-derived reagent) consumption except for small leaks. Feed minerals are surface-mined by front shovels and transported in trucks to the processing area. The machines are manned or robotic. Ilmenite and agglutinates occur mixed with silicate minerals which are not hydrogen-reducible at 700.degree.-1,200.degree. C. and consequently are separated and concentrated before feeding to the oxygen generation process. Solids rejected from the separation step and reduced solids from the oxygen process are returned to the mine area. The plant is powered by nuclear or solar power generators. Vapor-phase water electrolysis, a staged, countercurrent, fluidized bed reduction reactor and a radio-frequency-driven ceramic gas heater are used to improve thermal efficiency.

  7. Development of a Process Analytical Technology (PAT) for in-line monitoring of film thickness and mass of coating materials during a pan coating operation.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Claire; Genty, Muriel; Boiret, Mathieu; Julien, Marc; Meunier, Loïc; Lecoq, Olivier; Baron, Michel; Chaminade, Pierre; Péan, Jean Manuel

    2011-07-17

    The aim of this study was to perform in-line Near Infrared (NIR) measurements inside a pan coater to monitor a coating operation in real-time, by predicting the increases in mass of coating materials and coating thickness. A polymer combination of ethylcellulose/poly(vinyl-alcohol)-poly(ethylene-glycol) graft copolymer was used as functional aqueous coating. Coated tablets were sampled at regular intervals during the coating operation, then subjected to either simple and fast weighing (n=50) or accurate and non-destructive Terahertz Pulsed Imaging (TPI) measurements (n=3). Off-line NIR spectra analysis revealed that the coating operation could efficiently be controlled by focusing on two distinct NIR regions, related to absorption bands of ethylcellulose. Principal component analysis of in-line NIR spectra gave a clear classification of the collected coated tablets. Real-time quantitative monitoring of the coating operation was successfully performed from partial least square calibration models built using either TPI or weighing as reference method. Coating thicknesses as well as mass of coating materials used as primary values provided accurate NIR predictions. A comparison study demonstrated that both reference methods led to reliable and accurate real-time monitoring of the coating operation. This work demonstrated that in-line NIR measurements associated with multivariate analyses can be implemented to monitor in real-time a pan coating operation in order to fulfil the expectations of ICH Q8 guideline on pharmaceutical development, especially in terms of PAT control strategy and reduced end-product testing. PMID:21569842

  8. Lunar materials processing system integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1992-02-01

    The theme of this paper is that governmental resources will not permit the simultaneous development of all viable lunar materials processing (LMP) candidates. Choices will inevitably be made, based on the results of system integration trade studies comparing candidates to each other for high-leverage applications. It is in the best long-term interest of the LMP community to lead the selection process itself, quickly and practically. The paper is in five parts. The first part explains what systems integration means and why the specialized field of LMP needs this activity now. The second part defines the integration context for LMP -- by outlining potential lunar base functions, their interrelationships and constraints. The third part establishes perspective for prioritizing the development of LMP methods, by estimating realistic scope, scale, and timing of lunar operations. The fourth part describes the use of one type of analytical tool for gaining understanding of system interactions: the input/output model. A simple example solved with linear algebra is used to illustrate. The fifth and closing part identifies specific steps needed to refine the current ability to study lunar base system integration. Research specialists have a crucial role to play now in providing the data upon which this refinement process must be based.

  9. Lunar materials processing system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1992-01-01

    The theme of this paper is that governmental resources will not permit the simultaneous development of all viable lunar materials processing (LMP) candidates. Choices will inevitably be made, based on the results of system integration trade studies comparing candidates to each other for high-leverage applications. It is in the best long-term interest of the LMP community to lead the selection process itself, quickly and practically. The paper is in five parts. The first part explains what systems integration means and why the specialized field of LMP needs this activity now. The second part defines the integration context for LMP -- by outlining potential lunar base functions, their interrelationships and constraints. The third part establishes perspective for prioritizing the development of LMP methods, by estimating realistic scope, scale, and timing of lunar operations. The fourth part describes the use of one type of analytical tool for gaining understanding of system interactions: the input/output model. A simple example solved with linear algebra is used to illustrate. The fifth and closing part identifies specific steps needed to refine the current ability to study lunar base system integration. Research specialists have a crucial role to play now in providing the data upon which this refinement process must be based.

  10. Cosolvent approach for solution-processable electronic thin films.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhaoyang; He, Qiyuan; Yin, Anxiang; Xu, Yuxi; Wang, Chen; Ding, Mengning; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Papandrea, Benjamin; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-04-28

    Low-temperature solution-processable electronic materials are of considerable interest for large-area, low-cost electronics, thermoelectrics, and photovoltaics. Using a soluble precursor and suitable solvent to formulate a semiconductor ink is essential for large-area fabrication of semiconductor thin films. To date, it has been shown that hydrazine can be used as a versatile solvent to process a wide range of inorganic semiconductors. However, hydrazine is highly toxic and not suitable for large-scale manufacturing. Here we report a binary mixed solvent of amine and thiol for effective dispersion and dissolution of a large number of inorganic semiconductors including Cu2S, Cu2Se, In2S3, In2Se3, CdS, SnSe, and others. The mixed solvent is significantly less toxic and safer than hydrazine, while at the same time offering the comparable capability of formulating diverse semiconductor ink with a concentration as high as >200 mg/mL. We further show that such ink material can be readily processed into high-performance semiconducting thin films (Cu2S and Cu2Se) with the highest room-temperature conductivity among solution-based materials. Furthermore, we show that complex semiconductor alloys with tunable band gaps, such as CuIn(S(x)Se(1-x))2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1), can also be readily prepared by simply mixing Cu2S, Cu2Se, In2S3, and In2Se3 ink solutions in a proper ratio. Our study outlines a general strategy for the formulation of inorganic semiconductor ink for low-temperature processing of large-area electronic thin films on diverse substrates and can greatly impact diverse areas including flexible electronics, thermoelectrics, and photovoltaics. PMID:25867535

  11. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenbing

    The barrier to utilize solar generated electricity mainly comes from their higher cost relative to fossil fuels. However, innovations with new materials and processing techniques can potentially make cost effective photovoltaics. One such strategy is to develop solution processed photovoltaics which avoid the expensive vacuum processing required by traditional solar cells. The dissertation is mainly focused on two absorber material system for thin film solar cells: chalcopyrite CuIn(S,Se)2 (CISS) and kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S,Se) 4 organized in chronological order. Chalcopyrite CISS is a very promising material. It has been demonstrated to achieve the highest efficiency among thin film solar cells. Scaled-up industry production at present has reached the giga-watt per year level. The process however mainly relies on vacuum systems which account for a significant percentage of the manufacturing cost. In the first section of this dissertation, hydrazine based solution processed CISS has been explored. The focus of the research involves the procedures to fabricate devices from solution. The topics covered in Chapter 2 include: precursor solution synthesis with a focus on understanding the solution chemistry, CISS absorber formation from precursor, properties modification toward favorable device performance, and device structure innovation toward tandem device. For photovoltaics to have a significant impact toward meeting energy demands, the annual production capability needs to be on TW-level. On such a level, raw materials supply of rare elements (indium for CIS or tellurium for CdTe) will be the bottleneck limiting the scalability. Replacing indium with zinc and tin, earth abundant kesterite CZTS exhibits great potential to reach the goal of TW-level with no limitations on raw material availability. Chapter 3 shows pioneering work towards solution processing of CZTS film at low temperature. The solution processed devices show performances which rival vacuum

  12. Structure development of polyesters and their blends in film formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kwangjin

    A fundamental study of structure development in cast, single and double bubble, and biaxial film stretching processes of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) and PBT/PET blends was carried out. The deformation mechanisms and physical properties of films were described in terms of various structural parameters. We established a new process technique to fabricate double bubble biaxially orientated films from rapidly crystallizing polymers. Polyesters were largely stable in various film forming processes. In film casting, the rate of crystallization tended to dominate the processability of materials. The stability of first bubble was substantially improved with an increase in molecular rigidity. In cold-drawing processes, the stability was dominated by the strain hardening behavior of materials. PBT cast and first bubble films were semicrystalline with only the alpha phase. Cold-drawn films revealed Xsb{c}'s of 20-30% and polymorphism. The polymer chains increasingly oriented into the film plane with biaxial stretching. PBT biaxial films had a maximum tensile strength of 210 MPa. Cast and first bubble films of PET were largely amorphous. PET films stretched in a rubbery state possessed Xsb{c}'s of 20-35%. PET films exhibited (100) planar orientation with crystallites oriented either to the drawing direction or in the plane of the film. A maximum tensile strength of 400 MPa was obtained. Twin screw melt extruded PBT/PET blends exhibited equilibrium melting point depression. The interaction parameters (chisb{12}) were determined to be negative and composition dependent, ranging from -0.75 to -0.55 at 285sp°C. Cast and first bubble films of PBT/PET blends exhibited decreased Xsb{c} with rising PET content. Cold-drawn blend films possessed a Xsb{c}'s of 20-45%. The orientation in the PBT phase decreased with increasing PET content while that in the PET phase increased. The mechanical properties of the films

  13. Investigation of Zerodur material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1993-07-01

    The Final Report of the Center for Applied Optics (CAO), of The University of Alabama (UAH) study entitled 'Investigation of Zerodur Material Processing' is presented. The objectives of the effort were to prepare glass samples by cutting, grinding, etching, and polishing block Zerodur to desired specifications using equipment located in the optical shop located in the Optical System Branch at NASA/MSFC; characterize samples for subsurface damage and surface roughness; utilize Zerodur samples for coating investigations; and perform investigations into enhanced optical fabrication and metrology techniques. The results of this investigation will be used to support the Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) program as well as other NASA/MSFC research programs. The results of the technical effort are presented and discussed.

  14. Investigation of Zerodur material processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report of the Center for Applied Optics (CAO), of The University of Alabama (UAH) study entitled 'Investigation of Zerodur Material Processing' is presented. The objectives of the effort were to prepare glass samples by cutting, grinding, etching, and polishing block Zerodur to desired specifications using equipment located in the optical shop located in the Optical System Branch at NASA/MSFC; characterize samples for subsurface damage and surface roughness; utilize Zerodur samples for coating investigations; and perform investigations into enhanced optical fabrication and metrology techniques. The results of this investigation will be used to support the Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) program as well as other NASA/MSFC research programs. The results of the technical effort are presented and discussed.

  15. Fundamentals of polycrystalline thin film materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.N.; Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1991-01-01

    This report presents the results of a one-year research program on polycrystalline thin-film solar cells. The research was conducted to better understand the limitations and potential of solar cells using CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe by systematically investigating the fundamental relationships linking material processing, material properties, and device behavior. By selenizing Cu and In layers, we fabricated device-quality CuInSe{sub 2} thin films and demonstrated a CuInSe{sub 2} solar cell with 7% efficiency. We added Ga, to increase the band gap of CuInSe{sub 2} devices to increase the open-circuit voltage to 0.55 V. We fabricated and analyzed Cu(InGa)Se{sub 2}/CuInSe{sub 2} devices to demonstrate the potential for combining the benefits of higher V{sub oc} while retaining the current-generating capacity of CuInSe{sub 2}. We fabricated an innovative superstrate device design with more than 5% efficiency, as well as a bifacial spectral-response technique for determining the electron diffusion length and optical absorption coefficient of CuInSe{sub 2} in an operational cell. The diffusion length was found to be greater than 1 {mu}m. We qualitatively modeled the effect of reducing heat treatments in hydrogen and oxidizing treatments in air on the I-V behavior of CuInSe{sub 2} devices. We also investigated post-deposition heat treatments and chemical processing and used them to fabricate a 9.6%-efficient CdTe/CdS solar cell using physical vapor deposition.

