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Sample records for filtering snps imputed

  1. Genotype imputation efficiency in Nelore Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotype imputation efficiency in Nelore cattle was evaluated in different scenarios of lower density (LD) chips, imputation methods and sets of animals to have their genotypes imputed. Twelve commercial and virtual custom LD chips with densities varying from 7K to 75K SNPs were tested. Customized L...

  2. SWEEP: A Tool for Filtering High-Quality SNPs in Polyploid Crops

    PubMed Central

    Clevenger, Josh P.; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput next-generation sequence-based genotyping and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection opens the door for emerging genomics-based breeding strategies such as genome-wide association analysis and genomic selection. In polyploids, SNP detection is confounded by a highly similar homeologous sequence where a polymorphism between subgenomes must be differentiated from a SNP. We have developed and implemented a novel tool called SWEEP: Sliding Window Extraction of Explicit Polymorphisms. SWEEP uses subgenome polymorphism haplotypes as contrast to identify true SNPs between genotypes. The tool is a single command script that calls a series of modules based on user-defined options and takes sorted/indexed bam files or vcf files as input. Filtering options are highly flexible and include filtering based on sequence depth, alternate allele ratio, and SNP quality on top of the SWEEP filtering procedure. Using real and simulated data we show that SWEEP outperforms current SNP filtering methods for polyploids. SWEEP can be used for high-quality SNP discovery in polyploid crops. PMID:26153076

  3. SWEEP: A Tool for Filtering High-Quality SNPs in Polyploid Crops.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Josh P; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput next-generation sequence-based genotyping and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection opens the door for emerging genomics-based breeding strategies such as genome-wide association analysis and genomic selection. In polyploids, SNP detection is confounded by a highly similar homeologous sequence where a polymorphism between subgenomes must be differentiated from a SNP. We have developed and implemented a novel tool called SWEEP: Sliding Window Extraction of Explicit Polymorphisms. SWEEP uses subgenome polymorphism haplotypes as contrast to identify true SNPs between genotypes. The tool is a single command script that calls a series of modules based on user-defined options and takes sorted/indexed bam files or vcf files as input. Filtering options are highly flexible and include filtering based on sequence depth, alternate allele ratio, and SNP quality on top of the SWEEP filtering procedure. Using real and simulated data we show that SWEEP outperforms current SNP filtering methods for polyploids. SWEEP can be used for high-quality SNP discovery in polyploid crops. PMID:26153076

  4. Comprehensive evaluation of imputation performance in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Pritam; Yuhki, Naoya; Li, Man; Bader, Joel S; Hartz, Alex; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kao, W H Linda; Arking, Dan E

    2012-07-01

    Imputation of genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays to a larger known reference panel of SNPs has become a standard and an essential part of genome-wide association studies. However, little is known about the behavior of imputation in African Americans with respect to the different imputation algorithms, the reference population(s) and the reference SNP panels used. Genome-wide SNP data (Affymetrix 6.0) from 3207 African American samples in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) was used to systematically evaluate imputation quality and yield. Imputation was performed with the imputation algorithms MACH, IMPUTE and BEAGLE using several combinations of three reference panels of HapMap III (ASW, YRI and CEU) and 1000 Genomes Project (pilot 1 YRI June 2010 release, EUR and AFR August 2010 and June 2011 releases) panels with SNP data on chromosomes 18, 20 and 22. About 10% of the directly genotyped SNPs from each chromosome were masked, and SNPs common between the reference panels were used for evaluating the imputation quality using two statistical metrics-concordance accuracy and Cohen's kappa (?) coefficient. The dependencies of these metrics on the minor allele frequencies (MAF) and specific genotype categories (minor allele homozygotes, heterozygotes and major allele homozygotes) were thoroughly investigated to determine the best panel and method for imputation in African Americans. In addition, the power to detect imputed SNPs associated with simulated phenotypes was studied using the mean genotype of each masked SNP in the imputed data. Our results indicate that the genotype concordances after stratification into each genotype category and Cohen's ? coefficient are considerably better equipped to differentiate imputation performance compared with the traditionally used total concordance statistic, and both statistics improved with increasing MAF irrespective of the imputation method. We also find that both MACH and IMPUTE performed equally well and consistently better than BEAGLE irrespective of the reference panel used. Of the various combinations of reference panels, for both HapMap III and 1000 Genomes Project reference panels, the multi-ethnic panels had better imputation accuracy than those containing only single ethnic samples. The most recent 1000 Genomes Project release June 2011 had substantially higher number of imputed SNPs than HapMap III and performed as well or better than the best combined HapMap III reference panels and previous releases of the 1000 Genomes Project. PMID:22648186

  5. Imputation accuracy is robust to cattle reference genome updates.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, M; Vicario, D; Stella, A; Valentini, A; Ajmone-Marsan, P; Biffani, S; Biscarini, F; Jansen, G; Nicolazzi, E L

    2015-02-01

    Genotype imputation is routinely applied in a large number of cattle breeds. Imputation has become a need due to the large number of SNP arrays with variable density (currently, from 2900 to 777,962 SNPs). Although many authors have studied the effect of different statistical methods on imputation accuracy, the impact of a (likely) change in the reference genome assembly on imputation from lower to higher density has not been determined so far. In this work, 1021 Italian Simmental SNP genotypes were remapped on the three most recent reference genome assemblies. Four imputation methods were used to assess the impact of an update in the reference genome. As expected, the four methods behaved differently, with large differences in terms of accuracy. Updating SNP coordinates on the three tested cattle reference genome assemblies determined only a slight variation on imputation results within method. PMID:25515631

  6. Imputation Without Doing Imputation: A New Method for the Detection of Non-Genotyped Causal Variants

    PubMed Central

    Howey, Richard; Cordell, Heather J

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies allow detection of non-genotyped disease-causing variants through testing of nearby genotyped SNPs. This approach may fail when there are no genotyped SNPs in strong LD with the causal variant. Several genotyped SNPs in weak LD with the causal variant may, however, considered together, provide equivalent information. This observation motivates popular but computationally intensive approaches based on imputation or haplotyping. Here we present a new method and accompanying software designed for this scenario. Our approach proceeds by selecting, for each genotyped “anchor” SNP, a nearby genotyped “partner” SNP, chosen via a specific algorithm we have developed. These two SNPs are used as predictors in linear or logistic regression analysis to generate a final significance test. In simulations, our method captures much of the signal captured by imputation, while taking a fraction of the time and disc space, and generating a smaller number of false-positives. We apply our method to a case/control study of severe malaria genotyped using the Affymetrix 500K array. Previous analysis showed that fine-scale sequencing of a Gambian reference panel in the region of the known causal locus, followed by imputation, increased the signal of association to genome-wide significance levels. Our method also increases the signal of association from to . Our method thus, in some cases, eliminates the need for more complex methods such as sequencing and imputation, and provides a useful additional test that may be used to identify genetic regions of interest. PMID:24535679

  7. Genotype imputation via matrix completion

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Eric C.; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K.; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  8. Comparison of imputation variance estimators.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ra; Sterne, Jac; Tilling, K

    2014-04-22

    Appropriate imputation inference requires both an unbiased imputation estimator and an unbiased variance estimator. The commonly used variance estimator, proposed by Rubin, can be biased when the imputation and analysis models are misspecified and/or incompatible. Robins and Wang proposed an alternative approach, which allows for such misspecification and incompatibility, but it is considerably more complex. It is unknown whether in practice Robins and Wang's multiple imputation procedure is an improvement over Rubin's multiple imputation. We conducted a critical review of these two multiple imputation approaches, a re-sampling method called full mechanism bootstrapping and our modified Rubin's multiple imputation procedure via simulations and an application to data. We explored four common scenarios of misspecification and incompatibility. In general, for a moderate sample size (n?=?1000), Robins and Wang's multiple imputation produced the narrowest confidence intervals, with acceptable coverage. For a small sample size (n?=?100) Rubin's multiple imputation, overall, outperformed the other methods. Full mechanism bootstrapping was inefficient relative to the other methods and required modelling of the missing data mechanism under the missing at random assumption. Our proposed modification showed an improvement over Rubin's multiple imputation in the presence of misspecification. Overall, Rubin's multiple imputation variance estimator can fail in the presence of incompatibility and/or misspecification. For unavoidable incompatibility and/or misspecification, Robins and Wang's multiple imputation could provide more robust inferences. PMID:24682265

  9. High-density marker imputation accuracy in sixteen French cattle breeds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genotyping with the medium-density Bovine SNP50 BeadChip® (50K) is now standard in cattle. The high-density BovineHD BeadChip®, which contains 777 609 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), was developed in 2010. Increasing marker density increases the level of linkage disequilibrium between quantitative trait loci (QTL) and SNPs and the accuracy of QTL localization and genomic selection. However, re-genotyping all animals with the high-density chip is not economically feasible. An alternative strategy is to genotype part of the animals with the high-density chip and to impute high-density genotypes for animals already genotyped with the 50K chip. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the error rate when imputing from the 50K to the high-density chip. Methods Five thousand one hundred and fifty three animals from 16 breeds (89 to 788 per breed) were genotyped with the high-density chip. Imputation error rates from the 50K to the high-density chip were computed for each breed with a validation set that included the 20% youngest animals. Marker genotypes were masked for animals in the validation population in order to mimic 50K genotypes. Imputation was carried out using the Beagle 3.3.0 software. Results Mean allele imputation error rates ranged from 0.31% to 2.41% depending on the breed. In total, 1980 SNPs had high imputation error rates in several breeds, which is probably due to genome assembly errors, and we recommend to discard these in future studies. Differences in imputation accuracy between breeds were related to the high-density-genotyped sample size and to the genetic relationship between reference and validation populations, whereas differences in effective population size and level of linkage disequilibrium showed limited effects. Accordingly, imputation accuracy was higher in breeds with large populations and in dairy breeds than in beef breeds. More than 99% of the alleles were correctly imputed if more than 300 animals were genotyped at high-density. No improvement was observed when multi-breed imputation was performed. Conclusion In all breeds, imputation accuracy was higher than 97%, which indicates that imputation to the high-density chip was accurate. Imputation accuracy depends mainly on the size of the reference population and the relationship between reference and target populations. PMID:24004563

  10. Performance of genotype imputation for rare variants identified in exons and flanking regions of genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Li, Yun; Browning, Sharon R; Browning, Brian L; Slater, Andrew J; Kong, Xiangyang; Aponte, Jennifer L; Mooser, Vincent E; Chissoe, Stephanie L; Whittaker, John C; Nelson, Matthew R; Ehm, Margaret Gelder

    2011-01-01

    Genotype imputation has the potential to assess human genetic variation at a lower cost than assaying the variants using laboratory techniques. The performance of imputation for rare variants has not been comprehensively studied. We utilized 8865 human samples with high depth resequencing data for the exons and flanking regions of 202 genes and Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) data to characterize the performance of genotype imputation for rare variants. We evaluated reference sets ranging from 100 to 3713 subjects for imputing into samples typed for the Affymetrix (500K and 6.0) and Illumina 550K GWAS panels. The proportion of variants that could be well imputed (true r(2)>0.7) with a reference panel of 3713 individuals was: 31% (Illumina 550K) or 25% (Affymetrix 500K) with MAF (Minor Allele Frequency) less than or equal 0.001, 48% or 35% with 0.0010.05. The performance for common SNPs (MAF>0.05) within exons and flanking regions is comparable to imputation of more uniformly distributed SNPs. The performance for rare SNPs (0.01imputation for extending the assessment of common variants identified in humans via targeted exon resequencing into additional samples with GWAS data, but imputation of very rare variants (MAF

  11. Design of a low-density SNP chip for the main Australian sheep breeds and its effect on imputation and genomic prediction accuracy.

    PubMed

    Bolormaa, S; Gore, K; van der Werf, J H J; Hayes, B J; Daetwyler, H D

    2015-10-01

    Genotyping sheep for genome-wide SNPs at lower density and imputing to a higher density would enable cost-effective implementation of genomic selection, provided imputation was accurate enough. Here, we describe the design of a low-density (12k) SNP chip and evaluate the accuracy of imputation from the 12k SNP genotypes to 50k SNP genotypes in the major Australian sheep breeds. In addition, the impact of imperfect imputation on genomic predictions was evaluated by comparing the accuracy of genomic predictions for 15 novel meat traits including carcass and meat quality and omega fatty acid traits in sheep, from 12k SNP genotypes, imputed 50k SNP genotypes and real 50k SNP genotypes. The 12k chip design included 12 223 SNPs with a high minor allele frequency that were selected with intermarker spacing of 50-475 kb. SNPs for parentage and horned or polled tests also were represented. Chromosome ends were enriched with SNPs to reduce edge effects on imputation. The imputation performance of the 12k SNP chip was evaluated using 50k SNP genotypes of 4642 animals from six breeds in three different scenarios: (1) within breed, (2) single breed from multibreed reference and (3) multibreed from a single-breed reference. The highest imputation accuracies were found with scenario 2, whereas scenario 3 was the worst, as expected. Using scenario 2, the average imputation accuracy in Border Leicester, Polled Dorset, Merino, White Suffolk and crosses was 0.95, 0.95, 0.92, 0.91 and 0.93 respectively. Imputation scenario 2 was used to impute 50k genotypes for 10 396 animals with novel meat trait phenotypes to compare genomic prediction accuracy using genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP) with real and imputed 50k genotypes. The weighted mean imputation accuracy achieved was 0.92. The average accuracy of genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs) based on only 12k data was 0.08 across traits and breeds, but accuracies varied widely. The mean GBLUP accuracies with imputed 50k data more than doubled to 0.21. Accuracies of genomic prediction were very similar for imputed and real 50k genotypes. There was no apparent impact on accuracy of GEBVs as a result of using imputed rather than real 50k genotypes, provided imputation accuracy was >90%. PMID:26360638

  12. The utility of low-density genotyping for imputation in the Thoroughbred horse

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the dramatic reduction in the cost of high-density genotyping that has occurred over the last decade, it remains one of the limiting factors for obtaining the large datasets required for genomic studies of disease in the horse. In this study, we investigated the potential for low-density genotyping and subsequent imputation to address this problem. Results Using the haplotype phasing and imputation program, BEAGLE, it is possible to impute genotypes from low- to high-density (50K) in the Thoroughbred horse with reasonable to high accuracy. Analysis of the sources of variation in imputation accuracy revealed dependence both on the minor allele frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) being imputed and on the underlying linkage disequilibrium structure. Whereas equidistant spacing of the SNPs on the low-density panel worked well, optimising SNP selection to increase their minor allele frequency was advantageous, even when the panel was subsequently used in a population of different geographical origin. Replacing base pair position with linkage disequilibrium map distance reduced the variation in imputation accuracy across SNPs. Whereas a 1K SNP panel was generally sufficient to ensure that more than 80% of genotypes were correctly imputed, other studies suggest that a 2K to 3K panel is more efficient to minimize the subsequent loss of accuracy in genomic prediction analyses. The relationship between accuracy and genotyping costs for the different low-density panels, suggests that a 2K SNP panel would represent good value for money. Conclusions Low-density genotyping with a 2K SNP panel followed by imputation provides a compromise between cost and accuracy that could promote more widespread genotyping, and hence the use of genomic information in horses. In addition to offering a low cost alternative to high-density genotyping, imputation provides a means to combine datasets from different genotyping platforms, which is becoming necessary since researchers are starting to use the recently developed equine 70K SNP chip. However, more work is needed to evaluate the impact of between-breed differences on imputation accuracy. PMID:24495673

  13. Imputation of TPMT defective alleles for the identification of patients with high-risk phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Almoguera, Berta; Vazquez, Lyam; Connolly, John J.; Bradfield, Jonathan; Sleiman, Patrick; Keating, Brendan; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Background: The activity of thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) is subject to genetic variation. Loss-of-function alleles are associated with various degrees of myelosuppression after treatment with thiopurine drugs, thus genotype-based dosing recommendations currently exist. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential utility of leveraging genomic data from large biorepositories in the identification of individuals with TPMT defective alleles. Material and methods: TPMT variants were imputed using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel in 87,979 samples from the biobank at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Population ancestry was determined by principal component analysis using HapMap3 samples as reference. Frequencies of the TPMT imputed alleles, genotypes and the associated phenotype were determined across the different populations. A sample of 630 subjects with genotype data from Sanger sequencing (N = 59) and direct genotyping (N = 583) (12 samples overlapping in the two groups) was used to check the concordance between the imputed and observed genotypes, as well as the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the imputation. Results: Two SNPs (rs1800460 and rs1142345) that represent three TPMT alleles (*3A, *3B, and *3C) were imputed with adequate quality. Frequency for the associated enzyme activity varied across populations and 89.36–94.58% were predicted to have normal TPMT activity, 5.3–10.31% intermediate and 0.12–0.34% poor activities. Overall, 98.88% of individuals (623/630) were correctly imputed into carrying no risk alleles (553/553), heterozygous (45/46) and homozygous (25/31). Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of imputation were over 90% in all cases except for the sensitivity of imputing homozygous subjects that was 80.64%. Conclusion: Imputation of TPMT alleles from existing genomic data can be used as a first step in the screening of individuals at risk of developing serious adverse events secondary to thiopurine drugs. PMID:24860591

  14. Imputation-Based Population Genetics Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Samad, Hanif; Coll, Francesc; Preston, Mark D.; Ocholla, Harold; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Clark, Taane G.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing technologies are being increasingly applied to Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates to identify genetic determinants of malaria pathogenesis. However, genome-wide discovery methods, such as haplotype scans for signatures of natural selection, are hindered by missing genotypes in sequence data. Poor correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the P. falciparum genome complicates efforts to apply established missing-genotype imputation methods that leverage off patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD). The accuracy of state-of-the-art, LD-based imputation methods (IMPUTE, Beagle) was assessed by measuring allelic r2 for 459 P. falciparum samples from malaria patients in 4 countries: Thailand, Cambodia, Gambia, and Malawi. In restricting our analysis to 86k high-quality SNPs across the populations, we found that the complete-case analysis was restricted to 21k SNPs (24.5%), despite no single SNP having more than 10% missing genotypes. The accuracy of Beagle in filling in missing genotypes was consistently high across all populations (allelic r2, 0.87-0.96), but the performance of IMPUTE was mixed (allelic r2, 0.34-0.99) depending on reference haplotypes and population. Positive selection analysis using Beagle-imputed haplotypes identified loci involved in resistance to chloroquine (crt) in Thailand, Cambodia, and Gambia, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (dhfr, dhps) in Cambodia, and artemisinin (kelch13) in Cambodia. Tajima’s D-based analysis identified genes under balancing selection that encode well-characterized vaccine candidates: apical merozoite antigen 1 (ama1) and merozoite surface protein 1 (msp1). In contrast, the complete-case analysis failed to identify any well-validated drug resistance or candidate vaccine loci, except kelch13. In a setting of low LD and modest levels of missing genotypes, using Beagle to impute P. falciparum genotypes is a viable strategy for conducting accurate large-scale population genetics and association analyses, and supporting global surveillance for drug resistance markers and candidate vaccine antigens. PMID:25928499

  15. Japonica array: improved genotype imputation by designing a population-specific SNP array with 1070 Japanese individuals.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yosuke; Mimori, Takahiro; Kojima, Kaname; Nariai, Naoki; Danjoh, Inaho; Saito, Rumiko; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nagasaki, Masao

    2015-10-01

    The Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization constructed the reference panel (referred to as the 1KJPN panel), which contains >20 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from whole-genome sequence data from 1070 Japanese individuals. The 1KJPN panel contains the largest number of haplotypes of Japanese ancestry to date. Here, from the 1KJPN panel, we designed a novel custom-made SNP array, named the Japonica array, which is suitable for whole-genome imputation of Japanese individuals. The array contains 659?253 SNPs, including tag SNPs for imputation, SNPs of Y chromosome and mitochondria, and SNPs related to previously reported genome-wide association studies and pharmacogenomics. The Japonica array provides better imputation performance for Japanese individuals than the existing commercially available SNP arrays with both the 1KJPN panel and the International 1000 genomes project panel. For common SNPs (minor allele frequency (MAF)>5%), the genomic coverage of the Japonica array (r(2)>0.8) was 96.9%, that is, almost all common SNPs were covered by this array. Nonetheless, the coverage of low-frequency SNPs (0.5%imputations. PMID:26108142

  16. Japonica array: improved genotype imputation by designing a population-specific SNP array with 1070 Japanese individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yosuke; Mimori, Takahiro; Kojima, Kaname; Nariai, Naoki; Danjoh, Inaho; Saito, Rumiko; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nagasaki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    The Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization constructed the reference panel (referred to as the 1KJPN panel), which contains >20 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from whole-genome sequence data from 1070 Japanese individuals. The 1KJPN panel contains the largest number of haplotypes of Japanese ancestry to date. Here, from the 1KJPN panel, we designed a novel custom-made SNP array, named the Japonica array, which is suitable for whole-genome imputation of Japanese individuals. The array contains 659?253 SNPs, including tag SNPs for imputation, SNPs of Y chromosome and mitochondria, and SNPs related to previously reported genome-wide association studies and pharmacogenomics. The Japonica array provides better imputation performance for Japanese individuals than the existing commercially available SNP arrays with both the 1KJPN panel and the International 1000 genomes project panel. For common SNPs (minor allele frequency (MAF)>5%), the genomic coverage of the Japonica array (r2>0.8) was 96.9%, that is, almost all common SNPs were covered by this array. Nonetheless, the coverage of low-frequency SNPs (0.5%imputations. PMID:26108142

  17. Fast and accurate imputation of summary statistics enhances evidence of functional enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Zaitlen, Noah; Shi, Huwenbo; Bhatia, Gaurav; Gusev, Alexander; Pickrell, Joseph; Hirschhorn, Joel; Strachan, David P.; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Imputation using external reference panels (e.g. 1000 Genomes) is a widely used approach for increasing power in genome-wide association studies and meta-analysis. Existing hidden Markov models (HMM)-based imputation approaches require individual-level genotypes. Here, we develop a new method for Gaussian imputation from summary association statistics, a type of data that is becoming widely available. Results: In simulations using 1000 Genomes (1000G) data, this method recovers 84% (54%) of the effective sample size for common (>5%) and low-frequency (1–5%) variants [increasing to 87% (60%) when summary linkage disequilibrium information is available from target samples] versus the gold standard of 89% (67%) for HMM-based imputation, which cannot be applied to summary statistics. Our approach accounts for the limited sample size of the reference panel, a crucial step to eliminate false-positive associations, and it is computationally very fast. As an empirical demonstration, we apply our method to seven case–control phenotypes from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) data and a study of height in the British 1958 birth cohort (1958BC). Gaussian imputation from summary statistics recovers 95% (105%) of the effective sample size (as quantified by the ratio of ?2 association statistics) compared with HMM-based imputation from individual-level genotypes at the 227 (176) published single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the WTCCC (1958BC height) data. In addition, for publicly available summary statistics from large meta-analyses of four lipid traits, we publicly release imputed summary statistics at 1000G SNPs, which could not have been obtained using previously published methods, and demonstrate their accuracy by masking subsets of the data. We show that 1000G imputation using our approach increases the magnitude and statistical evidence of enrichment at genic versus non-genic loci for these traits, as compared with an analysis without 1000G imputation. Thus, imputation of summary statistics will be a valuable tool in future functional enrichment analyses. Availability and implementation: Publicly available software package available at http://bogdan.bioinformatics.ucla.edu/software/. Contact: bpasaniuc@mednet.ucla.edu or aprice@hsph.harvard.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary materials are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24990607

  18. Multimarker analysis and imputation of multiple platform pooling-based genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Homer, Nils; Tembe, Waibhav D; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Redman, Margot; Stephan, Dietrich A; Pearson, John V; Nelson, Stanley F; Craig, David

    2008-09-01

    For many genome-wide association (GWA) studies individually genotyping one million or more SNPs provides a marginal increase in coverage at a substantial cost. Much of the information gained is redundant due to the correlation structure inherent in the human genome. Pooling-based GWA studies could benefit significantly by utilizing this redundancy to reduce noise, improve the accuracy of the observations and increase genomic coverage. We introduce a measure of correlation between individual genotyping and pooling, under the same framework that r(2) provides a measure of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between pairs of SNPs. We then report a new non-haplotype multimarker multi-loci method that leverages the correlation structure between SNPs in the human genome to increase the efficacy of pooling-based GWA studies. We first give a theoretical framework and derivation of our multimarker method. Next, we evaluate simulations using this multimarker approach in comparison to single marker analysis. Finally, we experimentally evaluate our method using different pools of HapMap individuals on the Illumina 450S Duo, Illumina 550K and Affymetrix 5.0 platforms for a combined total of 1 333 631 SNPs. Our results show that use of multimarker analysis reduces noise specific to pooling-based studies, allows for efficient integration of multiple microarray platforms and provides more accurate measures of significance than single marker analysis. Additionally, this approach can be extended to allow for imputing the association significance for SNPs not directly observed using neighboring SNPs in LD. This multimarker method can now be used to cost-effectively complete pooling-based GWA studies with multiple platforms across over one million SNPs and to impute neighboring SNPs weighted for the loss of information due to pooling. PMID:18617537

  19. Imputation of missing data in time series for air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junger, W. L.; Ponce de Leon, A.

    2015-02-01

    Missing data are major concerns in epidemiological studies of the health effects of environmental air pollutants. This article presents an imputation-based method that is suitable for multivariate time series data, which uses the EM algorithm under the assumption of normal distribution. Different approaches are considered for filtering the temporal component. A simulation study was performed to assess validity and performance of proposed method in comparison with some frequently used methods. Simulations showed that when the amount of missing data was as low as 5%, the complete data analysis yielded satisfactory results regardless of the generating mechanism of the missing data, whereas the validity began to degenerate when the proportion of missing values exceeded 10%. The proposed imputation method exhibited good accuracy and precision in different settings with respect to the patterns of missing observations. Most of the imputations obtained valid results, even under missing not at random. The methods proposed in this study are implemented as a package called mtsdi for the statistical software system R.

  20. Imputation-Based Analysis of Association Studies

    E-print Network

    Gilad, Yoav

    Imputation-Based Analysis of Association Studies: Candidate Regions and Quantitative Traits, Washington, United States of America We introduce a new framework for the analysis of association studies://stephenslab.uchicago.edu/software.html. Citation: Servin B, Stephens M (2007) Imputation-based analysis of association studies: Candidate regions

  1. What Improves with Increased Missing Data Imputations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, Todd E.

    2008-01-01

    When using multiple imputation in the analysis of incomplete data, a prominent guideline suggests that more than 10 imputed data values are seldom needed. This article calls into question the optimism of this guideline and illustrates that important quantities (e.g., p values, confidence interval half-widths, and estimated fractions of missing…

  2. 16 CFR 1115.11 - Imputed knowledge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Imputed knowledge. 1115.11 Section 1115.11 ...Interpretation § 1115.11 Imputed knowledge. (a) In evaluating whether...other representations. This includes the knowledge a firm would have if it conducted a...

  3. Privacy-Preserving Data Imputation Geetha Jagannathan

    E-print Network

    Wright, Rebecca N.

    Privacy-Preserving Data Imputation Geetha Jagannathan Stevens Institute of Technology Hoboken, NJ, 07030, USA gjaganna@cs.stevens.edu Rebecca N. Wright Stevens Institute of Technology Hoboken, NJ, 07030

  4. Posterior predictive checking of multiple imputation models.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cattram D; Lee, Katherine J; Carlin, John B

    2015-07-01

    Multiple imputation is gaining popularity as a strategy for handling missing data, but there is a scarcity of tools for checking imputation models, a critical step in model fitting. Posterior predictive checking (PPC) has been recommended as an imputation diagnostic. PPC involves simulating "replicated" data from the posterior predictive distribution of the model under scrutiny. Model fit is assessed by examining whether the analysis from the observed data appears typical of results obtained from the replicates produced by the model. A proposed diagnostic measure is the posterior predictive "p-value", an extreme value of which (i.e., a value close to 0 or 1) suggests a misfit between the model and the data. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the posterior predictive p-value as an imputation diagnostic. Using simulation methods, we deliberately misspecified imputation models to determine whether posterior predictive p-values were effective in identifying these problems. When estimating the regression parameter of interest, we found that more extreme p-values were associated with poorer imputation model performance, although the results highlighted that traditional thresholds for classical p-values do not apply in this context. A shortcoming of the PPC method was its reduced ability to detect misspecified models with increasing amounts of missing data. Despite the limitations of posterior predictive p-values, they appear to have a valuable place in the imputer's toolkit. In addition to automated checking using p-values, we recommend imputers perform graphical checks and examine other summaries of the test quantity distribution. PMID:25939490

  5. Dual imputation model for incomplete longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Jolani, Shahab; Frank, Laurence E; van Buuren, Stef

    2014-05-01

    Missing values are a practical issue in the analysis of longitudinal data. Multiple imputation (MI) is a well-known likelihood-based method that has optimal properties in terms of efficiency and consistency if the imputation model is correctly specified. Doubly robust (DR) weighing-based methods protect against misspecification bias if one of the models, but not necessarily both, for the data or the mechanism leading to missing data is correct. We propose a new imputation method that captures the simplicity of MI and protection from the DR method. This method integrates MI and DR to protect against misspecification of the imputation model under a missing at random assumption. Our method avoids analytical complications of missing data particularly in multivariate settings, and is easy to implement in standard statistical packages. Moreover, the proposed method works very well with an intermittent pattern of missingness when other DR methods can not be used. Simulation experiments show that the proposed approach achieves improved performance when one of the models is correct. The method is applied to data from the fireworks disaster study, a randomized clinical trial comparing therapies in disaster-exposed children. We conclude that the new method increases the robustness of imputations. PMID:23909566

  6. Imputation of rare variants in next generation association studies

    PubMed Central

    Asimit, Jennifer L; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2014-01-01

    The role of rare variants has become a focus in the search for association with complex traits. Imputation is a powerful and cost-efficient tool to access variants that have not been directly typed, but there are several challenges when imputing rare variants, most notably reference panel selection. Extensions to rare variant association tests to incorporate genotype uncertainty from imputation are discussed, as well as the use of imputed low frequency and rare variants in the study of population isolates. PMID:23594497

  7. Multiple Imputation of Multilevel Missing Data-Rigor versus Simplicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drechsler, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Multiple imputation is widely accepted as the method of choice to address item-nonresponse in surveys. However, research on imputation strategies for the hierarchical structures that are typically found in the data in educational contexts is still limited. While a multilevel imputation model should be preferred from a theoretical point of view if…

  8. Alternative Multiple Imputation Inference for Mean and Covariance Structure Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Taehun; Cai, Li

    2012-01-01

    Model-based multiple imputation has become an indispensable method in the educational and behavioral sciences. Mean and covariance structure models are often fitted to multiply imputed data sets. However, the presence of multiple random imputations complicates model fit testing, which is an important aspect of mean and covariance structure…

  9. INVESTIGATION Genotype Imputation Reference Panel Selection

    E-print Network

    Rosenberg, Noah

    INVESTIGATION Genotype Imputation Reference Panel Selection Using Maximal Phylogenetic Diversity panel. The use of such an internal reference panel identifies population-specific variants and avoids population. To efficiently select an internal panel, we introduce an idea of phylogenetic diversity from

  10. LinkImpute: Fast and Accurate Genotype Imputation for Nonmodel Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Money, Daniel; Gardner, Kyle; Migicovsky, Zoë; Schwaninger, Heidi; Zhong, Gan-Yuan; Myles, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining genome-wide genotype data from a set of individuals is the first step in many genomic studies, including genome-wide association and genomic selection. All genotyping methods suffer from some level of missing data, and genotype imputation can be used to fill in the missing data and improve the power of downstream analyses. Model organisms like human and cattle benefit from high-quality reference genomes and panels of reference genotypes that aid in imputation accuracy. In nonmodel organisms, however, genetic and physical maps often are either of poor quality or are completely absent, and there are no panels of reference genotypes available. There is therefore a need for imputation methods designed specifically for nonmodel organisms in which genomic resources are poorly developed and marker order is unreliable or unknown. Here we introduce LinkImpute, a software package based on a k-nearest neighbor genotype imputation method, LD-kNNi, which is designed for unordered markers. No physical or genetic maps are required, and it is designed to work on unphased genotype data from heterozygous species. It exploits the fact that markers useful for imputation often are not physically close to the missing genotype but rather distributed throughout the genome. Using genotyping-by-sequencing data from diverse and heterozygous accessions of apples, grapes, and maize, we compare LD-kNNi with several genotype imputation methods and show that LD-kNNi is fast, comparable in accuracy to the best-existing methods, and exhibits the least bias in allele frequency estimates. PMID:26377960

  11. LinkImpute: Fast and Accurate Genotype Imputation for Nonmodel Organisms.

    PubMed

    Money, Daniel; Gardner, Kyle; Migicovsky, Zoë; Schwaninger, Heidi; Zhong, Gan-Yuan; Myles, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining genome-wide genotype data from a set of individuals is the first step in many genomic studies, including genome-wide association and genomic selection. All genotyping methods suffer from some level of missing data, and genotype imputation can be used to fill in the missing data and improve the power of downstream analyses. Model organisms like human and cattle benefit from high-quality reference genomes and panels of reference genotypes that aid in imputation accuracy. In nonmodel organisms, however, genetic and physical maps often are either of poor quality or are completely absent, and there are no panels of reference genotypes available. There is therefore a need for imputation methods designed specifically for nonmodel organisms in which genomic resources are poorly developed and marker order is unreliable or unknown. Here we introduce LinkImpute, a software package based on a k-nearest neighbor genotype imputation method, LD-kNNi, which is designed for unordered markers. No physical or genetic maps are required, and it is designed to work on unphased genotype data from heterozygous species. It exploits the fact that markers useful for imputation often are not physically close to the missing genotype but rather distributed throughout the genome. Using genotyping-by-sequencing data from diverse and heterozygous accessions of apples, grapes, and maize, we compare LD-kNNi with several genotype imputation methods and show that LD-kNNi is fast, comparable in accuracy to the best-existing methods, and exhibits the least bias in allele frequency estimates. PMID:26377960

  12. Association analysis of BMD-associated SNPs with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Yau, Michelle S; Liu, Youfang; Krishnan, Subha; Renner, Jordan B; Eaton, Charles B; Kwoh, C Kent; Nevitt, Michael C; Duggan, David J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Jordan, Joanne M; Hochberg, Marc C; Jackson, Rebecca D

    2014-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) risk is widely recognized to be heritable but few loci have been identified. Observational studies have identified higher systemic bone mineral density (BMD) to be associated with an increased risk of radiographic knee osteoarthritis. With this in mind, we sought to evaluate whether well-established genetic loci for variance in BMD are associated with risk for radiographic OA in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) and the Johnston County Osteoarthritis (JoCo) Project. Cases had at least one knee with definite radiographic OA, defined as the presence of definite osteophytes with or without joint space narrowing (Kellgren-Lawrence [KL] grade ? 2) and controls were absent for definite radiographic OA in both knees (KL grade ? 1 bilaterally). There were 2014 and 658 Caucasian cases, respectively, in the OAI and JoCo Studies, and 953 and 823 controls. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified for association analysis from the literature. Genotyping was carried out on Illumina 2.5M and 1M arrays in Genetic Components of Knee OA (GeCKO) and JoCo, respectively and imputation was done. Association analyses were carried out separately in each cohort with adjustments for age, body mass index (BMI), and sex, and then parameter estimates were combined across the two cohorts by meta-analysis. We identified four SNPs significantly associated with prevalent radiographic knee OA. The strongest signal (p?=?0.0009; OR?=?1.22; 95% CI, 1.08-1.37) maps to 12q3, which contains a gene coding for SP7. Additional loci map to 7p14.1 (TXNDC3), 11q13.2 (LRP5), and 11p14.1 (LIN7C). For all four loci the allele associated with higher BMD was associated with higher odds of OA. A BMD risk allele score was not significantly associated with OA risk. This meta-analysis demonstrates that several genomewide association studies (GWAS)-identified BMD SNPs are nominally associated with prevalent radiographic knee OA and further supports the hypothesis that BMD, or its determinants, may be a risk factor contributing to OA development. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:24339167

  13. Towards accurate imputation of quantitative genetic interactions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Recent technological breakthroughs have enabled high-throughput quantitative measurements of hundreds of thousands of genetic interactions among hundreds of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, these assays often fail to measure the genetic interactions among up to 40% of the studied gene pairs. Here we present a novel method, which combines genetic interaction data together with diverse genomic data, to quantitatively impute these missing interactions. We also present data on almost 190,000 novel interactions. PMID:20003301

  14. When Does Choice of Accuracy Measure Alter Imputation Accuracy Assessments?

    PubMed Central

    Ramnarine, Shelina; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Li-Shiun; Culverhouse, Robert; Duan, Weimin; Hancock, Dana B.; Hartz, Sarah M.; Johnson, Eric O.; Olfson, Emily; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Saccone, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Imputation, the process of inferring genotypes for untyped variants, is used to identify and refine genetic association findings. Inaccuracies in imputed data can distort the observed association between variants and a disease. Many statistics are used to assess accuracy; some compare imputed to genotyped data and others are calculated without reference to true genotypes. Prior work has shown that the Imputation Quality Score (IQS), which is based on Cohen’s kappa statistic and compares imputed genotype probabilities to true genotypes, appropriately adjusts for chance agreement; however, it is not commonly used. To identify differences in accuracy assessment, we compared IQS with concordance rate, squared correlation, and accuracy measures built into imputation programs. Genotypes from the 1000 Genomes reference populations (AFR N = 246 and EUR N = 379) were masked to match the typed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) coverage of several SNP arrays and were imputed with BEAGLE 3.3.2 and IMPUTE2 in regions associated with smoking behaviors. Additional masking and imputation was conducted for sequenced subjects from the Collaborative Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence and the Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence in African Americans (N = 1,481 African Americans and N = 1,480 European Americans). Our results offer further evidence that concordance rate inflates accuracy estimates, particularly for rare and low frequency variants. For common variants, squared correlation, BEAGLE R2, IMPUTE2 INFO, and IQS produce similar assessments of imputation accuracy. However, for rare and low frequency variants, compared to IQS, the other statistics tend to be more liberal in their assessment of accuracy. IQS is important to consider when evaluating imputation accuracy, particularly for rare and low frequency variants. PMID:26458263

  15. When Does Choice of Accuracy Measure Alter Imputation Accuracy Assessments?

    PubMed

    Ramnarine, Shelina; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Li-Shiun; Culverhouse, Robert; Duan, Weimin; Hancock, Dana B; Hartz, Sarah M; Johnson, Eric O; Olfson, Emily; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Saccone, Nancy L

    2015-01-01

    Imputation, the process of inferring genotypes for untyped variants, is used to identify and refine genetic association findings. Inaccuracies in imputed data can distort the observed association between variants and a disease. Many statistics are used to assess accuracy; some compare imputed to genotyped data and others are calculated without reference to true genotypes. Prior work has shown that the Imputation Quality Score (IQS), which is based on Cohen's kappa statistic and compares imputed genotype probabilities to true genotypes, appropriately adjusts for chance agreement; however, it is not commonly used. To identify differences in accuracy assessment, we compared IQS with concordance rate, squared correlation, and accuracy measures built into imputation programs. Genotypes from the 1000 Genomes reference populations (AFR N = 246 and EUR N = 379) were masked to match the typed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) coverage of several SNP arrays and were imputed with BEAGLE 3.3.2 and IMPUTE2 in regions associated with smoking behaviors. Additional masking and imputation was conducted for sequenced subjects from the Collaborative Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence and the Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence in African Americans (N = 1,481 African Americans and N = 1,480 European Americans). Our results offer further evidence that concordance rate inflates accuracy estimates, particularly for rare and low frequency variants. For common variants, squared correlation, BEAGLE R2, IMPUTE2 INFO, and IQS produce similar assessments of imputation accuracy. However, for rare and low frequency variants, compared to IQS, the other statistics tend to be more liberal in their assessment of accuracy. IQS is important to consider when evaluating imputation accuracy, particularly for rare and low frequency variants. PMID:26458263

  16. 48 CFR 1830.7002-4 - Determining imputed cost of money.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 true Determining imputed cost of money. 1830.7002-4 Section 1830.7002-4...1830.7002-4 Determining imputed cost of money. (a) Determine the imputed cost of money for an asset under construction,...

  17. 48 CFR 1830.7002-4 - Determining imputed cost of money.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Determining imputed cost of money. 1830.7002-4 Section 1830.7002-4...1830.7002-4 Determining imputed cost of money. (a) Determine the imputed cost of money for an asset under construction,...

  18. 48 CFR 1830.7002-4 - Determining imputed cost of money.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Determining imputed cost of money. 1830.7002-4 Section 1830.7002-4...1830.7002-4 Determining imputed cost of money. (a) Determine the imputed cost of money for an asset under construction,...

  19. 48 CFR 1830.7002-4 - Determining imputed cost of money.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Determining imputed cost of money. 1830.7002-4 Section 1830.7002-4...1830.7002-4 Determining imputed cost of money. (a) Determine the imputed cost of money for an asset under construction,...

  20. Linking SNPs to CAG repeat length in

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    Linking SNPs to CAG repeat length in Huntington's disease patients Wanzhao Liu1, Lori A Kennington1) is a promising therapy for human trinucleotide repeat diseases such as Huntington's disease. Linking SNP repeat length and nucleotide identity of heterozygous SNPs using Huntington's disease patient peripheral

  1. Different Classes of SNPs for Human Identification

    E-print Network

    with using genome-wide SNPs in linkage disequilibrium · Sensitivity · Cost #12;SNP Typing Platforms · Serial ·ARMS assay (Forensic Science Service - UK) ·RFLP Sensitivity, multiplexing, accurate typing Budowle, such as a particular skin color, hair color, eye color, etc. · Lineage Informative SNPs (LISNPs): Sets of tightly

  2. A second generation human haplotype map of over 3.1 million SNPs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We describe the Phase II HapMap, which characterizes over 3.1 million human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 270 individuals from four geographically diverse populations and includes 25–35% of common SNP variation in the populations surveyed. The map is estimated to capture untyped common variation with an average maximum r2 of between 0.9 and 0.96 depending on population. We demonstrate that the current generation of commercial genome-wide genotyping products captures common Phase II SNPs with an average maximum r2 of up to 0.8 in African and up to 0.95 in non-African populations, and that potential gains in power in association studies can be obtained through imputation. These data also reveal novel aspects of the structure of linkage disequilibrium. We show that 10–30% of pairs of individuals within a population share at least one region of extended genetic identity arising from recent ancestry and that up to 1% of all common variants are untaggable, primarily because they lie within recombination hotspots. We show that recombination rates vary systematically around genes and between genes of different function. Finally, we demonstrate increased differentiation at non-synonymous, compared to synonymous, SNPs, resulting from systematic differences in the strength or efficacy of natural selection between populations. PMID:17943122

  3. A second generation human haplotype map of over 3.1 million SNPs.

    PubMed

    Frazer, Kelly A; Ballinger, Dennis G; Cox, David R; Hinds, David A; Stuve, Laura L; Gibbs, Richard A; Belmont, John W; Boudreau, Andrew; Hardenbol, Paul; Leal, Suzanne M; Pasternak, Shiran; Wheeler, David A; Willis, Thomas D; Yu, Fuli; Yang, Huanming; Zeng, Changqing; Gao, Yang; Hu, Haoran; Hu, Weitao; Li, Chaohua; Lin, Wei; Liu, Siqi; Pan, Hao; Tang, Xiaoli; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Qingrun; Zhao, Hongbin; Zhao, Hui; Zhou, Jun; Gabriel, Stacey B; Barry, Rachel; Blumenstiel, Brendan; Camargo, Amy; Defelice, Matthew; Faggart, Maura; Goyette, Mary; Gupta, Supriya; Moore, Jamie; Nguyen, Huy; Onofrio, Robert C; Parkin, Melissa; Roy, Jessica; Stahl, Erich; Winchester, Ellen; Ziaugra, Liuda; Altshuler, David; Shen, Yan; Yao, Zhijian; Huang, Wei; Chu, Xun; He, Yungang; Jin, Li; Liu, Yangfan; Shen, Yayun; Sun, Weiwei; Wang, Haifeng; Wang, Yi; Wang, Ying; Xiong, Xiaoyan; Xu, Liang; Waye, Mary M Y; Tsui, Stephen K W; Xue, Hong; Wong, J Tze-Fei; Galver, Luana M; Fan, Jian-Bing; Gunderson, Kevin; Murray, Sarah S; Oliphant, Arnold R; Chee, Mark S; Montpetit, Alexandre; Chagnon, Fanny; Ferretti, Vincent; Leboeuf, Martin; Olivier, Jean-François; Phillips, Michael S; Roumy, Stéphanie; Sallée, Clémentine; Verner, Andrei; Hudson, Thomas J; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Cai, Dongmei; Koboldt, Daniel C; Miller, Raymond D; Pawlikowska, Ludmila; Taillon-Miller, Patricia; Xiao, Ming; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Mak, William; Song, You Qiang; Tam, Paul K H; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Kitamoto, Takuya; Morizono, Takashi; Nagashima, Atsushi; Ohnishi, Yozo; Sekine, Akihiro; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Deloukas, Panos; Bird, Christine P; Delgado, Marcos; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hunt, Sarah; Morrison, Jonathan; Powell, Don; Stranger, Barbara E; Whittaker, Pamela; Bentley, David R; Daly, Mark J; de Bakker, Paul I W; Barrett, Jeff; Chretien, Yves R; Maller, Julian; McCarroll, Steve; Patterson, Nick; Pe'er, Itsik; Price, Alkes; Purcell, Shaun; Richter, Daniel J; Sabeti, Pardis; Saxena, Richa; Schaffner, Stephen F; Sham, Pak C; Varilly, Patrick; Altshuler, David; Stein, Lincoln D; Krishnan, Lalitha; Smith, Albert Vernon; Tello-Ruiz, Marcela K; Thorisson, Gudmundur A; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Peter E; Cutler, David J; Kashuk, Carl S; Lin, Shin; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Guan, Weihua; Li, Yun; Munro, Heather M; Qin, Zhaohui Steve; Thomas, Daryl J; McVean, Gilean; Auton, Adam; Bottolo, Leonardo; Cardin, Niall; Eyheramendy, Susana; Freeman, Colin; Marchini, Jonathan; Myers, Simon; Spencer, Chris; Stephens, Matthew; Donnelly, Peter; Cardon, Lon R; Clarke, Geraldine; Evans, David M; Morris, Andrew P; Weir, Bruce S; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Mullikin, James C; Sherry, Stephen T; Feolo, Michael; Skol, Andrew; Zhang, Houcan; Zeng, Changqing; Zhao, Hui; Matsuda, Ichiro; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Macer, Darryl R; Suda, Eiko; Rotimi, Charles N; Adebamowo, Clement A; Ajayi, Ike; Aniagwu, Toyin; Marshall, Patricia A; Nkwodimmah, Chibuzor; Royal, Charmaine D M; Leppert, Mark F; Dixon, Missy; Peiffer, Andy; Qiu, Renzong; Kent, Alastair; Kato, Kazuto; Niikawa, Norio; Adewole, Isaac F; Knoppers, Bartha M; Foster, Morris W; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Watkin, Jessica; Gibbs, Richard A; Belmont, John W; Muzny, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M; Wheeler, David A; Yakub, Imtaz; Gabriel, Stacey B; Onofrio, Robert C; Richter, Daniel J; Ziaugra, Liuda; Birren, Bruce W; Daly, Mark J; Altshuler, David; Wilson, Richard K; Fulton, Lucinda L; Rogers, Jane; Burton, John; Carter, Nigel P; Clee, Christopher M; Griffiths, Mark; Jones, Matthew C; McLay, Kirsten; Plumb, Robert W; Ross, Mark T; Sims, Sarah K; Willey, David L; Chen, Zhu; Han, Hua; Kang, Le; Godbout, Martin; Wallenburg, John C; L'Archevêque, Paul; Bellemare, Guy; Saeki, Koji; Wang, Hongguang; An, Daochang; Fu, Hongbo; Li, Qing; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Renwu; Holden, Arthur L; Brooks, Lisa D; McEwen, Jean E; Guyer, Mark S; Wang, Vivian Ota; Peterson, Jane L; Shi, Michael; Spiegel, Jack; Sung, Lawrence M; Zacharia, Lynn F; Collins, Francis S; Kennedy, Karen; Jamieson, Ruth; Stewart, John

    2007-10-18

    We describe the Phase II HapMap, which characterizes over 3.1 million human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 270 individuals from four geographically diverse populations and includes 25-35% of common SNP variation in the populations surveyed. The map is estimated to capture untyped common variation with an average maximum r2 of between 0.9 and 0.96 depending on population. We demonstrate that the current generation of commercial genome-wide genotyping products captures common Phase II SNPs with an average maximum r2 of up to 0.8 in African and up to 0.95 in non-African populations, and that potential gains in power in association studies can be obtained through imputation. These data also reveal novel aspects of the structure of linkage disequilibrium. We show that 10-30% of pairs of individuals within a population share at least one region of extended genetic identity arising from recent ancestry and that up to 1% of all common variants are untaggable, primarily because they lie within recombination hotspots. We show that recombination rates vary systematically around genes and between genes of different function. Finally, we demonstrate increased differentiation at non-synonymous, compared to synonymous, SNPs, resulting from systematic differences in the strength or efficacy of natural selection between populations. PMID:17943122

  4. A Comparison of Imputation Methods for Bayesian Factor Analysis Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkle, Edgar C.

    2011-01-01

    Imputation methods are popular for the handling of missing data in psychology. The methods generally consist of predicting missing data based on observed data, yielding a complete data set that is amiable to standard statistical analyses. In the context of Bayesian factor analysis, this article compares imputation under an unrestricted…

  5. Distance Measures and Smoothing Methodology for Imputing Features of

    E-print Network

    Feuerverger, Andrey

    Distance Measures and Smoothing Methodology for Imputing Features of Documents Andrey FEUERVERGER distance measures with statistical smoothing to develop techniques for imputing missing features-validation; Dating; Kernel; Re- semblance distance; Shingle. 1. INTRODUCTION There is a large literature on measuring

  6. Comparison of random forest and parametric imputation models for imputing missing data using MICE: a CALIBER study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Anoop D; Bartlett, Jonathan W; Carpenter, James; Nicholas, Owen; Hemingway, Harry

    2014-03-15

    Multivariate imputation by chained equations (MICE) is commonly used for imputing missing data in epidemiologic research. The "true" imputation model may contain nonlinearities which are not included in default imputation models. Random forest imputation is a machine learning technique which can accommodate nonlinearities and interactions and does not require a particular regression model to be specified. We compared parametric MICE with a random forest-based MICE algorithm in 2 simulation studies. The first study used 1,000 random samples of 2,000 persons drawn from the 10,128 stable angina patients in the CALIBER database (Cardiovascular Disease Research using Linked Bespoke Studies and Electronic Records; 2001-2010) with complete data on all covariates. Variables were artificially made "missing at random," and the bias and efficiency of parameter estimates obtained using different imputation methods were compared. Both MICE methods produced unbiased estimates of (log) hazard ratios, but random forest was more efficient and produced narrower confidence intervals. The second study used simulated data in which the partially observed variable depended on the fully observed variables in a nonlinear way. Parameter estimates were less biased using random forest MICE, and confidence interval coverage was better. This suggests that random forest imputation may be useful for imputing complex epidemiologic data sets in which some patients have missing data. PMID:24589914

  7. Imputing supertrees and supernetworks from quartets.

    PubMed

    Holland, B; Conner, Glenn; Huber, Katharina; Moulton, V

    2007-02-01

    Inferring species phylogenies is an important part of understanding molecular evolution. Even so, it is well known that an accurate phylogenetic tree reconstruction for a single gene does not always necessarily correspond to the species phylogeny. One commonly accepted strategy to cope with this problem is to sequence many genes; the way in which to analyze the resulting collection of genes is somewhat more contentious. Supermatrix and supertree methods can be used, although these can suppress conflicts arising from true differences in the gene trees caused by processes such as lineage sorting, horizontal gene transfer, or gene duplication and loss. In 2004, Huson et al. (IEEE/ACM Trans. Comput. Biol. Bioinformatics 1:151-158) presented the Z-closure method that can circumvent this problem by generating a supernetwork as opposed to a supertree. Here we present an alternative way for generating supernetworks called Q-imputation. In particular, we describe a method that uses quartet information to add missing taxa into gene trees. The resulting trees are subsequently used to generate consensus networks, networks that generalize strict and majority-rule consensus trees. Through simulations and application to real data sets, we compare Q-imputation to the matrix representation with parsimony (MRP) supertree method and Z-closure, and demonstrate that it provides a useful complementary tool. PMID:17366137

  8. Complex-disease networks of trait-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) unveiled by information theory

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiquan; Lee, Younghee; Chen, James L; Rebman, Ellen; Li, Jianrong

    2012-01-01

    Objective Thousands of complex-disease single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been discovered in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, these intragenic SNPs have not been collectively mined to unveil the genetic architecture between complex clinical traits. The authors hypothesize that biological annotations of host genes of trait-associated SNPs may reveal the biomolecular modularity across complex-disease traits and offer insights for drug repositioning. Methods Trait-to-polymorphism (SNPs) associations confirmed in GWAS were used. A novel method to quantify trait–trait similarity anchored in Gene Ontology annotations of human proteins and information theory was developed. The results were then validated with the shortest paths of physical protein interactions between biologically similar traits. Results A network was constructed consisting of 280 significant intertrait similarities among 177 disease traits, which covered 1438 well-validated disease-associated SNPs. Thirty-nine percent of intertrait connections were confirmed by curators, and the following additional studies demonstrated the validity of a proportion of the remainder. On a phenotypic trait level, higher Gene Ontology similarity between proteins correlated with smaller ‘shortest distance’ in protein interaction networks of complexly inherited diseases (Spearman p<2.2×10?16). Further, ‘cancer traits’ were similar to one another, as were ‘metabolic syndrome traits’ (Fisher's exact test p=0.001 and 3.5×10?7, respectively). Conclusion An imputed disease network by information-anchored functional similarity from GWAS trait-associated SNPs is reported. It is also demonstrated that small shortest paths of protein interactions correlate with complex-disease function. Taken together, these findings provide the framework for investigating drug targets with unbiased functional biomolecular networks rather than worn-out single-gene and subjective canonical pathway approaches. PMID:22278381

  9. A hybrid imputation approach for microarray missing value estimation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Missing data is an inevitable phenomenon in gene expression microarray experiments due to instrument failure or human error. It has a negative impact on performance of downstream analysis. Technically, most existing approaches suffer from this prevalent problem. Imputation is one of the frequently used methods for processing missing data. Actually many developments have been achieved in the research on estimating missing values. The challenging task is how to improve imputation accuracy for data with a large missing rate. Methods In this paper, induced by the thought of collaborative training, we propose a novel hybrid imputation method, called Recursive Mutual Imputation (RMI). Specifically, RMI exploits global correlation information and local structure in the data, captured by two popular methods, Bayesian Principal Component Analysis (BPCA) and Local Least Squares (LLS), respectively. Mutual strategy is implemented by sharing the estimated data sequences at each recursive process. Meanwhile, we consider the imputation sequence based on the number of missing entries in the target gene. Furthermore, a weight based integrated method is utilized in the final assembling step. Results We evaluate RMI with three state-of-art algorithms (BPCA, LLS, Iterated Local Least Squares imputation (ItrLLS)) on four publicly available microarray datasets. Experimental results clearly demonstrate that RMI significantly outperforms comparative methods in terms of Normalized Root Mean Square Error (NRMSE), especially for datasets with large missing rates and less complete genes. Conclusions It is noted that our proposed hybrid imputation approach incorporates both global and local information of microarray genes, which achieves lower NRMSE values against to any single approach only. Besides, this study highlights the need for considering the imputing sequence of missing entries for imputation methods. PMID:26330180

  10. Novel and efficient tag SNPs selection algorithms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Pei; Hung, Che-Lun; Tsai, Suh-Jen Jane; Lin, Yaw-Ling

    2014-01-01

    SNPs are the most abundant forms of genetic variations amongst species; the association studies between complex diseases and SNPs or haplotypes have received great attention. However, these studies are restricted by the cost of genotyping all SNPs; thus, it is necessary to find smaller subsets, or tag SNPs, representing the rest of the SNPs. In fact, the existing tag SNP selection algorithms are notoriously time-consuming. An efficient algorithm for tag SNP selection was presented, which was applied to analyze the HapMap YRI data. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve better performance than the existing tag SNP selection algorithms; in most cases, this proposed algorithm is at least ten times faster than the existing methods. In many cases, when the redundant ratio of the block is high, the proposed algorithm can even be thousands times faster than the previously known methods. Tools and web services for haplotype block analysis integrated by hadoop MapReduce framework are also developed using the proposed algorithm as computation kernels. PMID:24212035

  11. Reference-free detection of isolated SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Uricaru, Raluca; Rizk, Guillaume; Lacroix, Vincent; Quillery, Elsa; Plantard, Olivier; Chikhi, Rayan; Lemaitre, Claire; Peterlongo, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between genomes is becoming a routine task with next-generation sequencing. Generally, SNP detection methods use a reference genome. As non-model organisms are increasingly investigated, the need for reference-free methods has been amplified. Most of the existing reference-free methods have fundamental limitations: they can only call SNPs between exactly two datasets, and/or they require a prohibitive amount of computational resources. The method we propose, discoSnp, detects both heterozygous and homozygous isolated SNPs from any number of read datasets, without a reference genome, and with very low memory and time footprints (billions of reads can be analyzed with a standard desktop computer). To facilitate downstream genotyping analyses, discoSnp ranks predictions and outputs quality and coverage per allele. Compared to finding isolated SNPs using a state-of-the-art assembly and mapping approach, discoSnp requires significantly less computational resources, shows similar precision/recall values, and highly ranked predictions are less likely to be false positives. An experimental validation was conducted on an arthropod species (the tick Ixodes ricinus) on which de novo sequencing was performed. Among the predicted SNPs that were tested, 96% were successfully genotyped and truly exhibited polymorphism. PMID:25404127

  12. MIBEN: Robust Multiple Imputation with the Bayesian Elastic Net

    E-print Network

    Lang, Kyle Matthew

    2015-05-31

    with the Bayesian Elastic Net (MIBEN), as a remedy for this difficulty. A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to assess the performance of the MIBEN technique and compare it to several state-of-the-art multiple imputation methods....

