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Sample records for film metal coated

  1. Formation of selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide-sulfide films on metal or metal coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Eser, Erten; Fields, Shannon

    2012-05-01

    A process and composition for preventing cracking in composite structures comprising a metal coated substrate and a selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide sulfide film. Specifically, cracking is prevented in the coating of molybdenum coated substrates upon which a copper, indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) film is deposited. Cracking is inhibited by adding a Se passivating amount of oxygen to the Mo and limiting the amount of Se deposited on the Mo coating.

  2. Thin Film Metal Coated Fiber Optic Hydrophone Probe

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, R.; Arora, P.; Gandhi, G.; Daryoush, A.S.; El-Sherif, M.; Lewin, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve on sensitivity performance of fiber sensor employed as Fiber Optic Hydrophone Probe (FOHP) by nano-scale thin film gold coating. The fiber is designed to provide a uniform and spatial averaging free response up to 100 MHz by etching down to an active diameter of about 9 μm. The sensitivity performance of straight cleaved (i.e. full size core and cladding) uncoated, tapered uncoated and tapered thin film gold coated fiber sensors were compared in the frequency range of 1.5 MHz to 20 MHz in the presence of acoustic pressure amplitude levels of up to 6 MPa. An unprecedented voltage sensitivity of −245 dB re 1V/uPa (560 mV/ MPa) was measured for thin film gold coated FOHP by optimizing the gold coating thickness. PMID:19881652

  3. Diamond Composite Films for Protective Coatings on Metals and Method of Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Composite films consisting of diamond crystallites and hard amorphous films such as diamond-like carbon, titanium nitride, and titanium oxide are provided as protective coatings for metal substrates against extremely harsh environments. A composite layer having diamond crystallites and a hard amorphous film is affixed to a metal substrate via an interlayer including a bottom metal silicide film and a top silicon carbide film. The interlayer is formed either by depositing metal silicide and silicon carbide directly onto the metal substrate, or by first depositing an amorphous silicon film, then allowing top and bottom portions of the amorphous silicon to react during deposition of the diamond crystallites, to yield the desired interlayer structure.

  4. Metal Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, General Magnaplate Corporation developed process techniques for bonding dry lubricant coatings to space metals. The coatings were not susceptible to outgassing and offered enhanced surface hardness and superior resistance to corrosion and wear. This development was necessary because conventional lubrication processes were inadequate for lightweight materials used in Apollo components. General Magnaplate built on the original technology and became a leader in development of high performance metallurgical surface enhancement coatings - "synergistic" coatings, - which are used in applications from pizza making to laser manufacture. Each of the coatings is designed to protect a specific metal or group of metals to solve problems encountered under operating conditions.

  5. Ceramic coating effect on liner metal temperatures of film-cooled annular combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.; Wear, J. D.; Liebert, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the effect of a ceramic coating on the average metal temperatures of full annular, film cooled combustion chamber liner. The investigation was conducted at pressures from 0.50 to 0.062. At all test conditions, experimental results indicate that application of a ceramic coating will result in significantly lower wall temperatures. In a simplified heat transfer analysis, agreement between experimental and calculated liner temperatures was achieved. Simulated spalling of a small portion of the ceramic coating resulted in only small increases in liner temperature because of the thermal conduction of heat from the hotter, uncoated liner metal.

  6. Non-stick syringe needles: Beneficial effects of thin film metallic glass coating

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jinn P.; Yu, Chia-Chi; Tanatsugu, Yusuke; Yasuzawa, Mikito; Shen, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of Zr-based (Zr53Cu33Al9Ta5) thin film metallic glass (TFMG) for the coating of syringe needles and compares the results with those obtained using titanium nitride and pure titanium coatings. TFMG coatings were shown to reduce insertion forces by ∼66% and retraction forces by ∼72%, when tested using polyurethane rubber block. The benefits of TFMG-coated needles were also observed when tested using muscle tissue from pigs. In nano-scratch tests, the TFMG coatings achieved a coefficient of friction (COF) of just ∼0.05, which is about one order of magnitude lower than those of other coatings. Finite-element modeling also indicates a significant reduction in injection and retraction forces. The COF can be attributed to the absence of grain boundaries in the TFMG coating as well as a smooth surface morphology and low surface free energy. PMID:27573062

  7. Non-stick syringe needles: Beneficial effects of thin film metallic glass coating.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jinn P; Yu, Chia-Chi; Tanatsugu, Yusuke; Yasuzawa, Mikito; Shen, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of Zr-based (Zr53Cu33Al9Ta5) thin film metallic glass (TFMG) for the coating of syringe needles and compares the results with those obtained using titanium nitride and pure titanium coatings. TFMG coatings were shown to reduce insertion forces by ∼66% and retraction forces by ∼72%, when tested using polyurethane rubber block. The benefits of TFMG-coated needles were also observed when tested using muscle tissue from pigs. In nano-scratch tests, the TFMG coatings achieved a coefficient of friction (COF) of just ∼0.05, which is about one order of magnitude lower than those of other coatings. Finite-element modeling also indicates a significant reduction in injection and retraction forces. The COF can be attributed to the absence of grain boundaries in the TFMG coating as well as a smooth surface morphology and low surface free energy. PMID:27573062

  8. Composite materials obtained by the ion-plasma sputtering of metal compound coatings on polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikov, Nikolai; Polyakov, Evgenii; Borisov, Sergei; Barashev, Nikolai; Biramov, Emir; Maltceva, Anastasia; Vereshchagin, Artem; Khartov, Stas; Voronin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the principle and examples composite materials obtained by deposition of metal compound coatings on polymer film substrates by the ion-plasma sputtering method are presented. A synergistic effect is to obtain the materials with structural properties of the polymer substrate and the surface properties of the metal deposited coatings. The technology of sputtering of TiN coatings of various thicknesses on polyethylene terephthalate films is discussed. The obtained composites are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is shown. The examples of application of this method, such as receiving nanocomposite track membranes and flexible transparent electrodes, are considered.

  9. Biocompatibility evaluation of sputtered zirconium-based thin film metallic glass-coated steels

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Balasubramanian; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Rajan, Senthilperumal Thanka

    2015-01-01

    Thin film metallic glasses comprised of Zr48Cu36Al8Ag8 (at.%) of approximately 1.5 μm and 3 μm in thickness were prepared using magnetron sputtering onto medical grade 316L stainless steel. Their structural and mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion, and antimicrobial activity were analyzed. The amorphous thin film metallic glasses consisted of a single glassy phase, with an absence of any detectable peaks corresponding to crystalline phases. Elemental composition close to the target alloy was noted from EDAX analysis of the thin film. The surface morphology of the film showed a smooth surface on scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In vitro electrochemical corrosion studies indicated that the zirconium-based metallic glass could withstand body fluid, showing superior resistance to corrosion and electrochemical stability. Interactions between the coated surface and bacteria were investigated by agar diffusion, solution suspension, and wet interfacial contact methods. The results indicated a clear zone of inhibition against the growth of microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, confirming the antimicrobial activity of the thin film metallic glasses. Cytotoxicity studies using L929 fibroblast cells showed these coatings to be noncytotoxic in nature. PMID:26491304

  10. Microwave bonding of thin film metal coated substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Bonding of materials such as MEMS materials is carried out using microwaves. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity containing other less microwave absorbing materials, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin depth of the films. This causes heating in one place more than another. This thereby minimizes unwanted heating effects during the microwave bonding process.

  11. Hollow glass waveguides with multilayer polystyrene and metal sulfide thin film coatings for improved infrared transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Valencia S.

    2007-12-01

    The overall goal of this project was to improve transmission of infrared radiation in hollow waveguides. First, polystyrene was studied as a new dielectric material for silver-coated hollow glass waveguides. The deposition and performance of polystyrene, as a single dielectric layer, were investigated. The potential of polystyrene as the low index of refraction material in a multilayer coating was also demonstrated. Cadmium sulfide and lead sulfide were each considered as the high index material in the multilayer stack. Multilayer silver coated hollow glass waveguides can be formed using polystyrene and either cadmium sulfide or lead sulfide. These material pairs are interesting because they form a multilayer structure with high index contrast, which can significantly lower the loss of a waveguide. The deposition of lead sulfide was also optimized in this project. Lead sulfide, as a single layer dielectric coating, is an attractive material for transmission of longer wavelength radiation, especially 10.6 mum. It is also of interest for emerging applications such as metals processing by lasers because hollow waveguides with silver and lead sulfide can make a low loss waveguide. Losses as low as 0.1dB/m were achieved. The deposition of zinc sulfide and zinc selenide was also investigated in this project. They are of interest because of their small extinction coefficients at longer wavelengths and potential for use in waveguides used for materials processing. The numerous simultaneous chemical reactions occurring during deposition of these materials makes obtaining pure films difficult. Gold was evaluated as a replacement for silver as the highly reflecting metallic layer. It was considered an attractive alternative because it has greater resistance to degradation in high temperature and corrosive environments. All samples were made using an electroless process. Characterization of the samples was performed using the optical techniques of FTIR and UV

  12. Non-conductive ferromagnetic carbon-coated (Co, Ni) metal/polystyrene nanocomposites films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takacs, H.; Viala, B.; Tortai, J.-H.; Hermán, V.; Duclairoir, F.

    2016-03-01

    This article reports non-conductive ferromagnetic properties of metal/polymer nanocomposite films intended to be used for RF applications. The nanocomposite arrangement is unique showing a core double-shell structure of metal-carbon-polystyrene: M/C//P1/P2, where M = Co, Ni is the core material, C = graphene or carbon is the first shell acting as a protective layer against oxidation, P1 = pyrene-terminated polystyrene is the second shell for electrical insulation, and P2 = polystyrene is a supporting matrix (// indicates actual grafting). The nanocomposite formulation is briefly described, and the film deposition by spin-coating is detailed. Original spin-curves are reported and analyzed. One key outcome is the achievement of uniform and cohesive films at the wafer scale. Structural properties of films are thoroughly detailed, and weight and volume fractions of M/C are considered. Then, a comprehensive overview of DC magnetic and electrical properties is reported. A discussion follows on the magnetic softness of the nanocomposites vs. that of a single particle (theoretical) and the raw powder (experimental). Finally, unprecedented achievement of high magnetization (˜0.6 T) and ultra-high resistivity (˜1010 μΩ cm) is shown. High magnetization comes from the preservation of the existing protective shell C, with no significant degradation on the particle net-moment, and high electrical insulation is ensured by adequate grafting of the secondary shell P1. To conclude, the metal/polymer nanocomposites are situated in the landscape of soft ferromagnetic materials for RF applications (i.e., inductors and antennas), by means of two phase-diagrams, where they play a crucial role.

  13. Water Vapor Permeation of Metal Oxide/Polymer Coated Plastic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, Yukihiro; Oya, Toshiyuki; Kuwahara, Mitsuru; Ito, Katsuya

    Barrier performance to water vapor permeation of ceramic coated layers deposited on flexible polymer films is of great interest to food packaging, medical device packaging and flat panel display industries. In this study, a new type film in which a ceramic layer is deposited on a polymer coated film was proposed for lower water vapor permeation. It is important how to control interfacial properties between each layer and film for good barrier performance. Several kinds of polymer coated materials were prepared for changing surface free energy of the films before and after depositing the ceramic layer. The ceramic layer, which is composed of mixed material of SiO2 and Al2O3, was adopted under the same conditions. The following results were obtained; 1) Water vapor permeation is not related to the surface energy of polymer coated films, 2) After depositing the ceramic layer, however, a strong correlation is observed between the water vapor permeation and surface free energy. 3) The phenomenon is considered that the polarity of the polymer layers plays a key role in changing the structure of ceramic coated layers.

  14. Structural characterization of multi-coated YBCO films processed by metal-organic deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, S. H.; Lim, J. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Kim, K. T.; Lee, C. M.; Park, E. C.; Hwang, S. M.; Park, S.; Joo, J.

    2008-09-01

    YBCO films were fabricated using the TFA-MOD process. The effects of film thickness on phase formation, degree of texture, microstructures, and critical properties were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, pole-figure, and transmission electron microscopy. The films were prepared with various thicknesses by producing multi-coated films by repeating the dip-coating and calcining processes. The microstructure and resultant critical current ( Ic) and critical current density ( Jc) varied remarkably with film thickness: the Ic increased from 39 to 169 A/cm-width, while Jc ranged from 0.85 to 0.92 MA/cm 2 with increasing number of coatings from one to three or four. Both values decreased when further coatings were applied as a result of microstructural degradation. It is believed that this decrease in Ic for the multi-coated film is partly due to the presence of a second phase, pores, and poor texture formability. The optimum thickness for maximizing both the Ic and Jc values is believed to be in the range of 1.1-1.7 μm.

  15. Thin-film metal coated insulation barrier in a Josephson tunnel junction. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Hawkins, G.A.; Clarke, J.

    1975-10-31

    A highly stable, durable, and reproducible Josephson tunnel junction consists of a thin-film electrode of a hard superconductor, a thin oxide insulation layer over the electrode constituting a Josephson tunnel junction barrier, a thin-film layer of stabilizing metal over the barrier, and a second thin-film hard superconductive electrode over the stabilizing film. The thin stabilizing metal film is made only thick enough to limit penetration of the electrode material through the insulation layer so as to prevent a superconductive short.

  16. Analysis of metal temperature and coolant flow with a thermal-barrier coating on a full-coverage-film-cooled turbine vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    The potential benefits of combining full-coverage film cooling with a thermal-barrier coating were investigated analytically for sections on the suction and pressure sides a high-temperature, high-pressure turbine vane. Metal and ceramic coating temperatures were calculated as a function of coating thickness and coolant flow. With a thermal-barrier coating, the coolant flows required for the chosen sections were half those of an uncoated design, and the metal outer temperatures were simultaneously reduced by over 111 K (200 F). For comparison, transpiration cooling was also investigated. Full-coverage film cooling of a coated vane required more coolant flow than did transpiration cooling.

  17. Effects of applying bias voltage on metal-coated pentacene films on SiO2 studied by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirosawa, Ichiro; Watanabe, Takeshi; Oji, Hiroshi; Yasuno, Satoshi; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki; Tada, Keisuke; Yoshimoto, Noriyuki

    2016-03-01

    The effects of bias voltage application on C 1s photoelectron kinetic energies in Au- and Ag-coated pentacene films on SiO2 were studied by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was observed that the kinetic energies of C 1s were smaller in shallow regions in contact with metals than in mid regions of the pentacene films. The differences in C 1s kinetic energy between the shallow and mid regions of the Ag-coated pentacene films were slightly larger than those of the Au-coated films. The differences in the kinetic energies were decreased by applying negative voltages. The larger effect of voltage application was observed in the Ag-coated film than in the Au-coated film. In addition, partially reduced Si atoms in SiO2 were found at the interface to the pentacene film.

  18. Significant influences of metal reactivity and oxide films at particle surfaces on coating microstructure in cold spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.-Y.; Zhang, C.; Wang, H.-T.; Guo, X. P.; Liao, H. L.; Li, C.-J.; Coddet, C.

    2007-01-01

    Based on large amount of experimental observations, the effects of metal reactivity and oxide films at particle surfaces on coating deposition behavior in cold spraying were presented and discussed. The oxygen contents in as-sprayed Ti, Ti-6Al-4V and Al coatings were higher than those in the corresponding starting powders. The obvious flashing jets outside nozzle exit during deposition of Ti and Ti-6Al-4V were caused by the reaction of the particles with oxygen in the entrained or the adopted air. For Ti and Ti-6Al-4V coatings, their porous structures are predominantly attributed to the surface reactivity (defined as reactivity with oxygen). This surface reaction could be helpful for formation of a metallurgical bonding between the deposited particles. For Al, even though it is more reactive than Ti, the oxide films at Al particle surfaces suppress the surface activity.

  19. Performance improvement of an ionic polymer metal composite actuator by parylene thin film coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Jun; Lee, In Taek; Lee, Ho-Young; Hyup Kim, Yong

    2006-12-01

    IPMC (ionic polymer-metal composite) is a kind of ionic EAP (electroactive polymer) which is actuated by the movement of cations combined with water molecules in the polymer. The cations and water molecules move due to the applied voltage on the metal electrodes which are located on both sides of the polymer. However, water contained in the polymer gradually evaporates during the actuation and this reduces the performance of the IPMC actuator. To suppress the water evaporation from the IPMC, waterproof material such as parylene, silicone rubber and other polymers were coated on the surface of the IPMC. The displacement, the force and the lifetime of the actuator were observed by using a laser displacement measurement system and a load cell. The water impermeability of the polymer coating with respect to time was measured on a hot plate. Results showed that the parylene coating effectively suppressed the water loss from the IPMC and enlarged the lifetime of the actuator dramatically. However, it was found that parylene has poor adhesion properties to the metal electrode. To improve the adhesion, plasma treatments of argon (Ar), oxygen (O2) and trifluoromethane (CHF3) were performed on the electrode surface before parylene coating. We evaluated the surface morphology change of the electrode after plasma treatment by SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and AFM (atomic force microscopy). In addition, a tape adhesion test and a peel test were performed for quantitative analysis of adhesion strength between the metal electrode and parylene. It was found that the argon plasma treatment was the most effective to improve the adhesion strength between the metal electrode and parylene.

  20. On calculating the energy characteristics of a metal film with a dielectric coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, A. V.

    2014-02-01

    A method for calculating the characteristics of a metal film in a dielectric surroundings is suggested. The most interesting case of asymmetric metal-dielectric sandwiches, in which the dielectrics on both sides of the film are different, is considered in the context of the Kohn-Sham modified method. The spectrum, the electron work function, and the surface energy of polycrystalline and single-crystal films placed into passive insulators are calculated for the first time. In general, the dielectric surroundings leads to a negative change in the electron work function and the surface energy. In addition to size-effect-related changes, the shift of the work function is determined by the arithmetic mean of the dielectric constants of the surrounding media. Calculations have been performed for Na, Al, and Pb.

  1. Review of the thermal contact conductance of junctions with metallic coatings and films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, M. A.; Fletcher, L. S.

    1993-10-01

    The reliability of standard electronic modules may be improved by decreasing overall module temperature. This may be accomplished by enhancing the thermal contact conductance at the interface between the module frame guide rib and the card rail to which the module is clamped. The surface irregularities resulting from the machining or extruding of the components cause the true contact area to be much less than the apparent contact area, increasing the contact resistance. Some metallic coatings deform easily under load and increase the contact area and associated conductance. This investigation evaluates possible coatings and determines those most suitable for enhancing contact conductance based upon predictions using existing theories for thermal contact conductance of coated junctions.

  2. Omnidirectional, broadband light absorption using large-area, ultrathin lossy metallic film coatings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongyang; Palacios, Edgar; Butun, Serkan; Kocer, Hasan; Aydin, Koray

    2015-01-01

    Resonant absorbers based on nanostructured materials are promising for variety of applications including optical filters, thermophotovoltaics, thermal emitters, and hot-electron collection. One of the significant challenges for such micro/nanoscale featured medium or surface, however, is costly lithographic processes for structural patterning which restricted from industrial production of complex designs. Here, we demonstrate lithography-free, broadband, polarization-independent optical absorbers based on a three-layer ultrathin film composed of subwavelength chromium (Cr) and oxide film coatings. We have measured almost perfect absorption as high as 99.5% across the entire visible regime and beyond (400–800 nm). In addition to near-ideal absorption, our absorbers exhibit omnidirectional independence for incidence angle over ±60 degrees. Broadband absorbers introduced in this study perform better than nanostructured plasmonic absorber counterparts in terms of bandwidth, polarization and angle independence. Improvements of such “blackbody” samples based on uniform thin-film coatings is attributed to extremely low quality factor of asymmetric highly-lossy Fabry-Perot cavities. Such broadband absorber designs are ultrathin compared to carbon nanotube based black materials, and does not require lithographic processes. This demonstration redirects the broadband super absorber design to extreme simplicity, higher performance and cost effective manufacturing convenience for practical industrial production. PMID:26450563

  3. Omnidirectional, broadband light absorption using large-area, ultrathin lossy metallic film coatings.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyang; Palacios, Edgar; Butun, Serkan; Kocer, Hasan; Aydin, Koray

    2015-01-01

    Resonant absorbers based on nanostructured materials are promising for variety of applications including optical filters, thermophotovoltaics, thermal emitters, and hot-electron collection. One of the significant challenges for such micro/nanoscale featured medium or surface, however, is costly lithographic processes for structural patterning which restricted from industrial production of complex designs. Here, we demonstrate lithography-free, broadband, polarization-independent optical absorbers based on a three-layer ultrathin film composed of subwavelength chromium (Cr) and oxide film coatings. We have measured almost perfect absorption as high as 99.5% across the entire visible regime and beyond (400-800 nm). In addition to near-ideal absorption, our absorbers exhibit omnidirectional independence for incidence angle over ±60 degrees. Broadband absorbers introduced in this study perform better than nanostructured plasmonic absorber counterparts in terms of bandwidth, polarization and angle independence. Improvements of such "blackbody" samples based on uniform thin-film coatings is attributed to extremely low quality factor of asymmetric highly-lossy Fabry-Perot cavities. Such broadband absorber designs are ultrathin compared to carbon nanotube based black materials, and does not require lithographic processes. This demonstration redirects the broadband super absorber design to extreme simplicity, higher performance and cost effective manufacturing convenience for practical industrial production. PMID:26450563

  4. Scanning electron microscopy at macromolecular resolution in low energy mode on biological specimens coated with ultra thin metal films.

    PubMed

    Peters, K R

    1979-01-01

    In this report, conditions for attaining high resolution in scanning electron microscopy with soft biological specimens are described using the currently available high resolution scanning electron microscopes in emission mode of low energy electrons (secondary and charging electrons). Retinal rod outer segments, red blood cells, intestinal mucosa, and ferritin molecules were all used as biological test specimens. From uncoated specimens a new source of signal, referred to as a discharge signal, can provide a high yield of low energy electrons from an excitation area approximately the size of the beam's cross section. Additionally, under these conditions sufficient topographic contrast can be achieved by applying ultra thin metal coatins. A 0.5 nm thick gold film is found sufficient for generating the total signal, whereas increased coating thickness causes additional topographic background signal. However, a 2.0 nm film is needed for imaging surface details with the present instrument. Ultra thin, even, and grainless tantalum films have been found effective in eliminating the charging artifacts caused by external fields, and the decoration artifacts caused by crystal growth as seen in gold films. To improve, in high magnification work on ultra thin coated specimen, signal-to-noise ratio, methods for obtaining saturation of the signal with discharge electrons are shown. The necessity of confirming the information obtained in SEM by independent techniques (TEM of stereo-replicas or ultra thin sections) is discussed. PMID:392703

  5. Metallic coating of microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, S.F.

    1980-08-15

    Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates.

  6. Coating of plasma polymerized film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morita, S.; Ishibashi, S.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma polymerized thin film coating and the use of other coatings is suggested for passivation film, thin film used for conducting light, and solid body lubrication film of dielectrics of ultra insulators for electrical conduction, electron accessories, etc. The special features of flow discharge development and the polymerized film growth mechanism are discussed.

  7. Electrosynthesis of hydrogel films on metal substrates for the development of coatings with tunable drug delivery performances.

    PubMed

    De Giglio, E; Cometa, S; Satriano, C; Sabbatini, L; Zambonin, P G

    2009-03-15

    Novel polyacrylates-based hydrogel thin films were prepared by electrochemical polymerization, a new method to obtain hydrogels directly onto metal substrates. 2-Hydroxy-ethyl-methacrylate (HEMA), a macromer poly (ethylene-glycol diacrylate) (PEGDA) and PEGDA copolymerized with acrylic acid (AA) were used to obtain hydrogels. The electrosynthesized coatings were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to assess their surface chemical composition, and by water content determination measurements, to characterize the swelling behavior. In particular, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring was used to evaluate the pH-dependency of the swelling for AA-containing hydrogels. Moreover, a model protein (bovine serum albumin) and a model drug (caffeine) were entrapped within the hydrogel coatings during electrosynthesis, to examine the release performances and mechanisms of the electrosynthesized hydrogels. It was observed that all the examined polymers showed significant release properties and, in particular, AA-containing hydrogel films confirmed a strong pH-dependence as expected. These coatings seem to be promising in orthopedic field for in situ drug delivery applications. PMID:18404708

  8. Photovoltage and stability of an n-type silicon semiconductor coated with metal or metal-free phthalocyanine thin films in aqueous redox solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakato, Y.; Shioji, M.; Tsubomura, H.