  16. Fundamentals of polycrystalline thin film materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Bill N.; Birkmire, Robert W.; Phillips, James E.; Shafarman, William N.; Hegedus, Steven S.; McCandless, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents the results of a one-year research program on polycrystalline thin-film solar cells. The research was conducted to better understand the limitations and potential of solar cells using CuInSe2 and CdTe by systematically investigating the fundamental relationships linking material processing, material properties, and device behavior. By selenizing Cu and In layers, we fabricated device-quality CuInSe2 thin films and demonstrated a CuInSe2 solar cell with 7 percent efficiency. We added Ga, to increase the band gap of CuInSe2 devices to increase the open-circuit voltage to 0.55 V. We fabricated and analyzed CuInGaSe2/CuInSe2 devices to demonstrate the potential for combining the benefits of higher V(sub oc) while retaining the current-generating capacity of CuInSe2. We fabricated an innovative superstrate device design with more than 5 percent efficiency, as well as a bifacial spectral-response technique for determining the electron diffusion length and optical absorption coefficient of CuInSe2 in an operational cell. The diffusion length was found to be greater than 1 micron. We qualitatively modeled the effect of reducing heat treatments in hydrogen and oxidizing treatments in air on the I-V behavior of CuInSe2 devices. We also investigated post-deposition heat treatments and chemical processing and used them to fabricate a 9.6 percent-efficient CdTe/CdS solar cell using physical vapor deposition.

  17. Packaging material for thin film lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Weatherspoon, Kim A.

    1996-01-01

    A thin film battery including components which are capable of reacting upon exposure to air and water vapor incorporates a packaging system which provides a barrier against the penetration of air and water vapor. The packaging system includes a protective sheath overlying and coating the battery components and can be comprised of an overlayer including metal, ceramic, a ceramic-metal combination, a parylene-metal combination, a parylene-ceramic combination or a parylene-metal-ceramic combination.

  18. Progress toward developing high performance immersion compatible materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Karen; Patel, Kaushal; Chen, Rex; Li, Wenjie; Kwong, Ranee; Lawson, Peggy; Varanasi, Rao; Robinson, Chris; Holmes, Steven J.; Gil, Dario; Kimmel, Kurt; Slezak, Mark; Dabbagh, Gary; Chiba, Takashi; Shimokawa, Tsutomu

    2005-05-01

    To make immersion lithography a reality in manufacturing, several challenges related to materials and defects must be addressed. Two such challenges include the development of water immersion compatible materials, and the vigorous pursuit of defect reduction with respect to both the films and the processes. Suitable resists and topcoats must be developed to be compatible with the water-soaked environment during exposure. Going beyond the requisite studies of component leaching from films into the water, and absorption of water into the films, application-specific optimization of photoresists and top coats will be required. This would involve an understanding of how a wide array of resist chemistry and formulations behave under immersion conditions. The intent of this paper is to compare lithographic performance under immersion and dry conditions of resists containing different polymer platforms, protecting groups, and formulations. The compatibility of several developer-soluble top-coat materials with a variety of resists is also studied with emphasis on profile control issues. With respect to defects, the sources are numerous. Bubbles and particles created during the imaging process, material remnants from incomplete removal of topcoats, and image collapse as related to resist swelling from water infusion are all sources of yield-limiting defects. Parallel efforts are required in the material development cycle focusing both on meeting the lithographic requirements, and on understanding and eliminating sources of defects. In this paper, efforts in the characterization and reduction of defects as related to materials chemistry and processing effects will be presented.

  19. Biocomposite cellulose-alginate films: promising packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Sirviö, Juho Antti; Kolehmainen, Aleksi; Liimatainen, Henrikki; Niinimäki, Jouko; Hormi, Osmo E O

    2014-05-15

    Biocomposite films based on cellulose and alginate were produced using unmodified birch pulp, microfibrillated cellulose (MFC), nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and birch pulp derivate, nanofibrillated anionic dicarboxylic acid cellulose (DCC), having widths of fibres ranging from 19.0 μm to 25 nm as cellulose fibre materials. Ionically cross-linked biocomposites were produced using Ca(2+) cross-linking. Addition of micro- and nanocelluloses as a reinforcement increased the mechanical properties of the alginate films remarkably, e.g. addition of 15% of NFC increased a tensile strength of the film from 70.02 to 97.97 MPa. After ionic cross-linking, the tensile strength of the film containing 10% of DCC was increased from 69.63 to 125.31 MPa. The biocomposite films showed excellent grease barrier properties and reduced water vapour permeability (WVP) after the addition of cellulose fibres, except when unmodified birch pulp was used. PMID:24423542

  20. High Pressure Hydrogen Materials Compatibility of Piezoelectric Films

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Bonham, Charles C.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Pitman, Stan G.; Dahl, Michael E.; Henager, Charles H.

    2010-12-02

    Abstract: Hydrogen is being considered as a next-generation clean burning fuel. However, hydrogen has well known materials issues, including blistering and embrittlement in metals. Piezoelectric materials are used as actuators in hydrogen fuel technology. We present studies of materials compatibility of piezoelectric films in a high pressure hydrogen environment. Absorption of high pressure hydrogen was studied with Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and barium titanate (BTO) thin films. Hydrogen surface degradation in the form of blistering and Pb mixing was also observed.

  1. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Diamond Films and Optoelectronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Jose M.

    1996-01-01

    We present a summary of the research, citations of publications resulting from the research and abstracts of such publications. We have made no inventions in the performance of the work in this project. The main goals of the project were to set up a Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond growth system attached to an UltraHigh Vacuum (UHV) atomic resolution Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) system and carry out experiments aimed at studying the properties and growth of diamond films using atomic resolution UHV STM. We successfully achieved these goals. We observed, for the first time, the atomic structure of the surface of CVD grown epitaxial diamond (100) films using UHV STM. We studied the effects of atomic hydrogen on the CVD diamond growth process. We studied the electronic properties of the diamond (100) (2x1) surface, and the effect of alkali metal adsorbates such as Cs on the work function of this surface using UHV STM spectroscopy techniques. We also studied, using STM, new electronic materials such as carbon nanotubes and gold nanostructures. This work resulted in four publications in refereed scientific journals and five publications in refereed conference proceedings.

  2. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  3. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  4. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  5. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  6. Semiconducting boron carbide thin films: Structure, processing, and diode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ruqiang

    The high energy density and long lifetime of betavoltaic devices make them very useful to provide the power for applications ranging from implantable cardiac pacemakers to deep space satellites and remote sensors. However, when made with conventional semiconductors, betavoltaic devices tend to suffer rapid degradation as a result of radiation damage. It has been suggested that the degradation problem could potentially be alleviated by replacing conventional semiconductors with a radiation hard semiconducting material like icosahedral boron carbide. The goal of my dissertation was to better understand the fundamental properties and structure of boron carbide thin films and to explore the processes to fabricate boron carbide based devices for voltaic applications. A pulsed laser deposition system and a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering deposition system were designed and built to achieve the goals. After comparing the experimental results obtained using these two techniques, it was concluded that RF magnetron sputtering deposition technique is a good method to make B4C boron carbide thin films to fabricate repeatable and reproducible voltaic devices. The B4C thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering require in situ dry pre-cleaning to make ohmic contacts for B4C thin films to fabricate the devices. By adding another RF sputtering to pre-clean the substrate and thin films, a process to fabricate B4C / n-Si heterojunctions has been established. In addition, a low energy electron accelerator (LEEA) was built to mimic beta particles emitted from Pm147 and used to characterize the betavoltaic performance of betavoltaic devices as a function of beta energy and beta flux as well as do accelerated lifetime testing for betavoltaic devices. The energy range of LEEA is 20 - 250 keV with the current from several nA to 50 muA. High efficiency Si solar cells were used to demonstrate the powerful capabilities of LEEA, i.e., the characterization of betavoltaic

  7. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the primary purposes of this work are to study important technologies, particularly involving thin films, relevant to organic and polymeric materials for improving applicability to optical circuitry and devices and to assess the contribution of convection on film quality in unit and microgravity environments. Among the most important materials processing techniques of interest in this work are solution-based and by physical vapor transport, both having proven gravitational and acceleration dependence. In particular, PolyDiAcetylenes (PDA's) and PhthaloCyanines (Pc's) are excellent NonLinear Optical (NLO) materials with the promise of significantly improved NLO properties through order and film quality enhancements possible through microgravity processing. Our approach is to focus research on integrated optical circuits and optoelectronic devices relevant to solution-based and vapor processes of interest in the Space Sciences Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Modification of organic materials is an important aspect of achieving more highly ordered structures in conjunction with microgravity processing. Parallel activities include characterization of materials for particular NLO properties and determination of appropriation device designs consistent with selected applications. One result of this work is the determination, theoretically, that buoyancy-driven convection occurs at low pressures in an ideal gas in a thermalgradient from source to sink. Subsequent experiment supports the theory. We have also determined theoretically that buoyancy-driven convection occurs during photodeposition of PDA, an MSFC-patented process for fabricating complex circuits, which is also supported by experiment. Finally, the discovery of intrinsic optical bistability in metal-free Pc films enables the possibility of the development of logic gate technology on the basis of these materials.

  8. The Effect of Plasma Surface Treatment on a Porous Green Ceramic Film with Polymeric Binder Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Yun

    2013-06-01

    To reduce time and energy during thermal binder removal in the ceramic process, plasma surface treatment was applied before the lamination process. The adhesion strength in the lamination films was enhanced by oxidative plasma treatment of the porous green ceramic film with polymeric binding materials. The oxygen plasma characteristics were investigated through experimental parameters and weight loss analysis. The experimental results revealed the need for parameter analysis, including gas material, process time, flow rate, and discharge power, and supported a mechanism consisting of competing ablation and deposition processes. The weight loss analysis was conducted for cyclic plasma treatment rather than continuous plasma treatment for the purpose of improving the film's permeability by suppressing deposition of the ablated species. The cyclic plasma treatment improved the permeability compared to the continuous plasma treatment.

  9. Process for making thin film solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Eberspacher, C.; Ermer, J.H.; Mitchell, K.W.

    1991-09-03

    This paper describes a semiconducting thin film forced on a substrate by the method. It comprises: depositing a composite film of copper and indium on a substrate, the film having an atomic copper to indium ratio of about one, depositing a film of selenium on the composite copper indium film, the selenium film thickness selected to provide an atomic ratio of selenium to copper and indium of less than one, and heating the substrate with the composite copper indium film and the selenium film in the presence of H{sub 2}S gas for a time and at a temperature sufficient to cause interdiffusion of copper, indium, selenium and sulfur to form a semiconductor of the class CuInSe{sub 2{minus}x}S{sub x} where x is less than two.

  10. Thick film silicon growth techniques. [die materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Mlavsky, A. I.; Jewett, D. N.; White, V. E.

    1973-01-01

    The research which was directed toward finding an improved die material is reported. Wetting experiments were conducted with various materials to determine their compatibility with silicon. Work has also continued toward the development of quartz as a die material as new techniques have provided more optimistic results than observed in the past. As a result of the thermal modification previously described, improvements in growth stability have contributed to an increase in ribbon quality.

  11. Materials genomics of thin film strain relaxation by misfit dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, R.; Parvaneh, H.; Andersen, D.; Bean, John C.