  13. missForest: Nonparametric missing value imputation using random forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stekhoven, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    missForest imputes missing values particularly in the case of mixed-type data. It uses a random forest trained on the observed values of a data matrix to predict the missing values. It can be used to impute continuous and/or categorical data including complex interactions and non-linear relations. It yields an out-of-bag (OOB) imputation error estimate without the need of a test set or elaborate cross-validation and can be run in parallel to save computation time. missForest has been used to, among other things, impute variable star colors in an All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) dataset of variable stars with no NOMAD match.

  14. Imputation in families using a heuristic phasing approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) remains prohibitively expensive, which has encouraged the development of methods to impute WGS data into nonsequenced individuals using a framework of single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Although successful methods have been developed for cohorts of unrelated individuals, current imputation methods in related individuals are limited by pedigree size, by the distance of relationships, or by computation time. In this article, we describe a method for imputation in arbitrarily shaped multigenerational pedigrees that can impute genotypes across distantly related individuals based on identity by descent. We evaluate this approach using GWAS data and apply this approach to WGS data distributed for Genetic Analysis Workshop 18. PMID:25519369

  15. 47 CFR 1.1416 - Imputation of rates; modification costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...1416 Section 1.1416 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures § 1.1416 Imputation of rates; modification costs. (a)...

  16. 47 CFR 1.1416 - Imputation of rates; modification costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...1416 Section 1.1416 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures § 1.1416 Imputation of rates; modification costs. (a)...

  17. 47 CFR 1.1416 - Imputation of rates; modification costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...1416 Section 1.1416 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures § 1.1416 Imputation of rates; modification costs. (a)...

  18. Imputation strategies for missing continuous outcomes in cluster randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Taljaard, Monica; Donner, Allan; Klar, Neil

    2008-06-01

    In cluster randomized trials, intact social units such as schools, worksites or medical practices - rather than individuals themselves - are randomly allocated to intervention and control conditions, while the outcomes of interest are then observed on individuals within each cluster. Such trials are becoming increasingly common in the fields of health promotion and health services research. Attrition is a common occurrence in randomized trials, and a standard approach for dealing with the resulting missing values is imputation. We consider imputation strategies for missing continuous outcomes, focusing on trials with a completely randomized design in which fixed cohorts from each cluster are enrolled prior to random assignment. We compare five different imputation strategies with respect to Type I and Type II error rates of the adjusted two-sample t -test for the intervention effect. Cluster mean imputation is compared with multiple imputation, using either within-cluster data or data pooled across clusters in each intervention group. In the case of pooling across clusters, we distinguish between standard multiple imputation procedures which do not account for intracluster correlation and a specialized procedure which does account for intracluster correlation but is not yet available in standard statistical software packages. A simulation study is used to evaluate the influence of cluster size, number of clusters, degree of intracluster correlation, and variability among cluster follow-up rates. We show that cluster mean imputation yields valid inferences and given its simplicity, may be an attractive option in some large community intervention trials which are subject to individual-level attrition only; however, it may yield less powerful inferences than alternative procedures which pool across clusters especially when the cluster sizes are small and cluster follow-up rates are highly variable. When pooling across clusters, the imputation procedure should generally take intracluster correlation into account to obtain valid inferences; however, as long as the intracluster correlation coefficient is small, we show that standard multiple imputation procedures may yield acceptable type I error rates; moreover, these procedures may yield more powerful inferences than a specialized procedure, especially when the number of available clusters is small. Within-cluster multiple imputation is shown to be the least powerful among the procedures considered. PMID:18537126

  19. Generation of genome-scale gene-associated SNPs in catfish for the construction of a high-density SNP array

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have become the marker of choice for genome-wide association studies. In order to provide the best genome coverage for the analysis of performance and production traits, a large number of relatively evenly distributed SNPs are needed. Gene-associated SNPs may fulfill these requirements of large numbers and genome wide distribution. In addition, gene-associated SNPs could themselves be causative SNPs for traits. The objective of this project was to identify large numbers of gene-associated SNPs using high-throughput next generation sequencing. Results Transcriptome sequencing was conducted for channel catfish and blue catfish using Illumina next generation sequencing technology. Approximately 220 million reads (15.6 Gb) for channel catfish and 280 million reads (19.6 Gb) for blue catfish were obtained by sequencing gene transcripts derived from various tissues of multiple individuals from a diverse genetic background. A total of over 35 billion base pairs of expressed short read sequences were generated. Over two million putative SNPs were identified from channel catfish and almost 2.5 million putative SNPs were identified from blue catfish. Of these putative SNPs, a set of filtered SNPs were identified including 342,104 intra-specific SNPs for channel catfish, 366,269 intra-specific SNPs for blue catfish, and 420,727 inter-specific SNPs between channel catfish and blue catfish. These filtered SNPs are distributed within 16,562 unique genes in channel catfish and 17,423 unique genes in blue catfish. Conclusions For aquaculture species, transcriptome analysis of pooled RNA samples from multiple individuals using Illumina sequencing technology is both technically efficient and cost-effective for generating expressed sequences. Such an approach is most effective when coupled to existing EST resources generated using traditional sequencing approaches because the reference ESTs facilitate effective assembly of the expressed short reads. When multiple individuals with different genetic backgrounds are used, RNA-Seq is very effective for the identification of SNPs. The SNPs identified in this report will provide a much needed resource for genetic studies in catfish and will contribute to the development of a high-density SNP array. Validation and testing of these SNPs using SNP arrays will form the material basis for genome association studies and whole genome-based selection in catfish. PMID:21255432

  20. A comparison of genomic selection models across time in interior spruce (Picea engelmannii × glauca) using unordered SNP imputation methods.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, B; El-Dien, O G; Klápšt?, J; Porth, I; Chen, C; Jaquish, B; El-Kassaby, Y A

    2015-12-01

    Genomic selection (GS) potentially offers an unparalleled advantage over traditional pedigree-based selection (TS) methods by reducing the time commitment required to carry out a single cycle of tree improvement. This quality is particularly appealing to tree breeders, where lengthy improvement cycles are the norm. We explored the prospect of implementing GS for interior spruce (Picea engelmannii × glauca) utilizing a genotyped population of 769 trees belonging to 25 open-pollinated families. A series of repeated tree height measurements through ages 3-40 years permitted the testing of GS methods temporally. The genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) platform was used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery in conjunction with three unordered imputation methods applied to a data set with 60% missing information. Further, three diverse GS models were evaluated based on predictive accuracy (PA), and their marker effects. Moderate levels of PA (0.31-0.55) were observed and were of sufficient capacity to deliver improved selection response over TS. Additionally, PA varied substantially through time accordingly with spatial competition among trees. As expected, temporal PA was well correlated with age-age genetic correlation (r=0.99), and decreased substantially with increasing difference in age between the training and validation populations (0.04-0.47). Moreover, our imputation comparisons indicate that k-nearest neighbor and singular value decomposition yielded a greater number of SNPs and gave higher predictive accuracies than imputing with the mean. Furthermore, the ridge regression (rrBLUP) and BayesC? (BC?) models both yielded equal, and better PA than the generalized ridge regression heteroscedastic effect model for the traits evaluated. PMID:26126540

  1. Combining fractional polynomial model building with multiple imputation.

    PubMed

    Morris, Tim P; White, Ian R; Carpenter, James R; Stanworth, Simon J; Royston, Patrick

    2015-11-10

    Multivariable fractional polynomial (MFP) models are commonly used in medical research. The datasets in which MFP models are applied often contain covariates with missing values. To handle the missing values, we describe methods for combining multiple imputation with MFP modelling, considering in turn three issues: first, how to impute so that the imputation model does not favour certain fractional polynomial (FP) models over others; second, how to estimate the FP exponents in multiply imputed data; and third, how to choose between models of differing complexity. Two imputation methods are outlined for different settings. For model selection, methods based on Wald-type statistics and weighted likelihood-ratio tests are proposed and evaluated in simulation studies. The Wald-based method is very slightly better at estimating FP exponents. Type I error rates are very similar for both methods, although slightly less well controlled than analysis of complete records; however, there is potential for substantial gains in power over the analysis of complete records. We illustrate the two methods in a dataset from five trauma registries for which a prognostic model has previously been published, contrasting the selected models with that obtained by analysing the complete records only. PMID:26095614

  2. Visualization of SNPs with t-SNE

    PubMed Central

    Platzer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Background Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are one of the largest sources of new data in biology. In most papers, SNPs between individuals are visualized with Principal Component Analysis (PCA), an older method for this purpose. Principal Findings We compare PCA, an aging method for this purpose, with a newer method, t-Distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding (t-SNE) for the visualization of large SNP datasets. We also propose a set of key figures for evaluating these visualizations; in all of these t-SNE performs better. Significance To transform data PCA remains a reasonably good method, but for visualization it should be replaced by a method from the subfield of dimension reduction. To evaluate the performance of visualization, we propose key figures of cross-validation with machine learning methods, as well as indices of cluster validity. PMID:23457633

  3. Handling Missing Values in Longitudinal Panel Data With Multiple Imputation

    PubMed Central

    Young, Rebekah; Johnson, David R.

    2015-01-01

    This article offers an applied review of key issues and methods for the analysis of longitudinal panel data in the presence of missing values. The authors consider the unique challenges associated with attrition (survey dropout), incomplete repeated measures, and unknown observations of time. Using simulated data based on 4 waves of the Marital Instability Over the Life Course Study (n = 2,034), they applied a fixed effect regression model and an event-history analysis with time-varying covariates. They then compared results for analyses with nonimputed missing data and with imputed data both in long and in wide structures. Imputation produced improved estimates in the event-history analysis but only modest improvements in the estimates and standard errors of the fixed effects analysis. Factors responsible for differences in the value of imputation are examined, and recommendations for handling missing values in panel data are presented. PMID:26113748

  4. Missing value imputation: with application to handwriting data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhen; Srihari, Sargur N.

    2015-01-01

    Missing values make pattern analysis difficult, particularly with limited available data. In longitudinal research, missing values accumulate, thereby aggravating the problem. Here we consider how to deal with temporal data with missing values in handwriting analysis. In the task of studying development of individuality of handwriting, we encountered the fact that feature values are missing for several individuals at several time instances. Six algorithms, i.e., random imputation, mean imputation, most likely independent value imputation, and three methods based on Bayesian network (static Bayesian network, parameter EM, and structural EM), are compared with children's handwriting data. We evaluate the accuracy and robustness of the algorithms under different ratios of missing data and missing values, and useful conclusions are given. Specifically, static Bayesian network is used for our data which contain around 5% missing data to provide adequate accuracy and low computational cost.

  5. A Comparison of Item-Level and Scale-Level Multiple Imputation for Questionnaire Batteries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschall, Amanda C.; West, Stephen G.; Enders, Craig K.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral science researchers routinely use scale scores that sum or average a set of questionnaire items to address their substantive questions. A researcher applying multiple imputation to incomplete questionnaire data can either impute the incomplete items prior to computing scale scores or impute the scale scores directly from other scale…

  6. Multiple Imputation of Item Scores in Test and Questionnaire Data, and Influence on Psychometric Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ginkel, Joost R.; van der Ark, L. Andries; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2007-01-01

    The performance of five simple multiple imputation methods for dealing with missing data were compared. In addition, random imputation and multivariate normal imputation were used as lower and upper benchmark, respectively. Test data were simulated and item scores were deleted such that they were either missing completely at random, missing at…

  7. Multiple ant colony algorithm method for selecting tag SNPs.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bo; Li, Xiong; Zhu, Wen; Li, Renfa; Wang, Shulin

    2012-10-01

    The search for the association between complex disease and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or haplotypes has recently received great attention. Finding a set of tag SNPs for haplotyping in a great number of samples is an important step to reduce cost for association study. Therefore, it is essential to select tag SNPs with more efficient algorithms. In this paper, we model problem of selection tag SNPs by MINIMUM TEST SET and use multiple ant colony algorithm (MACA) to search a smaller set of tag SNPs for haplotyping. The various experimental results on various datasets show that the running time of our method is less than GTagger and MLR. And MACA can find the most representative SNPs for haplotyping, so that MACA is more stable and the number of tag SNPs is also smaller than other evolutionary methods (like GTagger and NSGA-II). Our software is available upon request to the corresponding author. PMID:22480582

  8. Accuracy of genotype imputation in Swiss cattle breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of imputation from Illumina Bovine3k Bead Chip (3k) and Illumina BovineLD (6k) to 54k chip information in Swiss dairy cattle breeds. Genotype data comprised of 54k SNP chip data of Original Braunvieh (OB), Brown Swiss (BS), Swiss Fleckvieh (SF...

  9. Investigation of Multiple Imputation in Low-Quality Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ginkel, Joost R.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of multiple imputation in questionnaire data has been studied in various simulation studies. However, in practice, questionnaire data are usually more complex than simulated data. For example, items may be counterindicative or may have unacceptably low factor loadings on every subscale, or completely missing subscales may…

  10. Guidebook for Imputation of Missing Data. Technical Report No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Lauress L.; McLaughlin, Donald H.

    This guidebook is designed for data analysts who are working with computer data files that contain records with incomplete data. It indicates choices the analyst must make and the criteria for making those choices in regard to the following questions: (1) What resources are available for performing the imputation? (2) How big is the data file? (3)…

  11. HICCUP: Hierarchical Clustering Based Value Imputation using Heterogeneous Gene Expression

    E-print Network

    Lee, Dongwon

    microarray dataset verify that HICCUP outperforms existing approaches. I. INTRODUCTION Microarray technology Microarray Datasets Qiankun Zhao AOL Labs China qiankun.zhao@corp.aol.com Prasenjit Mitra Penn State University, Korea kangj@korea.ac.kr Abstract--A novel microarray value imputation method, HIC- CUP1

  12. Multiple Imputation Strategies for Multiple Group Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Craig K.; Gottschall, Amanda C.

    2011-01-01

    Although structural equation modeling software packages use maximum likelihood estimation by default, there are situations where one might prefer to use multiple imputation to handle missing data rather than maximum likelihood estimation (e.g., when incorporating auxiliary variables). The selection of variables is one of the nuances associated…

  13. TSPYL5 SNPs: Association with Plasma Estradiol Concentrations and Aromatase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mohan; Ingle, James N.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Buzdar, Aman U.; Robson, Mark E.; Kubo, Michiaki; Wang, Liewei; Batzler, Anthony; Jenkins, Gregory D.; Pietrzak, Tracy L.; Carlson, Erin E.; Goetz, Matthew P.; Northfelt, Donald W.; Perez, Edith A.; Williard, Clark V.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2013-01-01

    We performed a discovery genome-wide association study to identify genetic factors associated with variation in plasma estradiol (E2) concentrations using DNA from 772 postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer prior to the initiation of aromatase inhibitor therapy. Association analyses showed that the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) (rs1864729) with the lowest P value (P = 3.49E-08), mapped to chromosome 8 near TSPYL5. We also identified 17 imputed SNPs in or near TSPYL5 with P values < 5E-08, one of which, rs2583506, created a functional estrogen response element. We then used a panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) stably transfected with ER? with known genome-wide SNP genotypes to demonstrate that TSPYL5 expression increased after E2 exposure of cells heterozygous for variant TSPYL5 SNP genotypes, but not in those homozygous for wild-type alleles. TSPYL5 knockdown decreased, and overexpression increased aromatase (CYP19A1) expression in MCF-7 cells, LCLs, and adipocytes through the skin/adipose (I.4) promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that TSPYL5 bound to the CYP19A1 I.4 promoter. A putative TSPYL5 binding motif was identified in 43 genes, and TSPYL5 appeared to function as a transcription factor for most of those genes. In summary, genome-wide significant SNPs in TSPYL5 were associated with elevated plasma E2 in postmenopausal breast cancer patients. SNP rs2583506 created a functional estrogen response element, and LCLs with variant SNP genotypes displayed increased E2-dependent TSPYL5 expression. TSPYL5 induced CYP19A1 expression and that of many other genes. These studies have revealed a novel mechanism for regulating aromatase expression and plasma E2 concentrations in postmenopausal women with ER(+) breast cancer. PMID:23518928

  14. Missing Data and Multiple Imputation: An Unbiased Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foy, M.; VanBaalen, M.; Wear, M.; Mendez, C.; Mason, S.; Meyers, V.; Alexander, D.; Law, J.

    2014-01-01

    The default method of dealing with missing data in statistical analyses is to only use the complete observations (complete case analysis), which can lead to unexpected bias when data do not meet the assumption of missing completely at random (MCAR). For the assumption of MCAR to be met, missingness cannot be related to either the observed or unobserved variables. A less stringent assumption, missing at random (MAR), requires that missingness not be associated with the value of the missing variable itself, but can be associated with the other observed variables. When data are truly MAR as opposed to MCAR, the default complete case analysis method can lead to biased results. There are statistical options available to adjust for data that are MAR, including multiple imputation (MI) which is consistent and efficient at estimating effects. Multiple imputation uses informing variables to determine statistical distributions for each piece of missing data. Then multiple datasets are created by randomly drawing on the distributions for each piece of missing data. Since MI is efficient, only a limited number, usually less than 20, of imputed datasets are required to get stable estimates. Each imputed dataset is analyzed using standard statistical techniques, and then results are combined to get overall estimates of effect. A simulation study will be demonstrated to show the results of using the default complete case analysis, and MI in a linear regression of MCAR and MAR simulated data. Further, MI was successfully applied to the association study of CO2 levels and headaches when initial analysis showed there may be an underlying association between missing CO2 levels and reported headaches. Through MI, we were able to show that there is a strong association between average CO2 levels and the risk of headaches. Each unit increase in CO2 (mmHg) resulted in a doubling in the odds of reported headaches.

  15. Identifying causal regulatory SNPs in ChIP-seq enhancers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Di; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of non-coding SNPs have been linked to human diseases in the past. The identification of causal alleles within this pool of disease-associated non-coding SNPs is largely impossible due to the inability to accurately quantify the impact of non-coding variation. To overcome this challenge, we developed a computational model that uses ChIP-seq intensity variation in response to non-coding allelic change as a proxy to the quantification of the biological role of non-coding SNPs. We applied this model to HepG2 enhancers and detected 4796 enhancer SNPs capable of disrupting enhancer activity upon allelic change. These SNPs are significantly over-represented in the binding sites of HNF4 and FOXA families of liver transcription factors and liver eQTLs. In addition, these SNPs are strongly associated with liver GWAS traits, including type I diabetes, and are linked to the abnormal levels of HDL and LDL cholesterol. Our model is directly applicable to any enhancer set for mapping causal regulatory SNPs. PMID:25520196

  16. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Highly Incomplete SNP Genotype Data with Imputations: An Empirical Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yong-Bi

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) recently has emerged as a promising genomic approach for assessing genetic diversity on a genome-wide scale. However, concerns are not lacking about the uniquely large unbalance in GBS genotype data. Although some genotype imputation has been proposed to infer missing observations, little is known about the reliability of a genetic diversity analysis of GBS data, with up to 90% of observations missing. Here we performed an empirical assessment of accuracy in genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes with imputations. Three large single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype data sets for corn, wheat, and rice were acquired, and missing data with up to 90% of missing observations were randomly generated and then imputed for missing genotypes with three map-independent imputation methods. Estimating heterozygosity and inbreeding coefficient from original, missing, and imputed data revealed variable patterns of bias from assessed levels of missingness and genotype imputation, but the estimation biases were smaller for missing data without genotype imputation. The estimates of genetic differentiation were rather robust up to 90% of missing observations but became substantially biased when missing genotypes were imputed. The estimates of topology accuracy for four representative samples of interested groups generally were reduced with increased levels of missing genotypes. Probabilistic principal component analysis based imputation performed better in terms of topology accuracy than those analyses of missing data without genotype imputation. These findings are not only significant for understanding the reliability of the genetic diversity analysis with respect to large missing data and genotype imputation but also are instructive for performing a proper genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete GBS or other genotype data. PMID:24626289

  17. Tree-based prediction on incomplete data using imputation or surrogate decisions

    E-print Network

    Tree-based prediction on incomplete data using imputation or surrogate decisions Holger Cevallos for such test cases. The missing values are handled either by using surrogate decisions within the trees fractions of missing data an ensemble method combined with surrogates or single imputation suffices

  18. Nonparametric Bayesian Multiple Imputation for Incomplete Categorical Variables in Large-Scale Assessment Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Si, Yajuan; Reiter, Jerome P.

    2013-01-01

    In many surveys, the data comprise a large number of categorical variables that suffer from item nonresponse. Standard methods for multiple imputation, like log-linear models or sequential regression imputation, can fail to capture complex dependencies and can be difficult to implement effectively in high dimensions. We present a fully Bayesian,…

  19. 48 CFR 1830.7002-4 - Determining imputed cost of money.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of money. 1830.7002-4 Section 1830.7002-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS... Determining imputed cost of money. (a) Determine the imputed cost of money for an asset under construction, fabrication, or development by applying a cost of money rate (see 1830.7002-2) to the...

  20. 48 CFR 1830.7002-4 - Determining imputed cost of money.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of money. 1830.7002-4 Section 1830.7002-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS... Determining imputed cost of money. (a) Determine the imputed cost of money for an asset under construction, fabrication, or development by applying a cost of money rate (see 1830.7002-2) to the...

  1. 48 CFR 1830.7002-4 - Determining imputed cost of money.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of money. 1830.7002-4 Section 1830.7002-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS... Determining imputed cost of money. (a) Determine the imputed cost of money for an asset under construction, fabrication, or development by applying a cost of money rate (see 1830.7002-2) to the...

  2. 48 CFR 1830.7002-4 - Determining imputed cost of money.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of money. 1830.7002-4 Section 1830.7002-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS... Determining imputed cost of money. (a) Determine the imputed cost of money for an asset under construction, fabrication, or development by applying a cost of money rate (see 1830.7002-2) to the...

  3. 48 CFR 1830.7002-4 - Determining imputed cost of money.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... money. 1830.7002-4 Section 1830.7002-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND... Determining imputed cost of money. (a) Determine the imputed cost of money for an asset under construction, fabrication, or development by applying a cost of money rate (see 1830.7002-2) to the...

  4. Imputation of Missing Genotypes From Sparse to High Density Using Long-Range Phasing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Related individuals in a population share long chromosome segments which trace to a common ancestor. We describe a long-range phasing algorithm that makes use of this property to phase whole chromosomes and simultaneously impute a large number of missing markers. We test our method by imputing marke...

  5. Methods of Imputation used in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To present the predominate methods of imputing used to estimate nutrient values for foods in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR20). Materials and Methods: The USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory developed standard methods for imputing nutrient values for foods wh...

  6. A Method for Imputing Response Options for Missing Data on Multiple-Choice Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolkowitz, Amanda A.; Skorupski, William P.

    2013-01-01

    When missing values are present in item response data, there are a number of ways one might impute a correct or incorrect response to a multiple-choice item. There are significantly fewer methods for imputing the actual response option an examinee may have provided if he or she had not omitted the item either purposely or accidentally. This…

  7. Multiple imputation of covariates by fully conditional specification: Accommodating the substantive model

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, Shaun R; White, Ian R; Carpenter, James R

    2015-01-01

    Missing covariate data commonly occur in epidemiological and clinical research, and are often dealt with using multiple imputation. Imputation of partially observed covariates is complicated if the substantive model is non-linear (e.g. Cox proportional hazards model), or contains non-linear (e.g. squared) or interaction terms, and standard software implementations of multiple imputation may impute covariates from models that are incompatible with such substantive models. We show how imputation by fully conditional specification, a popular approach for performing multiple imputation, can be modified so that covariates are imputed from models which are compatible with the substantive model. We investigate through simulation the performance of this proposal, and compare it with existing approaches. Simulation results suggest our proposal gives consistent estimates for a range of common substantive models, including models which contain non-linear covariate effects or interactions, provided data are missing at random and the assumed imputation models are correctly specified and mutually compatible. Stata software implementing the approach is freely available. PMID:24525487

  8. HIBAG—HLA genotype imputation with attribute bagging

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X; Shen, J; Cox, C; Wakefield, J C; Ehm, M G; Nelson, M R; Weir, B S

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping of classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles is an essential tool in the analysis of diseases and adverse drug reactions with associations mapping to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). However, deriving high-resolution HLA types subsequent to whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing or sequencing is often cost prohibitive for large samples. An alternative approach takes advantage of the extended haplotype structure within the MHC to predict HLA alleles using dense SNP genotypes, such as those available from genome-wide SNP panels. Current methods for HLA imputation are difficult to apply or may require the user to have access to large training data sets with SNP and HLA types. We propose HIBAG, HLA Imputation using attribute BAGging, that makes predictions by averaging HLA-type posterior probabilities over an ensemble of classifiers built on bootstrap samples. We assess the performance of HIBAG using our study data (n=2668 subjects of European ancestry) as a training set and HLA data from the British 1958 birth cohort study (n?1000 subjects) as independent validation samples. Prediction accuracies for HLA-A, B, C, DRB1 and DQB1 range from 92.2% to 98.1% using a set of SNP markers common to the Illumina 1M Duo, OmniQuad, OmniExpress, 660K and 550K platforms. HIBAG performed well compared with the other two leading methods, HLA*IMP and BEAGLE. This method is implemented in a freely available HIBAG R package that includes pre-fit classifiers for European, Asian, Hispanic and African ancestries, providing a readily available imputation approach without the need to have access to large training data sets. PMID:23712092

  9. HIBAG--HLA genotype imputation with attribute bagging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Shen, J; Cox, C; Wakefield, J C; Ehm, M G; Nelson, M R; Weir, B S

    2014-04-01

    Genotyping of classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles is an essential tool in the analysis of diseases and adverse drug reactions with associations mapping to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). However, deriving high-resolution HLA types subsequent to whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing or sequencing is often cost prohibitive for large samples. An alternative approach takes advantage of the extended haplotype structure within the MHC to predict HLA alleles using dense SNP genotypes, such as those available from genome-wide SNP panels. Current methods for HLA imputation are difficult to apply or may require the user to have access to large training data sets with SNP and HLA types. We propose HIBAG, HLA Imputation using attribute BAGging, that makes predictions by averaging HLA-type posterior probabilities over an ensemble of classifiers built on bootstrap samples. We assess the performance of HIBAG using our study data (n=2668 subjects of European ancestry) as a training set and HLA data from the British 1958 birth cohort study (n?1000 subjects) as independent validation samples. Prediction accuracies for HLA-A, B, C, DRB1 and DQB1 range from 92.2% to 98.1% using a set of SNP markers common to the Illumina 1M Duo, OmniQuad, OmniExpress, 660K and 550K platforms. HIBAG performed well compared with the other two leading methods, HLA*IMP and BEAGLE. This method is implemented in a freely available HIBAG R package that includes pre-fit classifiers for European, Asian, Hispanic and African ancestries, providing a readily available imputation approach without the need to have access to large training data sets. PMID:23712092

  10. J.M. Butler ANZFSS 2006 STRs vs SNPs

    E-print Network

    , multiplexing, accurate typing Budowle 2004 FSI 139-142; Sobrino et al., 2005 FSI (epub); Dixon et al., 2005 FSI (epub) ASPE = allele-specific primer extension #12;J.M. Butler ­ ANZFSS 2006 STRs vs SNPs April 4, 2006

  11. Harmonization of study and reference data by PhaseLift: saving time when imputing study data.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Mathias; Winkler, Thomas W; Stark, Klaus; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ried, Janina S; Grallert, Harald; Weber, Bernhard H F; Heid, Iris M

    2014-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies are usually accompanied by imputation techniques to complement genome-wide SNP chip genotypes. Current imputation approaches separate the phasing of study data from imputing, which makes the phasing independent from the reference data. The two-step approach allows for updating the imputation for a new reference panel without repeating the tedious phasing step. This advantage, however, does no longer hold, when the build of the study data differs from the build of the reference data. In this case, the current approach is to harmonize the study data annotation with the reference data (prephasing lift-over), requiring rephasing and re-imputing. As a novel approach, we propose to harmonize study haplotypes with reference haplotypes (postphasing lift-over). This allows for updating imputed study data for new reference panels without requiring rephasing. With continuously updated reference panels, our approach can save considerable computing time of up to 1 month per re-imputation. We evaluated the rephasing and postphasing lift-over approaches by using data from 1,644 unrelated individuals imputed by both approaches and comparing it with directly typed genotypes. On average, both approaches perform equally well with mean concordances of 93% between imputed and typed genotypes for both approaches. Also, imputation qualities are similar (mean difference in RSQ < 0.1%). We demonstrate that our novel postphasing lift-over approach is a practical and time-saving alternative to the prephasing lift-over. This might encourage study partners to accommodate updated reference builds and ultimately improve the information content of study data. Our novel approach is implemented in the software PhaseLift. PMID:24962562

  12. Combining multiple imputation and meta-analysis with individual participant data

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Stephen; White, Ian R; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Wood, Angela M

    2013-01-01

    Multiple imputation is a strategy for the analysis of incomplete data such that the impact of the missingness on the power and bias of estimates is mitigated. When data from multiple studies are collated, we can propose both within-study and multilevel imputation models to impute missing data on covariates. It is not clear how to choose between imputation models or how to combine imputation and inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis methods. This is especially important as often different studies measure data on different variables, meaning that we may need to impute data on a variable which is systematically missing in a particular study. In this paper, we consider a simulation analysis of sporadically missing data in a single covariate with a linear analysis model and discuss how the results would be applicable to the case of systematically missing data. We find in this context that ensuring the congeniality of the imputation and analysis models is important to give correct standard errors and confidence intervals. For example, if the analysis model allows between-study heterogeneity of a parameter, then we should incorporate this heterogeneity into the imputation model to maintain the congeniality of the two models. In an inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis, we should impute missing data and apply Rubin's rules at the study level prior to meta-analysis, rather than meta-analyzing each of the multiple imputations and then combining the meta-analysis estimates using Rubin's rules. We illustrate the results using data from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration. PMID:23703895

  13. Imputation of KIR Types from SNP Variation Data.

    PubMed

    Vukcevic, Damjan; Traherne, James A; Næss, Sigrid; Ellinghaus, Eva; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Dilthey, Alexander; Lathrop, Mark; Karlsen, Tom H; Franke, Andre; Moffatt, Miriam; Cookson, William; Trowsdale, John; McVean, Gil; Sawcer, Stephen; Leslie, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    Large population studies of immune system genes are essential for characterizing their role in diseases, including autoimmune conditions. Of key interest are a group of genes encoding the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which have known and hypothesized roles in autoimmune diseases, resistance to viruses, reproductive conditions, and cancer. These genes are highly polymorphic, which makes typing expensive and time consuming. Consequently, despite their importance, KIRs have been little studied in large cohorts. Statistical imputation methods developed for other complex loci (e.g., human leukocyte antigen [HLA]) on the basis of SNP data provide an inexpensive high-throughput alternative to direct laboratory typing of these loci and have enabled important findings and insights for many diseases. We present KIR?IMP, a method for imputation of KIR copy number. We show that KIR?IMP is highly accurate and thus allows the study of KIRs in large cohorts and enables detailed investigation of the role of KIRs in human disease. PMID:26430804

  14. Experimental analysis of methods for imputation of missing values in databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhangfar, Alireza; Kurgan, Lukasz A.; Pedrycz, Witold

    2004-04-01

    A very important issue faced by researchers and practitioners who use industrial and research databases is incompleteness of data, usually in terms of missing or erroneous values. While some of data analysis algorithms can work with incomplete data, a large portion of them require complete data. Therefore, different strategies, such as deletion of incomplete examples, and imputation (filling) of missing values through variety of statistical and machine learning (ML) procedures, are developed to preprocess the incomplete data. This study concentrates on performing experimental analysis of several algorithms for imputation of missing values, which range from simple statistical algorithms like mean and hot deck imputation to imputation algorithms that work based on application of inductive ML algorithms. Three major families of ML algorithms, such as probabilistic algorithms (e.g. Naive Bayes), decision tree algorithms (e.g. C4.5), and decision rule algorithms (e.g. CLIP4), are used to implement the ML based imputation algorithms. The analysis is carried out using a comprehensive range of databases, for which missing values were introduced randomly. The goal of this paper is to provide general guidelines on selection of suitable data imputation algorithms based on characteristics of the data. The guidelines are developed by performing a comprehensive experimental comparison of performance of different data imputation algorithms.

  15. Association Studies with Imputed Variants Using Expectation-Maximization Likelihood-Ratio Tests

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuan-Chieh; Sun, Wei; Wu, Ying; Chen, Mengjie; Mohlke, Karen L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Li, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Genotype imputation has become standard practice in modern genetic studies. As sequencing-based reference panels continue to grow, increasingly more markers are being well or better imputed but at the same time, even more markers with relatively low minor allele frequency are being imputed with low imputation quality. Here, we propose new methods that incorporate imputation uncertainty for downstream association analysis, with improved power and/or computational efficiency. We consider two scenarios: I) when posterior probabilities of all potential genotypes are estimated; and II) when only the one-dimensional summary statistic, imputed dosage, is available. For scenario I, we have developed an expectation-maximization likelihood-ratio test for association based on posterior probabilities. When only imputed dosages are available (scenario II), we first sample the genotype probabilities from its posterior distribution given the dosages, and then apply the EM-LRT on the sampled probabilities. Our simulations show that type I error of the proposed EM-LRT methods under both scenarios are protected. Compared with existing methods, EM-LRT-Prob (for scenario I) offers optimal statistical power across a wide spectrum of MAF and imputation quality. EM-LRT-Dose (for scenario II) achieves a similar level of statistical power as EM-LRT-Prob and, outperforms the standard Dosage method, especially for markers with relatively low MAF or imputation quality. Applications to two real data sets, the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey study and the Women’s Health Initiative Study, provide further support to the validity and efficiency of our proposed methods. PMID:25383782

  16. Use of partial least squares regression to impute SNP genotypes in Italian Cattle breeds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of the present study was to test the ability of the partial least squares regression technique to impute genotypes from low density single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) panels i.e. 3K or 7K to a high density panel with 50K SNP. No pedigree information was used. Methods Data consisted of 2093 Holstein, 749 Brown Swiss and 479 Simmental bulls genotyped with the Illumina 50K Beadchip. First, a single-breed approach was applied by using only data from Holstein animals. Then, to enlarge the training population, data from the three breeds were combined and a multi-breed analysis was performed. Accuracies of genotypes imputed using the partial least squares regression method were compared with those obtained by using the Beagle software. The impact of genotype imputation on breeding value prediction was evaluated for milk yield, fat content and protein content. Results In the single-breed approach, the accuracy of imputation using partial least squares regression was around 90 and 94% for the 3K and 7K platforms, respectively; corresponding accuracies obtained with Beagle were around 85% and 90%. Moreover, computing time required by the partial least squares regression method was on average around 10 times lower than computing time required by Beagle. Using the partial least squares regression method in the multi-breed resulted in lower imputation accuracies than using single-breed data. The impact of the SNP-genotype imputation on the accuracy of direct genomic breeding values was small. The correlation between estimates of genetic merit obtained by using imputed versus actual genotypes was around 0.96 for the 7K chip. Conclusions Results of the present work suggested that the partial least squares regression imputation method could be useful to impute SNP genotypes when pedigree information is not available. PMID:23738947

  17. Association between SNPs and gene expression in multiple regions of the human brain

    E-print Network

    Lee, Doheon

    Association between SNPs and gene expression in multiple regions of the human brain S Kim1 , H Cho2-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) and gene expression in brain tissue may be a promising approach to find functionally associations between 648 transcripts and 6725 SNPs in the various brain regions. Several SNPs showed brain

  18. High-accuracy haplotype imputation using unphased genotype data as the references.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenzhi; Xu, Wei; Fu, Guoxing; Ma, Li; Richards, Jendai; Rao, Weinian; Bythwood, Tameka; Guo, Shiwen; Song, Qing

    2015-11-10

    Enormously growing genomic datasets present a new challenge on missing data imputation, a notoriously resource-demanding task. Haplotype imputation requires ethnicity-matched references. However, to date, haplotype references are not available for the majority of populations in the world. We explored to use existing unphased genotype datasets as references; if it succeeds, it will cover almost all of the populations in the world. The results showed that our HiFi software successfully yields 99.43% accuracy with unphased genotype references. Our method provides a cost-effective solution to breakthrough the bottleneck of limited reference availability for haplotype imputation in the big data era. PMID:26232609

  19. Traffic Speed Data Imputation Method Based on Tensor Completion

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Bin; Feng, Jianshuai; Liu, Ying; Wang, Wuhong

    2015-01-01

    Traffic speed data plays a key role in Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS); however, missing traffic data would affect the performance of ITS as well as Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS). In this paper, we handle this issue by a novel tensor-based imputation approach. Specifically, tensor pattern is adopted for modeling traffic speed data and then High accurate Low Rank Tensor Completion (HaLRTC), an efficient tensor completion method, is employed to estimate the missing traffic speed data. This proposed method is able to recover missing entries from given entries, which may be noisy, considering severe fluctuation of traffic speed data compared with traffic volume. The proposed method is evaluated on Performance Measurement System (PeMS) database, and the experimental results show the superiority of the proposed approach over state-of-the-art baseline approaches. PMID:25866501

  20. Traffic speed data imputation method based on tensor completion.

    PubMed

    Ran, Bin; Tan, Huachun; Feng, Jianshuai; Liu, Ying; Wang, Wuhong

    2015-01-01

    Traffic speed data plays a key role in Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS); however, missing traffic data would affect the performance of ITS as well as Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS). In this paper, we handle this issue by a novel tensor-based imputation approach. Specifically, tensor pattern is adopted for modeling traffic speed data and then High accurate Low Rank Tensor Completion (HaLRTC), an efficient tensor completion method, is employed to estimate the missing traffic speed data. This proposed method is able to recover missing entries from given entries, which may be noisy, considering severe fluctuation of traffic speed data compared with traffic volume. The proposed method is evaluated on Performance Measurement System (PeMS) database, and the experimental results show the superiority of the proposed approach over state-of-the-art baseline approaches. PMID:25866501

  1. Analysis of mitochondrial transcription factor A SNPs in alcoholic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    TANG, CHUN; LIU, HONGMING; TANG, YONGLIANG; GUO, YONG; LIANG, XIANCHUN; GUO, LIPING; PI, RUXIAN; YANG, JUNTAO

    2014-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to alcoholic cirrhosis (AC) exists. We previously demonstrated hepatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in patients with AC compared with chronic alcoholics without cirrhosis. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is central to mtDNA expression regulation and repair; however, it is unclear whether there are specific mtTFA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients with AC and whether they affect mtDNA repair. In the present study, we screened mtTFA SNPs in patients with AC and analyzed their impact on the copy number of mtDNA in AC. A total of 50 patients with AC, 50 alcoholics without AC and 50 normal subjects were enrolled in the study. SNPs of full-length mtTFA were analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with gene sequencing. The hepatic mtTFA mRNA and mtDNA copy numbers were measured using quantitative PCR (qPCR), and mtTFA protein was measured using western blot analysis. A total of 18 mtTFA SNPs specific to patients with AC with frequencies >10% were identified. Two were located in the coding region and 16 were identified in non-coding regions. Conversely, there were five SNPs that were only present in patients with AC and normal subjects and had a frequency >10%. In the AC group, the hepatic mtTFA mRNA and protein levels were significantly lower than those in the other two groups. Moreover, the hepatic mtDNA copy number was significantly lower in the AC group than in the controls and alcoholics without AC. Based on these data, we conclude that AC-specific mtTFA SNPs may be responsible for the observed reductions in mtTFA mRNA, protein levels and mtDNA copy number and they may also increase the susceptibility to AC. PMID:24348767

  2. Differential network analysis with multiply imputed lipidomic data.

    PubMed

    Kujala, Maiju; Nevalainen, Jaakko; März, Winfried; Laaksonen, Reijo; Datta, Susmita

    2015-01-01

    The importance of lipids for cell function and health has been widely recognized, e.g., a disorder in the lipid composition of cells has been related to atherosclerosis caused cardiovascular disease (CVD). Lipidomics analyses are characterized by large yet not a huge number of mutually correlated variables measured and their associations to outcomes are potentially of a complex nature. Differential network analysis provides a formal statistical method capable of inferential analysis to examine differences in network structures of the lipids under two biological conditions. It also guides us to identify potential relationships requiring further biological investigation. We provide a recipe to conduct permutation test on association scores resulted from partial least square regression with multiple imputed lipidomic data from the LUdwigshafen RIsk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) study, particularly paying attention to the left-censored missing values typical for a wide range of data sets in life sciences. Left-censored missing values are low-level concentrations that are known to exist somewhere between zero and a lower limit of quantification. To make full use of the LURIC data with the missing values, we utilize state of the art multiple imputation techniques and propose solutions to the challenges that incomplete data sets bring to differential network analysis. The customized network analysis helps us to understand the complexities of the underlying biological processes by identifying lipids and lipid classes that interact with each other, and by recognizing the most important differentially expressed lipids between two subgroups of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients, the patients that had a fatal CVD event and the ones who remained stable during two year follow-up. PMID:25822937

  3. Differential Network Analysis with Multiply Imputed Lipidomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Kujala, Maiju; Nevalainen, Jaakko; März, Winfried; Laaksonen, Reijo; Datta, Susmita

    2015-01-01

    The importance of lipids for cell function and health has been widely recognized, e.g., a disorder in the lipid composition of cells has been related to atherosclerosis caused cardiovascular disease (CVD). Lipidomics analyses are characterized by large yet not a huge number of mutually correlated variables measured and their associations to outcomes are potentially of a complex nature. Differential network analysis provides a formal statistical method capable of inferential analysis to examine differences in network structures of the lipids under two biological conditions. It also guides us to identify potential relationships requiring further biological investigation. We provide a recipe to conduct permutation test on association scores resulted from partial least square regression with multiple imputed lipidomic data from the LUdwigshafen RIsk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) study, particularly paying attention to the left-censored missing values typical for a wide range of data sets in life sciences. Left-censored missing values are low-level concentrations that are known to exist somewhere between zero and a lower limit of quantification. To make full use of the LURIC data with the missing values, we utilize state of the art multiple imputation techniques and propose solutions to the challenges that incomplete data sets bring to differential network analysis. The customized network analysis helps us to understand the complexities of the underlying biological processes by identifying lipids and lipid classes that interact with each other, and by recognizing the most important differentially expressed lipids between two subgroups of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients, the patients that had a fatal CVD event and the ones who remained stable during two year follow-up. PMID:25822937

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies SNPs in the MHC class II loci that are associated with self-reported history of whooping cough.

    PubMed

    McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M; Davey-Smith, George; Timpson, Nicholas J

    2015-10-15

    Whooping cough is currently seeing resurgence in countries despite high vaccine coverage. There is considerable variation in subject-specific response to infection and vaccine efficacy, but little is known about the role of human genetics. We carried out a case-control genome-wide association study of adult or parent-reported history of whooping cough in two cohorts from the UK: the ALSPAC cohort and the 1958 British Birth Cohort (815/758 cases and 6341/4308 controls, respectively). We also imputed HLA alleles using dense SNP data in the MHC region and carried out gene-based and gene-set tests of association and estimated the amount of additive genetic variation explained by common SNPs. We observed a novel association at SNPs in the MHC class II region in both cohorts [lead SNP rs9271768 after meta-analysis, odds ratio [95% confidence intervals (CIs)] 1.47 (1.35, 1.6), P-value 1.21E - 18]. Multiple strong associations were also observed at alleles at the HLA class II loci. The majority of these associations were explained by the lead SNP rs9271768. Gene-based and gene-set tests and estimates of explainable common genetic variation could not establish the presence of additional associations in our sample. Genetic variation at the MHC class II region plays a role in susceptibility to whooping cough. These findings provide additional perspective on mechanisms of whooping cough infection and vaccine efficacy. PMID:26231221

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies SNPs in the MHC class II loci that are associated with self-reported history of whooping cough

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M.; Davey-Smith, George; Timpson, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Whooping cough is currently seeing resurgence in countries despite high vaccine coverage. There is considerable variation in subject-specific response to infection and vaccine efficacy, but little is known about the role of human genetics. We carried out a case–control genome-wide association study of adult or parent-reported history of whooping cough in two cohorts from the UK: the ALSPAC cohort and the 1958 British Birth Cohort (815/758 cases and 6341/4308 controls, respectively). We also imputed HLA alleles using dense SNP data in the MHC region and carried out gene-based and gene-set tests of association and estimated the amount of additive genetic variation explained by common SNPs. We observed a novel association at SNPs in the MHC class II region in both cohorts [lead SNP rs9271768 after meta-analysis, odds ratio [95% confidence intervals (CIs)] 1.47 (1.35, 1.6), P-value 1.21E ? 18]. Multiple strong associations were also observed at alleles at the HLA class II loci. The majority of these associations were explained by the lead SNP rs9271768. Gene-based and gene-set tests and estimates of explainable common genetic variation could not establish the presence of additional associations in our sample. Genetic variation at the MHC class II region plays a role in susceptibility to whooping cough. These findings provide additional perspective on mechanisms of whooping cough infection and vaccine efficacy. PMID:26231221

  6. Model, properties and imputation method of missing SNP genotype data utilizing mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Wan, Weiming; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Feng, Enmin

    2009-07-01

    Mutual information can be used as a measure for the association of a genetic marker or a combination of markers with the phenotype. In this paper, we study the imputation of missing genotype data. We first utilize joint mutual information to compute the dependence between SNP sites, then construct a mathematical model in order to find the two SNP sites having maximal dependence with missing SNP sites, and further study the properties of this model. Finally, an extension method to haplotype-based imputation is proposed to impute the missing values in genotype data. To verify our method, extensive experiments have been performed, and numerical results show that our method is superior to haplotype-based imputation methods. At the same time, numerical results also prove joint mutual information can better measure the dependence between SNP sites. According to experimental results, we also conclude that the dependence between the adjacent SNP sites is not necessarily strongest.

  7. On the value of Mendelian laws of segregation in families: data quality control, imputation and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Blue, Elizabeth Marchani; Sun, Lei; Tintle, Nathan L.; Wijsman, Ellen M.

    2014-01-01

    When analyzing family data, we dream of perfectly informative data, even whole genome sequences (WGS) for all family members. Reality intervenes, and we find next-generation sequence (NGS) data have error, and are often too expensive or impossible to collect on everyone. Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 groups “Quality Control” and “Dropping WGS through families using GWAS framework” focused on finding, correcting, and using errors within the available sequence and family data, developing methods to infer and analyze missing sequence data among relatives, and testing for linkage and association with simulated blood pressure. We found that single nucleotide polymorphisms, NGS, and imputed data are generally concordant, but that errors are particularly likely at rare variants, homozygous genotypes, within regions with repeated sequences or structural variants, and within sequence data imputed from unrelateds. Admixture complicated identification of cryptic relatedness, but information from Mendelian transmission improved error detection and provided an estimate of the de novo mutation rate. Both genotype and pedigree errors had an adverse effect on subsequent analyses. Computationally fast rules-based imputation was accurate, but could not cover as many loci or subjects as more computationally demanding probability-based methods. Incorporating population-level data into pedigree-based imputation methods improved results. Observed data outperformed imputed data in association testing, but imputed data were also useful. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of existing methods, and suggest possible future directions. Topics include improving communication between those performing data collection and analysis, establishing thresholds for and improving imputation quality, and incorporating error into imputation and analytical models. PMID:25112184

  8. Tracing Cattle Breeds with Principal Components Analysis Ancestry Informative SNPs

    E-print Network

    Paschou, Peristera

    Tracing Cattle Breeds with Principal Components Analysis Ancestry Informative SNPs Jamey Lewis1 that can be used to trace the breed of unknown cattle samples. Taking advantage of the power of Principal the origin of individual cattle. In doing so, we present a thorough examination of population genetic

  9. Association analysis of candidate SNPs on reproductive traits in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Being able to identify young females with superior reproduction traits would have a large financial impact on commercial swine producers. Previous studies have discovered SNPs associated with economically important traits such as litter size, growth rate, fat deposition, and feed intake. The objecti...

  10. Quality assessment parameters for EST-derived SNPs from catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two factors were found to be most significant for validation of EST-derived SNPs: the contig size and the minor allele sequence frequency. The larger the contigs were, the greater the validation rate although the validation rate was reasonably high when the contig sizes were equal to or larger than...

  11. Large-scale imputation of epigenomic datasets for systematic annotation of diverse human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Jason; Kellis, Manolis

    2015-04-01

    With hundreds of epigenomic maps, the opportunity arises to exploit the correlated nature of epigenetic signals, across both marks and samples, for large-scale prediction of additional datasets. Here, we undertake epigenome imputation by leveraging such correlations through an ensemble of regression trees. We impute 4,315 high-resolution signal maps, of which 26% are also experimentally observed. Imputed signal tracks show overall similarity to observed signals and surpass experimental datasets in consistency, recovery of gene annotations and enrichment for disease-associated variants. We use the imputed data to detect low-quality experimental datasets, to find genomic sites with unexpected epigenomic signals, to define high-priority marks for new experiments and to delineate chromatin states in 127 reference epigenomes spanning diverse tissues and cell types. Our imputed datasets provide the most comprehensive human regulatory region annotation to date, and our approach and the ChromImpute software constitute a useful complement to large-scale experimental mapping of epigenomic information. PMID:25690853

  12. Large-scale epigenome imputation improves data quality and disease variant enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Jason; Kellis, Manolis

    2015-01-01

    With hundreds of epigenomic maps, the opportunity arises to exploit the correlated nature of epigenetic signals, across both marks and samples, for large-scale prediction of additional datasets. Here, we undertake epigenome imputation by leveraging such correlations through an ensemble of regression trees. We impute 4,315 high-resolution signal maps, of which 26% are also experimentally observed. Imputed signal tracks show overall similarity to observed signals, and surpass experimental datasets in consistency, recovery of gene annotations, and enrichment for disease-associated variants. We use the imputed data to detect low quality experimental datasets, to find genomic sites with unexpected epigenomic signals, to define high-priority marks for new experiments, and to delineate chromatin states in 127 reference epigenomes spanning diverse tissues and cell types. Our imputed datasets provide the most comprehensive human regulatory annotation to date, and our approach and the ChromImpute software constitute a useful complement to large-scale experimental mapping of epigenomic information. PMID:25690853

  13. Missing value imputation for microarray data: a comprehensive comparison study and a web tool

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microarray data are usually peppered with missing values due to various reasons. However, most of the downstream analyses for microarray data require complete datasets. Therefore, accurate algorithms for missing value estimation are needed for improving the performance of microarray data analyses. Although many algorithms have been developed, there are many debates on the selection of the optimal algorithm. The studies about the performance comparison of different algorithms are still incomprehensive, especially in the number of benchmark datasets used, the number of algorithms compared, the rounds of simulation conducted, and the performance measures used. Results In this paper, we performed a comprehensive comparison by using (I) thirteen datasets, (II) nine algorithms, (III) 110 independent runs of simulation, and (IV) three types of measures to evaluate the performance of each imputation algorithm fairly. First, the effects of different types of microarray datasets on the performance of each imputation algorithm were evaluated. Second, we discussed whether the datasets from different species have different impact on the performance of different algorithms. To assess the performance of each algorithm fairly, all evaluations were performed using three types of measures. Our results indicate that the performance of an imputation algorithm mainly depends on the type of a dataset but not on the species where the samples come from. In addition to the statistical measure, two other measures with biological meanings are useful to reflect the impact of missing value imputation on the downstream data analyses. Our study suggests that local-least-squares-based methods are good choices to handle missing values for most of the microarray datasets. Conclusions In this work, we carried out a comprehensive comparison of the algorithms for microarray missing value imputation. Based on such a comprehensive comparison, researchers could choose the optimal algorithm for their datasets easily. Moreover, new imputation algorithms could be compared with the existing algorithms using this comparison strategy as a standard protocol. In addition, to assist researchers in dealing with missing values easily, we built a web-based and easy-to-use imputation tool, MissVIA (http://cosbi.ee.ncku.edu.tw/MissVIA), which supports many imputation algorithms. Once users upload a real microarray dataset and choose the imputation algorithms, MissVIA will determine the optimal algorithm for the users' data through a series of simulations, and then the imputed results can be downloaded for the downstream data analyses. PMID:24565220

  14. Assets of imputation to ultra-high density for productive and functional traits.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Montero, J A; Gianola, D; Weigel, K; Alenda, R; González-Recio, O

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate different-density genotyping panels for genotype imputation and genomic prediction. Genotypes from customized Golden Gate Bovine3K BeadChip [LD3K; low-density (LD) 3,000-marker (3K); Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA] and BovineLD BeadChip [LD6K; 6,000-marker (6K); Illumina Inc.] panels were imputed to the BovineSNP50v2 BeadChip [50K; 50,000-marker; Illumina Inc.]. In addition, LD3K, LD6K, and 50K genotypes were imputed to a BovineHD BeadChip [HD; high-density 800,000-marker (800K) panel], and with predictive ability evaluated and compared subsequently. Comparisons of prediction accuracy were carried out using Random boosting and genomic BLUP. Four traits under selection in the Spanish Holstein population were used: milk yield, fat percentage (FP), somatic cell count, and days open (DO). Training sets at 50K density for imputation and prediction included 1,632 genotypes. Testing sets for imputation from LD to 50K contained 834 genotypes and testing sets for genomic evaluation included 383 bulls. The reference population genotyped at HD included 192 bulls. Imputation using BEAGLE software (http://faculty.washington.edu/browning/beagle/beagle.html) was effective for reconstruction of dense 50K and HD genotypes, even when a small reference population was used, with 98.3% of SNP correctly imputed. Random boosting outperformed genomic BLUP in terms of prediction reliability, mean squared error, and selection effectiveness of top animals in the case of FP. For other traits, however, no clear differences existed between methods. No differences were found between imputed LD and 50K genotypes, whereas evaluation of genotypes imputed to HD was on average across data set, method, and trait, 4% more accurate than 50K prediction, and showed smaller (2%) mean squared error of predictions. Similar bias in regression coefficients was found across data sets but regressions were 0.32 units closer to unity for DO when genotypes were imputed to HD density. Imputation to HD genotypes might produce higher stability in the genomic proofs of young candidates. Regarding selection effectiveness of top animals, more (2%) top bulls were classified correctly with imputed LD6K genotypes than with LD3K. When the original 50K genotypes were used, correct classification of top bulls increased by 1%, and when those genotypes were imputed to HD, 3% more top bulls were detected. Selection effectiveness could be slightly enhanced for certain traits such as FP, somatic cell count, or DO when genotypes are imputed to HD. Genetic evaluation units may consider a trait-dependent strategy in terms of method and genotype density for use in the genome-enhanced evaluations. PMID:23810591

  15. From SNPs to Genes: Disease Association at the Gene Level

    PubMed Central

    Lehne, Benjamin; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Schlitt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Interpreting Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) at a gene level is an important step towards understanding the molecular processes that lead to disease. In order to incorporate prior biological knowledge such as pathways and protein interactions in the analysis of GWAS data it is necessary to derive one measure of association for each gene. We compare three different methods to obtain gene-wide test statistics from Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) based association data: choosing the test statistic from the most significant SNP; the mean test statistics of all SNPs; and the mean of the top quartile of all test statistics. We demonstrate that the gene-wide test statistics can be controlled for the number of SNPs within each gene and show that all three methods perform considerably better than expected by chance at identifying genes with confirmed associations. By applying each method to GWAS data for Crohn's Disease and Type 1 Diabetes we identified new potential disease genes. PMID:21738570

  16. SNP-VISTA: An Interactive SNPs Visualization Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Nameeta; Teplitsky, Michael V.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Hamann, Bernd; Dubchak, Inna L.

    2005-07-05

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies promise better diagnostics for many diseases as well as better understanding of evolution of microbial populations. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms(SNPs) are established genetic markers that aid in the identification of loci affecting quantitative traits and/or disease in a wide variety of eukaryotic species. With today's technological capabilities, it is possible to re-sequence a large set of appropriate candidate genes in individuals with a given disease and then screen for causative mutations.In addition, SNPs have been used extensively in efforts to study the evolution of microbial populations, and the recent application of random shotgun sequencing to environmental samples makes possible more extensive SNP analysis of co-occurring and co-evolving microbial populations. The program is available at http://genome.lbl.gov/vista/snpvista.