    1981-06-11

    An n-type silicon (n-Si) semiconductor coated with an evaporated thin film of metal phthalocyanine (MPc) or metal-free phthalocyanine (H/sub 2/Pc) worked as a fairly stable photoanode in aqueous redox solutions. The photovoltage observed for a photocell, (n-Si/CuPc/Fe/sup 3 +//Fe/sup 2 +/ aqueous solution (pH 4.2) /Pt), was 0.50 V, only slightly less than that for a p-n junction Si photocell (approx. 0.6 V). The action spectrum was similar to that of a bare n-Si electrode, except for a depression caused by photoabsorption by the CuPc film in the red region. The above wet photocell has current-voltage characteristics better than those for a solid photocell, (n-Si/CuPc/Pd).

  9. LEVELING METAL COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Gage, H.A.

    1959-02-10

    A method is described for applying metallic coatings to a cylinder of uranium. An aluminum-silicon coat is applied by a process consisting of first cleaning the article by immersion for 5 minutes in 50% nitric acid at 65 C. The article then is dipped through a flux, prepared by adding 10% sodium fluoride to 90% of a flux comprising 53% potassium chloride, 42% lithium chloride, and 5% sodium chloride at 560 for 2 minutes and then directly into a molten metal bath comprising 99% aluminun and 12% silicon at 620 C for 3 minutes. While the coating is yet molten the article is transferred to a pair of steel rollers and rolled until the coating solidifies. By varying the composition of the flux other metals such as zinc, lead or the like may be coated on uranium in a similar manner.

  10. CuInSe₂ thin-film solar cells with 7.72 % efficiency prepared via direct coating of a metal salts/alcohol-based precursor solution.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sejin; Son, Tae Hwa; Cho, Ara; Gwak, Jihye; Yun, Jae Ho; Shin, Keeshik; Ahn, Seoung Kyu; Park, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Kyunghoon

    2012-09-01

    A simple direct solution coating process for forming CuInSe₂ (CIS) thin films was described, employing a low-cost and environmentally friendly precursor solution. The precursor solution was prepared by mixing metal acetates, ethanol, and ethanolamine. The facile formation of a precursor solution without the need to prefabricate nanoparticles enables a rapid and easy processing, and the high stability of the solution in air further ensures the precursor preparation and the film deposition in ambient conditions without a glove box. The thin film solar cell fabricated with the absorber film prepared by this route showed an initial conversion efficiency of as high as 7.72 %. PMID:22890958

  11. Method of forming metal hydride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The substrate to be coated (which may be of metal, glass or the like) is cleaned, both chemically and by off-sputtering in a vacuum chamber. In an ultra-high vacuum system, vapor deposition by a sublimator or vaporizer coats a cooled shroud disposed around the substrate with a thin film of hydride forming metal which getters any contaminant gas molecules. A shutter is then opened to allow hydride forming metal to be deposited as a film or coating on the substrate. After the hydride forming metal coating is formed, deuterium or other hydrogen isotopes are bled into the vacuum system and diffused into the metal film or coating to form a hydride of metal film. Higher substrate temperatures and pressures may be used if various parameters are appropriately adjusted.

  12. METAL COATING BATHS

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, J.W.

    1958-08-26

    A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

  13. Carbonaceous film coating

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Leon

    1989-01-01

    A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris[1,3,2]diazaborine[1,2-a:1'2'-c:1"2"-e]borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

  14. Thin film ion conducting coating

    DOEpatents

    Goldner, Ronald B.; Haas, Terry; Wong, Kwok-Keung; Seward, George

    1989-01-01

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

  15. Metal oxide films on metal

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Xin D.; Tiwari, Prabhat

    1995-01-01

    A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

  16. Reflective and Electrically Conductive Surface Silvered Polyimide Films and Coatings Prepared via Unusual Single-Stage Self-Metallization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southward, Robin E.; Stoakley, Diane M.

    2001-01-01

    Highly reflective and/or surface conductive flexible polyimide films can be prepared by the incorporation of positive valent silver compounds into solutions of poly(amic acid)s formed from a variety of dianhydrides and diamines. Thermal curing of selected silver(I)-containing poly(amic acid)s leads to cycloimidization of the polyimide precursor with concomitant silver(I) reduction and surface aggregation of the metal yielding a reflective and/or conductive silver surface similar to that of the native metal. However, not all silver(I) precursors are effective surface metallization agents and not all poly(amic acid)s metallize with equal facility. Ligand/anion and polyimide structural effects on film metallization efficacy and on physical properties on metallized films are reviewed.

  17. Fabrication of transparent conductive electrode film using thermal roll-imprinted Ag metal grid and coated conductive polymer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jong-Su; Jo, Jeongdai; Yoon, Seong-Man; Kim, Do-Jin

    2012-02-01

    In this study, to fabricate a low-resistance and high optical transparent conductive electrode (TCE) film, the following steps were performed: the design and manufacture of an electroforming stamp mold, the fabrication of thermal-roll imprinted (TRI) poly-carbonate (PC) patterned films, the manufacture of high-conductivity and low-resistance Ag paste which was filled into patterned PC film using a doctor blade process and then coated with a thin film layer of conductive polymer by a spin coating process. As a result of these imprinting processes the PC films obtained a line width of 10 +/- 0.5 Mm, a channel length of 500 +/- 2 microm, and a pattern depth of 7.34 +/- 0.5 microm. After the Ag paste was used to fill part of the patterned film with conductive polymer coating, the following parameters were obtained: a sheet resistance of 9.65 Omega/sq, optical transparency values were 83.69% at a wavelength of 550 nm. PMID:22629916

  18. MOF Thin Film-Coated Metal Oxide Nanowire Array: Significantly Improved Chemiresistor Sensor Performance.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ming-Shui; Tang, Wen-Xiang; Wang, Guan-E; Nath, Bhaskar; Xu, Gang

    2016-07-01

    A strategy for combining metal oxides and metal-organic frameworks is proposed to design new materials for sensing volatile organic compounds, for the first time. The prepared ZnO@ZIF-CoZn core-sheath nanowire arrays show greatly enhanced performance not only on its selectivity but also on its response, recovery behavior, and working temperature. PMID:27153113

  19. Preparation of Superconducting Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O Coating Films by the Sol-Gel Method Using an Aqueous Solution of Metal Acetates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Haoren; Kozuka, Hiromitsu; Yoko, Toshinobu; Sakka, Sumio

    1990-07-01

    Superconducting Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O coating films have been prepared on YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia) and Al2O3 substrates by the sol-gel method using an aqueous solution of metal acetates containing tartaric acid. A film of 20 μm thickness on the YSZ substrate showed Tc(onset) at 115 K and Tc(end) at 79 K, consisting of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox crystals with the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. The reaction between the film and the YSZ and Al2O3 substrates produced CaZrO3 and CuAl2O4, respectively, during heat treatment, which suppresses the formation of superconducting phases and causes the degradation of the superconducting properties of the films.

  20. Scribable coating for plastic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. T.

    1967-01-01

    Scribable opaque coating for transparent plastic film tape is not affected by aging, vacuum, and moderate temperature extremes. It consists of titanium dioxide, a water-compatible acrylic polymer emulsion, and a detergent. The coating mixture is readily dispersed in water before it is dried.

  1. Polymer-assisted aqueous deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Li, DeQuan; Jia, Quanxi

    2003-07-08

    An organic solvent-free process for deposition of metal oxide thin films is presented. The process includes aqueous solutions of necessary metal precursors and an aqueous solution of a water-soluble polymer. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is fired at high temperatures to yield optical quality metal oxide thin films.

  2. METHOD OF APPLYING METALLIC COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, J.W.; Eubank, L.D.

    1961-08-01

    A method for applying a protective coating to a uranium rod is described. The steps include preheating the unanium rod to the coating temperature, placement of the rod between two rotating rollers, pouring a coating metal such as aluminum-silicon in molten form between one of the rotating rollers and the uranium rod, and rotating the rollers continually until the coating is built up to the desired thickness. (AEC)

  3. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

  4. Third-order optical nonlinearities of sol-gel silica coating films containing metal porphyrin derivatives measured by resonant femtosecond degenerate four-wave mixing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatani, Kazuo; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Takenaka, Shunsuke

    2003-11-01

    Third-order optical nonlinearities of sol-gel silica coating films containing metal porphyrin derivatives were measured under resonant conditions by the femtosecond degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) technique. Temporal profiles of the DFWM signal were measured with a time resolution of 0.3 ps, and were found to consist of two components, the coherent instantaneous nonlinear response and the delayed response with a decay time constant of several to several hundred ps. The latter can be attributed to population grating of an excited state, and contribution of slow component was very little for a zinc porphyrin derivative. The values of electronic component of the optical nonlinear susceptibility, χ(3) xxxx, for these films were ca. 2 x 10-10 esu.

  5. Tailoring Thin Film-Lacquer Coatings for Space Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Wanda C.; Harris, George; Miller, Grace; Petro, John

    1998-01-01

    Thin film coatings have the capability of obtaining a wide range of thermal radiative properties, but the development of thin film coatings can sometimes be difficult and costly when trying to achieve highly specular surfaces. Given any space mission's thermal control requirements, there is often a need for a variation of solar absorptance (Alpha(s)), emittance (epsilon) and/or highly specular surfaces. The utilization of thin film coatings is one process of choice for meeting challenging thermal control requirements because of its ability to provide a wide variety of Alpha(s)/epsilon ratios. Thin film coatings' radiative properties can be tailored to meet specific thermal control requirements through the use of different metals and the variation of dielectric layer thickness. Surface coatings can be spectrally selective to enhance radiative coupling and decoupling. The application of lacquer to a surface can also provide suitable specularity for thin film application without the cost and difficulty associated with polishing.

  6. Magnetron-Sputtered Amorphous Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Mehra, M.; Khanna, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous coatings of refractory metal/metalloid-based alloys deposited by magnetron sputtering provide extraordinary hardness and wear resistance. Sputtering target fabricated by thoroughly mixing powders of tungsten, rhenium, and boron in stated proportions and pressing at 1,200 degrees C and 3,000 lb/in. to second power (21 MPa). Substrate lightly etched by sputtering before deposition, then maintained at bias of - 500 V during initial stages of film growth while target material sputtered onto it. Argon gas at pressure used as carrier gas for sputter deposition. Coatings dense, pinhole-free, extremely smooth, and significantly resistant to chemical corrosion in acidic and neutral aqueous environments.

  7. Metal-Coated Optical Fibers for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeakes, Jason; Murphy, Kent; Claus, Richard; Greene, Jonathan; Tran, Tuan

    1996-01-01

    This poster will highlight on-going research at the Virginia Tech Fiber & Electro-Optics Research Center (FEORC) in the area of thin films on optical fibers. Topics will include the sputter deposition of metals and metal; alloys onto optical fiber and fiber optic sensors for innovative applications. Specific information will be available on thin film fiber optic hydrogen sensors, corrosion sensors, and metal-coated optical fiber for high temperature aerospace applications.

  8. Role of edible film and coating additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edible films and coatings have received increasing interest because films and coatings can carry a diversity of functional ingredients. Plasticizers, such as glycerol, acetylated monoglycerides, polyethylene glycol, and sucrose are often used to modify the mechanical properties of the film or coatin...

  9. Metal-Coated Optical Fibers for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeakes, Jason; Murphy, Kent; Claus, Richard; Greene, Jonathan; Tran, Tuan

    1996-01-01

    A DC magnetron sputtering system has been used to actively coat optical fibers with hermetic metal coatings during the fiber draw process. Thin films of Inconel 625 have been deposited on optical fibers and annealed in air at 2000 F. Scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron microscopy have been used to investigate the morphology and composition of the films prior to and following thermal cycling. Issues to be addressed include film adhesion, other coating materials, and a discussion of additional applications for this novel technology.

  10. Nanocrystalline Pd alloy films coated by electroless deposition.

    PubMed

    Strukov, G V; Strukova, G K; Batov, I E; Sakharov, M K; Kudrenko, E A; Mazilkin, A A

    2011-10-01

    The structures of palladium and palladium alloys thin films deposited from organic electrolytes onto metallic substrates by electroless plating method have been investigated. The coatings are dense, pore-free 0.005-1 microm thick films with high adhesive strength to the substrate surface. EDX, XRD, SEM and TEM methods were used to determine the composition and structure of alloy coatings of the following binary systems: Pd-Au, Pd-Ag, Pd-Ni, Pd-Pb, and ternary system Pd-Au-Ni. The coatings of Pd-Au, Pd-Ag and Pd-Ni have a solid solution structure, whereas Pd-Pb is intermetallic compound. It has been found that the deposited films consist of nanocrystalline grains with sizes in the range of 11-35 nm. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigations reveal the existence of clusters formed by nanocrystalline grains. The origin for the formation of nanocrystalline structures of coating films is discussed. PMID:22400291

  11. Coated metal fiber coalescing cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, W.D.; Swain, R.J.

    1980-12-23

    A cell is described for coalescing oil droplets dispersed in a water emulsion including an elongated perforated tube core into which the emulsion is injected, layers of oleophilic plastic covered metal mat wound about the core through which the emulsion is forced to pass, the fibers of the metal mat being covered by oleophilic plastic such as vinyl, acrylic, polypropylene, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, the metal being in the form of layers of expanded metal or metal fibers, either aluminum or stainless steel. In manufacturing the cell a helix wound wire is formed around the cylindrical plastic coated metal to retain it in place and resist pressure drop of fluid flowing through the metal fibers. In addition, the preferred arrangement includes the use of an outer sleeve formed of a mat of fibrous material such as polyester fibers, acrylic fibers, modacrylic fibers and mixtures thereof.

  12. Thin film-coated polymer webs

    DOEpatents

    Wenz, Robert P.; Weber, Michael F.; Arudi, Ravindra L.

    1992-02-04

    The present invention relates to thin film-coated polymer webs, and more particularly to thin film electronic devices supported upon a polymer web, wherein the polymer web is treated with a purifying amount of electron beam radiation.

  13. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Roper, J.R.

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  14. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Roper, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  15. STRIPPING METAL COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Siefen, H.T.; Campbell, J.M.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for removing aluminumuranium-silicon alloy bonded to metallic U comprising subjecting the Al-U -Si alloy to treatment with hot concentrated HNO/sun 3/ to partially dissolve and embrittle the alloy and shot- blasting the embrittled alloy to loosen it from the U.

  16. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

  17. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1992-03-31

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

  18. Coated metal articles and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  19. Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making

    DOEpatents

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  20. Alloy Films Deposited by Electroplating as Precursors for Protective Oxide Coatings on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Metallic Interconnect Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christopher; Gemmen, R.S.; Cross, Caleb

    2006-10-01

    The successful development of stainless steel interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) may be the materials breakthrough that makes SOFC technology truly commercial. Many of the ferritic stainless steels, however, suffer from a relatively high area specific resistance (ASR) after long exposure times at temperature and the Cr in the native oxide can evaporate and contaminate other cell components. Conductive coatings that resist oxide scale growth and chromium evaporation may prevent both of these problems. In the present study electrochemical deposition of binary alloys followed by oxidation of the alloy to form protective and conductive oxide layers is examined. Results are presented for the deposition of Mn/Co and Fe/Ni alloys via electroplating to form a precursor for spinel oxide coating formation. Analysis of the alloy coatings is done by SEM, EDS and XRD.

  1. High-mobility ultrathin semiconducting films prepared by spin coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitzi, David B.; Kosbar, Laura L.; Murray, Conal E.; Copel, Matthew; Afzali, Ali

    2004-03-01

    The ability to deposit and tailor reliable semiconducting films (with a particular recent emphasis on ultrathin systems) is indispensable for contemporary solid-state electronics. The search for thin-film semiconductors that provide simultaneously high carrier mobility and convenient solution-based deposition is also an important research direction, with the resulting expectations of new technologies (such as flexible or wearable computers, large-area high-resolution displays and electronic paper) and lower-cost device fabrication. Here we demonstrate a technique for spin coating ultrathin (~50Å), crystalline and continuous metal chalcogenide films, based on the low-temperature decomposition of highly soluble hydrazinium precursors. We fabricate thin-film field-effect transistors (TFTs) based on semiconducting SnS2-xSex films, which exhibit n-type transport, large current densities (>105Acm-2) and mobilities greater than 10cm2V-1s-1-an order of magnitude higher than previously reported values for spin-coated semiconductors. The spin-coating technique is expected to be applicable to a range of metal chalcogenides, particularly those based on main group metals, as well as for the fabrication of a variety of thin-film-based devices (for example, solar cells, thermoelectrics and memory devices).

  2. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  3. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  4. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.; Kattelus, H.; So, F.

    1984-01-01

    The general objective was to determine the potential of amorphous metallic thin films as a means of improving the stability of metallic contacts to a silicon substrate. The specific objective pursued was to determine the role of nitrogen in the formation and the resulting properties of amorphous thin-film diffusion barriers. Amorphous metallic films are attractive as diffusion barriers because of the low atomic diffusivity in these materials. Previous investigations revealed that in meeting this condition alone, good diffusion barriers are not necessarily obtained, because amorphous films can react with an adjacent medium (e.g., Si, Al) before they recrystallize. In the case of a silicon single-crystalline substrate, correlation exists between the temperature at which an amorphous metallic binary thin film reacts and the temperatures at which the films made of the same two metallic elements react individually. Amorphous binary films made of Zr and W were investigated. Both react with Si individually only at elevated temperatures. It was confirmed that such films react with Si only above 700 C when annealed in vacuum for 30 min. Amorphous W-N films were also investigated. They are more stable as barriers between Al and Si than polycrystalline W. Nitrogen effectively prevents the W-Al reaction that sets in at 500 C with polycrystalline W.

  5. Analysis of Hard Thin Film Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Dashen

    1998-01-01

    MSFC is interested in developing hard thin film coating for bearings. The wearing of the bearing is an important problem for space flight engine. Hard thin film coating can drastically improve the surface of the bearing and improve the wear-endurance of the bearing. However, many fundamental problems in surface physics, plasma deposition, etc, need further research. The approach is using electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition (ECRCVD) to deposit hard thin film an stainless steel bearing. The thin films in consideration include SiC, SiN and other materials. An ECRCVD deposition system is being assembled at MSFC.

  6. Analysis of Hard Thin Film Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Dashen

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is interested in developing hard thin film coating for bearings. The wearing of the bearing is an important problem for space flight engine. Hard thin film coating can drastically improve the surface of the bearing and improve the wear-endurance of the bearing. However, many fundamental problems in surface physics, plasma deposition, etc, need further research. The approach is using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECRCVD) to deposit hard thin film on stainless steel bearing. The thin films in consideration include SiC, SiN and other materials. An ECRCVD deposition system is being assembled at MSFC.

  7. Self Healing Coating/Film Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Calle, Luz; Williams, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been developing self healing materials and technologies. This project seeks to further develop self healing functionality in thin films for applications such as corrosion protective coatings, inflatable structures, space suit materials, and electrical wire insulation.

  8. Tailoring Thin Film-Lacquer Coatings for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Wanda C.; Harris, George; Miller, Grace; Petro, John

    1998-01-01

    Thin film coatings have the capability of obtaining a wide range of thermal radiative properties, but the development of thin film coatings can sometimes be difficult and costly when trying to achieve highly specular surfaces. Given any space mission's then-nal control requirements, there is often a need for a variation of solar absorptance (alpha(sub s)), emittance (epsilon) and/or highly specular surfaces. The utilization of thin film coatings is one process of choice for meeting challenging thermal control requirements because of its ability to provide a wide variety of alpha(sub s)/epsilon ratios. Thin film coatings' radiative properties can be tailored to meet specific thermal control requirements through the use of different metals and the variation of dielectric layer thickness. Surface coatings can be spectrally selective to enhance radiative coupling and decoupling. The application of lacquer to a surface can also provide suitable specularity for thin film application without the cost and difficulty associated with polishing.

  9. Tantalum-based thin film coatings for wear resistant arthroprostheses.

    PubMed

    Balagna, C; Faga, M G; Spriano, S

    2011-10-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys with high carbon content (HC-CoCrMo) are widely used as materials for arthroprosthesis, in particular in metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joints. In spite of their good wear and corrosion resistance, production of metallic wear particles and metal ion release will occur on a large time-scale. An enhancement of the metal ion level in the patient's blood and urine is often reported in clinical data. Hypersensitivity, inflammatory response and cell necrosis can occur as consequence. So implants on young patients and women on childbearing age are not so widespread. The aim of this research is the realization of a thin film coating in order to improve the biocompatibility of Co-based alloys and to reduce debris production, ion release and citotoxicity. The innovative process consists of a thermal treatment in molten salts, in order to obtain a tantalum enriched thin film coating. Tantalum is chosen because it is considered a biocompatible metal with high corrosion resistance and low ion release. Three HC-CoCrMo alloys, produced by different manufacturing processes, are tested as substrates. The coating is a thin film of TaC or it can be composed by a multilayer of two tantalum carbides and metallic tantalum, depending on the temperature of the treatment and on the carbon content of the substrate. The thin films as well the substrates are characterized from the structural, chemical and morphological point of view. Moreover mechanical behaviour of treated and untreated materials is analyzed by means of nanohardness, scratch and ball-on-disc wear tests. The coating increases the mechanical and tribological properties of HC-CoCrMo. PMID:22400292

  10. Coating to enhance metal-polymer adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathi, A.; Mahulikar, D.

    1996-12-31

    An ultra-thin electroplated coating has been developed to enhance adhesion of metals to polymers. The coating was developed for microelectronic packaging applications where it greatly improves adhesion of metal leadframes to plastic molding compounds. Recent tests show that the coating enhances adhesion of different metals to other types of adhesives as well and may thus have wider applicability. Results of adhesion tests with this coating, as well as its other characteristics such as corrosion resistance, are discussed. The coating is a very thin transparent electroplated coating containing zinc and chromium. It has been found to be effective on a variety of metal surfaces including copper alloys, Fe-Ni alloys, Al alloys, stainless steel, silver, nickel, Pd/Ni and Ni-Sn. Contact resistance measurements show that the coating has little or no effect on electrical resistivity.

  11. Overlay metallic-cermet alloy coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Levine, S. R.; Glasgow, T. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A substrate, such as a turbine blade, vane, or the like, which is subjected to high temperature use is coated with a base coating of an oxide dispersed, metallic alloy (cermet). A top coating of an oxidation, hot corrosion, erosion resistant alloy of nickel, cobalt, or iron is then deposited on the base coating. A heat treatment is used to improve the bonding. The base coating serves as an inhibitor to interdiffusion between the protective top coating and the substrate. Otherwise, the protective top coating would rapidly interact detrimentally with the substrate and degrade by spalling of the protective oxides formed on the outer surface at elevated temperatures.

  12. Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Lane, Michael H.; Varrin, Jr., Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

  13. Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy study of metal-oxide thin film catalysts: Pt-CeO2 coated CNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matolínová, I.; Fiala, R.; Khalakhan, I.; Vorokhta, M.; Sofer, Z.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Matolín, V.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of Pt with CeO2 layers was investigated by using high resolution hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Pt doped CeO2 layers were deposited simultaneously by rf-magnetron sputtering on a SiO2/Si substrate and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown on a carbon diffusion layer of a polymer membrane fuel cell. In the case of the CNT support photoelectron spectra showed the formation of ionic platinum rich cerium oxide with Pt2+,4+ species, and with the Pt2+/Pt4+ ratio strongly dependent on the amount of platinum. Ce reveals 4+/3+ mixed valent character with Ce3+ concentration increasing with Pt content. In the case of the SiO2/Si substrate the film revealed Ce4+ and Pt4+ species only.