    2015-12-01

    We summarize the development and implementation of a "process simulator" for modeling thin film strain relaxation by injection of misfit dislocations. The process simulator, initially developed for GexSi1-x/Si(100) lattice-mismatched epitaxy, integrates elasticity and dislocation theory with experimental measurements of kinetic parameters describing dislocation nucleation, propagation, and interactions. This enables predictive simulation of the development of misfit dislocation arrays during growth and thermal annealing sequences. Further, in the spirit of the materials genome initiative, we show how once a relatively complete description is built for one materials system, extension to a related system may be implemented using a greatly reduced data set. We illustrate this concept by translation of the simulator for GexSi1-x/Si(100) epitaxy into predictive simulation for the GexSi1-x/Si(110) system (which has quite different dislocation microstructure and kinetics) using greatly reduced data sets for the latter system and incorporating data refinement methods to extract unknown kinetic parameters. This sets the platform for extension of these methods to a broader set of strained layer systems.

  12. Photoexcited carriers in organic light emitting materials and blended films observed by surface photovoltage spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jihua; Gordon, Keith C.; McQuillan, A. James; Zidon, Yigal; Shapira, Yoram

    2005-04-01

    The electronic structure of the widely-used light emitting materials, 2,5-bis(5-tert-butyl-2-benzoxazolyl) thiophene (BBOT), poly( N -vinylcarbazole) (PVK) thin films have been characterized using surface photovoltage spectroscopy. The photo-induced charge separation and transfer processes in both blend films of PVK:BBOT and PVK:TPD:BBOT, where TPD is N,N' -diphenyl- N,N' -bis(3-methylphenyl)-[ 1,1' -biphenyl]- 4,4' -diamine have also been investigated. The results of the photo-induced contact potential difference (CPD) change show that BBOT film is an electron-transporting material while PVK film is a hole-transporting one. The photoluminescence and electroluminescence results of the blend films suggest an exciplex interaction between BBOT and PVK or TPD. A positive CPD change due to photo-excitation of the BBOT in PVK:BBOT blend film is attributed to electron trapping at the localized state induced by dispersed BBOT species. In the PVK:TPD:BBOT blend films, a positive CPD change, which starts at the same transition energy as in the former blend film but is significantly enhanced, is observed and explained in terms of charge transfer between the involved energy structures of the blend components. The dependence of the observed effects on the blend composition and ensuing electronic structure is discussed.

  13. Materials and processes control for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Materials and processes control relative to space applications is discussed. The components of a total material and process control system are identified, contamination control issues are listed, and recommendations are made.

  14. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organics which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials.

  15. Advanced aerial film processing system for long range reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryman, I. G.

    1980-01-01

    An introduction is given to the system features and development histories of continuous aerial film processing equipment. The advantages and disadvantages of (1) deep tank, full immersion processing, (2) spray processing, and (3) viscous processing are enumerated, with respect to load end, supply accumulator, spray cabinet, squeegee section, dryer, film take-up section and film transport system functions. Future research efforts are recommended toward the incorporation of water regeneration, pollution control, and pH monitoring and control systems, and the greater use of computer technology to prevent operator errors and permit the handling of thinner, advanced films.

  16. Control method and system for use when growing thin-films on semiconductor-based materials

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    2001-01-01

    A process and system for use during the growth of a thin film upon the surface of a substrate by exposing the substrate surface to vaporized material in a high vacuum (HV) facility involves the directing of an electron beam generally toward the surface of the substrate as the substrate is exposed to vaporized material so that electrons are diffracted from the substrate surface by the beam and the monitoring of the pattern of electrons diffracted from the substrate surface as vaporized material settles upon the substrate surface. When the monitored pattern achieves a condition indicative of the desired condition of the thin film being grown upon the substrate, the exposure of the substrate to the vaporized materials is shut off or otherwise adjusted. To facilitate the adjustment of the crystallographic orientation of the film relative to the electron beam, the system includes a mechanism for altering the orientation of the surface of the substrate relative to the electron beam.

  17. Antireflection effects at nanostructured material interfaces and the suppression of thin-film interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiaoyin; Zhang, Xu A.; Bagal, Abhijeet; Guo, Wei; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2013-06-01

    Thin-film interference is a well-known effect, and it is commonly observed in the colored appearance of many natural phenomena. Caused by the interference of light reflected from the interfaces of thin material layers, such interference effects can lead to wavelength and angle-selective behavior in thin-film devices. In this work, we describe the use of interfacial nanostructures to eliminate interference effects in thin films. Using the same principle inspired by moth-eye structures, this approach creates an effective medium where the index is gradually varying between the neighboring materials. We present the fabrication process for such nanostructures at a polymer-silicon interface, and experimentally demonstrate its effectiveness in suppressing thin-film interference. The principle demonstrated in this work can lead to enhanced efficiency and reduce wavelength/angle sensitivity in multilayer optoelectronic devices.

  18. Apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a thin-film substrate

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Eric J.; Kooyer, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a surface of a continuous thin-film substrate and a treated thin-film cathode having increased smoothness are disclosed. A web of untreated cathode material is moved between a feed mechanism and a take-up mechanism, and passed through a treatment station. The web of cathode material typically includes areas having surface defects, such as prominences extending from the surface of the cathode material. The surface of the cathode material is treated with an abrasive material to reduce the height of the prominences so as to increase an 85 degree gloss value of the cathode material surface by at least approximately 10. The web of cathode material may be subjected to a subsequent abrasive treatment at the same or other treatment station. Burnishing or lapping film is employed at a treatment station to process the cathode material. An abrasive roller may alternatively be used to process the web of cathode material. The apparatus and method of the present invention may also be employed to treat the surface of a lithium anode foil so as to cleanse and reduce the roughness of the anode foil surface.

  19. Apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a thin-film substrate

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Eric J.; Kooyer, Richard L.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and method for treating a cathode material provided on a surface of a continuous thin-film substrate and a treated thin-film cathode having increased smoothness are disclosed. A web of untreated cathode material is moved between a feed mechanism and a take-up mechanism, and passed through a treatment station. The web of cathode material typically includes areas having surface defects, such as prominences extending from the surface of the cathode material. The surface of the cathode material is treated with an abrasive material to reduce the height of the prominences so as to increase an 85 degree gloss value of the cathode material surface by at least approximately 10. The web of cathode material may be subjected to a subsequent abrasive treatment at the same or other treatment station. Burnishing or lapping film is employed at a treatment station to process the cathode material. An abrasive roller may alternatively be used to process the web of cathode material. The apparatus and method of the present invention may also be employed to treat the surface of a lithium anode foil so as to cleanse and reduce the roughness of the anode foil surface.

  20. Research on polycrystalline thin-film materials, cells, and modules

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.L.; Zweibel, K.; Ullal, H.S.

    1990-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports research activities in polycrystalline thin films through the Polycrystalline Thin-Film Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). This program includes research and development (R D) in both copper indium diselenide and cadmium telluride thin films for photovoltaic applications. The objective of this program is to support R D of photovoltaic cells and modules that meet the DOE long-term goals of high efficiency (15%--20%), low cost ($50/m{sup 2}), and reliability (30-year life time). Research carried out in this area is receiving increased recognition due to important advances in polycrystalline thin-film CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe solar cells and modules. These have become the leading thin-film materials for photovoltaics in terms of efficiency and stability. DOE has recognized this potential through a competitive initiative for the development of CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe modules. This paper focuses on the recent progress and future directions of the Polycrystalline Thin-Film Program and the status of the subcontracted research on these promising photovoltaic materials. 26 refs., 12 figs, 1 tab.

  1. Research on polycrystalline thin-film materials, cells, and modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, R. L.; Zweibel, K.; Ullal, H. S.

    1990-11-01

    DOE supports research activities in polycrystalline thin films through the Polycrystalline Thin Film Program. This program includes includes R and D in both copper indium diselenide and cadmium telluride thin films for photovoltaic applications. The objective is to support R and D of photovoltaic cells and modules that meet the DOE long term goals of high efficiency (15 to 20 percent), low cost ($50/sq cm), and reliability (30-year life time). Research carried out in this area is receiving increased recognition due to important advances in polycrystalline thin film CuInSe2 and CdTe solar cells and modules. These have become the leading thin film materials for photovoltaics in terms of efficiency and stability. DOE has recognized this potential through a competitive initiative for the development of CuInSe(sub 2) and CdTe modules. The recent progress and future directions are studied of the Polycrystalline Thin Film Program and the status of the subcontracted research on these promising photovoltaic materials.

  2. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of diamond films and optoelectronic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Jose M.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we report on progress achieved from 12/1/92 to 10/1/93 under the grant entitled 'Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Diamond Films and Optoelectronic Materials'. We have set-up a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond film growth system and a Raman spectroscopy system to study the nucleation and growth of diamond films with atomic resolution using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). A unique feature of the diamond film growth system is that diamond films can be transferred directly to the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber of a scanning tunneling microscope without contaminating the films by exposure to air. The University of North Texas (UNT) provided $20,000 this year as matching funds for the NASA grant to purchase the diamond growth system. In addition, UNT provided a Coherent Innova 90S Argon ion laser, a Spex 1404 double spectrometer, and a Newport optical table costing $90,000 to set-up the Raman spectroscopy system. The CVD diamond growth system and Raman spectroscopy system will be used to grow and characterize diamond films with atomic resolution using STM as described in our proposal. One full-time graduate student and one full-time undergraduate student are supported under this grant. In addition, several graduate and undergraduate students were supported during the summer to assist in setting-up the diamond growth and Raman spectroscopy systems. We have obtained research results concerning STM of the structural and electronic properties of CVD grown diamond films, and STM and scanning tunneling spectroscopy of carbon nanotubes. In collaboration with the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) group at UNT, we have also obtained results concerning the optoelectronic material siloxene. These results were published in refereed scientific journals, submitted for publication, and presented as invited and contributed talks at scientific conferences.

  3. Process for fabrication of metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.; Svensson, S.

    1990-07-17

    This invention is comprised of a method of fabricating metal oxide films from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of metal oxides, e.g. electro-optically active transition metal oxides, at a high deposition rate. The presence of hydrogen during the plasma reaction enhances the deposition rate of the metal oxide. Various types of metal oxide films can be produced.

  4. Materials processing in space: Early experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Herring, H. W.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of the space environment were reviewed. Potential applications of space processing are discussed and include metallurgical processing, and processing of semiconductor materials. The behavior of fluid in low gravity is described. The evolution of apparatus for materials processing in space was reviewed.

  5. Thick-film MEMS thermoelectric sensor fabricated using a thermally assisted lift-off process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yuan; Cai, Haogang; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a thick-film microelectromechanical systems thermoelectric sensor fabricated by a low-temperature thermally assisted lift-off process. During the process, thick metal or semiconductor films experience controlled breakup due to thermal reflow of the underlying lithographically defined photoresist patterns, thereby facilitating the sacrificial removal of the photoresist. This enables rapid and reliable patterning of thick films that can otherwise be difficult to achieve by conventional processes. Experimental results with a sensor consisting of a 60-junction thick-film antimony-bismuth thermopile demonstrate an electric conductivity of 5.44×106 S/m and a Seebeck coefficient of 114 μV/K per junction, which are comparable to those obtained from bulk materials. Thus, the thick-film sensor can potentially allow low-noise, high-efficiency thermoelectric measurements.

  6. Repair materials and processes for the MD-11 Composite Tailcone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Bonnar, Gerard R.

    This paper describes field and depot level repair methods for the MD-11 Composite Tailcone. The repair materials, processing methods, and mechanical properties of the test specimens and subcomponents are discussed. According to recent tests, the dry carbon cloth and the liquid resin matrix that can be cured under 93 C have better processing and mechanical properties than the 121 C curing prepregs and film adhesives. The moisture in the parent CFRP is the main cause of creating voids in the adhesive layer during the 121 C/vacuum pressure cure cycle. The lower processing temperature (wet layup) showed better results than higher processing temperature (prepreg/adhesive layup) for composite repair.