  17. Accounting for Misclassified Outcomes in Binary Regression Models Using Multiple Imputation With Internal Validation Data

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jessie K.; Cole, Stephen R.; Troester, Melissa A.; Richardson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Outcome misclassification is widespread in epidemiology, but methods to account for it are rarely used. We describe the use of multiple imputation to reduce bias when validation data are available for a subgroup of study participants. This approach is illustrated using data from 308 participants in the multicenter Herpetic Eye Disease Study between 1992 and 1998 (48% female; 85% white; median age, 49 years). The odds ratio comparing the acyclovir group with the placebo group on the gold-standard outcome (physician-diagnosed herpes simplex virus recurrence) was 0.62 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.35, 1.09). We masked ourselves to physician diagnosis except for a 30% validation subgroup used to compare methods. Multiple imputation (odds ratio (OR) = 0.60; 95% CI: 0.24, 1.51) was compared with naive analysis using self-reported outcomes (OR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.47, 1.73), analysis restricted to the validation subgroup (OR = 0.57; 95% CI: 0.20, 1.59), and direct maximum likelihood (OR = 0.62; 95% CI: 0.26, 1.53). In simulations, multiple imputation and direct maximum likelihood had greater statistical power than did analysis restricted to the validation subgroup, yet all 3 provided unbiased estimates of the odds ratio. The multiple-imputation approach was extended to estimate risk ratios using log-binomial regression. Multiple imputation has advantages regarding flexibility and ease of implementation for epidemiologists familiar with missing data methods. PMID:24627573

  18. Probability genotype imputation method and integrated weighted lasso for QTL identification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many QTL studies have two common features: (1) often there is missing marker information, (2) among many markers involved in the biological process only a few are causal. In statistics, the second issue falls under the headings “sparsity” and “causal inference”. The goal of this work is to develop a two-step statistical methodology for QTL mapping for markers with binary genotypes. The first step introduces a novel imputation method for missing genotypes. Outcomes of the proposed imputation method are probabilities which serve as weights to the second step, namely in weighted lasso. The sparse phenotype inference is employed to select a set of predictive markers for the trait of interest. Results Simulation studies validate the proposed methodology under a wide range of realistic settings. Furthermore, the methodology outperforms alternative imputation and variable selection methods in such studies. The methodology was applied to an Arabidopsis experiment, containing 69 markers for 165 recombinant inbred lines of a F8 generation. The results confirm previously identified regions, however several new markers are also found. On the basis of the inferred ROC behavior these markers show good potential for being real, especially for the germination trait Gmax. Conclusions Our imputation method shows higher accuracy in terms of sensitivity and specificity compared to alternative imputation method. Also, the proposed weighted lasso outperforms commonly practiced multiple regression as well as the traditional lasso and adaptive lasso with three weighting schemes. This means that under realistic missing data settings this methodology can be used for QTL identification. PMID:24378210

  19. Multiple imputation for harmonizing longitudinal non-commensurate measures in individual participant data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Juned; Reiter, Jerome P; Brincks, Ahnalee; Gibbons, Robert D; Crespi, Catherine M; Brown, C Hendricks

    2015-11-20

    There are many advantages to individual participant data meta-analysis for combining data from multiple studies. These advantages include greater power to detect effects, increased sample heterogeneity, and the ability to perform more sophisticated analyses than meta-analyses that rely on published results. However, a fundamental challenge is that it is unlikely that variables of interest are measured the same way in all of the studies to be combined. We propose that this situation can be viewed as a missing data problem in which some outcomes are entirely missing within some trials and use multiple imputation to fill in missing measurements. We apply our method to five longitudinal adolescent depression trials where four studies used one depression measure and the fifth study used a different depression measure. None of the five studies contained both depression measures. We describe a multiple imputation approach for filling in missing depression measures that makes use of external calibration studies in which both depression measures were used. We discuss some practical issues in developing the imputation model including taking into account treatment group and study. We present diagnostics for checking the fit of the imputation model and investigate whether external information is appropriately incorporated into the imputed values. Copyright © 2015?John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26095855

  20. PRIMAL: Fast and Accurate Pedigree-based Imputation from Sequence Data in a Founder Population

    PubMed Central

    Livne, Oren E.; Han, Lide; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Wentworth-Sheilds, William; Abney, Mark; Ober, Carole; Nicolae, Dan L.

    2015-01-01

    Founder populations and large pedigrees offer many well-known advantages for genetic mapping studies, including cost-efficient study designs. Here, we describe PRIMAL (PedigRee IMputation ALgorithm), a fast and accurate pedigree-based phasing and imputation algorithm for founder populations. PRIMAL incorporates both existing and original ideas, such as a novel indexing strategy of Identity-By-Descent (IBD) segments based on clique graphs. We were able to impute the genomes of 1,317 South Dakota Hutterites, who had genome-wide genotypes for ~300,000 common single nucleotide variants (SNVs), from 98 whole genome sequences. Using a combination of pedigree-based and LD-based imputation, we were able to assign 87% of genotypes with >99% accuracy over the full range of allele frequencies. Using the IBD cliques we were also able to infer the parental origin of 83% of alleles, and genotypes of deceased recent ancestors for whom no genotype information was available. This imputed data set will enable us to better study the relative contribution of rare and common variants on human phenotypes, as well as parental origin effect of disease risk alleles in >1,000 individuals at minimal cost. PMID:25735005

  1. Sensitivity analysis in multiple imputation in effectiveness studies of psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crameri, Aureliano; von Wyl, Agnes; Koemeda, Margit; Schulthess, Peter; Tschuschke, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The importance of preventing and treating incomplete data in effectiveness studies is nowadays emphasized. However, most of the publications focus on randomized clinical trials (RCT). One flexible technique for statistical inference with missing data is multiple imputation (MI). Since methods such as MI rely on the assumption of missing data being at random (MAR), a sensitivity analysis for testing the robustness against departures from this assumption is required. In this paper we present a sensitivity analysis technique based on posterior predictive checking, which takes into consideration the concept of clinical significance used in the evaluation of intra-individual changes. We demonstrate the possibilities this technique can offer with the example of irregular longitudinal data collected with the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ-45) and the Helping Alliance Questionnaire (HAQ) in a sample of 260 outpatients. The sensitivity analysis can be used to (1) quantify the degree of bias introduced by missing not at random data (MNAR) in a worst reasonable case scenario, (2) compare the performance of different analysis methods for dealing with missing data, or (3) detect the influence of possible violations to the model assumptions (e.g., lack of normality). Moreover, our analysis showed that ratings from the patient's and therapist's version of the HAQ could significantly improve the predictive value of the routine outcome monitoring based on the OQ-45. Since analysis dropouts always occur, repeated measurements with the OQ-45 and the HAQ analyzed with MI are useful to improve the accuracy of outcome estimates in quality assurance assessments and non-randomized effectiveness studies in the field of outpatient psychotherapy. PMID:26283989

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 4, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2013 2347 Load Curve Data Cleansing and Imputation Via

    E-print Network

    Giannakis, Georgios

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 4, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2013 2347 Load Curve Data Cleansing and communication errors. In this context, a novel load cleansing and imputation scheme is developed leveraging (D-) PCP algorithm is developed to carry out the imputation and cleansing tasks using networked

  3. Relaxing the independent censoring assumption in the Cox proportional hazards model using multiple imputation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dan; White, Ian R; Seaman, Shaun; Evans, Hannah; Baisley, Kathy; Carpenter, James

    2014-11-30

    The Cox proportional hazards model is frequently used in medical statistics. The standard methods for fitting this model rely on the assumption of independent censoring. Although this is sometimes plausible, we often wish to explore how robust our inferences are as this untestable assumption is relaxed. We describe how this can be carried out in a way that makes the assumptions accessible to all those involved in a research project. Estimation proceeds via multiple imputation, where censored failure times are imputed under user-specified departures from independent censoring. A novel aspect of our method is the use of bootstrapping to generate proper imputations from the Cox model. We illustrate our approach using data from an HIV-prevention trial and discuss how it can be readily adapted and applied in other settings. PMID:25060703

  4. A New Missing Data Imputation Algorithm Applied to Electrical Data Loggers.

    PubMed

    Crespo Turrado, Concepción; Sánchez Lasheras, Fernando; Calvo-Rollé, José Luis; Piñón-Pazos, Andrés José; de Cos Juez, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, data collection is a key process in the study of electrical power networks when searching for harmonics and a lack of balance among phases. In this context, the lack of data of any of the main electrical variables (phase-to-neutral voltage, phase-to-phase voltage, and current in each phase and power factor) adversely affects any time series study performed. When this occurs, a data imputation process must be accomplished in order to substitute the data that is missing for estimated values. This paper presents a novel missing data imputation method based on multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) and compares it with the well-known technique called multivariate imputation by chained equations (MICE). The results obtained demonstrate how the proposed method outperforms the MICE algorithm. PMID:26690437

  5. On multivariate imputation and forecasting of decadal wind speed missing data.

    PubMed

    Wesonga, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of multiple imputations by chained equations and time series forecasting of wind speed data. The study was motivated by the high prevalence of missing wind speed historic data. Findings based on the fully conditional specification under multiple imputations by chained equations, provided reliable wind speed missing data imputations. Further, the forecasting model shows, the smoothing parameter, alpha (0.014) close to zero, confirming that recent past observations are more suitable for use to forecast wind speeds. The maximum decadal wind speed for Entebbe International Airport was estimated to be 17.6 metres per second at a 0.05 level of significance with a bound on the error of estimation of 10.8 metres per second. The large bound on the error of estimations confirms the dynamic tendencies of wind speed at the airport under study. PMID:25625036

  6. Exact Inference for Hardy-Weinberg Proportions with Missing Genotypes: Single and Multiple Imputation

    PubMed Central

    Graffelman, Jan; Nelson, S.; Gogarten, S. M.; Weir, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of exact-test based statistical inference for Hardy?Weinberg equilibrium in the presence of missing genotype data. Missing genotypes often are discarded when markers are tested for Hardy?Weinberg equilibrium, which can lead to bias in the statistical inference about equilibrium. Single and multiple imputation can improve inference on equilibrium. We develop tests for equilibrium in the presence of missingness by using both inbreeding coefficients (or, equivalently, ?2 statistics) and exact p-values. The analysis of a set of markers with a high missing rate from the GENEVA project on prematurity shows that exact inference on equilibrium can be altered considerably when missingness is taken into account. For markers with a high missing rate (>5%), we found that both single and multiple imputation tend to diminish evidence for Hardy?Weinberg disequilibrium. Depending on the imputation method used, 6?13% of the test results changed qualitatively at the 5% level. PMID:26377959

  7. Integration of multiethnic fine-mapping and genomic annotation to prioritize candidate functional SNPs at prostate cancer susceptibility regions.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Hazelett, Dennis J; Wiklund, Fredrik; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Stram, Daniel O; Berndt, Sonja I; Wang, Zhaoming; Rand, Kristin A; Hoover, Robert N; Machiela, Mitchell J; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Xu, Jianfeng; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Timothy J; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Stanford, Janet L; Kolb, Suzanne; Gapstur, Susan M; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Strom, Sara S; Pettaway, Curtis A; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A; Yeboah, Edward D; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B; Adjei, Andrew A; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Isaacs, William B; Chen, Constance; Lindstrom, Sara; Le Marchand, Loic; Giovannucci, Edward L; Pomerantz, Mark; Long, Henry; Li, Fugen; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Kittles, Rick A; Murphy, Adam B; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, M Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm J M; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S Lilly; Witte, John S; Casey, Graham; Riboli, Elio; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L; Hunter, David J; Gronberg, Henrik; Cook, Michael B; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Easton, Douglas F; Henderson, Brian E; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Conti, David V; Haiman, Christopher A

    2015-10-01

    Interpretation of biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk associations for prostate cancer is complicated by the relatively large number of risk variants (n = 100) and the thousands of surrogate SNPs in linkage disequilibrium. Here, we combined three distinct approaches: multiethnic fine-mapping, putative functional annotation (based upon epigenetic data and genome-encoded features), and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses, in an attempt to reduce this complexity. We examined 67 risk regions using genotyping and imputation-based fine-mapping in populations of European (cases/controls: 8600/6946), African (cases/controls: 5327/5136), Japanese (cases/controls: 2563/4391) and Latino (cases/controls: 1034/1046) ancestry. Markers at 55 regions passed a region-specific significance threshold (P-value cutoff range: 3.9 × 10(-4)-5.6 × 10(-3)) and in 30 regions we identified markers that were more significantly associated with risk than the previously reported variants in the multiethnic sample. Novel secondary signals (P < 5.0 × 10(-6)) were also detected in two regions (rs13062436/3q21 and rs17181170/3p12). Among 666 variants in the 55 regions with P-values within one order of magnitude of the most-associated marker, 193 variants (29%) in 48 regions overlapped with epigenetic or other putative functional marks. In 11 of the 55 regions, cis-eQTLs were detected with nearby genes. For 12 of the 55 regions (22%), the most significant region-specific, prostate-cancer associated variant represented the strongest candidate functional variant based on our annotations; the number of regions increased to 20 (36%) and 27 (49%) when examining the 2 and 3 most significantly associated variants in each region, respectively. These results have prioritized subsets of candidate variants for downstream functional evaluation. PMID:26162851

  8. Singleton SNPs in the human genome and implications for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xiayi; Taylor, Martin S; Cardon, Lon R

    2008-04-01

    The human genome is estimated to contain one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) every 300 base pairs. The presence of LD between SNP markers can be used to save genotyping cost via appropriate SNP tagging strategies, whereas absence or low level of LD between markers generally increase genotyping cost. It is quite common that a large proportion of tagging SNPs in a tagging scheme often turn out to be singleton SNPs, that is, SNPs that only tag themselves rather than contribute power to the rest of a region. If genotyping cost is a major concern, which often is the case at the present time for genome-wide association studies, these singleton tagging SNPs would be the primary targets to be removed from genotyping. It is important, however, to understand the characteristics of such SNPs and estimate the impact of removing them in a study. Using the HapMap genotype data and genome wide expression data, we assessed the distribution and functional implications of singleton SNPs in the human genome. Our results demonstrated that SNPs of potentially higher functional importance (eg, nonsynonymous SNPs, SNPs in splicing sites and SNPs in 5' and 3' UTR) are associated with a higher tendency to be singleton SNPs than SNPs in intronic and intergenic regions. We further assessed whether singleton SNPs can be tagged using haplotypes of tagSNPs in the three genome wide chips, that is, GeneChip 500k of Affymetrix, HumanHap300 and HumanHap550 of Illumina, and discussed the general implications on genetic association studies. PMID:18197193

  9. Transcriptome analysis of the gill of Takifugu rubripes using Illumina sequencing for discovery of SNPs.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jun; Wang, Hongdi; Liu, Shikai; Qiu, Xuemei; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiuli

    2014-06-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have become the marker of choice for genome-wide association studies in many species. High-throughput sequencing of RNA was developed primarily to analyze global gene expression, while it is an efficient way to discover SNPs from the expressed genes. In this study, we conducted transcriptome sequencing of the gill samples of Takifugu rubripes analyzed by using Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform to identify gene-associated SNPs from the transcriptome of T. rubripes gill. A total of 27,085,235 unique-mapped-reads from 55,061,524 raw data reads were generated. A total of 56,972 putative SNPs were discovered, which were located in 11,327 genes. 35,839 SNPs were transitions (Ts), 21,074 SNPs were transversions (Tv) and 88.1% of 56,972 SNPs were assigned to the 22 chromosomes. The average minor allele frequency (MAF) of the SNPs was 0.26. GO and KEGG pathway analyses were conducted to analyze the genes containing SNPs. Validation of selected SNPs revealed that 63.4% of SNPs (34/52) were true SNPs. RNA-Seq is a cost-effective way to discover gene-associated SNPs. In this study, a large number of SNPs were identified and these data will be useful resources for population genetic study, evolution analysis, resource assessment, genetic linkage analysis and genome-wide association studies. The results of our study can also offer some useful information as molecular makers to help select and cultivate T. rubripes. PMID:24747987

  10. Molecular Beacon CNT-based Detection of SNPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Veligura, A. A.; Shulitsky, B. G.; Y Fedotenkova, L.

    2015-11-01

    An fluorescence quenching effect due to few-walled carbon nanotubes chemically modified by carboxyl groups has been utilized to discriminate Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP). It was shown that the complex obtained from these nanotube and singlestranded primer DNA is formed due to stacking interactions between the hexagons of the nanotubes and aromatic rings of nucleotide bases as well as due to establishing of hydrogen bonds between acceptor amine groups of nucleotide bases and donor carboxyl groups of the nanotubes. It has been demonstrated that these complexes may be used to make highly effective DNA biosensors detecting SNPs which operate as molecular beacons.

  11. The Effect of Auxiliary Variables and Multiple Imputation on Parameter Estimation in Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoo, Jin Eun

    2009-01-01

    This Monte Carlo study investigates the beneficiary effect of including auxiliary variables during estimation of confirmatory factor analysis models with multiple imputation. Specifically, it examines the influence of sample size, missing rates, missingness mechanism combinations, missingness types (linear or convex), and the absence or presence…

  12. 37 CFR 11.110 - Imputation of conflicts of interest; General rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... TRADEMARK OFFICE USPTO Rules of Professional Conduct Client-Practitioner Relationship § 11.110 Imputation of... knowingly represent a client when any one of them practicing alone would be prohibited from doing so by... practitioner and does not present a significant risk of materially limiting the representation of the client...

  13. Effects of reduced panel, reference origin, and genetic relationship on imputation of genotypes in Hereford cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate alternative methods for designing and utilizing reduced single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panels for imputing SNP genotypes. Two purebred Hereford populations, an experimental population known as Line 1 Hereford (L1, N=240) and registered Hereford wi...

  14. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE 49:709718 (2006) Smoking Imputation and Lung Cancer in

    E-print Network

    Reid, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE 49:709­718 (2006) Smoking Imputation and Lung Cancer exhaust exposure and lung cancer mortality in a large retrospective cohort study of US railroad workers­1996. Mortality analyses incorporated the effect of smoking on lung cancer risk. Results The smoking adjusted

  15. Evaluation of an Imputed Pitch Velocity Model of the Auditory Kappa Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Molly J.; McAuley, J. Devin

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments evaluated an imputed pitch velocity model of the auditory kappa effect. Listeners heard 3-tone sequences and judged the timing of the middle (target) tone relative to the timing of the 1st and 3rd (bounding) tones. Experiment 1 held pitch constant but varied the time (T) interval between bounding tones (T = 728, 1,000, or 1,600…

  16. Tree-based prediction on incomplete data using imputation or surrogate decisions

    E-print Network

    Tree-based prediction on incomplete data using imputation or surrogate decisions H. Cevallos, Celestijnenlaan 200B B-3001, Leuven, Belgium Supplementary material A. Tree-based methods Tree-based methods Tree (CART) algorithm proposed by [4]. The CART5 algorithm recursively partitions the predictor space

  17. Imputation of missing genotypes from sparse to high density using long-range phasing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Related individuals share potentially long chromosome segments that trace to a common ancestor. A phasing algorithm (ChromoPhase) that utilizes this characteristic of finite populations was developed to phase large sections of a chromosome. In addition to phasing, ChromoPhase imputes missing genotyp...

  18. Reporting the Use of Multiple Imputation for Missing Data in Higher Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manly, Catherine A.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2015-01-01

    Higher education researchers using survey data often face decisions about handling missing data. Multiple imputation (MI) is considered by many statisticians to be the most appropriate technique for addressing missing data in many circumstances. In particular, it has been shown to be preferable to listwise deletion, which has historically been a…

  19. The Effects of Methods of Imputation for Missing Values on the Validity and Reliability of Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cokluk, Omay; Kayri, Murat

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study is the comparative examination of the factor structures, corrected item-total correlations, and Cronbach-alpha internal consistency coefficients obtained by different methods used in imputation for missing values in conditions of not having missing values, and having missing values of different rates in terms of testing…

  20. How Many People Visit YouTube? Imputing Missing Events in Panels With Excess Zeros

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Corinna

    @google.com Abstract: Media-metering panels track TV and online usage of people to an- alyze viewing behavior. HoweverTube. Keywords: imputation; missing data; zero inflation; panel data. 1 Introduction Media panels (GfK Consumer (§2); ii) present the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) and also add prior information on missingness

  1. The operating regimes and basic control principles of SNPS Topaz''. [Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, A.N.; Volberg, M.S.; Grayznov, G.M.; Zhabotinsky, E.E.; Serbin, V.I. )

    1991-01-05

    The basic operating regimes of space nuclear power system (SNPS) Topaz'' are considered. These regimes include: prelaunch preparation and launch into working orbit, SNPS start-up to obtain desired electric power, nominal regime, SNPS shutdown. The main requirements for SNPS at different regimes are given, and the control algorithms providing these requirements are described. The control algorithms were chosen on the basis of theoretical studies and ground power tests of the SNPS prototypes. Topaz'' successful ground and flight tests allow to conclude that for SNPS of this type control algorithm providing required thermal state of cesium vapor supply system and excluding any possibility of discharge processes in current conducting elements is the most expedient at the start-up regime. At the nominal regime required electric power should be provided by maintenance of reactor current and fast-acting voltage regulator utilization. The limitation of the outlet coolant temperature should be foreseen also.

  2. PCA-Correlated SNPs for Structure Identification in Worldwide Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Paschou, Peristera; Ziv, Elad; Burchard, Esteban G; Choudhry, Shweta; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Mahoney, Michael W; Drineas, Petros

    2007-01-01

    Existing methods to ascertain small sets of markers for the identification of human population structure require prior knowledge of individual ancestry. Based on Principal Components Analysis (PCA), and recent results in theoretical computer science, we present a novel algorithm that, applied on genomewide data, selects small subsets of SNPs (PCA-correlated SNPs) to reproduce the structure found by PCA on the complete dataset, without use of ancestry information. Evaluating our method on a previously described dataset (10,805 SNPs, 11 populations), we demonstrate that a very small set of PCA-correlated SNPs can be effectively employed to assign individuals to particular continents or populations, using a simple clustering algorithm. We validate our methods on the HapMap populations and achieve perfect intercontinental differentiation with 14 PCA-correlated SNPs. The Chinese and Japanese populations can be easily differentiated using less than 100 PCA-correlated SNPs ascertained after evaluating 1.7 million SNPs from HapMap. We show that, in general, structure informative SNPs are not portable across geographic regions. However, we manage to identify a general set of 50 PCA-correlated SNPs that effectively assigns individuals to one of nine different populations. Compared to analysis with the measure of informativeness, our methods, although unsupervised, achieved similar results. We proceed to demonstrate that our algorithm can be effectively used for the analysis of admixed populations without having to trace the origin of individuals. Analyzing a Puerto Rican dataset (192 individuals, 7,257 SNPs), we show that PCA-correlated SNPs can be used to successfully predict structure and ancestry proportions. We subsequently validate these SNPs for structure identification in an independent Puerto Rican dataset. The algorithm that we introduce runs in seconds and can be easily applied on large genome-wide datasets, facilitating the identification of population substructure, stratification assessment in multi-stage whole-genome association studies, and the study of demographic history in human populations. PMID:17892327

  3. 7 CFR 3017.630 - May the Department of Agriculture impute conduct of one person to another?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May the Department of Agriculture impute conduct of one person to another? 3017.630 Section 3017.630 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture...

  4. Identity-by-descent graphs offer a flexible framework for imputation and both linkage and association analyses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the flexibility of identity-by-descent (IBD) graphs for genotype imputation and testing relationships between genotype and phenotype. We analyzed chromosome 3 and the first replicate of simulated diastolic blood pressure. IBD graphs were obtained from complete pedigrees and full multipoint marker analysis, facilitating subsequent linkage and other analyses. For rare alleles, pedigree-based imputation using these IBD graphs had a higher call rate than did population-based imputation. Combining the two approaches improved call rates for common alleles. We found it advantageous to incorporate known, rather than estimated, pedigree relationships when testing for association. Replacing missing data with imputed alleles improved association signals as well. Analyses were performed with knowledge of the underlying model. PMID:25519371

  5. Imputing forest carbon stock estimates from inventory plots to a nationally continuous coverage.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Barry Tyler; Woodall, Christopher W; Griffith, Douglas M

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. has been providing national-scale estimates of forest carbon (C) stocks and stock change to meet United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) reporting requirements for years. Although these currently are provided as national estimates by pool and year to meet greenhouse gas monitoring requirements, there is growing need to disaggregate these estimates to finer scales to enable strategic forest management and monitoring activities focused on various ecosystem services such as C storage enhancement. Through application of a nearest-neighbor imputation approach, spatially extant estimates of forest C density were developed for the conterminous U.S. using the U.S.'s annual forest inventory. Results suggest that an existing forest inventory plot imputation approach can be readily modified to provide raster maps of C density across a range of pools (e.g., live tree to soil organic carbon) and spatial scales (e.g., sub-county to biome). Comparisons among imputed maps indicate strong regional differences across C pools. The C density of pools closely related to detrital input (e.g., dead wood) is often highest in forests suffering from recent mortality events such as those in the northern Rocky Mountains (e.g., beetle infestations). In contrast, live tree carbon density is often highest on the highest quality forest sites such as those found in the Pacific Northwest. Validation results suggest strong agreement between the estimates produced from the forest inventory plots and those from the imputed maps, particularly when the C pool is closely associated with the imputation model (e.g., aboveground live biomass and live tree basal area), with weaker agreement for detrital pools (e.g., standing dead trees). Forest inventory imputed plot maps provide an efficient and flexible approach to monitoring diverse C pools at national (e.g., UNFCCC) and regional scales (e.g., Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation projects) while allowing timely incorporation of empirical data (e.g., annual forest inventory). PMID:23305341

  6. High quality SNPs/Indels mining and characterization in ginger from ESTs data base.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Mahendra; Das, Aradhana; Subudhi, Enketeswara

    2015-01-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) is an important herb of the family Zingiberaceae. It is accepted as a universal cure for a multitude of diseases in Indian systems of medicine and its rhizomes are equally popular as a spice ingredient throughout Asia. SNPs, the definitive genetic markers, representing the finest resolution of a DNA sequence, are abundantly found in populations having a lower rate of mutation and are used for genomic analysis. The public ESTs sequences mostly lack quality files, making high quality SNPs detection more difficult since it is exclusively based on sequence comparisons. In the present study, current dbESTs of NCBI was mined and 38115 ginger ESTs sequences were obtained and assembled into contigs using CAP3 program. In this analysis, recent software tool QualitySNP was used to detect 11523 potential SNPs sites, 8810 high quality SNPs and 1008 indels polymorphisms with a frequency of 1.61 SNPs / 10 kbp. Of ESTs libraries generated from three ginger tissues together, rhizomes had a frequency of 0.32 SNPs and 0.03 indels per 10 kbp whereas the leaves had a frequency of 2.51 SNPs and 0.23 indels per 10 kbp and root is showing relative frequency of 0.76/10 kbp SNPs and 0.02/10 kbp indels. The present analysis provides additional information about the tissue wise presence of haplotypes (222), distribution of high quality exonic (2355) and intronic (6455) SNPs and information about singletons (7538) in addition to contigs transitions and transversions ratio (0.57). Among all tissue detected SNPs, transversions number is higher in comparison to the number of transitions. Quality SNPs detected in this work can be used as markers for further ginger genetic experiments. PMID:25848168

  7. High quality SNPs/Indels mining and characterization in ginger from ESTs data base

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Mahendra; Das, Aradhana; Subudhi, Enketeswara

    2015-01-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) is an important herb of the family Zingiberaceae. It is accepted as a universal cure for a multitude of diseases in Indian systems of medicine and its rhizomes are equally popular as a spice ingredient throughout Asia. SNPs, the definitive genetic markers, representing the finest resolution of a DNA sequence, are abundantly found in populations having a lower rate of mutation and are used for genomic analysis. The public ESTs sequences mostly lack quality files, making high quality SNPs detection more difficult since it is exclusively based on sequence comparisons. In the present study, current dbESTs of NCBI was mined and 38115 ginger ESTs sequences were obtained and assembled into contigs using CAP3 program. In this analysis, recent software tool QualitySNP was used to detect 11523 potential SNPs sites, 8810 high quality SNPs and 1008 indels polymorphisms with a frequency of 1.61 SNPs / 10 kbp. Of ESTs libraries generated from three ginger tissues together, rhizomes had a frequency of 0.32 SNPs and 0.03 indels per 10 kbp whereas the leaves had a frequency of 2.51 SNPs and 0.23 indels per 10 kbp and root is showing relative frequency of 0.76/10 kbp SNPs and 0.02/10 kbp indels. The present analysis provides additional information about the tissue wise presence of haplotypes (222), distribution of high quality exonic (2355) and intronic (6455) SNPs and information about singletons (7538) in addition to contigs transitions and transversions ratio (0.57). Among all tissue detected SNPs, transversions number is higher in comparison to the number of transitions. Quality SNPs detected in this work can be used as markers for further ginger genetic experiments. PMID:25848168

  8. SNiPlay: a web-based tool for detection, management and analysis of SNPs. Application to grapevine diversity projects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background High-throughput re-sequencing, new genotyping technologies and the availability of reference genomes allow the extensive characterization of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion/deletion events (indels) in many plant species. The rapidly increasing amount of re-sequencing and genotyping data generated by large-scale genetic diversity projects requires the development of integrated bioinformatics tools able to efficiently manage, analyze, and combine these genetic data with genome structure and external data. Results In this context, we developed SNiPlay, a flexible, user-friendly and integrative web-based tool dedicated to polymorphism discovery and analysis. It integrates: 1) a pipeline, freely accessible through the internet, combining existing softwares with new tools to detect SNPs and to compute different types of statistical indices and graphical layouts for SNP data. From standard sequence alignments, genotyping data or Sanger sequencing traces given as input, SNiPlay detects SNPs and indels events and outputs submission files for the design of Illumina's SNP chips. Subsequently, it sends sequences and genotyping data into a series of modules in charge of various processes: physical mapping to a reference genome, annotation (genomic position, intron/exon location, synonymous/non-synonymous substitutions), SNP frequency determination in user-defined groups, haplotype reconstruction and network, linkage disequilibrium evaluation, and diversity analysis (Pi, Watterson's Theta, Tajima's D). Furthermore, the pipeline allows the use of external data (such as phenotype, geographic origin, taxa, stratification) to define groups and compare statistical indices. 2) a database storing polymorphisms, genotyping data and grapevine sequences released by public and private projects. It allows the user to retrieve SNPs using various filters (such as genomic position, missing data, polymorphism type, allele frequency), to compare SNP patterns between populations, and to export genotyping data or sequences in various formats. Conclusions Our experiments on grapevine genetic projects showed that SNiPlay allows geneticists to rapidly obtain advanced results in several key research areas of plant genetic diversity. Both the management and treatment of large amounts of SNP data are rendered considerably easier for end-users through automation and integration. Current developments are taking into account new advances in high-throughput technologies. SNiPlay is available at: http://sniplay.cirad.fr/. PMID:21545712

  9. The role of complementary bipartite visual analytical representations in the analysis of SNPs: a case study

    E-print Network

    Bhavnani, Suresh K.

    -nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can help to classify subjects on the basis of their continental origins, with applications. This variation, resulting from millennia of natural selection and random drift, is coded in w20e30 million specific diseases2 and SNPs that are highly associated with continental origins. For example, several

  10. PATHOTYPING OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA BY ANALYSIS OF SNPS IN CYAA AND FLANKING 23S RIBOSOMAL SEQUENCES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The egg-contaminating phenotype of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis was linked to single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occurring in cyaA, which encodes adenylate cyclase that produces cAMP and pyrophosphate from ATP. Ribotyping indicated that SNPs in cyaA were linked to polymorphisms occur...

  11. selectSNP – An R package for selecting SNPs optimal for genetic evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a huge increase in the number of SNPs in the public repositories. This has made it a challenge to design low and medium density SNP panels, which requires careful selection of available SNPs considering many criteria, such as map position, allelic frequency, possible biological functi...

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER STRs vs. SNPs: thoughts on the future of forensic DNA testing

    E-print Network

    in specialized applications such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) testing, Y-SNPs as lineage markers, ancestry applications. Keywords DNA Á DNA typing Á DNA profiling Á Short tandem repeat Á Single nucleotide polymorphismORIGINAL PAPER STRs vs. SNPs: thoughts on the future of forensic DNA testing John M. Butler Æ

  13. Liver and adipose expression associated SNPs are enriched for association to Type 2 Diabetes

    E-print Network

    Yandell, Brian S.

    1 Liver and adipose expression associated SNPs are enriched for association to Type 2 Diabetes Hua the stringent level of association required to achieve genome-wide significance. Genetics of gene expression enriched for SNPs that associate with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in three large- scale GWAS than a matched set

  14. Double Sampling with Multiple Imputation to Answer Large Sample Meta-Research Questions: Introduction and Illustration by Evaluating Adherence to Two Simple CONSORT Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Capers, Patrice L.; Brown, Andrew W.; Dawson, John A.; Allison, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meta-research can involve manual retrieval and evaluation of research, which is resource intensive. Creation of high throughput methods (e.g., search heuristics, crowdsourcing) has improved feasibility of large meta-research questions, but possibly at the cost of accuracy. Objective: To evaluate the use of double sampling combined with multiple imputation (DS?+?MI) to address meta-research questions, using as an example adherence of PubMed entries to two simple consolidated standards of reporting trials guidelines for titles and abstracts. Methods: For the DS large sample, we retrieved all PubMed entries satisfying the filters: RCT, human, abstract available, and English language (n?=?322, 107). For the DS subsample, we randomly sampled 500 entries from the large sample. The large sample was evaluated with a lower rigor, higher throughput (RLOTHI) method using search heuristics, while the subsample was evaluated using a higher rigor, lower throughput (RHITLO) human rating method. Multiple imputation of the missing-completely at-random RHITLO data for the large sample was informed by: RHITLO data from the subsample; RLOTHI data from the large sample; whether a study was an RCT; and country and year of publication. Results: The RHITLO and RLOTHI methods in the subsample largely agreed (phi coefficients: title?=?1.00, abstract?=?0.92). Compliance with abstract and title criteria has increased over time, with non-US countries improving more rapidly. DS?+?MI logistic regression estimates were more precise than subsample estimates (e.g., 95% CI for change in title and abstract compliance by year: subsample RHITLO 1.050–1.174 vs. DS?+?MI 1.082–1.151). As evidence of improved accuracy, DS?+?MI coefficient estimates were closer to RHITLO than the large sample RLOTHI. Conclusion: Our results support our hypothesis that DS?+?MI would result in improved precision and accuracy. This method is flexible and may provide a practical way to examine large corpora of literature. PMID:25988135

  15. Inference from Multiple Imputation for Missing Data Using Mixtures of Normals

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Russell J.; Wang, Naisyin; Raftery, Adrian E.

    2010-01-01

    We consider two difficulties with standard multiple imputation methods for missing data based on Rubin's t method for confidence intervals: their often excessive width, and their instability. These problems are present most often when the number of copies is small, as is often the case when a data collection organization is making multiple completed datasets available for analysis. We suggest using mixtures of normals as an alternative to Rubin's t. We also examine the performance of improper imputation methods as an alternative to generating copies from the true posterior distribution for the missing observations. We report the results of simulation studies and analyses of data on health-related quality of life in which the methods suggested here gave narrower confidence intervals and more stable inferences, especially with small numbers of copies or non-normal posterior distributions of parameter estimates. A free R software package called MImix that implements our methods is available from CRAN. PMID:20454634

  16. Scoring the collective effects of SNPs: association of minor alleles with complex traits in model organisms.

    PubMed

    Yuan, DeJian; Zhu, ZuoBin; Tan, XiaoHua; Liang, Jie; Zeng, Chen; Zhang, JieGen; Chen, Jun; Ma, Long; Dogan, Ayca; Brockmann, Gudrun; Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva; Rice, Amanda D; Moyer, Richard W; Man, Xian; Yi, Ke; Li, YanKe; Lu, Qing; Huang, YiMin; Huang, Shi

    2014-09-01

    It has long been assumed that most parts of a genome and most genetic variations or SNPs are non-functional with regard to reproductive fitness. However, the collective effects of SNPs have yet to be examined by experimental science. We here developed a novel approach to examine the relationship between traits and the total amount of SNPs in panels of genetic reference populations. We identified the minor alleles (MAs) in each panel and the MA content (MAC) that each inbred strain carried for a set of SNPs with genotypes determined in these panels. MAC was nearly linearly linked to quantitative variations in numerous traits in model organisms, including life span, tumor susceptibility, learning and memory, sensitivity to alcohol and anti-psychotic drugs, and two correlated traits poor reproductive fitness and strong immunity. These results suggest that the collective effects of SNPs are functional and do affect reproductive fitness. PMID:25104319

  17. Thermal state of SNPS Topaz'' units: Calculation basing and experimental confirmation

    SciTech Connect

    Bogush, I.P.; Bushinsky, A.V.; Galkin, A.Y.; Serbin, V.I.; Zhabotinsky, E.E. )

    1991-01-01

    The ensuring thermal state parameters of thermionic space nuclear power system (SNPS) units in required limits on all operating regimes is a factor which determines SNPSs lifetime. The requirements to unit thermal state are distinguished to a marked degree, and both the corresponding units arragement in SNPS power generating module and the use of definite control algorithms, special thermal regulation and protection are neccessary for its provision. The computer codes which permit to define the thermal transient performances of liquid metal loop and main units had been elaborated for calculation basis of required SNPS Topaz'' unit thermal state. The conformity of these parameters to a given requirements are confirmed by results of autonomous unit tests, tests of mock-ups, power tests of ground SNPS prototypes and flight tests of two SNPS Topaz''.

  18. Normalization and missing value imputation for label-free LC-MS analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Karpievitch, Yuliya; Dabney, Alan R.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-11-05

    Shotgun proteomic data are affected by a variety of known and unknown systematic biases as well as high proportions of missing values. Typically, normalization is performed in an attempt to remove systematic biases from the data before statistical inference, sometimes followed by missing value imputation to obtain a complete matrix of intensities. Here we discuss several approaches to normalization and dealing with missing values, some initially developed for microarray data and some developed specifically for mass spectrometry-based data.

  19. RNA-Seq Uncovers SNPs and Alternative Splicing Events in Asian Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Xu, Liming; Liu, Yanling; Yang, Pingfang

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq is an efficient way to comprehensively identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and alternative splicing (AS) events from the expressed genes. In this study, we conducted transcriptome sequencing of four Asian lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) cultivars using Illumina HiSeq2000 platform to identify SNPs and AS events in lotus. A total of 505 million pair-end RNA-Seq reads were generated from four cultivars, of which 86% were mapped to the lotus reference genome. Using the four sets of data together, a total of 357,689 putative SNPs were identified with an average density of one SNP per 2.2 kb. These SNPs were located in 1,253 scaffolds and 15,016 expressed genes. A/G and C/T were the two major types of SNPs in the Asian lotus transcriptome. In parallel, a total of 177,540 AS events were detected in the four cultivars and were distributed in 64% of the expressed genes of lotus. The predominant type of AS events was alternative 5’ first exon, which accounted for 41.2% of all the observed AS events, and exon skipping only accounted for 4.3% of all AS. Gene Ontology analysis was conducted to analyze the function of the genes containing SNPs and AS events. Validation of selected SNPs and AS events revealed that 74% of SNPs and 80% of AS events were reliable, which indicates that RNA-Seq is an efficient approach to uncover gene-associated SNPs and AS events. A large number of SNPs and AS events identified in our study will facilitate further genetic and functional genomics research in lotus. PMID:25928215

  20. Missing data imputation of solar radiation data under different atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Turrado, Concepción Crespo; López, María Del Carmen Meizoso; Lasheras, Fernando Sánchez; Gómez, Benigno Antonio Rodríguez; Rollé, José Luis Calvo; Juez, Francisco Javier de Cos

    2014-01-01

    Global solar broadband irradiance on a planar surface is measured at weather stations by pyranometers. In the case of the present research, solar radiation values from nine meteorological stations of the MeteoGalicia real-time observational network, captured and stored every ten minutes, are considered. In this kind of record, the lack of data and/or the presence of wrong values adversely affects any time series study. Consequently, when this occurs, a data imputation process must be performed in order to replace missing data with estimated values. This paper aims to evaluate the multivariate imputation of ten-minute scale data by means of the chained equations method (MICE). This method allows the network itself to impute the missing or wrong data of a solar radiation sensor, by using either all or just a group of the measurements of the remaining sensors. Very good results have been obtained with the MICE method in comparison with other methods employed in this field such as Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR). The average RMSE value of the predictions for the MICE algorithm was 13.37% while that for the MLR it was 28.19%, and 31.68% for the IDW. PMID:25356644

  1. Missing value imputation on missing completely at random data using multilayer perceptrons.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ramírez, Esther-Lydia; Pino-Mejías, Rafael; López-Coello, Manuel; Cubiles-de-la-Vega, María-Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Data mining is based on data files which usually contain errors in the form of missing values. This paper focuses on a methodological framework for the development of an automated data imputation model based on artificial neural networks. Fifteen real and simulated data sets are exposed to a perturbation experiment, based on the random generation of missing values. These data set sizes range from 47 to 1389 records. A perturbation experiment was performed for each data set where the probability of missing value was set to 0.05. Several architectures and learning algorithms for the multilayer perceptron are tested and compared with three classic imputation procedures: mean/mode imputation, regression and hot-deck. The obtained results, considering different performance measures, not only suggest this approach improves the quality of a database with missing values, but also the best results are clearly obtained using the Multilayer Perceptron model in data sets with categorical variables. Three learning rules (Levenberg-Marquardt, BFGS Quasi-Newton and Conjugate Gradient Fletcher-Reeves Update) and a small number of hidden nodes are recommended. PMID:20875726

  2. Effects of Different Missing Data Imputation Techniques on the Performance of Undiagnosed Diabetes Risk Prediction Models in a Mixed-Ancestry Population of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Masconi, Katya L.; Matsha, Tandi E.; Erasmus, Rajiv T.; Kengne, Andre P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Imputation techniques used to handle missing data are based on the principle of replacement. It is widely advocated that multiple imputation is superior to other imputation methods, however studies have suggested that simple methods for filling missing data can be just as accurate as complex methods. The objective of this study was to implement a number of simple and more complex imputation methods, and assess the effect of these techniques on the performance of undiagnosed diabetes risk prediction models during external validation. Methods Data from the Cape Town Bellville-South cohort served as the basis for this study. Imputation methods and models were identified via recent systematic reviews. Models’ discrimination was assessed and compared using C-statistic and non-parametric methods, before and after recalibration through simple intercept adjustment. Results The study sample consisted of 1256 individuals, of whom 173 were excluded due to previously diagnosed diabetes. Of the final 1083 individuals, 329 (30.4%) had missing data. Family history had the highest proportion of missing data (25%). Imputation of the outcome, undiagnosed diabetes, was highest in stochastic regression imputation (163 individuals). Overall, deletion resulted in the lowest model performances while simple imputation yielded the highest C-statistic for the Cambridge Diabetes Risk model, Kuwaiti Risk model, Omani Diabetes Risk model and Rotterdam Predictive model. Multiple imputation only yielded the highest C-statistic for the Rotterdam Predictive model, which were matched by simpler imputation methods. Conclusions Deletion was confirmed as a poor technique for handling missing data. However, despite the emphasized disadvantages of simpler imputation methods, this study showed that implementing these methods results in similar predictive utility for undiagnosed diabetes when compared to multiple imputation. PMID:26406594

  3. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner (Pleasanton, CA)

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  4. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  5. SNPs in putative regulatory regions identified by human mouse comparative sequencing and transcription factor binding site data

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Poulabi; Bahlo, Melanie; Schwartz, Jody R.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Houston, Kathryn A.; Dubchak, Inna; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Genome wide disease association analysis using SNPs is being explored as a method for dissecting complex genetic traits and a vast number of SNPs have been generated for this purpose. As there are cost and throughput limitations of genotyping large numbers of SNPs and statistical issues regarding the large number of dependent tests on the same data set, to make association analysis practical it has been proposed that SNPs should be prioritized based on likely functional importance. The most easily identifiable functional SNPs are coding SNPs (cSNPs) and accordingly cSNPs have been screened in a number of studies. SNPs in gene regulatory sequences embedded in noncoding DNA are another class of SNPs suggested for prioritization due to their predicted quantitative impact on gene expression. The main challenge in evaluating these SNPs, in contrast to cSNPs is a lack of robust algorithms and databases for recognizing regulatory sequences in noncoding DNA. Approaches that have been previously used to delineate noncoding sequences with gene regulatory activity include cross-species sequence comparisons and the search for sequences recognized by transcription factors. We combined these two methods to sift through mouse human genomic sequences to identify putative gene regulatory elements and subsequently localized SNPs within these sequences in a 1 Megabase (Mb) region of human chromosome 5q31, orthologous to mouse chromosome 11 containing the Interleukin cluster.

  6. Imputation of sequence variants for identification of genetic risks for Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for Parkinson's disease have linked two loci (MAPT and SNCA) to risk of Parkinson's disease. We aimed to identify novel risk loci for Parkinson's disease. Methods We did a meta-analysis of datasets from five Parkinson's disease GWAS from the USA and Europe to identify loci associated with Parkinson's disease (discovery phase). We then did replication analyses of significantly associated loci in an independent sample series. Estimates of population-attributable risk were calculated from estimates from the discovery and replication phases combined, and risk-profile estimates for loci identified in the discovery phase were calculated. Findings The discovery phase consisted of 5333 case and 12-019 control samples, with genotyped and imputed data at 7-689-524 SNPs. The replication phase consisted of 7053 case and 9007 control samples. We identified 11 loci that surpassed the threshold for genome-wide significance (p<5×10?8). Six were previously identified loci (MAPT, SNCA, HLA-DRB5, BST1, GAK and LRRK2) and five were newly identified loci (ACMSD, STK39, MCCC1/LAMP3, SYT11, and CCDC62/HIP1R). The combined population-attributable risk was 60·3% (95% CI 43·7–69·3). In the risk-profile analysis, the odds ratio in the highest quintile of disease risk was 2·51 (95% CI 2·23–2·83) compared with 1·00 in the lowest quintile of disease risk. Interpretation These data provide an insight into the genetics of Parkinson's disease and the molecular cause of the disease and could provide future targets for therapies. Funding Wellcome Trust, National Institute on Aging, and US Department of Defense. PMID:21292315

  7. Genotype imputation accuracy in a F2 pig population using high density and low density SNP panels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background F2 resource populations have been used extensively to map QTL segregating between pig breeds. A limitation associated with the use of these resource populations for fine mapping of QTL is the reduced number of founding individuals and recombinations of founding haplotypes occurring in the population. These limitations, however, become advantageous when attempting to impute unobserved genotypes using within family segregation information. A trade-off would be to re-type F2 populations using high density SNP panels for founding individuals and low density panels (tagSNP) in F2 individuals followed by imputation. Subsequently a combined meta-analysis of several populations would provide adequate power and resolution for QTL mapping, and could be achieved at relatively low cost. Such a strategy allows the wealth of phenotypic information that has previously been obtained on experimental resource populations to be further mined for QTL identification. In this study we used experimental and simulated high density genotypes (HD-60K) from an F2 cross to estimate imputation accuracy under several genotyping scenarios. Results Selection of tagSNP using physical distance or linkage disequilibrium information produced similar imputation accuracies. In particular, tagSNP sets averaging 1 SNP every 2.1 Mb (1,200 SNP genome-wide) yielded imputation accuracies (IA) close to 0.97. If instead of using custom panels, the commercially available 9K chip is used in the F2, IA reaches 0.99. In order to attain such high imputation accuracy the F0 and F1 generations should be genotyped at high density. Alternatively, when only the F0 is genotyped at HD, while F1 and F2 are genotyped with a 9K panel, IA drops to 0.90. Conclusions Combining 60K and 9K panels with imputation in F2 populations is an appealing strategy to re-genotype existing populations at a fraction of the cost. PMID:23651538

  8. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Aquaspace H2OME Guardian Water Filter, available through Western Water International, Inc., reduces lead in water supplies. The filter is mounted on the faucet and the filter cartridge is placed in the "dead space" between sink and wall. This filter is one of several new filtration devices using the Aquaspace compound filter media, which combines company developed and NASA technology. Aquaspace filters are used in industrial, commercial, residential, and recreational environments as well as by developing nations where water is highly contaminated.

  9. Improved imputation of low-frequency and rare variants using the UK10K haplotype reference panel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Howie, Bryan; McCarthy, Shane; Memari, Yasin; Walter, Klaudia; Min, Josine L; Danecek, Petr; Malerba, Giovanni; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Gambaro, Giovanni; Richards, J Brent; Durbin, Richard; Timpson, Nicholas J; Marchini, Jonathan; Soranzo, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Imputing genotypes from reference panels created by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) provides a cost-effective strategy for augmenting the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) content of genome-wide arrays. The UK10K Cohorts project has generated a data set of 3,781 whole genomes sequenced at low depth (average 7x), aiming to exhaustively characterize genetic variation down to 0.1% minor allele frequency in the British population. Here we demonstrate the value of this resource for improving imputation accuracy at rare and low-frequency variants in both a UK and an Italian population. We show that large increases in imputation accuracy can be achieved by re-phasing WGS reference panels after initial genotype calling. We also present a method for combining WGS panels to improve variant coverage and downstream imputation accuracy, which we illustrate by integrating 7,562 WGS haplotypes from the UK10K project with 2,184 haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project. Finally, we introduce a novel approximation that maintains speed without sacrificing imputation accuracy for rare variants. PMID:26368830

  10. Improved imputation of low-frequency and rare variants using the UK10K haplotype reference panel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jie; Howie, Bryan; McCarthy, Shane; Memari, Yasin; Walter, Klaudia; Min, Josine L.; Danecek, Petr; Malerba, Giovanni; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Al Turki, Saeed; Amuzu, Antoinette; Anderson, Carl A.; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Artigas, María Soler; Ayub, Muhammad; Bala, Senduran; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Barroso, Inês; Beales, Phil; Benn, Marianne; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Birney, Ewan; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick F.; Bounds, Rebecca; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Pablo Casas, Juan; Chambers, John C.; Charlton, Ruth; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Ciampi, Antonio; Cirak, Sebahattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Cocca, Massimiliano; Collier, David A.; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Curtis, David; Daly, Allan; Day, Ian N. M.; Day-Williams, Aaron; Dedoussis, George; Down, Thomas; Du, Yuanping; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Dunham, Ian; Edkins, Sarah; Ekong, Rosemary; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David M.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, James; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Christopher S.; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gasparini, Paolo; Gaunt, Tom R.; Geihs, Matthias; Geschwind, Daniel; Greenwood, Celia; Griffin, Heather; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Guo, Xueqin; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey E.; Holmans, Peter; Huang, Liren; Hubbard, Tim; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Hysi, Pirro; Iotchkova, Valentina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, David K.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Johnson, Jon; Joyce, Chris; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John P.; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Keogh, Julia; Khawaja, Farrah; Kleber, Marcus E.; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Lachance, Genevieve; Langenberg, Claudia; Langford, Cordelia; Lawson, Daniel; Lee, Irene; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Lek, Monkol; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Liang, Jieqin; Lin, Hong; Liu, Ryan; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Luis R.; Lopes, Margarida; Luan, Jian'an; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Mangino, Massimo; Marenne, Gaëlle; März, Winfried; Maslen, John; Matchan, Angela; Mathieson, Iain; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McKechanie, Andrew G.; McQuillin, Andrew; Metrustry, Sarah; Migone, Nicola; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Morris, Richard; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael C.; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy R.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Payne, Stewart J.; Perry, John R. B.; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Pollitt, Rebecca C.; Povey, Sue; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Ridout, Cheryl K.; Ring, Susan; Ritchie, Graham R. S.; Roberts, Nicola; Robinson, Rachel L.; Savage, David B.; Scambler, Peter; Schiffels, Stephan; Schmidts, Miriam; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Scott, Richard H.; Scott, Robert A.; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Sharp, Sally I.; Shaw, Adam; Shihab, Hashem A.; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin S.; Smee, Carol; Smith, George Davey; Southam, Lorraine; Spasic-Boskovic, Olivera; Spector, Timothy D.; St Clair, David; St Pourcain, Beate; Stalker, Jim; Stevens, Elizabeth; Sun, Jianping; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Suvisaari, Jaana; Syrris, Petros; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Taylor, Rohan; Tian, Jing; Tobin, Martin D.; Toniolo, Daniela; Traglia, Michela; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Valdes, Ana M.; Vandersteen, Anthony M.; Varbo, Anette; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Visscher, Peter M.; Wain, Louise V.; Walters, James T. R.; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yu; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Eleanor; Whincup, Peter; Whyte, Tamieka; Williams, Hywel J.; Williamson, Kathleen A.; Wilson, Crispian; Wilson, Scott G.; Wong, Kim; Xu, ChangJiang; Yang, Jian; Zaza, Gianluigi; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Pingbo; Zhang, Weihua; Gambaro, Giovanni; Richards, J. Brent; Durbin, Richard; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Marchini, Jonathan; Soranzo, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Imputing genotypes from reference panels created by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) provides a cost-effective strategy for augmenting the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) content of genome-wide arrays. The UK10K Cohorts project has generated a data set of 3,781 whole genomes sequenced at low depth (average 7x), aiming to exhaustively characterize genetic variation down to 0.1% minor allele frequency in the British population. Here we demonstrate the value of this resource for improving imputation accuracy at rare and low-frequency variants in both a UK and an Italian population. We show that large increases in imputation accuracy can be achieved by re-phasing WGS reference panels after initial genotype calling. We also present a method for combining WGS panels to improve variant coverage and downstream imputation accuracy, which we illustrate by integrating 7,562 WGS haplotypes from the UK10K project with 2,184 haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project. Finally, we introduce a novel approximation that maintains speed without sacrificing imputation accuracy for rare variants. PMID:26368830

  11. Randomly and Non-Randomly Missing Renal Function Data in the Strong Heart Study: A Comparison of Imputation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Shara, Nawar; Yassin, Sayf A.; Valaitis, Eduardas; Wang, Hong; Howard, Barbara V.; Wang, Wenyu; Lee, Elisa T.; Umans, Jason G.

    2015-01-01

    Kidney and cardiovascular disease are widespread among populations with high prevalence of diabetes, such as American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Study (SHS). Studying these conditions simultaneously in longitudinal studies is challenging, because the morbidity and mortality associated with these diseases result in missing data, and these data are likely not missing at random. When such data are merely excluded, study findings may be compromised. In this article, a subset of 2264 participants with complete renal function data from Strong Heart Exams 1 (1989–1991), 2 (1993–1995), and 3 (1998–1999) was used to examine the performance of five methods used to impute missing data: listwise deletion, mean of serial measures, adjacent value, multiple imputation, and pattern-mixture. Three missing at random models and one non-missing at random model were used to compare the performance of the imputation techniques on randomly and non-randomly missing data. The pattern-mixture method was found to perform best for imputing renal function data that were not missing at random. Determining whether data are missing at random or not can help in choosing the imputation method that will provide the most accurate results. PMID:26414328

  12. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  13. Metallic Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Filtration technology originated in a mid 1960's NASA study. The results were distributed to the filter industry, an HR Textron responded, using the study as a departure for the development of 421 Filter Media. The HR system is composed of ultrafine steel fibers metallurgically bonded and compressed so that the pore structure is locked in place. The filters are used to filter polyesters, plastics, to remove hydrocarbon streams, etc. Several major companies use the product in chemical applications, pollution control, etc.

  14. SNP-Seek database of SNPs derived from 3000 rice genomes.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Nickolai; Tai, Shuaishuai; Wang, Wensheng; Mansueto, Locedie; Palis, Kevin; Fuentes, Roven Rommel; Ulat, Victor Jun; Chebotarov, Dmytro; Zhang, Gengyun; Li, Zhikang; Mauleon, Ramil; Hamilton, Ruaraidh Sackville; McNally, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    We have identified about 20 million rice SNPs by aligning reads from the 3000 rice genomes project with the Nipponbare genome. The SNPs and allele information are organized into a SNP-Seek system (http://www.oryzasnp.org/iric-portal/), which consists of Oracle database having a total number of rows with SNP genotypes close to 60 billion (20 M SNPs × 3 K rice lines) and web interface for convenient querying. The database allows quick retrieving of SNP alleles for all varieties in a given genome region, finding different alleles from predefined varieties and querying basic passport and morphological phenotypic information about sequenced rice lines. SNPs can be visualized together with the gene structures in JBrowse genome browser. Evolutionary relationships between rice varieties can be explored using phylogenetic trees or multidimensional scaling plots. PMID:25429973

  15. Effect of vitamin E and SNPs at cytokine genes on cytokine production in the elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E (E) impacts cytokine production, yet individual response to E supplementation varies. Studies show cytokine production is heritable. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may explain differences in cytokine production between individuals. We hypothesize that differential response t...