  14. Bi-metal coated aperture SNOM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Wróbel, Piotr; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2011-05-01

    Aperture probes of scanning near-field optical microscopes (SNOM) offer resolution which is limited by a sum of the aperture diameter at the tip of a tapered waveguide probe and twice the skin depth in metal used for coating. An increase of resolution requires a decrease of the aperture diameter. However, due to low energy throughput of such probes aperture diameters usually are larger than 50 nm. A groove structure at fiber core-metal coating interface for photon-to-plasmon conversion enhances the energy throughput 5-fold for Al coated probes and 30-fold for Au coated probes due to lower losses in the metal. However, gold coated probes have lower resolution, first due to light coupling from the core to plasmons at the outside of the metal coating, and second due to the skin depth being larger than for Al. Here we report on the impact of a metal bilayer of constant thickness for coating aperture SNOM probes. The purpose of the bilayer of two metals of which the outer one is aluminum and the inner is a noble metal is to assure low losses, hence larger transmission. Using body-of-revolution finite-difference time-domain simulations we analyze properties of probes without corrugations to measure the impact of using a metal bilayer and choose an optimum bi-metal configuration. Additionally we investigate how this type of metalization works in the case of grooved probes.

  15. Flexible thin metal film thermal sensing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, Donald L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A flexible thin metal film thermal sensing system is provided. A self-metallized polymeric film has a polymeric film region and a metal surface disposed thereon. A layer of electrically-conductive metal is deposited directly onto the self-metallized polymeric film's metal surface. Coupled to at least one of the metal surface and the layer of electrically-conductive metal is a device/system for measuring an electrical characteristic associated therewith as an indication of temperature.

  16. Coating a Sphere With Evaporated Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D. M.; Jackson, H. W.; Gatewood, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    In vacuum coating apparatus, metal evaporated onto sphere from small source located some distance away. Sphere held in path of metal vapor while rotated about axis that rocks back and forth. One tilting motion particularly easy to produce is sinusoidal rocking with frequency much lower than rotational frequency. Apparatus developed for coating single-crystal sapphire spheres with niobium.

  17. Superconductive niobium films coating carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Cirillo, M.; Behabtu, N.; Young, C. C.; Pasquali, M.; Vecchione, A.; Fittipaldi, R.; Corato, V.

    2014-11-01

    Superconducting niobium (Nb) has been successfully obtained by sputter deposition on carbon nanotube fibers. The transport properties of the niobium coating the fibers are compared to those of niobium thin films deposited on oxidized Si substrates during the same deposition run. For niobium films with thicknesses above 300 nm, the niobium coating the fibers and the thin films show similar normal state and superconducting properties with critical current density, measured at T = 4.2 K, of the order of 105 A cm-2. Thinner niobium layers coating the fibers also show the onset of the superconducting transition in the resistivity versus temperature dependence, but zero resistance is not observed down to T = 1 K. We evidence by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and current-voltage measurements that the granular structure of the samples is the main reason for the lack of true global superconductivity for thicknesses below 300 nm.

  18. Metallic Thin-Film Bonding and Alloy Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, Jack Merrill (Inventor); Campbell, Geoff (Inventor); Peotter, Brian S. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion bonding a stack of aluminum thin films is particularly challenging due to a stable aluminum oxide coating that rapidly forms on the aluminum thin films when they are exposed to atmosphere and the relatively low meting temperature of aluminum. By plating the individual aluminum thin films with a metal that does not rapidly form a stable oxide coating, the individual aluminum thin films may be readily diffusion bonded together using heat and pressure. The resulting diffusion bonded structure can be an alloy of choice through the use of a carefully selected base and plating metals. The aluminum thin films may also be etched with distinct patterns that form a microfluidic fluid flow path through the stack of aluminum thin films when diffusion bonded together.

  19. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis. PMID:18980236

  20. Systematic Evaluation of Jc Decrease in Thick Film Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Ignatiev; Dr. Amit Goyal

    2006-05-10

    Address both thickness dependence of Jc, in thick film YBCO coated conductors through an application of a suite of new measurement techniques to thick film wire samples produced by commercially viable coated conductor technologies.

  1. Metal fluoride coatings prepared by ion-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Martin; Sode, Maik; Gäbler, Dieter; Bernitzki, Helmut; Zaczek, Christoph; Kaiser, Norbert; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    ArF lithography technology requires minimization of optical losses due to scattering and absorption. Consequently, it is necessary to optimize the coating process of metal fluorides. The properties of metal fluoride thin films are mainly affected by the deposition methods, their parameters (temperature and deposition rate) and the vacuum conditions. A substrate temperature of more than 300°C is a condition for high density and low water content of metal fluorides. Therefore, a substrate temperature of 150°C results in inhomogeneous films with high water content. Until now, the best results were achieved by boat evaporation. This paper will demonstrate that most of the common metal fluorides like MgF2, AlF3, and even LaF3 can be deposited by electron beam evaporation. In comparison to other deposition methods, the prepared thin films have the lowest absorption in the VUV spectral range. Furthermore, metal fluoride thin films were prepared by ion assistance. It will be demonstrated, that they have less water content, high packing density, and low absorption in the VUV spectral range. In this study, single layers of LaF3 and AlF3 and antireflection coatings were prepared by electron beam evaporation with and without ion-assistance. The mechanical, structural, and optical properties were examined and discussed.

  2. Film coatings for contoured surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanery, H. E.; Frost, R. K.; Olson, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thickness of fluorocarbon elastomer films applied in contoured shapes by vacuum forming is difficult to control at sharply curved areas. Process for spraying contoured fluorocarbon elastomer films of uniform strength and thickness has been used instead of vacuum forming to fabricate curtain covering external tank of Space Shuttle. Conventional spray equipment may be used.

  3. Plasma-Spray Metal Coating On Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molds, forms, and other substrates made of foams coated with metals by plasma spraying. Foam might be ceramic, carbon, metallic, organic, or inorganic. After coat applied by plasma spraying, foam left intact or removed by acid leaching, conventional machining, water-jet cutting, or another suitable technique. Cores or vessels made of various foam materials plasma-coated with metals according to method useful as thermally insulating containers for foods, liquids, or gases, or as mandrels for making composite-material (matrix/fiber) parts, or making thermally insulating firewalls in automobiles.

  4. Real-time measurement of protein adsorption on electrophoretically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings and magnetron sputtered metallic films using the surface acoustic wave technique.

    PubMed

    Meininger, M; Schmitz, T; Wagner, T; Ewald, A; Gbureck, U; Groll, J; Moseke, C

    2016-04-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensors are highly sensitive for mass binding and are therefore used to detect protein-protein and protein-antibody interactions. Whilst the standard surface of the chips is a thin gold film, measurements on implant- or bone-like surfaces could significantly enhance the range of possible applications for this technique. The aim of this study was to establish methods to coat biosensor chips with Ti, TiN, and silver-doped TiN using physical vapor deposition as well as with hydroxyapatite by electrophoresis. To demonstrate that protein adsorption can be detected on these surfaces, binding experiments with fibronectin and fibronectin-specific antibodies have been performed with the coatings, which successfully proved the applicability of PVD and EPD for SAW biosensor functionalization. PMID:26838860

  5. Metal/dielectric/metal sandwich film for broadband reflection reduction

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Lin, Meng-Jie; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wu, Huang-Ming; Liao, Hung-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    A film comprising randomly distributed metal/dielectric/metal sandwich nanopillars with a distribution of cross-sectional diameters, displayed extremely low reflectance over the blue-to-red regime, when coated on glass and illuminated normally. When it is illuminated by normally incident light, this sandwich film (SWF) has a low extinction coefficient, its phase thickness is close to a negative wavelength in the blue-to-red spectral regime, and it provides weakly dispersive forward and backward impedances, so that reflected waves from the two faces of the SWF interfere destructively. Broadband reflection-reduction, over a wide range of incidence angles and regardless of the polarization state of the incident light, was observed when the SWF was deposited on polished silicon. PMID:23591704

  6. Antimicrobial edible films and coatings.

    PubMed

    Cagri, Arzu; Ustunol, Zeynep; Ryser, Elliot T

    2004-04-01

    Increasing consumer demand for microbiologically safer foods, greater convenience, smaller packages, and longer product shelf life is forcing the industry to develop new food-processing, cooking, handling, and packaging strategies. Nonfluid ready-to-eat foods are frequently exposed to postprocess surface contamination, leading to a reduction in shelf life. The food industry has at its disposal a wide range of nonedible polypropylene- and polyethylene-based packaging materials and various biodegradable protein- and polysaccharide-based edible films that can potentially serve as packaging materials. Research on the use of edible films as packaging materials continues because of the potential for these films to enhance food quality, food safety, and product shelf life. Besides acting as a barrier against mass diffusion (moisture, gases, and volatiles), edible films can serve as carriers for a wide range of food additives, including flavoring agents, antioxidants, vitamins, and colorants. When antimicrobial agents such as benzoic acid, sorbic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, nisin, and lysozyme have been incorporated into edible films, such films retarded surface growth of bacteria, yeasts, and molds on a wide range of products, including meats and cheeses. Various antimicrobial edible films have been developed to minimize growth of spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms, including Listeria monocytogenes, which may contaminate the surface of cooked ready-to-eat foods after processing. Here, we review the various types of protein-based (wheat gluten, collagen, corn zein, soy, casein, and whey protein), polysaccharide-based (cellulose, chitosan, alginate, starch, pectin, and dextrin), and lipid-based (waxes, acylglycerols, and fatty acids) edible films and a wide range of antimicrobial agents that have been or could potentially be incorporated into such films during manufacture to enhance the safety and shelf life of ready-to-eat foods. PMID:15083740

  7. Formulating Precursors for Coating Metals and Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Gatica, Jorge E.; Reye, John T.

    2005-01-01

    A protocol has been devised for formulating low-vapor-pressure precursors for protective and conversion coatings on metallic and ceramic substrates. The ingredients of a precursor to which the protocol applies include additives with phosphate esters, or aryl phosphate esters in solution. Additives can include iron, chromium, and/or other transition metals. Alternative or additional additives can include magnesium compounds to facilitate growth of films on substrates that do not contain magnesium. Formulation of a precursor begins with mixing of the ingredients into a high-vapor-pressure solvent to form a homogeneous solution. Then the solvent is extracted from the solution by evaporation - aided, if necessary, by vacuum and/or slight heating. The solvent is deemed to be completely extracted when the viscosity of the remaining solution closely resembles the viscosity of the phosphate ester or aryl phosphate ester. In addition, satisfactory removal of the solvent can be verified by means of a differential scanning calorimetry essay: the absence of endothermic processes for temperatures below 150 C would indicate that the residual solvent has been eliminated from the solution beyond a detectable dilution level.

  8. Introduction: Edible Coatings and Films to Improve Food Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book gives a history of the development and uses of edible coatings, detailed chapters on coating caracteristics, determination of coating properties, methods for making coatings, and discription of coating film formers (polysaccharieds, lipids, resins, proteins). The book also disucsses coatin...

  9. Molecular Level Coating of Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar osmotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing, synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper. making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  10. Molecular Level Coating for Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); Saint Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar aprotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper, making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  11. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  12. METHOD FOR COATING GRAPHITE WITH METALLIC CARBIDES

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.A.

    1960-03-22

    A method for producing refractory coatings of metallic carbides on graphite was developed. In particular, the graphite piece to be coated is immersed in a molten solution of 4 to 5% by weight of zirconium, titanium, or niobium dissolved in tin. The solution is heated in an argon atmosphere to above 1400 deg C, whereby the refractory metal reacts with the surface of the graphite to form a layer of metalic carbide. The molten solution is cooled to 300 to 400 deg C, and the graphite piece is removed. Excess tin is wiped from the graphite, which is then heated in vacuum to above 2300 deg C. The tin vaporizes from the graphite surface, leaving the surface coated with a tenacious layer of refractory metallic carbide.

  13. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  14. Massive failure of TiNbN coating in surface engineered metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty: Retrieval analysis.

    PubMed

    Łapaj, Łukasz; Markuszewski, Jacek; Wendland, Justyna; Mróz, Adrian; Wierusz-Kozłowska, Małgorzata

    2016-07-01

    This article presents examination of a failed total hip replacement with surface engineered metal-on-metal (MoM) articulation. The implant was coated with a thin TiNbN film (Physical Vapor Deposition), and at retrieval 53 months after implantation the coating was abraded on weight-bearing part of the head and acetabular component. Scanning electron microscopy of bearing surfaces demonstrated multifocal crack formation, delamination of small film fragments, and formation of aggregates containing nanometer sized wear debris. We also observed coating damage in third body mechanism. Complex failure mechanism of TiNbN coating demonstrated in this study suggests insufficient bonding strength between the coating and substrate alloy and raise concerns regarding the use of such coatings in total hip arthroplasty with MoM bearing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1043-1049, 2016. PMID:25980456

  15. Ultrathin metallic coatings can induce quantum levitation between nanosurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boström, Mathias; Ninham, Barry W.; Brevik, Iver; Persson, Clas; Parsons, Drew F.; Sernelius, Bo E.

    2012-06-01

    There is an attractive Casimir-Lifshitz force between two silica surfaces in a liquid (bromobenze or toluene). We demonstrate that adding an ultrathin (5-50 Å) metallic nanocoating to one of the surfaces results in repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces above a critical separation. The onset of such quantum levitation comes at decreasing separations as the film thickness decreases. Remarkably, the effect of retardation can turn attraction into repulsion. From that we explain how an ultrathin metallic coating may prevent nanoelectromechanical systems from crashing together.

  16. Covering solid, film cooled surfaces with a duplex thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating systems were applied to hardware having passageways in the walls connecting apertures in the surface to a gas supply for film cooling. An inert gas, such as argon, is discharged through the apertures during the application of the thermal barrier coating system by plasma spraying. This flow of inert gas reduces both blocking of the holes and base metal oxidation during the coating operation.

  17. Metal alloy coatings and methods for applying

    DOEpatents

    Merz, Martin D.; Knoll, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    A method of coating a substrate comprises plasma spraying a prealloyed feed powder onto a substrate, where the prealloyed feed powder comprises a significant amount of an alloy of stainless steel and at least one refractory element selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The plasma spraying of such a feed powder is conducted in an oxygen containing atmosphere and forms an adherent, corrosion resistant, and substantially homogenous metallic refractory alloy coating on the substrate.

  18. High temperature barrier coatings for refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Walech, T.

    1995-01-01

    Improvements in high temperature oxidation resistant metal coating technology will allow NASA and commercial entities to develop competitive civil space transport and communication systems. The success of investigations completed in this program will have a positive impact on broadening the technology base for high temperature materials. The work reported herein describes processes and procedures for successfully depositing coherent oxidation barrier coatings on refractory metals to prevent degradation under very severe operating environments. Application of the new technology developed is now being utilized in numerous Phase 3 applications through several prominent aerospace firms. Major achievements have included: (1) development of means to deposit thick platinum and rhodium coatings with lower stress and fewer microcracks than could be previously achieved; (2) development of processes to deposit thick adherent coatings of platinum group metals on refractory substrates that remain bonded through high temperature excursions and without need for intermediate coatings (bonding processes unique to specific refractory metals and alloys have been defined; (3) demonstration that useful alloys of refractory and platinum coatings can be made through thermal diffusion means; (4) demonstration that selected barrier coatings on refractory substrates can withstand severe oxidizing environments in the range of 1260 deg and 1760 deg C for long time periods essential to the life requirements of the hardware; and (5) successful application of the processes and procedures to prototype hardware. The results of these studies have been instrumental in improved thermal oxidation barrier coatings for the NASP propulsion system. Other Phase 3 applications currently being exploited include small uncooled thrusters for spacecraft and microsatellite maneuvering systems.

  19. Process for fabrication of metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.; Svensson, S.

    1990-07-17

    This invention is comprised of a method of fabricating metal oxide films from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of metal oxides, e.g. electro-optically active transition metal oxides, at a high deposition rate. The presence of hydrogen during the plasma reaction enhances the deposition rate of the metal oxide. Various types of metal oxide films can be produced.

  20. Metal seated ball valves with carbide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, R.; Yung, E.

    1994-12-31

    Valvtechnologies valves utilize Alloy Carbide HVOF Sprayed RAM{reg_sign} Hardcoatings such as Chrome Carbide and Tungsten Carbide Coatings. The coatings are applied using a Proprietary Gun combusting Hydrogen and Oxygen. The powders are heated and accelerated toward the valve component forming a tenaciously bonded coating. Each coating is chosen depending upon the environment the valve will operate in. These valves have solved many Petro-Chemical service life problems. Free from the temperature limits of elastomers, the only sealing materials are metal, the carbides and grafoils (carbons). Operating temperatures to 982 C (1,800 F) are typical limits; 649 C (1,200 F) is common. Lower temperatures are also common, even in the cryogenic range. Even though the coatings have low thermal expansion rates, RAM{reg_sign} Hardcoatings can expand and contract with the base material and still maintain a seal.

  1. Extraordinary optical transmission in nanopatterned ultrathin metal films without holes.

    PubMed

    Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2016-02-28

    We experimentally and theoretically demonstrate that a continuous gold film on a periodically textured substrate exhibits extraordinary optical transmission, even though no holes were etched in the film. Our film synthesis started by nanoimprinting a periodic array of nanocups with a period of ∼750 nm on a polystyrene film over a glass substrate. A thin non-conformal gold film was sputter-deposited on the polystyrene by angle-directed deposition. The gold film was continuous with spatial thickness variation, the film being thinnest at the bottom of the nanocup. Measurements revealed an extraordinary transmission peak at a wavelength just smaller than the period, with an enhancement of ∼2.5 compared to the classically expected value. Scattering matrix simulations model well the transmission and reflectance measurements when an ultrathin gold layer (∼5 nm), smaller than the skin depth is retained at the bottom of the nanocups. Electric field intensities are enhanced by >100 within the nanocup, and ∼40 in the ultrathin gold layer causing transmission through it. We show a wavelength red-shift of ∼30 nm in the extraordinary transmission peak when the nanocups are coated with a thin film of a few nanometers, which can be utilized for biosensing. The continuous corrugated metal films are far simpler structures to observe extraordinary transmission, circumventing the difficult process of etching the metal film. Such continuous metal films with ultrathin regions are simple platforms for non-linear optics, plasmonics, and biological and chemical sensing. PMID:26853881

  2. Extraordinary optical transmission in nanopatterned ultrathin metal films without holes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrate that a continuous gold film on a periodically textured substrate exhibits extraordinary optical transmission, even though no holes were etched in the film. Our film synthesis started by nanoimprinting a periodic array of nanocups with a period of ~750 nm on a polystyrene film over a glass substrate. A thin non-conformal gold film was sputter-deposited on the polystyrene by angle-directed deposition. The gold film was continuous with spatial thickness variation, the film being thinnest at the bottom of the nanocup. Measurements revealed an extraordinary transmission peak at a wavelength just smaller thanmore » the period, with an enhancement of ~2.5 compared to the classically expected value. Scattering matrix simulations model well the transmission and reflectance measurements when an ultrathin gold layer (~5 nm), smaller than the skin depth is retained at the bottom of the nanocups. Electric field intensities are enhanced by >100 within the nanocup, and ~40 in the ultrathin gold layer causing transmission through it. We show a wavelength red-shift of ~30 nm in the extraordinary transmission peak when the nanocups are coated with a thin film of a few nanometers, which can be utilized for biosensing. The continuous corrugated metal films are far simpler structures to observe extraordinary transmission, circumventing the difficult process of etching the metal film. Such continuous metal films with ultrathin regions are simple platforms for non-linear optics, plasmonics, and biological and chemical sensing.« less

  3. Applications of thin carbon coatings and films in injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Eusebio Duarte

    In this research, the technical feasibility of two novel applications of thin carbon coatings is demonstrated. The first application consists of using thin carbon coatings on molds for molding ultra-thin plastic parts (<0.5 mm thickness) with lower pressures by promoting wall slip. The second application consists of a new approach to provide electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding for plastic parts using in mold coated nanoparticle thin films or nanopapers to create a conductive top layer. During this research, the technical feasibility of a new approach was proven which provides injection molding of ultra-thin parts at lower pressures, without the need of fast heating/fast cooling or other expensive mold modification. An in-house developed procedure by other members of our group, was employed for coating the mold surface using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) resulting in a graphene coating with carbide bonding to the mold surface. The coating resulted in a significant decrease of surface friction and consequently easiness of flow when compared to their uncoated counterparts. Thermoplastic polymers and their composites are a very attractive alternative but are hindered by the non-conductive nature of polymers. There are two general approaches used to date to achieve EMI shielding for plastic products. One is to spray a conductive metal coating onto the plastic surface forming a layer that must maintain its shielding effectiveness (SE), and its adhesion to the plastic throughout the expected life of the product. However, metal coatings add undesirable weight and tend to corrode over time. Furthermore, scratching the coating may create shielding failure; therefore, a protective topcoat may be required. The other approach is to use polymer composites filled with conductive fillers such as carbon black (CB), carbon nanofiber (CNF), and carbon nanotube (CNT). While conductive fillers may increase the electrical conductivity of polymer composites, the loading of

  4. Rapidly solidified metal coatings by peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, H. P.

    1987-01-01

    Specimens of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy were peen plated with rapidly solidified tin-lead and aluminum powders, and the cross-sections of the coated specimens were examined by light and electron microscopy. The properties of the peen plated specimens were also compared with those of shot peened specimens without any coating. It is found that peen plating with rapidly solidified metals improves the fatigue properties of the coated samples to a greater extent than shot peening alone. Specimens of 7075-T6 alloy peen plated with rapidly solidified tin-lead and aluminum exhibited better fatigue resistance than shot peened specimens in both air and salt water.

  5. Metallic seal for thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is particularly concerned with sealing thermal barrier coating systems of the type in use and being contemplated for use in diesel and other internal combustion engines. The invention also would find application in moderately high temperature regions of gas turbine engines and any other application employing a thermal barrier coating at moderate temperatures. Ni-35Cr-6Al-1Y, Ni-35Cr-6Al-1Yb, or other metallic alloy denoted as MCrAlx is applied over a zirconia-based thermal barrier overlayer. The close-out layer is glass-bead preened to densify its surface. This seals and protects the thermal barrier coating system.

  6. Study of two different thin film coating methods in transmission laser micro-joining of thin Ti-film coated glass and polyimide for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sultana, T; Georgiev, G L; Baird, R J; Auner, G W; Newaz, G; Patwa, R; Herfurth, H J

    2009-07-01

    Biomedical devices and implants require precision joining for hermetic sealing which can be achieved with low power lasers. The effect of two different thin metal film coating methods was studied in transmission laser micro-joints of titanium-coated glass and polyimide. The coating methods were cathodic arc physical vapor deposition (CA-PVD) and electron beam evaporation (EB-PVD). Titanium-coated glass joined to polyimide film can have neural electrode application. The improvement of the joint quality will be essential for robust performance of the device. Low power fiber laser (wave length = 1100 nm) was used for transmission laser micro-joining of thin titanium (Ti) film (approximately 200 nm) coated Pyrex borosilicate 7740 glass wafer (0.5 mm thick) and polyimide (Imidex) film (0.2 mm thick). Ti film acts as the coupling agent in the joining process. The Ti film deposition rate in the CA-PVD was 5-10 A/s and in the EB-PVD 1.5 A/s. The laser joint strength was measured by a lap shear test, the Ti film surfaces were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the lap shear tested joints were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The film properties and the failure modes of the joints were correlated to joint strength. The CA-PVD produced around 4 times stronger laser joints than EB-PVD. The adhesion of the Ti film on glass by CA-PVD is better than that of the EB-PVD method. This is likely to be due to a higher film deposition rate and consequently higher adhesion or sticking coefficient for the CA-PVD particles arriving on the substrate compared to that of the EB-PVD film. EB-PVD shows poor laser bonding properties due to the development of thermal hotspots which occurs from film decohesion. PMID:19627828

  7. Photobiomolecular metallic particles and films

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2003-05-06

    The method of the invention is based on the unique electron-carrying function of a photocatalytic unit such as the photosynthesis system I (PSI) reaction center of the protein-chlorophyll complex isolated from chloroplasts. The method employs a photo-biomolecular metal deposition technique for precisely controlled nucleation and growth of metallic clusters/particles, e.g., platinum, palladium, and their alloys, etc., as well as for thin-film formation above the surface of a solid substrate. The photochemically mediated technique offers numerous advantages over traditional deposition methods including quantitative atom deposition control, high energy efficiency, and mild operating condition requirements.