  7. Pulsed RF Plasma Source for Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiruddin, Abutaher Mohammad

    A pulsed rf plasma source was evaluated for materials processing. A pulsed rf discharge of carbon tetrafluoride (CF_4), sulfur hexafluoride (SF _6), oxygen (O_2), or acetylene (C_2H_2 ) created the plasmas. The frequency and duration of the rf discharge were about 290 kHz and 30 musec, respectively. The repetition rate was 1 discharge per minute. Plasma diagnostics included Langmuir probes, a photodiode dectector, an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA), and a microwave interferometer. Langmuir probe measurements showed that at a position 67 cm away from the rf coil, CF_4 plasma arrived in separate packets. Plasma densities and electron temperatures at this position were in the range 4 times 10^{11} cm ^{-3} to 1.8 times 10^{13} cm ^{-3} and 2 eV to 8.3 eV, respectively. The OMA measurements identified neutral atomic fluorine in the CF_4 plasma and neutral atomic oxygen in the O_2 plasma. A plasma slab model of the microwave interferometer was applied to predict the interferometer response. The measured response was found to be almost identical to the predicted response. The influence of different reactor parameters on plasma parameters was studied. Metal barriers of different geometry were used to control the ratio of charged particles to atomic neutrals in the plasma chamber. Four plasma structures were identified: precursor plasma, shock induced plasma, driver plasma, and delayed glow plasma. Pulsed CF _4 and SF_6 plasmas were used to etch silicon dioxide (SiO_2 ) grown on silicon wafers. The SF_6 plasma etched SiO_2 at a rate of about 0.71 A per discharge and the CF_4 plasma deposited a non-uniform film (possibly polymer) instead of etching. The C_2H _2 plasma deposited plasma polymerized acetylene on a KBr pellet with a deposition rate of 127 A per discharge. An FT-IR spectrum of the deposited film showed that carbon -to-carbon double bonds as well as carbon-to-hydrogen bonds were present. This device can be used in plasma assisted deposition and/or synthesis

  8. Dual ion beam processed diamondlike films for industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Kussmaul, M. T.; Banks, B. A.; Sovey, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Single and dual beam ion source systems are used to generate amorphous diamondlike carbon (DLC) films, which were evaluated for a variety of applications including protective coatings on transmitting materials, power electronics as insulated gates and corrosion resistant barriers. A list of the desirable properties of DLC films along with potential applications are presented.

  9. Dielectric Spectroscopy Analysis of Aged EVOH films with Application to Deterioration of Food Packaging Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeller, Timothy

    2007-06-01

    Samples of EVOH films from compositions of 29 - 44 mol% ethylene content were exposed to thermal aging with and without light exposure. The results of Dielectric Spectroscopy on select samples showed Cole-Cole plots of skewed dielectric constant indicating multiple distributions of dipole relaxation times. The onset for decreases in dielectric response occurs earlier in samples exposed to elevated temperature under light exposure. Lower permittivity is exhibited in samples of higher ethylene content. Results from heat exposed samples are presented. Colorimetric analysis indicates only a slight film yellowing in one case. Raman spectroscopy on untreated films discerns changes in the C-C-O stretch associated with the alcohol. The effects of aging on microstructure may cause hindrance of molecular motion from moisture desorption. Slight material degradation occurs from film hardening presumably due to crosslinking. An electrical circuit model of the conduction processes associated with the EVOH films is presented. Dielectric analysis shows promise for monitoring material changes related to deterioration. We are also using these methods to understand Fluorescence Imaging which has been recently released for paper and plastic materials analysis. Future work may include refinement of these techniques for identification of changes in material properties correlated to packaging material barrier resistance.

  10. Efficient production of nanoparticle-loaded orodispersible films by process integration in a stirred media mill.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Denise; Finke, Jan Henrik; Kwade, Arno

    2016-09-25

    Orodispersible films possess a great potential as a versatile platform for nanoparticle-loaded oral dosage forms. In this case, poorly water-soluble organic materials were ground in a stirred media mill and embedded into a polymer matrix. The aim of this study was the shortening of this manufacturing process by the integration of several process steps into a stirred media mill without facing disadvantages regarding the film quality. Furthermore, this process integration is time conserving due to the high stress intensities provided in the mill and applicable for high solids contents and high suspension viscosities. Two organic materials, the model compound Anthraquinone and the active pharmaceutical ingredient Naproxen were investigated in this study. Besides the impact of the film processing on the crystallinity of the particles in the orodispersible film, a particle load of up to 50% was investigated with the new developed processing route. Additionally, a disintegration test was developed, combining an appropriate amount of saliva substitute and a clear endpoint determination. In summary, high nanoparticle loads in orodispersible films with good particle size preservation after film redispersion in water as well as a manufacturing of the film casting mass within a few minutes in a stirred media mill was achieved. PMID:27477101

  11. Organic thin film transistors: from active materials to novel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsi, L.; Cioffi, N.; Di Franco, C.; Sabbatini, L.; Zambonin, P. G.; Bleve-Zacheo, T.

    2001-08-01

    In this paper, a bird's eye view of most of the organic materials employed as n-channel and p-channel transistor active layers is given along with the relevant device performances; organic thin film transistors (OTFT) operation regimes are discussed and an interesting perspective application of OTFT as multi-parameter gas sensor is proposed.

  12. Influence Of Film And Processing On Film-Screen Image Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, R. S.

    1982-12-01

    This paper describes experiments which explore the ways in which variations in film and processing influence noise through their effects on the sensitometric curve shape and silver granularity. These include comparisons of several film types and processing conditions for which total radiographic noise from screen exposures and granularity from light exposures are analyzed relative to the instantaneous gradient at the measured density. It is seen that film granularity may indeed contribute substantially to total noise under conditions of low quantum mottle visualization.

  13. Synthesis of thin films and materials utilizing a gaseous catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, Daniel E; Schwenzer, Birgit; Gomm, John R; Roth, Kristian M; Heiken, Brandon; Brutchey, Richard

    2013-10-29

    A method for the fabrication of nanostructured semiconducting, photoconductive, photovoltaic, optoelectronic and electrical battery thin films and materials at low temperature, with no molecular template and no organic contaminants. High-quality metal oxide semiconductor, photovoltaic and optoelectronic materials can be fabricated with nanometer-scale dimensions and high dopant densities through the use of low-temperature biologically inspired synthesis routes, without the use of any biological or biochemical templates.

  14. Materials Analysis of CED Nb Films Being Coated on Bulk Nb Single Cell SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Reece, Charles; Palczewski, Ari; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Krishnan, Mahadevan; James, Colt; Irfan, Irfan

    2013-09-01

    This study is an on-going research on depositing a Nb film on the internal wall of bulk Nb single cell SRF cavities, via a cathodic arc Nb plasma ions source, an coaxial energetic condensation (CED) facility at AASC company. The motivation is to firstly create a homoepitaxy-like Nb/Nb film in a scale of a ~1.5GHz RF single cell cavity. Next, through SRF measurement and materials analysis, it might reveal the baseline properties of the CED-type homoepitaxy Nb films. Literally, a top-surface layer of Nb films which sustains SRF function, always grows up in homo-epitaxy mode, on top of a Nb nucleation layer. Homo-epitaxy growth of Nb must be the final stage (a crystal thickening process) of any coatings of Nb film on alternative cavity structure materials. Such knowledge of Nb-Nb homo-epitaxy is useful to create future realistic SRF cavity film coatings, such as hetero-epitaxy Nb/Cu Films, or template-layer-mitigated Nb films. One large-grain, and three fine grain bulk Nb cavities were coated. They went through cryogenic RF measurement. Preliminary results show that the Q0 of a Nb film could be as same as the pre-coated bulk Nb surface (which received a chemically-buffered polishing plus a light electro-polishing); but quality factor of two tested cavities dropped quickly. We are investigating if the severe Q-slope is caused by hydrogen incorporation before deposition, or is determined by some structural defects during Nb film growth.

  15. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, Donald 0; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David; Witherow, William K.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make Abstract: them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics.

  16. Polymers for nuclear materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, G.; Benicewicz, B.; Duke, J.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The use of open-celled microcellular foams as solid sorbents for metal ions and other solutes could provide a revolutionary development in separation science. Macroreticular and gel-bead materials are the current state-of-the-art for solid sorbents to separate metal ions and other solutes from solution. The new polymer materials examined in this effort offer a number of advantages over the older materials that can have a large impact on industrial separations. The advantages include larger usable surface area in contact with the solution, faster sorption kinetics, ability to tailor the uniform cell size to a specific application, and elimination of channeling and packing instability.

  17. Thin film thermocouples for thermoelectric characterization of nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Matthew; Zhou, Chuanle; Varrenti, Andrew; Chyung, Seung Hye; Long, Jieyi; Memik, Seda

    2011-03-01

    The increased use of nanostructured materials as thermoelectrics requires reliable and accurate characterization of the anisotropic thermal coefficients of small structures, such as superlattices and quantum wire networks. Thin evaporated metal films can be used to create thermocouples with a very small thermal mass and low thermal conductivity, in order to measure thermal gradients on nanostructures and thereby measure the thermal conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient of the nanostructure. In this work we confirm the known result that thin metal films have lower Seebeck coefficients than bulk metals, and we also calibrate the Seebeck coefficient of a thin-film Ni/Cr thermocouple with 50 nm thickness, showing it to have about 1/4 the bulk value. We demonstrate reproducibility of this thin-filmSeebeck coefficient on multiple substrates, and we show that this coefficient does, in fact, change as a function of film thickness. We will discuss prototype measurement designs and preliminary work as to how these thin films can be used to study both Seebeck coefficients and thermal conductivities of superlattices in various geometries. The same technology can in principle be used on integrated circuits for thermal mapping, under the name ``Integrated On-Chip Thermocouple Array'' (IOTA).

  18. Cellulose Nanofibril Film as a Piezoelectric Sensor Material.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Satu; Siponkoski, Tuomo; Sarlin, Essi; Mettänen, Marja; Vuoriluoto, Maija; Pammo, Arno; Juuti, Jari; Rojas, Orlando J; Franssila, Sami; Tuukkanen, Sampo

    2016-06-22

    Self-standing films (45 μm thick) of native cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) were synthesized and characterized for their piezoelectric response. The surface and the microstructure of the films were evaluated with image-based analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The measured dielectric properties of the films at 1 kHz and 9.97 GHz indicated a relative permittivity of 3.47 and 3.38 and loss tangent tan δ of 0.011 and 0.071, respectively. The films were used as functional sensing layers in piezoelectric sensors with corresponding sensitivities of 4.7-6.4 pC/N in ambient conditions. This piezoelectric response is expected to increase remarkably upon film polarization resulting from the alignment of the cellulose crystalline regions in the film. The CNF sensor characteristics were compared with those of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as reference piezoelectric polymer. Overall, the results suggest that CNF is a suitable precursor material for disposable piezoelectric sensors, actuators, or energy generators with potential applications in the fields of electronics, sensors, and biomedical diagnostics. PMID:27232271

  19. Self-Assembling Process for Fabricating Tailored Thin Films

    ScienceCinema

    Sandia

    2009-09-01

    A simple, economical nanotechnology coating process that enables the development of nanoparticle thin films with architectures and properties unattainable by any other processing method. 2007 R&D 100 winner (SAND2007-1878P)

  20. Self-Assembling Process for Fabricating Tailored Thin Films

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-01-08

    A simple, economical nanotechnology coating process that enables the development of nanoparticle thin films with architectures and properties unattainable by any other processing method. 2007 R&D 100 winner (SAND2007-1878P)

  1. Self-Assembling Process for Fabricating Tailored Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-31

    A simple, economical nanotechnology coating process that enables the development of nanoparticle thin films with architectures and properties unattainable by any other processing method. 2007 R&D 100 winner (SAND2007-1878P)

  2. Ambient pressure process for preparing aerogel thin films reliquified sols useful in preparing aerogel thin films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, Charles Jeffrey; Prakash, Sai Sivasankaran

    1999-01-01

    A method for preparing aerogel thin films by an ambient-pressure, continuous process. The method of this invention obviates the use of an autoclave and is amenable to the formation of thin films by operations such as dip coating. The method is less energy intensive and less dangerous than conventional supercritical aerogel processing techniques.