  16. NEAFS Y-mtDNA Workshop (Butler and Coble) Background and Y-SNPs

    E-print Network

    ://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/training.htm 1 Y-Chromosome and Mitochondrial DNA Analysis NEAFS 2006 Workshop Rye Brook, NY November 1, 2006 Dr. John M. Butler Dr. Michael D. Coble The Human Y-Chromosome: Background and Y-SNPs john.butler@nist.gov Michael.Coble@afip.osd.mil Presentation Outline · Characteristics of the Y-Chromosome and Y-SNPs · Y

  17. Using Multiple Imputations to Accommodate Time-Outs in Online Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Andy; McClure, Jennifer B

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurately estimating the period of time that individuals are exposed to online intervention content is important for understanding program engagement. This can be calculated from time-stamped data reflecting navigation to and from individual webpages. Prolonged periods of inactivity are commonly handled with a time-out feature and assigned a prespecified exposure duration. Unfortunately, this practice can lead to biased results describing program exposure. Objective The aim of the study was to describe how multiple imputations can be used to better account for the time spent viewing webpages that result in a prolonged period of inactivity or a time-out. Methods To illustrate this method, we present data on time-outs collected from the Q2 randomized smoking cessation trial. For this analysis, we evaluate the effects on intervention exposure of receiving content written in a prescriptive versus motivational tone. Using multiple imputations, we created five complete datasets in which the time spent viewing webpages that resulted in a time-out were replaced with values estimated with imputation models. We calculated standard errors using Rubin’s formulas to account for the variability due to the imputations. We also illustrate how current methods of accounting for time-outs (excluding timed-out page views or assigning an arbitrary viewing time) can influence conclusions about participant engagement. Results A total of 63.00% (1175/1865) of participants accessed the online intervention in the Q2 trial. Of the 6592 unique page views, 683 (10.36%, 683/6592) resulted in a time-out. The median time spent viewing webpages that did not result in a time-out was 1.07 minutes. Assuming participants did not spend any time viewing a webpage that resulted in a time-out, no difference between the two message tones was observed (ratio of mean time online: 0.87, 95% CI 0.75-1.02). Assigning 30 minutes of viewing time to all page views that resulted in a time-out concludes that participants who received content in a motivational tone spent less time viewing content (ratio of mean time online: 0.86, 95% CI 0.77-0.98) than those participants who received content in a prescriptive tone. Using multiple imputations to account for time-outs concludes that there is no difference in participant engagement between the two message tones (ratio of mean time online: 0.87; 95% CI 0.75-1.01). Conclusions The analytic technique chosen can significantly affect conclusions about online intervention engagement. We propose a standardized methodology in which time spent viewing webpages that result in a time-out is treated as missing information and corrected with multiple imputations. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00992264; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00992264 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Kw5m8EkP). PMID:24263289

  18. Verification of SNPs Associated with Growth Traits in Two Populations of Farmed Atlantic Salmon.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsin Y; Hamilton, Alastair; Guy, Derrick R; Tinch, Alan E; Bishop, Steve C; Houston, Ross D

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between genetic variants and traits of economic importance in aquaculture species is pertinent to selective breeding programmes. High-throughput sequencing technologies have enabled the discovery of large numbers of SNPs in Atlantic salmon, and high density SNP arrays now exist. A previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a high density SNP array (132K SNPs) has revealed the polygenic nature of early growth traits in salmon, but has also identified candidate SNPs showing suggestive associations with these traits. The aim of this study was to test the association of the candidate growth-associated SNPs in a separate population of farmed Atlantic salmon to verify their effects. Identifying SNP-trait associations in two populations provides evidence that the associations are true and robust. Using a large cohort (N = 1152), we successfully genotyped eight candidate SNPs from the previous GWAS, two of which were significantly associated with several growth and fillet traits measured at harvest. The genes proximal to these SNPs were identified by alignment to the salmon reference genome and are discussed in the context of their potential role in underpinning genetic variation in salmon growth. PMID:26703584

  19. Allelic expression mapping across cellular lineages to establish impact of non-coding SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Adoue, Veronique; Schiavi, Alicia; Light, Nicholas; Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson; Lundmark, Per; Ge, Bing; Kwan, Tony; Caron, Maxime; Rönnblom, Lars; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Shu-Huang; Goodall, Alison H; Cambien, Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Ouwehand, Willem H; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Pastinen, Tomi

    2014-01-01

    Most complex disease-associated genetic variants are located in non-coding regions and are therefore thought to be regulatory in nature. Association mapping of differential allelic expression (AE) is a powerful method to identify SNPs with direct cis-regulatory impact (cis-rSNPs). We used AE mapping to identify cis-rSNPs regulating gene expression in 55 and 63 HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines from a Caucasian and an African population, respectively, 70 fibroblast cell lines, and 188 purified monocyte samples and found 40–60% of these cis-rSNPs to be shared across cell types. We uncover a new class of cis-rSNPs, which disrupt footprint-derived de novo motifs that are predominantly bound by repressive factors and are implicated in disease susceptibility through overlaps with GWAS SNPs. Finally, we provide the proof-of-principle for a new approach for genome-wide functional validation of transcription factor–SNP interactions. By perturbing NF?B action in lymphoblasts, we identified 489 cis-regulated transcripts with altered AE after NF?B perturbation. Altogether, we perform a comprehensive analysis of cis-variation in four cell populations and provide new tools for the identification of functional variants associated to complex diseases. PMID:25326100

  20. Allelic expression mapping across cellular lineages to establish impact of non-coding SNPs.

    PubMed

    Adoue, Veronique; Schiavi, Alicia; Light, Nicholas; Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson; Lundmark, Per; Ge, Bing; Kwan, Tony; Caron, Maxime; Rönnblom, Lars; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Shu-Huang; Goodall, Alison H; Cambien, Francois; Deloukas, Panos; Ouwehand, Willem H; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Pastinen, Tomi

    2014-01-01

    Most complex disease-associated genetic variants are located in non-coding regions and are therefore thought to be regulatory in nature. Association mapping of differential allelic expression (AE) is a powerful method to identify SNPs with direct cis-regulatory impact (cis-rSNPs). We used AE mapping to identify cis-rSNPs regulating gene expression in 55 and 63 HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines from a Caucasian and an African population, respectively, 70 fibroblast cell lines, and 188 purified monocyte samples and found 40-60% of these cis-rSNPs to be shared across cell types. We uncover a new class of cis-rSNPs, which disrupt footprint-derived de novo motifs that are predominantly bound by repressive factors and are implicated in disease susceptibility through overlaps with GWAS SNPs. Finally, we provide the proof-of-principle for a new approach for genome-wide functional validation of transcription factor-SNP interactions. By perturbing NF?B action in lymphoblasts, we identified 489 cis-regulated transcripts with altered AE after NF?B perturbation. Altogether, we perform a comprehensive analysis of cis-variation in four cell populations and provide new tools for the identification of functional variants associated to complex diseases. PMID:25326100

  1. All SNPs Are Not Created Equal: Genome-Wide Association Studies Reveal a Consistent Pattern of Enrichment among Functionally Annotated SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Schork, Andrew J.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Pham, Phillip; Torkamani, Ali; Roddey, J. Cooper; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Kelsoe, John R.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Furberg, Helena; Schork, Nicholas J.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Dale, Anders M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent results indicate that genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have the potential to explain much of the heritability of common complex phenotypes, but methods are lacking to reliably identify the remaining associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We applied stratified False Discovery Rate (sFDR) methods to leverage genic enrichment in GWAS summary statistics data to uncover new loci likely to replicate in independent samples. Specifically, we use linkage disequilibrium-weighted annotations for each SNP in combination with nominal p-values to estimate the True Discovery Rate (TDR?=?1?FDR) for strata determined by different genic categories. We show a consistent pattern of enrichment of polygenic effects in specific annotation categories across diverse phenotypes, with the greatest enrichment for SNPs tagging regulatory and coding genic elements, little enrichment in introns, and negative enrichment for intergenic SNPs. Stratified enrichment directly leads to increased TDR for a given p-value, mirrored by increased replication rates in independent samples. We show this in independent Crohn's disease GWAS, where we find a hundredfold variation in replication rate across genic categories. Applying a well-established sFDR methodology we demonstrate the utility of stratification for improving power of GWAS in complex phenotypes, with increased rejection rates from 20% in height to 300% in schizophrenia with traditional FDR and sFDR both fixed at 0.05. Our analyses demonstrate an inherent stratification among GWAS SNPs with important conceptual implications that can be leveraged by statistical methods to improve the discovery of loci. PMID:23637621

  2. A comparison of selected parametric and imputation methods for estimating snag density and snag quality attributes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eskelson, Bianca N.I.; Hagar, Joan; Temesgen, Hailemariam

    2012-01-01

    Snags (standing dead trees) are an essential structural component of forests. Because wildlife use of snags depends on size and decay stage, snag density estimation without any information about snag quality attributes is of little value for wildlife management decision makers. Little work has been done to develop models that allow multivariate estimation of snag density by snag quality class. Using climate, topography, Landsat TM data, stand age and forest type collected for 2356 forested Forest Inventory and Analysis plots in western Washington and western Oregon, we evaluated two multivariate techniques for their abilities to estimate density of snags by three decay classes. The density of live trees and snags in three decay classes (D1: recently dead, little decay; D2: decay, without top, some branches and bark missing; D3: extensive decay, missing bark and most branches) with diameter at breast height (DBH) ? 12.7 cm was estimated using a nonparametric random forest nearest neighbor imputation technique (RF) and a parametric two-stage model (QPORD), for which the number of trees per hectare was estimated with a Quasipoisson model in the first stage and the probability of belonging to a tree status class (live, D1, D2, D3) was estimated with an ordinal regression model in the second stage. The presence of large snags with DBH ? 50 cm was predicted using a logistic regression and RF imputation. Because of the more homogenous conditions on private forest lands, snag density by decay class was predicted with higher accuracies on private forest lands than on public lands, while presence of large snags was more accurately predicted on public lands, owing to the higher prevalence of large snags on public lands. RF outperformed the QPORD model in terms of percent accurate predictions, while QPORD provided smaller root mean square errors in predicting snag density by decay class. The logistic regression model achieved more accurate presence/absence classification of large snags than the RF imputation approach. Adjusting the decision threshold to account for unequal size for presence and absence classes is more straightforward for the logistic regression than for the RF imputation approach. Overall, model accuracies were poor in this study, which can be attributed to the poor predictive quality of the explanatory variables and the large range of forest types and geographic conditions observed in the data.

  3. Missing data imputation on the 5-year survival prediction of breast cancer patients with unknown discrete values.

    PubMed

    García-Laencina, Pedro J; Abreu, Pedro Henriques; Abreu, Miguel Henriques; Afonoso, Noémia

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Using historical patient information stored in clinical datasets, data mining and machine learning approaches can be applied to predict the survival of breast cancer patients. A common drawback is the absence of information, i.e., missing data, in certain clinical trials. However, most standard prediction methods are not able to handle incomplete samples and, then, missing data imputation is a widely applied approach for solving this inconvenience. Therefore, and taking into account the characteristics of each breast cancer dataset, it is required to perform a detailed analysis to determine the most appropriate imputation and prediction methods in each clinical environment. This research work analyzes a real breast cancer dataset from Institute Portuguese of Oncology of Porto with a high percentage of unknown categorical information (most clinical data of the patients are incomplete), which is a challenge in terms of complexity. Four scenarios are evaluated: (I) 5-year survival prediction without imputation and 5-year survival prediction from cleaned dataset with (II) Mode imputation, (III) Expectation-Maximization imputation and (IV) K-Nearest Neighbors imputation. Prediction models for breast cancer survivability are constructed using four different methods: K-Nearest Neighbors, Classification Trees, Logistic Regression and Support Vector Machines. Experiments are performed in a nested ten-fold cross-validation procedure and, according to the obtained results, the best results are provided by the K-Nearest Neighbors algorithm: more than 81% of accuracy and more than 0.78 of area under the Receiver Operator Characteristic curve, which constitutes very good results in this complex scenario. PMID:25725446

  4. Imputation by the mean score should be avoided when validating a Patient Reported Outcomes questionnaire by a Rasch model in presence of informative missing data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nowadays, more and more clinical scales consisting in responses given by the patients to some items (Patient Reported Outcomes - PRO), are validated with models based on Item Response Theory, and more specifically, with a Rasch model. In the validation sample, presence of missing data is frequent. The aim of this paper is to compare sixteen methods for handling the missing data (mainly based on simple imputation) in the context of psychometric validation of PRO by a Rasch model. The main indexes used for validation by a Rasch model are compared. Methods A simulation study was performed allowing to consider several cases, notably the possibility for the missing values to be informative or not and the rate of missing data. Results Several imputations methods produce bias on psychometrical indexes (generally, the imputation methods artificially improve the psychometric qualities of the scale). In particular, this is the case with the method based on the Personal Mean Score (PMS) which is the most commonly used imputation method in practice. Conclusions Several imputation methods should be avoided, in particular PMS imputation. From a general point of view, it is important to use an imputation method that considers both the ability of the patient (measured for example by his/her score), and the difficulty of the item (measured for example by its rate of favourable responses). Another recommendation is to always consider the addition of a random process in the imputation method, because such a process allows reducing the bias. Last, the analysis realized without imputation of the missing data (available case analyses) is an interesting alternative to the simple imputation in this context. PMID:21756330

  5. SNPs for Parentage Testing and Traceability in Globally Diverse Breeds of Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Michael P.; Leymaster, Kreg A.; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S.; Kijas, James W.; Clarke, Shannon M.; McEwan, John; Maddox, Jillian F.; Basnayake, Veronica; Petrik, Dustin T.; Simpson, Barry; Smith, Timothy P. L.; Chitko-McKown, Carol G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-based parentage determination accelerates genetic improvement in sheep by increasing pedigree accuracy. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers can be used for determining parentage and to provide unique molecular identifiers for tracing sheep products to their source. However, the utility of a particular “parentage SNP” varies by breed depending on its minor allele frequency (MAF) and its sequence context. Our aims were to identify parentage SNPs with exceptional qualities for use in globally diverse breeds and to develop a subset for use in North American sheep. Starting with genotypes from 2,915 sheep and 74 breed groups provided by the International Sheep Genomics Consortium (ISGC), we analyzed 47,693 autosomal SNPs by multiple criteria and selected 163 with desirable properties for parentage testing. On average, each of the 163 SNPs was highly informative (MAF?0.3) in 48±5 breed groups. Nearby polymorphisms that could otherwise confound genetic testing were identified by whole genome and Sanger sequencing of 166 sheep from 54 breed groups. A genetic test with 109 of the 163 parentage SNPs was developed for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The scoring rates and accuracies for these 109 SNPs were greater than 99% in a panel of North American sheep. In a blinded set of 96 families (sire, dam, and non-identical twin lambs), each parent of every lamb was identified without using the other parent’s genotype. In 74 ISGC breed groups, the median estimates for probability of a coincidental match between two animals (PI), and the fraction of potential adults excluded from parentage (PE) were 1.1×10(?39) and 0.999987, respectively, for the 109 SNPs combined. The availability of a well-characterized set of 163 parentage SNPs facilitates the development of high-throughput genetic technologies for implementing accurate and economical parentage testing and traceability in many of the world’s sheep breeds. PMID:24740156

  6. Subspace Learning and Imputation for Streaming Big Data Matrices and Tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardani, Morteza; Mateos, Gonzalo; Giannakis, Georgios B.

    2015-05-01

    Extracting latent low-dimensional structure from high-dimensional data is of paramount importance in timely inference tasks encountered with `Big Data' analytics. However, increasingly noisy, heterogeneous, and incomplete datasets as well as the need for {\\em real-time} processing of streaming data pose major challenges to this end. In this context, the present paper permeates benefits from rank minimization to scalable imputation of missing data, via tracking low-dimensional subspaces and unraveling latent (possibly multi-way) structure from \\emph{incomplete streaming} data. For low-rank matrix data, a subspace estimator is proposed based on an exponentially-weighted least-squares criterion regularized with the nuclear norm. After recasting the non-separable nuclear norm into a form amenable to online optimization, real-time algorithms with complementary strengths are developed and their convergence is established under simplifying technical assumptions. In a stationary setting, the asymptotic estimates obtained offer the well-documented performance guarantees of the {\\em batch} nuclear-norm regularized estimator. Under the same unifying framework, a novel online (adaptive) algorithm is developed to obtain multi-way decompositions of \\emph{low-rank tensors} with missing entries, and perform imputation as a byproduct. Simulated tests with both synthetic as well as real Internet and cardiac magnetic resonance imagery (MRI) data confirm the efficacy of the proposed algorithms, and their superior performance relative to state-of-the-art alternatives.

  7. Maximum likelihood, multiple imputation and regression calibration for measurement error adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Karen; Natarajan, Loki

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY In epidemiologic studies of exposure-disease association, often only a surrogate measure of exposure is available for the majority of the sample. A validation sub-study may be conducted to estimate the relation between the surrogate measure and true exposure levels. In this article, we discuss three methods of estimation for such a main study / validation study design: (i) maximum likelihood (ML), (ii) multiple imputation (MI) and (iii) regression calibration (RC). For logistic regression, we show how each method depends on a different numerical approximation to the likelihood, and we adapt standard software to compute both multiple imputation and maximum likelihood estimates. We use simulation to compare the performance of the estimators for both realistic and extreme settings, and for both internal and external validation designs. Our results indicate that with large measurement error or large enough sample sizes, ML performs as well or better than MI and RC. However, for smaller measurement error and small sample sizes, either ML or RC may have the advantage. Interestingly, in most cases the relative advantage of RC versus ML was determined by the relative variance rather than bias of the estimators. Software code for all three methods in SAS is provided. PMID:18937275

  8. Multiple imputation of missing covariates in NONMEM and evaluation of the method's sensitivity to ?-shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Åsa M; Karlsson, Mats O

    2013-10-01

    Multiple imputation (MI) is an approach widely used in statistical analysis of incomplete data. However, its application to missing data problems in nonlinear mixed-effects modelling is limited. The objective was to implement a four-step MI method for handling missing covariate data in NONMEM and to evaluate the method's sensitivity to ?-shrinkage. Four steps were needed; (1) estimation of empirical Bayes estimates (EBEs) using a base model without the partly missing covariate, (2) a regression model for the covariate values given the EBEs from subjects with covariate information, (3) imputation of covariates using the regression model and (4) estimation of the population model. Steps (3) and (4) were repeated several times. The procedure was automated in PsN and is now available as the mimp functionality ( http://psn.sourceforge.net/ ). The method's sensitivity to shrinkage in EBEs was evaluated in a simulation study where the covariate was missing according to a missing at random type of missing data mechanism. The ?-shrinkage was increased in steps from 4.5 to 54%. Two hundred datasets were simulated and analysed for each scenario. When shrinkage was low the MI method gave unbiased and precise estimates of all population parameters. With increased shrinkage the estimates became less precise but remained unbiased. PMID:23868748

  9. A multiple imputation approach for clustered interval-censored survival data.

    PubMed

    Lam, K F; Xu, Ying; Cheung, Tak-Lun

    2010-03-15

    Multivariate interval-censored failure time data arise commonly in many studies of epidemiology and biomedicine. Analysis of these type of data is more challenging than the right-censored data. We propose a simple multiple imputation strategy to recover the order of occurrences based on the interval-censored event times using a conditional predictive distribution function derived from a parametric gamma random effects model. By imputing the interval-censored failure times, the estimation of the regression and dependence parameters in the context of a gamma frailty proportional hazards model using the well-developed EM algorithm is made possible. A robust estimator for the covariance matrix is suggested to adjust for the possible misspecification of the parametric baseline hazard function. The finite sample properties of the proposed method are investigated via simulation. The performance of the proposed method is highly satisfactory, whereas the computation burden is minimal. The proposed method is also applied to the diabetic retinopathy study (DRS) data for illustration purpose and the estimates are compared with those based on other existing methods for bivariate grouped survival data. PMID:20069624

  10. Filtering apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Monroeville, PA); Dilmore, William J. (Murrysville, PA)

    1992-01-01

    A vertical vessel having a lower inlet and an upper outlet enclosure separated by a main horizontal tube sheet. The inlet enclosure receives the flue gas from a boiler of a power system and the outlet enclosure supplies cleaned gas to the turbines. The inlet enclosure contains a plurality of particulate-removing clusters, each having a plurality of filter units. Each filter unit includes a filter clean-gas chamber defined by a plate and a perforated auxiliary tube sheet with filter tubes suspended from each tube sheet and a tube connected to each chamber for passing cleaned gas to the outlet enclosure. The clusters are suspended from the main tube sheet with their filter units extending vertically and the filter tubes passing through the tube sheet and opening in the outlet enclosure. The flue gas is circulated about the outside surfaces of the filter tubes and the particulate is absorbed in the pores of the filter tubes. Pulses to clean the filter tubes are passed through their inner holes through tubes free of bends which are aligned with the tubes that pass the clean gas.

  11. Filtering apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Haldipur, G.B.; Dilmore, W.J.

    1992-09-01

    A vertical vessel is described having a lower inlet and an upper outlet enclosure separated by a main horizontal tube sheet. The inlet enclosure receives the flue gas from a boiler of a power system and the outlet enclosure supplies cleaned gas to the turbines. The inlet enclosure contains a plurality of particulate-removing clusters, each having a plurality of filter units. Each filter unit includes a filter clean-gas chamber defined by a plate and a perforated auxiliary tube sheet with filter tubes suspended from each tube sheet and a tube connected to each chamber for passing cleaned gas to the outlet enclosure. The clusters are suspended from the main tube sheet with their filter units extending vertically and the filter tubes passing through the tube sheet and opening in the outlet enclosure. The flue gas is circulated about the outside surfaces of the filter tubes and the particulate is absorbed in the pores of the filter tubes. Pulses to clean the filter tubes are passed through their inner holes through tubes free of bends which are aligned with the tubes that pass the clean gas. 18 figs.

  12. TNF? and IL10 SNPs act together to predict disease behaviour in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, E; Eri, R; Hume, G; Johnstone, S; Pandeya, N; Lincoln, D; Templeton, D; Radford-Smith, G

    2005-01-01

    Background: The cytokines tumour necrosis factor (TNF)? and interleukin (IL)10 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD), with increased concentrations reported in patients with active disease. However, limited data exist on their effects on disease phenotype in the same population. Certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the promoter region of the IL10 (-1082G/A, -592C/A) and TNF? (-308G/A, -857C/T) genes have been associated with altered levels of circulating IL10 and TNF?. Methods: We conducted an Australian based case–control study (304 CD patients; 231 healthy controls) of these four SNPs. Further investigation of two SNPs was conducted using a logistic regression analysis. Results: We identified a possible association of both IL10 SNPs and TNF?-857 with CD. Further investigation of a relationship with disease severity showed a significant association of higher producing IL10-1082G and TNF?-857C alleles with stricturing behaviour, which was strongest when these alleles were combined and persisted after multivariate analysis (p = 0.007; odds ratio (OR) 2.37, 95% CI 1.26 to 4.43). In addition, the TNF?-857CC genotype was independently associated with familial CD (p = 0.03; OR 3.12; 95% CI 1.15 to 8.46). Conclusion: These two SNPs may help to predict disease behaviour in CD patients, which may be clinically useful in shaping treatment of the disease at an earlier stage. PMID:15937090

  13. Bayesian integration of genetics and epigenetics detects causal regulatory SNPs underlying expression variability

    PubMed Central

    Das, Avinash; Morley, Michael; Moravec, Christine S.; Tang, W. H. W.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ashley, Euan A.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Hu, Ray; Li, Mingyao; Li, Hongzhe; Liu, Yichuan; Qu, Liming; Sanchez, Pablo; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Jensen, Shane; Hannenhalli, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    The standard expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) detects polymorphisms associated with gene expression without revealing causality. We introduce a coupled Bayesian regression approach—eQTeL, which leverages epigenetic data to estimate regulatory and gene interaction potential, and identifies combination of regulatory single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that explain the gene expression variance. On human heart data, eQTeL not only explains a significantly greater proportion of expression variance but also predicts gene expression more accurately than other methods. Based on realistic simulated data, we demonstrate that eQTeL accurately detects causal regulatory SNPs, including those with small effect sizes. Using various functional data, we show that SNPs detected by eQTeL are enriched for allele-specific protein binding and histone modifications, which potentially disrupt binding of core cardiac transcription factors and are spatially proximal to their target. eQTeL SNPs capture a substantial proportion of genetic determinants of expression variance and we estimate that 58% of these SNPs are putatively causal. PMID:26456756

  14. Bioinformatics prioritization of SNPs perturbing microRNA regulation of hematological malignancy-implicated genes.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Hamid; Bastami, Milad; Zare-Abdollahi, Davood; Alipoor, Behnam; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Mirfakhraie, Reza; Omrani, Mir Davood; Masotti, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The contribution of microRNAs (miRNAs) to cancer has been extensively investigated and it became obvious that a strict regulation of miRNA-mRNA regulatory network is crucial for safeguarding cell health. Apart from the direct impact of miRNA dysregulation in cancer pathogenesis, genetic variations in miRNAs are likely to disrupt miRNA-target interaction. Indeed, many evidences suggested that SNPs within miRNA regulome are associated with the development of different hematological malignancies. However, a full catalog of SNPs within miRNAs target sites of genes relevant to hematopoiesis and hematological malignancies is still lacking. Accordingly, we aimed to systematically identify and characterize such SNPs and provide a prioritized list of most potentially disrupting SNPs. Although in the present study we did not address the functional significance of these potential disturbing variants, we believe that our compiled results will be valuable for researchers interested in determining the role of target-SNPs in the development of hematological malignancies. PMID:26520014

  15. Thiopurine pharmacogenomics: association of SNPs with clinical response and functional validation of candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Matimba, Alice; Li, Fang; Livshits, Alina; Cartwright, Cher S; Scully, Stephen; Fridley, Brooke L; Jenkins, Gregory; Batzler, Anthony; Wang, Liewei; Weinshilboum, Richard; Lennard, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Aim We investigated candidate genes associated with thiopurine metabolism and clinical response in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Materials & methods We performed genome-wide SNP association studies of 6-thioguanine and 6-mercaptopurine cytotoxicity using lymphoblastoid cell lines. We then genotyped the top SNPs associated with lymphoblastoid cell line cytotoxicity, together with tagSNPs for genes in the ‘thiopurine pathway’ (686 total SNPs), in DNA from 589 Caucasian UK ALL97 patients. Functional validation studies were performed by siRNA knockdown in cancer cell lines. Results SNPs in the thiopurine pathway genes ABCC4, ABCC5, IMPDH1, ITPA, SLC28A3 and XDH, and SNPs located within or near ATP6AP2, FRMD4B, GNG2, KCNMA1 and NME1, were associated with clinical response and measures of thiopurine metabolism. Functional validation showed shifts in cytotoxicity for these genes. Conclusion The clinical response to thiopurines may be regulated by variation in known thiopurine pathway genes and additional novel genes outside of the thiopurine pathway. PMID:24624911

  16. Improved feature-based prediction of SNPs in human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Xiong, Yi; Zhang, Zhuo-Yu; Guo, Quan; Xu, Qin; Liow, Hien-Haw; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2015-03-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) make up the most common form of mutations in human cytochrome P450 enzymes family, and have the potential to bring with different drug responses or specific diseases in individual patients. Here, based on machine learning technology, we aim to explore an effective set of sequence-based features for improving prediction of SNPs by using support vector machine algorithms. The features are derived from the target residues and flanking protein sequences, such as amino acid types, sequences composition, physicochemical properties, position-specific scoring matrix, phylogenetic entropy and the number of possible codons of target residues. In order to deal with the imbalance data with a majority of non-SNPs and a minority of SNPs, a preprocessing strategy based on fuzzy set theory was applied to the datasets. Our final model achieves the performance of 93.8% in sensitivity, 88.8% in specificity, 91.3% in accuracy and 0.971 of AUC value, which is significantly higher than the previous DNA sequence-based or protein sequence-based methods. Furthermore, our study also suggested the roles of individual features for prediction of SNPs. The most important features consist of the amino acid type, the number of available codons, position-specific scoring matrix and phylogenetic entropy. The improved model will be a promising tool for SNP predictions, and assist in the research of genome mutation and personalized prescriptions. PMID:25792441

  17. Partition dataset according to amino acid type improves the prediction of deleterious non-synonymous SNPs

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Shanghai Center for Bioinformation Technology, Shanghai 200235 ; Li, Yi-Xue; Shanghai Center for Bioinformation Technology, Shanghai 200235 ; Ye, Zhi-Qiang; Key Laboratory of Systems Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper dataset partition can improve the prediction of deleterious nsSNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partition according to original residue type at nsSNP is a good criterion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar strategy is supposed promising in other machine learning problems. -- Abstract: Many non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) are associated with diseases, and numerous machine learning methods have been applied to train classifiers for sorting disease-associated nsSNPs from neutral ones. The continuously accumulated nsSNP data allows us to further explore better prediction approaches. In this work, we partitioned the training data into 20 subsets according to either original or substituted amino acid type at the nsSNP site. Using support vector machine (SVM), training classification models on each subset resulted in an overall accuracy of 76.3% or 74.9% depending on the two different partition criteria, while training on the whole dataset obtained an accuracy of only 72.6%. Moreover, the dataset was also randomly divided into 20 subsets, but the corresponding accuracy was only 73.2%. Our results demonstrated that partitioning the whole training dataset into subsets properly, i.e., according to the residue type at the nsSNP site, will improve the performance of the trained classifiers significantly, which should be valuable in developing better tools for predicting the disease-association of nsSNPs.

  18. Imputation of single nucleotide polymorhpism genotypes of Hereford cattle: reference panel size, family relationship and population structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study is to investigate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes imputation of Hereford cattle. Purebred Herefords were from two sources, Line 1 Hereford (N=240) and representatives of Industry Herefords (N=311). Using different reference panels of 62 and 494 males with 1...

  19. Genetic variance estimation with imputed variants finds negligible missing heritability for human height and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Bakshi, Andrew; Zhu, Zhihong; Hemani, Gibran; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Lee, Sang Hong; Robinson, Matthew R; Perry, John R B; Nolte, Ilja M; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Snieder, Harold; Esko, Tonu; Milani, Lili; Mägi, Reedik; Metspalu, Andres; Hamsten, Anders; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ingelsson, Erik; Soranzo, Nicole; Keller, Matthew C; Wray, Naomi R; Goddard, Michael E; Visscher, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    We propose a method (GREML-LDMS) to estimate heritability for human complex traits in unrelated individuals using whole-genome sequencing data. We demonstrate using simulations based on whole-genome sequencing data that ?97% and ?68% of variation at common and rare variants, respectively, can be captured by imputation. Using the GREML-LDMS method, we estimate from 44,126 unrelated individuals that all ?17 million imputed variants explain 56% (standard error (s.e.) = 2.3%) of variance for height and 27% (s.e. = 2.5%) of variance for body mass index (BMI), and we find evidence that height- and BMI-associated variants have been under natural selection. Considering the imperfect tagging of imputation and potential overestimation of heritability from previous family-based studies, heritability is likely to be 60-70% for height and 30-40% for BMI. Therefore, the missing heritability is small for both traits. For further discovery of genes associated with complex traits, a study design with SNP arrays followed by imputation is more cost-effective than whole-genome sequencing at current prices. PMID:26323059

  20. 21 CFR 1404.630 - May the Office of National Drug Control Policy impute conduct of one person to another?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May the Office of National Drug Control Policy impute conduct of one person to another? 1404.630 Section 1404.630 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General Principles Relating to Suspension and Debarment Actions §...

  1. Selection of Variables that Influence Drug Injection in Prison: Comparison of Methods with Multiple Imputed Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Haji-Maghsoudi, Saiedeh; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background Prisoners, compared to the general population, are at greater risk of infection. Drug injection is the main route of human immunodeficiency virus ý(HIV) transmission, in particular in Iran. What would be of interest is to determine variables that govern drug injection among prisoners. However, one of the issues that challenge model building is incomplete national data sets. In this paper, we addressed the process of model development when missing data exist. Methods Complete data on 2720 prisoners was available. A logistic regression model was fitted and served as gold standard. We then randomly omitted 20%, and 50% of data. Missing date were imputed 10 times, applying multiple imputation by chained equations (MICE). Rubin’s rule (RR) was applied to select candidate variables and to combine the results across imputed data sets. In S1, S2, and S3 methods, variables retained significant in one, five, and ten imputed data sets and were candidate for the multifactorial model. Two weighting approaches were also applied. Findings Age of onset of drug use, recent use of drug before imprisonment, being single, and length of imprisonment were significantly associated with drug injection among prisoners. All variable selection schemes were able to detect significance of these variables. Conclusion We have seen that the performances of easier variable selection methods were comparable with RR. This indicates that the screening step can be used to select candidate variables for the multifactorial model. PMID:25140216

  2. 7 CFR 3017.630 - May the Department of Agriculture impute conduct of one person to another?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May the Department of Agriculture impute conduct of one person to another? 3017.630 Section 3017.630 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  3. Novel methods to optimize genotypic imputation for low-coverage, next-generation sequence data in crop plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next-generation sequencing technology such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) made low-cost, but often low-coverage, whole-genome sequencing widely available. Extensive inbreeding in crop plants provides an untapped, high quality source of phased haplotypes for imputing missing genotypes. We introduc...

  4. Estimating the proportion of variation in susceptibility to multiple sclerosis captured by common SNPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Corey T.; Disanto, Giulio; Breden, Felix; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V.

    2012-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease with underlying genetic and environmental factors. Although the contribution of alleles within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are known to exert strong effects on MS risk, much remains to be learned about the contributions of loci with more modest effects identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs), as well as loci that remain undiscovered. We use a recently developed method to estimate the proportion of variance in disease liability explained by 475,806 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 1,854 MS cases and 5,164 controls. We reveal that ~30% of MS genetic liability is explained by SNPs in this dataset, the majority of which is accounted for by common variants. These results suggest that the unaccounted for proportion could be explained by variants that are in imperfect linkage disequilibrium with common GWAS SNPs, highlighting the potential importance of rare variants in the susceptibility to MS.

  5. Gender Imputation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In late 2007, the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) expanded its Enrollment Reporting service to include several additional data elements (commonly referred to as the "A2" or "expanded" data elements). One of these expanded data elements is student gender. Although gender is potentially important to a number of research…

  6. Accounting for uncertainty due to 'last observation carried forward' outcome imputation in a meta-analysis model.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulou, Vasiliki; Efthimiou, Orestis; Leucht, Stefan; Salanti, Georgia

    2015-02-28

    Missing outcome data are a problem commonly observed in randomized control trials that occurs as a result of participants leaving the study before its end. Missing such important information can bias the study estimates of the relative treatment effect and consequently affect the meta-analytic results. Therefore, methods on manipulating data sets with missing participants, with regard to incorporating the missing information in the analysis so as to avoid the loss of power and minimize the bias, are of interest. We propose a meta-analytic model that accounts for possible error in the effect sizes estimated in studies with last observation carried forward (LOCF) imputed patients. Assuming a dichotomous outcome, we decompose the probability of a successful unobserved outcome taking into account the sensitivity and specificity of the LOCF imputation process for the missing participants. We fit the proposed model within a Bayesian framework, exploring different prior formulations for sensitivity and specificity. We illustrate our methods by performing a meta-analysis of five studies comparing the efficacy of amisulpride versus conventional drugs (flupenthixol and haloperidol) on patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Our meta-analytic models yield estimates similar to meta-analysis with LOCF-imputed patients. Allowing for uncertainty in the imputation process, precision is decreased depending on the priors used for sensitivity and specificity. Results on the significance of amisulpride versus conventional drugs differ between the standard LOCF approach and our model depending on prior beliefs on the imputation process. Our method can be regarded as a useful sensitivity analysis that can be used in the presence of concerns about the LOCF process. PMID:25492741

  7. A genome-wide survey for SNPs altering microRNA seed sites identifies functional candidates in GWAS

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene variants within regulatory regions are thought to be major contributors of the variation of complex traits/diseases. Genome wide association studies (GWAS), have identified scores of genetic variants that appear to contribute to human disease risk. However, most of these variants do not appear to be functional. Thus, the significance of the association may be brought up by still unknown mechanisms or by linkage disequilibrium (LD) with functional polymorphisms. In the present study, focused on functional variants related with the binding of microRNAs (miR), we utilized SNP data, including newly released 1000 Genomes Project data to perform a genome-wide scan of SNPs that abrogate or create miR recognition element (MRE) seed sites (MRESS). Results We identified 2723 SNPs disrupting, and 22295 SNPs creating MRESSs. We estimated the percent of SNPs falling within both validated (5%) and predicted conserved MRESSs (3%). We determined 87 of these MRESS SNPs were listed in GWAS association studies, or in strong LD with a GWAS SNP, and may represent the functional variants of identified GWAS SNPs. Furthermore, 39 of these have evidence of co-expression of target mRNA and the predicted miR. We also gathered previously published eQTL data supporting a functional role for four of these SNPs shown to associate with disease phenotypes. Comparison of FST statistics (a measure of population subdivision) for predicted MRESS SNPs against non MRESS SNPs revealed a significantly higher (P = 0.0004) degree of subdivision among MRESS SNPs, suggesting a role for these SNPs in environmentally driven selection. Conclusions We have demonstrated the potential of publicly available resources to identify high priority candidate SNPs for functional studies and for disease risk prediction. PMID:21995669

  8. Silver sulfide nanoparticles (Ag2S-NPs) are taken up by plants and are phytotoxic.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Menzies, Neal W; Lombi, Enzo; Sekine, Ryo; Blamey, F Pax C; Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C; Cheng, Miaomiao; Kappen, Peter; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Tang, Caixian; Kopittke, Peter M

    2015-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) are used in more consumer products than any other nanomaterial and their release into the environment is unavoidable. Of primary concern is the wastewater stream in which most silver NPs are transformed to silver sulfide NPs (Ag2S-NPs) before being applied to agricultural soils within biosolids. While Ag2S-NPs are assumed to be biologically inert, nothing is known of their effects on terrestrial plants. The phytotoxicity of Ag and its accumulation was examined in short-term (24?h) and longer-term (2-week) solution culture experiments with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) exposed to Ag2S-NPs (0-20?mg?Ag?L(-1)), metallic Ag-NPs (0-1.6?mg?Ag?L(-1)), or ionic Ag (AgNO3; 0-0.086?mg?Ag?L(-1)). Although not inducing any effects during 24-h exposure, Ag2S-NPs reduced growth by up to 52% over a 2-week period. This toxicity did not result from their dissolution and release of toxic Ag(+) in the rooting medium, with soluble Ag concentrations remaining below 0.001?mg?Ag?L(-1). Rather, Ag accumulated as Ag2S in the root and shoot tissues when plants were exposed to Ag2S-NPs, consistent with their direct uptake. Importantly, this differed from the form of Ag present in tissues of plants exposed to AgNO3. For the first time, our findings have shown that Ag2S-NPs exert toxic effects through their direct accumulation in terrestrial plant tissues. These findings need to be considered to ensure high yield of food crops, and to avoid increasing Ag in the food chain. PMID:25686712

  9. SNPs in stress-responsive rice genes: validation, genotyping, functional relevance and population structure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) validation and large-scale genotyping are required to maximize the use of DNA sequence variation and determine the functional relevance of candidate genes for complex stress tolerance traits through genetic association in rice. We used the bead array platform-based Illumina GoldenGate assay to validate and genotype SNPs in a select set of stress-responsive genes to understand their functional relevance and study the population structure in rice. Results Of the 384 putative SNPs assayed, we successfully validated and genotyped 362 (94.3%). Of these 325 (84.6%) showed polymorphism among the 91 rice genotypes examined. Physical distribution, degree of allele sharing, admixtures and introgression, and amino acid replacement of SNPs in 263 abiotic and 62 biotic stress-responsive genes provided clues for identification and targeted mapping of trait-associated genomic regions. We assessed the functional and adaptive significance of validated SNPs in a set of contrasting drought tolerant upland and sensitive lowland rice genotypes by correlating their allelic variation with amino acid sequence alterations in catalytic domains and three-dimensional secondary protein structure encoded by stress-responsive genes. We found a strong genetic association among SNPs in the nine stress-responsive genes with upland and lowland ecological adaptation. Higher nucleotide diversity was observed in indica accessions compared with other rice sub-populations based on different population genetic parameters. The inferred ancestry of 16% among rice genotypes was derived from admixed populations with the maximum between upland aus and wild Oryza species. Conclusions SNPs validated in biotic and abiotic stress-responsive rice genes can be used in association analyses to identify candidate genes and develop functional markers for stress tolerance in rice. PMID:22921105

  10. Identification of novel drought-tolerant-associated SNPs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Villordo-Pineda, Emiliano; González-Chavira, Mario M; Giraldo-Carbajo, Patricia; Acosta-Gallegos, Jorge A; Caballero-Pérez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a leguminous in high demand for human nutrition and a very important agricultural product. Production of common bean is constrained by environmental stresses such as drought. Although conventional plant selection has been used to increase production yield and stress tolerance, drought tolerance selection based on phenotype is complicated by associated physiological, anatomical, cellular, biochemical, and molecular changes. These changes are modulated by differential gene expression. A common method to identify genes associated with phenotypes of interest is the characterization of Single Nucleotide Polymorphims (SNPs) to link them to specific functions. In this work, we selected two drought-tolerant parental lines from Mesoamerica, Pinto Villa, and Pinto Saltillo. The parental lines were used to generate a population of 282 families (F3:5) and characterized by 169 SNPs. We associated the segregation of the molecular markers in our population with phenotypes including flowering time, physiological maturity, reproductive period, plant, seed and total biomass, reuse index, seed yield, weight of 100 seeds, and harvest index in three cultivation cycles. We observed 83 SNPs with significant association (p < 0.0003 after Bonferroni correction) with our quantified phenotypes. Phenotypes most associated were days to flowering and seed biomass with 58 and 44 associated SNPs, respectively. Thirty-seven out of the 83 SNPs were annotated to a gene with a potential function related to drought tolerance or relevant molecular/biochemical functions. Some SNPs such as SNP28 and SNP128 are related to starch biosynthesis, a common osmotic protector; and SNP18 is related to proline biosynthesis, another well-known osmotic protector. PMID:26257755

  11. Macrocyclic lactones and their relationship to the SNPs related to benzimidazole resistance.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Shoaib; Mani, Thangadurai; Beech, Robin; Prichard, Roger

    2015-06-01

    Haemonchus contortus is an abomasal nematode of ruminants that is widely present across the world. Its ability to cause death of infected animals and rapidly develop anthelmintic resistance makes it a dangerous pathogen. Ivermectin (IVM) and moxidectin (MOX) are macrocyclic lactones (MLs). They have been successfully used to treat parasitic nematodes over the last three decades. A genetic association between IVM selection and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the ?-tubulin isotype 1 gene was reported in H. contortus. These SNPs result in replacing phenylalanine (F, TTC) with tyrosine (Y, TAC) at position 167 or 200 on the ?-tubulin protein. Recently we reported a direct interaction of IVM with ?- and ?-tubulin. It had been hypothesized that the SNPs (F167Y and F200Y) may change tubulin dynamics and directly affect IVM binding. The goal of the current study was to observe the effects of SNPs (F167Y and F200Y) on tubulin polymerization and IVM binding. It was also of interest to evaluate the differences between IVM and MOX on tubulin polymerization. We conclude that the SNPs cause no difference in the polymerization of wild and mutant tubulins. Furthermore, neither of the SNPs reduced IVM binding. Varying results were obtained in the degree of polymerization of parasitic and mammalian tubulin for IVM and MOX, i.e., the extent of polymerization was greater for IVM compared with MOX, for H. contortus tubulin, and vice versa for mammalian tubulin. Molecular modeling showed that IVM and MOX docked into the taxane binding pocket of both mammalian and parasitic wild type and mutant tubulins. However the binding was stronger for mammalian tubulin as compared to parasitic tubulin. PMID:26253426

  12. Identification of novel drought-tolerant-associated SNPs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Villordo-Pineda, Emiliano; González-Chavira, Mario M.; Giraldo-Carbajo, Patricia; Acosta-Gallegos, Jorge A.; Caballero-Pérez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a leguminous in high demand for human nutrition and a very important agricultural product. Production of common bean is constrained by environmental stresses such as drought. Although conventional plant selection has been used to increase production yield and stress tolerance, drought tolerance selection based on phenotype is complicated by associated physiological, anatomical, cellular, biochemical, and molecular changes. These changes are modulated by differential gene expression. A common method to identify genes associated with phenotypes of interest is the characterization of Single Nucleotide Polymorphims (SNPs) to link them to specific functions. In this work, we selected two drought-tolerant parental lines from Mesoamerica, Pinto Villa, and Pinto Saltillo. The parental lines were used to generate a population of 282 families (F3:5) and characterized by 169 SNPs. We associated the segregation of the molecular markers in our population with phenotypes including flowering time, physiological maturity, reproductive period, plant, seed and total biomass, reuse index, seed yield, weight of 100 seeds, and harvest index in three cultivation cycles. We observed 83 SNPs with significant association (p < 0.0003 after Bonferroni correction) with our quantified phenotypes. Phenotypes most associated were days to flowering and seed biomass with 58 and 44 associated SNPs, respectively. Thirty-seven out of the 83 SNPs were annotated to a gene with a potential function related to drought tolerance or relevant molecular/biochemical functions. Some SNPs such as SNP28 and SNP128 are related to starch biosynthesis, a common osmotic protector; and SNP18 is related to proline biosynthesis, another well-known osmotic protector. PMID:26257755

  13. Exonic versus intronic SNPs: contrasting roles in revealing the population genetic differentiation of a widespread bird species.

    PubMed

    Zhan, X; Dixon, A; Batbayar, N; Bragin, E; Ayas, Z; Deutschova, L; Chavko, J; Domashevsky, S; Dorosencu, A; Bagyura, J; Gombobaatar, S; Grlica, I D; Levin, A; Milobog, Y; Ming, M; Prommer, M; Purev-Ochir, G; Ragyov, D; Tsurkanu, V; Vetrov, V; Zubkov, N; Bruford, M W

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen considerable progress in applying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to population genetics studies. However, relatively few have attempted to use them to study the genetic differentiation of wild bird populations and none have examined possible differences of exonic and intronic SNPs in these studies. Here, using 144 SNPs, we examined population genetic differentiation in the saker falcon (Falco cherrug) across Eurasia. The position of each SNP was verified using the recently sequenced saker genome with 108 SNPs positioned within the introns of 10 fragments and 36 SNPs in the exons of six genes, comprising MHC, MC1R and four others. In contrast to intronic SNPs, both Bayesian clustering and principal component analyses using exonic SNPs consistently revealed two genetic clusters, within which the least admixed individuals were found in Europe/central Asia and Qinghai (China), respectively. Pairwise D analysis for exonic SNPs showed that the two populations were significantly differentiated and between the two clusters the frequencies of five SNP markers were inferred to be influenced by selection. Central Eurasian populations clustered in as intermediate between the two main groups, consistent with their geographic position. But the westernmost populations of central Europe showed evidence of demographic isolation. Our work highlights the importance of functional exonic SNPs for studying population genetic pattern in a widespread avian species. PMID:25074575

  14. Tool for rapid annotation of microbial SNPs (TRAMS): a simple program for rapid annotation of genomic variation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Reumerman, Richard A; Tucker, Nicholas P; Herron, Paul R; Hoskisson, Paul A; Sangal, Vartul

    2013-09-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has been widely used to study genomic variation in a variety of prokaryotes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) resulting from genomic comparisons need to be annotated for their functional impact on the coding sequences. We have developed a program, TRAMS, for functional annotation of genomic SNPs which is available to download as a single file executable for WINDOWS users with limited computational experience and as a Python script for Mac OS and Linux users. TRAMS needs a tab delimited text file containing SNP locations, reference nucleotide and SNPs in variant strains along with a reference genome sequence in GenBank or EMBL format. SNPs are annotated as synonymous, nonsynonymous or nonsense. Nonsynonymous SNPs in start and stop codons are separated as non-start and non-stop SNPs, respectively. SNPs in multiple overlapping features are annotated separately for each feature and multiple nucleotide polymorphisms within a codon are combined before annotation. We have also developed a workflow for Galaxy, a highly used tool for analysing NGS data, to map short reads to a reference genome and extract and annotate the SNPs. TRAMS is a simple program for rapid and accurate annotation of SNPs that will be very useful for microbiologists in analysing genomic diversity in microbial populations. PMID:23828175

  15. Sixteen new lung function signals identified through 1000 Genomes Project reference panel imputation.

    PubMed

    Artigas, María Soler; Wain, Louise V; Miller, Suzanne; Kheirallah, Abdul Kader; Huffman, Jennifer E; Ntalla, Ioanna; Shrine, Nick; Obeidat, Ma'en; Trochet, Holly; McArdle, Wendy L; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Hui, Jennie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Joshi, Peter K; Teumer, Alexander; Albrecht, Eva; Imboden, Medea; Rawal, Rajesh; Lopez, Lorna M; Marten, Jonathan; Enroth, Stefan; Surakka, Ida; Polasek, Ozren; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Granell, Raquel; Hysi, Pirro G; Flexeder, Claudia; Mahajan, Anubha; Beilby, John; Bossé, Yohan; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Campbell, Harry; Gieger, Christian; Gläser, Sven; González, Juan R; Grallert, Harald; Hammond, Chris J; Harris, Sarah E; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heliövaara, Markku; Henderson, John; Hocking, Lynne; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Ingelsson, Erik; Johansson, Åsa; Kemp, John P; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumar, Ashish; Lind, Lars; Melén, Erik; Musk, Arthur W; Navarro, Pau; Nickle, David C; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Raitakari, Olli T; Ried, Janina S; Ripatti, Samuli; Schulz, Holger; Scott, Robert A; Sin, Don D; Starr, John M; Viñuela, Ana; Völzke, Henry; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Zemunik, Tatijana; Jarvis, Deborah L; Spector, Tim D; Evans, David M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Vitart, Veronique; Kähönen, Mika; Gyllensten, Ulf; Rudan, Igor; Deary, Ian J; Karrasch, Stefan; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Heinrich, Joachim; Stubbe, Beate; Wilson, James F; Wareham, Nicholas J; James, Alan L; Morris, Andrew P; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hayward, Caroline; Sayers, Ian; Strachan, David P; Hall, Ian P; Tobin, Martin D

    2015-01-01

    Lung function measures are used in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In 38,199 European ancestry individuals, we studied genome-wide association of forced expiratory volume in 1?s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC with 1000 Genomes Project (phase 1)-imputed genotypes and followed up top associations in 54,550 Europeans. We identify 14 novel loci (P<5 × 10(-8)) in or near ENSA, RNU5F-1, KCNS3, AK097794, ASTN2, LHX3, CCDC91, TBX3, TRIP11, RIN3, TEKT5, LTBP4, MN1 and AP1S2, and two novel signals at known loci NPNT and GPR126, providing a basis for new understanding of the genetic determinants of these traits and pulmonary diseases in which they are altered. PMID:26635082

  16. A Nonparametric, Multiple Imputation-Based Method for the Retrospective Integration of Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Carrig, Madeline M.; Manrique-Vallier, Daniel; Ranby, Krista W.; Reiter, Jerome P.; Hoyle, Rick H.

    2015-01-01

    Complex research questions often cannot be addressed adequately with a single data set. One sensible alternative to the high cost and effort associated with the creation of large new data sets is to combine existing data sets containing variables related to the constructs of interest. The goal of the present research was to develop a flexible, broadly applicable approach to the integration of disparate data sets that is based on nonparametric multiple imputation and the collection of data from a convenient, de novo calibration sample. We demonstrate proof of concept for the approach by integrating three existing data sets containing items related to the extent of problematic alcohol use and associations with deviant peers. We discuss both necessary conditions for the approach to work well and potential strengths and weaknesses of the method compared to other data set integration approaches. PMID:26257437

  17. Sixteen new lung function signals identified through 1000 Genomes Project reference panel imputation

    PubMed Central

    Artigas, María Soler; Wain, Louise V.; Miller, Suzanne; Kheirallah, Abdul Kader; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Ntalla, Ioanna; Shrine, Nick; Obeidat, Ma'en; Trochet, Holly; McArdle, Wendy L.; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Hui, Jennie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Joshi, Peter K.; Teumer, Alexander; Albrecht, Eva; Imboden, Medea; Rawal, Rajesh; Lopez, Lorna M.; Marten, Jonathan; Enroth, Stefan; Surakka, Ida; Polasek, Ozren; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Granell, Raquel; Hysi, Pirro G.; Flexeder, Claudia; Mahajan, Anubha; Beilby, John; Bossé, Yohan; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Campbell, Harry; Gieger, Christian; Gläser, Sven; González, Juan R.; Grallert, Harald; Hammond, Chris J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heliövaara, Markku; Henderson, John; Hocking, Lynne; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Ingelsson, Erik; Johansson, Åsa; Kemp, John P.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumar, Ashish; Lind, Lars; Melén, Erik; Musk, Arthur W.; Navarro, Pau; Nickle, David C.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ried, Janina S.; Ripatti, Samuli; Schulz, Holger; Scott, Robert A.; Sin, Don D.; Starr, John M.; Deloukas, Panos; Hansell, Anna L.; Hubbard, Richard; Jackson, Victoria E.; Marchini, Jonathan; Pavord, Ian; Thomson, Neil C.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Viñuela, Ana; Völzke, Henry; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Zemunik, Tatijana; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Spector, Tim D.; Evans, David M.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Vitart, Veronique; Kähönen, Mika; Gyllensten, Ulf; Rudan, Igor; Deary, Ian J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Heinrich, Joachim; Stubbe, Beate; Wilson, James F.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; James, Alan L.; Morris, Andrew P.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hayward, Caroline; Sayers, Ian; Strachan, David P.; Hall, Ian P.; Tobin, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    Lung function measures are used in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In 38,199 European ancestry individuals, we studied genome-wide association of forced expiratory volume in 1?s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC with 1000 Genomes Project (phase 1)-imputed genotypes and followed up top associations in 54,550 Europeans. We identify 14 novel loci (P<5 × 10?8) in or near ENSA, RNU5F-1, KCNS3, AK097794, ASTN2, LHX3, CCDC91, TBX3, TRIP11, RIN3, TEKT5, LTBP4, MN1 and AP1S2, and two novel signals at known loci NPNT and GPR126, providing a basis for new understanding of the genetic determinants of these traits and pulmonary diseases in which they are altered. PMID:26635082

  18. lncRNASNP: a database of SNPs in lncRNAs and their potential functions in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jing; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jiayou; Miao, Xiaoping; Guo, An-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play key roles in various cellular contexts and diseases by diverse mechanisms. With the rapid growth of identified lncRNAs and disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), there is a great demand to study SNPs in lncRNAs. Aiming to provide a useful resource about lncRNA SNPs, we systematically identified SNPs in lncRNAs and analyzed their potential impacts on lncRNA structure and function. In total, we identified 495,729 and 777,095 SNPs in more than 30,000 lncRNA transcripts in human and mouse, respectively. A large number of SNPs were predicted with the potential to impact on the miRNA-lncRNA interaction. The experimental evidence and conservation of miRNA-lncRNA interaction, as well as miRNA expressions from TCGA were also integrated to prioritize the miRNA-lncRNA interactions and SNPs on the binding sites. Furthermore, by mapping SNPs to GWAS results, we found that 142 human lncRNA SNPs are GWAS tagSNPs and 197,827 lncRNA SNPs are in the GWAS linkage disequilibrium regions. All these data for human and mouse lncRNAs were imported into lncRNASNP database (http://bioinfo.life.hust.edu.cn/lncRNASNP/), which includes two sub-databases lncRNASNP-human and lncRNASNP-mouse. The lncRNASNP database has a user-friendly interface for searching and browsing through the SNP, lncRNA and miRNA sections. PMID:25332392

  19. SNPs for parentage testing and traceability in globally diverse breeds of sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA-based parentage determination accelerates genetic improvement by increasing pedigree accuracy. However, the utility of any “parentage SNP” varies by breed depending on its minor allele frequency (MAF) and its sequence context. Our aims were to identify parentage SNPs with exceptional qualities...

  20. Connecting SNPs in Diabetes: A Spatial Analysis of Meta-GWAS Loci

    PubMed Central

    Schierding, William; O’Sullivan, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have improved our understanding of the genetic foundations of a number of diseases, including diabetes. However, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are identified by GWAS, especially those that fall outside of gene regions, do not always clearly link to the underlying biology. Despite this, these SNPs have often been validated through re-sequencing efforts as not just tag SNPs, but as causative SNPs, and so must play a role in disease development or progression. In this study, we show how the 3D genome (spatial connections) and trans-expression Quantitative Trait Loci connect diabetes loci from different GWAS meta-analyses, informing the backbone of regulatory networks. Our findings include a three-way functional–spatial connection between the TM6SF2, CTRB1–BCAR1, and CELSR2–PSRC1 loci (rs201189528, rs7202844, and rs7202844, respectively) connected through the KCNIP3 and BCAR1/BCAR3 loci, respectively. These spatial hubs serve as an example of how loci in genes with little biological connection to disease come together to contribute to the diabetes phenotype. PMID:26191039

  1. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) use dense maps of SNPs that

    E-print Network

    Sinha, Himanshu

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) use dense maps of SNPs that cover the human genome to look in question. The recent crop of results from GWAS (reviewed in refs 1­4) might seem like a sudden development of the lessons that were learnt from the initial crop of GWAS for future studies of human genetic variation

  2. BARCSOYSNP23: A SELECTED PANEL OF SNPS FOR SOYBEAN CULTIVAR IDENTIFICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes a set of 23 informative SNPs (BARCSoySNP23) distributed on 19 of the 20 soybean linkage groups that can be used for soybean cultivar identification. Selection of the set was made based upon the linkage map position of each SNP as well as the information provided by each SNP fo...

  3. Cross-amplification and validation of SNPs conserved over 44 million years between seals and dogs.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph I; Thorne, Michael A S; McEwing, Rob; Forcada, Jaume; Ogden, Rob

    2013-01-01

    High-density SNP arrays developed for humans and their companion species provide a rapid and convenient tool for generating SNP data in closely-related non-model organisms, but have not yet been widely applied to phylogenetically divergent taxa. Consequently, we used the CanineHD BeadChip to genotype 24 Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) individuals. Despite seals and dogs having diverged around 44 million years ago, 33,324 out of 173,662 loci (19.2%) could be genotyped, of which 173 were polymorphic and clearly interpretable. Two SNPs were validated using KASP genotyping assays, with the resulting genotypes being 100% concordant with those obtained from the high-density array. Two loci were also confirmed through in silico visualisation after mapping them to the fur seal transcriptome. Polymorphic SNPs were distributed broadly throughout the dog genome and did not differ significantly in proximity to genes from either monomorphic SNPs or those that failed to cross-amplify in seals. However, the nearest genes to polymorphic SNPs were significantly enriched for functional annotations relating to energy metabolism, suggesting a possible bias towards conserved regions of the genome. PMID:23874599

  4. Connecting SNPs in Diabetes: A Spatial Analysis of Meta-GWAS Loci.

    PubMed

    Schierding, William; O'Sullivan, Justin M

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have improved our understanding of the genetic foundations of a number of diseases, including diabetes. However, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are identified by GWAS, especially those that fall outside of gene regions, do not always clearly link to the underlying biology. Despite this, these SNPs have often been validated through re-sequencing efforts as not just tag SNPs, but as causative SNPs, and so must play a role in disease development or progression. In this study, we show how the 3D genome (spatial connections) and trans-expression Quantitative Trait Loci connect diabetes loci from different GWAS meta-analyses, informing the backbone of regulatory networks. Our findings include a three-way functional-spatial connection between the TM6SF2, CTRB1-BCAR1, and CELSR2-PSRC1 loci (rs201189528, rs7202844, and rs7202844, respectively) connected through the KCNIP3 and BCAR1/BCAR3 loci, respectively. These spatial hubs serve as an example of how loci in genes with little biological connection to disease come together to contribute to the diabetes phenotype. PMID:26191039

  5. The effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of calpastatin (CAST) gene on meat tenderness of yak.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of calpastatin (CAST) gene with shear force of 2.54 cm steaks from M. longissimus dorsi from Gannan yaks (Bos grunniens, n=181) was studied. Yaks were harvested at 2, 3, and 4 yr of age (n=51, 59, and 71, respectively), and samples of each ya...