  8. METAL COATED ARTICLES AND METHOD OF MAKING

    DOEpatents

    Eubank, L.D.

    1958-08-26

    A method for manufacturing a solid metallic uranium body having an integral multiple layer protective coating, comprising an inner uranium-aluminum alloy firmly bonded to the metallic uranium is presented. A third layer of silver-zinc alloy is bonded to the zinc-aluiminum layer and finally a fourth layer of lead-silver alloy is firmly bonded to the silver-zinc layer.

  9. Channel cracks in atomic-layer and molecular-layer deposited multilayer thin film coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Rong; Dunn, Martin L.

    2014-06-21

    Metal oxide thin film coatings produced by atomic layer deposition have been shown to be an effective permeation barrier. The primary failure mode of such coatings under tensile loads is the propagation of channel cracks that penetrate vertically into the coating films. Recently, multi-layer structures that combine the metal oxide material with relatively soft polymeric layers produced by molecular layer deposition have been proposed to create composite thin films with desired properties, including potentially enhanced resistance to fracture. In this paper, we study the effects of layer geometry and material properties on the critical strain for channel crack propagation in the multi-layer composite films. Using finite element simulations and a thin-film fracture mechanics formalism, we show that if the fracture energy of the polymeric layer is lower than that of the metal oxide layer, the channel crack tends to penetrate through the entire composite film, and dividing the metal oxide and polymeric materials into thinner layers leads to a smaller critical strain. However, if the fracture energy of the polymeric material is high so that cracks only run through the metal oxide layers, more layers can result in a larger critical strain. For intermediate fracture energy of the polymer material, we developed a design map that identifies the optimal structure for given fracture energies and thicknesses of the metal oxide and polymeric layers. These results can facilitate the design of mechanically robust permeation barriers, an important component for the development of flexible electronics.

  10. Superhardness effect in transition-metal diborides films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhin, A. I.; Goncharov, A. A.; Pogrebnyak, A. D.; Stupak, V. A.; Goncharova, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The structure, composition, and properties of transition-metal diboride films have been studied. It was shown that they are characterized by a wide range of structural states, namely from amorphous-like to nanocrystalline with crystallite sizes of 1-50 nm. The characteristic peculiarity of the structure of film transition-metal diborides with high physical and mechanical properties is the formation of a nanocrystalline (columnar) structure with the growth texture in plane [00.1] and a nanocrystallite size of 20-50 nm. The element composition of a superhard highly textured film transition-metal diborides was studied by ion mass spectrometry and Auger electron spectroscopy. The overstoichiometry effect in nanocrystalline transitionmetal diboride films is explained. It was shown that this effect is related to the formation of an additional B⎯B covalent bond, which is realized at subgrain boundaries and leads to the appearance of superhardness in the formed coatings.

  11. Mesoporous titanium dioxide coating for metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Grandfield, Kathryn; Hoess, Andreas; Ballo, Ahmed; Cai, Yanling; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    A bioactive mesoporous titanium dioxide (MT) coating for surface drug delivery has been investigated to develop a multifunctional implant coating, offering quick bone bonding and biological stability. An evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) method was used to prepare a mesoporous titanium dioxide coating of the anatase phase with BET surface area of 172 m(2)/g and average pore diameter of 4.3 nm. Adhesion tests using the scratch method and an in situ screw-in/screw-out technique confirm that the MT coating bonds tightly with the metallic substrate, even after removal from bone. Because of its high surface area, the bioactivity of the MT coating is much better than that of a dense TiO(2) coating of the same composition. Quick formation of hydroxyapatite (HA) in vitro can be related to enhance bonding with bone. The uptake of antibiotics by the MT coating reached 13.4 mg/cm(3) within a 24 h loading process. A sustained release behavior has been obtained with a weak initial burst. By using Cephalothin as a model drug, drug loaded MT coating exhibits a sufficient antibacterial effect on the material surface, and within millimeters from material surface, against E.coli. Additionally, the coated and drug loaded surfaces showed no cytotoxic effect on cell cultures of the osteoblastic cell line MG-63. In conclusion, this study describes a novel, biocompatiblemesoporous implant coating, which has the ability to induce HA formation and could be used as a surface drug-delivery system. PMID:21954047

  12. High-emittance coatings on metal substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuelson, R. C.; Luoma, W. L.; Walek, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    High-emittance coatings of iron, calcium, and zirconium titanates thermally sprayed on stainless steel, columbium-1 percent zirconium, and beryllium substrates promote and control radiative heat transfer from the metal substrates. Adherence, compatibility and emittance stability at elevated temperature and high vacuum were evaluated.

  13. Smoothing of ultrathin silver films by transition metal seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, André; Byon, Eungsun; Kim, Dong-Ho; Fukuda, Kentaro; Lim, Sunnie H. N.

    2006-11-01

    The nucleation and coalescence of silver islands on coated glass was investigated by in situ measurements of the sheet resistance. Sub-monolayer amounts of niobium and other transition metals were deposited prior to the deposition of silver. It was found that in some cases, the transition metals lead to coalescence of silver at nominally thinner films with smoother topology. The smoothing or roughening effects by the presence of the transition metal can be explained by kinetically limited transition metal islands growth and oxidation, followed by defect-dominated nucleation of silver.

  14. Simple Methods for Production of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Films from Household Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Baliss, Michelle S.; Hinman, Jordan J.; Ziegenhorn, John W.; Andrews, Mark J.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2013-01-01

    Production of thin metal oxide films was recently explored as part of an outreach program with a goal of producing nanoscale structures with household items. Household items coated with various metals or titanium compounds can be heated to produce colorful films with nanoscale thicknesses. As part of a materials chemistry laboratory experiment…

  15. Sol-gel metal oxide and metal oxide/polymer multilayers applied by meniscus coating

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J.A.; Thomas, I.M.

    1993-10-01

    We are developing a meniscus coating process for manufacturing large-aperture dielectric multilayer high reflectors (HR`s) at ambient conditions from liquid suspensions. Using a lab-scale coater capable of coating 150 mm square substrates, we have produced several HR`s which give 99% + reflection with 24 layers and with edge effects confined to about 10 mm. In calendar 1993 we are taking delivery of an automated meniscus coating machine capable of coating substrates up to 400 mm wide and 600 mm long. The laser-damage threshold and failure stress of sol-gel thin films can be substantially increased through the use of soluble polymers which act as binders for the metal oxide particles comprising the deposited film. Refractive index control of the film is also possible through varying the polymer/oxide ratio. Much of our present effort present is in optimizing oxide particle/binder/solvent formulations for the high-index material. Films from colloidal zirconia strengthened with polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP) have given best results to date. An increase in the laser damage threshold (LDT) for single layers has been shown to significantly increase with increased polymer loading, but as yet the LDT for multilayer stacks remains low.

  16. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOEpatents

    Mickelsen, Reid A.; Chen, Wen S.

    1985-01-01

    A compositionally uniform thin film of a mixed metal compound is formed by simultaneously evaporating a first metal compound and a second metal compound from independent sources. The mean free path between the vapor particles is reduced by a gas and the mixed vapors are deposited uniformly. The invention finds particular utility in forming thin film heterojunction solar cells.

  17. Indium doped zinc oxide nanowire thin films for antireflection and solar absorber coating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shaik, Ummar Pasha; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam

    2014-04-24

    Indium doped ZnO nanowire thin films were prepared by thermal oxidation of Zn-In metal bilayer films at 500°C. The ZnO:In nanowires are 20-100 nm in diameter and several tens of microns long. X-ray diffraction patterns confirm the formation of oxide and indicate that the films are polycrystalline, both in the as deposited and annealed states. The transmission which is <2% for the as deposited Zn-In films increases to >90% for the ZnO:In nanowire films. Significantly, the reflectance for the as deposited films is < 10% in the region between 200 to 1500 nm and < 2% for the nanowire films. Thus, the as deposited films can be used solar absorber coatings while the nanowire films are useful for antireflection applications. The growth of nanowires by this technique is attractive since it does not involve very high temperatures and the use of catalysts.

  18. Thin film hydrous metal oxide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.

    1995-01-01

    Thin film (<100 nm) hydrous metal oxide catalysts are prepared by 1) synthesis of a hydrous metal oxide, 2) deposition of the hydrous metal oxide upon an inert support surface, 3) ion exchange with catalytically active metals, and 4) activating the hydrous metal oxide catalysts.

  19. Protective coatings of metal surfaces by cold plasma treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manory, R.; Grill, A.

    1985-01-01

    The cold plasma techniques for deposition of various types of protective coatings are reviewed. The main advantage of these techniques for deposition of ceramic films is the lower process temperature, which enables heat treating of the metal prior to deposition. In the field of surface hardening of steel, significant reduction of treatment time and energy consumption were obtained. A simple model for the plasma - surface reactions in a cold plasma system is presented, and the plasma deposition techniques are discussed in view of this model.

  20. Does metal coating improve the durability of silicone voice prostheses?

    PubMed

    Arweiler-Harbeck, D; Sanders, A; Held, M; Jerman, M; Ehrich, H; Jahnke, K

    2001-07-01

    Voice prostheses, which are used for voice rehabilitation in cancer patients after laryngectomy, usually become colonized with a mixed biofilm of bacteria and Candida after 2-4 months and lose their efficiency. It is essential to ensure the stability and biocompatibility of these implants. With the aid of surface frame analysis we have shown that local antifungal treatment is inadequate for eliminating the deep infiltration and encapsulation of Candida colonies in silicone. A surface that prevents the adhesion of microorganisms is required. Because of its special properties there are few methods available for coating silicone. We employed, for the first time, a new method of surface modification using anodic vacuum arc coating. Using this method it was possible to obtain a solid film of gold or titanium metal with a layer thickness < 100 nm. Resistance against Candida colonization and destruction of coated prostheses were tested both in vitro and in vivo. A titanium coating seemed to provide the optimal solution to the problem, because surface adhesion and the smoothness of the material appeared to be superior to those of a gold coating. PMID:11583401

  1. Development of an all-metal thick film cost affective metallization system for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.

    1981-01-01

    An economical thick film solar cell contact for high volume production of low cost silicon solar array modules was investigated. All metal screenable pastes using base metals were studied. Solar cells with junction depths varying by a factor of 3.3, with and without a deposited oxide coating were used. Cells were screened and fired by a two step firing process. Adhesion and metallurgical results are unsatisfactory. No electrical information is obtained due to inadequate contact adhesion.

  2. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  3. The gravity effect on spin coating glucose thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, P.; Wang, H.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the gravity effect on spin-coated glucose film by comparing properties of films fabricated by two different methods: erected spin coating (ESC) and inverted spin coating (ISC). A “Bi-Layer” model, i.e. substrate effect layer and free layer, for spin coating is proposed to analyze the gravity effect on spin coating process which offers a more accurate prediction on film thickness. The thickness and deposition pattern are different in samples fabricated by ESC and ISC methods in titrating-repeated spin coating experiment. Finally, in a glucose coating/ferromagnetic composite structure, an enhanced Kerr rotation with the enhancement factor of 2.11 is achieved by ISC method.

  4. Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating

    DOEpatents

    Byrnes, Larry Edward; Kramer, Martin Stephen; Neiser, Richard A.

    2003-08-26

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

  5. Sustainable films and coatings from hemicelluloses: a review.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Natanya M L; Plackett, David

    2008-06-01

    This review summarizes the results of past research on films and coatings from hemicelluloses, biopolymers that are as yet relatively unexploited commercially. The targeted uses of hemicelluloses have primarily been packaging films and coatings for foodstuffs as well as biomedical applications. Oxygen permeability of hemicellulose films, an important characteristic for food packaging, was typically comparable to values found for other biopolymer films such as amylose and amylopectin. As expected, the modification of hemicelluloses to create more hydrophobic films reduced the water vapor permeability. However, modified hemicellulose coatings intended for food still exhibited water vapor permeabilities several magnitudes higher than those of other polymers currently used for this purpose. Research on hemicelluloses for biomedical applications has included biocompatible hydrogels and coatings and material surfaces with enhanced cell affinity. Numerous possibilities exist for chemically modifying hemicelluloses, and fundamental studies of films from modified hemicelluloses have identified other potential applications, including selective membranes. PMID:18457452

  6. Method of coating graphite tubes with refractory metal carbides

    DOEpatents

    Wohlberg, C.

    1973-12-11

    A method of coating graphite tubes with a refractory metal carbide is described. An alkali halide is reacted with a metallic oxide, the metallic portion being selected from the IVth or Vth group of the Periodic Table, the resulting salt reacting in turn with the carbon to give the desired refractory metal carbide coating. (Official Gazette)

  7. Instrumental color control for metallic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Han, Bing; Cui, Guihua; Rigg, Bryan; Luo, Ming R.

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes work investigating a suitable color quality control method for metallic coatings. A set of psychological experiments was carried out based upon 50 pairs of samples. The results were used to test the performance of various color difference formulae. Different techniques were developed by optimising the weights and/or the lightness parametric factors of colour differences calculated from the four measuring angles. The results show that the new techniques give a significant improvement compared to conventional techniques.

  8. Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence: Ultrafast Energy Transfer from Dyes in a Polymer Film to Metal Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaebeom; Pang, Yoonsoo

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence from dye molecules dispersed in thin polymer layers increases by 20-25 times when a silver island film exists beneath the layer. Polymer layers of <100 nm thick cover the silver island film to minimize emission quenching from direct contact and also keep the dye molecules in close proximity to the metal nanosurface for possible fluorescence enhancements by silver island film. We report an ultrafast radiation process of ~400 ps lifetime from the surface plasmons of silver nanoparticles observed in time-resolved fluorescence of rhodamine 6G and DCM in thin polymer films coated on silver island surface. The ultrafast energy transfer and fluorescence from metal nanoparticles might be strongly related to the efficiency of metal-enhanced fluorescence. PMID:27433635

  9. Wear Resistance of Coating Films on Hob Teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezaki, Yoji; Funaki, Yoshiyuki; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Ohnishi, Osamu; Doi, Toshiro

    The wear resistance of coating films on hob teeth is investigated through the simulated hobbing tests with a flytool. The coating films on hob teeth are titanium family ceramics such as TiN, TiCN, TiSiN and TiAlN and aluminum chromium family ceramics such as AlCrN and AlCrSiN. The wear of coated tools is shown about film thickness, film materials, ingredient ratio in a film component and the oxidization of coating films. The oxidization is clarified from a result of the influence on the crater wear progress through wear cutting tests in atmosphere of nitrogen gas or oxygen gas. The oxidization of TiAlN coating films produces oxide products on the tool rake face, and this oxidation relates to the amount of crater wear. The increase of aluminum concentration in the TiAlN film improves the crater wear resistance in air atmosphere, while it has a reverse effect in nitrogen gases. The AlCrSiN film has effective wear resistance against the abrasive wear and/or oxidization wear. The oxidation film formed on the AlCrSiN film is very firm and this suppresses the oxidation wear on the rake face and works against the abrasive wear advantageously.

  10. Liquid Galvanic Coatings for Protection of Imbedded Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor); Curran, Joseph J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Coating compositions and methods of their use are described herein for the reduction of corrosion in imbedded metal structures. The coatings are applied as liquids to an external surface of a substrate in which the metal structures are imbedded. The coatings are subsequently allowed to dry. The liquid applied coatings provide galvanic protection to the imbedded metal structures. Continued protection can be maintained with periodic reapplication of the coating compositions, as necessary, to maintain electrical continuity. Because the coatings may be applied using methods similar to standard paints, and because the coatings are applied to external surfaces of the substrates in which the metal structures are imbedded, the corresponding corrosion protection may be easily maintained. The coating compositions are particularly useful in the protection of metal-reinforced concrete.

  11. Optoacoustic method for determination of submicron metal coating properties: Theoretical consideration

    SciTech Connect

    Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Kopylova, Daria S.; Podymova, Natalia B.; Karabutov, Alexander A.

    2009-07-01

    The goal of this work is theoretical consideration of the optoacoustic (OA) conversion in the system consisting of a metal film deposited on a transparent dielectric substrate and covered by a transparent liquid. This consideration implies a method for nondestructive evaluation of submicron metal coatings. The main principle of the method is the following. Irradiation of the metal film by a nanosecond laser pulse leads to transient heating and expansion of the film that in turn results in the generation of an acoustic signal. The waveform of the signal results from two contributions: the 'primary' signal from the thermal expansion of the metal film, which repeats the temporal profile of the laser pulse envelope, and the 'secondary' signal, which originates from the thermal expansion of the adjacent liquid layer. Due to low thermal conductivity of liquid compared to metal, the liquid accumulates heat that is released in metal and produces that secondary contribution into the OA conversion. This contribution is very sensitive to the properties of the film. The influence of the film thickness and its thermophysical parameters on the frequency-dependent efficiency of OA conversion and on the temporal profile of excited OA signals is discussed in detail. Based on these results, the method for nondestructive evaluation of submicron metal coatings properties is proposed.

  12. Development of alloy-film coated dispenser cathode for terahertz vacuum electron devices application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, R. K.; Bera, A.; Raju, R. S.; Tanwar, A. K.; Baek, I. K.; Min, S. H.; Kwon, O. J.; Sattorov, M. A.; Lee, K. W.; Park, G.-S.

    2013-07-01

    High power terahertz vacuum electron devices demand high current density and uniform emission dispenser cathode. It was found that the coating of noble metals e.g., Os, Ir, and Re on the surface of tungsten dispenser cathodes enhances the emission capabilities and uniformity. Hence metal coated cathode might be the best candidate for terahertz devices applications. In this study, ternary-alloy-film cathode (2Os:2Re:1 W) and Os coated cathode have been developed and the results are presented. The cathodes made out of this alloy coating showed 1.5 times higher emission and 0.02 eV emission uniformity as compared to those of simply Os coated cathodes which can be used in terahertz devices application.

  13. A Study of Deposition Coatings Formed by Electroformed Metallic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Kojiro; Tobayama, Go; Togashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Major joining methods of dental casting metal include brazing and laser welding. However, brazing cannot be applied for electroformed metals since heat treatment could affect the fit, and, therefore, laser welding is used for such metals. New methods of joining metals that do not impair the characteristics of electroformed metals should be developed. When new coating is performed on the surface of the base metal, surface treatment is usually performed before re-coating. The effect of surface treatment is clinically evaluated by peeling and flex tests. However, these testing methods are not ideal for deposition coating strength measurement of electroformed metals. There have been no studies on the deposition coating strength and methods to test electroformed metals. We developed a new deposition coating strength test for electroformed metals. The influence of the negative electrolytic method, which is one of the electrochemical surface treatments, on the strength of the deposition coating of electroformed metals was investigated, and the following conclusions were drawn: 1. This process makes it possible to remove residual deposits on the electrodeposited metal surface layer. 2. Cathode electrolysis is a simple and safe method that is capable of improving the surface treatment by adjustments to the current supply method and current intensity. 3. Electrochemical treatment can improve the deposition coating strength compared to the physical or chemical treatment methods. 4. Electro-deposition coating is an innovative technique for the deposition coating of electroformed metal. PMID:27326757

  14. A Study of Deposition Coatings Formed by Electroformed Metallic Materials.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shoji; Sugiyama, Shuta; Shimura, Kojiro; Tobayama, Go; Togashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Major joining methods of dental casting metal include brazing and laser welding. However, brazing cannot be applied for electroformed metals since heat treatment could affect the fit, and, therefore, laser welding is used for such metals. New methods of joining metals that do not impair the characteristics of electroformed metals should be developed. When new coating is performed on the surface of the base metal, surface treatment is usually performed before re-coating. The effect of surface treatment is clinically evaluated by peeling and flex tests. However, these testing methods are not ideal for deposition coating strength measurement of electroformed metals. There have been no studies on the deposition coating strength and methods to test electroformed metals. We developed a new deposition coating strength test for electroformed metals. The influence of the negative electrolytic method, which is one of the electrochemical surface treatments, on the strength of the deposition coating of electroformed metals was investigated, and the following conclusions were drawn: 1. This process makes it possible to remove residual deposits on the electrodeposited metal surface layer. 2. Cathode electrolysis is a simple and safe method that is capable of improving the surface treatment by adjustments to the current supply method and current intensity. 3. Electrochemical treatment can improve the deposition coating strength compared to the physical or chemical treatment methods. 4. Electro-deposition coating is an innovative technique for the deposition coating of electroformed metal. PMID:27326757

  15. Extraordinary optical transmission in nanopatterned ultrathin metal films without holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally and theoretically demonstrate that a continuous gold film on a periodically textured substrate exhibits extraordinary optical transmission, even though no holes were etched in the film. Our film synthesis started by nanoimprinting a periodic array of nanocups with a period of ~750 nm on a polystyrene film over a glass substrate. A thin non-conformal gold film was sputter-deposited on the polystyrene by angle-directed deposition. The gold film was continuous with spatial thickness variation, the film being thinnest at the bottom of the nanocup. Measurements revealed an extraordinary transmission peak at a wavelength just smaller than the period, with an enhancement of ~2.5 compared to the classically expected value. Scattering matrix simulations model well the transmission and reflectance measurements when an ultrathin gold layer (~5 nm), smaller than the skin depth is retained at the bottom of the nanocups. Electric field intensities are enhanced by >100 within the nanocup, and ~40 in the ultrathin gold layer causing transmission through it. We show a wavelength red-shift of ~30 nm in the extraordinary transmission peak when the nanocups are coated with a thin film of a few nanometers, which can be utilized for biosensing. The continuous corrugated metal films are far simpler structures to observe extraordinary transmission, circumventing the difficult process of etching the metal film. Such continuous metal films with ultrathin regions are simple platforms for non-linear optics, plasmonics, and biological and chemical sensing.We experimentally and theoretically demonstrate that a continuous gold film on a periodically textured substrate exhibits extraordinary optical transmission, even though no holes were etched in the film. Our film synthesis started by nanoimprinting a periodic array of nanocups with a period of ~750 nm on a polystyrene film over a glass substrate. A thin non-conformal gold film was sputter-deposited on the polystyrene by

  16. Metal-Film Hall-Effect Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.

    1994-01-01

    Large positive and negative Hall coefficients achievable. Family of Hall-effect devices made from multilayer metal films instead of semiconductor materials. Metal films easier to fabricate; formed by deposition on variety of substrates, and leads readily attached to them. Fabricated with larger areas, potentially more reliable, and less affected by impurities. Also used to measure magnetic fields. Devices especially useful at low temperatures.

  17. Flexible Thin Metal Film Thermal Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, Donald Laurence (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A flexible thin metal film thermal sensing system is provided. A thermally-conductive film made from a thermally-insulating material is doped with thermally-conductive material. At least one layer of electrically-conductive metal is deposited directly onto a surface of the thermally-conductive film. One or more devices are coupled to the layer(s) to measure an electrical characteristic associated therewith as an indication of temperature.

  18. A Metasurface Anti-reflection Coating for Enhancing Surface Plasmon-Polariton of Metallic Hole Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Khagendra; Jeon, Jiyeon; Kim, Jun; Ku, Zahyun; Lee, Sang Jun; Zhou, Jiangfeng; Usf, Usa Collaboration; Kriss, Korea Collaboration; Afrl, Usa Collaboration

    We demonstrate a metasurface made of metallic disk resonator array as an anti-reflection (AR) coating to enhance (reduce) the transmission (reflection) through metal hole array (MHA). Our result show that the simulated (measured) transmission at the first order surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) resonance is increased up to 82 %(88%) compared to uncoated MHA. The electric field of the surface wave is also enhanced by 33%. Using an effective medium theory, we show that the metasurface operates at off-resonance wavelengths and can be understood as a thin film that exhibits high effective permittivity (~30) with very low loss (loss tangent ~0.005). Thus we reveal the mechanism of the metasurface AR coating as the traditional thin film AR coating. With tunable effective permittivity, our structure provides great flexibility to achieve AR coating for general substance at any wavelength.

  19. Electrodes synthesized from carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal metal adlayer

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Harris, Alexander

    2014-04-15

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The preferred manufacturing process involves the initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by a surface preparation process involving immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing a suitable quantity of non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means. The nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. The process can be controlled and repeated to obtain a desired film coverage. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  20. Metallic coatings on silicon substrates, and methods of forming metallic coatings on silicon substrates

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Hyde, Timothy A.; Fincke, James R.