  3. Materials processing with superposed Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaoming; Trallero-Herrero, Carlos A.; Lei, Shuting

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental results of femtosecond laser processing on the surface of glass and metal thin film using superposed Bessel beams. These beams are generated by a combination of a spatial light modulator (SLM) and an axicon with >50% efficiency, and they possess the long depth-of-focus (propagation-invariant) property as found in ordinary Bessel beams. Through micromachining experiments using femtosecond laser pulses, we show that multiple craters can be fabricated on glass with single-shot exposure, and the 1+(-1) superposed beam can reduce collateral damage caused by the rings in zero-order Bessel beams in the scribing of metal thin film.

  4. Effect of varying processing solution temperature on radiographic contrast and relative film speed of dental film.

    PubMed

    Matthee, M J; Becker, P J; Seeliger, J E

    1990-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a stepwise rise in temperature on three film types processed in six different processing solutions and to identify the combinations of film, solution and temperature which produced the best results in terms of radiographic contrast and relative film speed. The film types were Agfa Dentus M2, Flow X-ray and Kodak Ultra Speed while the processing solutions were Agfa, Dürr, EBX, Kolchem, MEMS and Pro-tech. An aluminium step-wedge was exposed under standardised conditions. Processing was carried out in a Dürr 245L automatic processor with variable temperature settings from 25 degrees to 35 degrees C. Unexposed films were processed at each temperature setting to determine the base plus fog values. Densitometric readings were taken using a digital densitometer, and the base plug fog values subtracted from each reading. Radiographic contrast and relative film speed were calculated and the data obtained subjected to statistical analysis using Duncan's Multiple Range Test. It could be concluded that, as the processing solution temperature rose from 25 degrees C to 35 degrees C, both radiographic contrast and relative film speed increased. The highest radiographic contrast was obtained by Agfa film in Kolchem solution at 35 degrees C, while Kodak Ultra Speed film in MEMS solution at 35 degrees C gave the highest relative film speed. An acceptable base plus fog level of 0.25 was obtained in the case of Agfa film in combination with Agfa, Dürr and Pro-tech solutions and Flow X-ray film with Dürr solutions. All the other combinations produced a base plug fog level higher than 0.25. PMID:2098942

  5. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY . Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  6. FMR study of thin film FeGe skyrmionic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Page, Michael R.; Gallagher, James; Purser, Carola; Schulze, Joseph; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    Magnetic Skyrmions have attracted intense interest due to their novel topological properties and the potential for energy efficient computing. Magnetic dynamics play an important part in enabling some of these functionalities. Understanding these dynamics can shed light on the interplay of the various magnetic interactions that exist in these materials and lead to a rich magnetic phase diagram, including the Skyrmion phase. We have grown phase-pure FeGe epitaxial films on Si (111) and studied them using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). FeGe has one of the highest recorded skyrmion transition temperatures, close to room temperature, and thin films are known to further stabilize the Skyrmion phase in the magnetic field-temperature space. We have performed cavity-based single frequency FMR from liquid nitrogen to room temperature on 120 nm thick films in both in-plane and out-of-plane geometries. The resulting complex spectra are consistent with those reported in literature for the bulk material and can be understood in terms of a conical model for the magnetism. Variable temperature broadband spectroscopy and measurements on thinner films, to better identify the various magnetic phases and their dynamic behavior, are ongoing and their progress will be discussed. Funding for this research was provided by the Center for Emergent Materials: an NSF MRSEC under Award Number DMR-1420451.

  7. Screening of Novel Li-Air Battery Catalyst Materials by a Thin Film Combinatorial Materials Approach.

    PubMed

    Hauck, John G; McGinn, Paul J

    2015-06-01

    A combinatorial synthesis and high-throughput screening process was developed for the investigation of potential oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts for use as Li-air battery cathode materials. Libraries of discrete ternary metal alloy compositions were deposited via thin-film sputtering. The samples were electrochemically tested in parallel using cyclic voltammetry in O2-saturated KOH electrolyte. Compositions were ranked by ORR and OER onset potentials with respect to an internal Pt reference. Results from the Pt-Mn-Co, Cr-Mn-Co, Pd-Mn-Co, and Pd-Mn-Ru systems are reported. Many alloy compositions showed marked improvement in catalytic activity compared to pure Pt. Among the systems considered, Pt12Mn44Co44, Pd43Co57 and Pd36Mn28Ru36 in particular exhibited lower overpotentials for oxygen reactions, which occur at the cathode in Li-air batteries. PMID:25965839

  8. Solution-Processed Indium Oxide Based Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wangying

    Oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) have attracted considerable attention over the past decade due to their high carrier mobility and excellent uniformity. However, most of these oxide TFTs are usually fabricated using costly vacuum-based techniques. Recently, the solution processes have been developed due to the possibility of low-cost and large-area fabrication. In this thesis, we have carried out a detailed and systematic study of solution-processed oxide thin films and TFTs. At first, we demonstrated a passivation method to overcome the water susceptibility of solution-processed InZnO TFTs by utilizing octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The unpassivated InZnO TFTs exhibited large hysteresis in their electrical characteristics due to the adsorbed water at the semiconductor surface. Formation of a SAM of ODPA on the top of InZnO removed water molecules weakly absorbed at the back channel and prevented water diffusion from the surroundings. Therefore the passivated devices exhibited significantly reduced hysteretic characteristics. Secondly, we developed a simple spin-coating approach for high- k dielectrics (Al2O3, ZrO2, Y 2O3 and TiO2). These materials were used as gate dielectrics for solution-processed In2O3 or InZnO TFTs. Among the high-k dielectrics, the Al2O3-based devices showed the best performance, which is attributed to the smooth dielectric/semiconductor interface and the low interface trap density besides its good insulating property. Thirdly, the formation and properties of Al2O3 thin films under various annealing temperatures were intensively studied, revealing that the sol-gel-derived Al2O3 thin film undergoes the decomposition of organic residuals and nitrate groups, as well as conversion of aluminum hydroxides to form aluminum oxide. Besides, the Al2O 3 film was used as gate dielectric for solution-processed oxide TFTs, resulting in high mobility and low operating voltage. Finally, we proposed a green route for

  9. Waveguides in Thin Film Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakisov, Sergey; Abdeldayem, Hossin; Venkateswarlu, Putcha; Teague, Zedric

    1996-01-01

    Results on the fabrication of integrated optical components in polymeric materials using photo printing methods will be presented. Optical waveguides were fabricated by spin coating preoxidized silicon wafers with organic dye/polymer solution followed by soft baking. The waveguide modes were studied using prism coupling technique. Propagation losses were measured by collecting light scattered from the trace of a propagation mode by either scanning photodetector or CCD camera. We observed the formation of graded index waveguides in photosensitive polyimides after exposure of UV light from a mercury arc lamp. By using a theoretical model, an index profile was reconstructed which is in agreement with the profile reconstructed by the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin calculation technique using a modal spectrum of the waveguides. Proposed mechanism for the formation of the graded index includes photocrosslinking followed by UV curing accompanied with optical absorption increase. We also developed the prototype of a novel single-arm double-mode interferometric sensor based on our waveguides. It demonstrates high sensitivity to the chance of ambient temperature. The device can find possible applications in aeropropulsion control systems.

  10. Nanocrystalline diamond films: new material for IR optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konov, Vitali I.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Pimenov, Sergej M.; Ralchenko, Victor G.; Smolin, Andrey A.; Khomich, A. V.; Polyakov, Vladimir I.; Rukovishnikov, A. I.; Perov, Polievet I.; Loubnin, E. N.

    1995-07-01

    Thin nanocrystalline diamond films promising for IR optical applications were grown on Si substrates from methane-hydrogen gas mixture in a DC arc plasma CVD reactor. Three stages for the synthesis of the highly smooth noncrystalline diamond films are important: (i) substrate pretreatment with ultrafine diamond powder, (ii) excimer laser irradiation of seeded substrates, and (iii) two-step deposition process. A correlation between optical properties of the films and growth conditions has been established by means of Raman spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and optical transmission spectroscopy techniques. Surface roughness, which was Ra equals 8 - 40 nm for the 1 micrometers thick films, significantly decreased the transmission in the visible because of light scattering, but it had a negligible effect in the IR range. The films are transparent in the IR and have optical constants n equals 2.34-2.36 and k equals 0.005- 0.03. The hydrogen incorporation in the films in amounts up to 1.5% have been deduced from intensity of C-H absorption band around 2900 cm(superscript -1.

  11. Materials processing in space bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pentecost, E. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Literature dealing with flight experiments utilizing a low gravity environment to elucidate and control various processes or with ground based activities that provide supporting research is listed. Included are Government reports, contractor reports, conference proceedings, and journal articles. Subdivisions of the bibliography include the five categories: crystal growth; metals, alloys, and composites, fluids and transport; glasses and ceramics; and Ultrahigh Vacuum and Containerless Processing Technologies, in addition to a list of patents and a compilation of anonymously authored collections and reports and a cross reference index.

  12. Densitometric evaluation of four rapid dental film processing solutions.

    PubMed

    Matthee, M J; Seeliger, J E

    1991-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate densitometrically four rapid processing solutions for dental films; also to identify those combinations of film, solution and temperature which produced the best results in terms of radiographic contrast and relative film speed at a given temperature. The film types used were Agfa Dentus M2, Flow X-ray and Kodak Ultra-speed while the rapid processing solutions tested were Kolchem Rapid Dev 1, Kolchem Rapid Dev 2, MEMS Ultra-Neg and Siemens Insta-Neg. An aluminium step-wedge was radiographed under standardized conditions. Processing was done manually at 18, 20, 22, 25, 27, 29 and 32 degrees C, the temperatures being controlled with the aid of two Julabo thermostatically controlled immersion circulators, to ensure constant temperatures. Unexposed films were processed at each temperature setting to determine base plus fog values. Densitometric readings were taken using a digital densitometer, and base plus fog values were subtracted from each reading. Radiographic contrast and relative film speed were calculated and the data obtained subjected to statistical analysis using Duncan's Multiple Range Test. It was concluded that Agfa Dentus M2 film processed with Kolchem Rapid Dev 2 at 18 degrees C gave the highest radiographic contrast of 0.44 and relative film speed of 4.36. All base plus fog values were within the acceptable limit of 0.25. PMID:1820681

  13. Bulk and Thin Film Contact Resistance with Dissimilar Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Y. Y.; Zhang, P.; Tang, W.; Gomez, M. R.; French, D. M.; Zier, J. C.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2011-10-01

    Contact resistance is important to integrated circuits, thin film devices, carbon nanotube based cathodes, MEMS relays and interconnectors, wire-array z-pinches, metal-insulator-vacuum junctions, and high power microwave sources, etc. This paper summarizes the recent modeling efforts at U of M, addressing the effect of dissimilar materials and of finite dimensions on the contact resistance of both bulk contacts and thin film contacts. Accurate analytical scaling laws are constructed for the contact resistance of both bulk and thin film contacts over a large range of resistivity ratios and aspect ratios in Cartesian and cylindrical geometries. They were validated against known limiting cases; and spot-checks with numerical simulations and experiments. Supported by AFOSR, AFRL, L-3, and Northrop-Grumman.