  6. Bootstrap aggregating of alternating decision trees to detect sets of SNPs that associate with disease.

    PubMed

    Guy, Richard T; Santago, Peter; Langefeld, Carl D

    2012-02-01

    Complex genetic disorders are a result of a combination of genetic and nongenetic factors, all potentially interacting. Machine learning methods hold the potential to identify multilocus and environmental associations thought to drive complex genetic traits. Decision trees, a popular machine learning technique, offer a computationally low complexity algorithm capable of detecting associated sets of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of arbitrary size, including modern genome-wide SNP scans. However, interpretation of the importance of an individual SNP within these trees can present challenges. We present a new decision tree algorithm denoted as Bagged Alternating Decision Trees (BADTrees) that is based on identifying common structural elements in a bootstrapped set of Alternating Decision Trees (ADTrees). The algorithm is order nk(2), where n is the number of SNPs considered and k is the number of SNPs in the tree constructed. Our simulation study suggests that BADTrees have higher power and lower type I error rates than ADTrees alone and comparable power with lower type I error rates compared to logistic regression. We illustrate the application of these data using simulated data as well as from the Lupus Large Association Study 1 (7,822 SNPs in 3,548 individuals). Our results suggest that BADTrees hold promise as a low computational order algorithm for detecting complex combinations of SNP and environmental factors associated with disease. PMID:22851473

  7. Large-scale transcriptome characterization and mass discovery of SNPs in globe artichoke and its

    E-print Network

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Large-scale transcriptome characterization and mass discovery of SNPs in globe artichoke and its cultivated varieties, globe artichoke and cardoon, which are grown mainly for food. Cynara cardunculus to the Asteraceae family (formerly Compositae) and includes three botanical taxa: the globe artichoke (var. scolymus

  8. Multiplex Detection of 10 SNPs Located in the Coding Region of the Mitochondrial Genome

    E-print Network

    nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) represent an important class of DNA variation in which sequence differences Regions of the Mitochondrial Genome (HV1 and HV2) The principal limitation in forensic mtDNA testing electrophoresis platform. Fluorescent SNP detection is accomplished (through a mini-sequencing assay) by using

  9. Parallel Analysis of 124 Universal SNPs for Human Identification by Targeted Semiconductor Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Suhua; Bian, Yingnan; Zhang, Zheren; Zheng, Hancheng; Wang, Zheng; Zha, Lagabaiyila; Cai, Jifeng; Gao, Yuzhen; Ji, Chaoneng; Hou, Yiping; Li, Chengtao

    2015-01-01

    SNPs, abundant in human genome with lower mutation rate, are attractive to genetic application like forensic, anthropological and evolutionary studies. Universal SNPs showing little allelic frequency variation among populations while remaining highly informative for human identification were obtained from previous studies. However, genotyping tools target only dozens of markers simultaneously, limiting their applications. Here, 124 SNPs were simultaneous tested using Ampliseq technology with Ion Torrent PGM platform. Concordance study was performed with 2 reference samples of 9947A and 9948 between NGS and Sanger sequencing. Full concordance were obtained except genotype of rs576261 with 9947A. Parameter of FMAR (%) was introduced for NGS data analysis for the first time, evaluating allelic performance, sensitivity testing and mixture testing. FMAR values for accurate heterozygotes should be range from 50% to 60%, for homozygotes or Y-SNP should be above 90%. SNPs of rs7520386, rs4530059, rs214955, rs1523537, rs2342747, rs576261 and rs12997453 were recognized as poorly performing loci, either with allelic imbalance or with lower coverage. Sensitivity testing demonstrated that with DNA range from 10?ng-0.5?ng, all correct genotypes were obtained. For mixture testing, a clear linear correlation (R2?=?0.9429) between the excepted FMAR and observed FMAR values of mixtures was observed. PMID:26691610

  10. Parallel Analysis of 124 Universal SNPs for Human Identification by Targeted Semiconductor Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suhua; Bian, Yingnan; Zhang, Zheren; Zheng, Hancheng; Wang, Zheng; Zha, Lagabaiyila; Cai, Jifeng; Gao, Yuzhen; Ji, Chaoneng; Hou, Yiping; Li, Chengtao

    2015-01-01

    SNPs, abundant in human genome with lower mutation rate, are attractive to genetic application like forensic, anthropological and evolutionary studies. Universal SNPs showing little allelic frequency variation among populations while remaining highly informative for human identification were obtained from previous studies. However, genotyping tools target only dozens of markers simultaneously, limiting their applications. Here, 124 SNPs were simultaneous tested using Ampliseq technology with Ion Torrent PGM platform. Concordance study was performed with 2 reference samples of 9947A and 9948 between NGS and Sanger sequencing. Full concordance were obtained except genotype of rs576261 with 9947A. Parameter of FMAR (%) was introduced for NGS data analysis for the first time, evaluating allelic performance, sensitivity testing and mixture testing. FMAR values for accurate heterozygotes should be range from 50% to 60%, for homozygotes or Y-SNP should be above 90%. SNPs of rs7520386, rs4530059, rs214955, rs1523537, rs2342747, rs576261 and rs12997453 were recognized as poorly performing loci, either with allelic imbalance or with lower coverage. Sensitivity testing demonstrated that with DNA range from 10?ng-0.5?ng, all correct genotypes were obtained. For mixture testing, a clear linear correlation (R(2)?=?0.9429) between the excepted FMAR and observed FMAR values of mixtures was observed. PMID:26691610

  11. Expression of DISC1 binding partners is reduced in schizophrenia and associated with DISC1 SNPs

    E-print Network

    Wang, Kuan Hong

    Expression of DISC1 binding partners is reduced in schizophrenia and associated with DISC1 SNPs 1, 2005; Revised December 30, 2005; Accepted February 8, 2006 DISC1 has been identified-terminus-truncated DISC1 disrupts intracellular transport, neural architecture and migration, perhaps because it fails

  12. Cross-Amplification and Validation of SNPs Conserved over 44 Million Years between Seals and Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joseph I.; Thorne, Michael A. S.; McEwing, Rob; Forcada, Jaume; Ogden, Rob

    2013-01-01

    High-density SNP arrays developed for humans and their companion species provide a rapid and convenient tool for generating SNP data in closely-related non-model organisms, but have not yet been widely applied to phylogenetically divergent taxa. Consequently, we used the CanineHD BeadChip to genotype 24 Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) individuals. Despite seals and dogs having diverged around 44 million years ago, 33,324 out of 173,662 loci (19.2%) could be genotyped, of which 173 were polymorphic and clearly interpretable. Two SNPs were validated using KASP genotyping assays, with the resulting genotypes being 100% concordant with those obtained from the high-density array. Two loci were also confirmed through in silico visualisation after mapping them to the fur seal transcriptome. Polymorphic SNPs were distributed broadly throughout the dog genome and did not differ significantly in proximity to genes from either monomorphic SNPs or those that failed to cross-amplify in seals. However, the nearest genes to polymorphic SNPs were significantly enriched for functional annotations relating to energy metabolism, suggesting a possible bias towards conserved regions of the genome. PMID:23874599

  13. Assessing SNPs versus RAPDs for predicting heterogeneity and screening efficiency in wild potato (Solanum)species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowing how genetic diversity is partitioned among and within wild potato species populations is important for efficient sampling for collection, preservation and evaluation. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of SNPs for assessing germplasm by using the exact set of four model species previous...

  14. Large-scale enrichment and discovery of gene-associated SNPs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the recent advent of massively parallel pyrosequencing by 454 Life Sciences it has become feasible to cost-effectively identify numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the recombinogenic regions of the maize (Zea mays L.) genome. We developed a modified version of hypomethylated...

  15. Assessing SNPs Versus RAPDs for Predicting Heterogeneity and Screening Efficiency in Wild Potato (Solanum) Species

    E-print Network

    Douches, David S.

    Assessing SNPs Versus RAPDs for Predicting Heterogeneity and Screening Efficiency in Wild Potato January 2015 # The Potato Association of America 2015 Abstract Knowing how genetic diversity is partitioned among and within wild potato species populations is impor- tant for efficient sampling

  16. Alternative strategies for selecting subsets of predicting SNPs by LASSO-LARS procedure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) can be used to predict SNP effects. This operator has the desirable feature of including in the model only a subset of explanatory SNPs, which can be useful both in QTL detection and GWS studies. LASSO solutions can be obtained by the least angle regression (LARS) algorithm. The big issue with this procedure is to define the best constraint (t), i.e. the upper bound of the sum of absolute value of the SNP effects which roughly corresponds to the number of SNPs to be selected. Usai et al. (2009) dealt with this problem by a cross-validation approach and defined t as the average number of selected SNPs overall replications. Nevertheless, in small size populations, such estimator could give underestimated values of t. Here we propose two alternative ways to define t and compared them with the "classical" one. Methods The first (strategy 1), was based on 1,000 cross-validations carried out by randomly splitting the reference population (2,000 individuals with performance) into two halves. The value of t was the number of SNPs which occurred in more than 5% of replications. The second (strategy 2), which did not use cross-validations, was based on the minimization of the Cp-type selection criterion which depends on the number of selected SNPs and the expected residual variance. Results The size of the subset of selected SNPs was 46, 189 and 64 for the classical approach, strategy 1 and 2 respectively. Classical and strategy 2 gave similar results and indicated quite clearly the regions were QTL with additive effects were located. Strategy 1 confirmed such regions and added further positions which gave a less clear scenario. Correlation between GEBVs estimated with the three strategies and TBVs in progenies without phenotypes were 0.9237, 0.9000 and 0.9240 for classical, strategy 1 and 2 respectively. Conclusions This suggests that the Cp-type selection criterion is a valid alternative to the cross-validations to define the best constraint for selecting subsets of predicting SNPs by LASSO-LARS procedure. PMID:22640825

  17. PExFInS: An Integrative Post-GWAS Explorer for Functional Indels and SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhongshan; Chu, Hin; Fan, Yanhui; Li, Cun; Song, You-Qiang; Zhou, Jie; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) mapping and linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis have been widely employed to interpret findings of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). With the availability of deep sequencing data of 423 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from six global populations and the microarray expression data, we performed eQTL analysis, identified more than 228?K SNP cis-eQTLs and 21?K indel cis-eQTLs and generated a LCL cis-eQTL database. We demonstrate that the percentages of population-shared and population-specific cis-eQTLs are comparable; while indel cis-eQTLs in the population-specific subsection make more contribution to gene expression variations than those in the population-shared subsection. We found cis-eQTLs, especially the population-shared cis-eQTLs are significantly enriched toward transcription start site. Moreover, the National Human Genome Research Institute cataloged GWAS SNPs are enriched for LCL cis-eQTLs. Specifically, 32.8% GWAS SNPs are LCL cis-eQTLs, among which 12.5% can be tagged by indel cis-eQTLs, suggesting the fundamental contribution of indel cis-eQTLs to GWAS association signals. To search for functional indels and SNPs tagging GWAS SNPs, a pipeline Post-GWAS Explorer for Functional Indels and SNPs (PExFInS) has been developed, integrating LD analysis, functional annotation from public databases, cis-eQTL mapping with our LCL cis-eQTL database and other published cis-eQTL datasets. PMID:26612672

  18. PExFInS: An Integrative Post-GWAS Explorer for Functional Indels and SNPs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhongshan; Chu, Hin; Fan, Yanhui; Li, Cun; Song, You-Qiang; Zhou, Jie; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) mapping and linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis have been widely employed to interpret findings of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). With the availability of deep sequencing data of 423 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from six global populations and the microarray expression data, we performed eQTL analysis, identified more than 228?K SNP cis-eQTLs and 21?K indel cis-eQTLs and generated a LCL cis-eQTL database. We demonstrate that the percentages of population-shared and population-specific cis-eQTLs are comparable; while indel cis-eQTLs in the population-specific subsection make more contribution to gene expression variations than those in the population-shared subsection. We found cis-eQTLs, especially the population-shared cis-eQTLs are significantly enriched toward transcription start site. Moreover, the National Human Genome Research Institute cataloged GWAS SNPs are enriched for LCL cis-eQTLs. Specifically, 32.8% GWAS SNPs are LCL cis-eQTLs, among which 12.5% can be tagged by indel cis-eQTLs, suggesting the fundamental contribution of indel cis-eQTLs to GWAS association signals. To search for functional indels and SNPs tagging GWAS SNPs, a pipeline Post-GWAS Explorer for Functional Indels and SNPs (PExFInS) has been developed, integrating LD analysis, functional annotation from public databases, cis-eQTL mapping with our LCL cis-eQTL database and other published cis-eQTL datasets. PMID:26612672

  19. Identification of putative SNPs in progressive retinal atrophy affected Canis lupus familiaris using exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Bhaskar; Kelawala, Divyesh N; Shah, Tejas; Patel, Anand B; Patil, Deepak B; Parikh, Pinesh V; Patel, Namrata; Parmar, Nidhi; Mohapatra, Amit B; Singh, Krishna M; Menon, Ramesh; Pandya, Dipal; Jakhesara, Subhash J; Koringa, Prakash G; Rao, Mandava V; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2015-12-01

    Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is one of the major causes of retinal photoreceptor cell degeneration in canines. The inheritance pattern of PRA is autosomal recessive and genetically heterogeneous. Here, using targeted sequencing technology, we have performed exome sequencing of 10 PRA-affected (Spitz = 7, Cocker Spaniel = 1, Lhasa Aphso = 1 and Spitz-Labrador cross breed = 1) and 6 normal (Spitz = 5, Cocker Spaniel = 1) dogs. The high-throughput sequencing using 454-Roche Titanium sequencer generated about 2.16 Giga bases of raw data. Initially, we have successfully identified 25,619 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that passed the stringent SNP calling parameters. Further, we performed association study on the cohort, and the highly significant (0.001) associations were short-listed and investigated in-depth. Out of the 171 significant SNPs, 113 were previously unreported. Interestingly, six among them were non-synonymous coding (NSC) SNPs, which includes CPPED1 A>G (p.M307V), PITRM1 T>G (p.S715A), APP G>A (p.T266M), RNF213 A>G (p.V1482A), C>A (p.V1456L), and SLC46A3 G>A (p.R168Q). On the other hand, 35 out of 113 unreported SNPs were falling in regulatory regions such as 3'-UTR, 5'-UTR, etc. In-depth bioinformatics analysis revealed that majority of NSC SNPs have damaging effect and alter protein stability. This study highlighted the genetic markers associated with PRA, which will help to develop genetic assay-based screening in effective breeding. PMID:26515695

  20. Effect prediction of identified SNPs linked to fruit quality and chilling injury in peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch

    E-print Network

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    Effect prediction of identified SNPs linked to fruit quality and chilling injury in peach [Prunus species. Fruit quality traits are essential peach breeding program objectives since they determine associated with these SNPs on downstream products from the `peach v1.0' genome sequence was carried out

  1. More than 5 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor-allele frequency greater than 10% are expected to

    E-print Network

    Kruglyak, Leonid

    in European populations but only 50% of those common in the African American population and that efficient greater than 10% in one or both populations, 1,081 of 2,729 SNPs were common (888 in African Americans polymorphisms as those observed in only one population, 22% of common SNPs in African Americans were private

  2. A Large-Scale Analysis of the Relationship of Synonymous SNPs Changing MicroRNA Regulation with Functionality and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuchen; Qiu, Chengxiang; Cui, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Historically, owing to not changing amino acid composition of protein sequences, synonymous mutations are commonly assumed to be neutral during evolution and therefore have no effect on the phenotype and disease. Here, based on observations from large-scale analysis of genomic data, we predicted the putative synonymous SNPs that could result in functional consequences and disease risk through changing the microRNA-mediated gene regulation. We found that nearly half of the synonymous SNPs could affect protein expression by changing microRNA regulation in human genome and these SNPs significantly prefer to be associated with human diseases and traits. The synonymous SNPs changing microRNA-mediated gene regulation tend to be more under recent positive selection, prefer to affect gene expression, and implicate in human disease. We conclude that the miRNA-mediated regulation changes could be a potential mechanism for the contributions of synonymous SNPs to protein functions and disease risks. PMID:26437399

  3. Filter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kuban, Daniel P. (Oak Ridge, TN); Singletary, B. Huston (Oak Ridge, TN); Evans, John H. (Rockwood, TN)

    1984-01-01

    A plurality of holding tubes are respectively mounted in apertures in a partition plate fixed in a housing receiving gas contaminated with particulate material. A filter cartridge is removably held in each holding tube, and the cartridges and holding tubes are arranged so that gas passes through apertures therein and across the partition plate while particulate material is collected in the cartridges. Replacement filter cartridges are respectively held in holding canisters mounted on a support plate which can be secured to the aforesaid housing, and screws mounted on said canisters are arranged to push replacement cartridges into the cartridge holding tubes and thereby eject used cartridges therefrom.

  4. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Seeking to find a more effective method of filtering potable water that was highly contaminated, Mike Pedersen, founder of Western Water International, learned that NASA had conducted extensive research in methods of purifying water on board manned spacecraft. The key is Aquaspace Compound, a proprietary WWI formula that scientifically blends various types of glandular activated charcoal with other active and inert ingredients. Aquaspace systems remove some substances; chlorine, by atomic adsorption, other types of organic chemicals by mechanical filtration and still others by catalytic reaction. Aquaspace filters are finding wide acceptance in industrial, commercial, residential and recreational applications in the U.S. and abroad.

  5. Variable selection models based on multiple imputation with an application for predicting median effective dose and maximum effect

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Y.; Datta, S.; Conklin, D.J.; Kong, M.

    2015-01-01

    The statistical methods for variable selection and prediction could be challenging when missing covariates exist. Although multiple imputation (MI) is a universally accepted technique for solving missing data problem, how to combine the MI results for variable selection is not quite clear, because different imputations may result in different selections. The widely applied variable selection methods include the sparse partial least-squares (SPLS) method and the penalized least-squares method, e.g. the elastic net (ENet) method. In this paper, we propose an MI-based weighted elastic net (MI-WENet) method that is based on stacked MI data and a weighting scheme for each observation in the stacked data set. In the MI-WENet method, MI accounts for sampling and imputation uncertainty for missing values, and the weight accounts for the observed information. Extensive numerical simulations are carried out to compare the proposed MI-WENet method with the other competing alternatives, such as the SPLS and ENet. In addition, we applied the MIWENet method to examine the predictor variables for the endothelial function that can be characterized by median effective dose (ED50) and maximum effect (Emax) in an ex-vivo phenylephrine-induced extension and acetylcholine-induced relaxation experiment. PMID:26412909

  6. Using multiple imputation to efficiently correct cerebral MRI whole brain lesion and atrophy data in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chua, Alicia S; Egorova, Svetlana; Anderson, Mark C; Polgar-Turcsanyi, Mariann; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Guttmann, Charles R G; Bakshi, Rohit; Healy, Brian C

    2015-10-01

    Automated segmentation of brain MRI scans into tissue classes is commonly used for the assessment of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, manual correction of the resulting brain tissue label maps by an expert reader remains necessary in many cases. Since automated segmentation data awaiting manual correction are "missing", we proposed to use multiple imputation (MI) to fill-in the missing manually-corrected MRI data for measures of normalized whole brain volume (brain parenchymal fraction-BPF) and T2 hyperintense lesion volume (T2LV). Automated and manually corrected MRI measures from 1300 patients enrolled in the Comprehensive Longitudinal Investigation of Multiple Sclerosis at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (CLIMB) were identified. Simulation studies were conducted to assess the performance of MI with missing data both missing completely at random and missing at random. An imputation model including the concurrent automated data as well as clinical and demographic variables explained a high proportion of the variance in the manually corrected BPF (R(2)=0.97) and T2LV (R(2)=0.89), demonstrating the potential to accurately impute the missing data. Further, our results demonstrate that MI allows for the accurate estimation of group differences with little to no bias and with similar precision compared to an analysis with no missing data. We believe that our findings provide important insights for efficient correction of automated MRI measures to obviate the need to perform manual correction on all cases. PMID:26093330

  7. InBox: Filtering Employee Create Filter

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    InBox: Filtering Employee 1 Create Filter An Inbox filter enables you to limit the action items you see in your Inbox. You can create a personal Inbox filter that is available only to you in your Inbox. You can define an Inbox filter for specific or all business processes, and then define conditions

  8. Phosphorus Filter

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Tom Kehler, fishery biologist at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Northeast Fishery Center in Lamar, Pennsylvania, checks the flow rate of water leaving a phosphorus filter column. The USGS has pioneered a new use for acid mine drainage residuals that are currently a disposal challenge, usi...

  9. Transcriptome-facilitated development of SNPs for the Sonoran Desert rock fig, Ficus petiolaris (Moraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nicholas G.; Houston, Derek D.; Nason, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) primers were developed for a native North American desert fig, Ficus petiolaris (Moraceae), to provide markers for population genetic studies designed to quantify patterns of gene flow across a complex landscape. Methods and Results: Transcriptome sequencing and bioinformatic protocols were implemented to discover SNPs in single-copy protein-coding genes. Multiplexes of 30 nuclear and 24 organellar (chloroplast and mitochondrial) SNPs were selected for primer development and genotyping on the Sequenom MASSArray System. Of these 54 loci, 49 reliably amplified across a panel of 96 F. petiolaris individuals. Conclusions: This study has provided SNP primers that can be applied in future studies investigating population genetics of F. petiolaris and its coevolution with associated pollinating and nonpollinating fig wasps. PMID:26191464

  10. Coding SNPs as intrinsic markers for sample tracking in large-scale transcriptome studies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weihong; Gao, Hong; Seok, Junhee; Wilhelmy, Julie; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale transcriptome profiling in clinical studies often involves assaying multiple samples of a patient to monitor disease progression, treatment effect, and host response in multiple tissues. Such profiling is prone to human error, which often results in mislabeled samples. Here, we present a method to detect mislabeled sample outliers using coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (cSNPs) specifically designed on the microarray and demonstrate that the mislabeled samples can be efficiently identified by either simple clustering of allele-specific expression scores or Mahalanobis distance-based outlier detection method. Based on our results, we recommend the incorporation of cSNPs into future transcriptome array designs as intrinsic markers for sample tracking. PMID:22668418

  11. Strategies for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping to enhance genotype imputation in Gyr (Bos indicus) dairy cattle: Comparison of commercially available SNP chips.

    PubMed

    Boison, S A; Santos, D J A; Utsunomiya, A H T; Carvalheiro, R; Neves, H H R; O'Brien, A M Perez; Garcia, J F; Sölkner, J; da Silva, M V G B

    2015-07-01

    Genotype imputation is widely used as a cost-effective strategy in genomic evaluation of cattle. Key determinants of imputation accuracies, such as linkage disequilibrium patterns, marker densities, and ascertainment bias, differ between Bos indicus and Bos taurus breeds. Consequently, there is a need to investigate effectiveness of genotype imputation in indicine breeds. Thus, the objective of the study was to investigate strategies and factors affecting the accuracy of genotype imputation in Gyr (Bos indicus) dairy cattle. Four imputation scenarios were studied using 471 sires and 1,644 dams genotyped on Illumina BovineHD (HD-777K; San Diego, CA) and BovineSNP50 (50K) chips, respectively. Scenarios were based on which reference high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel (HDP) should be adopted [HD-777K, 50K, and GeneSeek GGP-75Ki (Lincoln, NE)]. Depending on the scenario, validation animals had their genotypes masked for one of the lower-density panels: Illumina (3K, 7K, and 50K) and GeneSeek (SGGP-20Ki and GGP-75Ki). We randomly selected 171 sires as reference and 300 as validation for all the scenarios. Additionally, all sires were used as reference and the 1,644 dams were imputed for validation. Genotypes of 98 individuals with 4 and more offspring were completely masked and imputed. Imputation algorithms FImpute and Beagle v3.3 and v4 were used. Imputation accuracies were measured using the correlation and allelic correct rate. FImpute resulted in highest accuracies, whereas Beagle 3.3 gave the least-accurate imputations. Accuracies evaluated as correlation (allelic correct rate) ranged from 0.910 (0.942) to 0.961 (0.974) using 50K as HDP and with 3K (7K) as low-density panels. With GGP-75Ki as HDP, accuracies were moderate for 3K, 7K, and 50K, but high for SGGP-20Ki. The use of HD-777K as HDP resulted in accuracies of 0.888 (3K), 0.941 (7K), 0.980 (SGGP-20Ki), 0.982 (50K), and 0.993 (GGP-75Ki). Ungenotyped individuals were imputed with an average accuracy of 0.970. The average top 5 kinship coefficients between reference and imputed individuals was a strong predictor of imputation accuracy. FImpute was faster and used less memory than Beagle v4. Beagle v4 outperformed Beagle v3.3 in accuracy and speed of computation. A genotyping strategy that uses the HD-777K SNP chip as a reference panel and SGGP-20Ki as the lower-density SNP panel should be adopted as accuracy was high and similar to that of the 50K. However, the effect of using imputed HD-777K genotypes from the SGGP-20Ki on genomic evaluation is yet to be studied. PMID:25958293

  12. Rank and Order: Evaluating the Performance of SNPs for Individual Assignment in a Non-Model Organism

    PubMed Central

    Storer, Caroline G.; Pascal, Carita E.; Roberts, Steven B.; Templin, William D.; Seeb, Lisa W.; Seeb, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are valuable tools for ecological and evolutionary studies. In non-model species, the use of SNPs has been limited by the number of markers available. However, new technologies and decreasing technology costs have facilitated the discovery of a constantly increasing number of SNPs. With hundreds or thousands of SNPs potentially available, there is interest in comparing and developing methods for evaluating SNPs to create panels of high-throughput assays that are customized for performance, research questions, and resources. Here we use five different methods to rank 43 new SNPs and 71 previously published SNPs for sockeye salmon: FST, informativeness (In), average contribution to principal components (LC), and the locus-ranking programs BELS and WHICHLOCI. We then tested the performance of these different ranking methods by creating 48- and 96-SNP panels of the top-ranked loci for each method and used empirical and simulated data to obtain the probability of assigning individuals to the correct population using each panel. All 96-SNP panels performed similarly and better than the 48-SNP panels except for the 96-SNP BELS panel. Among the 48-SNP panels, panels created from FST, In, and LC ranks performed better than panels formed using the top-ranked loci from the programs BELS and WHICHLOCI. The application of ranking methods to optimize panel performance will become more important as more high-throughput assays become available. PMID:23185290

  13. Genome-wide association studies using haplotypes and individual SNPs in Simmental cattle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Fan, Huizhong; Wang, Yanhui; Zhang, Lupei; Gao, Xue; Chen, Yan; Li, Junya; Ren, HongYan; Gao, Huijiang

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping technologies have provided the opportunity to map genes using associations between complex traits and markers. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) based on either a single marker or haplotype have identified genetic variants and underlying genetic mechanisms of quantitative traits. Prompted by the achievements of studies examining economic traits in cattle and to verify the consistency of these two methods using real data, the current study was conducted to construct the haplotype structure in the bovine genome and to detect relevant genes genuinely affecting a carcass trait and a meat quality trait. Using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip, 942 young bulls with genotyping data were introduced as a reference population to identify the genes in the beef cattle genome significantly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels. In total, 92,553 haplotype blocks were detected in the genome. The regions of high linkage disequilibrium extended up to approximately 200 kb, and the size of haplotype blocks ranged from 22 bp to 199,266 bp. Additionally, the individual SNP analysis and the haplotype-based analysis detected similar regions and common SNPs for these two representative traits. A total of 12 and 7 SNPs in the bovine genome were significantly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels, respectively. By comparison, 4 and 5 haplotype blocks containing the majority of significant SNPs were strongly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels, respectively. In addition, 36 SNPs with high linkage disequilibrium were detected in the GNAQ gene, a potential hotspot that may play a crucial role for regulating carcass trait components. PMID:25330174

  14. Genome-Wide Association Studies Using Haplotypes and Individual SNPs in Simmental Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Fan, Huizhong; Wang, Yanhui; Zhang, Lupei; Gao, Xue; Chen, Yan; Li, Junya; Ren, HongYan; Gao, Huijiang

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping technologies have provided the opportunity to map genes using associations between complex traits and markers. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) based on either a single marker or haplotype have identified genetic variants and underlying genetic mechanisms of quantitative traits. Prompted by the achievements of studies examining economic traits in cattle and to verify the consistency of these two methods using real data, the current study was conducted to construct the haplotype structure in the bovine genome and to detect relevant genes genuinely affecting a carcass trait and a meat quality trait. Using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip, 942 young bulls with genotyping data were introduced as a reference population to identify the genes in the beef cattle genome significantly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels. In total, 92,553 haplotype blocks were detected in the genome. The regions of high linkage disequilibrium extended up to approximately 200 kb, and the size of haplotype blocks ranged from 22 bp to 199,266 bp. Additionally, the individual SNP analysis and the haplotype-based analysis detected similar regions and common SNPs for these two representative traits. A total of 12 and 7 SNPs in the bovine genome were significantly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels, respectively. By comparison, 4 and 5 haplotype blocks containing the majority of significant SNPs were strongly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels, respectively. In addition, 36 SNPs with high linkage disequilibrium were detected in the GNAQ gene, a potential hotspot that may play a crucial role for regulating carcass trait components. PMID:25330174

  15. Y-Chromosomal SNPs in Finno–Ugric-Speaking Populations Analyzed by Minisequencing on Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Raitio, Mirja; Lindroos, Katarina; Laukkanen, Minna; Pastinen, Tomi; Sistonen, Pertti; Sajantila, Antti; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2001-01-01

    An increasing number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the Y chromosome are being identified. To utilize the full potential of the SNP markers in population genetic studies, new genotyping methods with high throughput are required. We describe a microarray system based on the minisequencing single nucleotide primer extension principle for multiplex genotyping of Y-chromosomal SNP markers. The system was applied for screening a panel of 25 Y-chromosomal SNPs in a unique collection of samples representing five Finno–Ugric populations. The specific minisequencing reaction provides 5-fold to infinite discrimination between the Y-chromosomal genotypes, and the microarray format of the system allows parallel and simultaneous analysis of large numbers of SNPs and samples. In addition to the SNP markers, five Y-chromosomal microsatellite loci were typed. Altogether 10,000 genotypes were generated to assess the genetic diversity in these population samples. Six of the 25 SNP markers (M9, Tat, SRY10831, M17, M12, 92R7) were polymorphic in the analyzed populations, yielding six distinct SNP haplotypes. The microsatellite data were used to study the genetic structure of two major SNP haplotypes in the Finns and the Saami in more detail. We found that the most common haplotypes are shared between the Finns and the Saami, and that the SNP haplotypes show regional differences within the Finns and the Saami, which supports the hypothesis of two separate settlement waves to Finland. PMID:11230171

  16. Genome-wide analysis in Drosophila reveals age-specific effects of SNPs on fitness traits.

    PubMed

    Durham, Mary F; Magwire, Michael M; Stone, Eric A; Leips, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Most organisms exhibit senescence; a decline in physiological function with age. In nature, rates of senescence vary extensively among individuals and this variation has a significant genetic component; however, we know little about the genes underlying senescence. Here we show the first evidence that individual alleles influence fecundity in an age-specific manner and so the genetic basis of natural variation in fecundity changes dramatically with age. We complete a genome-wide association to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affecting lifespan and age-specific fecundity using the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel. We identify 1,031 SNPs affecting fecundity and 52 influencing lifespan. Only one SNP is associated with both early- and late-age fecundity. The age-specific effect of candidate genes on fecundity is validated using RNA interference. In addition, there is a dramatic increase in the number of SNPs influencing fecundity with age. This result provides support for the mutation accumulation theory of aging. PMID:25000897

  17. The SNPs of Melanocortin 4 Receptor (MC4R) Associated with Body Weight in Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ruixia; Zhang, YiBo; Du, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), which is associated with inherited human obesity, is involoved in food intake and body weight of mammals. To study the relationships between MC4R gene polymorphism and body weight in Beagle dogs, we detected and compared the nucleotide sequence of the whole coding region and 3?- and 5?- flanking regions of the dog MC4R gene (1214 bp). In 120 Beagle dogs, two SNPs (A420C, C895T) were identi?ed and their relation with body weight was analyzed with RFLP-PCR method. The results showed that the SNP at A420C was signi?cantly associated with canine body weight trait when it changed amino acid 101 of the MC4R protein from asparagine to threonine,while canine body weight variations were significant in female dogs when MC4R nonsense mutation at C895T. It suggested that the two SNPs might affect the MC4R gene’s function which was relative to body weight in Beagle dogs. Therefore, MC4R was a candidate gene for selecting different size dogs with the MC4R SNPs (A420C, C895T) being potentially valuable as a genetic marker. PMID:24521865

  18. Functional classification of 15 million SNPs detected from diverse chicken populations

    PubMed Central

    Gheyas, Almas A.; Boschiero, Clarissa; Eory, Lel; Ralph, Hannah; Kuo, Richard; Woolliams, John A.; Burt, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has prompted a surge of discovery of millions of genetic variants from vertebrate genomes. Besides applications in genetic association and linkage studies, a fraction of these variants will have functional consequences. This study describes detection and characterization of 15 million SNPs from chicken genome with the goal to predict variants with potential functional implications (pfVars) from both coding and non-coding regions. The study reports: 183K amino acid-altering SNPs of which 48% predicted as evolutionary intolerant, 13K splicing variants, 51K likely to alter RNA secondary structures, 500K within most conserved elements and 3K from non-coding RNAs. Regions of local fixation within commercial broiler and layer lines were investigated as potential selective sweeps using genome-wide SNP data. Relationships with phenotypes, if any, of the pfVars were explored by overlaying the sweep regions with known QTLs. Based on this, the candidate genes and/or causal mutations for a number of important traits are discussed. Although the fixed variants within sweep regions were enriched with non-coding SNPs, some non-synonymous-intolerant mutations reached fixation, suggesting their possible adaptive advantage. The results presented in this study are expected to have important implications for future genomic research to identify candidate causal mutations and in poultry breeding. PMID:25926514

  19. Novel SNPs in the Ankyrin 1 gene and their association with beef quality traits.

    PubMed

    Horodyska, J; Sweeney, T; Ryan, M; Hamill, R M

    2015-10-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of bovine Ankyrin 1 (ANK1) have been associated with tenderness and intramuscular fat level in beef. The objectives of this study were to characterise novel DNA variants in the coding region of bovine ANK1 and test for association with beef quality traits. A 3kb region of ANK1 cDNA was amplified and sequenced in 32 Charolais cattle using five sets of overlapping primers. Eighteen SNPs were identified and a predicted exon was confirmed. An in silico translation indicated that SNP4 and SNP16 were non-conservative. Three SNPs were genotyped in 158 crossbred cattle (n=158) with associated meat quality data. SNP6 was associated with texture scores while SNP17 was associated with juiciness. Haplotype (cHAP) 1 was associated with lightness, redness, ultimate pH, as well as sarcomere length. Alleles of the ANK1 gene could be potential targets for gene-assisted selection to improve a range of meat quality traits in beef. PMID:26051041

  20. Genome-wide association study based on multiple imputation with low-depth sequencing data: application to biofuel traits in reed canarygrass.

    PubMed

    Ramstein, Guillaume P; Lipka, Alexander E; Lu, Fei; Costich, Denise E; Cherney, Jerome H; Buckler, Edward S; Casler, Michael D

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping by sequencing allows for large-scale genetic analyses in plant species with no reference genome, but sets the challenge of sound inference in presence of uncertain genotypes. We report an imputation-based genome-wide association study (GWAS) in reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L., Phalaris caesia Nees), a cool-season grass species with potential as a biofuel crop. Our study involved two linkage populations and an association panel of 590 reed canarygrass genotypes. Plants were assayed for up to 5228 single nucleotide polymorphism markers and 35 traits. The genotypic markers were derived from low-depth sequencing with 78% missing data on average. To soundly infer marker-trait associations, multiple imputation (MI) was used: several imputes of the marker data were generated to reflect imputation uncertainty and association tests were performed on marker effects across imputes. A total of nine significant markers were identified, three of which showed significant homology with the Brachypodium dystachion genome. Because no physical map of the reed canarygrass genome was available, imputation was conducted using classification trees. In general, MI showed good consistency with the complete-case analysis and adequate control over imputation uncertainty. A gain in significance of marker effects was achieved through MI, but only for rare cases when missing data were <45%. In addition to providing insight into the genetic basis of important traits in reed canarygrass, this study presents one of the first applications of MI to genome-wide analyses and provides useful guidelines for conducting GWAS based on genotyping-by-sequencing data. PMID:25770100

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study Based on Multiple Imputation with Low-Depth Sequencing Data: Application to Biofuel Traits in Reed Canarygrass

    PubMed Central

    Ramstein, Guillaume P.; Lipka, Alexander E.; Lu, Fei; Costich, Denise E.; Cherney, Jerome H.; Buckler, Edward S.; Casler, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing allows for large-scale genetic analyses in plant species with no reference genome, but sets the challenge of sound inference in presence of uncertain genotypes. We report an imputation-based genome-wide association study (GWAS) in reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L., Phalaris caesia Nees), a cool-season grass species with potential as a biofuel crop. Our study involved two linkage populations and an association panel of 590 reed canarygrass genotypes. Plants were assayed for up to 5228 single nucleotide polymorphism markers and 35 traits. The genotypic markers were derived from low-depth sequencing with 78% missing data on average. To soundly infer marker-trait associations, multiple imputation (MI) was used: several imputes of the marker data were generated to reflect imputation uncertainty and association tests were performed on marker effects across imputes. A total of nine significant markers were identified, three of which showed significant homology with the Brachypodium dystachion genome. Because no physical map of the reed canarygrass genome was available, imputation was conducted using classification trees. In general, MI showed good consistency with the complete-case analysis and adequate control over imputation uncertainty. A gain in significance of marker effects was achieved through MI, but only for rare cases when missing data were <45%. In addition to providing insight into the genetic basis of important traits in reed canarygrass, this study presents one of the first applications of MI to genome-wide analyses and provides useful guidelines for conducting GWAS based on genotyping-by-sequencing data. PMID:25770100

  2. Design of a High Density SNP Genotyping Assay in the Pig Using SNPs Identified and Characterized by Next Generation Sequencing Technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dissection of complex traits of economic importance for the pig industry requires the availability of a significant number of genetic markers, such as SNPs. This study was conducted in order to discover thousands of porcine SNPs using next generation sequencing technologies and use those SNPs, a...

  3. Water Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A compact, lightweight electrolytic water sterilizer available through Ambassador Marketing, generates silver ions in concentrations of 50 to 100 parts per billion in water flow system. The silver ions serve as an effective bactericide/deodorizer. Tap water passes through filtering element of silver that has been chemically plated onto activated carbon. The silver inhibits bacterial growth and the activated carbon removes objectionable tastes and odors caused by addition of chlorine and other chemicals in municipal water supply. The three models available are a kitchen unit, a "Tourister" unit for portable use while traveling and a refrigerator unit that attaches to the ice cube water line. A filter will treat 5,000 to 10,000 gallons of water.

  4. Eyeglass Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Biomedical Optical Company of America's suntiger lenses eliminate more than 99% of harmful light wavelengths. NASA derived lenses make scenes more vivid in color and also increase the wearer's visual acuity. Distant objects, even on hazy days, appear crisp and clear; mountains seem closer, glare is greatly reduced, clouds stand out. Daytime use protects the retina from bleaching in bright light, thus improving night vision. Filtering helps prevent a variety of eye disorders, in particular cataracts and age related macular degeneration.

  5. Rethinking Stability of Silver Sulfide Nanoparticles (Ag2S-NPs) in the Aquatic Environment: Photoinduced Transformation of Ag2S-NPs in the Presence of Fe(III).

    PubMed

    Li, Lingxiangyu; Wang, Yawei; Liu, Qian; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-01-01

    The stability of engineered nanomaterials in a natural aquatic environment has drawn much attention over the past few years. Silver sulfide nanoparticles (Ag2S-NPs) are generally assumed to be stable in a natural environment as a result of their physicochemical property; however, it may vary depending upon environmental conditions. Here, we investigated whether and how the environmentally relevant factors including light irradiation, solution pH, inorganic salts, dissolved organic matter (DOM), and dissolved oxygen (DO) individually and in combination influenced the stability of Ag2S-NPs in an aquatic environment. We presented for the first time that transformation of Ag2S-NPs can indeed occur in the aqueous system with an environmentally relevant concentration of Fe(3+) under simulated solar irradiation and natural sunlight within a short time (96 h), along with significant changes in morphology and dissolution. The photoinduced transformation of Ag2S-NPs in the presence of Fe(3+) can be dramatically influenced by solution pH, Ca(2+)/Na(+), Cl(-)/SO4(2-), DOM, and DO. Moreover, Ag2S-NP dissolution increased within 28 h, followed rapid decline in the next 68 h, which may be a result of the reconstitution of small Ag2S-NPs. Taken together, this work is of importance to comprehensively evaluate the stability of Ag2S-NPs in an aquatic environment, improving our understanding of their potential risks to human and environmental health. PMID:26606372

  6. High-accuracy imputation for HLA class I and II genes based on high-resolution SNP data of population-specific references.

    PubMed

    Khor, S-S; Yang, W; Kawashima, M; Kamitsuji, S; Zheng, X; Nishida, N; Sawai, H; Toyoda, H; Miyagawa, T; Honda, M; Kamatani, N; Tokunaga, K

    2015-12-01

    Statistical imputation of classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles is becoming an indispensable tool for fine-mappings of disease association signals from case-control genome-wide association studies. However, most currently available HLA imputation tools are based on European reference populations and are not suitable for direct application to non-European populations. Among the HLA imputation tools, The HIBAG R package is a flexible HLA imputation tool that is equipped with a wide range of population-based classifiers; moreover, HIBAG R enables individual researchers to build custom classifiers. Here, two data sets, each comprising data from healthy Japanese individuals of difference sample sizes, were used to build custom classifiers. HLA imputation accuracy in five HLA classes (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DPB1) increased from the 82.5-98.8% obtained with the original HIBAG references to 95.2-99.5% with our custom classifiers. A call threshold (CT) of 0.4 is recommended for our Japanese classifiers; in contrast, HIBAG references recommend a CT of 0.5. Finally, our classifiers could be used to identify the risk haplotypes for Japanese narcolepsy with cataplexy, HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*06:02, with 100% and 99.7% accuracy, respectively; therefore, these classifiers can be used to supplement the current lack of HLA genotyping data in widely available genome-wide association study data sets. PMID:25707395

  7. A real-time PCR genotyping assay to detect FAD2A SNPs in peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The high oleic (C18:1) phenotype in peanuts has been previously demonstrated to result from a homozygous recessive genotype (ol1ol1ol2ol2) in two homeologous fatty acid desaturase genes (FAD2A and FAD2B) with two key SNPs. These mutant SNPs, specifically G448A in FAD2A and 442insA in FAD2B, signifi...

  8. Rocket noise filtering system using digital filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauritzen, David

    1990-01-01

    A set of digital filters is designed to filter rocket noise to various bandwidths. The filters are designed to have constant group delay and are implemented in software on a general purpose computer. The Parks-McClellan algorithm is used. Preliminary tests are performed to verify the design and implementation. An analog filter which was previously employed is also simulated.

  9. Improved Ancestry Estimation for both Genotyping and Sequencing Data using Projection Procrustes Analysis and Genotype Imputation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chaolong; Zhan, Xiaowei; Liang, Liming; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Lin, Xihong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of individual ancestry is important in genetic association studies, especially when a large number of samples are collected from multiple sources. However, existing approaches developed for genome-wide SNP data do not work well with modest amounts of genetic data, such as in targeted sequencing or exome chip genotyping experiments. We propose a statistical framework to estimate individual ancestry in a principal component ancestry map generated by a reference set of individuals. This framework extends and improves upon our previous method for estimating ancestry using low-coverage sequence reads (LASER 1.0) to analyze either genotyping or sequencing data. In particular, we introduce a projection Procrustes analysis approach that uses high-dimensional principal components to estimate ancestry in a low-dimensional reference space. Using extensive simulations and empirical data examples, we show that our new method (LASER 2.0), combined with genotype imputation on the reference individuals, can substantially outperform LASER 1.0 in estimating fine-scale genetic ancestry. Specifically, LASER 2.0 can accurately estimate fine-scale ancestry within Europe using either exome chip genotypes or targeted sequencing data with off-target coverage as low as 0.05×. Under the framework of LASER 2.0, we can estimate individual ancestry in a shared reference space for samples assayed at different loci or by different techniques. Therefore, our ancestry estimation method will accelerate discovery in disease association studies not only by helping model ancestry within individual studies but also by facilitating combined analysis of genetic data from multiple sources. PMID:26027497

  10. Improved ancestry estimation for both genotyping and sequencing data using projection procrustes analysis and genotype imputation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaolong; Zhan, Xiaowei; Liang, Liming; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Lin, Xihong

    2015-06-01

    Accurate estimation of individual ancestry is important in genetic association studies, especially when a large number of samples are collected from multiple sources. However, existing approaches developed for genome-wide SNP data do not work well with modest amounts of genetic data, such as in targeted sequencing or exome chip genotyping experiments. We propose a statistical framework to estimate individual ancestry in a principal component ancestry map generated by a reference set of individuals. This framework extends and improves upon our previous method for estimating ancestry using low-coverage sequence reads (LASER 1.0) to analyze either genotyping or sequencing data. In particular, we introduce a projection Procrustes analysis approach that uses high-dimensional principal components to estimate ancestry in a low-dimensional reference space. Using extensive simulations and empirical data examples, we show that our new method (LASER 2.0), combined with genotype imputation on the reference individuals, can substantially outperform LASER 1.0 in estimating fine-scale genetic ancestry. Specifically, LASER 2.0 can accurately estimate fine-scale ancestry within Europe using either exome chip genotypes or targeted sequencing data with off-target coverage as low as 0.05×. Under the framework of LASER 2.0, we can estimate individual ancestry in a shared reference space for samples assayed at different loci or by different techniques. Therefore, our ancestry estimation method will accelerate discovery in disease association studies not only by helping model ancestry within individual studies but also by facilitating combined analysis of genetic data from multiple sources. PMID:26027497

  11. Non-linear filtering Example: Median filter

    E-print Network

    Oliensis, John

    Non-linear filtering · Example: Median filter · Replaces pixel value by median value over neighborhood · Generates no new gray levels I=(1 2 3 2 3 2 1) 2 22 3 2 #12;Median filters Advantage (?): the "odd-man-out" effect e.g. 1,1,1,7,1,1,1,1 ?,1,1,1.1,1,1,? #12;Median filters: example filter width = 5

  12. Application of Population Sequencing (POPSEQ) for Ordering and Imputing Genotyping-by-Sequencing Markers in Hexaploid Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Edae, Erena A.; Bowden, Robert L.; Poland, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies in conjunction with new bioinformatics tools enabled fine-tuning of sequence-based, high-resolution mapping strategies for complex genomes. Although genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) provides a large number of markers, its application for association mapping and genomics-assisted breeding is limited by a large proportion of missing data per marker. For species with a reference genomic sequence, markers can be ordered on the physical map. However, in the absence of reference marker order, the use and imputation of GBS markers is challenging. Here, we demonstrate how the population sequencing (POPSEQ) approach can be used to provide marker context for GBS in wheat. The utility of a POPSEQ-based genetic map as a reference map to create genetically ordered markers on a chromosome for hexaploid wheat was validated by constructing an independent de novo linkage map of GBS markers from a Synthetic W7984 × Opata M85 recombinant inbred line (SynOpRIL) population. The results indicated that there is strong agreement between the independent de novo linkage map and the POPSEQ mapping approach in mapping and ordering GBS markers for hexaploid wheat. After ordering, a large number of GBS markers were imputed, thus providing a high-quality reference map that can be used for QTL mapping for different traits. The POPSEQ-based reference map and whole-genome sequence assemblies are valuable resources that can be used to order GBS markers and enable the application of highly accurate imputation methods to leverage the application GBS markers in wheat. PMID:26530417

  13. Residential proximity to electromagnetic field sources and birth weight: Minimizing residual confounding using multiple imputation and propensity score matching.

    PubMed

    de Vocht, Frank; Lee, Brian

    2014-08-01

    Studies have suggested that residential exposure to extremely low frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) from high voltage cables, overhead power lines, electricity substations or towers are associated with reduced birth weight and may be associated with adverse birth outcomes or even miscarriages. We previously conducted a study of 140,356 singleton live births between 2004 and 2008 in Northwest England, which suggested that close residential proximity (? 50 m) to ELF-EMF sources was associated with reduced average birth weight of 212 g (95%CI: -395 to -29 g) but not with statistically significant increased risks for other adverse perinatal outcomes. However, the cohort was limited by missing data for most potentially confounding variables including maternal smoking during pregnancy, which was only available for a small subgroup, while also residual confounding could not be excluded. This study, using the same cohort, was conducted to minimize the effects of these problems using multiple imputation to address missing data and propensity score matching to minimize residual confounding. Missing data were imputed using multiple imputation using chained equations to generate five datasets. For each dataset 115 exposed women (residing ? 50 m from a residential ELF-EMF source) were propensity score matched to 1150 unexposed women. After doubly robust confounder adjustment, close proximity to a residential ELF-EMF source remained associated with a reduction in birth weight of -116 g (95% confidence interval: -224:-7 g). No effect was found for proximity ? 100 m compared to women living further away. These results indicate that although the effect size was about half of the effect previously reported, close maternal residential proximity to sources of ELF-EMF remained associated with suboptimal fetal growth. PMID:24815339

  14. HLA-A SNPs and amino acid variants are associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Malaysian Chinese.

    PubMed

    Chin, Yoon-Ming; Mushiroda, Taisei; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Krishnan, Gopala; Yap, Lee-Fah; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Lim, Paul Vey-Hong; Yap, Yoke-Yeow; Pua, Kin-Choo; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Sam, Choon-Kook; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Ng, Ching-Ching

    2015-02-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) arises from the mucosal epithelium of the nasopharynx and is constantly associated with Epstein-Barr virus type 1 (EBV-1) infection. We carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 575,247 autosomal SNPs in 184 NPC patients and 236 healthy controls of Malaysian Chinese ethnicity. Potential association signals were replicated in a separate cohort of 260 NPC patients and 245 healthy controls. We confirmed the association of HLA-A to NPC with the strongest signal detected in rs3869062 (p?=?1.73 × 10(-9)). HLA-A fine mapping revealed associations in the amino acid variants as well as its corresponding SNPs in the antigen peptide binding groove (p(HLA-A-aa-site-99)?=?3.79 × 10(-8), p(rs1136697)?=?3.79 × 10(-8)) and T-cell receptor binding site (p(HLA-A-aa-site-145)?=?1.41 × 10(-4), p(rs1059520)?=?1.41 × 10(-4)) of the HLA-A. We also detected strong association signals in the 5'-UTR region with predicted active promoter states (p(rs41545520)?=?7.91 × 10(-8)). SNP rs41545520 is a potential binding site for repressor ATF3, with increased binding affinity for rs41545520-G correlated with reduced HLA-A expression. Multivariate logistic regression diminished the effects of HLA-A amino acid variants and SNPs, indicating a correlation with the effects of HLA-A*11:01, and to a lesser extent HLA-A*02:07. We report the strong genetic influence of HLA-A on NPC susceptibility in the Malaysian Chinese. PMID:24947555

  15. A New Methodology to Associate SNPs with Human Diseases According to Their Pathway Related Context

    PubMed Central

    Bakir-Gungor, Burcu; Sezerman, Osman Ugur

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with hundreds of ?thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are popular strategies to reveal the genetic basis of human complex diseases. Despite many successes of GWAS, it is well recognized that new analytical approaches have to be integrated to achieve their full potential. Starting with a list of SNPs, found to be associated with disease in GWAS, here we propose a novel methodology to devise functionally important KEGG pathways through the identification of genes within these pathways, where these genes are obtained from SNP analysis. Our methodology is based on functionalization of important SNPs to identify effected genes and disease related pathways. We have tested our methodology on WTCCC Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) dataset and identified: i) previously known RA related KEGG pathways (e.g., Toll-like receptor signaling, Jak-STAT signaling, Antigen processing, Leukocyte transendothelial migration and MAPK signaling pathways); ii) additional KEGG pathways (e.g., Pathways in cancer, Neurotrophin signaling, Chemokine signaling pathways) as associated with RA. Furthermore, these newly found pathways included genes which are targets of RA-specific drugs. Even though GWAS analysis identifies 14 out of 83 of those drug target genes; newly found functionally important KEGG pathways led to the discovery of 25 out of 83 genes, known to be used as drug targets for the treatment of RA. Among the previously known pathways, we identified additional genes associated with RA (e.g. Antigen processing and presentation, Tight junction). Importantly, within these pathways, the associations between some of these additionally found genes, such as HLA-C, HLA-G, PRKCQ, PRKCZ, TAP1, TAP2 and RA were verified by either OMIM database or by literature retrieved from the NCBI PubMed module. With the whole-genome sequencing on the horizon, we show that the full potential of GWAS can be achieved by integrating pathway and network-oriented analysis and prior knowledge from functional properties of a SNP. PMID:22046267

  16. Transposon Insertions, Structural Variations, and SNPs Contribute to the Evolution of the Melon Genome.

    PubMed

    Sanseverino, Walter; Hénaff, Elizabeth; Vives, Cristina; Pinosio, Sara; Burgos-Paz, William; Morgante, Michele; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastián E; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Casacuberta, Josep Maria

    2015-10-01

    The availability of extensive databases of crop genome sequences should allow analysis of crop variability at an unprecedented scale, which should have an important impact in plant breeding. However, up to now the analysis of genetic variability at the whole-genome scale has been mainly restricted to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This is a strong limitation as structural variation (SV) and transposon insertion polymorphisms are frequent in plant species and have had an important mutational role in crop domestication and breeding. Here, we present the first comprehensive analysis of melon genetic diversity, which includes a detailed analysis of SNPs, SV, and transposon insertion polymorphisms. The variability found among seven melon varieties representing the species diversity and including wild accessions and highly breed lines, is relatively high due in part to the marked divergence of some lineages. The diversity is distributed nonuniformly across the genome, being lower at the extremes of the chromosomes and higher in the pericentromeric regions, which is compatible with the effect of purifying selection and recombination forces over functional regions. Additionally, this variability is greatly reduced among elite varieties, probably due to selection during breeding. We have found some chromosomal regions showing a high differentiation of the elite varieties versus the rest, which could be considered as strongly selected candidate regions. Our data also suggest that transposons and SV may be at the origin of an important fraction of the variability in melon, which highlights the importance of analyzing all types of genetic variability to understand crop genome evolution. PMID:26174143

  17. Linkage analysis of SNPs in IGFBP-6 and its relation with the body sizes of pig.

    PubMed

    Fang, X B; Liu, S C; Wu, Q Y; Li, S M; Cheng, Y Y; Fu, H Y; Lu, C; Su, D; Yu, H; Hao, L L

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 (IGFBP-6) is a member of the IGFBP family, which is known to be a key factor in regulating the effect of insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-2) on the animal growth and development. Gene sequences of 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) and exon 4 of IGFBP-6 may influence the expression and proteolysis of IGFBP-6. In this study, 551 bp of the IGFBP-6 (including 257 bp of intron 3, exon 4, and 170 bp of 3' UTR) were sequenced and compared in the Bama and Tibetan mini-pigs, the Landrace and Large White pigs, and the Northeast wild boars. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in the IGFBP-6, in which T593C, T636C, and T745C were in intron 3, A67G was in exon 4, and G37A was in 3' UTR. T636C, T745C, and A67G were in linkage and formed four kinds of haplotypes, with CCT being the dominant haplotype in the mini-pigs; however, the haplotype block was not formed in the Landrace pigs and Large White pigs or the Northeast wild boars. Based on the above results, we concluded that the SNPs and haplotype of the IGFBP-6 may be related to the mini-size formation of the pig. PMID:26681221

  18. Updating the Y-chromosomal phylogenetic tree for forensic applications based on whole genome SNPs.

    PubMed

    Van Geystelen, A; Decorte, R; Larmuseau, M H D

    2013-12-01

    The Y-chromosomal phylogenetic tree has a wide variety of important forensic applications and therefore it needs to be state-of-the-art. Nevertheless, since the last 'official' published tree many publications reported additional Y-chromosomal lineages and other phylogenetic topologies. Therefore, it is difficult for forensic scientists to interpret those reports and use an up-to-date tree and corresponding nomenclature in their daily work. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) data is useful to verify and optimise the current phylogenetic tree for haploid markers. The AMY-tree software is the first open access program which analyses WGS data for Y-chromosomal phylogenetic applications. Here, all published information is collected in a phylogenetic tree and the correctness of this tree is checked based on the first large analysis of 747 WGS samples with AMY-tree. The obtained result is one phylogenetic tree with all peer-reviewed reported Y-SNPs without the observed recurrent and ambiguous mutations. Nevertheless, the results showed that currently only the genomes of a limited set of Y-chromosomal (sub-)haplogroups is available and that many newly reported Y-SNPs based on WGS projects are false positives, even with high sequencing coverage methods. This study demonstrates the usefulness of AMY-tree in the process of checking the quality of the present Y-chromosomal tree and it accentuates the difficulties to enlarge this tree based on only WGS methods. PMID:23597787

  19. The genetics of human infertility by functional interrogation of SNPs in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priti; Schimenti, John C

    2015-08-18

    Infertility is a prevalent health issue, affecting ?15% of couples of childbearing age. Nearly one-half of idiopathic infertility cases are thought to have a genetic basis, but the underlying causes are largely unknown. Traditional methods for studying inheritance, such as genome-wide association studies and linkage analyses, have been confounded by the genetic and phenotypic complexity of reproductive processes. Here we describe an association- and linkage-free approach to identify segregating infertility alleles, in which CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing is used to model putatively deleterious nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) in the mouse orthologs of fertility genes. Mice bearing "humanized" alleles of four essential meiosis genes, each predicted to be deleterious by most of the commonly used algorithms for analyzing functional SNP consequences, were examined for fertility and reproductive defects. Only a Cdk2 allele mimicking SNP rs3087335, which alters an inhibitory WEE1 protein kinase phosphorylation site, caused infertility and revealed a novel function in regulating spermatogonial stem cell maintenance. Our data indicate that segregating infertility alleles exist in human populations. Furthermore, whereas computational prediction of SNP effects is useful for identifying candidate causal mutations for diverse diseases, this study underscores the need for in vivo functional evaluation of physiological consequences. This approach can revolutionize personalized reproductive genetics by establishing a permanent reference of benign vs. infertile alleles. PMID:26240362

  20. Genomics and introgression: discovery and mapping ofthousands of species-diagnostic SNPs using RAD sequencing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hand, Brian K; Hether, Tyler D; Kovach, Ryan P.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Amish, Stephen J.; Boyer, Matthew C.; O’Rourke, Sean M.; Miller, Michael R.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Hohenlohe, Paul A.; Luikart, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Invasive hybridization and introgression pose a serious threat to the persistence of many native species. Understanding the effects of hybridization on native populations (e.g., fitness consequences) requires numerous species-diagnostic loci distributed genome-wide. Here we used RAD sequencing to discover thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are diagnostic between rainbow trout (RBT, Oncorhynchus mykiss), the world’s most widely introduced fish, and native westslope cutthroat trout (WCT, O. clarkii lewisi) in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA. We advanced previous work that identified 4,914 species-diagnostic loci by using longer sequence reads (100 bp vs. 60 bp) and a larger set of individuals (n = 84). We sequenced RAD libraries for individuals from diverse sampling sources, including native populations of WCT and hatchery broodstocks of WCT and RBT. We also took advantage of a newly released reference genome assembly for RBT to align our RAD loci. In total, we discovered 16,788 putatively diagnostic SNPs, 10,267 of which we mapped to anchored chromosome locations on the RBT genome. A small portion of previously discovered putative diagnostic loci (325 of 4,914) were no longer diagnostic (i.e., fixed between species) based on our wider survey of non-hybridized RBT and WCT individuals. Our study suggests that RAD loci mapped to a draft genome assembly could provide the marker density required to identify genes and chromosomal regions influencing selection in admixed populations of conservation concern and evolutionary interest.