    2008-03-11

    The invention includes methods of forming a metallic coating on a substrate which contains silicon. A metallic glass layer is formed over a silicon surface of the substrate. The invention includes methods of protecting a silicon substrate. The substrate is provided within a deposition chamber along with a deposition target. Material from the deposition target is deposited over at least a portion of the silicon substrate to form a protective layer or structure which contains metallic glass. The metallic glass comprises iron and one or more of B, Si, P and C. The invention includes structures which have a substrate containing silicon and a metallic layer over the substrate. The metallic layer contains less than or equal to about 2 weight % carbon and has a hardness of at least 9.2 GPa. The metallic layer can have an amorphous microstructure or can be devitrified to have a nanocrystalline microstructure.

  1. Evaluation of a non-catalytic coating for metallic TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, C. M.; Brown, R. D.; Shideler, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A commercially available ceramic coating was evaluated for application to metallic heat shields for Shuttle-type entry vehicles. Coated Inconel 617 specimens were subjected to thermal shock cycles, surface emittances were measured, and surface equilibrium temperatures were measured for coated and oxidized specimens exposed to an arc-tunnel environment. The coating adhered very well to the metal and appeared to be very non-catalytic.

  2. A shape-recovery polymer coating for the corrosion protection of metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Alexander; van den Berg, Otto; Van Damme, Jonas; Verheyen, Karen; Bauters, Erwin; De Graeve, Iris; Du Prez, Filip E; Terryn, Herman

    2015-01-14

    Self-healing polymer coatings are a type of smart material aimed for advanced corrosion protection of metals. This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of two new UV-cure self-healing coatings based on acrylated polycaprolactone polyurethanes. On a macroscopic scale, the cured films all show outstanding mechanical properties, combining relatively high Young's modulus of up to 270 MPa with a strain at break above 350%. After thermal activation the strained films recover up to 97% of their original length. Optical and electron microscopy reveals the self-healing properties of these coatings on hot dip galvanized steel with scratches and microindentations. The temperature-induced closing of such defects restores the corrosion protection and barrier properties of the coating as shown by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning vibrating electrode technique. Therefore, such coatings are a complementary option for encapsulation-based autonomous corrosion protection systems. PMID:25517028

  3. Sputtered metallic coatings for optical fibers used in high-temperature environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunther, Michael F.; Zeakes, Jason S.; Lieber, Donald E.; May, Russell G.; Claus, Richard O.

    1994-05-01

    Rf and dc planar magnetron sputtering systems were used to deposit high-temperature nickel- based super alloys, INCONEL 617, 625, Haynes 214, and thin films of palladium, as coatings on optical fibers for use in temperatures approaching 1000 degree(s)C. The nickel-based alloy coatings were applied on-line as the optical fiber was drawn, minimizing the exposure of the fiber to the deleterious effects of humidity. The thin film coatings of pure metals were sputtered using a new rf magnetron sputtering system custom designed and built for the Fiber and Electro Optics Research Center. The resulting coatings were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The coated fibers exhibit promise for embedded sensors in high temperature, high load composites used for advanced aerospace and energy applications.

  4. High-reflectance composite metal coatings for planar-integrated free-space optics.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Matthias; Seiler, Thomas; Wei, An-Chi

    2006-02-01

    For planar-integrated free-space optical (PIFSO) systems high-reflectance thin-film coatings are crucial. Evaporated metal films are preferred for their relative technological simplicity. We propose a three-layer Al-Ag-Al coating composition that combines the high reflectance of Ag with the chemical passivity of Al and its good adherence to glass. Two special measures are taken to prevent delamination: one is an anchoring of the edges of the coating in narrow ditches that are etched into the substrate and the other is the use of an adhesive Al underlayer; to reduce absorption this underlayer is implemented only in sparsely distributed discrete areas. The optical properties of such composite coatings are investigated theoretically. The fabrication complexity is only slightly increased compared to PIFSO systems with one-layer Al reflectors. In experimental tests we verified a reflectance of approximately 98% and an adherence comparable to that of simple Al coatings. PMID:16485677

  5. Abrasion resistance of biaxially oriented polypropylene films coated with nanocomposite hard coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Zhu, Yaofeng; Fu, Yaqin

    2013-11-01

    KMnO4-treated, functionalized, biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) films coated with nano-silica hybrid material were synthesized. The abrasion resistance of the films was examined using a reciprocating fabric abrasion tester. Functional groups were confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Contact angle measurements were performed on the BOPP film surface to quantify the effectiveness of the functionalization. Results indicate that the abrasion resistance and roughness of the composite film were significantly affected by the modification of the BOPP film. Water surface contact angle of the modified BOPP films decreased from 90.1° to 71.4°,when KMnO4 concentration increased from 0 M to 0.25 M. Wettability of the BOPP films clearly improved after KMnO4 treatment. Abrasion resistance of the functionalized films coated with hybrid materials improved by 27.4% compared with that of the original film.

  6. Platinum-coated non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell electrocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2015-04-14

    Core-shell particles encapsulated by a thin film of a catalytically active metal are described. The particles are preferably nanoparticles comprising a non-noble core with a noble metal shell which preferably do not include Pt. The non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles are encapsulated by a catalytically active metal which is preferably Pt. The core-shell nanoparticles are preferably formed by prolonged elevated-temperature annealing of nanoparticle alloys in an inert environment. This causes the noble metal component to surface segregate and form an atomically thin shell. The Pt overlayer is formed by a process involving the underpotential deposition of a monolayer of a non-noble metal followed by immersion in a solution comprising a Pt salt. A thin Pt layer forms via the galvanic displacement of non-noble surface atoms by more noble Pt atoms in the salt. The overall process is a robust and cost-efficient method for forming Pt-coated non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles.

  7. Controlling film topography to form highly hydrophobic waterborne coatings.

    PubMed

    López, Ana B; de la Cal, José C; Asua, José M

    2016-08-17

    Coatings have a tremendous impact on economy as they reduce corrosion that has an estimated cost of 3% of the world's GDP. Hydrophobic coatings are particularly efficient for this purpose and the challenge is to produce cost effective and environmentally friendly, highly hydrophobic, cohesive and non-porous coatings applicable to large and irregular surfaces. This work shows that this goal can be achieved by forming wrinkles on the surface of waterborne coatings through fine-tuning of the film forming conditions. The proof of concept was demonstrated by using waterborne dispersions of copolymers of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate, and using the temperature and hardness of the copolymer as control variables during film formation. This allowed the formation of transparent films with a wrinkled surface that had a contact angle of 133°, which represents an increase of 20° with respect to the film cast under standard conditions. PMID:27476531

  8. Ion-beam-assisted deposition of biaxially aligned yttria-stabilized zirconia template films on metallic substrates for YBCO-coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, B.; Li, M.; Fisher, B. L.; Balachandran, U.

    2002-07-01

    Biaxially textured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films were grown on mechanically polished Hastelloy C276 (HC) substrates by ion-beam-assisted deposition and electron-beam evaporation. The surface root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the polished HC substrates was ≈3 nm, as measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A water-cooled sample stage was used to hold the substrate temperature below 100 °C during deposition. RMS roughness of ≈3.3 nm was measured on the deposited YSZ films by AFM. X-ray pole figures were conducted for texture analysis; in-plane texture measured from YSZ (111) φ-scan FWHM was 13.2° and out-of-plane texture from the YSZ (002) ω-scan FWHM was 7.7°. An ≈10 nm thick CeO2 buffer layer was deposited on the YSZ film at 800 °C before YBCO films were ablated by pulsed laser deposition at 780 °C in a 250 mTorr flowing oxygen environment. Good in-plane texture with FWHM ≈ 7° was observed in YBCO films. Tc = 90 K, with sharp transition, and transport Jc of ≈2.2 × 106 A cm-2 were observed in a 0.5 μm thick, 5 mm wide, and 1 cm long sample at 77 K in self-field.

  9. Adherence of ion beam sputter deposited metal films on H-13 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to sputter deposit 17 different metal and metal oxide films ranging in thickness from 1 to 8 micrometers on H-13 steel substrates. The film adherence to the substrate surface was measured using a tensile test apparatus. Comparisons in bond strength were made between ion beam, ion plating, and RF deposited films. A protective coating to prevent heat checking in H-13 steel dies used for aluminum die casting was studied. The results of exposing the coated substrates to temperatures up to 700 degrees are presented.

  10. Transmission enhancement based on strong interference in metal-semiconductor layered film for energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Du, Kaikai; Mao, Kening; Fang, Xu; Zhao, Ding; Ye, Hui; Qiu, Min

    2016-07-01

    A fundamental strategy to enhance optical transmission through a continuous metallic film based on strong interference dominated by interface phase shift is developed. In a metallic film coated with a thin semiconductor film, both transmission and absorption are simultaneously enhanced as a result of dramatically reduced reflection. For a 50-nm-thick Ag film, experimental transmission enhancement factors of 4.5 and 9.5 are realized by exploiting Ag/Si non-symmetric and Si/Ag/Si symmetric geometries, respectively. These planar layered films for transmission enhancement feature ultrathin thickness, broadband and wide-angle operation, and reduced resistance. Considering one of their potential applications as transparent metal electrodes in solar cells, a calculated 182% enhancement in the total transmission efficiency relative to a single metallic film is expected. This strategy relies on no patterned nanostructures and thereby may power up a wide spectrum of energy-harvesting applications such as thin-film photovoltaics and surface photocatalysis.

  11. Process for ultra smooth diamond coating on metals and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); Catledge, Shane A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a new process to deposit well adhered ultra smooth diamond films on metals by adding nitrogen gas to the methane/hydrogen plasma created by a microwave discharge. Such diamond coating process is useful in tribological/wear resistant applications in bio-implants, machine tools, and magnetic recording industry.

  12. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, K.C.; Kodas, T.T.

    1994-01-11

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said substrate.

  13. High Precision Metal Thin Film Liftoff Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari D. (Inventor); Patel, Amil A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A metal film liftoff process includes applying a polymer layer onto a silicon substrate, applying a germanium layer over the polymer layer to create a bilayer lift off mask, applying a patterned photoresist layer over the germanium layer, removing an exposed portion of the germanium layer, removing the photoresist layer and a portion of the polymer layer to expose a portion of the substrate and create an overhanging structure of the germanium layer, depositing a metal film over the exposed portion of the substrate and the germanium layer, and removing the polymer and germanium layers along with the overlaying metal film.

  14. Reflective Self-Metallizing Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David W. (Inventor); Caplan, Maggie L. (Inventor); St.Clair, Anne (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A silver organic complex, such as silver acetate, is solubilized in a polyamic acid resin or soluble polyimide solution using a suitable solvent such as hexafluoroacetyl acetone. The mixture is stable and can be applied to both flat and contoured surfaces. Application can be performed by casting, dip-coating, spraying, or other suitable techniques. In addition, the mixture can be cast or extruded as a polyimide film which is not applied to an underlying substrate. Upon curing, a flexible silver coated polyimide film is produced.

  15. FORMING PROTECTIVE FILMS ON METAL

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.; Kammerer, O.F.; Sadofsky, J.; Weeks, J.R.

    1958-12-16

    Methods are described of inhibiting the corrosion of ferrous metal by contact with heavy liquid metals such as bismuth and gallium at temperatures above 500 icient laborato C generally by bringing nltrogen and either the metal zirconium, hafnium, or titanium into reactlve contact with the ferrous metal to form a thin adherent layer of the nitride of the metal and thereafter maintaining a fractional percentage of the metal absorbed in the heavy liquid metal in contact with the ferrous metal container. The general purpose for uslng such high boiling liquid metals in ferrous contalners would be as heat transfer agents in liquid-metal-fueled nuclear reactors.

  16. Increase in the DSSC efficiency when using metal-coated carbon nanowall counter electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangjoon; Choi, Won Seok; Lim, Dong-Gun; Choi, Eun Chang; Hong, Byungyou

    2014-08-01

    This research was conducted to improve the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using metal-layer-coated carbon nanowalls (CNWs) as counter electrodes. The CNWs were synthesized on a fluorine-doped tin-oxide (FTO) glass substrate in a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system using methane (CH4), and the CNWS were sputter-coated with metal films several times by using an RF magnetron sputtering system and four-inch metal targets (Cu, W and Ni, separately). Then, the metal-layer-coated CNWs were used as counter electrodes for manufacturing the DSCCs. The vertical and the surface conditions of the metal-coated CNWs used as the DSCC electrodes were characterized by their electrical variations through field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Hall measurements. Their optical characteristics were analyzed using UV-Vis equipment, and the energy conversion efficiencies of the DSSCs manufactured using the metal-layer-coated CNWs as the counter electrodes were measured. The results confirmed that the efficiency improved when the W-coated CNW was used as the counter electrode.

  17. Joint of REBa2Cu3O7-δ Coated Conductors Using Metal Organic Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, K.; Teranishi, R.; Yamada, K.; Sato, Y.; Kaneko, K.

    Joint techniques connecting REBa2Cu3O7-δ(REBCO) coated conductors (CCs) are required to fabricate long length CCs and to repair locally damaged one. Two pieces of REBCO CC were attempted to be jointed using a metal organic deposition (MOD) method. The starting solution for YBCO layer was coated on GdBCO layer of CCs and calcined to fabricate precursor films, two of which were stuck together in a face to face manner, and then these films were pressurized and crystallized to joint them. Two CCs were successfully jointed together with c-axis oriented YBCO without pores and reacted phases at the joint interface.

  18. Mechanical characterization and reliability of films and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurn, Jeremy Adam

    This work describes newly-developed and conventional mechanical characterization techniques for films and coatings and the use of such techniques in conjunction with fracture models to examine the reliability of brittle film and coating systems. A wide range of film and coating systems is examined, emphasizing the generality of both the characterization techniques and the analysis methods. Emphasis is placed on systems of technological importance including dielectric films (such as silicon dioxide, amorphous silicon, silicon nitride, silicon oxy-nitride, and low-dielectric constant silsesquioxane) on silicon substrates for the microelectronics and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) industries, and alumina films on alumina titanium-carbide substrates for the magnetic recording head industry. Characterization techniques include depth-sensing indentation at ultra-microscopic and macroscopic dimensions ("nanoindentation" and "macroindentation," respectively), conventional Vickers hardness testing in inert and reactive environments, and substrate curvature measurements for film stress determination at elevated temperatures. Analysis is carried out using newly-developed and conventional analytic constitutive models as well as numerical simulations using finite element methods. The first part of the thesis describes the experimental techniques and analysis methods to deduce the elastic, plastic, fracture, and adhesive properties of brittle films and coatings. The second part focuses on the thermomechanical and environmental reliability of dielectric films for microelectronic applications based on experimental results and numerical analysis.

  19. Assessment of ceramic coatings for metal fuel melting crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels during the manufacturing of SFR fuels. Refractory coatings were applied to niobium substrates by vacuum plasma-spray coating method. Melt dipping tests conducted were the coated rods lowered into the fuel melt at 1600 C. degrees, and withdrawn and cooled outside the crucible in the inert atmosphere of the induction furnace. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods indicated that plasma-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating doesn't form significant reaction layer between fuel melt and coating layer. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods showed that TiC, TaC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings exhibited the promising performance among other ceramic coatings. These materials could be promising candidate materials for the reusable melt crucible of metal fuel for SFR. In addition, in order to develop the vacuum plasma-spray coating method for re-usable crucible of metal fuel slugs to be overcome the issue of thermal expansion mismatch between coating material and crucible, various combinations of coating conditions were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. It is observed that most coating methods maintained sound coating state in U-Zr melt. (authors)

  20. Bulk photoemission from metal films and nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ikhsanov, R Sh; Babicheva, V E; Protsenko, I E; Uskov, A V; Guzhva, M E

    2015-01-31

    Internal emission of photoelectrons from metal films and nanoparticles (nanowires and nanospheres) into a semiconductor matrix is studied theoretically by taking into account the jump of the effective electron mass at the metal – semiconductor interface and the cooling effect of hot electrons due to electron – electron collisions in the metal. The internal quantum efficiency of photoemission for the film and nanoparticles of two types (nanospheres and nanowires) is calculated. It is shown that the reduction of the effective mass of the electron during its transition from metal to semiconductor may lead to a significant (orders of magnitude and higher) decrease in the internal quantum efficiency of bulk photoemission. (nanostructures)

  1. Adhesion and friction of thin metal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in vacuum with thin films of titanium, chromium, iron, and platinum sputter deposited on quartz or mica substrates. A single crystal hemispherically tipped gold slider was used in contact with the films at loads of 1.0 to 30.0 and at a sliding velocity of 0.7 mm/min at 23 C. Test results indicate that the friction coefficient is dependent on the adhesion of two interfaces, that between the film and its substrate and the slider and the film. There exists a relationship between the percent d bond character of metals in bulk and in thin film form and the friction coefficient. Oxygen can increase adhesive bonding of a metal film (platinum) to a substrate.

  2. Single Wall Carbon Nano Tube Films and Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumar, T. V.; Kumar, Satish; Ericson, Lars M.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2002-03-01

    Purified single wall carbon nano tubes (SWNTs) produced from the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPCO) process have been dissolved /dispersed in oleum. These solutions /dispersions were optically homogeneous and have been used to form stand-alone SWNT films. The washed, dried, and heat-treated films are isotropic. The scanning electron micrographs of the film surface shows that the nanotube ropes (or fibrils) of about 20 nm diameters are arranged just like macroscopic fibers in a non-woven fabric. Polarized Raman spectroscopy of the SWNT film confirms the isotropic nature of these films. The films are being characterized for their thermal, mechanical as well electrical properties. Thin nano tube coatings, including optically transparent coatings, have also been made on a variety of substrates such as glass, polyethylene, polystyrene, polypropylene, silicon wafer, as well as stainless steel.

  3. Ellipsometric study of oxide films formed on LDEF metal samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franzen, W.; Brodkin, J. S.; Sengupta, L. C.; Sagalyn, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    The optical constants of samples of six different metals (Al, Cu, Ni, Ta, W, and Zr) exposed to space on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were studied by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. Measurements were also carried out on portions of each sample which were shielded from direct exposure by a metal bar. A least-squares fit of the data using an effective medium approximation was then carried out, with thickness and composition of surface films formed on the metal substrates as variable parameters. The analysis revealed that exposed portions of the Cu, Ni, Ta, and Zr samples are covered with porous oxide films ranging in thickness from 500 to 1000 A. The 410 A thick film of Al2O3 on the exposed Al sample is practically free of voids. Except for Cu, the shielded portions of these metals are covered by thin non-porous oxide films characteristic of exposure to air. The shielded part of the Cu sample has a much thicker porous coating of Cu2O. The tungsten data could not be analyzed.

  4. Adherence of ion beam sputter deposited metal films on H-13 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source sputter deposited 17 metals and metal oxides on H-13 steel. The films ranged 1 to 8 micrometers in thickness and their adherence was generally greater than the capacity of the measuring device; adherence quality depended on proper precleaning of the substrate before deposition. N2 or air was introduced for correct stoichiometry in metallic compounds. Au, Ag, MgO, and Ta5Si3 films 8 microns thick have bond strength equal to 1 micron coatings; the bond strength of pure metallic films up to 5 microns thick was greater than the epoxy to film bond (8000 psi). The results of exposures of coated material to temperatures up to 700 C are presented.

  5. Thin film coatings for space electrical power system applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines some of the ways in which thin film coatings can play a role in aerospace applications. Space systems discussed include photovoltaic and solar dynamic electric power generation systems, including applications in environmental protection, thermal energy storage, and radiator emittance enhancement. Potential applications of diamondlike films to both atmospheric and space based systems are examined. Also, potential uses of thin films of the recently discovered high-temperature superconductive materials are discussed.

  6. Thin film coatings for space electrical power system applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines some of the ways in which thin film coatings can play a role in aerospace applications. Space systems discussed include photovoltaic and solar dynamic electric power generation systems, including applications in environmental protection, thermal energy storage, and radiator emittance enhancement. Potential applications of diamondlike films to both atmospheric and space based systems are examined. Also, potential uses of thin films of the recently discovered high-temperature superconductive materials are discussed.

  7. Durability of Metallic Interconnects and Protective Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2009-12-15

    To build up a useful voltage, a number of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrically connected into series in a stack via interconnects, which are placed between adjacent cells. In addition to functioning as a bi-polar electrical connector, the interconnect also acts as a separator plate that separates the fuel at the anode side of one cell from the air at the cathode side on an adjacent cell. During SOFC operation at the high temperatures, the interconnects are thus simultaneously exposed to the oxidizing air at one side and a reducing fuel that can be either hydrogen or hydrocarbon at the other. Besides, they are in contact with adjacent components, such as electrodes or electrical contacts, seals, etc. With steady reduction in SOFC operating temperatures into the low or intermediate range 600-850oC, oxidation resistant alloys are often used to construct interconnects. However, the metallic interconnects may degrade via interactions at their interfaces with surrounding environments or adjacent components, potentially affecting the stability and performance of interconnects and the SOFC stacks. Thus protection layers are applied to metallic interconnects that also intend to mitigate or prevent chromium migration into cells and the cell poisoning. This chapter provides a comprehensive review of materials for metallic interconnects, their degradation and coating protection.

  8. Laser patterning of transparent conductive metal nanowire coatings: simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Henley, Simon J; Cann, Maria; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan; Milne, David

    2014-01-21

    Transparent and electrically conductive metal nanowire networks are possible replacements for costly indium tin oxide (ITO) films in many optoelectronic devices. ITO films are regularly patterned using pulsed lasers so similar technologies could be used for nanowire coatings to define electrode structures. Here, the effects of laser irradiation on conducting silver nanowire coatings are simulated and then investigated experimentally for networks formed by spray deposition onto transparent substrates. The ablation threshold fluence is found experimentally for such nanowire networks and is then related to film thickness. An effective model using finite-element heat transfer analysis is examined to look at energy dissipation through these nanowire networks and used to understand mechanisms at play in the laser-material interactions. It is demonstrated that the three-dimensional nature of these coatings and the relative ratios of the rates of lateral to vertical heat diffusion are important controlling parameter affecting the ablation threshold. PMID:24287486

  9. Metal current collect protected by oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2004-05-25

    Provided are low-cost, mechanically strong, highly electronically conductive current collects and associated structures for solid-state electrochemical devices, techniques for forming these structures, and devices incorporating the structures. The invention provides solid state electrochemical devices having as current interconnects a ferritic steel felt or screen coated with a protective oxide film.

  10. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, Kendall J; Pena, Maria I

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  11. Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

    1988-06-29

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

  12. Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, Donald J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Wright, Steven A.

    1991-01-01

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

  13. Ceramic coating on ceramic with metallic bond coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishitake, K.; Era, H.; Otsubo, F.; Sonoda, T.

    1997-09-01

    The change in structure and adhesion strength of the interface by heating in air has been investigated for a plasma- sprayed alumina coating on a ceramic substrate with a 50Ni- 50Cr alloy bond coating. A veined structure composed of NiO, NiCr 2O4, and NiAl2O4 oxides grew from the bond coating into cracks or pores in the top coating and the alumina substrate after heating at 1273 K for 20 h in air. The NiAl2O4 spinel may have formed by the oxidization of nickel, which subsequently reacted with the alumina coating or the substrate. The mechanism of the penetration of the spinel oxides into the cracks or pores is not clear. The adhesion strength of the coating is increased to about 15 MPa after heating at 1273 K for 20 h in air, compared to an as- sprayed coating strength of only 1.5 MPa.

  14. Solid-gel precursor solutions and methods for the fabrication of polymetallicsiloxane coating films

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1993-01-01

    Solutions and preparation methods necessary for the fabrication of metal oxide cross-linked polysiloxane coating films are disclosed. The films are useful in provide heat resistance against oxidation, wear resistance, thermal insulation, and corrosion resistance of substrates. The sol-gel precursor solution comprises a mixture of a monomeric organoalkoxysilane, a metal alkoxide M(OR).sub.n (wherein M is Ti, Zr, Ge or Al; R is CH.sub.3, C.sub.2 H.sub.5 or C.sub.3 H.sub.7 ; and n is 3 or 4), methanol, water, HCl and NaOH. The invention provides a sol-gel solution, and a method of use thereof, which can be applied and processed at low temperatures (i.e., <1000.degree. C.). The substrate can be coated by immersing it in the above mentioned solution at ambient temperature. The substrate is then withdrawn from the solution. Next, the coated substrate is heated for a time sufficient and at a temperature sufficient to yield a solid coating. The coated substrate is then heated for a time sufficient, and temperature sufficient to produce a polymetallicsiloxane coating.