  14. Possibilities of Laser Processing of Paper Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Alexander; Saukkonen, Esa; Piili, Heidi

    Nowadays, lasers are applied in many industrial processes: the most developed technologies include such processes as laser welding, hybrid welding, laser cutting of steel, etc. In addition to laser processing of metallic materials, there are also many industrial applications of laser processing of non-metallic materials, like laser welding of polymers, laser marking of glass and laser cutting of wood-based materials. It is commonly known that laser beam is suitable for cutting of paper materials as well as all natural wood-fiber based materials. This study reveals the potential and gives overview of laser application in processing of paper materials. In 1990's laser technology increased its volume in papermaking industry; lasers at paper industry gained acceptance for different perforating and scoring applications. Nowadays, with reduction in the cost of equipment and development of laser technology (especially development of CO2 technology), laser processing of paper material has started to become more widely used and more efficient. However, there exists quite little published research results and reviews about laser processing of paper materials. In addition, forest industry products with pulp and paper products in particular are among major contributors for the Finnish economy with 20% share of total exports in the year 2013. This has been the standpoint of view and motivation for writing this literature review article: when there exists more published research work, knowledge of laser technology can be increased to apply it for processing of paper materials.

  15. Thin film materials and devices for resistive temperature sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basantani, Hitesh A.

    Thin films of vanadium oxide (VOx) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are the two dominant material systems used in resistive infrared radiation detectors (microbolometers) for sensing long wave infrared (LWIR) wavelengths in the 8--14 microm range. Typical thin films of VO x (x < 2) currently used in the bolometer industry have a magnitude of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) between 2%/K -- 3%/K. In contrast, thin films of hydrogenated germanium (SiGe:H) have |TCR| between 3%/K to 4%/K. Devices made from either of these materials have resulted in similar device performance with NETD ≈ 25 mK. The performance of the microbolometers is limited by the electronic noise, especially 1/f noise. Therefore, regardless of the choice of bolometer sensing material and read out circuitry, manufacturers are constantly striving to reduce 1/f noise while simultaneously increasing TCR to give better signal to noise ratios in their bolometers and ultimately, better image quality with more thermal information to the end user. In this work, thin films of VOx and hydrogenated germanium (Ge:H), having TCR values > 4 %/K are investigated as potential candidates for higher sensitivity next generation of microbolometers. Thin films of VO x were deposited by Biased Target Ion Beam Deposition (BTIBD) (˜85 nm thick). Electrical characterization of lateral resistor structures showed resistivity ranging from 104 O--cm to 2.1 x 104 O--cm, TCR varying from --4%/K to --5%/K, normalized Hooge parameter (alphaH/n) of 5 x 10 -21 to 5 x 10-18 cm3. Thin films of Ge:H were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) by incorporating an increasing amount of crystal fraction in the growing thin films. Thin films of Ge:H having a mixed phase, amorphous + nanocrystalline, having a |TCR| > 6 %/K were deposited with resistivity < 2,300 O--cm and a normalized Hooge's parameter 'alphaH/n' < 2 x 10-20 cm3. Higher TCR materials are desired, however, such materials have

  16. Space processing of electronic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    The bulk growth of solid solution alloys of mercury telluride and cadmium telluride is discussed. These alloys are usually described by the formula Hg1-xCdxTe, and are useful for the construction of infrared detectors. The electronic energy band gap can be controlled between zero and 1.6 electron volts by adjusting the composition x. The most useful materials are at x approximately 20%, suitable for detection wavelengths of about 10 micrometers. The problems of growing large crystals are rooted in the wide phase diagram of the HgTe-CdTe pseudobinary system which leads to exaggerate segregation in freezing, constitutional supercooling, and other difficulties, and in the high vapor pressure of mercury at the growth temperatures, which leads to loss of stoichiometry and to the necessity of working in strong, pressure resistant sealed containers.

  17. Mixed metal oxide films as pH sensing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshak, Khalil; Gill, Edric; Korostynska, Olga; Arshak, Arousian

    2007-05-01

    Due to the demand for accurate, reliable and highly sensitive pH sensors, research is being pursued to find novel materials to achieve this goal. Semiconducting metal oxides, such as TiO, SnO and SnO II and insulating oxides such as Nb IIO 5 and Bi IIO 3, and their mixtures in different proportions are being investigated for this purpose. The films of these materials mixtures are used in conjunction with an interdigitated electrode pattern to produce a conductimetric/capacitive pH sensor. The advantages of this approach include straightforward manufacturing, versatility and cost-effectiveness. It was noted that upon contact with a solution, the electrical parameters of the films, such as resistance etc., change. The correlation of these changes with pH values is the basis for the proposed system development. The ultimate goal is to find materials composition, which would have the highest sensitivity towards the pH level of the solutions. It was found that the materials that produced the highest sensitivity either had a long response time or were unstable over a wide pH range. Those exhibiting lower sensitivities were found to be more stable over a wide pH range. All oxide films tested demonstrated a change in electrical parameters upon contact with buffers of known pH value.

  18. Laser Material Processing for Microengineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helvajian, H.

    1995-01-01

    The processing of materials via laser irradiation is presented in a brief survey. Various techniques currently used in laser processing are outlined and the significance to the development of space qualified microinstrumentation are identified. In general the laser processing technique permits the transferring of patterns (i.e. lithography), machining (i.e. with nanometer precision), material deposition (e.g., metals, dielectrics), the removal of contaminants/debris/passivation layers and the ability to provide process control through spectroscopy.

  19. Thin film processing of photorefractive BaTiO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Paul R.; Potember, Richard S.

    1991-01-01

    The principle objectives of this ongoing research involve the preparation and characterization of polycrystalline single-domain thin films of BaTiO3 for photorefractive applications. These films must be continuous, free of cracks, and of high optical quality. The two methods proposed are sputtering and sol-gel related processing.

  20. Infrared Database for Process Support Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, K. E.; Boothe, R. E.; Burns, H. D.

    2003-01-01

    Process support materials' compatibility with cleaning processes is critical to ensure final hardware cleanliness and that performance requirements are met. Previous discovery of potential contaminants in process materials shows the need for incoming materials testing and establishment of a process materials database. The Contamination Control Team of the Materials, Processes, and Manufacturing (MP&M) Department at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has initiated the development of such an infrared (IR) database, called the MSFC Process Materials IR database, of the common process support materials used at MSFC. These process support materials include solvents, wiper cloths, gloves, bagging materials, etc. Testing includes evaluation of the potential of gloves, wiper cloths, and other items to transfer contamination to handled articles in the absence of solvent exposure, and the potential for solvent exposure to induce material degradation. This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the initial testing completed through December 2002. It is anticipated that additional testing will be conducted with updates provided in future TMs.Materials were analyzed using two different IR techniques: (1) Dry transference and (2) liquid extraction testing. The first of these techniques utilized the Nicolet Magna 750 IR spectrometer outfitted with a horizontal attenuated total reflectance (HATR) crystal accessory. The region from 650 to 4,000 wave numbers was analyzed, and 50 scans were performed per IR spectrum. A dry transference test was conducted by applying each sample with hand pressure to the HATR crystal to first obtain a spectrum of the parent material. The material was then removed from the HATR crystal and analyzed to determine the presence of any residues. If volatile, liquid samples were examined both prior to and following evaporation.The second technique was to perform an extraction test with each sample in five different solvents.Once the scans were complete for

  1. Utilizing stretch-tunable thermochromic elastomeric opal films as novel reversible switchable photonic materials.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christian G; Lederle, Christina; Zentel, Kristina; Stühn, Bernd; Gallei, Markus

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the preparation of highly thermoresponsive and fully reversible stretch-tunable elastomeric opal films featuring switchable structural colors is reported. Novel particle architectures based on poly(diethylene glycol methylether methacrylate-co-ethyl acrylate) (PDEGMEMA-co-PEA) as shell polymer are synthesized via seeded and stepwise emulsion polymerization protocols. The use of DEGMEMA as comonomer and herein established synthetic strategies leads to monodisperse soft shell particles, which can be directly processed to opal films by using the feasible melt-shear organization technique. Subsequent UV crosslinking strategies open access to mechanically stable and homogeneous elastomeric opal films. The structural colors of the opal films feature mechano- and thermoresponsiveness, which is found to be fully reversible. Optical characterization shows that the combination of both stimuli provokes a photonic bandgap shift of more than 50 nm from 560 nm in the stretched state to 611 nm in the fully swollen state. In addition, versatile colorful patterns onto the colloidal crystal structure are produced by spatial UV-induced crosslinking by using a photomask. This facile approach enables the generation of spatially cross-linked switchable opal films with fascinating optical properties. Herein described strategies for the preparation of PDEGMEMA-containing colloidal architectures, application of the melt-shear ordering technique, and patterned crosslinking of the final opal films open access to novel stimuli-responsive colloidal crystal films, which are expected to be promising materials in the field of security and sensing applications. PMID:25243892

  2. Roadmap for Process Equipment Materials Technology

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2003-10-01

    This Technology Roadmap addresses the ever-changing material needs of the chemical and allied process industries, and the energy, economic and environmental burdens associated with corrosion and other materials performance and lifetime issues. This Technology Roadmap outlines the most critical of these R&D needs, and how they can impact the challenges facing today’s materials of construction.

  3. Investigation of solution-processed bismuth-niobium-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Satoshi; Ariga, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Shin; Onoue, Masatoshi; Miyasako, Takaaki; Tokumitsu, Eisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya; Chinone, Norimichi; Cho, Yasuo

    2014-10-21

    The characteristics of bismuth-niobium-oxide (BNO) films prepared using a solution process were investigated. The BNO film annealed at 550°C involving three phases: an amorphous phase, Bi₃NbO₇ fluorite microcrystals, and Nb-rich cubic pyrochlore microcrystals. The cubic pyrochlore structure, which was the main phase in this film, has not previously been reported in BNO films. The relative dielectric constant of the BNO film was approximately 140, which is much higher than that of a corresponding film prepared using a conventional vacuum sputtering process. Notably, the cubic pyrochlore microcrystals disappeared with increasing annealing temperature and were replaced with triclinic β-BiNbO₄ crystals at 590°C. The relative dielectric constant also decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Therefore, the high relative dielectric constant of the BNO film annealed at 550°C is thought to result from the BNO cubic pyrochlore structure. In addition, the BNO films annealed at 500°C contained approximately 6.5 atm.% carbon, which was lost at approximately 550°C. This result suggests that the carbon in the BNO film played an important role in the formation of the cubic pyrochlore structure.

  4. Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to the Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN), which was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory of NASA-Marshall. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. The data base is NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET) to be hazardous to the environment. The data base also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these materials.