  1. Analysis of 49 autosomal SNPs in three ethnic groups from Iran: Persians, Lurs and Kurds.

    PubMed

    Sharafi Farzad, M; Tomas, C; Børsting, C; Zeinali, Z; Malekdoost, M; Zeinali, S; Morling, N

    2013-07-01

    A total number of 149 individuals from Iran (Persians, Lurs and Kurds) were analyzed for 49 autosomal SNPs using PCR, SBE and capillary electrophoresis. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed. One SNP pair (rs1015250-rs251934) showed significant linkage disequilibrium in Kurds. However, this was most likely due to chance. High intrapopulation variability and no significant population structure were observed among the three ethnic groups from Iran. Pairwise FST values obtained from the mean numbers of pairwise differences between SNP profiles were calculated for Persians, Lurs, Kurds and eighteen other worldwide populations. For each of the three Iranian ethnic groups, the lowest FST values calculated between an Iranian and non-Iranian populations were observed between Iranians and populations in Iraq and Turkey. The three Iranian ethnic groups grouped together with other West Asian populations in the MDS plot drawn from the FST values. Statistical parameters of forensic interest calculated for the Iranian ethnic groups showed values of the same order of magnitudes as those obtained for Asians. The mean match probability calculated for the 49 SNPs ranged from 1.7x10(-18) for Kurds to 1.3x10(-19) for Persians. Despite the low level of genetic structure observed among Persians, Lurs and Kurds, a single autosomal SNP database should be used with care when extending its forensic application to other Iranian ethnic groups. PMID:23648204

  2. A North American Yersinia pestis Draft Genome Sequence: SNPs and Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jicheng; Mastrian, Stephen D.; Shah, Maulik K.; Vogler, Amy J.; Allender, Christopher J.; Clark, Erin A.; Benitez, Debbie S.; Youngkin, David J.; Girard, Jessica M.; Auerbach, Raymond K.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Keim, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Background Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is responsible for some of the greatest epidemic scourges of mankind. It is widespread in the western United States, although it has only been present there for just over 100 years. As a result, there has been very little time for diversity to accumulate in this region. Much of the diversity that has been detected among North American isolates is at loci that mutate too quickly to accurately reconstruct large-scale phylogenetic patterns. Slowly-evolving but stable markers such as SNPs could be useful for this purpose, but are difficult to identify due to the monomorphic nature of North American isolates. Methodology/Principal Findings To identify SNPs that are polymorphic among North American populations of Y. pestis, a gapped genome sequence of Y. pestis strain FV-1 was generated. Sequence comparison of FV-1 with another North American strain, CO92, identified 19 new SNP loci that differ among North American isolates. Conclusions/Significance The 19 SNP loci identified in this study should facilitate additional studies of the genetic population structure of Y. pestis across North America. PMID:17311096

  3. Genetic relationship between five psychiatric disorders estimated from genome-wide SNPs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Most psychiatric disorders are moderately to highly heritable. The degree to which genetic variation is unique to individual disorders or shared across disorders is unclear. To examine shared genetic etiology, we use genome-wide genotype data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) for cases and controls in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We apply univariate and bivariate methods for the estimation of genetic variation within and covariation between disorders. SNPs explained 17–29% of the variance in liability. The genetic correlation calculated using common SNPs was high between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (0.68 ± 0.04 s.e.), moderate between schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (0.43 ± 0.06 s.e.), bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder (0.47 ± 0.06 s.e.), and ADHD and major depressive disorder (0.32 ± 0.07 s.e.), low between schizophrenia and ASD (0.16 ± 0.06 s.e.) and non-significant for other pairs of disorders as well as between psychiatric disorders and the negative control of Crohn’s disease. This empirical evidence of shared genetic etiology for psychiatric disorders can inform nosology and encourages the investigation of common pathophysiologies for related disorders. PMID:23933821

  4. Insights into Diversity and Imputed Metabolic Potential of Bacterial Communities in the Continental Shelf of Agatti Island.

    PubMed

    Kumbhare, Shreyas V; Dhotre, Dhiraj P; Dhar, Sunil Kumar; Jani, Kunal; Apte, Deepak A; Shouche, Yogesh S; Sharma, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Marine microbes play a key role and contribute largely to the global biogeochemical cycles. This study aims to explore microbial diversity from one such ecological hotspot, the continental shelf of Agatti Island. Sediment samples from various depths of the continental shelf were analyzed for bacterial diversity using deep sequencing technology along with the culturable approach. Additionally, imputed metagenomic approach was carried out to understand the functional aspects of microbial community especially for microbial genes important in nutrient uptake, survival and biogeochemical cycling in the marine environment. Using culturable approach, 28 bacterial strains representing 9 genera were isolated from various depths of continental shelf. The microbial community structure throughout the samples was dominated by phylum Proteobacteria and harbored various bacterioplanktons as well. Significant differences were observed in bacterial diversity within a short region of the continental shelf (1-40 meters) i.e. between upper continental shelf samples (UCS) with lesser depths (i.e. 1-20 meters) and lower continental shelf samples (LCS) with greater depths (i.e. 25-40 meters). By using imputed metagenomic approach, this study also discusses several adaptive mechanisms which enable microbes to survive in nutritionally deprived conditions, and also help to understand the influence of nutrition availability on bacterial diversity. PMID:26066038

  5. Insights into Diversity and Imputed Metabolic Potential of Bacterial Communities in the Continental Shelf of Agatti Island

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Sunil Kumar; Jani, Kunal; Apte, Deepak A.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Sharma, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Marine microbes play a key role and contribute largely to the global biogeochemical cycles. This study aims to explore microbial diversity from one such ecological hotspot, the continental shelf of Agatti Island. Sediment samples from various depths of the continental shelf were analyzed for bacterial diversity using deep sequencing technology along with the culturable approach. Additionally, imputed metagenomic approach was carried out to understand the functional aspects of microbial community especially for microbial genes important in nutrient uptake, survival and biogeochemical cycling in the marine environment. Using culturable approach, 28 bacterial strains representing 9 genera were isolated from various depths of continental shelf. The microbial community structure throughout the samples was dominated by phylum Proteobacteria and harbored various bacterioplanktons as well. Significant differences were observed in bacterial diversity within a short region of the continental shelf (1–40 meters) i.e. between upper continental shelf samples (UCS) with lesser depths (i.e. 1–20 meters) and lower continental shelf samples (LCS) with greater depths (i.e. 25–40 meters). By using imputed metagenomic approach, this study also discusses several adaptive mechanisms which enable microbes to survive in nutritionally deprived conditions, and also help to understand the influence of nutrition availability on bacterial diversity. PMID:26066038

  6. Imputation of the Date of HIV Seroconversion in a Cohort of Seroprevalent Subjects: Implications for Analysis of Late HIV Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino-Vegas, Paz; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Geskus, Ronald; Padilla, Belén; Segura, Ferrán; Rubio, Rafael; del Romero, Jorge; Santos, Jesus; Moreno, Santiago; del Amo, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Since subjects may have been diagnosed before cohort entry, analysis of late HIV diagnosis (LD) is usually restricted to the newly diagnosed. We estimate the magnitude and risk factors of LD in a cohort of seroprevalent individuals by imputing seroconversion dates. Methods. Multicenter cohort of HIV-positive subjects who were treatment naive at entry, in Spain, 2004–2008. Multiple-imputation techniques were used. Subjects with times to HIV diagnosis longer than 4.19 years were considered LD. Results. Median time to HIV diagnosis was 2.8 years in the whole cohort of 3,667 subjects. Factors significantly associated with LD were: male sex; Sub-Saharan African, Latin-American origin compared to Spaniards; and older age. In 2,928 newly diagnosed subjects, median time to diagnosis was 3.3 years, and LD was more common in injecting drug users. Conclusions. Estimates of the magnitude and risk factors of LD for the whole cohort differ from those obtained for new HIV diagnoses. PMID:22013517

  7. A new GWAS and meta-analysis with 1000Genomes imputation identifies novel risk variants for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tassan, Nada A.; Whiffin, Nicola; Hosking, Fay J.; Palles, Claire; Farrington, Susan M.; Dobbins, Sara E.; Harris, Rebecca; Gorman, Maggie; Tenesa, Albert; Meyer, Brian F.; Wakil, Salma M.; Kinnersley, Ben; Campbell, Harry; Martin, Lynn; Smith, Christopher G.; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Barclay, Ella; Maughan, Timothy S.; Kaplan, Richard; Kerr, Rachel; Kerr, David; Buchannan, Daniel D.; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of colorectal cancer (CRC) have identified 23 susceptibility loci thus far. Analyses of previously conducted GWAS indicate additional risk loci are yet to be discovered. To identify novel CRC susceptibility loci, we conducted a new GWAS and performed a meta-analysis with five published GWAS (totalling 7,577 cases and 9,979 controls of European ancestry), imputing genotypes utilising the 1000 Genomes Project. The combined analysis identified new, significant associations with CRC at 1p36.2 marked by rs72647484 (minor allele frequency [MAF]?=?0.09) near CDC42 and WNT4 (P?=?1.21?×?10?8, odds ratio [OR]?=?1.21 ) and at 16q24.1 marked by rs16941835 (MAF?=?0.21, P?=?5.06?×?10?8; OR?=?1.15) within the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) RP11-58A18.1 and ~500?kb from the nearest coding gene FOXL1. Additionally we identified a promising association at 10p13 with rs10904849 intronic to CUBN (MAF?=?0.32, P?=?7.01?×?10-8; OR?=?1.14). These findings provide further insights into the genetic and biological basis of inherited genetic susceptibility to CRC. Additionally, our analysis further demonstrates that imputation can be used to exploit GWAS data to identify novel disease-causing variants. PMID:25990418

  8. Identification of Pyrus single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and evaluation for genetic mapping in European pear and interspecific Pyrus hybrids.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Sara; Saeed, Munazza; Knäbel, Mareike; Kim, YoonKyeong; Troggio, Michela; Malnoy, Mickael; Velasco, Riccardo; Fontana, Paolo; Won, KyungHo; Durel, Charles-Eric; Perchepied, Laure; Schaffer, Robert; Wiedow, Claudia; Bus, Vincent; Brewer, Lester; Gardiner, Susan E; Crowhurst, Ross N; Chagné, David

    2013-01-01

    We have used new generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from three European pear (Pyrus communis L.) cultivars and subsequently developed a subset of 1096 pear SNPs into high throughput markers by combining them with the set of 7692 apple SNPs on the IRSC apple Infinium® II 8K array. We then evaluated this apple and pear Infinium® II 9K SNP array for large-scale genotyping in pear across several species, using both pear and apple SNPs. The segregating populations employed for array validation included a segregating population of European pear ('Old Home'×'Louise Bon Jersey') and four interspecific breeding families derived from Asian (P. pyrifolia Nakai and P. bretschneideri Rehd.) and European pear pedigrees. In total, we mapped 857 polymorphic pear markers to construct the first SNP-based genetic maps for pear, comprising 78% of the total pear SNPs included in the array. In addition, 1031 SNP markers derived from apple (13% of the total apple SNPs included in the array) were polymorphic and were mapped in one or more of the pear populations. These results are the first to demonstrate SNP transferability across the genera Malus and Pyrus. Our construction of high density SNP-based and gene-based genetic maps in pear represents an important step towards the identification of chromosomal regions associated with a range of horticultural characters, such as pest and disease resistance, orchard yield and fruit quality. PMID:24155917

  9. Detection of associations with rare and common SNPs for quantitative traits: a nonparametric Bayes-based approach.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Baye, Tesfaye M; He, Hua; Zhang, Xue; Kurowski, Brad G; Martin, Lisa J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a nonparametric Bayes-based clustering algorithm to detect associations with rare and common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for quantitative traits. Unlike current methods, our approach identifies associations with rare genetic variants at the variant level, not the gene level. In this method, we use a Dirichlet process prior for the distribution of SNP-specific regression coefficients, conduct hierarchical clustering with a distance measure derived from posterior pairwise probabilities of two SNPs having the same regression coefficient, and explore data-driven approaches to select the number of clusters. SNPs falling inside the largest cluster have relatively low or close to zero estimates of regression coefficients and are considered not associated with the trait. SNPs falling outside the largest cluster have relatively high estimates of regression coefficients and are considered potential risk variants. Using the data from the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17, we successfully detected associations with both rare and common SNPs for a quantitative trait. We conclude that our method provides a novel and broadly applicable strategy for obtaining association results with a reasonably low proportion of false discovery and that it can be routinely used in resequencing studies. PMID:22373351

  10. High density linkage mapping of genomic and transcriptomic SNPs for synteny analysis and anchoring the genome sequence of chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Rashmi; Jeena, Ganga; Shah, Niraj; Gupta, Shefali; Pradhan, Seema; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Jain, Mukesh; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    This study presents genome-wide discovery of SNPs through next generation sequencing of the genome of Cicer reticulatum. Mapping of the C. reticulatum sequenced reads onto the draft genome assembly of C. arietinum (desi chickpea) resulted in identification of 842,104 genomic SNPs which were utilized along with an additional 36,446 genic SNPs identified from transcriptome sequences of the aforementioned varieties. Two new chickpea Oligo Pool All (OPAs) each having 3,072 SNPs were designed and utilized for SNP genotyping of 129 Recombinant Inbred Lines (RILs). Using Illumina GoldenGate Technology genotyping data of 5,041 SNPs were generated and combined with the 1,673 marker data from previously published studies, to generate a high resolution linkage map. The map comprised of 6698 markers distributed on eight linkage groups spanning 1083.93?cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.16?cM. Utility of the present map was demonstrated for improving the anchoring of the earlier reported draft genome sequence of desi chickpea by ~30% and that of kabuli chickpea by 18%. The genetic map reported in this study represents the most dense linkage map of chickpea , with the potential to facilitate efficient anchoring of the draft genome sequences of desi as well as kabuli chickpea varieties. PMID:26303721

  11. Identification of Pyrus Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and Evaluation for Genetic Mapping in European Pear and Interspecific Pyrus Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Troggio, Michela; Malnoy, Mickael; Velasco, Riccardo; Fontana, Paolo; Won, KyungHo; Durel, Charles-Eric; Perchepied, Laure; Schaffer, Robert; Wiedow, Claudia; Bus, Vincent; Brewer, Lester; Gardiner, Susan E.; Crowhurst, Ross N.; Chagné, David

    2013-01-01

    We have used new generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from three European pear (Pyrus communis L.) cultivars and subsequently developed a subset of 1096 pear SNPs into high throughput markers by combining them with the set of 7692 apple SNPs on the IRSC apple Infinium® II 8K array. We then evaluated this apple and pear Infinium® II 9K SNP array for large-scale genotyping in pear across several species, using both pear and apple SNPs. The segregating populations employed for array validation included a segregating population of European pear (‘Old Home’בLouise Bon Jersey’) and four interspecific breeding families derived from Asian (P. pyrifolia Nakai and P. bretschneideri Rehd.) and European pear pedigrees. In total, we mapped 857 polymorphic pear markers to construct the first SNP-based genetic maps for pear, comprising 78% of the total pear SNPs included in the array. In addition, 1031 SNP markers derived from apple (13% of the total apple SNPs included in the array) were polymorphic and were mapped in one or more of the pear populations. These results are the first to demonstrate SNP transferability across the genera Malus and Pyrus. Our construction of high density SNP-based and gene-based genetic maps in pear represents an important step towards the identification of chromosomal regions associated with a range of horticultural characters, such as pest and disease resistance, orchard yield and fruit quality. PMID:24155917

  12. Identification of Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in Deer (Odocoileus spp.) Using the BovineSNP50 BeadChip

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Gwilym D.; Latch, Emily K.

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are growing in popularity as a genetic marker for investigating evolutionary processes. A panel of SNPs is often developed by comparing large quantities of DNA sequence data across multiple individuals to identify polymorphic sites. For non-model species, this is particularly difficult, as performing the necessary large-scale genomic sequencing often exceeds the resources available for the project. In this study, we trial the Bovine SNP50 BeadChip developed in cattle (Bos taurus) for identifying polymorphic SNPs in cervids Odocoileus hemionus (mule deer and black-tailed deer) and O. virginianus (white-tailed deer) in the Pacific Northwest. We found that 38.7% of loci could be genotyped, of which 5% (n?=?1068) were polymorphic. Of these 1068 polymorphic SNPs, a mixture of putatively neutral loci (n?=?878) and loci under selection (n?=?190) were identified with the FST-outlier method. A range of population genetic analyses were implemented using these SNPs and a panel of 10 microsatellite loci. The three types of deer could readily be distinguished with both the SNP and microsatellite datasets. This study demonstrates that commercially developed SNP chips are a viable means of SNP discovery for non-model organisms, even when used between very distantly related species (the Bovidae and Cervidae families diverged some 25.1?30.1 million years before present). PMID:22590559

  13. High density linkage mapping of genomic and transcriptomic SNPs for synteny analysis and anchoring the genome sequence of chickpea.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Rashmi; Jeena, Ganga; Shah, Niraj; Gupta, Shefali; Pradhan, Seema; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Jain, Mukesh; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    This study presents genome-wide discovery of SNPs through next generation sequencing of the genome of Cicer reticulatum. Mapping of the C. reticulatum sequenced reads onto the draft genome assembly of C. arietinum (desi chickpea) resulted in identification of 842,104 genomic SNPs which were utilized along with an additional 36,446 genic SNPs identified from transcriptome sequences of the aforementioned varieties. Two new chickpea Oligo Pool All (OPAs) each having 3,072 SNPs were designed and utilized for SNP genotyping of 129 Recombinant Inbred Lines (RILs). Using Illumina GoldenGate Technology genotyping data of 5,041 SNPs were generated and combined with the 1,673 marker data from previously published studies, to generate a high resolution linkage map. The map comprised of 6698 markers distributed on eight linkage groups spanning 1083.93?cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.16?cM. Utility of the present map was demonstrated for improving the anchoring of the earlier reported draft genome sequence of desi chickpea by ~30% and that of kabuli chickpea by 18%. The genetic map reported in this study represents the most dense linkage map of chickpea , with the potential to facilitate efficient anchoring of the draft genome sequences of desi as well as kabuli chickpea varieties. PMID:26303721

  14. Discovery of URAT1 SNPs and association between serum uric acid levels and URAT1

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Kweon; Kim, Soriul; Chung, Jae-Yong; Jee, Sun Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Human urate transporter 1 (URAT1) is a member of the organic anion transporter family (SLC22A12) that primarily regulates the renal tubular reabsorption of uric acid. This case–control study was designed to analyse whether hURAT1 might also be a candidate gene for hyperuricaemia or hypouricaemia. Setting We recruited 68 healthy volunteers and divided them into two groups: a normal uric acid group and a hyperuricaemia group. We analysed the sequence of the URAT1 gene and found five significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We then selected 900 male subjects from the 262?200 enrolled in the Korean Cancer Prevention Study-II (KCPS-II) cohort for further genetic analysis. Participants DNA samples from 36 individuals with normal uric acid (<4.5?mg/dL) and 32 individuals with hyperuricaemia (>8.5?mg/dL) were sequenced. Five significant SNPs (rs7929627, rs75786299, rs3825017, rs11602903 and rs121907892) were identified. We then chose 900 subjects from the KCPS-II cohort consisting of 450 subjects with normal uric acid (UA <4.1?mg/dL) and 450 subjects with hyperuricaemia (UA >8.7?mg/dL). The groups were matched by age, body mass index, metabolic syndrome and use of anti-hypertensive medication. Primary outcome measures We compared the OR of the incidence of hyperuricaemia by URAT1 genotype. Results The strongest association with hyperuricaemia was observed for rs75786299 (IVS3+11A/G) with an OR of 32.05. rs7929627 (IVS7-103A/G) and rs3825017 (N82N) showed an association with hyperuricaemia with ORs of 2.56 and 2.29, respectively. rs11602903 (788A/T) and rs121907892 (W258X) were negatively correlated with hyperuricaemia with ORs of 0.350 and 0.447, respectively. Individuals carrying the GATAG haplotype (n=32)—a relatively common variant consisting of rs7929627, rs75786299 and rs3825017—showed the highest risk for hyperuricaemia with an OR of 92.23 (p=9.55×10?3). Conclusions These results indicate that five newly described SNPs in the hURAT1 gene are significantly associated with uric acid level (4-2008-0318 and 4-2011-0277). PMID:26603249

  15. Genome-wide association study based on multiple imputation with low-depth sequencing data: application to biofuel traits in reed canarygrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping by sequencing allows for large-scale genetic analyses in plant species with no reference genome, but sets the challenge of sound inference in presence of uncertain genotypes. We report an imputation-based genome-wide association study (GWAS) in reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L., P...

  16. Genome-wide association analysis based on multiple imputation with low-depth GBS data: application to biofuel traits in reed canarygrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping-by-sequencing allows for large-scale genetic analyses in plant species with no reference genome, creating the challenge of sound inference in the presence of uncertain genotypes. Here we report an imputation-based genome-wide association study (GWAS) in reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundina...

  17. Marker genotype imputation in a low-marker-density panel with a high-marker-density reference panel: accuracy evaluation in barley breeding lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated a strategy in which the scores of markers untyped in a low-density experimental panel were imputed on the basis of data from a high-density reference panel, in its application to whole-genome genotyping of barley breeding lines. Using a barley core set consisting of 98 lines genotyped w...

  18. The identification of trans-associations between prostate cancer GWAS SNPs and RNA expression differences in tumor-adjacent stroma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; McClelland, Michael; Jia, Zhenyu; Rahmatpanah, Farah B.; Sawyers, Anne; Trent, Jeffrey; Duggan, David; Mercola, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Here we tested the hypothesis that SNPs associated with prostate cancer risk, might differentially affect RNA expression in prostate cancer stroma. The most significant 35 SNP loci were selected from Genome Wide Association (GWA) studies of ~40,000 patients. We also selected 4030 transcripts previously associated with prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. eQTL analysis was carried out by a modified BAYES method to analyze the associations between the risk variants and expressed transcripts jointly in a single model. We observed 47 significant associations between eight risk variants and the expression patterns of 46 genes. This is the first study to identify associations between multiple SNPs and multiple in trans gene expression differences in cancer stroma. Potentially, a combination of SNPs and associated expression differences in prostate stroma may increase the power of risk assessment for individuals, and for cancer progression. PMID:25638161

  19. Relationship between three novel SNPs of BRCA1 and canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Weidong; YANG, Xu; QIU, Hengbin; ZHANG, Di; WANG, Huanan; HUANG, Jian; LIN, Degui

    2015-01-01

    The BRCA1 gene plays an important role in the development of human breast cancer, and recent research indicated that genetic variations of BRCA1 are also related to canine mammary tumors (CMTs). Here, using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), we cloned the 5?- and 3?-UTRs of BRCA1. By direct sequencing of the flanking sequences of the 5?- and 3?-UTRs of BRCA1, three previously unreported single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, two (?1228T >C, ?1173C >T) in the putative promoter regions and one non-synonymous SNP (63449G >A) in exon 23. Compared with 16 normal samples, the sequences from 34 CMTs suggested that SNP (?1173C >T) was associated with the development of CMTs (odds ratio (OR)=2.57, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07–6.15). PMID:26156012

  20. Relationship between three novel SNPs of BRCA1 and canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weidong; Yang, Xu; Qiu, Hengbin; Zhang, Di; Wang, Huanan; Huang, Jian; Lin, Degui

    2015-12-01

    The BRCA1 gene plays an important role in the development of human breast cancer, and recent research indicated that genetic variations of BRCA1 are also related to canine mammary tumors (CMTs). Here, using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), we cloned the 5'- and 3'-UTRs of BRCA1. By direct sequencing of the flanking sequences of the 5'- and 3'-UTRs of BRCA1, three previously unreported single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, two (-1228T >C, -1173C >T) in the putative promoter regions and one non-synonymous SNP (63449G >A) in exon 23. Compared with 16 normal samples, the sequences from 34 CMTs suggested that SNP (-1173C >T) was associated with the development of CMTs (odds ratio (OR)=2.57, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-6.15). PMID:26156012

  1. The evolutionary history of Afrocanarian blue tits inferred from genomewide SNPs.

    PubMed

    Gohli, Jostein; Leder, Erica H; Garcia-Del-Rey, Eduardo; Johannessen, Lars Erik; Johnsen, Arild; Laskemoen, Terje; Popp, Magnus; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2015-01-01

    A common challenge in phylogenetic reconstruction is to find enough suitable genomic markers to reliably trace splitting events with short internodes. Here, we present phylogenetic analyses based on genomewide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of an enigmatic avian radiation, the subspecies complex of Afrocanarian blue tits (Cyanistes teneriffae). The two sister species, the Eurasian blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) and the azure tit (Cyanistes cyanus), constituted the out-group. We generated a large data set of SNPs for analysis of population structure and phylogeny. We also adapted our protocol to utilize degraded DNA from old museum skins from Libya. We found strong population structuring that largely confirmed subspecies monophyly and constructed a coalescent-based phylogeny with full support at all major nodes. The results are consistent with a recent hypothesis that La Palma and Libya are relic populations of an ancient Afrocanarian blue tit, although a small data set for Libya could not resolve its position relative to La Palma. The birds on the eastern islands of Fuerteventura and Lanzarote are similar to those in Morocco. Together they constitute the sister group to the clade containing the other Canary Islands (except La Palma), in which El Hierro is sister to the three central islands. Hence, extant Canary Islands populations seem to originate from multiple independent colonization events. We also found population divergences in a key reproductive trait, viz. sperm length, which may constitute reproductive barriers between certain populations. We recommend a taxonomic revision of this polytypic species, where several subspecies should qualify for species rank. PMID:25407440

  2. Linkage disequilibrium blocks, haplotype structure, and htSNPs of human CYP7A1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Kaori; Wang, Shuang; Jenison, Robert D; Guo, Grace L; Klaassen, Curtis D; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne; Zhong, Xiao-bo

    2006-01-01

    Background Cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the rate limiting enzyme for converting cholesterol into bile acids. Genetic variations in the CYP7A1 gene have been associated with metabolic disorders of cholesterol and bile acids, including hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, arteriosclerosis, and gallstone disease. Current genetic studies are focused mainly on analysis of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at A-278C in the promoter region of the CYP7A1 gene. Here we report a genetic approach for an extensive analysis on linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks and haplotype structures of the entire CYP7A1 gene and its surrounding sequences in Africans, Caucasians, Asians, Mexican-Americans, and African-Americans. Result The LD patterns and haplotype blocks of CYP7A1 gene were defined in Africans, Caucasians, and Asians using genotyping data downloaded from the HapMap database to select a set of haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNP). A low cost, microarray-based platform on thin-film biosensor chips was then developed for high-throughput genotyping to study transferability of the HapMap htSNPs to Mexican-American and African-American populations. Comparative LD patterns and haplotype block structure was defined across all test populations. Conclusion A constant genetic structure in CYP7A1 gene and its surrounding sequences was found that may lead to a better design for association studies of genetic variations in CYP7A1 gene with cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. PMID:16709249

  3. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50%) alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles) compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle)-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle)-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI) to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning “environment” or “lifestyle” AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases. PMID:26201053

  4. SNPs and breast cancer risk prediction for African American and Hispanic women.

    PubMed

    Allman, Richard; Dite, Gillian S; Hopper, John L; Gordon, Ora; Starlard-Davenport, Athena; Chlebowski, Rowan; Kooperberg, Charles

    2015-12-01

    For African American or Hispanic women, the extent to which clinical breast cancer risk prediction models are improved by including information on susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is unknown, even though these women comprise increasing proportions of the US population and represent a large proportion of the world's population. We studied 7539 African American and 3363 Hispanic women from the Women's Health Initiative. The age-adjusted 5-year risks from the BCRAT and IBIS risk prediction models were measured and combined with a risk score based on >70 independent susceptibility SNPs. Logistic regression, adjusting for age group, was used to estimate risk associations with log-transformed age-adjusted 5-year risks. Discrimination was measured by the odds ratio (OR) per standard deviation (SD) and the area under the receiver operator curve (AUC). When considered alone, the ORs for African American women were 1.28 for BCRAT, and 1.04 for IBIS. When combined with the SNP risk score (OR 1.23), the corresponding ORs were 1.39 and 1.22. For Hispanic women the corresponding ORs were 1.25 for BCRAT, and 1.15 for IBIS. When combined with the SNP risk score (OR 1.39), the corresponding ORs were 1.48 and 1.42. There was no evidence that any of the combined models were not well calibrated. Including information on known breast cancer susceptibility loci provides approximately 10 and 19 % improvement in risk prediction using BCRAT for African Americans and Hispanics, respectively. The corresponding figures for IBIS are approximately 18 and 26 %, respectively. PMID:26589314

  5. A consensus linkage map of the grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) based on microsatellites and SNPs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) belongs to the family Cyprinidae which includes more than 2000 fish species. It is one of the most important freshwater food fish species in world aquaculture. A linkage map is an essential framework for mapping traits of interest and is often the first step towards understanding genome evolution. The aim of this study is to construct a first generation genetic map of grass carp using microsatellites and SNPs to generate a new resource for mapping QTL for economically important traits and to conduct a comparative mapping analysis to shed new insights into the evolution of fish genomes. Results We constructed a first generation linkage map of grass carp with a mapping panel containing two F1 families including 192 progenies. Sixteen SNPs in genes and 263 microsatellite markers were mapped to twenty-four linkage groups (LGs). The number of LGs was corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of grass carp. The sex-specific map was 1149.4 and 888.8 cM long in females and males respectively whereas the sex-averaged map spanned 1176.1 cM. The average resolution of the map was 4.2 cM/locus. BLAST searches of sequences of mapped markers of grass carp against the whole genome sequence of zebrafish revealed substantial macrosynteny relationship and extensive colinearity of markers between grass carp and zebrafish. Conclusions The linkage map of grass carp presented here is the first linkage map of a food fish species based on co-dominant markers in the family Cyprinidae. This map provides a valuable resource for mapping phenotypic variations and serves as a reference to approach comparative genomics and understand the evolution of fish genomes and could be complementary to grass carp genome sequencing project. PMID:20181260

  6. Whole-exome imputation of sequence variants identified two novel alleles associated with adult body height in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengmeng; Auer, Paul L; Jiao, Shuo; Haessler, Jeffrey; Altshuler, David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Carlson, Christopher S; Carty, Cara L; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Curtis, Keith; Franceschini, Nora; Hsu, Li; Jackson, Rebecca; Lange, Leslie A; Lettre, Guillaume; Monda, Keri L; Nickerson, Deborah A; Reiner, Alex P; Rich, Stephen S; Rosse, Stephanie A; Rotter, Jerome I; Willer, Cristen J; Wilson, James G; North, Kari; Kooperberg, Charles; Heard-Costa, Nancy; Peters, Ulrike

    2014-12-15

    Adult body height is a quantitative trait for which genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous loci, primarily in European populations. These loci, comprising common variants, explain <10% of the phenotypic variance in height. We searched for novel associations between height and common (minor allele frequency, MAF ?5%) or infrequent (0.5% < MAF < 5%) variants across the exome in African Americans. Using a reference panel of 1692 African Americans and 471 Europeans from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) Exome Sequencing Project (ESP), we imputed whole-exome sequence data into 13 719 African Americans with existing array-based GWAS data (discovery). Variants achieving a height-association threshold of P < 5E-06 in the imputed dataset were followed up in an independent sample of 1989 African Americans with whole-exome sequence data (replication). We used P < 2.5E-07 (=0.05/196 779 variants) to define statistically significant associations in meta-analyses combining the discovery and replication sets (N = 15 708). We discovered and replicated three independent loci for association: 5p13.3/C5orf22/rs17410035 (MAF = 0.10, ? = 0.64 cm, P = 8.3E-08), 13q14.2/SPRYD7/rs114089985 (MAF = 0.03, ? = 1.46 cm, P = 4.8E-10) and 17q23.3/GH2/rs2006123 (MAF = 0.30; ? = 0.47 cm; P = 4.7E-09). Conditional analyses suggested 5p13.3 (C5orf22/rs17410035) and 13q14.2 (SPRYD7/rs114089985) may harbor novel height alleles independent of previous GWAS-identified variants (r(2) with GWAS loci <0.01); whereas 17q23.3/GH2/rs2006123 was correlated with GWAS-identified variants in European and African populations. Notably, 13q14.2/rs114089985 is infrequent in African Americans (MAF = 3%), extremely rare in European Americans (MAF = 0.03%), and monomorphic in Asian populations, suggesting it may be an African-American-specific height allele. Our findings demonstrate that whole-exome imputation of sequence variants can identify low-frequency variants and discover novel variants in non-European populations. PMID:25027330

  7. Recirculating electric air filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-01

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage electrode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  8. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner (Pleasanton, CA)

    1986-01-01

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage eleode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  9. Hepa filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Murphy, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  10. HEPA filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1994-02-22

    A process is described for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal. 4 figures.

  11. Recirculating electric air filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage electrode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

  12. An Entanglement Filter

    E-print Network

    Ryo Okamoto; Jeremy L. O'Brien; Holger F. Hofmann; Tomohisa Nagata; Keiji Sasaki; Shigeki Takeuchi

    2009-05-01

    The ability to filter quantum states is a key capability in quantum information science and technology, in which one-qubit filters, or polarizers, have found wide application. Filtering on the basis of entanglement requires extension to multi-qubit filters with qubit-qubit interactions. We demonstrated an optical entanglement filter that passes a pair of photons if they have the desired correlations of their polarization. Such devices have many important applications to quantum technologies.

  13. Backward multiple imputation estimation of the conditional lifetime expectancy function with application to censored human longevity data

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jing; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Wahba, Grace

    2015-01-01

    The conditional lifetime expectancy function (LEF) is the expected lifetime of a subject given survival past a certain time point and the values of a set of explanatory variables. This function is attractive to researchers because it summarizes the entire residual life distribution and has an easy interpretation compared with the popularly used hazard function. In this paper, we propose a general framework of backward multiple imputation for estimating the conditional LEF and the variance of the estimator in the right-censoring setting. Simulation studies are conducted to investigate the empirical properties of the proposed estimator and the corresponding variance estimator. We demonstrate the method on the Beaver Dam Eye Study data, where the expected human lifetime is modeled with smoothing-spline ANOVA given the covariates information including sex, lifestyle factors, and disease variables. PMID:26371300

  14. Deciphering associations for lung cancer risk through imputation and analysis of 12?316 cases and 16?831 controls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufei; Wei, Yongyue; Gaborieau, Valerie; Shi, Jianxin; Han, Younghun; Timofeeva, Maria N; Su, Li; Li, Yafang; Eisen, Timothy; Amos, Christopher I; Landi, Maria Teresa; Christiani, David C; McKay, James D; Houlston, Richard S

    2015-12-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified common variants at multiple loci influencing lung cancer risk. To decipher the genetic basis of the association signals at 3q28, 5p15.33, 6p21.33, 9p21 and 12p13.33, we performed a meta-analysis of data from five genome-wide association studies in populations of European ancestry totalling 12?316 lung cancer cases and 16?831 controls using imputation to recover untyped genotypes. For four of the regions, it was possible to refine the association signal identifying a smaller region of interest likely to harbour the functional variant. Our analysis did not provide evidence that any of the associations at the loci being a consequence of synthetic associations rather than linkage disequilibrium with a common risk variant at these risk loci. PMID:25804397

  15. Genome of the Netherlands population-specific imputations identify an ABCA6 variant associated with cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Karssen, Lennart C.; Deelen, Joris; Isaacs, Aaron; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Mbarek, Hamdi; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Trompet, Stella; Postmus, Iris; Verweij, Niek; van Enckevort, David J.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; White, Charles C.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Bartz, Traci M.; Manichaikul, Ani; Joshi, Peter K.; Peloso, Gina M.; Deelen, Patrick; van Dijk, Freerk; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; Francioli, Laurent C.; Menelaou, Androniki; Pulit, Sara L.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A.; Franco, Oscar H.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Beekman, Marian; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Uh, Hae-Won; Trochet, Holly; Hocking, Lynne J.; Porteous, David J.; Sattar, Naveed; Packard, Chris J.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Bis, Joshua C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Campbell, Harry; Duan, Qing; Lange, Leslie A.; Wilson, James F.; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F.; Rich, Stephen S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Kearney, Patricia M.; Stott, David J.; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Neerincx, Pieter B.T.; Elbers, Clara C.; Francesco Palamara, Pier; Pe'er, Itsik; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; van Oven, Mannis; Vermaat, Martijn; Li, Mingkun; Laros, Jeroen F.J.; Stoneking, Mark; de Knijff, Peter; Kayser, Manfred; Veldink, Jan H.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Byelas, Heorhiy; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Dijkstra, Martijn; Amin, Najaf; Joeri van der Velde, K.; van Setten, Jessica; Kattenberg, Mathijs; van Schaik, Barbera D.C.; Bot, Jan; Nijman, Isaäc J.; Mei, Hailiang; Koval, Vyacheslav; Ye, Kai; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; Moed, Matthijs H.; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Sohail, Mashaal; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Marschall, Tobias; Schönhuth, Alexander; Guryev, Victor; Suchiman, H. Eka D.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.; Platteel, Mathieu; Pitts, Steven J.; Potluri, Shobha; Cox, David R.; Li, Qibin; Li, Yingrui; Du, Yuanping; Chen, Ruoyan; Cao, Hongzhi; Li, Ning; Cao, Sujie; Wang, Jun; Bovenberg, Jasper A.; Jukema, J. Wouter; van der Harst, Pim; Sijbrands, Eric J.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Swertz, Morris A.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Eline Slagboom, P.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants associated with blood lipid levels may be population-specific. To identify low-frequency variants associated with this phenotype, population-specific reference panels may be used. Here we impute nine large Dutch biobanks (~35,000 samples) with the population-specific reference panel created by the Genome of the Netherlands Project and perform association testing with blood lipid levels. We report the discovery of five novel associations at four loci (P value <6.61 × 10?4), including a rare missense variant in ABCA6 (rs77542162, p.Cys1359Arg, frequency 0.034), which is predicted to be deleterious. The frequency of this ABCA6 variant is 3.65-fold increased in the Dutch and its effect (?LDL-C=0.135, ?TC=0.140) is estimated to be very similar to those observed for single variants in well-known lipid genes, such as LDLR. PMID:25751400

  16. Risk-associated coding synonymous SNPs in type 2 diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases: genetic silence and the underrated association with splicing regulation and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Karambataki, M; Malousi, A; Kouidou, S

    2014-12-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are tentatively critical with regard to disease predisposition, but coding synonymous SNPs (sSNPs) are generally considered "neutral". Nevertheless, sSNPs in serine/arginine-rich (SR) and splice-site (SS) exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) or in exonic CpG methylation targets, could be decisive for splicing, particularly in aging-related conditions, where mis-splicing is frequently observed. We presently identified 33 genes T2D-related and 28 related to neurodegenerative diseases, by investigating the impact of the corresponding coding sSNPs on splicing and using gene ontology data and computational tools. Potentially critical (prominent) sSNPs comply with the following criteria: changing the splicing potential of prominent SR-ESEs or of significant SS-ESEs by >1.5 units (?score), or formation/deletion of ESEs with maximum splicing score. We also noted the formation/disruption of CpGs (tentative methylation sites of epigenetic sSNPs). All disease association studies involving sSNPs are also reported. Only 21/670 coding SNPs, mostly epigenetic, reported in 33 T2D-related genes, were found to be prominent coding synonymous. No prominent sSNPs have been recorded in three key T2D-related genes (GCGR, PPARGC1A, IGF1). Similarly, 20/366 coding synonymous were identified in ND related genes, mostly epigenetic. Meta-analysis showed that 17 of the above prominent sSNPs were previously investigated in association with various pathological conditions. Three out of four sSNPs (all epigenetic) were associated with T2D and one with NDs (branch site sSNP). Five were associated with other or related pathological conditions. None of the four sSNPs introducing new ESEs was found to be disease-associated. sSNPs introducing smaller ?score changes (<1.5) in key proteins (INSR, IRS1, DISC1) were also correlated to pathological conditions. This data reveals that genetic variation in splicing-regulatory and particularly CpG sites might be related to disease predisposition and that in-silico analysis is useful for identifying sSNPs, which might be falsely identified as silent or synonymous. PMID:25771874

  17. Discovery and Fine-Mapping of Glycaemic and Obesity-Related Trait Loci Using High-Density Imputation.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Momoko; M?gi, Reedik; van de Bunt, Martijn; Surakka, Ida; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Mahajan, Anubha; Marullo, Letizia; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; H?gg, Sara; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ladenvall, Claes; Ried, Janina S; Winkler, Thomas W; Willems, Sara M; Pervjakova, Natalia; Esko, Tõnu; Beekman, Marian; Nelson, Christopher P; Willenborg, Christina; Wiltshire, Steven; Ferreira, Teresa; Fernandez, Juan; Gaulton, Kyle J; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Hamsten, Anders; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Willemsen, Gonneke; Milaneschi, Yuri; Robertson, Neil R; Groves, Christopher J; Bennett, Amanda J; Lehtim?ki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma S; Rung, Johan; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Perola, Markus; Heid, Iris M; Herder, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Roden, Michael; Hypponen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Karssen, Lennart C; Mihailov, Evelin; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; de Craen, Anton J M; Deelen, Joris; Havulinna, Aki S; Blades, Matthew; Hengstenberg, Christian; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kaprio, Jaakko; Tobin, Martin D; Samani, Nilesh J; Lind, Lars; Salomaa, Veikko; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Slagboom, P Eline; Metspalu, Andres; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Jula, Antti; Groop, Leif; Raitakari, Olli T; Power, Chris; Penninx, Brenda W J H; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Johannes H; Boomsma, Dorret I; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ingelsson, Erik; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Ripatti, Samuli; Prokopenko, Inga; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-07-01

    Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ?0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI) at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG), none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3) and FG (GCK and G6PC2). The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated. PMID:26132169

  18. Discovery and Fine-Mapping of Glycaemic and Obesity-Related Trait Loci Using High-Density Imputation

    PubMed Central

    van de Bunt, Martijn; Surakka, Ida; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Mahajan, Anubha; Marullo, Letizia; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; H?gg, Sara; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ladenvall, Claes; Ried, Janina S.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Willems, Sara M.; Pervjakova, Natalia; Esko, Tõnu; Beekman, Marian; Nelson, Christopher P.; Willenborg, Christina; Ferreira, Teresa; Fernandez, Juan; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Hamsten, Anders; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Milaneschi, Yuri; Robertson, Neil R.; Groves, Christopher J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Lehtim?ki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma S.; Rung, Johan; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Perola, Markus; Heid, Iris M.; Herder, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Roden, Michael; Hypponen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Karssen, Lennart C.; Mihailov, Evelin; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Deelen, Joris; Havulinna, Aki S.; Blades, Matthew; Hengstenberg, Christian; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kaprio, Jaakko; Tobin, Martin D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Lind, Lars; Salomaa, Veikko; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Metspalu, Andres; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Jula, Antti; Groop, Leif; Raitakari, Olli T.; Power, Chris; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Johannes H.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Ingelsson, Erik; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Ripatti, Samuli; Prokopenko, Inga; McCarthy, Mark I.; Morris, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ?0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI) at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG), none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3) and FG (GCK and G6PC2). The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated. PMID:26132169

  19. Canonical Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) for High-Resolution Subtyping of Shiga-Toxin Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Griffing, Sean M.; MacCannell, Duncan R.; Schmidtke, Amber J.; Freeman, Molly M.; Hyytiä-Trees, Eija; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Ribot, Efrain M.; Bono, James L.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a canonical, parsimoniously-informative SNP panel for subtyping Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 that would be consistent with epidemiological, PFGE, and MLVA clustering of human specimens. Our group had previously identified 906 putative discriminatory SNPs, which were pared down to 391 SNPs based on their prevalence in a test set. The 391 SNPs were screened using a high-throughput form of TaqMan PCR against a set of clinical isolates that represent the most diverse collection of O157:H7 isolates from outbreaks and sporadic cases examined to date. Another 30 SNPs identified by others were also screened using the same method. Two additional targets were tested using standard TaqMan PCR endpoint analysis. These 423 SNPs were reduced to a 32 SNP panel with the almost the same discriminatory value. While the panel partitioned our diverse set of isolates in a manner that was consistent with epidemiological data and PFGE and MLVA phylogenies, it resulted in fewer subtypes than either existing method and insufficient epidemiological resolution in 10 of 47 clusters. Therefore, another round of SNP discovery was undertaken using comparative genomic resequencing of pooled DNA from the 10 clusters with insufficient resolution. This process identified 4,040 potential SNPs and suggested one of the ten clusters was incorrectly grouped. After its removal, there were 2,878 SNPs, of which only 63 were previously identified and 438 occurred across multiple clusters. Among highly clonal bacteria like STEC O157:H7, linkage disequilibrium greatly limits the number of parsimoniously informative SNPs. Therefore, it is perhaps unsurprising that our panel accounted for the potential discriminatory value of numerous other SNPs reported in the literature. We concluded published O157:H7 SNPs are insufficient for effective epidemiological subtyping. However, the 438 multi-cluster SNPs we identified may provide the additional information required. PMID:26132731

  20. IN SILICO DISCOVERY, MAPPING, AND GENOTYPING OF 1,039 CATTLE SNPS ON A PANEL OF EIGHTEEN BREEDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To contribute to cattle haplotype map construction we discovered ~3,000 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by comparison of repeat-masked BAC-end sequences (BESs) from the cattle RPCI-42 BAC library with the cattle whole-genome shotgun (WGS) contigs. For the sequence alignment, the Time...

  1. Association between IL-10a SNPs and resistance to cyprinid herpesvirus-3 infection in common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of gene polymorphisms and disease association is essential for assessing putative candidate genes affecting susceptibility or resistance to disease. In this paper, we report the results of an association analysis between SNPs in common carp innate immune response genes and resistance to Cy...

  2. Identification of candidate genes for prostate cancer-risk SNPs utilizing a normal prostate tissue eQTL data set

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeau, S. N.; French, A. J.; McDonnell, S. K.; Cheville, J.; Middha, S.; Tillmans, L.; Riska, S.; Baheti, S.; Larson, M. C.; Fogarty, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Larson, N.; Nair, A.; O'Brien, D.; Wang, L.; Schaid, D J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies have identified loci associated with the risk of developing prostate cancer but the associated genes are not well studied. Here we create a normal prostate tissue-specific eQTL data set and apply this data set to previously identified prostate cancer (PrCa)-risk SNPs in an effort to identify candidate target genes. The eQTL data set is constructed by the genotyping and RNA sequencing of 471 samples. We focus on 146 PrCa-risk SNPs, including all SNPs in linkage disequilibrium with each risk SNP, resulting in 100 unique risk intervals. We analyse cis-acting associations where the transcript is located within 2?Mb (±1?Mb) of the risk SNP interval. Of all SNP–gene combinations tested, 41.7% of SNPs demonstrate a significant eQTL signal after adjustment for sample histology and 14 expression principal component covariates. Of the 100 PrCa-risk intervals, 51 have a significant eQTL signal and these are associated with 88 genes. This study provides a rich resource to study biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk to PrCa. PMID:26611117

  3. Identification of candidate genes for prostate cancer-risk SNPs utilizing a normal prostate tissue eQTL data set.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, S N; French, A J; McDonnell, S K; Cheville, J; Middha, S; Tillmans, L; Riska, S; Baheti, S; Larson, M C; Fogarty, Z; Zhang, Y; Larson, N; Nair, A; O'Brien, D; Wang, L; Schaid, D J

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies have identified loci associated with the risk of developing prostate cancer but the associated genes are not well studied. Here we create a normal prostate tissue-specific eQTL data set and apply this data set to previously identified prostate cancer (PrCa)-risk SNPs in an effort to identify candidate target genes. The eQTL data set is constructed by the genotyping and RNA sequencing of 471 samples. We focus on 146 PrCa-risk SNPs, including all SNPs in linkage disequilibrium with each risk SNP, resulting in 100 unique risk intervals. We analyse cis-acting associations where the transcript is located within 2?Mb (±1?Mb) of the risk SNP interval. Of all SNP-gene combinations tested, 41.7% of SNPs demonstrate a significant eQTL signal after adjustment for sample histology and 14 expression principal component covariates. Of the 100 PrCa-risk intervals, 51 have a significant eQTL signal and these are associated with 88 genes. This study provides a rich resource to study biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk to PrCa. PMID:26611117

  4. Simultaneous analysis of hundreds of Y-chromosomal SNPs for high-resolution paternal lineage classification using targeted semiconductor sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ralf, Arwin; van Oven, Mannis; Zhong, Kaiyin; Kayser, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    SNPs from the non-recombining part of the human Y chromosome (Y-SNPs) are informative to classify paternal lineages in forensic, genealogical, anthropological, and evolutionary studies. Although thousands of Y-SNPs were identified thus far, previous Y-SNP multiplex tools target only dozens of markers simultaneously, thereby restricting the provided Y-haplogroup resolution and limiting their applications. Here, we overcome this shortcoming by introducing a high-resolution multiplex tool for parallel genotyping-by-sequencing of 530 Y-SNPs using the Ion Torrent PGM platform, which allows classification of 432 worldwide Y haplogroups. Contrary to previous Y-SNP multiplex tools, our approach covers branches of the entire Y tree, thereby maximizing the paternal lineage classification obtainable. We used a default DNA input amount of 10 ng per reaction but preliminary sensitivity testing revealed positive results from as little as 100 pg input DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that sample pooling using barcodes is feasible, allowing increased throughput for lower per-sample costs. In addition to the wetlab protocol, we provide a software tool for automated data quality control and haplogroup classification. The unique combination of ultra-high marker density and high sensitivity achievable from low amounts of potentially degraded DNA makes this new multiplex tool suitable for a wide range of Y-chromosome applications. PMID:25338970

  5. Identification of Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in Deer (Odocoileus spp.) Using the BovineSNP50

    E-print Network

    Latch, Emily K.

    . virginianus (white-tailed deer) in the Pacific Northwest. We found that 38.7% of loci could be genotypedIdentification of Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in Deer (Odocoileus spp.) Using the BovineSNP50 BeadChip Gwilym D. Haynes, Emily K. Latch* Department of Biological Sciences, Behavioral

  6. Evaluation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) Genotyped by the Illumina Bovine SNP50K in Cattle Focusing on Hanwoo Breed

    PubMed Central

    Dadi, Hailu; Kim, Jong-Joo; Yoon, Duhak; Kim, Kwan-Suk

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the informativeness of SNPs genotyped by the Illumina Bovine SNP50K assay in different cattle breeds. To investigate these on a genome-wide scale, we considered 52,678 SNPs spanning the whole autosomal and X chromosomes in cattle. Our study samples consists of six different cattle breeds. Across the breeds approximately 72 and 6% SNPs were found polymorphic and fixed or close to fix in all the breeds, respectively. The variations in the average minor allele frequency (MAF) were significantly different between the breeds studied. The level of average MAF observed in Hanwoo was significantly lower than the other breeds. Hanwoo breed also displayed the lowest number of polymorphic SNPs across all the chromosomes. More importantly, this study indicated that the Bovine SNP50K assay will have reduced power for genome-wide association studies in Hanwoo as compared to other cattle breeds. Overall, the Bovine SNP50K assay described in this study offer a useful genotyping platform for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in the cattle breeds. The assay data represent a vast and generally untapped resource to assist the investigation of the complex production traits and the development of marker-assisted selection programs. PMID:25049474

  7. In silico analysis of functional nsSNPs in human TRPC6 gene associated with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Bhoomi B; Koringa, Prakash G; Mistry, Kinnari N; Patel, Amrut K; Gang, Sishir; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study is to identify functional non-synonymous SNPs of TRPC6 gene using various in silico approaches. These SNPs are believed to have a direct impact on protein stability through conformation changes. Transient receptor potential cation channel-6 (TRPC6) is one of the proteins that plays a key role causing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) associated with the steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome (SRNS). Data of TRPC6 was collected from dbSNP and further used to investigate a damaging effect using SIFT, PolyPhen, PROVEAN, and PANTHER. The comparative analysis predicted that two functional SNPs "rs35857503 at position N157T and rs36111323 at position A404V" showed a damaging effect (score of 0.096-1.00).We modeled the 3D structure of TRPC6 using a SWISS-MODEL workspace and validated it via PROCHECK to get a Ramachandran plot (83.0% residues in the most favored region, 12.7% in additionally allowed regions, 2.3% in a generously allowed region and 2.0% were in a disallowed region). QMEAN (0.311) and MUSTER (10.06) scores were under acceptable limits. Putative functional SNPs that may possibly undergo post-translation modifications were also identified in TRPC6 protein. It was found that mutation at N157T can lead to alteration in glycation whereas mutation at A404V was present at a ligand binding site. Additionally, I-Mutant showed a decrease in stability for these nsSNPs upon mutation, thus suggesting that the N157T and A404V variants of TRPC6 could directly or indirectly destabilize the amino acid interactions causing functional deviations of protein to some extent. PMID:26127002

  8. Transcriptome characterization and high throughput SSRs and SNPs discovery in Cucurbita pepo (Cucurbitaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cucurbita pepo belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family. The "Zucchini" types rank among the highest-valued vegetables worldwide, and other C. pepo and related Cucurbita spp., are food staples and rich sources of fat and vitamins. A broad range of genomic tools are today available for other cucurbits that have become models for the study of different metabolic processes. However, these tools are still lacking in the Cucurbita genus, thus limiting gene discovery and the process of breeding. Results We report the generation of a total of 512,751 C. pepo EST sequences, using 454 GS FLX Titanium technology. ESTs were obtained from normalized cDNA libraries (root, leaves, and flower tissue) prepared using two varieties with contrasting phenotypes for plant, flowering and fruit traits, representing the two C. pepo subspecies: subsp. pepo cv. Zucchini and subsp. ovifera cv Scallop. De novo assembling was performed to generate a collection of 49,610 Cucurbita unigenes (average length of 626 bp) that represent the first transcriptome of the species. Over 60% of the unigenes were functionally annotated and assigned to one or more Gene Ontology terms. The distributions of Cucurbita unigenes followed similar tendencies than that reported for Arabidopsis or melon, suggesting that the dataset may represent the whole Cucurbita transcriptome. About 34% unigenes were detected to have known orthologs of Arabidopsis or melon, including genes potentially involved in disease resistance, flowering and fruit quality. Furthermore, a set of 1,882 unigenes with SSR motifs and 9,043 high confidence SNPs between Zucchini and Scallop were identified, of which 3,538 SNPs met criteria for use with high throughput genotyping platforms, and 144 could be detected as CAPS. A set of markers were validated, being 80% of them polymorphic in a set of variable C. pepo and C. moschata accessions. Conclusion We present the first broad survey of gene sequences and allelic variation in C. pepo, where limited prior genomic information existed. The transcriptome provides an invaluable new tool for biological research. The developed molecular markers are the basis for future genetic linkage and quantitative trait loci analysis, and will be essential to speed up the process of breeding new and better adapted squash varieties. PMID:21310031

  9. In silico analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in human ?-globin gene.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Mohammed; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Khan, Wajahatullah; Warsy, Arjumand S; Elrobh, Mohamed; Khan, Zahid; Al Amri, Abdullah; Bazzi, Mohammad D

    2011-01-01

    Single amino acid substitutions in the globin chain are the most common forms of genetic variations that produce hemoglobinopathies--the most widespread inherited disorders worldwide. Several hemoglobinopathies result from homozygosity or compound heterozygosity to beta-globin (HBB) gene mutations, such as that producing sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS), HbC, HbD and HbE. Several of these mutations are deleterious and result in moderate to severe hemolytic anemia, with associated complications, requiring lifelong care and management. Even though many hemoglobinopathies result from single amino acid changes producing similar structural abnormalities, there are functional differences in the generated variants. Using in silico methods, we examined the genetic variations that can alter the expression and function of the HBB gene. Using a sequence homology-based Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) server we have searched for the SNPs, which showed that 200 (80%) non-synonymous polymorphism were found to be deleterious. The structure-based method via PolyPhen server indicated that 135 (40%) non-synonymous polymorphism may modify protein function and structure. The Pupa Suite software showed that the SNPs will have a phenotypic consequence on the structure and function of the altered protein. Structure analysis was performed on the key mutations that occur in the native protein coded by the HBB gene that causes hemoglobinopathies such as: HbC (E?K), HbD (E?Q), HbE (E?K) and HbS (E?V). Atomic Non-Local Environment Assessment (ANOLEA), Yet Another Scientific Artificial Reality Application (YASARA), CHARMM-GUI webserver for macromolecular dynamics and mechanics, and Normal Mode Analysis, Deformation and Refinement (NOMAD-Ref) of Gromacs server were used to perform molecular dynamics simulations and energy minimization calculations on ?-Chain residue of the HBB gene before and after mutation. Furthermore, in the native and altered protein models, amino acid residues were determined and secondary structures were observed for solvent accessibility to confirm the protein stability. The functional study in this investigation may be a good model for additional future studies. PMID:22028795

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a set of expressed-sequence tag (EST) and conserved ortholog set II (COSII) markers in cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the fundamental unit of genetic variation and are applied as molecular tools for genetic mapping, breeding, germplasm characterization, taxonomy, and evaluation of distinctness, uniformity and stability (DUS). We report 29 novel SNPs in 10 EST and COSII ma...

  11. Cacao single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers: A discovery strategy to identify SNPs for genotyping, genetic mapping and genome wide association studies (GWAS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common genetic markers in Theobroma cacao, occurring approximately once in every 200 nucleotides. SNPs, like microsatellites, are co-dominant and PCR-based, but they have several advantages over microsatellites. They are unambiguous, so that a SN...

  12. Canonical single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for high-resolution subtyping of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop a canonical SNP panel for subtyping of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC). To this purpose, 906 putative SNPs were identified using resequencing tiling arrays. A subset of 391 SNPs was further screened using high-throughput TaqMan PCR against a d...