  15. Solid-gel precursor solutions and methods for the fabrication of polymetallicsiloxane coating films

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1992-01-01

    Solutions and preparation methods necessary for the fabrication of metal oxide cross-linked polysiloxane coating films are disclosed. The films are useful in provide heat resistance against oxidation, wear resistance, thermal insulation, and corrosion resistance of substrates. The sol-gel precursor solution comprises a mixture of a monomeric organoalkoxysilane, a metal alkoxide M(OR).sub.n (wherein M is Ti, Zr, Ge or Al; R is CH.sub.3, C.sub.2 H.sub.5 or C.sub.3 H.sub.7 ; and n is 3 or 4), methanol, water, HCl and NaOH. The invention provides a sol-gel solution, and a method of use thereof, which can be applied and processed at low temperatures (i.e., <1000.degree. C.). The substrate can be coated by immersing it in the above mentioned solution at ambient temperature. The substrate is then withdrawn from the solution. Next, the coated substrate is heated for a time sufficient and at a temperature sufficient to yield a solid coating. The coated substrate is then heated for a time sufficient, and temperature sufficient to produce a polymetallicsiloxane coating.

  16. Solid-gel precursor solutions and methods for the fabrication of polymetallicsiloxane coating films

    DOEpatents

    Toshifumi Sugama.

    1993-04-06

    Solutions and preparation methods necessary for the fabrication of metal oxide cross-linked polysiloxane coating films are disclosed. The films are useful in provide heat resistance against oxidation, wear resistance, thermal insulation, and corrosion resistance of substrates. The sol-gel precursor solution comprises a mixture of a monomeric organoalkoxysilane, a metal alkoxide M(OR)[sub n] (wherein M is Ti, Zr, Ge or Al; R is CH[sub 3], C[sub 2]H[sub 5] or C[sub 3]H[sub 7]; and n is 3 or 4), methanol, water, HCl and NaOH. The invention provides a sol-gel solution, and a method of use thereof, which can be applied and processed at low temperatures (i.e., < 1,000 C.). The substrate can be coated by immersing it in the above mentioned solution at ambient temperature. The substrate is then withdrawn from the solution. Next, the coated substrate is heated for a time sufficient and at a temperature sufficient to yield a solid coating. The coated substrate is then heated for a time sufficient, and temperature sufficient to produce a polymetallicsiloxane coating.

  17. Development of edible films and coatings from alginates and carrageenans.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli-Kafrani, Elham; Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Masoudpour-Behabadi, Mahdieh

    2016-02-10

    The use of renewable resources, which can reduce waste disposal problems, is being explored to produce biopolymer films and coatings. Renewability, degradability, and edibility make such films particularly suitable for food and nonfood packaging applications. Edible films and coatings play an important role in the quality, safety, transportation, storage, and display of a wide range of fresh and processed foods. They can diminish main alteration by avoiding moisture losses and decreasing adverse chemical reaction rates. Also, they can prevent spoilage and microbial contamination of foods. Additionally, nanomaterials and food additives, such as flavors, antimicrobials, antioxidants, and colors, can be incorporated into edible films and coatings in order to extend their applications. Water-soluble hydrocolloids like polysaccharides usually impart better mechanical properties to edible films and coatings than do hydrophobic substances. They also are excellent barriers to oxygen and carbon dioxide. Recently, there has been much attention on carrageenan and alginate as sources of film-forming materials. Thus, this review highlights production and characteristics of these films. PMID:26686140

  18. Metal films on the surfaces and within diamond crystals from Arkhangelskaya and Yakutian diamond provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, A. B.; Kriulina, G. Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Representative samples of diamonds from five kimberlite pipes (Lomonosovskaya, Archangel'sk, Snegurochka, XXIII Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU), and Internationalnaya) of the Arkhangelskaya and Yakutian diamond provinces in Russia have been studied. Thirty-three varieties of metal films have been identified as syngenetic associated minerals. The films consist of 15 chemical elements that occur in the form of native metals and their natural alloys. Remnants of metal films were detected within diamond crystals. The metal films coating diamonds are a worldwide phenomenon. To date, these films have been described from Europe, Asia, South America, and Africa. Native metals, their alloys, and intermetallides are actual companion minerals of diamond.

  19. Microstructural modeling and design optimization of adaptive thin-film nanocomposite coatings for durability and wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, James Deon

    Adaptive thin-film nanocomposite coatings comprised of crystalline ductile phases of gold and molybdenum disulfide, and brittle phases of diamond like carbon (DLC) and ytrria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) have been investigated by specialized microstructurally-based finite-element techniques. A new microstructural computational technique for efficiently creating models of nanocomposite coatings with control over composition, grain size, spacing and morphologies has been developed to account for length scales that range from nanometers to millimeters for efficient computations. The continuum mechanics model at the nanometer scale was verified with molecular dynamic models for nanocrystalline diamond. Using this new method, the interrelated effects of microstructural characteristics such as grain shapes and sizes, matrix thicknesses, local material behavior due to interfacial stresses and strains, varying amorphous and crystalline compositions, and transfer film adhesion and thickness on coating behavior have been investigated. A mechanistic model to account for experimentally observed transfer film adhesion modes and changes in thickness was also developed. One of the major objectives of this work is to determine optimal crystalline and amorphous compositions and behavior related to wear and durability over a wide range of thermo-mechanical conditions. The computational predictions, consistent with experimental observations, indicate specific interfacial regions between DLC and ductile metal inclusions are critical regions of stress and strain accumulation that can be precursors to material failure and wear. The predicted results underscore a competition between the effects of superior tribological properties associated with MoS 2 and maintaining manageable stress levels that would not exceed the coating strength. Varying the composition results in tradeoffs between lubrication, toughness, and strength, and the effects of critical stresses and strains can be controlled

  20. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOEpatents

    Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

    1985-06-11

    Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

  1. Deposition and Characterization of Thin Films on Metallic Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatica, Jorge E.

    2005-01-01

    A CVD method was successfully developed to produce conversion coatings on aluminum alloys surfaces with reproducible results with a variety of precursors. A well defined protocol to prepare the precursor solutions formulated in a previous research was extended to other additives. It was demonstrated that solutions prepared following such a protocol could be used to systematically generate protective coatings onto aluminum surfaces. Experiments with a variety of formulations revealed that a refined deposition protocol yields reproducible conversion coatings of controlled composition. A preliminary correlation between solution formulations and successful precursors was derived. Coatings were tested for adhesion properties enhancement for commercial paints. A standard testing method was followed and clear trends were identified. Only one precursors was tested systematically. Anticipated work on other precursors should allow a better characterization of the effect of intermetallics on the production of conversion/protective coatings on metals and ceramics. The significance of this work was the practical demonstration that chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques can be used to systematically generate protective/conversion coating on non-ferrous surfaces. In order to become an effective approach to replace chromate-based pre- treatment processes, namely in the aerospace or automobile industry, the process parameters must be defined more precisely. Moreover, the feasibility of scale-up designs necessitates a more comprehensive characterization of the fluid flow, transport phenomena, and chemical kinetics interacting in the process. Kinetic characterization showed a significantly different effect of magnesium-based precursors when compared to iron-based precursors. Future work will concentrate on refining the process through computer simulations and further experimental studies on the effect of other transition metals to induce deposition of conversion/protective films

  2. Nano-enabled tribological thin film coatings: global patent scenario.

    PubMed

    Sivudu, Kurva S; Mahajan, Yashwant R; Joshi, Shrikant V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present current status and future prospects of nano-enabled tribological thin film coatings based on worldwide patent landscape analysis. The study also presents an overview of technological trends by carrying out state-of-the-art literature analysis, including survey of corporate websites. Nanostructured tribological coatings encompass a wide spectrum of nanoscale microstructures, including nanocrystalline, nanolayered, nano-multilayered, nanocomposite, nanogradient structures or their unique combinations, which are composed of single or multi-component phases. The distinct microstructural features of the coatings impart outstanding tribological properties combined with multifunctional attributes to the coated components. Their unique combination of remarkable properties make them ideal candidates for a wide range of applications in diverse fields such as cutting and metalworking tools, biomedical devices, automotive engine components, wear parts, hard disc drives etc. The patent landscape analysis has revealed that nano-enabled tribological thin film coatings have significant potential for commercial applications in view of the lion's share of corporate industry in patenting activity. The largest patent portfolio is held by Japan followed by USA, Germany, Sweden and China. The prominent players involved in this field are Mitsubishi Materials Corp., Sandvik Aktiebolag, Hitachi Ltd., Sumitomo Electric Industries Ltd., OC Oerlikon Corp., and so on. The outstanding potential of nanostructured thin film tribological coatings is yet to be fully unravelled and, therefore, immense opportunities are available in future for microstructurally engineered novel coatings to enhance their performance and functionality by many folds. PMID:24962377

  3. Biofouling of Cr-Nickel Spray Coated Films on Steel Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kento; Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ikigai, Hajime; Kogo, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2012-03-01

    Nowadays, corrosion of metals brings us serious economic loss and it often reaches several percentage of GNP. Particularly the marine corrosion was serious and the counter measure was very hard to be established, since the number of factors is huge and complicated. One of the complicated factors in marine corrosion is biofouling. Biofouling was classified into two main categories, microfouling and macrofouling. The former is composed of biofilm formation mainly. Marine bacteria are attached to material surfaces, seeking for nutrition in oligotrophic environment and they excrete polysaccharide to form biofilm on metal surfaces. Then larger living matters are attached on the biofilms to develop biofouling on metal surfaces, which often lead loss and failures of metals in marine environments. From the viewpoint of corrosion protection and maintenance of marine structures, biofouling should be mitigated as much as possible. In this study, we applied spray coating to steels and investigated if chromium-nickel spray coating could mitigate the biofouling, being compared with the conventional aluminium-zinc spray coating in marine environments. The specimens used for this investigation are aluminium, zinc, aluminium-zinc, stacked chromium/nickel and those films were formed on carbon steel (JIS SS400). And the pores formed by spray coating were sealed by a commercial reagent for some specimens. All of those specimens were immersed into sea water located at Marina Kawage (854-3, Chisato, Tsu, Mie Prefecture) in Ise Bay for two weeks. The depth of the specimen was two meter from sea water surface and the distance was always kept constant, since they were suspended from the floating pier. The temperature in sea water changed from 10 to 15 degrees Celsius during the immersion test. The biofouling behavior was investigated by low vacuum SEM (Hitachi Miniscope TM1000) and X-ray fluorescent analysis. When the spray coated specimens with and without sealing agents were compared

  4. Graphene film growth on polycrystalline metals.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Rebecca S; Coleman, Karl S

    2013-01-15

    Graphene, a true wonder material, is the newest member of the nanocarbon family. The continuous network of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms gives rise to exceptional electronic, mechanical, and thermal properties, which could result in the application of graphene in next generation electronic components, energy-storage materials such as capacitors and batteries, polymer nanocomposites, transparent conducting electrodes, and mechanical resonators. With one particularly attractive application, optically transparent conducting electrodes or films, graphene has the potential to rival indium tin oxide (ITO) and become a material for producing next generation displays, solar cells, and sensors. Typically, graphene has been produced from graphite using a variety of methods, but these techniques are not suitable for growing large-area graphene films. Therefore researchers have focused much effort on the development of methodology to grow graphene films across extended surfaces. This Account describes current progress in the formation and control of graphene films on polycrystalline metal surfaces. Researchers can grow graphene films on a variety of polycrystalline metal substrates using a range of experimental conditions. In particular, group 8 metals (iron and ruthenium), group 9 metals (cobalt, rhodium, and iridium), group 10 metals (nickel and platinum), and group 11 metals (copper and gold) can support the growth of these films. Stainless steel and other commercial copper-nickel alloys can also serve as substrates for graphene film growth. The use of copper and nickel currently predominates, and these metals produce large-area films that have been efficiently transferred and tested in many electronic devices. Researchers have grown graphene sheets more than 30 in. wide and transferred them onto display plastic ready for incorporation into next generation displays. The further development of graphene films in commercial applications will require high

  5. Versatile Method for Coating Surfaces with Functional and Responsive Polymer-Based Films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang Matthew; Serpe, Michael J

    2015-12-16

    A versatile surface modification technique was developed to yield poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAm) microgel-based thin films on a variety of substrates, e.g., metals, nonmetals, and polymers. Because the chemistry, and hence functionality and responsivity, of the pNIPAm-based microgels is easily tuned, multifunctional and responsive thin films could be generated on many different surfaces without varying the coating conditions. In one case, we showed that fluorescent/light emitting thin films could be generated using crystal violet-modified microgels. Antibacterial films could be obtained using silver nanoparticle-modified pNIPAm-based microgels. Finally, we show that thin films fabricated via the methods here could be used as a component in optical sensors. Although we show only a few examples of the utility of this approach, we feel that the apparent universality of the technique can be extended to countless other applications. PMID:26640982

  6. Low Temperature Growth of Nanostructured Diamond Films on Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul A.; Catledge, Shane A.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2001-01-01

    The field of nanocrystalline diamond and tetrahedral amorphous carbon films has been the focus of intense experimental activity in the last few years for applications in field emission display devices, optical windows, and tribological coatings, The choice of substrate used in most studies has typically been silicon. For metals, however, the thermal expansion mismatch between the diamond film and substrate gives rise to thermal stress that often results in delamination of the film. To avoid this problem in conventional CVD deposition low substrate temperatures (less than 700 C) have been used, often with the incorporation of oxygen or carbon monoxide to the feedgas mixture. Conventionally grown CVD diamond films are also rough and would require post-deposition polishing for most applications. Therefore, there is an obvious need to develop techniques for deposition of well-adhered, smooth nano-structured diamond films on metals for various tribological applications. In our work, nanostructured diamond films are grown on a titanium alloy substrate using a two-step deposition process. The first step is performed at elevated temperature (820 C) for 30 minutes using a H2/CH4/N2 gas mixture in order to grow a thin (approx. 600 nm) nanostructured diamond layer and improve film adhesion. The remainder of the deposition involves growth at low temperature (less than 600 C) in a H2/CH4/O2 gas mixture. Laser reflectance Interferometry (LRI) pattern during growth of a nanostructured diamond film on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The first 30 minutes are at a high temperature of 820 C and the rest of the film is grown at a low temperature of 580 T. The fringe pattern is observed till the very end due to extremely low surface roughness of 40 nm. The continuation of the smooth nanostructured diamond film growth during low temperature deposition is confirmed by in-situ laser reflectance interferometry and by post-deposition micro-Raman spectroscopy and surface profilometry. Similar experiments

  7. Thermal contact conductance of non-flat, rough, metallic coated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.A.; Fletcher, L.S.

    1996-12-31

    Thermal contact conductance is an important consideration in such applications as thermally induced stress in supersonic and hypersonic flight vehicles, nuclear reactor cooling, electronics packaging, spacecraft thermal control, and gas turbine and internal combustion engine cooling. In many instances, the highest possible thermal contact conductance is desired. For this reason, soft, high conductivity, metallic coatings are sometimes applied to contacting surfaces (often metallic) to increase thermal contact conductance. Two previously developed theoretical models for thermal contact conductance of metallic coated metals have been proven accurate for flat, rough surfaces. However, these two theories often substantially over-predict the conductance of non-flat, rough, metallic coated metals. In this investigation, a previously developed semi-empirical conductance model for flat and non-flat, rough, uncoated metals is employed in predicting the conductance of flat and non-flat, rough, metallic coated metals. The more commonly cited of the previous theoretical models for flat surfaces and the semi-empirical model are compared to experimental thermal contact conductance results from a number of investigations in the literature. Results for a number of metallic coating/substrate combinations on surfaces with widely varying flatness and roughness were analyzed. Both models agree well with experimental results for flat, rough, metallic coated metals. However, the semi-empirical model is substantially more accurate and more conservative than the theoretical model compared to the majority of experimental results for non-flat, rough, metallic coated metals.

  8. Corrosion protection by sonoelectrodeposited organic films on zinc coated steel.

    PubMed

    Et Taouil, Abdeslam; Mahmoud, Mahmoud Mourad; Lallemand, Fabrice; Lallemand, Séverine; Gigandet, Marie-Pierre; Hihn, Jean-Yves

    2012-11-01

    A variety of coatings based on electrosynthesized polypyrrole were deposited on zinc coated steel in presence or absence of ultrasound, and studied in terms of corrosion protection. Cr III and Cr VI commercial passivation were used as references. Depth profiling showed a homogeneous deposit for Cr III, while SEM imaging revealed good surface homogeneity for Cr VI layers. These chromium-based passivations ensured good protection against corrosion. Polypyrrole (PPy) was also electrochemically deposited on zinc coated steel with and without high frequency ultrasound irradiation in aqueous sodium tartrate-molybdate solution. Such PPy coatings act as a physical barrier against corrosive species. PPy electrosynthesized in silent conditions exhibits similar properties to Cr VI passivation with respect to corrosion protection. Ultrasound leads to more compact and more homogeneous surface structures for PPy, as well as to more homogeneous distribution of doping molybdate anions within the film. Far better corrosion protection is exhibited for such sonicated films. PMID:22516111

  9. Optical coatings and thin films for display technologies using closed-field magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Desmond R.; Brinkley, Ian; Walls, J. M.

    2004-11-01

    "Closed field" magnetron (CFM) sputtering offers high throughput, flexible deposition process for optical coatings and thin films required in display technologies. CFM sputtering uses two or more different metal targets to deposit multilayers comprising a wide range of dielectrics, metals and conductive oxides. CFM provides a room temperature deposition process with high ion current density, low bias voltage and reactive oxidation in the entire volume around the rotating substrate drum carrier, depositing films over a large surface area at a high rate with excellent and reproducible properties. Machines based on CFM are scaleable to meet a range of batch and in-line size requirements. Thin film thickness control to <+/-1% is accomplished using time, although quartz crystal or optical monitoring are used for more demanding applications. Fine layer thickness control and deposition of graded index layers is also assisted with a special rotating shutter mechanism. This paper presents data on optical properties for CFM deposited coatings relevant to displays, including anti-reflection, IR blocker and color and thermal control filters, graded coatings, barrier coatings as well as conductive transparent oxides such as indium tin oxide. Benefits of the CFM process for a range of display technologies; OLED, EL and projection are described.

  10. Process for buried metallization in diamond film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Max L.; Ting, Jyh-Ming; Lagounov, Alex; Tang, Chi

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate methods of combining chemical vapor deposition diamond growth techniques with state-of-the-art physical vapor deposition or ion beam enhanced deposition to produce buried metallization of polycrystalline diamond films. The mechanical and electrical integrity of both the insulating and conducting elements following metallization and diamond overgrowth was shown. Both methods were shown to have bonding strength sufficient to withstand tape lift-off, which is regarded to be a good indication of strength needed for die attachment and wire bonding. Diamond overgrowth was also shown, thus enabling buried metallized layers to be created. Electrical resistivity property measurements on metallized layers and between metallization separated by diamond films were shown to be sufficient to allow the use of diamond as an insulating inter-layer material for multi-layer circuit boards.

  11. Development of metal based thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong-Il

    In this work, metal-based thermal barrier coatings (MBTBCs) have been produced, using high frequency induction plasma spraying (IPS) of iron-based nanostructured alloy powders. Important advances have been made over recent years to the development of ceramic-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for internal combustion engines application, but they are not yet applied in mass production situations. Besides the important economic considerations, the reliability of ceramic: TBCs is also an issue, being associated with the difficulty of predicting their "in-service" lifetime. Through engineering of the nano/amorphous structure of MBTBCs, their thermal conductivity can be made as low as those of ceramic-based TBCs, with reduced mean free paths of the electrons/phonons scattering. In this work, nano/amorphous structured coatings were deposited by IPS using the following spray parameters: spraying distance (210 ˜ 270 mm), plasma gas composition (Ar/N2), IPS torch power (24kW), and powder feed-rate (16g/min.). The structure and properties of the deposited layers were characterized through SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) observations. The thermal diffusivity (alpha) properties of the MBTBCs were measured using a laser flash method. Density (rho) and specific heat (Cp) of the MBTBCs were also measured, and their thermal conductivity (k) calculated (k =alpharhoCp). The thermal conductivity of MBTBCs was found to be as low as 1.99 W/m/K. The heat treatment study showed that crystal structure changes, and grain size growth from a few nanometers to tenth of nanometers occurred at 550°C under static exposure conditions. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of MBTBCs was 13E-6/K, which is close to the TEC of cast iron and thus, closer to the TEC values of aluminium alloys than are conventional TBCs. Fracture toughness of MBTBCs has also been assessed by use of Vickers hardness tests, with a 500 g load for 15 s, and the results show that there are no measurable crack

  12. Evaluation of volatile organic compound reduction technologies for metal coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Huang, E.W.

    1997-12-31

    Under the sponsorship of California Air Resources Board, AeroVironment Environmental Services, Inc. (AVES) is currently conducting a study to demonstrate a new zero-VOC Industrial Maintenance Metal Coating. This new technology can help the coating industry reduce emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). In a previous study conducted by AVES, current VOCs technologies available on the market for metal parts and product coatings were evaluated for compliance with the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) proposed Rule 1107 (Metal Parts and Product Coatings). There are low-VOC coating products available for industries of interest. For general metal coating applications, certain coating products can comply with current SCAQMD Rule 1107 VOC limits. Some of the low-VOC products that are considered as a substitute or an alternative to high-VOC petroleum-based products are summarized. The current available emerging technologies offer a great opportunity for emission reduction through a gradual shift from high to low/no VOC coatings. By phasing in low/no VOC coatings, industries will be able to reduce energy use and air emissions without installation of add-on controls.

  13. Durable silver thin film coating for diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Jesse D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Komashko, Aleksey M.

    2006-05-30

    A durable silver film thin film coated non-planar optical element has been developed to replace Gold as a material for fabricating such devices. Such a coating and resultant optical element has an increased efficiency and is resistant to tarnishing, can be easily stripped and re-deposited without modifying underlying grating structure, improves the throughput and power loading of short pulse compressor designs for ultra-fast laser systems, and can be utilized in variety of optical and spectrophotometric systems, particularly high-end spectrometers that require maximized efficiency.

  14. Electrical properties of nanoscale metallic thin films on dielectric elastomer at various strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Md. Shahnewaz Sabit; Ye, Zhihang; Chen, Zheng; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have significant applications in artificial muscle and other biomedical equipment and device fabrications. Metallic thin films by thin film transfer and sputter coating techniques can provide conductive surfaces on the DE samples, and can be used as electrodes for the actuators and other biomedical sensing devices. In the present study, 3M VHB 4910 tape was used as a DE for the coating and electrical characterization tests. A 150 nm thickness of gold was coated on the DE surfaces by sputter coating under vacuum with different pre-strains, ranging from 0 to 100%. Some of the thin films were transferred to the surface of the DEs. Sputter coating, and direct transferring gold leaf coating methods were studied and the results were analyzed in detail in terms of the strain rates and electrical resistivity changes. Initial studies indicated that the metallic surfaces remain conductive even though the DE films were considerably elongated. The coated DEs can be used as artificial muscle by applying electrical stimulation through the conductive surfaces. This study may provide great benefits to the readers, researchers, as well as companies involved in manufacturing of artificial muscles and actuators using smart materials.

  15. Coalescence and percolation in thin metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, X.; Duxbury, P.M.; Jeffers, G.; Dubson, M.A. Center for Fundamental Materials Research, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1116 )

    1991-12-15

    Metals thermally evaporated onto warm insulating substrates evolve to the thin-film state via the morphological sequence: compact islands, elongated islands, percolation, hole filling, and finally the thin-film state. The coverage at which the metal percolates ({ital p}{sub {ital c}}) is often considerably higher than that predicted by percolation models, such as inverse swiss cheese or lattice percolation. Using a simple continuum model, we show that high-{ital p}{sub {ital c}}'s arise naturally in thin films that exhibit a crossover from full coalescence of islands at early stages of growth to partial coalescence at later stages. In this interrupted-coalescence model, full coalescence of islands occurs up to a critical island radius {ital R}{sub {ital c}}, after which islands overlap, but do not fully coalesce. We present the morphology of films and the critical area coverages generated by this model.