  5. Development of Bismuth-based Lead-free Piezoelectric Materials: Thin Film Piezoelectric Materials via PVD and CSD Routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Yu Hong

    Piezoelectric materials have been widely used in electromechanical actuators, sensors, and ultrasonic transducers. Among these materials, lead zirconate titanate Pb(Zr1-xTix)O3 (PZT) has been primarily investigated due to its excellent piezoelectric properties. However, environmental concerns due to the toxicity of PbO have led to investigations into alternative materials systems. Bismuth-based perovskite piezoelectric materials such as (Bi0.5,Na0.5)TiO3 - (Bi0.5K 0.5)TiO3 (BNT - BKT), (Bi0.5,Na0.5 )TiO3 - (Bi0.5K0.5)TiO3 - BaTiO3(BNT - BKT - BT), (Bi0.5K 0.5)TiO3 - Bi(Zn0.5,Ti0.5)O 3 (BKT - BZT), and (Bi0.5,Na0.5)TiO 3 - (Bi0.5K0.5)TiO3 - Bi(Mg 0.5,Ti0.5)O3 (BNT - BKT - BMgT) have been explored as potential alternatives to PZT. These materials systems have been extensively studied in bulk ceramic form, however many of the ultimate applications will be in thin film embodiments (i.e., microelectromechanical systems). For this reason, in this thesis these lead-free piezoelectrics are synthesized in thin film form to understand the structure-property-processing relationships and their impact on the ultimate device response. Fabrication of high quality of 0.95BKT - 0.05BZT thin films on platinized silicon substrates was attempted by pulsed laser deposition. Due to cation volatility, deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, deposition pressure, and target-substrate distance, as well as target overdoping were explored to achieve phase pure materials. This route led to high dielectric loss, indicative of poor ferroelectric behavior. This was likely a result of the poor thin film morphology observed in films deposited via this method. Subsequently, 0.8BNT - 0.2BKT, 85BNT - 10BKT - 5BT, and 72.5BNT - 22.5BKT - 5BMgT (near morphotropic phase boundary composition) were synthesized via chemical solution deposition. To compensate the loss of A-site cations, overdoped precursor solutions were prepared. Crystallization after each spin cast layer were required to

  6. Mathematical and physical modelling of materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical and physical modeling of turbulence phenomena in metals processing, electromagnetically driven flows in materials processing, gas-solid reactions, rapid solidification processes, the electroslag casting process, the role of cathodic depolarizers in the corrosion of aluminum in sea water, and predicting viscoelastic flows are described.

  7. Precision grinding process development for brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Davis, P J; Piscotty, M A

    1999-04-01

    High performance, brittle materials are the materials of choice for many of today's engineering applications. This paper describes three separate precision grinding processes developed at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory to machine precision ceramic components. Included in the discussion of the precision processes is a variety of grinding wheel dressing, truing and profiling techniques.

  8. Failure and fracture of thin film materials for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonnalagadda, Krishna Nagasai

    Design and reliable operation of Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) depend on the material parameters that influence the failure and fracture properties of brittle and metallic thin films. Failure in brittle materials is quantified by the onset of catastrophic fracture, while in metals, the onset of inelastic deformation is considered as failure as it increases the material compliance. This dissertation research developed new experimental methods to address three aspects on the failure response of these two categories of materials: (a) the role of microstructure and intrinsic stress gradients in the opening mode fracture of mathematically sharp pre-cracks in amorphous and polycrystalline brittle thin films, (b) the critical conditions for mixed mode I/II pre-cracks and their comparison with linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) criteria for crack initiation in homogeneous materials, and (c) the strain rate sensitivity of textured nanocrystalline Au and Pt films with grain sizes of 38 nm and 25 nm respectively. One of the technical objectives of this research was to develop experimental methods and tools that could become standards in MEMS and thin film experimental mechanics. In this regard, a new method was introduced to conduct mode I and mixed mode I/II fracture studies with microscale thin film specimens containing sharp edge pre-cracks. The mode I experiments permitted the direct application of LEFM handbook solutions. On the other hand, the newly introduced mixed mode I/II experiments in thin films were conducted by establishing a new protocol that employs non-standard oblique edge pre-cracks and a numerical analysis based on the J-integral to calculate the stress intensity factors. Similarly, a new experimental protocol has been implemented to carry out experiments with metallic thin films at strain rates that vary by more than six orders of magnitude. The results of mode I fracture experiments concluded that grain inhomogeneity in polycrystalline

  9. High mobility amorphous zinc oxynitride semiconductor material for thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Yan; Lim, Rodney; White, John M.

    2009-10-01

    Zinc oxynitride semiconductor material is produced through a reactive sputtering process in which competition between reactions responsible for the growth of hexagonal zinc oxide (ZnO) and for the growth of cubic zinc nitride (Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2}) is promoted. In contrast to processes in which the reaction for either the oxide or the nitride is dominant, the multireaction process yields a substantially amorphous or a highly disordered nanocrystalline film with higher Hall mobility, 47 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} for the as-deposited film produced at 50 deg. C and 110 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} after annealing at 400 deg. C. In addition, it has been observed that the Hall mobility of the material increases as the carrier concentration decreases in a carrier concentration range where a multicomponent metal oxide semiconductor, indium-gallium-zinc oxide, follows the opposite trend. This indicates that the carrier transports in the single-metal compound and the multimetal compound are probably dominated by different mechanisms. Film stability and thin film transistor performance of the material have also been tested, and results are presented herein.

  10. Photo-thermal processing of semiconductor fibers and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nishant

    Furnace processing and rapid thermal processing (RTP) have been an integral part of several processing steps in semiconductor manufacturing. The performance of RTP techniques can be improved many times by exploiting quantum photo-effects of UV and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons in thermal processing and this technique is known as rapid photo-thermal processing (RPP). As compared to furnace processing and RTP, RPP provides higher diffusion coefficient, lower stress and lower microscopic defects. In this work, a custom designed automated photo assisted processing system was built from individual parts and an incoherent light source. This photo-assisted processing system is used to anneal silica clad silicon fibers and deposit thin-films. To the best of our knowledge, incoherent light source based rapid photo-thermal processing (RPP) was used for the first time to anneal glass-clad silicon core optical fibers. X-ray diffraction examination, Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements showed a considerable enhancement of structural and crystalline properties of RPP treated silicon fibers. Photons in UV and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regions play a very important role in improving the bulk and carrier transport properties of RPP-treated silicon optical fibers, and the resultant annealing permits a path forward to in situ enhancement of the structure and properties of these new crystalline core optical fibers. To explore further applications of RPP, thin-films of Calcium Copper Titanate (CaCu3Ti4O12) or CCTO and Copper (I) Oxide (Cu2O) were also deposited using photo-assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si/SiO2 and n-Si substrate respectively. CCTO is one of the most researched giant dielectric constant materials in recent years. The given photo-assisted MOCVD approach provided polycrystalline CCTO growth on a SiO2 surface with grain sizes as large as 410 nm. Copper (I) oxide (Cu2O) is a direct band gap semiconductor with p-type conductivity and

  11. Thin film microelectronics materials production in the vacuum of space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, A.; Sterling, M.; Horton, C.; Freundlich, A.; Pei, S.; Hill, R.

    1997-01-01

    The international Space Station era will open up a new dimension in the use of one of the unique attributes of space, vacuum, for the production of advanced semiconductor materials and devices for microelectronics applications. Ultra-vacuum is required for the fabrication in thin film form of high quality semiconductors. This can be accomplished behind a free flying platform similar to the current Wake Shield Facility which is specifically designed to support in-space production. The platform will require apparatus for thin film growth, a robotics interface to allow for the change out of raw materials and the harvesting of finished product, and a servicing plant incorporating Space Station that will support long-term utilization of the platform.

  12. Hydrogen gettering packing material, and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.; Thompson, Lisa M.; Smith, Henry Michael; Schicker, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  13. Do Films Make You Learn? Inference Processes in Expository Film Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tibus, Maike; Heier, Anke; Schwan, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The present article examines how suitable expository films are for learning. This question was motivated by the assumption that films are processed in a superficial manner. However, previous research has been dominated by the analyses of outcome measures and has never taken a look at online measures so that no clear conclusions have been drawn.…

  14. Dual-mode ion switching conducting polymer films as high energy supercapacitor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Naoi, Katsuhiko; Oura, Yasushi

    1995-12-31

    The electropolymerized polypyrrole films formed from micellar solution of anionic surfactants, viz., Dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS), showed potential-dependent anion and cation ion switching behavior and the peculiar columnar structure. The formation process and the redox of the polypyrrole was studied with the in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) methods. In-situ AFM observation clearly indicated that such a columnar structure started to form around critical charge densities of 60--100 mC cm{sup {minus}2}. The cyclic voltammogram for the PPy doped with DBS{sup {minus}} film showed two redox couples, each of which corresponds to a cation and an anion exchange process. Thus, the film behaves as a dual-mode ion doping/undoping exchanger. As the PPy film was prepared in higher concentration of the surfactant dopant, where the micelles are formed in solution, the resulting film showed a considerably higher (ca. three orders of magnitude) diffusion coefficient compared to ordinary PPy films so far reported. Such an enhanced diffusivity of ions could be attributed to a peculiar structure of the polymer formed. The feasibility of such polypyrrole in use of supercapacitor material was discussed.

  15. ALD/MLD processes for Mn and Co based hybrid thin films.

    PubMed

    Ahvenniemi, E; Karppinen, M

    2016-06-28

    Here we report the growth of novel transition metal-organic thin-film materials consisting of manganese or cobalt as the metal component and terephthalate as the rigid organic backbone. The hybrid thin films are deposited by the currently strongly emerging atomic/molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD) technique using the combination of a metal β-diketonate, i.e. Mn(thd)3, Co(acac)3 or Co(thd)2, and terephthalic acid (1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid) as precursors. All the processes yield homogeneous and notably smooth amorphous metal-terephthalate hybrid thin films with growth rates of 1-2 Å per cycle. The films are stable towards humidity and withstand high temperatures up to 300 or 400 °C under an oxidative or a reductive atmosphere. The films are characterized with XRR, AFM, GIXRD, XPS and FTIR techniques. PMID:27277668

  16. Optical storage in azobenzene-containing epoxy polymers processed as Langmuir Blodgett films.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Raquel; Mondragon, Iñaki; Sanfelice, Rafaela C; Pavinatto, Felippe J; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Oyanguren, Patricia; Galante, María J

    2013-04-01

    In this study, azocopolymers containing different main-chain segments have been synthesized with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA, DER 332, n=0.03) and the azochromophore Disperse Orange 3 (DO3) cured with two monoamines, viz. benzylamine (BA) and m-toluidine (MT). The photoinduced birefringence was investigated in films produced with these azopolymers using the spin coating (SC) and Langmuir Blodgett (LB) techniques. In the LB films, birefringence increased with the content of azochromophore and the film thickness, as expected. The nanostructured nature of the LB films led to an enhanced birefringence and faster dynamics in the writing process, compared to the SC films. In summary, the combination of azocopolymers and the LB method may allow materials with tuned properties for various optical applications, including in biological systems were photoisomerization may be used to trigger actions such as drug delivery. PMID:23827588

  17. Positron annihilation studies of vacancy related defects in ceramic and thin film Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} materials

    SciTech Connect

    Keeble, D.J.; Krishnan, A.; Umlor, M.T.; Lynn, K.G.; Warren, W.L.; Dimos, D.; Tuttle, B.A.; Ramesh, R.; Poindexter, E.H.

    1994-07-01

    Preliminary positron annihilation studies of ceramic and thin film Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) materials have been completed. This paper examines effects of processing conditions on vacancy related defects. Positron lifetime measurements on bulk PLZT plates showed an increase in positron trapping to a defect state with increasing grain size consistent with trapping to lead vacancy related defects formed through lead oxide loss during processing. Variable energy positron beam measurements were completed on bulk PLZT plates, sol-gel PZT thin films and laser ablated PLZT thin films. Films processed in a reduced oxygen atmosphere were found to give a higher S-parameter, due to an increase in concentration of neutral or negatively charged vacancy type defects, compared with material processed in an oxidizing ambient.

  18. Selectiveness of laser processing due to energy coupling localization: case of thin film solar cell scribing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Račiukaitis, G.; Grubinskas, S.; Gečys, P.; Gedvilas, M.