  13. Rigid porous filter

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Dennis, Richard A. (Morgantown, WV)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter including a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulates from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulates. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  14. Cordierite silicon nitride filters

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, J.; Buchan, B. ); Duiven, R.; Berger, M. ); Cleveland, J.; Ferri, J. )

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a silicon nitride based crossflow filter. This report summarizes the findings and results of the project. The project was phased with Phase I consisting of filter material development and crossflow filter design. Phase II involved filter manufacturing, filter testing under simulated conditions and reporting the results. In Phase I, Cordierite Silicon Nitride (CSN) was developed and tested for permeability and strength. Target values for each of these parameters were established early in the program. The values were met by the material development effort in Phase I. The crossflow filter design effort proceeded by developing a macroscopic design based on required surface area and estimated stresses. Then the thermal and pressure stresses were estimated using finite element analysis. In Phase II of this program, the filter manufacturing technique was developed, and the manufactured filters were tested. The technique developed involved press-bonding extruded tiles to form a filter, producing a monolithic filter after sintering. Filters manufactured using this technique were tested at Acurex and at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The filters did not delaminate during testing and operated and high collection efficiency and good cleanability. Further development in areas of sintering and filter design is recommended.

  15. Filter type gas sampler with filter consolidation

    DOEpatents

    Miley, Harry S. (219 Rockwood Dr., Richland, WA 99352); Thompson, Robert C. (5313 Phoebe La., West Richland, WA 99352); Hubbard, Charles W. (1900 Stevens, Apt. 526, Richland, WA 99352); Perkins, Richard W. (1413 Sunset, Richland, WA 99352)

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for automatically consolidating a filter or, more specifically, an apparatus for drawing a volume of gas through a plurality of sections of a filter, whereafter the sections are subsequently combined for the purpose of simultaneously interrogating the sections to detect the presence of a contaminant.

  16. Filter type gas sampler with filter consolidation

    DOEpatents

    Miley, H.S.; Thompson, R.C.; Hubbard, C.W.; Perkins, R.W.

    1997-03-25

    Disclosed is an apparatus for automatically consolidating a filter or, more specifically, an apparatus for drawing a volume of gas through a plurality of sections of a filter, where after the sections are subsequently combined for the purpose of simultaneously interrogating the sections to detect the presence of a contaminant. 5 figs.

  17. Genomics of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD); Exploring the SNPs of Protease-Antiprotease Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Phougat, Neetu; Ruhil, Sonam; Dhankhar, Sandeep; Balhara, Meenakshi; Chhillar, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The COPD has been an important respiratory condition that affects people worldwide and its incidence has been alarming. The increasing incidence of this disorder has been attributed to global industrialization and environmental pollution. Although the exposures to environmental pollutants and smoking have been important triggers, the genetic component of individuals has been shown to be important for development and progression of COPD. Recent literature reported that protease-antiprotease imbalance to be important in etiopathogenesis of COPD. The enzymes namely neutrophil elastase and matrix metalloprotienases are considered to be foremost proteolytic molecules released by neutrophils and macrophages during inflammatory events in COPD. Normally, the lungs remain protected from the destructive effect of these two antiproteases by ?1-antitrypsin (?1AT) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) respectively. In this review, we are trying to highlight the work by various research groups in exploring the SNPs of various genes of inflammatory pathways and the protease-antiprotease pathway, which may have some degree of association with COPD. PMID:24179443

  18. Structural forms of the human amylase locus and their relationships to SNPs, haplotypes and obesity.

    PubMed

    Usher, Christina L; Handsaker, Robert E; Esko, Tõnu; Tuke, Marcus A; Weedon, Michael N; Hastie, Alex R; Cao, Han; Moon, Jennifer E; Kashin, Seva; Fuchsberger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M; Frayling, Timothy M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; McCarroll, Steven A

    2015-08-01

    Hundreds of genes reside in structurally complex, poorly understood regions of the human genome. One such region contains the three amylase genes (AMY2B, AMY2A and AMY1) responsible for digesting starch into sugar. Copy number of AMY1 is reported to be the largest genomic influence on obesity, although genome-wide association studies for obesity have found this locus unremarkable. Using whole-genome sequence analysis, droplet digital PCR and genome mapping, we identified eight common structural haplotypes of the amylase locus that suggest its mutational history. We found that the AMY1 copy number in an individual's genome is generally even (rather than odd) and partially correlates with nearby SNPs, which do not associate with body mass index (BMI). We measured amylase gene copy number in 1,000 obese or lean Estonians and in 2 other cohorts totaling ?3,500 individuals. We had 99% power to detect the lower bound of the reported effects on BMI, yet found no association. PMID:26098870

  19. Validating predicted biological effects of Alzheimer’s disease associated SNPs using CSF biomarker levels

    PubMed Central

    Kauwe, John SK; Cruchaga, Carlos; Bertelsen, Sarah; Mayo, Kevin; Latu, Wayne; Nowotny, Petra; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Fagan, Anne M; Holtzman, David M; Goate, Alison M

    2011-01-01

    Recent large-scale genetic studies of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) have identified risk variants in CALHM1, GAB2 and SORL1. The mechanisms by which these genes might modulate risk are not definitively known. CALHM1 and SORL1 may alter amyloid-beta (A?) levels and GAB2 may influence phosphorylation of the tau protein. In this study we have analyzed disease associated genetic variants in each of these genes for association with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) A? or tau levels in 602 samples from two independent CSF series. We failed to detect association between CSF A?42 levels and SNPs in SORL1 despite substantial statistical power to detect association. While we also failed to detect association between variants in GAB2 and CSF tau levels, power to detect this association was limited. Finally, our data suggest that the minor allele of rs2986017, in CALHM1, is marginally associated with CSF A?42 levels. This association is consistent with previous reports that this non-synonymous coding substitution results in increased A? levels in vitro and provides support for an A?-related mechanism for modulating risk for AD. PMID:20634593

  20. Assessment of genetic diversity in lentils (Lens culinaris Medik.) based on SNPs.

    PubMed

    Basheer-Salimia, R; Camilli, B; Scacchi, S; Noli, E; Awad, M

    2015-01-01

    This study is the first attempt to establish an SNP database for the purpose of estimating the genetic diversity and relatedness of Palestinian lentil genotypes. A total of 14 lentil accessions (11 local, two supplied by ICARDA, and one introduced from Italy) were investigated. By sequencing two genes, lectin and lipid transfer protein 5 (LTP5), four SNPs were detected (three in the first and one in latter gene) with average frequencies of one SNP every 228 and 578 bp, respectively. In addition, in LTP5 two single-nucleotide indels were observed in the non-coding part of the gene. Four haplotypes were identified in the lectin gene, three in LTP5. One lectin haplotype coincided with that present in GenBank belonging to two cultivated varieties, two were rather similar to this, whereas the last one turned out closer to the sequence of one wild lentil accession, indicating the existence of diversity in the Palestinian germplasm. These results, enhancing the available knowledge of lentil genetic resources in Palestine, may contribute to their conservation and utilization in breeding projects. PMID:26125786

  1. Au-nanoprobes for detection of SNPs associated with antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veigas, Bruno; Machado, Diana; Perdigão, João; Portugal, Isabel; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2010-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading causes of infection in humans, causing high morbility and mortality all over the world. The rate of new cases of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) continues to increase, and since these infections are very difficult to manage, they constitute a serious health problem. In most cases, drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been related to mutations in several loci within the pathogen's genome. The development of fast, cheap and simple screening methodologies would be of paramount relevance for the early detection of these mutations, essential for the timely and effective diagnosis and management of MDRTB patients. The use of gold nanoparticles derivatized with thiol-modified oligonucleotides (Au-nanoprobes) has led to new approaches in molecular diagnostics. Based on the differential non-cross-linking aggregation of Au-nanoprobes, we were able to develop a colorimetric method for the detection of specific sequences and to apply this approach to pathogen identification and single base mutations/single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) discrimination. Here we report on the development of Au-nanoprobes for the specific identification of SNPs within the beta subunit of the RNA polymerase (rpoB locus), responsible for resistance to rifampicin in over 95% of rifampicin resistant M. tuberculosis strains.

  2. A new ALF from Litopenaeus vannamei and its SNPs related to WSSV resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingwen; Yu, Yang; Li, Fuhua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-11-01

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) are basic components of the crustacean immune system that defend against a range of pathogens. The cDNA sequence of a new ALF, designated nLvALF2, with an open reading frame encoding 132 amino acids was cloned. Its deduced amino acid sequence contained the conserved functional domain of ALFs, the LPS binding domain (LBD). Its genomic sequence consisted of three exons and four introns. nLvALF2 was mainly expressed in the Oka organ and gills of shrimps. The transcriptional level of nLvALF2 increased significantly after white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, suggesting its important roles in protecting shrimps from WSSV. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found in the genomic sequence of nLvALF2, of which 38 were analyzed for associations with the susceptibility/resistance of shrimps to WSSV. The loci g.2422 A>G, g.2466 T>C, and g.2529 G>A were significantly associated with the resistance to WSSV ( P<0.05). These SNP loci could be developed as markers for selection of WSSV-resistant varieties of Litopenaeus vannamei.

  3. POLYNOMIAL-BASED DIGITAL FILTERS AS PROTOTYPE FILTERS IN DFT MODULATED FILTER BANKS

    E-print Network

    Göckler, Heinz G.

    POLYNOMIAL-BASED DIGITAL FILTERS AS PROTOTYPE FILTERS IN DFT MODULATED FILTER BANKS 1 Djordje Babic investigate the possibility to use polyno- mial-based digital FIR filters as prototype filters in DFT and cosine modulated filter banks. In order to apply the FIR filter with piecewise polynomial response

  4. Bag filters for TPP

    SciTech Connect

    L.V. Chekalov; Yu.I. Gromov; V.V. Chekalov

    2007-05-15

    Cleaning of TPP flue gases with bag filters capable of pulsed regeneration is examined. A new filtering element with a three-dimensional filtering material formed from a needle-broached cloth in which the filtration area, as compared with a conventional smooth bag, is increased by more than two times, is proposed. The design of a new FRMI type of modular filter is also proposed. A standard series of FRMI filters with a filtration area ranging from 800 to 16,000 m{sup 2} is designed for an output more than 1 million m{sub 3}/h of with respect to cleaned gas. The new bag filter permits dry collection of sulfur oxides from waste gases at TPP operating on high-sulfur coals. The design of the filter makes it possible to replace filter elements without taking the entire unit out of service.

  5. MST Filterability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M. R.; Burket, P. R.; Duignan, M. R.

    2015-03-12

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The low filter flux through the ARP has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Recent filter flux has averaged approximately 5 gallons per minute (gpm). Salt Batch 6 has had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. In addition, at the time the testing started, SRR was assessing the impact of replacing the 0.1 micron filter with a 0.5 micron filter. This report describes testing of MST filterability to investigate the impact of filter pore size and MST particle size on filter flux and testing of filter enhancers to attempt to increase filter flux. The authors constructed a laboratory-scale crossflow filter apparatus with two crossflow filters operating in parallel. One filter was a 0.1 micron Mott sintered SS filter and the other was a 0.5 micron Mott sintered SS filter. The authors also constructed a dead-end filtration apparatus to conduct screening tests with potential filter aids and body feeds, referred to as filter enhancers. The original baseline for ARP was 5.6 M sodium salt solution with a free hydroxide concentration of approximately 1.7 M.3 ARP has been operating with a sodium concentration of approximately 6.4 M and a free hydroxide concentration of approximately 2.5 M. SRNL conducted tests varying the concentration of sodium and free hydroxide to determine whether those changes had a significant effect on filter flux. The feed slurries for the MST filterability tests were composed of simple salts (NaOH, NaNO2, and NaNO3) and MST (0.2 – 4.8 g/L). The feed slurry for the filter enhancer tests contained simulated salt batch 6 supernate, MST, and filter enhancers.

  6. Survey of digital filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, H. T., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A three part survey is made of the state-of-the-art in digital filtering. Part one presents background material including sampled data transformations and the discrete Fourier transform. Part two, digital filter theory, gives an in-depth coverage of filter categories, transfer function synthesis, quantization and other nonlinear errors, filter structures and computer aided design. Part three presents hardware mechanization techniques. Implementations by general purpose, mini-, and special-purpose computers are presented.

  7. Novel Backup Filter Device for Candle Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, B.; Goldsmith, R.; Dunham, G.; Henderson, A.

    2002-09-18

    The currently preferred means of particulate removal from process or combustion gas generated by advanced coal-based power production processes is filtration with candle filters. However, candle filters have not shown the requisite reliability to be commercially viable for hot gas clean up for either integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) or pressurized fluid bed combustion (PFBC) processes. Even a single candle failure can lead to unacceptable ash breakthrough, which can result in (a) damage to highly sensitive and expensive downstream equipment, (b) unacceptably low system on-stream factor, and (c) unplanned outages. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the need to have fail-safe devices installed within or downstream from candle filters. In addition to CeraMem, DOE has contracted with Siemens-Westinghouse, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota, and the Southern Research Institute (SRI) to develop novel fail-safe devices. Siemens-Westinghouse is evaluating honeycomb-based filter devices on the clean-side of the candle filter that can operate up to 870 C. The EERC is developing a highly porous ceramic disk with a sticky yet temperature-stable coating that will trap dust in the event of filter failure. SRI is developing the Full-Flow Mechanical Safeguard Device that provides a positive seal for the candle filter. Operation of the SRI device is triggered by the higher-than-normal gas flow from a broken candle. The CeraMem approach is similar to that of Siemens-Westinghouse and involves the development of honeycomb-based filters that operate on the clean-side of a candle filter. The overall objective of this project is to fabricate and test silicon carbide-based honeycomb failsafe filters for protection of downstream equipment in advanced coal conversion processes. The fail-safe filter, installed directly downstream of a candle filter, should have the capability for stopping essentially all particulate bypassing a broken or leaking candle while having a low enough pressure drop to allow the candle to be backpulse-regenerated. Forward-flow pressure drop should increase by no more than 20% because of incorporation of the fail-safe filter.

  8. HEPA filter encapsulation

    DOEpatents

    Gates-Anderson, Dianne D. (Union City, CA); Kidd, Scott D. (Brentwood, CA); Bowers, John S. (Manteca, CA); Attebery, Ronald W. (San Lorenzo, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A low viscosity resin is delivered into a spent HEPA filter or other waste. The resin is introduced into the filter or other waste using a vacuum to assist in the mass transfer of the resin through the filter media or other waste.

  9. Practical Active Capacitor Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L., Jr. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described that filters an electrical signal. The filtering uses a capacitor multiplier circuit where the capacitor multiplier circuit uses at least one amplifier circuit and at least one capacitor. A filtered electrical signal results from a direct connection from an output of the at least one amplifier circuit.

  10. Filter service system

    DOEpatents

    Sellers, Cheryl L. (Peoria, IL); Nordyke, Daniel S. (Arlington Heights, IL); Crandell, Richard A. (Morton, IL); Tomlins, Gregory (Peoria, IL); Fei, Dong (Peoria, IL); Panov, Alexander (Dunlap, IL); Lane, William H. (Chillicothe, IL); Habeger, Craig F. (Chillicothe, IL)

    2008-12-09

    According to an exemplary embodiment of the present disclosure, a system for removing matter from a filtering device includes a gas pressurization assembly. An element of the assembly is removably attachable to a first orifice of the filtering device. The system also includes a vacuum source fluidly connected to a second orifice of the filtering device.

  11. Complex Impedance Electronic Filters

    E-print Network

    Vickers, James

    Complex Impedance 12.6 Electronic Filters Electronic filters are used widely, for example with the frequency of the input voltage. A filter must have at least one component with has an impedance that varies with frequency. The impedance is given by the time dependent ratio of voltage across the component to current

  12. Nonlinear Attitude Filtering Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Crassidis, John L.; Cheng, Yang

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of modern nonlinear filtering methods for attitude estimation. Early applications relied mostly on the extended Kalman filter for attitude estimation. Since these applications, several new approaches have been developed that have proven to be superior to the extended Kalman filter. Several of these approaches maintain the basic structure of the extended Kalman filter, but employ various modifications in order to provide better convergence or improve other performance characteristics. Examples of such approaches include: filter QUEST, extended QUEST, the super-iterated extended Kalman filter, the interlaced extended Kalman filter, and the second-order Kalman filter. Filters that propagate and update a discrete set of sigma points rather than using linearized equations for the mean and covariance are also reviewed. A two-step approach is discussed with a first-step state that linearizes the measurement model and an iterative second step to recover the desired attitude states. These approaches are all based on the Gaussian assumption that the probability density function is adequately specified by its mean and covariance. Other approaches that do not require this assumption are reviewed, including particle filters and a Bayesian filter based on a non-Gaussian, finite-parameter probability density function on SO(3). Finally, the predictive filter, nonlinear observers and adaptive approaches are shown. The strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches are discussed.

  13. Association scan of 14,500 nsSNPs in four common diseases identifies variants involved in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We have genotyped 14,436 nsSNPs and 897 MHC tagSNPs in 1000 independent cases of Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS), Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (AITD), Multiple Sclerosis and Breast Cancer. Comparing each of these diseases against a common control set of 1500 unselected healthy British individuals, we report initial association and independent replication of two new loci for AS, ARTS1 and IL23R, and confirmation of the previously reported AITD association with TSHR and FCRL3. These findings, enabled in part by expanding the control reference group with individuals from the other disease groups to increase statistical power, highlight important new possibilities for autoimmune regulation and suggest that IL23R may be a common susceptibility factor for the major ‘seronegative’ diseases. PMID:17952073

  14. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  15. Regenerative particulate filter development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Descamp, V. A.; Boex, M. W.; Hussey, M. W.; Larson, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Development, design, and fabrication of a prototype filter regeneration unit for regenerating clean fluid particle filter elements by using a backflush/jet impingement technique are reported. Development tests were also conducted on a vortex particle separator designed for use in zero gravity environment. A maintainable filter was designed, fabricated and tested that allows filter element replacement without any leakage or spillage of system fluid. Also described are spacecraft fluid system design and filter maintenance techniques with respect to inflight maintenance for the space shuttle and space station.

  16. Association of SNPs in the UGT1A gene cluster with total bilirubin and mortality in the Diabetes Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Amanda J; Ng, Maggie C-Y; Xu, Jianzhao; Langefeld, Carl D; Koch, Kenneth L; Dawson, Paul A; Carr, J Jeffrey; Freedman, Barry I; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Bowden, Donald W

    2013-01-01

    Objective A negative relationship between total bilirubin concentration (TBili) and CVD risk has been documented in a series of epidemiological studies. In addition, TBili is thought to be under strong genetic regulation via the UGT1A gene family, suggesting it may be a heritable CVD risk factor. However, few studies directly relate TBili-associated UGT1A variants to CVD severity or outcome. This study replicated the genetic association for TBili in the Diabetes Heart Study (DHS), and examined the relationships of TBili-associated SNPs with measures of subclinical CVD and mortality. Methods This investigation included 1220 self-described European American (EA) individuals from the DHS, a family-based study examining risk for macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Genetic associations with TBili were examined using the Affymetrix Genome-wide Human SNP Array 5.0 and the Illumina Infinium Human Exome beadchip v1.0. Subsequent analyses assessed the relationships of the top TBili-associated SNPs with measures of vascular calcified plaque and mortality. Results A genome-wide association study (GWAS) detected 18 SNPs within the UGT1A gene family associated with TBili at p<5×10-8. The top hit was rs887829 (p=8.67×10-20). There was no compelling evidence of association between the top TBili-associated SNPs and vascular calcified plaque (p=0.05-0.88). There was, however, evidence of association with all-cause mortality (p=0.0004-0.06), the top hit being rs2741034. Conclusion These findings support a potential role for UGT1A genetic variants in risk for mortality in T2D. Further quantification of the extent of CVD risk conferred by UGT1A gene family variants in a high risk cohort with T2D is still required. PMID:23642732

  17. The novel SNPs of leptin gene and their associations with growth traits in Chinese Nanjiang Yellow goat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cen; Zhang, Hao; Niu, Lili; Guo, Jiazhong; Jia, Xianbo; Wang, Linjie; Li, Li; Zhang, Hongping; Zhong, Tao

    2015-11-01

    The leptin (LEP) gene encodes a protein that greatly affects the regulation of body weight, energy balance, and food intake in mammals. The objective of the present work was to identify genetic variants of the caprine LEP gene in 411 individuals from five Chinese goat breeds. Six novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (g.117T > C, g.1642G > A, g.2883G > A, g.3053T > C, g.3190G > A, and g.3314T > C) were detected using DNA sequencing. A chi-squared (?(2)) test showed that all of the LEP SNPs were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the studied population (P > 0.05). Six common haplotypes were identified in the five goat populations, with frequencies ranging from 0.083 to 0.244. The r(2) linkage disequilibrium plot of the LEP SNPs indicated linkage disequilibrium only in the cultured breeds (NJ and JY). Statistical analysis revealed that all of the six SNPs of the LEP gene were associated with growth traits. The individuals with the GG genotype at g.1642G>A and g.3190G > A loci showed higher birth weight (2.38 ± 0.03, 2.43 ± 0.05) and weight at 2 months of age (10.59 ± 0.16, 10.71 ± 0.26) than the A-bearing genotypes (AA or GA, P < 0.05). Our findings indicate that polymorphisms of the caprine LEP gene might be important genetic factors influencing growth traits, and these genetic markers may be useful for future marker-assisted selection programs in goat breeding and production. PMID:26142105

  18. CYP2B6 SNPs are associated with methadone dose required for effective treatment of opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Levran, Orna; Peles, Einat; Hamon, Sara; Randesi, Matthew; Adelson, Miriam; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-07-01

    Adequate methadone dosing in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for opioid addiction is critical for therapeutic success. One of the challenges in dose determination is the inter-individual variability in dose-response. Methadone metabolism is attributed primarily to cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP3A4, CYP2B6 and CYP2D6. The CYP2B6*6 allele [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) 785A>G (rs2279343) and 516G>T (rs3745274)] was associated with slow methadone metabolism. To explore the effects of CYP2B6*6 allele on methadone dose requirement, it was genotyped in a well-characterized sample of 74 Israeli former heroin addicts in MMT. The sample is primarily of Middle Eastern/European ancestry, based on ancestry informative markers (AIMs). Only patients with no major co-medication that may affect methadone metabolism were included. The stabilizing daily methadone dose in this sample ranges between 13 and 260mg (mean 140±52mg). The mean methadone doses required by subjects homozygous for the variant alleles of the CYP2B6 SNPs 785A>G and 516G>T (88, 96mg, respectively) were significantly lower than those of the heterozygotes (133, 129mg, respectively) and the non-carriers (150, 151mg, respectively) (nominal P=0.012, 0.048, respectively). The results remain significant after controlling for age, sex and the ABCB1 SNP 1236C>T (rs1128503), which was previously shown to be associated with high methadone dose requirement in this population (P=0.006, 0.030, respectively). An additional 77 CYP2B6, CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 SNPs were genotyped. Of these, 24 SNPs were polymorphic and none showed significant association with methadone dose. Further studies are necessary to replicate these preliminary findings in additional subjects and other populations. PMID:21790905

  19. Large-scale parentage inference with SNPs: an efficient algorithm for statistical confidence of parent pair allocations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Eric C

    2012-01-01

    Advances in genotyping that allow tens of thousands of individuals to be genotyped at a moderate number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) permit parentage inference to be pursued on a very large scale. The intergenerational tagging this capacity allows is revolutionizing the management of cultured organisms (cows, salmon, etc.) and is poised to do the same for scientific studies of natural populations. Currently, however, there are no likelihood-based methods of parentage inference which are implemented in a manner that allows them to quickly handle a very large number of potential parents or parent pairs. Here we introduce an efficient likelihood-based method applicable to the specialized case of cultured organisms in which both parents can be reliably sampled. We develop a Markov chain representation for the cumulative number of Mendelian incompatibilities between an offspring and its putative parents and we exploit it to develop a fast algorithm for simulation-based estimates of statistical confidence in SNP-based assignments of offspring to pairs of parents. The method is implemented in the freely available software SNPPIT. We describe the method in detail, then assess its performance in a large simulation study using known allele frequencies at 96 SNPs from ten hatchery salmon populations. The simulations verify that the method is fast and accurate and that 96 well-chosen SNPs can provide sufficient power to identify the correct pair of parents from amongst millions of candidate pairs. PMID:23152426

  20. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene of foodborne Bacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Fernández-No, I C; Böhme, K; Caamaño-Antelo, S; Barros-Velázquez, J; Calo-Mata, P

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of this work was the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene of foodborne Bacillus spp. that may be useful for typing purposes. These species include, among others, Bacillus cereus, an important pathogenic species involved in food poisoning, and Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus, which are causative agents of food spoilage described as responsible for foodborne disease outbreaks. With this purpose in mind, 52 Bacillus strains isolated from culture collections and fresh and processed food were considered. SNP type "Y" at sites 212 and 476 appeared in the majority of B. licheniformis studied strains. SNP type "R" at site 278 was detected in many strains of the B. subtilis/Bacillus amyloliquefaciens group, while polymorphism "Y" at site 173 was characteristic of the majority of strains of B. cereus/Bacillus thuringiensis group. The analysis of SNPs provided more intra-specific information than phylogenetic analysis in the cases of B. cereus and B. subtilis. Moreover, this study describes novel SNPs that should be considered when designing 16S rRNA-based primers and probes for multiplex-PCR, Real-Time PCR and microarray systems for foodborne Bacillus spp. PMID:25475292

  1. Whole-Genome Resequencing Analysis of Hanwoo and Yanbian Cattle to Identify Genome-Wide SNPs and Signatures of Selection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Woo; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Soo; Kim, Hyeong-Cheol; Yu, Dayeong; Chung, Won-Hyong; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Chai, Han-Ha; Cho, Yong-Min; Lim, Dajeong

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, Hanwoo has been selectively bred to improve economically important traits. Hanwoo is currently the representative Korean native beef cattle breed, and it is believed that it shared an ancestor with a Chinese breed, Yanbian cattle, until the last century. However, these two breeds have experienced different selection pressures during recent decades. Here, we whole-genome sequenced 10 animals each of Hanwoo and Yanbian cattle (20 total) using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer. A total of approximately 3.12 and 3.07 billion sequence reads were mapped to the bovine reference sequence assembly (UMD 3.1) at an average of approximately 10.71- and 10.53-fold coverage for Hanwoo and Yanbian cattle, respectively. A total of 17,936,399 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were yielded, of which 22.3% were found to be novel. By annotating the SNPs, we further retrieved numerous nonsynonymous SNPs that may be associated with traits of interest in cattle. Furthermore, we performed whole-genome screening to detect signatures of selection throughout the genome. We located several promising selective sweeps that are potentially responsible for economically important traits in cattle; the PPP1R12A gene is an example of a gene that potentially affects intramuscular fat content. These discoveries provide valuable genomic information regarding potential genomic markers that could predict traits of interest for breeding programs of these cattle breeds. PMID:26018558

  2. Rapid Genotyping of Y Chromosome SNPs Using a UV Photocleavable Oligonucleotide in MALDI-TOF MS Peter M. Vallone1; Anu Gaur2; Thomas Wenzel3; Jay Stoerker*2; Thomas Froehlich3; John M. Butler1; Markus Kostrzewa3

    E-print Network

    Rapid Genotyping of Y Chromosome SNPs Using a UV Photocleavable Oligonucleotide in MALDI-TOF MS on the non-recombining region of the Y chromosome are useful from a standpoint of evolutionary studies the usefulness of Y chromosome SNPs for human identity we are examining 5 Y SNPs (M9, M42, M45, M89, and M96

  3. Filter Bank Addresses and Frequencies Filter Freq (MHz) Addresess (ChA/B)

    E-print Network

    Filter Bank Addresses and Frequencies Filter Freq (MHz) Addresess (ChA/B) external high pass 1320 Injected Noise for Cals ONLY ONE CHANNEL SHOWN for filter bank FILTER BANK input unit 1 to 8 Power dividerA High Pass Filter 1320 MHz Filter #6 Filter #5 Filter #4 Filter #3 Filter #2 Filter #8 FILTER BANK

  4. Application of Multiple Imputation for Missing Values in Three-Way Three-Mode Multi-Environment Trial Data

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ting; McLachlan, Geoffrey J.; Dieters, Mark J.; Basford, Kaye E.

    2015-01-01

    It is a common occurrence in plant breeding programs to observe missing values in three-way three-mode multi-environment trial (MET) data. We proposed modifications of models for estimating missing observations for these data arrays, and developed a novel approach in terms of hierarchical clustering. Multiple imputation (MI) was used in four ways, multiple agglomerative hierarchical clustering, normal distribution model, normal regression model, and predictive mean match. The later three models used both Bayesian analysis and non-Bayesian analysis, while the first approach used a clustering procedure with randomly selected attributes and assigned real values from the nearest neighbour to the one with missing observations. Different proportions of data entries in six complete datasets were randomly selected to be missing and the MI methods were compared based on the efficiency and accuracy of estimating those values. The results indicated that the models using Bayesian analysis had slightly higher accuracy of estimation performance than those using non-Bayesian analysis but they were more time-consuming. However, the novel approach of multiple agglomerative hierarchical clustering demonstrated the overall best performances. PMID:26689369

  5. A comparison of strategies for imputing saturated pressure array data with application to the wheelchair-seating interface.

    PubMed

    Wininger, Michael; Crane, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Purpose: The common responses to pressure sensor saturation are extreme: either discarding of data, or wholesale alteration of experimental protocol. Here, we test four simplistic strategies for restoring missing data due to sensor saturation, avoiding such drastic measures. Methods: We tested these algorithms on 62 pressure maps collected from 42 individuals (20 M/22 F, 54.1?±?26.2 years, 1.7?±?0.1?m, 71.9?±?17.8?kg) under a variety of seating conditions. These strategies were tested via a cross-validation design, censoring the maximum pressure value in the datasets and measuring prediction error. Results: The four strategies showed various prediction error rates: ??=?0.43?±?0.14 (simple substitution), ??=?0.16?±?0.21 (scaled substitution), ??=?0.19?±?0.21 (feature extraction), and ??=?0.24?±?0.32 (extrapolation by non-linear modeling). Conclusion: For single-sensor saturation, it may be possible to restore missing data using simple techniques. Implications for Rehabilitation We present a method for imputing missing data from pressure sensor arrays. The implications for rehabilitation are as follows. Improved flexibility in design of protocols concerning interfacial pressure measurement. Restoration of missing data from existing datasets. Reduction in recruitment burden for future studies. Reduction in exposure risk to study participants. PMID:25203501

  6. Using imputation and mixture model approaches to integrate multi-state capture-recapture models with assignment information.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhi; Pollock, Kenneth H; Nichols, James D; Waser, Peter M; Cao, Weihua

    2014-06-01

    In this article, we first extend the superpopulation capture-recapture model to multiple states (locations or populations) for two age groups., Wen et al., (2011; 2013) developed a new approach combining capture-recapture data with population assignment information to estimate the relative contributions of in situ births and immigrants to the growth of a single study population. Here, we first generalize Wen et al., (2011; 2013) approach to a system composed of multiple study populations (multi-state) with two age groups, where an imputation approach is employed to account for the uncertainty inherent in the population assignment information. Then we develop a different, individual-level mixture model approach to integrate the individual-level population assignment information with the capture-recapture data. Our simulation and real data analyses show that the fusion of population assignment information with capture-recapture data allows us to estimate the origination-specific recruitment of new animals to the system and the dispersal process between populations within the system. Compared to a standard capture-recapture model, our new models improve the estimation of demographic parameters, including survival probability, origination-specific entry probability, and especially the probability of movement between populations, yielding higher accuracy and precision. PMID:24571715

  7. eQTL networks unveil enriched mRNA master integrators downstream of complex disease-associated SNPs.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiquan; Pouladi, Nima; Achour, Ikbel; Gardeux, Vincent; Li, Jianrong; Li, Qike; Zhang, Hao Helen; Martinez, Fernando D; 'Skip' Garcia, Joe G N; Lussier, Yves A

    2015-12-01

    The causal and interplay mechanisms of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with complex diseases (complex disease SNPs) investigated in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) at the transcriptional level (mRNA) are poorly understood despite recent advancements such as discoveries reported in the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTex). Protein interaction network analyses have successfully improved our understanding of both single gene diseases (Mendelian diseases) and complex diseases. Whether the mRNAs downstream of complex disease genes are central or peripheral in the genetic information flow relating DNA to mRNA remains unclear and may be disease-specific. Using expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) that provide DNA to mRNA associations and network centrality metrics, we hypothesize that we can unveil the systems properties of information flow between SNPs and the transcriptomes of complex diseases. We compare different conditions such as naïve SNP assignments and stringent linkage disequilibrium (LD) free assignments for transcripts to remove confounders from LD. Additionally, we compare the results from eQTL networks between lymphoblastoid cell lines and liver tissue. Empirical permutation resampling (p<0.001) and theoretic Mann-Whitney U test (p<10(-30)) statistics indicate that mRNAs corresponding to complex disease SNPs via eQTL associations are likely to be regulated by a larger number of SNPs than expected. We name this novel property mRNA hubness in eQTL networks, and further term mRNAs with high hubness as master integrators. mRNA master integrators receive and coordinate the perturbation signals from large numbers of polymorphisms and respond to the personal genetic architecture integratively. This genetic signal integration contrasts with the mechanism underlying some Mendelian diseases, where a genetic polymorphism affecting a single protein hub produces a divergent signal that affects a large number of downstream proteins. Indeed, we verify that this property is independent of the hubness in protein networks for which these mRNAs are transcribed. Our findings provide novel insights into the pleiotropy of mRNAs targeted by complex disease polymorphisms and the architecture of the information flow between the genetic polymorphisms and transcriptomes of complex diseases. PMID:26524128

  8. Generic Kalman Filter Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael E., II; Crues, Edwin Z.

    2005-01-01

    The Generic Kalman Filter (GKF) software provides a standard basis for the development of application-specific Kalman-filter programs. Historically, Kalman filters have been implemented by customized programs that must be written, coded, and debugged anew for each unique application, then tested and tuned with simulated or actual measurement data. Total development times for typical Kalman-filter application programs have ranged from months to weeks. The GKF software can simplify the development process and reduce the development time by eliminating the need to re-create the fundamental implementation of the Kalman filter for each new application. The GKF software is written in the ANSI C programming language. It contains a generic Kalman-filter-development directory that, in turn, contains a code for a generic Kalman filter function; more specifically, it contains a generically designed and generically coded implementation of linear, linearized, and extended Kalman filtering algorithms, including algorithms for state- and covariance-update and -propagation functions. The mathematical theory that underlies the algorithms is well known and has been reported extensively in the open technical literature. Also contained in the directory are a header file that defines generic Kalman-filter data structures and prototype functions and template versions of application-specific subfunction and calling navigation/estimation routine code and headers. Once the user has provided a calling routine and the required application-specific subfunctions, the application-specific Kalman-filter software can be compiled and executed immediately. During execution, the generic Kalman-filter function is called from a higher-level navigation or estimation routine that preprocesses measurement data and post-processes output data. The generic Kalman-filter function uses the aforementioned data structures and five implementation- specific subfunctions, which have been developed by the user on the basis of the aforementioned templates. The GKF software can be used to develop many different types of unfactorized Kalman filters. A developer can choose to implement either a linearized or an extended Kalman filter algorithm, without having to modify the GKF software. Control dynamics can be taken into account or neglected in the filter-dynamics model. Filter programs developed by use of the GKF software can be made to propagate equations of motion for linear or nonlinear dynamical systems that are deterministic or stochastic. In addition, filter programs can be made to operate in user-selectable "covariance analysis" and "propagation-only" modes that are useful in design and development stages.

  9. Filtering separators having filter cleaning apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Margraf, A.

    1984-08-28

    This invention relates to filtering separators of the kind having a housing which is subdivided by a partition, provided with parallel rows of holes or slots, into a dust-laden gas space for receiving filter elements positioned in parallel rows and being impinged upon by dust-laden gas from the outside towards the inside, and a clean gas space. In addition, the housing is provided with a chamber for cleansing the filter element surfaces of a row by counterflow action while covering at the same time the partition holes or slots leading to the adjacent rows of filter elements. The chamber is arranged for the supply of compressed air to at least one injector arranged to feed compressed air and secondary air to the row of filter elements to be cleansed. The chamber is also reciprocatingly displaceable along the partition in periodic and intermittent manner. According to the invention, a surface of the chamber facing towards the partition covers at least two of the rows of holes or slots of the partition, and the chamber is closed upon itself with respect to the clean gas space, and is connected to a compressed air reservoir via a distributor pipe and a control valve. At least one of the rows of holes or slots of the partition and the respective row of filter elements in flow communication therewith are in flow communication with the discharge side of at least one injector acted upon with compressed air. At least one other row of the rows of holes or slots of the partition and the respective row of filter elements is in flow communication with the suction side of the injector.

  10. Optically tunable optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Robert T. B.; Wah, Christopher; Iizuka, Keigo; Shimotahira, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an optically tunable optical filter that uses photorefractive barium titanate. With our filter we implement a spectrum analyzer at 632.8 nm with a resolution of 1.2 nm. We simulate a wavelength-division multiplexing system by separating two semiconductor laser diodes, at 1560 nm and 1578 nm, with the same filter. The filter has a bandwidth of 6.9 nm. We also use the same filter to take 2.5-nm-wide slices out of a 20-nm-wide superluminescent diode centered at 840 nm. As a result, we experimentally demonstrate a phenomenal tuning range from 632.8 to 1578 nm with a single filtering device.

  11. Concentric Split Flow Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A concentric split flow filter may be configured to remove odor and/or bacteria from pumped air used to collect urine and fecal waste products. For instance, filter may be designed to effectively fill the volume that was previously considered wasted surrounding the transport tube of a waste management system. The concentric split flow filter may be configured to split the air flow, with substantially half of the air flow to be treated traveling through a first bed of filter media and substantially the other half of the air flow to be treated traveling through the second bed of filter media. This split flow design reduces the air velocity by 50%. In this way, the pressure drop of filter may be reduced by as much as a factor of 4 as compare to the conventional design.

  12. Contactor/filter improvements

    DOEpatents

    Stelman, D.

    1988-06-30

    A contactor/filter arrangement for removing particulate contaminants from a gaseous stream is described. The filter includes a housing having a substantially vertically oriented granular material retention member with upstream and downstream faces, a substantially vertically oriented microporous gas filter element, wherein the retention member and the filter element are spaced apart to provide a zone for the passage of granular material therethrough. A gaseous stream containing particulate contaminants passes through the gas inlet means as well as through the upstream face of the granular material retention member, passing through the retention member, the body of granular material, the microporous gas filter element, exiting out of the gas outlet means. A cover screen isolates the filter element from contact with the moving granular bed. In one embodiment, the granular material is comprised of porous alumina impregnated with CuO, with the cover screen cleaned by the action of the moving granular material as well as by backflow pressure pulses. 6 figs.

  13. Hybrid Filter Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laicer, Castro; Rasimick, Brian; Green, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Cabin environmental control is an important issue for a successful Moon mission. Due to the unique environment of the Moon, lunar dust control is one of the main problems that significantly diminishes the air quality inside spacecraft cabins. Therefore, this innovation was motivated by NASA s need to minimize the negative health impact that air-suspended lunar dust particles have on astronauts in spacecraft cabins. It is based on fabrication of a hybrid filter comprising nanofiber nonwoven layers coated on porous polymer membranes with uniform cylindrical pores. This design results in a high-efficiency gas particulate filter with low pressure drop and the ability to be easily regenerated to restore filtration performance. A hybrid filter was developed consisting of a porous membrane with uniform, micron-sized, cylindrical pore channels coated with a thin nanofiber layer. Compared to conventional filter media such as a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, this filter is designed to provide high particle efficiency, low pressure drop, and the ability to be regenerated. These membranes have well-defined micron-sized pores and can be used independently as air filters with discreet particle size cut-off, or coated with nanofiber layers for filtration of ultrafine nanoscale particles. The filter consists of a thin design intended to facilitate filter regeneration by localized air pulsing. The two main features of this invention are the concept of combining a micro-engineered straight-pore membrane with nanofibers. The micro-engineered straight pore membrane can be prepared with extremely high precision. Because the resulting membrane pores are straight and not tortuous like those found in conventional filters, the pressure drop across the filter is significantly reduced. The nanofiber layer is applied as a very thin coating to enhance filtration efficiency for fine nanoscale particles. Additionally, the thin nanofiber coating is designed to promote capture of dust particles on the filter surface and to facilitate dust removal with pulse or back airflow.

  14. Uneven-order decentered Shapiro filters for boundary filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falissard, F.

    2015-07-01

    This paper addresses the use of Shapiro filters for boundary filtering. A new class of uneven-order decentered Shapiro filters is proposed and compared to classical Shapiro filters and even-order decentered Shapiro filters. The theoretical analysis shows that the proposed boundary filters are more accurate than the centered Shapiro filters and more robust than the even-order decentered boundary filters usable at the same distance to the boundary. The benefit of the new boundary filters is assessed for computations using the compressible Euler equations.

  15. Association Analysis of IL10, TNF-?, and IL23R-IL12RB2 SNPs with Behçet’s Disease Risk in Western Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Khaib Dit Naib, Ouahiba; Aribi, Mourad; Idder, Aicha; Chiali, Amel; Sairi, Hakim; Touitou, Isabelle; Lefranc, Gérard; Barat-Houari, Mouna

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We have conducted the first study of the association of interleukin (IL)-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), and IL23R-IL12RB2 region single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with Behçet’s disease (BD) in Western Algeria. Methods: A total of 51 BD patients and 96 unrelated controls from West region of Algeria were genotyped by direct sequencing for 11 SNPs including 2 SNPs from the IL10 promoter [c.-819T?>?C (rs1800871), c.-592A?>?C (rs1800872)], 6 SNPs from the TNF-? promoter [c.-1211T?>?C (rs1799964), c.-1043C?>?A (rs1800630), c.-1037C?>?T (rs1799724), c.-556G?>?A (rs1800750), c.-488G?>?A (rs1800629), and c.-418G?>?A (rs361525)], and 3 SNPs from the IL23R-IL12RB2 region [g.67747415A?>?C (rs12119179), g.67740092G?>?A (rs11209032), and g.67760140T?>?C (rs924080)]. Results: The minor alleles c.-819T and c.-592A were significantly associated with BD [odds ratio (OR)?=?2.18; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28–3.73, p?=?0.003]; whereas, there was weaker association between TNF-? promoter SNPs or IL23R-IL12RB2 region and disease risk. Conclusion: Unlike the TNF-? and the IL23R-IL12RB2 region SNPs, the two IL10 SNPs were strongly associated with BD. The -819T, and -592A alleles and the -819TT, -819CT, and -592AA and -592CA genotypes seem to be highly involved in the risk of developing of BD in the population of Western Algeria. PMID:24151497

  16. Filter Media Recommendation Review

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Robert C.; Miley, Harry S.; Arthur, Richard J.

    2002-01-07

    The original filter recommended by PNNL for the RASA is somewhat difficult to dissolve and has been discontinued by the manufacturer (3M) because the manufacturing process (substrate blown microfiber, or SBMF) has been superceded by a simpler process (scrim-free blown microfiber, or BMF). Several new potential filters have been evaluated by PNNL and by an independent commercial lab. A superior product has been identified which provides higher trapping efficiency, higher air flow, is easier to dissolve, and is thinner, accommodating more filters per RASA roll. This filter is recommended for all ground-based sampling, and with additional mechanical support, it could be useful for airborne sampling, as well.

  17. Visual Tracking & Particle Filters

    E-print Network

    LeGland, François

    -production (compositing, augmented reality, editing, re-purposing, stereo-3D authoring, motion capture for animation General case: sequential Monte Carlo approximation (particle filter) Pros: transports full distribution

  18. Nanofiber Filters Eliminate Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    With support from Phase I and II SBIR funding from Johnson Space Center, Argonide Corporation of Sanford, Florida tested and developed its proprietary nanofiber water filter media. Capable of removing more than 99.99 percent of dangerous particles like bacteria, viruses, and parasites, the media was incorporated into the company's commercial NanoCeram water filter, an inductee into the Space Foundation's Space Technology Hall of Fame. In addition to its drinking water filters, Argonide now produces large-scale nanofiber filters used as part of the reverse osmosis process for industrial water purification.

  19. Birefringent filter design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, Clayton H. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A birefringent filter is provided for tuning the wavelength of a broad band emission laser. The filter comprises thin plates of a birefringent material having thicknesses which are non-unity, integral multiples of the difference between the thicknesses of the two thinnest plates. The resulting wavelength selectivity is substantially equivalent to the wavelength selectivity of a conventional filter which has a thinnest plate having a thickness equal to this thickness difference. The present invention obtains an acceptable tuning of the wavelength while avoiding a decrease in optical quality associated with conventional filters wherein the respective plate thicknesses are integral multiples of the thinnest plate.

  20. Filter holder and gasket assembly for candle or tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, Thomas Edwin (Murrysville, PA); Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburgh, PA); Bruck, Gerald Joseph (Murrysville, PA); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (Export, PA)

    1999-03-02

    A filter holder and gasket assembly for holding a candle filter element within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel. The filter holder and gasket assembly includes a filter housing, an annular spacer ring securely attached within the filter housing, a gasket sock, a top gasket, a middle gasket and a cast nut.

  1. Filter holder and gasket assembly for candle or tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Lippert, T.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Bruck, G.J.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1999-03-02

    A filter holder and gasket assembly are disclosed for holding a candle filter element within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel. The filter holder and gasket assembly includes a filter housing, an annular spacer ring securely attached within the filter housing, a gasket sock, a top gasket, a middle gasket and a cast nut. 9 figs.

  2. Robustness issues in Kalman filtering

    E-print Network

    Ruckdeschel, Peter

    Robustness issues in Kalman filtering revisited Peter Ruckdeschel Fraunhofer ITWM, Abteilung possible with delay 3 Classical Method: Kalman­Filter Filter Problem E xt - ft(y1:t) 2 = minft !, with y1:t = (y1, . . . , yt), y1:0 := Kalman­Filter optimal solution among linear filters -- Kalman[/Bucy] [60

  3. Application of six IrisPlex SNPs and comparison of two eye color prediction systems in diverse Eurasia populations.

    PubMed

    Yun, Libing; Gu, Yan; Rajeevan, Haseena; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2014-05-01

    DNA-based prediction for externally visible characteristics such as eye color is already a useful tool in forensic criminal investigations. The IrisPlex system, consisting of six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a prediction model, was developed based on individuals from several European populations. Other recent studies have developed a different prediction model, also based on European populations. In this study, we compared two prediction models using the data for the six IrisPlex SNPs genotyped on 905 individuals from 12 different Eurasian populations. All SNPs showed significant differences in allele frequencies among three groups of populations: European, genetically intermediate (Khanty, Uygur, and Yakut), and East Asian. The two prediction models, the FROG-kb calculation based on the formula of Walsh et al. (2011) and the Snipper calculation from Ruiz et al. (2013), gave identical predictions of brown eye color for the four East Asian populations with complete data but did not give concordant predictions for many individuals in the seven intermediate and European populations. Inconsistencies were mainly conclusive prediction by one model but not the other. Of the 714 individuals with complete 6-locus genotypes, the two models gave 22 % inconsistent predictions. Eliminating the 306 individuals in the Korean and three Chinese populations, in which the predictions were always consistent for brown eye color, the inconsistencies (among the remaining 408 individuals) were 38.7 %. We conclude that more attention should be paid to predictive uncertainty/error. Implementation of both prediction models in future forensic casework is one immediate way to highlight uncertainty. PMID:24395150

  4. The Development of a High Density Linkage Map for Black Tiger Shrimp (Penaeus monodon) Based on cSNPs

    PubMed Central

    Baranski, Matthew; Gopikrishna, Gopalapillay; Robinson, Nicholas A.; Katneni, Vinaya Kumar; Shekhar, Mudagandur S.; Shanmugakarthik, Jayakani; Jothivel, Sarangapani; Gopal, Chavali; Ravichandran, Pitchaiyappan; Kent, Matthew; Arnyasi, Mariann; Ponniah, Alphis G.

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptome sequencing using Illumina RNA-seq was performed on populations of black tiger shrimp from India. Samples were collected from (i) four landing centres around the east coastline (EC) of India, (ii) survivors of a severe WSSV infection during pond culture (SUR) and (iii) the Andaman Islands (AI) in the Bay of Bengal. Equal quantities of purified total RNA from homogenates of hepatopancreas, muscle, nervous tissue, intestinal tract, heart, gonad, gills, pleopod and lymphoid organs were combined to create AI, EC and SUR pools for RNA sequencing. De novo transcriptome assembly resulted in 136,223 contigs (minimum size 100 base pairs, bp) with a total length 61 Mb, an average length of 446 bp and an average coverage of 163× across all pools. Approximately 16% of contigs were annotated with BLAST hit information and gene ontology annotations. A total of 473,620 putative SNPs/indels were identified. An Illumina iSelect genotyping array containing 6,000 SNPs was developed and used to genotype 1024 offspring belonging to seven full-sibling families. A total of 3959 SNPs were mapped to 44 linkage groups. The linkage groups consisted of between 16–129 and 13–130 markers, of length between 139–10.8 and 109.1–10.5 cM and with intervals averaging between 1.2 and 0.9 cM for the female and male maps respectively. The female map was 28% longer than the male map (4060 and 2917 cM respectively) with a 1.6 higher recombination rate observed for female compared to male meioses. This approach has substantially increased expressed sequence and DNA marker resources for tiger shrimp and is a useful resource for QTL mapping and association studies for evolutionarily and commercially important traits. PMID:24465553

  5. Failure to replicate an association of SNPs in the oxidized LDL receptor gene (OLR1) with CAD

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Joshua W; Assimes, Themistocles L; Boerwinkle, Eric; Fortmann, Stephen P; Go, Alan; Grove, Megan L; Hlatky, Mark; Iribarren, Carlos; Li, Jun; Myers, Richard; Risch, Neil; Sidney, Stephen; Southwick, Audrey; Volcik, Kelly A; Quertermous, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background The lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor LOX-1 (encoded by OLR1) is believed to play a key role in atherogenesis and some reports suggest an association of OLR1 polymorphisms with myocardial infarction (MI). We tested whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in OLR1 are associated with clinically significant CAD in the Atherosclerotic Disease, VAscular FuNction, & Geneti C Epidemiology (ADVANCE) study. Methods ADVANCE is a population-based case-control study of subjects receiving care within Kaiser Permanente of Northern California including a subset of participants of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. We first resequenced the promoter, exonic, and splice site regions of OLR1 and then genotyped four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including a non-synonymous SNP (rs11053646, Lys167Asn) as well as an intronic SNP (rs3736232) previously associated with CAD. Results In 1,809 cases with clinical CAD and 1,734 controls, the minor allele of the coding SNP was nominally associated with a lower odds ratio (OR) of CAD across all ethnic groups studied (minimally adjusted OR 0.8, P = 0.007; fully adjusted OR 0.8, P = 0.01). The intronic SNP was nominally associated with an increased risk of CAD (minimally adjusted OR 1.12, p = 0.03; fully adjusted OR 1.13, P = 0.03). However, these associations were not replicated in over 13,200 individuals (including 1,470 cases) in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Conclusion Our results do not support the presence of an association between selected common SNPs in OLR1 and the risk of clinical CAD. PMID:18384690

  6. Role of Type 1 Diabetes-Associated SNPs on Risk of Autoantibody Positivity in the TEDDY Study.

    PubMed

    Törn, Carina; Hadley, David; Lee, Hye-Seung; Hagopian, William; Lernmark, Åke; Simell, Olli; Rewers, Marian; Ziegler, Anette; Schatz, Desmond; Akolkar, Beena; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Chen, Wei-Min; Toppari, Jorma; Mykkänen, Juha; Ilonen, Jorma; Rich, Stephen S; She, Jin-Xiong; Steck, Andrea K; Krischer, Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study prospectively follows 8,677 children enrolled from birth who carry HLA-susceptibility genotypes for development of islet autoantibodies (IA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). During the median follow-up time of 57 months, 350 children developed at least one persistent IA (GAD antibody, IA-2A, or micro insulin autoantibodies) and 84 of them progressed to T1D. We genotyped 5,164 Caucasian children for 41 non-HLA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that achieved genome-wide significance for association with T1D in the genome-wide association scan meta-analysis conducted by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium. In TEDDY participants carrying high-risk HLA genotypes, eight SNPs achieved significant association to development of IA using time-to-event analysis (P < 0.05), whereof four were significant after adjustment for multiple testing (P < 0.0012): rs2476601 in PTPN22 (hazard ratio [HR] 1.54 [95% CI 1.27-1.88]), rs2292239 in ERBB3 (HR 1.33 [95% CI 1.14-1.55]), rs3184504 in SH2B3 (HR 1.38 [95% CI 1.19-1.61]), and rs1004446 in INS (HR 0.77 [0.66-0.90]). These SNPs were also significantly associated with T1D in particular: rs2476601 (HR 2.42 [95% CI 1.70-3.44]). Although genes in the HLA region remain the most important genetic risk factors for T1D, other non-HLA genetic factors contribute to IA, a first step in the pathogenesis of T1D, and the progression of the disease. PMID:25422107

  7. Multiple Imputation of Groundwater Data to Evaluate Spatial and Temporal Anthropogenic Influences on Subsurface Water Fluxes in Los Angeles, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manago, K. F.; Hogue, T. S.; Hering, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    In the City of Los Angeles, groundwater accounts for 11% of the total water supply on average, and 30% during drought years. Due to ongoing drought in California, increased reliance on local water supply highlights the need for better understanding of regional groundwater dynamics and estimating sustainable groundwater supply. However, in an urban setting, such as Los Angeles, understanding or modeling groundwater levels is extremely complicated due to various anthropogenic influences such as groundwater pumping, artificial recharge, landscape irrigation, leaking infrastructure, seawater intrusion, and extensive impervious surfaces. This study analyzes anthropogenic effects on groundwater levels using groundwater monitoring well data from the County of Los Angeles Department of Public Works. The groundwater data is irregularly sampled with large gaps between samples, resulting in a sparsely populated dataset. A multiple imputation method is used to fill the missing data, allowing for multiple ensembles and improved error estimates. The filled data is interpolated to create spatial groundwater maps utilizing information from all wells. The groundwater data is evaluated at a monthly time step over the last several decades to analyze the effect of land cover and identify other influencing factors on groundwater levels spatially and temporally. Preliminary results show irrigated parks have the largest influence on groundwater fluctuations, resulting in large seasonal changes, exceeding changes in spreading grounds. It is assumed that these fluctuations are caused by watering practices required to sustain non-native vegetation. Conversely, high intensity urbanized areas resulted in muted groundwater fluctuations and behavior decoupling from climate patterns. Results provides improved understanding of anthropogenic effects on groundwater levels in addition to providing high quality datasets for validation of regional groundwater models.

  8. Extended range harmonic filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankowski, H.; Geia, A. J.; Allen, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of filters, leaky-wall and open-guide, are combined into single component. Combination gives 10 db or greater additional attenuation to fourth and higher harmonics, at expense of increasing loss of fundamental frequency by perhaps 0.05 to 0.08 db. Filter is applicable to all high power microwave transmitters, but is especially desirable for satellite transmitters.

  9. Superconducting microwave filter

    SciTech Connect

    Kommrusch, R.S.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes improvement in a microwave cavity filter comprised of an evacuated substantially cylindrical housing with an RF input terminal and an RF output terminal, the cavity filter preferentially coupling RF energy at least one preferred frequency to the RF output terminal.

  10. Band-elimination filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, G. B.

    1977-01-01

    Helical resonator is employed to produce stable, highly selective filter. Other features of filter include controlled bandwidth by cascading identical stages and stagger tuning, adjustable notch depth, good isolation between stages, gain set by proper choice of resistors, and elimination of spurious responses.

  11. Tunable acoustical optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    Solid state filter with active crystal element increases sensitivity and resolution of passive and active spectrometers. Filter is capable of ranging through infrared and visible spectra, can be built as portable device for field use, and is suitable for ecological surveying, for pollution detection, and for pollutant classification.