  16. Mixed metal films with switchable optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, T. J.; Slack, J. L.; Farangis, B.; Rubin, M. D.

    2002-02-01

    Thin, Pd-capped metallic films containing magnesium and first-row transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co) switch reversibly from their initial reflecting state to visually transparent states when exposed to gaseous hydrogen or following cathodic polarization in an alkaline electrolyte. Reversion to the reflecting state is achieved by exposure to air or by anodic polarization. The films were prepared by cosputtering from one magnesium target and one manganese, iron, or cobalt target. Both the dynamic optical switching range and the speed of the transition depend on the magnesium-transition metal ratio. Infrared spectra of films in the transparent, hydrided (deuterided) states support the presence of the intermetallic hydride phases Mg3MnH7, Mg2FeH6, and Mg2CoH5.

  17. Simple push coating of polymer thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Toshikazu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Minemawari, Hiromi; Tsutsumi, Jun'ya; Horii, Yoshinori; Chikamatsu, Masayuki; Azumi, Reiko; Kumai, Reiji; Hasegawa, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    Solution processibility is a unique advantage of organic semiconductors, permitting the low-cost production of flexible electronics under ambient conditions. However, the solution affinity to substrate surfaces remains a serious dilemma; liquid manipulation is more difficult on highly hydrophobic surfaces, but the use of such surfaces is indispensable for improving device characteristics. Here we demonstrate a simple technique, which we call 'push coating', to produce uniform large-area semiconducting polymer films over a hydrophobic surface with eliminating material loss. We utilize a poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based trilayer stamp whose conformal contact with the substrate enables capillarity-induced wetting of the surface. Films are formed through solvent sorption and retention in the stamp, allowing the stamp to be peeled perfectly from the film. The planar film formation on hydrophobic surfaces also enables subsequent fine film patterning. The technique improves the crystallinity and field-effect mobility of stamped semiconductor films, constituting a major step towards flexible electronics production. PMID:23132026

  18. Film coatings for oral pulsatile release.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Alessandra; Zema, Lucia; Loreti, Giulia; Palugan, Luca; Gazzaniga, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    Pulsatile delivery is generally intended as a release of the active ingredient that is delayed for a programmable period of time to meet particular chronotherapeutic needs and, in the case of oral administration, also target distal intestinal regions, such as the colon. Most oral pulsatile delivery platforms consist in coated formulations wherein the applied polymer serves as the release-controlling agent. When exposed to aqueous media, the coating initially performs as a protective barrier and, subsequently, undergoes a timely failure based on diverse mechanisms depending on its physico-chemical and formulation characteristics. Indeed, it may be ruptured because of the gradual expansion of the core, swell and/or erode due to the glassy-rubbery polymer transition or become permeable thus allowing the drug molecules to diffuse outwards. Otherwise, when the coating is a semipermeable membrane provided with one or more orifices, the drug is released through the latter as a result of an osmotic water influx. The vast majority of pulsatile delivery systems described so far have been prepared by spray-coating, which offers important versatility and feasibility advantages over other techniques such as press- and dip-coating. In the present article, the design, manufacturing and performance of spray-coated pulsatile delivery platforms is thus reviewed. PMID:23506956

  19. Cellular response to titanium discs coated with polyelectrolyte multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Jing; Luo, Qiao-jie; Huang, Ying; Li, Xiao-dong

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) coatings on the biological behavior of titanium (Ti) substrates. Collagen type Ι/hyaluronic acid (Col/HA) and chitosan/hyaluronic acid (Chi/HA) multilayer PEM coatings were introduced onto Ti substrates using layer-by-layer assembly. Contact angle instruments and quartz crystal microbalance were used for film characterization. The results obtained showed that both Col/HA and Chi/HA surfaces had high hydrophilicity and promoted cell adhesion in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast and human gingival fibroblast cells. In addition, the synthesis of function-related proteins and gene expression levels in both MC3T3-E1 and fibroblast cells was higher for the Col/HA coating compared with the Chi/HA coating, indicating better cellular response to the Col/HA coating.

  20. Hydroxyapatite/metal composite coatings formed by electrocodeposition.

    PubMed

    Dasarathy, H; Riley, C; Coble, H D; Lacefield, W R; Maybee, G

    1996-05-01

    Early bone infusion by cementless fixation of composite orthopedic and dental implants consisting of metallic substrates and bioceramics is well documented. Calcium phosphate ceramics in general and hydroxyapatite (HA) in particular have been the most popular of the bioceramics used for coating metals. Here, a non-line of sight coating procedure by electrocodeposition is reported for mechanically fixing HA particles in a metal matrix. Analyses of the coating showed excellent adhesion to the substrate and no structural transformation in either crystallinity or stoichiometry. Adhesion and surface coverage of HA depended upon the particle size. As a demonstration of the coating procedure's non-line of sight applicability, it was successfully used to coat titanium rods sintered with small titanium spheres. PMID:8731152

  1. Ion beam sputter-deposited thin film coatings for protection of spacecraft polymers in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Rutledge, S. K.; Swec, D. M.; Nahra, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposited thin films of Al2O3, SiO2, and a codeposited mixture of predominantly SiO2 with small amounts of a fluoropolymer were evaluated both in laboratory plasma ashing tests and in space on board shuttle flight STS-8 for effectiveness in preventing oxidation of polyimide Kapton. Measurements of mass loss and optical performance of coated and uncoated polyimide samples exposed to the low Earth orbital environment are presented. Optical techniques were used to measure loss rates of protective films exposed to atomic oxygen. Results of the analysis of the space flight exposed samples indicate that thin film metal oxide coatings are very effective in protecting the polyimide. Metal oxide coatings with a small amount of fluoropolymer codeposited have the additional benefit of great flexibility.

  2. Ion beam sputter-deposited thin film coatings for protection of spacecraft polymers in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Rutledge, S. K.; Swec, D. M.; Nahra, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposited thin films at Al2O3, SiO2, and a codeposited mixture of predominantly SiO2 with small amounts of fluoropolymer were evaluated both in laboratory plasma ashing tests and in space on board Shuttle flight STS-8 for effectiveness in preventing oxidation of polyimide Kapton. Measurements of mass loss and optical performance of coated and uncoated polyimide samples exposed to the low earth orbital environment are presented. Optical techniques were used to measure loss rates of protective films exposed to atomic oxygen. Results of the analysis of the space flight exposed samples indicate that thin film metal oxide coatings are very effective in protecting the polyimide. Metal oxide coatings with a small amount of fluoropolymer codeposited have the additional benefit of great flexibility.

  3. Process optimization of ultrasonic spray coating of polymer films.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sanjukta; Keller, Stephan S; Alstrøm, Tommy S; Boisen, Anja; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2013-06-11

    In this work we have performed a detailed study of the influence of various parameters on spray coating of polymer films. Our aim is to produce polymer films of uniform thickness (500 nm to 1 μm) and low roughness compared to the film thickness. The coatings are characterized with respect to thickness, roughness (profilometer), and morphology (optical microscopy). Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) is used to do a full factorial design of experiments with selected process parameters such as temperature, distance between spray nozzle and substrate, and speed of the spray nozzle. A mathematical model is developed for statistical analysis which identifies the distance between nozzle and substrate as the most significant parameter. Depending on the drying of the sprayed droplets on the substrate, we define two broad regimes, "dry" and "wet". The optimum condition of spraying lies in a narrow window between these two regimes, where we obtain a film of desired quality. Both with increasing nozzle-substrate distance and temperature, the deposition moves from a wet state to a dry regime. Similar results are also achieved for solvents with low boiling points. Finally, we study film formation during spray coating with poly (D,L-lactide) (PDLLA). The results confirm the processing knowledge obtained with PVP and indicate that the observed trends are identical for spraying of other polymer films. PMID:23631433

  4. Transient coating of substrates with variable topography by viscous films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampropoulos, Nikos; Dimakopoulos, Yiannis; Tsamopoulos, John

    2015-11-01

    We study the transient coating of substrates exhibiting orthogonal trenches. We use the VoF method via OpenFOAM to solve the transient NS eqs on an unstructured grid, which dynamically undergoes local refinement around the interfaces. An Euler implicit method is used with adjustable time-step. The computational cost is reduced by parallel execution via MPI. Completely different wetting patterns result depending on the 3 dimensions of the topography, the capillary and Reynolds numbers and the dynamic contact angle. On one hand, continuous coating can be achieved in which the thin film of fluid wets the entire trench, while a steady flow is established upstream and downstream the topography. This is the desirable pattern in coating microelectronic devices for their protection and planarization. The other extreme possibility is that the film completely bypasses the trench, entrapping air inside it. This pattern reduces the drag coefficient on the film and, therefore, it is desirable in super-hydrophobic surfaces for microfluidic applications. Between these two extremes, a large variety of patterns exists in which the film partially wets the trench forming an air inclusion all along its bottom surface or its upstream or downstream inner corners or the film may breakup periodically. We produce comprehensive maps of film configurations covering a wide range of parameter values. GSRT of Greece via the program ``Excellence,'' Grant 1918.

  5. Superconducting YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ thin film grown on metallic film evaporated on MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdyan, A.; Azoulay, J.; Lapsker, I.

    2001-03-01

    At present it is commonly accepted that thin film formation of YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (YBCO) on conducting substrate is one of the keys to further development of advanced devices in the microelectronic and other applications. We have grown YBCO thin films by resistive evaporation technique on MgO coated with metallic layers (Ni or Ag). A simple inexpensive vacuum system equipped with resistively heated boats for metal and precursor mixture of yttrium, copper and barium fluoride powders was used. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for texture, morphology and surface analyses respectively. Electrical and magnetical properties were determined by a standard dc four-probe method. The way of heating process is shown to be critical parameter in the film quality. The physical and electrical properties of the YBCO films are discussed in light of the fact that XRD measurements done on the metallic buffer layers have revealed a multicrystalline structure.

  6. Selective electroless coating of palladium nanoparticles on metallic single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yiyu; Lv, Peng; Zhang, Xuequan; Li, Yu; Feng, Wei

    2010-08-01

    The selective electroless coating of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles on metallic single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) was studied. The remarkable increase in conductivity of SWNT/Pd films up to fourfold higher than pure SWNT was due to p-type doping and Ohmic contact. Metallic behavior of SWNT/Pd-Field effect transistor (on/off ratio=1.2) was attributed to more hole carriers and no electrostatic barrier between nanotube and Pd. G-band and radial breathing mode in Raman indicates a definitive increase in the proportion of metallic SWNT. Results indicate Pd are selectively coated on metallic SWNT with more negative potential allowing for the electroless Pd2+ reduction.

  7. Metal flame spray coating protects electrical cables in extreme environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, R. D.; Fox, H. A.

    1967-01-01

    Metal flame spray coating prevents EMF measurement error in sheathed instrumentation cables which are externally attached to cylinders which were cooled on the inside, but exposed to gamma radiation on the outside. The coating provides a thermoconductive path for radiation induced high temperatures within the cables.

  8. Precious-Metal Salt Coatings for Detecting Hydrazines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, Louis A.; Greene, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    Substrates coated with a precious-metal salt KAuCl4 have been found to be useful for detecting hydrazine vapors in air at and above a concentration of the order of 0.01 parts per million (ppm). Upon exposure to air containing a sufficient amount of hydrazine for a sufficient time, the coating material undergoes a visible change in color.

  9. Anti-diffusion metal coated O-rings

    DOEpatents

    Biallas, George Herman; Boyce, James Reid

    2016-03-22

    A method for inhibiting diffusion of gases and/or transmission of photons through elastomeric seals and a diffusion inhibiting elastomeric seal wherein at least a portion of the surface of a diffusion inhibiting elastomeric seal is coated with a compatibly-deformable, malleable metal coating.

  10. Metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples for gas turbine engines.

    PubMed

    Tougas, Ian M; Amani, Matin; Gregory, Otto J

    2013-01-01

    Temperatures of hot section components in today's gas turbine engines reach as high as 1,500 °C, making in situ monitoring of the severe temperature gradients within the engine rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need to develop instrumentation (i.e., thermocouples and strain gauges) for these turbine engines that can survive these harsh environments. Refractory metal and ceramic thin film thermocouples are well suited for this task since they have excellent chemical and electrical stability at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres, they are compatible with thermal barrier coatings commonly employed in today's engines, they have greater sensitivity than conventional wire thermocouples, and they are non-invasive to combustion aerodynamics in the engine. Thin film thermocouples based on platinum:palladium and indium oxynitride:indium tin oxynitride as well as their oxide counterparts have been developed for this purpose and have proven to be more stable than conventional type-S and type-K thin film thermocouples. The metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples described within this paper exhibited remarkable stability and drift rates similar to bulk (wire) thermocouples. PMID:24217356

  11. Size and rate dependent necking in thin metallic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, T.

    2014-01-01

    The control of the ductility of thin metallic films is a major issue in a variety of technologies involving flexible electronics, MEMS and deformable coatings. An enhanced closed form 1D imperfection based localization analysis is developed in order to investigate the mechanics of diffuse necking in metallic films. The model relies on a description of the localization process in a finite length specimen using either a 2- or 3-zone model, under plane stress or plane strain tension conditions. A strain gradient plasticity contribution to the stabilization of the localization process is taken into account in the hardening response through a simple estimate of the deformation gradient inside the necking zone. The model, with gradient plasticity effects, is validated towards 2D finite element simulations. The response of the material involves both strain-hardening and rate sensitivity, as well as possible creep relaxation. The plastic flow parameters are related to the grain size and film thickness. The model shows, in agreement with experiments, that the ductility can either drop to small values for very small grain sizes and/or film thickness due to the high strength and to the presence of imperfections, or can remain constant or even increase owing to an increased rate sensitivity resulting from thermally activated mechanisms. This last stabilization effect can be reinforced by gradient plasticity effects if allowed by the dominant deformation mechanism.

  12. Metallic and Ceramic Thin Film Thermocouples for Gas Turbine Engines

    PubMed Central

    Tougas, Ian M.; Amani, Matin; Gregory, Otto J.

    2013-01-01

    Temperatures of hot section components in today's gas turbine engines reach as high as 1,500 °C, making in situ monitoring of the severe temperature gradients within the engine rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need to develop instrumentation (i.e., thermocouples and strain gauges) for these turbine engines that can survive these harsh environments. Refractory metal and ceramic thin film thermocouples are well suited for this task since they have excellent chemical and electrical stability at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres, they are compatible with thermal barrier coatings commonly employed in today's engines, they have greater sensitivity than conventional wire thermocouples, and they are non-invasive to combustion aerodynamics in the engine. Thin film thermocouples based on platinum:palladium and indium oxynitride:indium tin oxynitride as well as their oxide counterparts have been developed for this purpose and have proven to be more stable than conventional type-S and type-K thin film thermocouples. The metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples described within this paper exhibited remarkable stability and drift rates similar to bulk (wire) thermocouples. PMID:24217356

  13. 21 CFR 175.360 - Vinylidene chloride copolymer coatings for nylon film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vinylidene chloride copolymer coatings for nylon... Use as Components of Coatings § 175.360 Vinylidene chloride copolymer coatings for nylon film. Vinylidene chloride copolymer coatings identified in this section and applied on nylon film may be...

  14. Effect of Doping on beta-Tricalcium Phosphate Bioresorbable Bulk Material and Thin Film Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Suhaila

    Magnesium has emerged as a revolutionary biodegradable metal for use as an orthopedic material, it has several advantages over the current metallic materials in use, including eliminating the effects of stress shielding, improving biocompatibility and inhibiting degradation rates, thus removing the requirement of a second surgery for implant removal. Due to the rapid degradation of magnesium, it is necessary to control the corrosion rates of the materials to match the rates of bone healing. This dissertation reports on the effect of doping on the properties of beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP). It also reports on its application as a thin film coating on magnesium alloys for implant applications. Adding various dopants to beta-TCP significantly influences critical properties. In this study, discs were fabricated in two compositions: (i) undoped beta-TCP, (ii) beta-TCP doped with 1.0 wt % MgO, 0.5 wt % ZnO, and 1.0 wt % TiO2. Films were fabricated from these compositions using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. These coatings were then characterized for corrosive, hardness, and cytocompatibility. The XRD patterns of the coating confirm the amorphous nature of the films. The presence of the metal oxides in beta-TCP improved ceramic densification. The application of these doped coatings was also found to increase the hardness by 88 %, the modulus of elasticity by 66 %, and improve corrosion resistance of the magnesium alloy substrate; with a 2.4 % improvement in Ecorr and 95 % decrease in icorr. Cell viability was studied using an osteoblast precursor cell line MC3T3-E1 to assure that the biocompatibility of these ceramics was not altered due to the dopants. Long-term biodegradation studies were conducted by measuring weight change and surface microstructure as a function of time in simulated body fluid. The results suggest that these coatings could be used for bioresorbable implants with improved corrosion resistance and increased hardness.

  15. Microtribological Performance of Metal-doped Molybdenum Disulfide Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Pantcho

    2011-07-01

    The mechanical and tribological properties of pure MoS2, pure Au, Au-MoS2 and Ti-MoS2 coatings were evaluated and examined at a microscopic scale. The metal doped MoS2 coatings had varying metal content, 5-10at% for Ti and 10-90% for Au. Reciprocating sliding wear tests were performed with a range of initial Hertzian contact pressures from 0.41 to 3.5 GPa and in air at two humidity levels (i.e. "low" being 3-5%RH and "high" being 30-40%RH). Titanium and gold were chosen for this study as metal additives due to their positive influence on the mechanical properties of the coating. The friction and wear behavior at the micro-scale were directly compared to tribological properties at the macro-scale, which were performed using an in situ tribometer. Reciprocating micro- and macro- wear tests were performed with spherical diamond tip (with 10 and 50 mum radii) and a sapphire tip (with a radius of 3.175 mm), respectively. The range of initial Hertzian contact pressures for macro-scale (i.e. between 0.41GPa and 1.2GPa) overlapped with that for micro-scale. However, the initial Hertzian contact diameters (2*a) were very different (i.e. 0.8-2.3 mum for micro-scale and 60-180 mum for macro-scale). It was observed that the small addition of Ti or Au to MoS2 improved the microtribological properties (i.e. lower friction and less wear) compared to pure MoS2 coatings. The improved microtribological properties with metal additions were attributed to an increase in the mechanical properties, decrease in adhesion, and a decrease in the interfacial shear strength. In terms of the different length scales, lower steady state friction was observed for macrotribology compared to microtribology. The higher friction at the micro- scale was explained by the greater adhesion effects and additional velocity accommodation modes (e.g. microplowing or plowing). The microplowing or plowing at the microscopic scale was attributed to the tip roughness and the inability to sustain a stable

  16. Thin films by metal-organic precursor plasma spray

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas L.; Sailer, Robert A.; Payne, Scott; Leach, James; Molz, Ronald J.

    2009-07-15

    While most plasma spray routes to coatings utilize solids as the precursor feedstock, metal-organic precursor plasma spray (MOPPS) is an area that the authors have investigated recently as a novel route to thin film materials. Very thin films are possible via MOPPS and the technology offers the possibility of forming graded structures by metering the liquid feed. The current work employs metal-organic compounds that are liquids at standard temperature-pressure conditions. In addition, these complexes contain chemical functionality that allows straightforward thermolytic transformation to targeted phases of interest. Toward that end, aluminum 3,5-heptanedionate (Al(hd){sub 3}), triethylsilane (HSi(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 3} or HSiEt{sub 3}), and titanium tetrakisdiethylamide (Ti(N(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2}){sub 4} or Ti(NEt{sub 2}){sub 4}) were employed as precursors to aluminum oxide, silicon carbide, and titanium nitride, respectively. In all instances, the liquids contain metal-heteroatom bonds envisioned to provide atomic concentrations of the appropriate reagents at the film growth surface, thus promoting phase formation (e.g., Si-C bond in triethylsilane, Ti-N bond in titanium amide, etc.). Films were deposited using a Sulzer Metco TriplexPro-200 plasma spray system under various experimental conditions using design of experiment principles. Film compositions were analyzed by glazing incidence x-ray diffraction and elemental determination by x-ray spectroscopy. MOPPS films from HSiEt{sub 3} showed the formation of SiC phase but Al(hd){sub 3}-derived films were amorphous. The Ti(NEt{sub 2}){sub 4} precursor gave MOPPS films that appear to consist of nanosized splats of TiOCN with spheres of TiO{sub 2} anatase. While all films in this study suffered from poor adhesion, it is anticipated that the use of heated substrates will aid in the formation of dense, adherent films.

  17. Effect of metallic-coating properties on the tribology of coated and oil-lubricated ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.R.; Erck, R.A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-09-01

    Friction and wear behavior was determined for zirconia ceramics lubricated with solid coatings (Ag, Au, and Nb) deposited by ion-beam-assisted-deposition (IBAD) techniques, and a polyol-ester-based synthetic oil. Although the use of soft Ag and Au coatings as solid lubricants in conjunction with the synthetic oil significantly reduced the friction and wear under boundary lubrication at temperatures up to 250[degrees]C, these films had poor durability. In contrast, the Nb coating was more durable (in terms of chemical reactivity and adhesion during the tribo-tests) than were the Ag or Au films. However, the friction and wear behavior of the Nb-coated zirconia was poorer than that of the ceramics coated with Ag or Au.

  18. Polarization Phase-Compensating Coats for Metallic Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2006-01-01

    A method of compensating for or minimizing phase differences between orthogonal polarizations of light reflected from metallic mirrors at oblique incidence, as, for example, from weakly curved mirrors, is undergoing development. The method is intended to satisfy a need to maintain precise polarization phase relationships or minimum polarization differences needed for proper operation of telescopes and other scientific instruments that include single or multiple mirrors. The basic idea of the method is to optimally coat mirrors with thin engineered layers of materials that introduce phase differences that, as nearly precisely as possible, are opposite of the undesired phase differences arising in reflection with non-optimum coatings. Depending on the specific optical system, the method could involve any or all of the following elements: a) Optimization of a single coat on all the mirrors in the system. b) Optimization of a unique coat for each mirror such that the polarization phase effects of the coat on one mirror compensate, to an acceptably high degree over an acceptably wide wavelength range, for those of the coat on another mirror. c) Tapering the coat on each mirror. Optimization could involve the choice of a single dielectric coating material and its thickness, or design of a more complex coat consisting of multiple layers of different dielectric materials and possibly some metallic materials. Such designs and coatings are particularly significant and needed for obtaining very high quality of wavefront required in high-contrast imaging instruments such as the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph.

  19. Growth of ZnO thin films doped with (Mn & Co) by spin coating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhruvashi, Rawat, Kusum; Shishodia, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    ZnO thin films co-doped with Mn and Co have been deposited on glass substrates by spin coating technique. Structural, optical and magnetic properties have been investigated as a function of dopant concentration. X-ray diffraction has confirmed the growth of c-axis oriented polycrystalline thin films. No impurity phases have been detected corresponding to metal oxides within the limitation of x-ray diffraction. The optical bandgap has been evaluated from tauc's plots derived from the transmittance spectra in the wavelength range 350-900 nm. Surface morphology of the films has been observed by field emission scanning electron microscope. The field dependence of magnetization (M-H curve) measured by vibrating sample magnetometer shows the ferromagnetic behavior of the films at room temperature. The magnetization versus temperature (M-T) curve has also been measured under zero field cooled and field cooled conditions.

  20. Coating Films of Titanium Nitride Prepared by Ion and Vapor Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Mamoru; Andoh, Yasunori; Ogata, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Yasuo; Matsuda, Koji; Fujimoto, Fuminori

    1985-06-01

    Titanium nitride coating films were prepared on polished stainless steel and graphite plates by vacuum evaporation of titanium with simultaneous bombardment by nitrogen ions with an energy of 10 to 30 keV (IVD method). The compositional variations of each element with depth and the crystal structure were analysed by means of XPS, RBS and X-ray diffraction. It was confirmed that a significant intermixed layer exists at the interface. The thickness of this layer was about 440 Å for a film prepared on a stainless-steel plate at about 300°C by a 30 keV nitrogen ion beam, and decreased with decrease of the ion energy. Films were mainly composed of TiN crystallites with [100] axes preferentially oriented normal to the film surfaces. Some titanium was bound to oxygen and carbon atoms, but there were no metallic-state titanium atoms.