    2013-07-01

    Selectiveness of the laser processing is the top-most important for applications of the processing technology in thin-film electronics, including photovoltaics. Coupling of laser energy in multilayered thin-film structures, depending on photo-physical properties of the layers and laser wavelength was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Energy coupling within thin films highly depends on the film structure. The finite element and two-temperature models were applied to simulate the energy and temperature distributions inside the stack of different layers of a thin-film solar cell during a picosecond laser irradiation. Reaction of the films to the laser irradiation was conditioned by optical properties of the layers at the wavelength of laser radiation. Simulation results are consistent with the experimental data achieved in laser scribing of copper-indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells on a flexible polymer substrate using picosecond-pulsed lasers. Selection of the right laser wavelength (1064 nm or 1572 nm) enabled keeping the energy coupling in a well-defined volume at the interlayer interface. High absorption at inner interface of the layers triggered localized temperature increase. Transient stress caused by the rapid temperature rise facilitating peeling of the films rather than evaporation. Ultra-short pulses ensured high energy input rate into absorbing material permitting peeling of the layers with no influence on the remaining material.

  19. Physical and Material Properties of Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide High Critical Temperature Superconducting Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiyuan

    1990-01-01

    A simple method of using layered structures and rapid thermal annealing to produce Y_1 Ba_2 Cu_3 O_{7-x} (YBCO) superconducting thin films is presented. Material properties of the films depend strongly on the processing conditions, the film stoichiometry, and the substrates. The films with critical temperature (T_{ rm c}) higher than liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) have been made on various substrates including magnesium oxide, sapphire, and silicon. The best film was obtained on a MgO substrate with T_{rm c} of 84 K. Silicon diffusion and reaction with oxygen during a high temperature anneal degrade the superconductivity of the film on a Si substrate. Using a buffer layer of gold, the Si-YBCO interaction is greatly reduced. Typical resistivity of the film shows a linear temperature dependence which may be attributed to an electron -phonon interaction. Anisotropic resistance behavior has been observed due to the layered structures. Different metal contacts to the YBCO films have been used to study the chemical and electrical properties of metal-YBCO film interfaces. Gold has been found nonreactive to YBCO film, thus, it has the lowest contact resistivity. Near the T_{rm c}, the contact resistivity of a Au-YBCO contact approaches zero. This may be due to the proximity effect. Other metals such as Pt, Pd, Sn and Ti, react with the YBCO film and form thin oxide layers at the interfaces. The oxide layer acts as an insulating barrier which forbids the proximity effect and causes a large contact resistivity. The structural and electrical properties of the Si-YBCO intermixed film have been studied for different thicknesses of the silicon layers. A novel patterning technique of using Si-YBCO intermixing has been developed for fabricating the YBCO superconducting device structures. A superconductor sample has a critical current value I _{rm c}. Below the I _{rm c} the material is superconducting, and above I_{rm c} the sample has a finite resistance. Based on this effect

  20. Ablation of film stacks in solar cell fabrication processes

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2013-04-02

    A dielectric film stack of a solar cell is ablated using a laser. The dielectric film stack includes a layer that is absorptive in a wavelength of operation of the laser source. The laser source, which fires laser pulses at a pulse repetition rate, is configured to ablate the film stack to expose an underlying layer of material. The laser source may be configured to fire a burst of two laser pulses or a single temporally asymmetric laser pulse within a single pulse repetition to achieve complete ablation in a single step.

  1. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Ansari, S.; Volk, David; Sarkar, S.; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-08-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  2. Solution-processed Optoelectronic Devices from Colloidal Inorganic Semiconductor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchieu, Andrew A.

    This dissertation contains design, synthesis, fabrication and testing of optoelectronic devices which are composed of colloidal inorganic semiconductor materials and fabricated by potentially low-cost solution-processing methods. The first part of this dissertation demonstrates a novel fabrication method where colloidal quantum dots (QDs) are self-assembled layer-by-layer into a thin film structure through electrostatic interaction. This process allows precise control of QD thin film thickness by self-assembly and can in principle be applied to a wide range of substrates. Using such QD thin films, photoconductor photodetectors and metal-intrinsic-metal photodiodes have been demonstrated. In the second part of this dissertation, heavy-metal-free colloidal Si materials are synthesized by electrochemical etching Si wafers, followed by surface modification and ultra-sonication for dispersion of Si nano- and/or micro-particles in various solvents. Demonstrated applications include RGB photoluminescent Si phosphors, scattering-enhanced Si nano-/micro-particle composite photodetectors and hybrid Si QD-organic light-emitting-diodes (LEDs).

  3. Electrohydrodynamic processing and characterisation of titanium dioxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalingam, Suntharavathanan

    The research in this thesis demonstrates a novel electrohydrodynamic preparation of titanium dioxide (TiC>2) films. In this process, a liquid breaks up into spray droplets under influence of an electric field. This process is influenced by many factors properties of the liquid - surface tension, electrical conductivity, relative permittivity, viscosity, density and liquid flow rate and applied voltage. This technique has unique advantage like simple set-up and economical way to formulate the films. Many modes of processing were identified by drawing the mode-selection map for various applied voltage and flow rate using a titania sol. For a fixed flow rate, changing the applied voltage changed the processing mode. For a fixed applied voltage, changing the flow rate changed the shape of the liquid filament at the end of the needle. The stable cone-jet mode processing produced a near mono-disperse of droplets. The stable cone-jet processing of TiC>2 films showed anatase phase and converted to rutile phase at higher annealing temperature. The morphological characterisation revealed the dense and crack free surfaces of the TiC>2 films. The dielectric constant of the electrohydrodynamically processed TiC>2 films was 7. The increase in annealing temperature reduced the dielectric constant of the films. The leakage current density of the films was improved by post deposition annealing. The optical characterisation of the films showed a good transparency in the visible light region. The transmission in the visible range varied between 70-90%. The annealing temperature influenced the transmittance of the films. The energy bandgap is -3.50 eV for indirect transition. The larger coverage area nitrogen doped titanium dioxide films were obtained by using a metal clamped needle - ground electrode set-up for the first time. Metal clamping the needle lowered the stable cone-jet operating voltage window. The nitrogen doping in TiC>2 films retarded the phase formation however, showed

  4. Fluid bed technology in materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, C.K.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    1999-01-01

    The author explores the various aspects of fluidization engineering and examines its applications in a multitude of materials processing techniques. Topics include process metallurgy, fluidization in nuclear engineering, and the pros and cons of various fluidization equipment. Gupta emphasizes fluidization engineering in high temperature processing, and high temperature fluidized bed furnaces.

  5. Spray Chemical Vapor Deposition of Single-Source Precursors for Chalcopyrite I-III-VI2 Thin-Film Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Harris, Jerry D.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Dickman, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Thin-film solar cells on flexible, lightweight, space-qualified substrates provide an attractive approach to fabricating solar arrays with high mass-specific power. A polycrystalline chalcopyrite absorber layer is among the new generation of photovoltaic device technologies for thin film solar cells. At NASA Glenn Research Center we have focused on the development of new single-source precursors (SSPs) for deposition of semiconducting chalcopyrite materials onto lightweight, flexible substrates. We describe the syntheses and thermal modulation of SSPs via molecular engineering. Copper indium disulfide and related thin-film materials were deposited via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using SSPs. Processing and post-processing parameters were varied in order to modify morphology, stoichiometry, crystallography, electrical properties, and optical properties to optimize device quality. Growth at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal hotwall reactor at 395 C yielded the best device films. Placing the susceptor closer to the evaporation zone and flowing a more precursor-rich carrier gas through the reactor yielded shinier-, smoother-, and denser-looking films. Growth of (112)-oriented films yielded more Cu-rich films with fewer secondary phases than growth of (204)/(220)-oriented films. Post-deposition sulfur-vapor annealing enhanced stoichiometry and crystallinity of the films. Photoluminescence studies revealed four major emission bands and a broad band associated with deep defects. The highest device efficiency for an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposited cell was one percent.

  6. Planning for Materials Processing in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A systems design study to describe the conceptual evolution, the institutional interrelationshiphs, and the basic physical requirements to implement materials processing in space was conducted. Planning for a processing era, rather than hardware design, was emphasized. Product development in space was examined in terms of fluid phenomena, phase separation, and heat and mass transfer. The effect of materials processing on the environment was studied. A concept for modular, unmanned orbiting facilities using the modified external tank of the space shuttle is presented. Organizational and finding structures which would provide for the efficient movement of materials from user to space are discussed.

  7. Effects of acetylacetone additions on PZT thin film processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.W.; Assink, R.A.; Dimos, D.; Sinclair, M.B.; Boyle, T.J.; Buchheit, C.D.

    1995-02-01

    Sol-gel processing methods are frequently used for the fabrication of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films for many electronic applications. Our standard approach for film fabrication utilizes lead acetate and acetic acid modified metal alkoxides of zirconium and titanium in the preparation of our precursor solutions. This report highlights some of our recent results on the effects of the addition of a second chelating ligand, acetylacetone, to this process. The authors discuss the changes in film drying behavior, densification and ceramic microstructure which accompany acetylacetone additions to the precursor solution and relate the observed variations in processing behavior to differences in chemical precursor structure induced by the acetylacetone ligand. Improvements in thin film microstructure, ferroelectric and optical properties are observed when acetylacetone is added to the precursor solution.

  8. Materials, processes, and environmental engineering network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    The Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN) was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. Environmental replacement materials information is a newly developed focus of MPEEN. This database is the NASA Environmental Information System, NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team, NOET, to be hazardous to the environment. An environmental replacement technology database is contained within NEIS. Environmental concerns about materials are identified by NOET, and control or replacement strategies are formed. This database also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these hazardous materials. In addition to addressing environmental concerns, MPEEN contains one of the largest materials databases in the world. Over 600 users access this network on a daily basis. There is information available on failure analysis, metals and nonmetals testing, materials properties, standard and commercial parts, foreign alloy cross-reference, Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) data, and Materials and Processes Selection List data.

  9. Photoacoustic characterization of the mechanical properties of thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feifei; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar; Fei, Dong; Rebinsky, Douglas A.

    2005-05-01

    Two high frequency photoacoustic techniques were applied to investigate the mechanical properties of two sets of thin film materials in this work. Broadband photoacoustic guided-wave method was used to measure the guided-wave phase velocity dispersion curves of nano-structured diamond-like carbon hard coatings. The experimental velocity spectra were analyzed by a nonlinear optimization approach in conjunction with a multi-layer wave-propagation model. The derived Young"s moduli using the broadband photoacoustic technique were compared with line-focus acoustic microscopy and nano-indentation tests and good quantitative agreement is found. In a second set of experiments, ultra-thin two-layer aluminum and silicon nitride thin film materials were tested using the femtosecond transient pump-probe method using high frequency bulk waves generated by the ultra-fast laser pulses. The measured moduli of silicon nitride thin layers are in the range of 270 - 340 GPa. Photoacoustic methods are shown to be suitable for in-situ and non-destructive evaluation of the mechanical properties of thin films.

  10. Magnetization Processes During FM Transitions of Supercooled Er Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, C. S.; Flynn, C. P.

    2000-03-01

    FM transitions are generally accompanied by dimensional changes of the crystal lattice. In magnetic films, the in-plane dimensional changes are inhibited by clamping to the substrate, creating a rich variety of phenomena (e.g. supercooling, dislocation formation and motion, bowing of dislocations, and altered magnetization processes), which can be directly observed with x-rays. Here we characterize the magnetization processes exhibited by unstrained Er films. Below the Curie temperature, the film exhibits supercooling, remaining in a metastable non-FM state and only relaxing to the FM state when a magnetic field is applied. This occurs by two distinct processes. The first process, which broadens the x-ray line shape, is nucleation and growth of FM domains. The second, which produces no line broadening, is isotropic magnetization of the entire film. Once magnetized, the film remains in the FM state until the temperature is raised several degrees above the Curie temperature, at which point the film relaxes to the non-FM state via one of these two paths. This process depends on the temperature when the field is removed.