  1. Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic films of Mo49Cr33B18 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, R.; Distefano, S.; Fitzgerald, D.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic alloy films of Mo49Cr33B18 with a crystallization temperature of 590 C were deposited onto glass and quartz substrates by magnetron sputter-quench technique. The amorphous nature of the films was confirmed by their diffuse X-ray diffraction patterns. The deposited films are densely packed (zone T) and exhibit low stress and good adhesion to the substrate. Corrosion current of as-deposited coating of MoCrB amorphous metallic alloy is approximately three orders of magnitude less than the corrosion current of 304 stainless steel in 1N H2SO4 solution.

  2. Nanoindentation of functionally graded hybrid polymer/metal thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, J.; Piedade, A. P.

    2013-11-01

    Hybrid functionally graded coatings (2D-FGC) were deposited by magnetron co-sputtering from poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and AISI 316L stainless steel (316L) targets. The carbon and fluorine content varied from 7.3 to 23.7 at.% and from 0 to 57 at.%, respectively. The surface modification was developed to change the surface of 316L vascular stents in order to improve the biocompatibility of the outmost layer of the metallic biomaterial. In-depth XPS analysis revealed the presence of a graded chemical composition accompanied by the variation of the film structure. These results were complemented by those of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis that highlighted the nanocomposite nature of the coatings. The nanomechanical characterization of 2D-FGC was performed by nanoindentation at several loads on the thin films deposited onto two different steel substrates: 316L and AISI M2. The study allowed establishing 0.7 mN as the load that characterized the coatings without substrate influence. Both hardness and Young modulus decrease with the increase of fluorine content due to the evolution in chemical composition, chemical bonds and structure.

  3. Soap-film coating: High-speed deposition of multilayer nanofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Renyun; Andersson, Henrik A.; Andersson, Mattias; Andres, Britta; Edlund, Håkan; Edström, Per; Edvardsson, Sverker; Forsberg, Sven; Hummelgård, Magnus; Johansson, Niklas; Karlsson, Kristoffer; Nilsson, Hans-Erik; Norgren, Magnus; Olsen, Martin; Uesaka, Tetsu; Öhlund, Thomas; Olin, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    The coating of thin films is applied in numerous fields and many methods are employed for the deposition of these films. Some coating techniques may deposit films at high speed; for example, ordinary printing paper is coated with micrometre-thick layers of clay at a speed of tens of meters per second. However, to coat nanometre thin films at high speed, vacuum techniques are typically required, which increases the complexity of the process. Here, we report a simple wet chemical method for the high-speed coating of films with thicknesses at the nanometre level. This soap-film coating technique is based on forcing a substrate through a soap film that contains nanomaterials. Molecules and nanomaterials can be deposited at a thickness ranging from less than a monolayer to several layers at speeds up to meters per second. We believe that the soap-film coating method is potentially important for industrial-scale nanotechnology. PMID:23503102

  4. Nanostructured multilayer polyelectrolyte films with silver nanoparticles as antibacterial coatings.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Tomasz; Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Kręgiel, Dorota; Szyk-Warszyńska, L; Warszyński, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Ultrathin polyelectrolyte films containing silver nanoparticles appear to be a promising material for antimicrobial coatings used in the medical area. The present work is focused on the formation of multilayer polyelectrolyte films using: polyethyleneimine (PEI) as polycation, Poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) as polyanions and negatively charged silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which led to the polyelectrolyte-silver nanocomposite coatings. The film thickness and mass were measured by ellipsometry and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and the structure and morphology of films were visualized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Systematic increase of the UV-Vis absorption confirmed formation of the consecutive layers of the film. The analysis of bacteria cell adhesion to films surface was done by the luminometry measurement. Three gram-negative bacterial strains with strong adhesive properties were used in this study: Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Asaia lannenesis. It was found that nanocomposite films have antimicrobial properties, which makes them very interesting for a number of practical applications, e.g. for the prevention of microbial colonization on treated surfaces. PMID:26193773

  5. Predicted and measured EMI shielding effectiveness of a metallic mesh coating on a sapphire window over a broad frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Keith T.; Pieratt, Matthew W.; Halman, Jennifer I.; Ramsey, Keith A.

    2009-05-01

    Metallic mesh thin film coatings have been used for many years to provide electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding on infrared windows and domes. The level of EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of metallic mesh coatings when used in a high frequency application is understood and characterized. Conversely, the level of SE of these metallic mesh coatings when used in a low frequency application has been called into question. In a recent study, we applied an appropriately designed metallic mesh coating to a sapphire window, mounted that window in a fixture, and tested the SE of the window assembly over a frequency range that envelopes the various military platforms covered in MIL-STD-461 (10 kHz to 18 GHz) for a radiated emissions test. The test plan was devised in such a way as to independently assess the individual contributions of the aperture, the mounting, and the metallic mesh coating to the total shielding. The results of our testing will be described in this paper. Additionally, the test results will be compared to the predicted SE for both the aperture and the metallic mesh coated window in order to validate the predictive model. Finally, an assessment of the appropriateness of the use of metallic mesh coatings for EMI shielding in a low and/or broad range frequency application will be made.

  6. Preparation and characterization of YBCO coating on metallic RABiT substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonal, M. R.; Prajapat, C. L.; Igalwar, P. S.; Maji, B. C.; Singh, M. R.; Krishnan, M.

    2016-05-01

    Superconducting YBCO films are coated on metallic Rolling Assisted Bi-axially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) Ni-5wt % W (NiW) (002) substrate using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system. Targets of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) and buffer layers of Ceria and 8 mole % Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) of high density are synthesized. At each stage of deposition coatings are characterized by XRD. Transport studies show superconducting nature of YBCO only when two successive buffer layers of YSZ and CeO2 are used.

  7. Immersion Deposition of Metal Films on Silicon and Germanium Substrates in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Xiang-Rong; Wai, Chien M.; Zhang, Daqing; Kranov, Yanko; Mcilroy, David; Lin, Yuehe; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2003-01-29

    A low temperature carbon dioxide based on immersion deposition technology (SFID) has been developed for producing palladium, copper, silver, and other metal films on silicon-based substrates in supercritical CO2. The reaction is initiated by oxidation of elemental silicon to SiF4 or H2SiF6 by HF with the release of electrons that cause the reduction of metal ions in an organometallic precursor to the metallic form on silicon surface in CO2. Only the substrate surfaces are coated with metals using this method. Based on surface analysis of the films and spectroscopic analysis of the reaction products, the mechanism of metal film deposition is discussed. The metal films (Pd, Cu, and Ag) formed on silicon surfaces by the SFID method exhibit good coverage, smooth and dense texture, high purity and a metallic behavior. Similarly, metal films can also be deposited onto geranium substrates using SFID. The gas-like properties and the high pressure of the supercritical fluids, combined with the low reaction temperature, make this SFID method potentially useful for depositing thin metal films in small features, which are difficult to accomplish by conventional CVD methods.

  8. Magnetoelastic sensor for characterizing properties of thin-film/coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachas, Leonidas G. (Inventor); Barrett, Gary (Inventor); Grimes, Craig A. (Inventor); Kouzoudis, Dimitris (Inventor); Schmidt, Stefan (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for determining elasticity characteristics of a thin-film layer. The apparatus comprises a sensor element having a base magnetostrictive element at least one surface of which is at least partially coated with the thin-film layer. The thin-film layer may be of a variety of materials (having a synthetic and/or bio-component) in a state or form capable of being deposited, manually or otherwise, on the base element surface, such as by way of eye-dropper, melting, dripping, brushing, sputtering, spraying, etching, evaporation, dip-coating, laminating, etc. Among suitable thin-film layers for the sensor element of the invention are fluent bio-substances, thin-film deposits used in manufacturing processes, polymeric coatings, paint, an adhesive, and so on. A receiver, preferably remotely located, is used to measure a plurality of values for magneto-elastic emission intensity of the sensor element in either characterization: (a) the measure of the plurality of values is used to identify a magneto-elastic resonant frequency value for the sensor element; and (b) the measure of the plurality of successive values is done at a preselected magneto-elastic frequency.

  9. Novel microstructure in spin coated polyaniline thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Deepak; Dutta, V.

    2007-05-01

    Polyaniline (Pani) thin films doped with camphor sulfonic acid (CSA) have been deposited on glass substrates using the spin coating technique. Pani is chemically synthesized by an oxidation method at ~0 °C. Pani-CSA films show a hexagonal structure in scanning electron micrographs, which occurs due to the crystalline growth of CSA. A dense hexagonal structure is visible for film deposited at 800 rpm, but it becomes sparser as the revolutions per minute are increased (1200, 1500 and 2000 rpm). Electronic transition of quinoid units cause an absorption shoulder at ~900 nm for films deposited at 1200, 1500 and 2000 rpm, which is not observed for film deposited at 800 rpm.

  10. Novel microstructure in spin coated polyaniline thin films.

    PubMed

    Verma, Deepak; Dutta, V

    2007-05-01

    Polyaniline (Pani) thin films doped with camphor sulfonic acid (CSA) have been deposited on glass substrates using the spin coating technique. Pani is chemically synthesized by an oxidation method at ∼0 °C. Pani-CSA films show a hexagonal structure in scanning electron micrographs, which occurs due to the crystalline growth of CSA. A dense hexagonal structure is visible for film deposited at 800 rpm, but it becomes sparser as the revolutions per minute are increased (1200, 1500 and 2000 rpm). Electronic transition of quinoid units cause an absorption shoulder at ∼900 nm for films deposited at 1200, 1500 and 2000 rpm, which is not observed for film deposited at 800 rpm. PMID:21690993

  11. Protective lithium ion conducting ceramic coating for lithium metal anodes and associate method

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A battery structure including a cathode, a lithium metal anode and an electrolyte disposed between the lithium anode and the cathode utilizes a thin-film layer of lithium phosphorus oxynitride overlying so as to coat the lithium anode and thereby separate the lithium anode from the electrolyte. If desired, a preliminary layer of lithium nitride may be coated upon the lithium anode before the lithium phosphorous oxynitride is, in turn, coated upon the lithium anode so that the separation of the anode and the electrolyte is further enhanced. By coating the lithium anode with this material lay-up, the life of the battery is lengthened and the performance of the battery is enhanced.

  12. Practical anti-reflection coating for metal semiconductor solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Y.-C. M.; Stirn, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The metal-semiconductor solar cell is a possible candidate for converting solar to electrical energy for terrestrial application. A method is given for obtaining optical parameters of practical antireflection coatings for the metal-semiconductor solar cell. This method utilizes the measured refractive index obtained from ellipsometry since the surface to be AR coated has a multilayer structure. Both the experimental results and theoretical calculation of optical parameters for Ta2O5 antireflection coatings on Au-GaAs and Au-GaAs(0.78)P(0.22) solar cells are presented for comparison.

  13. Instabilities of structured metal films on nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Nanyi; Wu, Yueying; Fowlkes, Jason; Rack, Philip; Kondic, Lou

    2014-11-01

    We consider instabilities of metal films on nanoscale, with particular focus on the interplay between the initial geometry and instability development. In experiments, metal films are deposited lithographically, allowing for precise control of the initial shape, and then exposed to laser pulses that liquefy them. The considered geometries involve various shapes (cylinders or prisms) superimposed on top of a flat film. We consider this problem within the framework of the long wave (lubrication) theory. Our simulations show that the main features of the instability development could be captured, as long as destabilizing liquid-solid interaction is considered in the model. We conclude by discussing the influence of the distance between the imposed perturbations, their shape, as well as experimental noise on the evolution. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET-1235710.

  14. Antireflective coatings applied from metal-organic derived liquid precursors.

    PubMed

    Yoldas, B E; O'Keeffe, T W

    1979-09-15

    Antireflective (AR) coatings, which are produced from organometallic driven solutions containing oxide constituents in a chemically polymerized form, are presented. These solutions leave a film on substrates which, upon heat treatment, converts to a glasslike oxide film having the desired optical thickness and index of refraction. The index can be varied continuously from 1.4 to 2.4; thus the AR coatings can be fine-tuned for different substrates and for specific wavelengths of light. Silicon solar cells AR-coated by this technique showed as much as 49% improvement in efficiency over the uncoated state. The real advantage of the process, however, lies in the fact that it is simple, well-suited for automated mass production of photovoltaic cells, and reduces the cost of coating application from an estimated $0.20 per W-package to about $0.01 per W-package. PMID:20212817

  15. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Brian H.; Kuritz, Tanya

    2000-06-01

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: (1) decreased exposure hazards for workers; (2) decreased secondary waste generation; (3) increased efficiency of decontamination; (4) positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and (5) lower cost of cleanup to the government. We propose to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) will then be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  16. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Brian H.; Kurtiz,Tanya

    1999-06-01

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: (1) decreased exposure hazards for workers; (2) decreased secondary waste generation; (3) increased efficiency of decontamination; (4) positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and (5) lower cost of cleanup to the government. We propose to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) will then be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  17. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Brian H.

    2002-04-30

    The proposed research aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies include the following: decreased exposure hazards for workers; decreased secondary waste generation; increased efficiency of decontamination; positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and lower cost of cleanup to the government. We proposed to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) was to be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  18. Interfacial bond strength of electrophoretically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings on metals.

    PubMed

    Wei, M; Ruys, A J; Swain, M V; Kim, S H; Milthorpe, B K; Sorrell, C C

    1999-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings were deposited onto substrates of metal biomaterials (Ti, Ti6Al4V, and 316L stainless steel) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Only ultra-high surface area HAp powder, prepared by the metathesis method 10Ca(NO3)2 + 6(NH4)2HPO4 + 8NH4OH), could produce dense coatings when sintered at 875-1000degreesC. Single EPD coatings cracked during sintering owing to the 15-18% sintering shrinkage, but the HAp did not decompose. The use of dual coatings (coat, sinter, coat, sinter) resolved the cracking problem. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) inspection revealed that the second coating filled in the "valleys" in the cracks of the first coating. The interfacial shear strength of the dual coatings was found, by ASTM F1044-87, to be approximately 12 MPa on a titanium substrate and approximately 22 MPa on 316L stainless steel, comparing quite favorably with the 34 MPa benchmark (the shear strength of bovine cortical bone was found to be 34 MPa). Stainless steel gave the better result since -316L (20.5 microm mK(-1)) > alpha-HAp (approximately 14 microm mK(-1)), resulting in residual compressive stresses in the coating, whereas alpha-titanium (approximately 10.3 microm mK(-1)) < alpha-HAp, resulting in residual tensile stresses in the coating. PMID:15348125

  19. Spray forming polymer membranes, coatings and films

    DOEpatents

    McHugh, K.M.; Watson, L.D.; McAtee, R.E.; Ploger, S.A.

    1993-10-12

    A method is described for forming a polymer film having controlled physical and chemical characteristics, wherein a plume of nebulized droplets of a polymer or polymer precursor is directed toward a substrate from a converging/diverging nozzle having a throat at which the polymer or a precursor thereof is introduced and an exit from which the nebulized droplets of the polymer or precursor thereof leave entrained in a carrier gas. Relative movement between the nozzle and the substrate is provided to form a polymer film. Physical and chemical characteristics can be controlled by varying the deposition parameters and the gas and liquid chemistries. Semipermeable membranes of polyphosphazene films are disclosed, as are a variety of other polymer systems, both porous and non-porous. 4 figures.

  20. Spray forming polymer membranes, coatings and films

    DOEpatents

    McHugh, Kevin M.; Watson, Lloyd D.; McAtee, Richard E.; Ploger, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    A method of forming a polymer film having controlled physical and chemical characteristics, wherein a plume of nebulized droplets of a polymer or polymer precursor is directed toward a substrate from a converging/diverging nozzle having a throat at which the polymer or a precursor thereof is introduced and an exit from which the nebulized droplets of the polymer or precursor thereof leave entrained in a carrier gas. Relative movement between the nozzle and the substrate is provided to form a polymer film. Physical and chemical characteristics can be controlled by varying the deposition parameters and the gas and liquid chemistries. Semipermeable membranes of polyphosphazene films are disclosed, as are a variety of other polymer systems, both porous and non-porous.

  1. Coatings Preserve Metal, Stone, Tile, and Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    John B. Schutt, a chemist at Goddard Space Flight Center, created a coating for spacecraft that could resist corrosion and withstand high heat. After retiring from NASA, Schutt used his expertise to create new formulations for Daytona Beach, Florida-based Adsil Corporation, which now manufactures a family of coatings to preserve various surfaces. Adsil has created 150 jobs due to the products.

  2. Deformation behavior of metallic glass thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. H.; Zhao, F.; Li, Y. L.; Chen, M. W.

    2012-09-01

    We report room-temperature deformation behavior of damage-free metallic glass films characterized by nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy. The glass films with thicknesses ranging from 5 μm down to ˜60 nm plastically deform by shear bands when subjected to both spherical and sharp Berkovich indenters. Importantly, we found that gallium contamination from focus ion beam (FIB) milling significantly suppresses shear band formation, indicating that the absence of shear bands in FIB milled samples may be caused by gallium irradiation damage, rather than sample size effect. Finite element simulation reveals that a high stress gradient at the film/substrate interface promotes the plastic deformation of the thin films but does not give rise to significant strain inhomogeneity.

  3. Micro-Scratch Study of a Magnetron-Sputtered Zr-Based Metallic-Glass Film

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F. X.; Yang, F. Q.; Gao, Yanfei; Jiang, W. H.; Guan, Y F; Rack, P. D.; Sergic, O.; Liaw, Peter K

    2009-01-01

    Using the micro-scratch technique, the tribological behavior of ZrCuAlNi metallic-glass coatings on 316L stainless steel was studied. With the application of ramping normal loads, the critical normal loads of about 110 mN were determined, at which the coefficient of friction increased sharply and the indenter penetration depth exceeded the film thickness. No clear evidence of coating debonding has been found, which, together with the observation of multiple shear bands, indicates good adhesion and ductility of the metallic-glass coating. When subjected to constant normal loads, the coefficient of friction increased rapidly once the critical normal load was passed. The scratch results and the scanning-electron microscopy observations indicated good adhesion between the coating and the substrate, which may be due to the good interfacial bonding and low coating residual stress.

  4. Multilayer thin film coatings for reduced infrared loss in hollow glass waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bledt, Carlos M.; Kopp, Daniel V.; Harrington, James A.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2011-09-01

    Hollow glass waveguides (HGWs) are an attractive alternative to traditional solid-core and 2D photonic crystal, infrared transmissive fibers. Applications for HGWs at wavelengths longer than 2 microns include use of the guides for the delivery of laser power and for use as chemical and thermal sensors. To date, the most common HGW is one with an inner coating of Ag followed by a single-dielectric layer of AgI. These single-layer dielectric coated HGWs have losses for a 700-micron bore guide as low as 0.2 dB/m at 10.6 microns. However, if a multilayer stack of alternating high/low index thin films is deposited instead of a single dielectric layer then the loss can be reduced substantially. In the present study, multilayer dielectric thin films have been deposited inside silica tubing using a liquid-phase deposition method. High index coating materials used include metal sulfides such as PbS while the low index materials include polystyrene (PS) and some sulfides. To date it has been possible to deposit two-layer coatings using, for example, CdS and PS but a lower loss is possible if the coating stack is composed of three dielectric layers. In past work CdS/PbS/CdS coatings were deposited and found to have a measured a loss at λ = 10.6 microns that is approximately two times lower than that for a single dielectric layer. In this paper the theory of multilayer coatings will be presented along with the optical loss measurements from λ = 2 to 12 microns for the multilayer dielectric coatings.

  5. 21 CFR 175.365 - Vinylidene chloride copolymer coatings for polycarbonate film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Vinylidene chloride copolymer coatings for...: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.365 Vinylidene chloride copolymer coatings for polycarbonate film. Vinylidene chloride copolymer coatings identified...

  6. Dip coated silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite films.

    PubMed

    Hijón, Natalia; Victoria Cabañas, M; Peña, Juan; Vallet-Regí, María

    2006-09-01

    Silicon-substituted hydroxyapatites have been deposited onto Ti6Al4V substrates by sol-gel technology. The Ca(10)(PO(4))(6-x-y)(SiO(4))(x)(CO(3))(y)(OH)(2-x+y) coatings obtained, with silicon contents up to x=1 (2.8 wt.%), show a homogeneous and crack-free surface composed of particles smaller than 20 nm. The silicon enters into the apatite structure in the form of SiO(4)(4-) groups that partially substitute the PO(4)(3-) groups. The Si content and the Ca/P molar ratio of the coatings agree with those originally introduced in the sols. Layers with thicknesses around 600 nm show adhesion strengths superior to 20 MPa as determined by a pull-out test. The formation of an apatite layer onto these coatings after immersion in a simulated body fluid is enhanced by the presence of silicon. PMID:16828579

  7. Reproducibility of electrochemical noise data from coated metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bierwagen, G.P.; Mills, D.J.; Tallman, D.E.; Skerry, B.S.

    1996-12-31

    The use of electrochemical noise (ECN) as a method to characterize the corrosion-protection properties of organic coatings on metal substrates was pioneered by Skerry and Eden, and since then has been used by others as a probe for coating metal corrosion studies. However, no statistical examination of the reproducibility of the data from such measurements has been published. In the data the authors present, they have done a systematic analysis of important experimental variables in such systems. They have examined the method for accuracy and reproducibility with respect to sample preparation, sample immersion, and metal substrate preparation. They have taken several marine coatings systems typical of US Navy use, prepared duplicate samples of coating metal systems, and examined them under the same immersion exposure. The variables they considered for reproducibility are paint application (in three-coat systems), metal panel preparation (grit-blasted steel), and immersion conditions. The authors present ECN data with respect to immersion time on the values of noise voltage standard deviation {sigma}{sub V}, noise current standard deviation {sigma}{sub I}, and the noise resistance R{sub n} as given by {sigma}{sub V}/{sigma}{sub I}. The variation among supposedly identical sample pairs in identical immersion monitored under identical conditions is presented. The statistics of the time records of the data are considered, and the variations with respect to specific coatings classes are also considered within the limits of the data. Based on these data, comments concerning ECN on coated metal systems as a predictive test method are presented along with special considerations that must be made to properly use the method for coating ranking and lifetime prediction.

  8. 21 CFR 888.3358 - Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained... Devices § 888.3358 Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3358 - Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained... Devices § 888.3358 Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a...

  10. Skylab D024 thermal control coatings and polymeric films experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehn, William L.; Hurley, Charles J.

    1992-01-01

    The Skylab D024 Thermal Control Coatings and Polymeric Films Experiment was designed to determine the effects of the external Skylab space environment on the performance and properties of a wide variety of selected thermal control coatings and polymeric films. Three duplicate sets of thermal control coatings and polymeric films were exposed to the Skylab space environment for varying periods of time during the mission. The specimens were retrieved by the astronauts during extravehicular activities (EVA) and placed in hermetically sealed return containers, recovered, and returned to the Wright Laboratory/Materials Laboratory/WPAFB, Ohio for analysis and evaluation. Postflight analysis of the three sets of recovered thermal control coatings indicated that measured changes in specimen thermo-optical properties were due to a combination of excessive contamination and solar degradation of the contaminant layer. The degree of degradation experienced over-rode, obscured, and compromised the measurement of the degradation of the substrate coatings themselves. Results of the analysis of the effects of exposure on the polymeric films and the contamination observed are also presented. The D024 results were used in the design of the LDEF M0003-5 Thermal Control Materials Experiment. The results are presented here to call to the attention of the many other LDEF experimenters the wealth of directly related, low earth orbit, space environmental exposure data that is available from the ten or more separate experiments that were conducted during the Skylab mission. Results of these experiments offer data on the results of low altitude space exposure on materials recovered from space with exposure longer than typical STS experiments for comparison with the LDEF results.