  12. Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Milne, Roger L.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Arias-Perez, Jose-Ignacio; Zamora, M. Pilar; Menéndez-Rodríguez, Primitiva; Hardisson, David; Mendiola, Marta; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lambrechts, Diether; Peuteman, Gilian; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katazyna; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Yen Lim, Wei; Wan Chan, Ching; Marme, Federick; Yang, Rongxi; Bugert, Peter; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Hooning, Maartje J.; Kriege, Mieke; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Koppert, Linetta B.; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Long, Jirong; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linde; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Barile, Monica; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Hopper, John L.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Makalic, Enes; Southey, Melissa C.; Hwang Teo, Soo; Har Yip, Cheng; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Tay, Wan-Ting; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Sanchez, Marie; Mulot, Claire; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zhang, Ben; Couch, Fergus J.; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; McKay, James; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Hall, Per; Giles, Graham G.; Benítez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Berchuck, Andrew; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Benlloch, Sara; Antoniou, Antonis; McGuffog, Lesley; Offit, Ken; Lee, Andrew; Dicks, Ed; Luccarini, Craig; Tessier, Daniel C.; Bacot, Francois; Vincent, Daniel; LaBoissière, Sylvie; Robidoux, Frederic; Nielsen, Sune F.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Windebank, Sharon A.; Hilker, Christopher A.; Meyer, Jeffrey; Angelakos, Maggie; Maskiell, Judi; van der Schoot, Ellen; Rutgers, Emiel; Verhoef, Senno; Hogervorst, Frans; Boonyawongviroj, Prat; Siriwanarungsan, Pornthep; Schrauder, Michael; Rübner, Matthias; Oeser, Sonja; Landrith, Silke; Williams, Eileen; Ryder-Mills, Elaine; Sargus, Kara; McInerney, Niall; Colleran, Gabrielle; Rowan, Andrew; Jones, Angela; Sohn, Christof; Schneeweiß, Andeas; Bugert, Peter; Álvarez, Núria; Lacey, James; Wang, Sophia; Ma, Huiyan; Lu, Yani; Deapen, Dennis; Pinder, Rich; Lee, Eunjung; Schumacher, Fred; Horn-Ross, Pam; Reynolds, Peggy; Nelson, David; Ziegler, Hartwig; Wolf, Sonja; Hermann, Volker; Lo, Wing-Yee; Justenhoven, Christina; Baisch, Christian; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate; Rabstein, Sylvia; Lotz, Anne; Harth, Volker; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Erkkilä, Irja; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; von Smitten, Karl; Antonenkova, Natalia; Hillemanns, Peter; Christiansen, Hans; Myöhänen, Eija

    2014-01-01

    Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations of a realistic magnitude. We assessed 41 common non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) for which evidence of association with breast cancer risk had been previously reported. Case-control data were combined from 38 studies of white European women (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) and analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. Strong evidence of association was observed for three nsSNPs: ATXN7-K264R at 3p21 [rs1053338, per allele OR = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04–1.10, P = 2.9 × 10?6], AKAP9-M463I at 7q21 (rs6964587, OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.03–1.07, P = 1.7 × 10?6) and NEK10-L513S at 3p24 (rs10510592, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.07–1.12, P = 5.1 × 10?17). The first two associations reached genome-wide statistical significance in a combined analysis of available data, including independent data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWASs): for ATXN7-K264R, OR = 1.07 (95% CI = 1.05–1.10, P = 1.0 × 10?8); for AKAP9-M463I, OR = 1.05 (95% CI = 1.04–1.07, P = 2.0 × 10?10). Further analysis of other common variants in these two regions suggested that intronic SNPs nearby are more strongly associated with disease risk. We have thus identified a novel susceptibility locus at 3p21, and confirmed previous suggestive evidence that rs6964587 at 7q21 is associated with risk. The third locus, rs10510592, is located in an established breast cancer susceptibility region; the association was substantially attenuated after adjustment for the known GWAS hit. Thus, each of the associated nsSNPs is likely to be a marker for another, non-coding, variant causally related to breast cancer risk. Further fine-mapping and functional studies are required to identify the underlying risk-modifying variants and the genes through which they act. PMID:24943594

  13. Common non-synonymous SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

    PubMed

    Milne, Roger L; Burwinkel, Barbara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Arias-Perez, Jose-Ignacio; Zamora, M Pilar; Menéndez-Rodríguez, Primitiva; Hardisson, David; Mendiola, Marta; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Bolla, Manjeet K; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lambrechts, Diether; Peuteman, Gilian; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katazyna; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Yen Lim, Wei; Wan Chan, Ching; Marme, Federick; Yang, Rongxi; Bugert, Peter; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Hooning, Maartje J; Kriege, Mieke; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Koppert, Linetta B; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha J; Long, Jirong; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Cornelissen, Sten; Braaf, Linde; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Barile, Monica; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; Hopper, John L; Schmidt, Daniel F; Makalic, Enes; Southey, Melissa C; Hwang Teo, Soo; Har Yip, Cheng; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Tay, Wan-Ting; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Sanchez, Marie; Mulot, Claire; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zhang, Ben; Couch, Fergus J; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; McKay, James; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Ahmed, Shahana; Shah, Mitul; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Giles, Graham G; Benítez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F

    2014-11-15

    Candidate variant association studies have been largely unsuccessful in identifying common breast cancer susceptibility variants, although most studies have been underpowered to detect associations of a realistic magnitude. We assessed 41 common non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) for which evidence of association with breast cancer risk had been previously reported. Case-control data were combined from 38 studies of white European women (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) and analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. Strong evidence of association was observed for three nsSNPs: ATXN7-K264R at 3p21 [rs1053338, per allele OR = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-1.10, P = 2.9 × 10(-6)], AKAP9-M463I at 7q21 (rs6964587, OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.03-1.07, P = 1.7 × 10(-6)) and NEK10-L513S at 3p24 (rs10510592, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.07-1.12, P = 5.1 × 10(-17)). The first two associations reached genome-wide statistical significance in a combined analysis of available data, including independent data from nine genome-wide association studies (GWASs): for ATXN7-K264R, OR = 1.07 (95% CI = 1.05-1.10, P = 1.0 × 10(-8)); for AKAP9-M463I, OR = 1.05 (95% CI = 1.04-1.07, P = 2.0 × 10(-10)). Further analysis of other common variants in these two regions suggested that intronic SNPs nearby are more strongly associated with disease risk. We have thus identified a novel susceptibility locus at 3p21, and confirmed previous suggestive evidence that rs6964587 at 7q21 is associated with risk. The third locus, rs10510592, is located in an established breast cancer susceptibility region; the association was substantially attenuated after adjustment for the known GWAS hit. Thus, each of the associated nsSNPs is likely to be a marker for another, non-coding, variant causally related to breast cancer risk. Further fine-mapping and functional studies are required to identify the underlying risk-modifying variants and the genes through which they act. PMID:24943594

  14. Combining information from two data sources with misreporting and incompleteness to assess hospice-use among cancer patients: a multiple imputation approach

    PubMed Central

    He, Yulei; Landrum, Mary Beth; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    Combining information from multiple data sources can enhance estimates of health-related measures by using one source to supply information that is lacking in another, assuming the former has accurate and complete data. However, there is little research conducted on combining methods when each source might be imperfect, for example, subject to measurement errors and/or missing data. In a multisite study of hospice-use by late-stage cancer patients, this variable was available from patients’ abstracted medical records, which may be considerably underreported because of incomplete acquisition of these records. Therefore, data for Medicare-eligible patients were supplemented with their Medicare claims that contained information on hospice-use, which may also be subject to underreporting yet to a lesser degree. In addition, both sources suffered from missing data because of unit nonresponse from medical record abstraction and sample undercoverage for Medicare claims. We treat the true hospice-use status from these patients as a latent variable and propose to multiply impute it using information from both data sources, borrowing the strength from each. We characterize the complete-data model as a product of an ‘outcome’ model for the probability of hospice-use and a ‘reporting’ model for the probability of underreporting from both sources, adjusting for other covariates. Assuming the reports of hospice-use from both sources are missing at random and the underreporting are conditionally independent, we develop a Bayesian multiple imputation algorithm and conduct multiple imputation analyses of patient hospice-use in demographic and clinical subgroups. The proposed approach yields more sensible results than alternative methods in our example. Our model is also related to dual system estimation in population censuses and dual exposure assessment in epidemiology. PMID:24804628

  15. Combining information from two data sources with misreporting and incompleteness to assess hospice-use among cancer patients: a multiple imputation approach.

    PubMed

    He, Yulei; Landrum, Mary Beth; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2014-09-20

    Combining information from multiple data sources can enhance estimates of health-related measures by using one source to supply information that is lacking in another, assuming the former has accurate and complete data. However, there is little research conducted on combining methods when each source might be imperfect, for example, subject to measurement errors and/or missing data. In a multisite study of hospice-use by late-stage cancer patients, this variable was available from patients' abstracted medical records, which may be considerably underreported because of incomplete acquisition of these records. Therefore, data for Medicare-eligible patients were supplemented with their Medicare claims that contained information on hospice-use, which may also be subject to underreporting yet to a lesser degree. In addition, both sources suffered from missing data because of unit nonresponse from medical record abstraction and sample undercoverage for Medicare claims. We treat the true hospice-use status from these patients as a latent variable and propose to multiply impute it using information from both data sources, borrowing the strength from each. We characterize the complete-data model as a product of an 'outcome' model for the probability of hospice-use and a 'reporting' model for the probability of underreporting from both sources, adjusting for other covariates. Assuming the reports of hospice-use from both sources are missing at random and the underreporting are conditionally independent, we develop a Bayesian multiple imputation algorithm and conduct multiple imputation analyses of patient hospice-use in demographic and clinical subgroups. The proposed approach yields more sensible results than alternative methods in our example. Our model is also related to dual system estimation in population censuses and dual exposure assessment in epidemiology. PMID:24804628

  16. Imputation of Exome Sequence Variants into Population- Based Samples and Blood-Cell-Trait-Associated Loci in African Americans: NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Paul L.; Johnsen, Jill M.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Lange, Leslie A.; Nalls, Michael A.; Zhang, Guosheng; Franceschini, Nora; Fox, Keolu; Lange, Ethan M.; Rich, Stephen S.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Wallace, Robert B.; Chen, Zhao; Graubert, Timothy A.; Wilson, James G.; Tang, Hua; Lettre, Guillaume; Reiner, Alex P.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Li, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have successfully applied exome sequencing to discover causal variants in selected individuals with familial, highly penetrant disorders. We demonstrate the utility of exome sequencing followed by imputation for discovering low-frequency variants associated with complex quantitative traits. We performed exome sequencing in a reference panel of 761 African Americans and then imputed newly discovered variants into a larger sample of more than 13,000 African Americans for association testing with the blood cell traits hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood count, and platelet count. First, we illustrate the feasibility of our approach by demonstrating genome-wide-significant associations for variants that are not covered by conventional genotyping arrays; for example, one such association is that between higher platelet count and an MPL c.117G>T (p.Lys39Asn) variant encoding a p.Lys39Asn amino acid substitution of the thrombpoietin receptor gene (p = 1.5 × 10?11). Second, we identified an association between missense variants of LCT and higher white blood count (p = 4 × 10?13). Third, we identified low-frequency coding variants that might account for allelic heterogeneity at several known blood cell-associated loci: MPL c.754T>C (p.Tyr252His) was associated with higher platelet count; CD36 c.975T>G (p.Tyr325?) was associated with lower platelet count; and several missense variants at the ?-globin gene locus were associated with lower hemoglobin. By identifying low-frequency missense variants associated with blood cell traits not previously reported by genome-wide association studies, we establish that exome sequencing followed by imputation is a powerful approach to dissecting complex, genetically heterogeneous traits in large population-based studies. PMID:23103231

  17. Sub-micron filter

    SciTech Connect

    Tepper, Frederick; Kaledin, Leonid

    2009-10-13

    Aluminum hydroxide fibers approximately 2 nanometers in diameter and with surface areas ranging from 200 to 650 m.sup.2/g have been found to be highly electropositive. When dispersed in water they are able to attach to and retain electronegative particles. When combined into a composite filter with other fibers or particles they can filter bacteria and nano size particulates such as viruses and colloidal particles at high flux through the filter. Such filters can be used for purification and sterilization of water, biological, medical and pharmaceutical fluids, and as a collector/concentrator for detection and assay of microbes and viruses. The alumina fibers are also capable of filtering sub-micron inorganic and metallic particles to produce ultra pure water. The fibers are suitable as a substrate for growth of cells. Macromolecules such as proteins may be separated from each other based on their electronegative charges.

  18. Sintered composite filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1986-05-02

    A particulate filter medium formed of a sintered composite of 0.5 micron diameter quartz fibers and 2 micron diameter stainless steel fibers is described. Preferred composition is about 40 vol.% quartz and about 60 vol.% stainless steel fibers. The media is sintered at about 1100/sup 0/C to bond the stainless steel fibers into a cage network which holds the quartz fibers. High filter efficiency and low flow resistance are provided by the smaller quartz fibers. High strength is provided by the stainless steel fibers. The resulting media has a high efficiency and low pressure drop similar to the standard HEPA media, with tensile strength at least four times greater, and a maximum operating temperature of about 550/sup 0/C. The invention also includes methods to form the composite media and a HEPA filter utilizing the composite media. The filter media can be used to filter particles in both liquids and gases.

  19. BIREFRINGENT FILTER MODEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    Birefringent filters are often used as line-narrowing components in solid state lasers. The Birefringent Filter Model program generates a stand-alone model of a birefringent filter for use in designing and analyzing a birefringent filter. It was originally developed to aid in the design of solid state lasers to be used on aircraft or spacecraft to perform remote sensing of the atmosphere. The model is general enough to allow the user to address problems such as temperature stability requirements, manufacturing tolerances, and alignment tolerances. The input parameters for the program are divided into 7 groups: 1) general parameters which refer to all elements of the filter; 2) wavelength related parameters; 3) filter, coating and orientation parameters; 4) input ray parameters; 5) output device specifications; 6) component related parameters; and 7) transmission profile parameters. The program can analyze a birefringent filter with up to 12 different components, and can calculate the transmission and summary parameters for multiple passes as well as a single pass through the filter. The Jones matrix, which is calculated from the input parameters of Groups 1 through 4, is used to calculate the transmission. Output files containing the calculated transmission or the calculated Jones' matrix as a function of wavelength can be created. These output files can then be used as inputs for user written programs. For example, to plot the transmission or to calculate the eigen-transmittances and the corresponding eigen-polarizations for the Jones' matrix, write the appropriate data to a file. The Birefringent Filter Model is written in Microsoft FORTRAN 2.0. The program format is interactive. It was developed on an IBM PC XT equipped with an 8087 math coprocessor, and has a central memory requirement of approximately 154K. Since Microsoft FORTRAN 2.0 does not support complex arithmetic, matrix routines for addition, subtraction, and multiplication of complex, double precision variables are included. The Birefringent Filter Model was written in 1987.

  20. Coparenting conflict, nonacceptance, and depression among divorced adults: results from a 12-year follow-up study of child custody mediation using multiple imputation.

    PubMed

    Sbarra, David A; Emery, Robert E

    2005-01-01

    Using statistically imputed data to increase available power, this article reevaluated the long-term effects of divorce mediation on adults' psychological adjustment and investigated the relations among coparenting custody conflict, nonacceptance of marital termination, and depression at 2 occasions over a decade apart following marital dissolution. Group comparisons revealed that fathers and parents who mediated their custody disputes reported significantly more nonacceptance at the 12-year follow-up assessment. Significant interactions were observed by gender in regression models predicting nonacceptance at the follow-up; mothers' nonacceptance was positively associated with concurrent depression, whereas fathers' nonacceptance was positively associated with early nonacceptance and negatively associated with concurrent conflict. PMID:15709851

  1. Stabilized BFGS approximate Kalman filter

    E-print Network

    Bibov, Alexander

    The Kalman filter (KF) and Extended Kalman filter (EKF) are well-known tools for assimilating data and model predictions. The filters require storage and multiplication of n × n and n × m matrices and inversion of m × m ...

  2. Kalman Filtering with Intermittent Observations

    E-print Network

    Jordan, Michael I.

    1 Kalman Filtering with Intermittent Observations Bruno Sinopoli, Luca Schenato, Massimo within sensor networks, we consider the prob- lem of performing Kalman filtering with intermittent be neglected. We address this problem starting from the discrete Kalman filtering formulation, and modelling

  3. Construction of High Density Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium L.) Linkage Maps Using Microsatellite Markers and SNPs Detected by Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS)

    PubMed Central

    Guajardo, Verónica; Solís, Simón; Sagredo, Boris; Gainza, Felipe; Muñoz, Carlos; Gasic, Ksenija; Hinrichsen, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Linkage maps are valuable tools in genetic and genomic studies. For sweet cherry, linkage maps have been constructed using mainly microsatellite markers (SSRs) and, recently, using single nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs) from a cherry 6K SNP array. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), a new methodology based on high-throughput sequencing, holds great promise for identification of high number of SNPs and construction of high density linkage maps. In this study, GBS was used to identify SNPs from an intra-specific sweet cherry cross. A total of 8,476 high quality SNPs were selected for mapping. The physical position for each SNP was determined using the peach genome, Peach v1.0, as reference, and a homogeneous distribution of markers along the eight peach scaffolds was obtained. On average, 65.6% of the SNPs were present in genic regions and 49.8% were located in exonic regions. In addition to the SNPs, a group of SSRs was also used for construction of linkage maps. Parental and consensus high density maps were constructed by genotyping 166 siblings from a ‘Rainier’ x ‘Rivedel’ (Ra x Ri) cross. Using Ra x Ri population, 462, 489 and 985 markers were mapped into eight linkage groups in ‘Rainier’, ‘Rivedel’ and the Ra x Ri map, respectively, with 80% of mapped SNPs located in genic regions. Obtained maps spanned 549.5, 582.6 and 731.3 cM for ‘Rainier’, ‘Rivedel’ and consensus maps, respectively, with an average distance of 1.2 cM between adjacent markers for both ‘Rainier’ and ‘Rivedel’ maps and of 0.7 cM for Ra x Ri map. High synteny and co-linearity was observed between obtained maps and with Peach v1.0. These new high density linkage maps provide valuable information on the sweet cherry genome, and serve as the basis for identification of QTLs and genes relevant for the breeding of the species. PMID:26011256

  4. MiRNA-Related SNPs and Risk of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Barrett’s Esophagus: Post Genome-Wide Association Analysis in the BEACON Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Buas, Matthew F.; Onstad, Lynn; Levine, David M.; Risch, Harvey A.; Chow, Wong-Ho; Liu, Geoffrey; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.; Bernstein, Leslie; Ye, Weimin; Bird, Nigel C.; Romero, Yvonne; Casson, Alan G.; Corley, Douglas A.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wu, Anna H.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Reid, Brian J.; Hardie, Laura J.; Peters, Ulrike; Whiteman, David C.; Vaughan, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) has increased substantially in recent decades. Multiple risk factors have been identified for EA and its precursor, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), such as reflux, European ancestry, male sex, obesity, and tobacco smoking, and several germline genetic variants were recently associated with disease risk. Using data from the Barrett’s and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON) genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 2,515 EA cases, 3,295 BE cases, and 3,207 controls, we examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that potentially affect the biogenesis or biological activity of microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs implicated in post-transcriptional gene regulation, and deregulated in many cancers, including EA. Polymorphisms in three classes of genes were examined for association with risk of EA or BE: miRNA biogenesis genes (157 SNPs, 21 genes); miRNA gene loci (234 SNPs, 210 genes); and miRNA-targeted mRNAs (177 SNPs, 158 genes). Nominal associations (P<0.05) of 29 SNPs with EA risk, and 25 SNPs with BE risk, were observed. None remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons (FDR q>0.50), and we did not find evidence for interactions between variants analyzed and two risk factors for EA/BE (smoking and obesity). This analysis provides the most extensive assessment to date of miRNA-related SNPs in relation to risk of EA and BE. While common genetic variants within components of the miRNA biogenesis core pathway appear unlikely to modulate susceptibility to EA or BE, further studies may be warranted to examine potential associations between unassessed variants in miRNA genes and targets with disease risk. PMID:26039359

  5. Association of BID SNPs (rs8190315 and rs2072392) and clinical features of benign prostate hyperplasia in Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Hosik; Kim, Su Kang; Yoo, Koo Han; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Young Ock; Chung, Joo-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Exercise has beneficial effect on cancer apoptosis and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The BH3 interacting domain death agonist (BID) gene expression is associated with apoptosis or cell proliferation. In this study, we investigated the association between BID single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the development, prostate volume, and international prostate symptom score (IPSS) of BPH. In 222 BPH males and 214 controls, two SNPs in BID [rs8190315 (Ser56Gly), and rs2072392 (Asp106Asp)] were genotyped and analyzed using multiple logistic regression models. In the result, the genotype and allele frequencies of rs8190315 and rs2072392 were not associated with BPH development or IPSS, however, the allele frequencies [odd ratio (OR)= 1.90, 95% confidence interval (CI)= 1.07–3.41, P= 0.03] and genotype frequencies (in dominant model, OR= 1.94, 95% CI= 1.01–3.74, P= 0.42) of rs8190315, and the genotype frequencies of rs2072392 (in dominant model, OR= 1.94, 95% CI= 1.01–3.74, P= 0.42) were associated with increased prostate volume. We propose that rs8190315 and rs2072392 of BID may contribute to the disease severity of BPH. PMID:25610824

  6. Highly multiplexed molecular inversion probe genotyping: Over 10,000 targeted SNPs genotyped in a single tube assay

    PubMed Central

    Hardenbol, Paul; Yu, Fuli; Belmont, John; MacKenzie, Jennifer; Bruckner, Carsten; Brundage, Tiffany; Boudreau, Andrew; Chow, Steve; Eberle, Jim; Erbilgin, Ayca; Falkowski, Mat; Fitzgerald, Ron; Ghose, Sy; Iartchouk, Oleg; Jain, Maneesh; Karlin-Neumann, George; Lu, Xiuhua; Miao, Xin; Moore, Bridget; Moorhead, Martin; Namsaraev, Eugeni; Pasternak, Shiran; Prakash, Eunice; Tran, Karen; Wang, Zhiyong; Jones, Hywel B.; Davis, Ronald W.; Willis, Thomas D.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale genetic studies are highly dependent on efficient and scalable multiplex SNP assays. In this study, we report the development of Molecular Inversion Probe technology with four-color, single array detection, applied to large-scale genotyping of up to 12,000 SNPs per reaction. While generating 38,429 SNP assays using this technology in a population of 30 trios from the Centre d'Etude Polymorphisme Humain family panel as part of the International HapMap project, we established SNP conversion rates of ?90% with concordance rates >99.6% and completeness levels >98% for assays multiplexed up to 12,000plex levels. Furthermore, these individual metrics can be “traded off” and, by sacrificing a small fraction of the conversion rate, the accuracy can be increased to very high levels. No loss of performance is seen when scaling from 6,000plex to 12,000plex assays, strongly validating the ability of the technology to suppress cross-reactivity at high multiplex levels. The results of this study demonstrate the suitability of this technology for comprehensive association studies that use targeted SNPs in indirect linkage disequilibrium studies or that directly screen for causative mutations. PMID:15687290

  7. Two Novel SNPs in ATXN3 3’ UTR May Decrease Age at Onset of SCA3/MJD in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Long, Zhe; Chen, Zhao; Wang, Chunrong; Huang, Fengzhen; Peng, Huirong; Hou, Xuan; Ding, Dongxue; Ye, Wei; Wang, Junling; Pan, Qian; Li, Jiada; Xia, Kun; Tang, Beisha; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), or Machado—Joseph disease (MJD), is an autosomal dominantly-inherited disease that produces progressive problems with movement. It is caused by the expansion of an area of CAG repeats in a coding region of ATXN3. The number of repeats is inversely associated with age at disease onset (AO) and is significantly associated with disease severity; however, the degree of CAG expansion only explains 50 to 70% of variance in AO. We tested two SNPs, rs709930 and rs910369, in the 3’ UTR of ATXN3 gene for association with SCA3/MJD risk and with SCA3/MJD AO in an independent cohort of 170 patients with SCA3/MJD and 200 healthy controls from mainland China. rs709930 genotype frequencies were statistically significantly different between patients and controls (p = 0.001, ? = 0.05). SCA3/MJD patients carrying the rs709930 A allele and rs910369 T allele experienced an earlier onset, with a decrease in AO of approximately 2 to 4 years. The two novel SNPs found in this study might be genetic modifiers for AO in SCA3/MJD. PMID:25689313

  8. Two novel SNPs in ATXN3 3' UTR may decrease age at onset of SCA3/MJD in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Long, Zhe; Chen, Zhao; Wang, Chunrong; Huang, Fengzhen; Peng, Huirong; Hou, Xuan; Ding, Dongxue; Ye, Wei; Wang, Junling; Pan, Qian; Li, Jiada; Xia, Kun; Tang, Beisha; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), or Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), is an autosomal dominantly-inherited disease that produces progressive problems with movement. It is caused by the expansion of an area of CAG repeats in a coding region of ATXN3. The number of repeats is inversely associated with age at disease onset (AO) and is significantly associated with disease severity; however, the degree of CAG expansion only explains 50 to 70% of variance in AO. We tested two SNPs, rs709930 and rs910369, in the 3' UTR of ATXN3 gene for association with SCA3/MJD risk and with SCA3/MJD AO in an independent cohort of 170 patients with SCA3/MJD and 200 healthy controls from mainland China. rs709930 genotype frequencies were statistically significantly different between patients and controls (p = 0.001, ? = 0.05). SCA3/MJD patients carrying the rs709930 A allele and rs910369 T allele experienced an earlier onset, with a decrease in AO of approximately 2 to 4 years. The two novel SNPs found in this study might be genetic modifiers for AO in SCA3/MJD. PMID:25689313

  9. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN); McLaughlin, Jerry C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowden, Richard A. (Powell, TN)

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  10. Fourier plane filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, D. S.; Aldrich, R. E.; Krol, F. T.

    1972-01-01

    An electrically addressed liquid crystal Fourier plane filter capable of real time optical image processing is described. The filter consists of two parts: a wedge filter having forty 9 deg segments and a ring filter having twenty concentric rings in a one inch diameter active area. Transmission of the filter in the off (transparent) state exceeds fifty percent. By using polarizing optics, contrast as high as 10,000:1 can be achieved at voltages compatible with FET switching technology. A phenomenological model for the dynamic scattering is presented for this special case. The filter is designed to be operated from a computer and is addressed by a seven bit binary word which includes an on or off command and selects any one of the twenty rings or twenty wedge pairs. The overall system uses addressable latches so that once an element is in a specified state, it will remain there until a change of state command is received. The drive for the liquid crystal filter is ? 30 V peak at 30 Hz to 70 Hz. These parameters give a rise time for the scattering of 20 msec and a decay time of 80 to 100 msec.

  11. Are reconstruction filters necessary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, Gerald C.

    2006-05-01

    Shannon's sampling theorem (also called the Shannon-Whittaker-Kotel'nikov theorem) was developed for the digitization and reconstruction of sinusoids. Strict adherence is required when frequency preservation is important. Three conditions must be met to satisfy the sampling theorem: (1) The signal must be band-limited, (2) the digitizer must sample the signal at an adequate rate, and (3) a low-pass reconstruction filter must be present. In an imaging system, the signal is band-limited by the optics. For most imaging systems, the signal is not adequately sampled resulting in aliasing. While the aliasing seems excessive mathematically, it does not significantly affect the perceived image. The human visual system detects intensity differences, spatial differences (shapes), and color differences. The eye is less sensitive to frequency effects and therefore sampling artifacts have become quite acceptable. Indeed, we love our television even though it is significantly undersampled. The reconstruction filter, although absolutely essential, is rarely discussed. It converts digital data (which we cannot see) into a viewable analog signal. There are several reconstruction filters: electronic low-pass filters, the display media (monitor, laser printer), and your eye. These are often used in combination to create a perceived continuous image. Each filter modifies the MTF in a unique manner. Therefore image quality and system performance depends upon the reconstruction filter(s) used. The selection depends upon the application.

  12. Fuzzy rank LUM filters.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yao; Barner, Kenneth E

    2006-12-01

    The rank information of samples is widely utilized in nonlinear signal processing algorithms. Recently developed fuzzy transformation theory introduces the concept of fuzzy ranks, which incorporates sample spread (or sample diversity) information into the sample ranking framework. Thus, the fuzzy rank reflects a sample's rank, as well as its similarity to the other sample (namely, joint rank order and spread), and can be utilized to improve the performance of the conventional rank-order-based filters. In this paper, the well-known lower-upper-middle (LUM) filters are generalized utilizing the fuzzy ranks, yielding the class of fuzzy rank LUM (F-LUM) filters. Statistical and deterministic properties of the F-LUM filters are derived, showing that the F-LUM smoothers have similar impulsive noise removal capability to the LUM smoothers, while preserving the image details better. The F-LUM sharpeners are capable of enhancing strong edges while simultaneously preserving small variations. The performance of the F-LUM filters are evaluated for the problems of image impulsive noise removal, sharpening and edge-detection preprocessing. The experimental results show that the F-LUM smoothers can achieve a better tradeoff between noise removal and detail preservation than the LUM smoothers. The F-LUM sharpeners are capable of sharpening the image edges without amplifying the noise or distorting the fine details. The joint smoothing and sharpening operation of the general F-LUM filters also showed superiority in edge detection preprocessing application. In conclusion, the simplicity and versatility of the F-LUM filters and their advantages over the conventional LUM filters are desirable in many practical applications. This also shows that utilizing fuzzy ranks in filter generalization is a promising methodology. PMID:17153940

  13. Multilevel filtering elliptic preconditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, C. C. Jay; Chan, Tony F.; Tong, Charles

    1989-01-01

    A class of preconditioners is presented for elliptic problems built on ideas borrowed from the digital filtering theory and implemented on a multilevel grid structure. They are designed to be both rapidly convergent and highly parallelizable. The digital filtering viewpoint allows the use of filter design techniques for constructing elliptic preconditioners and also provides an alternative framework for understanding several other recently proposed multilevel preconditioners. Numerical results are presented to assess the convergence behavior of the new methods and to compare them with other preconditioners of multilevel type, including the usual multigrid method as preconditioner, the hierarchical basis method and a recent method proposed by Bramble-Pasciak-Xu.

  14. Minimum uncertainty filters for pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Trantham, E.C. )

    1993-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to calculate filters with a minimum uncertainty, the product of filter length and bandwidth. The method is applicable to producing minimum uncertainly filters with time or frequency domain constraints on the filter. The calculus of variations is used to derive the conditions that minimize a filter's uncertainly. The general solution is a linear combination of Hermite functions, where the Hermite functions are summed from low to high order until the filter's constraints are met. Filters constrained to have zero amplitude at zero hertz have an uncertainty at least three times greater than expected from the uncertainty principle, and the minimum uncertainty filter is a first derivative Gaussian. For the previous filter, the minimum uncertainty high cut filter is a Gaussian function of frequency, but the minimum uncertainty low cut filter is a linear function of frequency.

  15. Remotely serviced filter and housing

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Maurice J. (Pocatello, ID); Zaladonis, Larry A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1988-09-27

    A filter system for a hot cell comprises a housing adapted for input of air or other gas to be filtered, flow of the air through a filter element, and exit of filtered air. The housing is tapered at the top to make it easy to insert a filter cartridge using an overhead crane. The filter cartridge holds the filter element while the air or other gas is passed through the filter element. Captive bolts in trunnion nuts are readily operated by electromechanical manipulators operating power wrenches to secure and release the filter cartridge. The filter cartridge is adapted to make it easy to change a filter element by using a master-slave manipulator at a shielded window station.

  16. Clique-Based Clustering of Correlated SNPs in a Gene Can Improve Performance of Gene-Based Multi-Bin Linear Combination Test

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yun Joo; Kim, Sun Ah; Bull, Shelley B.

    2015-01-01

    Gene-based analysis of multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene region is an alternative to single SNP analysis. The multi-bin linear combination test (MLC) proposed in previous studies utilizes the correlation among SNPs within a gene to construct a gene-based global test. SNPs are partitioned into clusters of highly correlated SNPs, and the MLC test statistic quadratically combines linear combination statistics constructed for each cluster. The test has degrees of freedom equal to the number of clusters and can be more powerful than a fully quadratic or fully linear test statistic. In this study, we develop a new SNP clustering algorithm designed to find cliques, which are complete subnetworks of SNPs with all pairwise correlations above a threshold. We evaluate the performance of the MLC test using the clique-based CLQ algorithm versus using the tag-SNP-based LDSelect algorithm. In our numerical power calculations we observed that the two clustering algorithms produce identical clusters about 40~60% of the time, yielding similar power on average. However, because the CLQ algorithm tends to produce smaller clusters with stronger positive correlation, the MLC test is less likely to be affected by the occurrence of opposing signs in the individual SNP effect coefficients. PMID:26346579

  17. Tag SNPs for HLA-B alleles that are associated with drug response and disease risk in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Sun, J; Yu, H; Chen, H; Wang, J; Zou, H; Lu, D; Xu, J; Zheng, S L

    2015-10-01

    Multiple HLA-B alleles (haplotypes) are associated with drug-induced adverse responses and disease risks but are difficult to be directly genotyped. The goal of this study is to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are able to tag HLA-B alleles in the Chinese Han population. Twelve HLA-B alleles that are associated with drug adverse responses and disease risks were identified. They were sequenced initially in 880 Chinese Han subjects where high-density SNPs within the HLA-B gene were available. Performances of these SNPs to tag the HLA-B alleles were assessed primarily by sensitivity and specificity. Two HLA-B alleles can be reliably tagged by SNPs at 100% sensitivity and >95% specificity. For example, HLA-B*15:02 can be tagged by the 'C' allele of rs10484555, and HLA-B*58:01 can be tagged by the 'T' allele of rs9262570. These results were confirmed in 500 additional Chinese Han subjects. If confirmed in independent studies, these tag SNPs could be used as a reliable, simple and cost-effective alternative for genotyping a subset of HLA-B alleles. PMID:25752521

  18. 11.10 Filter Banks What Are Filter Banks?

    E-print Network

    Fowler, Mark

    1/7 11.10 Filter Banks #12;2/7 What Are Filter Banks? Often need to slice up a "wideband" signal into various "subbands" Figure from Porat's Book #12;3/7 Filter Banks Application: Cell Phone Basestation FDMA Converter & ADC Filter Bank Demod Demod Demod Antenna ... ...User 1 User M ff2f1 1 GHz ... ... User 1

  19. Aerosol Optical Depth As a Measure of Particulate Exposure Using Imputed Censored Data, and Relationship with Childhood Asthma Hospital Admissions for 2004 in Athens, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Gary; Sterling, David A; Aryal, Subhash; Vemulapalli, Abhilash; Priftis, Kostas N; Sifakis, Nicolas I

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of human health implications from atmosphere exposure is a priority in both the geographic and the public health domains. The unique properties of geographic tools for remote sensing of the atmosphere offer a distinct ability to characterize and model aerosols in the urban atmosphere for evaluation of impacts on health. Asthma, as a manifestation of upper respiratory disease prevalence, is a good example of the potential interface of geographic and public health interests. The current study focused on Athens, Greece during the year of 2004 and (1) demonstrates a systemized process for aligning data obtained from satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) with geographic location and time, (2) evaluates the ability to apply imputation methods to censored data, and (3) explores whether AOD data can be used satisfactorily to investigate the association between AOD and health impacts using an example of hospital admission for childhood asthma. This work demonstrates the ability to apply remote sensing data in the evaluation of health outcomes, that the alignment process for remote sensing data is readily feasible, and that missing data can be imputed with a sufficient degree of reliability to develop complete datasets. Individual variables demonstrated small but significant effect levels on hospital admission of children for AOD, nitrogen oxides (NOx), relative humidity (rH), temperature, smoke, and inversely for ozone. However, when applying a multivari-able model, an association with asthma hospital admissions and air quality could not be demonstrated. This work is promising and will be expanded to include additional years. PMID:25987842

  20. Aerosol optical depth as a measure of particulate exposure using imputed censored data, and relationship with childhood asthma hospital admissions for 2004 in athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Gary; Sterling, David A; Aryal, Subhash; Vemulapalli, Abhilash; Priftis, Kostas N; Sifakis, Nicolas I

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of human health implications from atmosphere exposure is a priority in both the geographic and the public health domains. The unique properties of geographic tools for remote sensing of the atmosphere offer a distinct ability to characterize and model aerosols in the urban atmosphere for evaluation of impacts on health. Asthma, as a manifestation of upper respiratory disease prevalence, is a good example of the potential interface of geographic and public health interests. The current study focused on Athens, Greece during the year of 2004 and (1) demonstrates a systemized process for aligning data obtained from satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) with geographic location and time, (2) evaluates the ability to apply imputation methods to censored data, and (3) explores whether AOD data can be used satisfactorily to investigate the association between AOD and health impacts using an example of hospital admission for childhood asthma. This work demonstrates the ability to apply remote sensing data in the evaluation of health outcomes, that the alignment process for remote sensing data is readily feasible, and that missing data can be imputed with a sufficient degree of reliability to develop complete datasets. Individual variables demonstrated small but significant effect levels on hospital admission of children for AOD, nitrogen oxides (NOx), relative humidity (rH), temperature, smoke, and inversely for ozone. However, when applying a multivari-able model, an association with asthma hospital admissions and air quality could not be demonstrated. This work is promising and will be expanded to include additional years. PMID:25987842

  1. Erythropoietin-Stimulating Agents and Survival in End-Stage Renal Disease: Comparison of Payment Policy Analysis, Instrumental Variables, and Multiple Imputation of Potential Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dore, David D.; Swaminathan, Shailender; Gutman, Roee; Trivedi, Amal N.; Mor, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the assumptions and estimands across three approaches to estimating the effect of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs) on mortality. Study Design and Setting Using data from the Renal Management Information System, we conducted two analyses utilizing a change to bundled payment that we hypothesized mimicked random assignment to ESA (pre-post, difference-in-difference, and instrumental variable analyses). A third analysis was based on multiply imputing potential outcomes using propensity scores. Results There were 311,087 recipients of ESAs and 13,095 non-recipients. In the pre-post comparison, we identified no clear relationship between bundled payment (measured by calendar time) and the incidence of death within six months (risk difference -1.5%; 95% CI - 7.0% to 4.0%). In the instrumental variable analysis, the risk of mortality was similar among ESA recipients (risk difference -0.9%; 95% CI -2.1 to 0.3). In the multiple imputation analysis, we observed a 4.2% (95% CI 3.4% to 4.9%) absolute reduction in mortality risk with use of ESAs, but closer to the null for patients with baseline hematocrit >36%. Conclusion Methods emanating from different disciplines often rely on different assumptions, but can be informative about a similar causal contrast. The implications of these distinct approaches are discussed. PMID:23849152

  2. Cryogenic coaxial microwave filters

    E-print Network

    Tancredi, G; Meeson, P J

    2014-01-01

    At millikelvin temperatures the careful filtering of electromagnetic radiation, especially in the microwave regime, is critical for controlling the electromagnetic environment for experiments in fields such as solid-state quantum information processing and quantum metrology. We present a design for a filter consisting of small diameter dissipative coaxial cables that is straightforward to construct and provides a quantitatively predictable attenuation spectrum. We describe the fabrication process and demonstrate that the performance of the filters is in good agreement with theoretical modelling. We further perform an indicative test of the performance of the filters by making current-voltage measurements of small, underdamped Josephson Junctions at 15 mK and we present the results.

  3. Westinghouse filter update

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Bruck, G.J.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Newby, R.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1993-09-01

    Hot gas filters have been implemented and operated in four different test facilities: Subpilot scale entrained gasifier, located at the Texaco Montebello Research facilities in California, Foster Wheeler Advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion pilot plant facilities, located in Livingston, New Jersey, Slipstream of the American Electric Power (AEP) 70 MW (electric) Tidd-PFBC, located in Brilliant, Ohio, and in the Ahlstrom 10 MW (thermal) Circulating PFBC facility, located in Karhula, Finland. Candle filter testing has occurred at all four facilities; cross flow filter testing has occurred at the Texaco and Foster Wheeler facilities. Table 1 identifies and summarizes the key operating characteristics of these facilities and the type and scale of filter unit tested. A brief description of each project is given.

  4. Parallel Subconvolution Filtering Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Andrew A.

    2003-01-01

    These architectures are based on methods of vector processing and the discrete-Fourier-transform/inverse-discrete- Fourier-transform (DFT-IDFT) overlap-and-save method, combined with time-block separation of digital filters into frequency-domain subfilters implemented by use of sub-convolutions. The parallel-processing method implemented in these architectures enables the use of relatively small DFT-IDFT pairs, while filter tap lengths are theoretically unlimited. The size of a DFT-IDFT pair is determined by the desired reduction in processing rate, rather than on the order of the filter that one seeks to implement. The emphasis in this report is on those aspects of the underlying theory and design rules that promote computational efficiency, parallel processing at reduced data rates, and simplification of the designs of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits needed to implement high-order filters and correlators.

  5. Anti-Glare Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Glare from CRT screens has been blamed for blurred vision, eyestrain, headaches, etc. Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc. (OCLI) manufactures a coating to reduce glare which was used to coat the windows on the Gemini and Apollo spacecraft. In addition, OCLI offers anti-glare filters (Glare Guard) utilizing the same thin film coating technology. The coating minimizes brightness, provides enhanced contrast and improves readability. The filters are OCLI's first consumer product.

  6. Contactor/filter improvements

    DOEpatents

    Stelman, David (West Hills, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A contactor/filter arrangement for removing particulate contaminants from a gaseous stream includes a housing having a substantially vertically oriented granular material retention member with upstream and downstream faces, a substantially vertically oriented microporous gas filter element, wherein the retention member and the filter element are spaced apart to provide a zone for the passage of granular material therethrough. The housing further includes a gas inlet means, a gas outlet means, and means for moving a body of granular material through the zone. A gaseous stream containing particulate contaminants passes through the gas inlet means as well as through the upstream face of the granular material retention member, passing through the retention member, the body of granular material, the microporous gas filter element, exiting out of the gas outlet means. Disposed on the upstream face of the filter element is a cover screen which isolates the filter element from contact with the moving granular bed and collects a portion of the particulates so as to form a dust cake having openings small enough to exclude the granular material, yet large enough to receive the dust particles. In one embodiment, the granular material is comprised of prous alumina impregnated with CuO, with the cover screen cleaned by the action of the moving granular material as well as by backflow pressure pulses.

  7. NICMOS Filter Wheel Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    This is an engineering test {described in SMOV4 Activity Description NICMOS-04} to verify the aliveness, functionality, operability, and electro-mechanical calibration of the NICMOS filter wheel motors and assembly after NCS restart in SMOV4. This test has been designed to obviate concerns over possible deformation or breakage of the fitter wheel "soda-straw" shafts due to excess rotational drag torque and/or bending moments which may be imparted due to changes in the dewar metrology from warm-up/cool-down. This test should be executed after the NCS {and filter wheel housing} has reached and approximately equilibrated to its nominal operating temperature.Addition of visits G0 - G9 {9/9/09}: Ten visits copied from proposal 11868 {visits 20, 30, ..., 90, A0, B0}. Each visit moves two filter positions, takes lamp ON/OFF exposures and then moves back to the blank position. Visits G0, G1 and G2 will leave the filter wheels disabled. The remaining visits will leave the filter wheels enabled. There are sufficient in between times to allow for data download and analysis. In the case of problem is encountered, the filter wheels will be disabled through a real time command. The in between times are all set to 22-50 hours. It is preferable to have as short as possible in between time.

  8. Linear Filtering and Decimation & Expansion

    E-print Network

    Fowler, Mark

    1/6 Linear Filtering and Decimation & Expansion #12;2/6 Need for Filtering ­ Decimation Recall: M /M-/M - )(f X /M-/M - )(^ f X #12;3/6 Need for Filtering ­ Expansion Recall: Expansion leaves high Like We Sampled at Higher Rate #12;4/6 Need for Filtering ­ Expansion (cont.) So... the ideal post

  9. Filter and method of fabricating

    DOEpatents

    Janney, Mark A.

    2006-02-14

    A method of making a filter includes the steps of: providing a substrate having a porous surface; applying to the porous surface a coating of dry powder comprising particles to form a filter preform; and heating the filter preform to bind the substrate and the particles together to form a filter.

  10. The Kalman Filter Justin Pearson

    E-print Network

    Bigelow, Stephen

    The Kalman Filter Justin Pearson SIAM Seminar on Algorithms in Computational Science Nov 24, 2014 #12;Outline · Linear systems · + Linear Recursive Estimation · = Kalman Filter #12;The Kalman Filter: accels, gyros dynamical system #12;The Kalman Filter is an efficient algorithm for estimating the state

  11. Anti-clogging filter system

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Erik P.

    2015-05-19

    An anti-clogging filter system for filtering a fluid containing large particles and small particles includes an enclosure with at least one individual elongated tubular filter element in the enclosure. The individual elongated tubular filter element has an internal passage, a closed end, an open end, and a filtering material in or on the individual elongated tubular filter element. The fluid travels through the open end of the elongated tubular element and through the internal passage and through the filtering material. An anti-clogging element is positioned on or adjacent the individual elongated tubular filter element and provides a fluid curtain that preferentially directs the larger particulates to one area of the filter material allowing the remainder of the filter material to remain more efficient.

  12. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA); Bilek, Marcela M. M. (Engadine, AU); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  13. Remotely serviced filter and housing

    DOEpatents

    Ross, M.J.; Zaladonis, L.A.

    1987-07-22

    A filter system for a hot cell comprises a housing adapted for input of air or other gas to be filtered, flow of the air through a filter element, and exit of filtered air. The housing is tapered at the top to make it easy to insert a filter cartridge holds the filter element while the air or other gas is passed through the filter element. Captive bolts in trunnion nuts are readily operated by electromechanical manipulators operating power wrenches to secure and release the filter cartridge. The filter cartridge is adapted to make it easy to change a filter element by using a master-slave manipulator at a shielded window station. 6 figs.

  14. Identification and Analysis of Genome-Wide SNPs Provide Insight into Signatures of Selection and Domestication in Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Luyang; Liu, Shikai; Wang, Ruijia; Jiang, Yanliang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Jiaren; Bao, Lisui; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Dunham, Rex; Waldbieser, Geoff; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2014-01-01

    Domestication and selection for important performance traits can impact the genome, which is most often reflected by reduced heterozygosity in and surrounding genes related to traits affected by selection. In this study, analysis of the genomic impact caused by domestication and artificial selection was conducted by investigating the signatures of selection using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). A total of 8.4 million candidate SNPs were identified by using next generation sequencing. On average, the channel catfish genome harbors one SNP per 116 bp. Approximately 6.6 million, 5.3 million, 4.9 million, 7.1 million and 6.7 million SNPs were detected in the Marion, Thompson, USDA103, Hatchery strain, and wild population, respectively. The allele frequencies of 407,861 SNPs differed significantly between the domestic and wild populations. With these SNPs, 23 genomic regions with putative selective sweeps were identified that included 11 genes. Although the function for the majority of the genes remain unknown in catfish, several genes with known function related to aquaculture performance traits were included in the regions with selective sweeps. These included hypoxia-inducible factor 1?· HIF?? ¨ and the transporter gene ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 5 (ABCB5). HIF1?· is important for response to hypoxia and tolerance to low oxygen levels is a critical aquaculture trait. The large numbers of SNPs identified from this study are valuable for the development of high-density SNP arrays for genetic and genomic studies of performance traits in catfish. PMID:25313648

  15. Disinfecting Filters For Recirculated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilichi, Carmine A.

    1992-01-01

    Simple treatment disinfects air filters by killing bacteria, algae, fungi, mycobacteria, viruses, spores, and any other micro-organisms filters might harbor. Concept applied to reusable stainless-steel wire mesh filters and disposable air filters. Treatment used on filters in air-circulation systems in spacecraft, airplanes, other vehicles, and buildings to help prevent spread of colds, sore throats, and more-serious illnesses.

  16. Genetic Diversity of Sheep Breeds from Albania, Greece, and Italy Assessed by Mitochondrial DNA and Nuclear Polymorphisms (SNPs)

    PubMed Central

    Pariset, Lorraine; Mariotti, Marco; Gargani, Maria; Joost, Stephane; Negrini, Riccardo; Perez, Trinidad; Bruford, Michael; Ajmone Marsan, Paolo; Valentini, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    We employed mtDNA and nuclear SNPs to investigate the genetic diversity of sheep breeds of three countries of the Mediterranean basin: Albania, Greece, and Italy. In total, 154 unique mtDNA haplotypes were detected by means of D-loop sequence analysis. The major nucleotide diversity was observed in Albania. We identified haplogroups, A, B, and C in Albanian and Greek samples, while Italian individuals clustered in groups A and B. In general, the data show a pattern reflecting old migrations that occurred in postneolithic and historical times. PCA analysis on SNP data differentiated breeds with good correspondence to geographical locations. This could reflect geographical isolation, selection operated by local sheep farmers, and different flock management and breed admixture that occurred in the last centuries. PMID:22125424

  17. Comparison of Major and Minor Viral SNPs Identified through Single Template Sequencing and Pyrosequencing in Acute HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bouzek, Heather; Kim, Moon; Deng, Wenjie; Larsen, Brendan B.; Zhao, Hong; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Rolland, Morgane; Mullins, James I.

    2015-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies, such as 454-pyrosequencing, allow for the identification of variants in sequence populations at lower levels than consensus sequencing and most single-template Sanger sequencing experiments. We sought to determine if the greater depth of population sampling attainable using MPS technology would allow detection of minor variants in HIV founder virus populations very early in infection in instances where Sanger sequencing detects only a single variant. We compared single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) during acute HIV-1 infection from 32 subjects using both single template Sanger and 454-pyrosequencing. Pyrosequences from a median of 2400 viral templates per subject and encompassing 40% of the HIV-1 genome, were compared to a median of five individually amplified near full-length viral genomes sequenced using Sanger technology. There was no difference in the consensus nucleotide sequences over the 3.6kb compared in 84% of the subjects infected with single founders and 33% of subjects infected with multiple founder variants: among the subjects with disagreements, mismatches were found in less than 1% of the sites evaluated (of a total of nearly 117,000 sites across all subjects). The majority of the SNPs observed only in pyrosequences were present at less than 2% of the subject’s viral sequence population. These results demonstrate the utility of the Sanger approach for study of early HIV infection and provide guidance regarding the design, utility and limitations of population sequencing from variable template sources, and emphasize parameters for improving the interpretation of massively parallel sequencing data to address important questions regarding target sequence evolution. PMID:26317928

  18. Combined effects of three independent SNPs greatly increase the risk estimate for RA at 6q23.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Gisela; Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Gibbons, Laura J; Bowes, John; Flynn, Edward; Martin, Paul; Wilson, Anthony G; Bax, Deborah E; Morgan, Ann W; Emery, Paul; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Thomson, Wendy; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane

    2009-07-15

    The most consistent finding derived from the WTCCC GWAS for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was association to a SNP at 6q23. We performed a fine-mapping of the region in order to search the 6q23 region for additional disease variants. 3962 RA patients and 3531 healthy controls were included in the study. We found 18 SNPs associated with RA. The SNP showing the strongest association was rs6920220 [P = 2.6 x 10(-6), OR (95% CI) 1.22 (1.13-1.33)]. The next most strongly associated SNP was rs13207033 [P = 0.0001, OR (95% CI) 0.86 (0.8-0.93)] which was perfectly correlated with rs10499194, a SNP previously associated with RA in a US/European series. Additionally, we found a number of new potential RA markers, including rs5029937, located in the intron 2 of TNFAIP3. Of the 18 associated SNPs, three polymorphisms, rs6920220, rs13207033 and rs5029937, remained significant after conditional logistic regression analysis. The combination of the carriage of both risk alleles of rs6920220 and rs5029937 together with the absence of the protective allele of rs13207033 was strongly associated with RA when compared with carriage of none [OR of 1.86 (95% CI) (1.51-2.29)]. This equates to an effect size of 1.50 (95% CI 1.21-1.85) compared with controls and is higher than that obtained for any SNP individually. This is the first study to show that the confirmed loci from the GWA studies, that confer only a modest effect size, could harbour a significantly greater effect once the effect of additional risk variants are accounted for. PMID:19417005

  19. The Functional SNPs in the 5' Regulatory Region of the Porcine PPARD Gene Have Significant Association with Fat Deposition Traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunxia; Gao, Tengsen; Hu, Shanyao; Lin, Bin; Yan, Dechao; Xu, Zaiyan; Zhang, Zijun; Mao, Yuanliang; Mao, Huimin; Wang, Litong; Wang, Guoshui; Xiong, Yuanzhu; Zuo, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) is a key regulator of lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we identified two Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs, g.1015 A>G and g.1018 T>C) constituting four haplotypes (GT, GC, AC and AT) in the 5' regulatory region of porcine PPARD gene. Functional analysis of the four haplotypes showed that the transcriptional activity of the PPARD promoter fragment carrying haplotype AC was significantly lower than that of the other haplotypes in 3T3-L1, C2C12 and PK-15 cells, and haplotype AC had the lowest binding capacities to the nuclear extracts. Transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) enhanced the transcription activities of promoter fragments of PPARD gene carrying haplotypes GT, GC and AT in C2C12 and 3T3-L1 cells, and increased the protein expression of PPARD gene in C2C12 myoblasts. TCF7L2 differentially bound to the four haplotypes, and the binding capacity of TCF7L2 to haplotype AC was the lowest. There were significant associations between -655A/G and fat deposition traits in three pig populations including the Large White × Meishan F2 pigs, France and American Large White pigs. Pigs with genotype GG had significantly higher expression of PPARD at both mRNA and protein level than those with genotype AG. These results strongly suggested that the SNPs in 5' regulatory region of PPARD genes had significant impact on pig fat deposition traits. PMID:26599230

  20. Introgression and phenotypic assimilation in Zimmerius flycatchers (Tyrannidae): population genetic and phylogenetic inferences from genome-wide SNPs.

    PubMed

    Rheindt, Frank E; Fujita, Matthew K; Wilton, Peter R; Edwards, Scott V

    2014-03-01

    Genetic introgression is pervasive in nature and may lead to large-scale phenotypic assimilation and/or admixture of populations, but there is limited knowledge on whether large phenotypic changes are typically accompanied by high levels of introgression throughout the genome. Using bioacoustic, biometric, and spectrophotometric data from a flycatcher (Tyrannidae) system in the Neotropical genus Zimmerius, we document a mosaic pattern of phenotypic admixture in which a population of Zimmerius viridiflavus in northern Peru (henceforth "mosaic") is vocally and biometrically similar to conspecifics to the south but shares plumage characteristics with a different species (Zimmerius chrysops) to the north. To clarify the origins of the mosaic population, we used the RAD-seq approach to generate a data set of 37,361 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A range of population-genetic diagnostics shows that the genome of the mosaic population is largely indistinguishable from southern Z. viridiflavus and distinct from northern Z. chrysops, and the application of parsimony and species tree methods to the genome-wide SNP data set confirms the close affinity of the mosaic population with southern Z. viridiflavus. Even so, using a subset of 2710 SNPs found across all sampled lineages in configurations appropriate for a recently proposed statistical ("ABBA/BABA") test that distinguishes gene flow from incomplete lineage sorting, we detected low levels of gene flow from northern Z. chrysops into the mosaic population. Mapping the candidate loci for introgression from Z. chrysops into the mosaic population to the zebra finch genome reveals close linkage with genes significantly enriched in functions involving cell projection and plasma membranes. Introgression of key alleles may have led to phenotypic assimilation in the plumage of mosaic birds, suggesting that selection may have been a key factor facilitating introgression. PMID:24304652

  1. Association between promoter region genetic variants of PTH SNPs and serum 25(OH)-vitamin D level

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Al-Attas, Omar S; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Yakout, Sobhy M; Mohammed, Abdul Khader; Alenad, Amal M; Chrousos, George P; Alokail, Majed S

    2015-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) plays a crucial role in calcium metabolism and skeletal development via altering vitamin D level. Besides, hypersecretion of PTH is implicated in the etiology of osteoporosis. In this study, we analyzed association between promoter region sequence variants of PTH gene and circulating 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH)D) level. Genotypes of PTH SNPs rs1459015, rs10500783 and rs10500784 and circulating serum 25(OH)D level of healthy adults (N=386) of different nationalities living in Riyadh were determined and relation between the different PTH allelic variants and corresponding mean 25(OH)D values were obtained using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni post-hoc test for multiple comparisons. We observed a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (<50 nmol/l) among all nationals which ranged from 59% among Indians to 82% among Yemeni. Comparison of the means of 25(OH)D levels corresponding to different genotypes of PTH SNPs indicated that the T allele of SNP rs1459015 was associated with higher 25(OH)D level in the Sudanese (P=0.03), while the T allele of SNP rs10500783 was associated with higher 25(OH)D level in Saudis (P=0.03). Analysis of results also indicated that the Sudanese carriers of the CC genotype of SNP rs1459015 had a higher risk of suffering from vitamin D deficiency (P=0.02). In conclusion, our study indicated significant association between specific PTH gene promoter region variants and altered levels of 25(OH)D and vitamin D deficiency among specific nationals. PMID:26339419

  2. The Functional SNPs in the 5’ Regulatory Region of the Porcine PPARD Gene Have Significant Association with Fat Deposition Traits

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shanyao; Lin, Bin; Yan, Dechao; Xu, Zaiyan; Zhang, Zijun; Mao, Yuanliang; Mao, Huimin; Wang, Litong; Wang, Guoshui; Xiong, Yuanzhu; Zuo, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) is a key regulator of lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we identified two Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs, g.1015 A>G and g.1018 T>C) constituting four haplotypes (GT, GC, AC and AT) in the 5’ regulatory region of porcine PPARD gene. Functional analysis of the four haplotypes showed that the transcriptional activity of the PPARD promoter fragment carrying haplotype AC was significantly lower than that of the other haplotypes in 3T3-L1, C2C12 and PK-15 cells, and haplotype AC had the lowest binding capacities to the nuclear extracts. Transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) enhanced the transcription activities of promoter fragments of PPARD gene carrying haplotypes GT, GC and AT in C2C12 and 3T3-L1 cells, and increased the protein expression of PPARD gene in C2C12 myoblasts. TCF7L2 differentially bound to the four haplotypes, and the binding capacity of TCF7L2 to haplotype AC was the lowest. There were significant associations between -655A/G and fat deposition traits in three pig populations including the Large White × Meishan F2 pigs, France and American Large White pigs. Pigs with genotype GG had significantly higher expression of PPARD at both mRNA and protein level than those with genotype AG. These results strongly suggested that the SNPs in 5’ regulatory region of PPARD genes had significant impact on pig fat deposition traits. PMID:26599230

  3. The contribution of FTO and UCP-1 SNPs to extreme obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular risk in Brazilian individuals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity has become a common human disorder associated with significant morbidity and mortality and adverse effects on quality of life. Sequence variants in two candidate genes, FTO and UCP-1, have been reported to be overrepresented in obese Caucasian population. The association of these genes polymorphisms with the obesity phenotype in a multiethnic group such as the Brazilian population has not been previously reported. Methods To assess the putative contribution of both FTO and UCP-1 to body mass index (BMI) and cardiovascular risk we genotyped SNPs rs9939609 (FTO) and rs6536991, rs22705565 and rs12502572 (UCP-1) from 126 morbidly obese subjects (BMI 42.9 ± 5.6 kg/m2, mean ± SE) and 113 normal-weight ethnically matched controls (BMI 22.6 ± 3.5 kg/m2, mean ± SE). Waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose and serum lipids were also measured. Each sample was also genotyped for 40 biallelic short insertion/deletion polymorphism (indels) for ethnic assignment and to estimate the proportion of European, African and Amerindian biogeographical ancestry in the Brazilian population. Results Cases did not differ from controls in the proportions of genomic ancestry. The FTO SNP rs9939609 and UCP-1 SNP rs6536991 were significantly associated with BMI (p= 0.04 and p<0.0001 respectively). An allele dose dependent tendency was observed for BMI for rs6536991 sample of controls. No other significant associations between any SNP and hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes were noted after correction for BMI and no significant synergistic effect between FTO and UCP-1 SNPs with obesity were noted. There was not an association between rs9939609 (FTO) and rs6536991 (UCP-1) in with maximum weight loss after 1 year in 94 obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Conclusion Our data are consistent with FTO rs9939609 and UCP-1 rs6536991 common variants as contributors to obesity in the Brazilian population. PMID:23134754

  4. Autosomal SNPs study of a population sample from north of Portugal and a sample of immigrants from the Eastern Europe living in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Lurdes Pontes, M; Pinheiro, M F

    2014-03-01

    The use of autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for forensic research has been widely discussed in recent years, mainly because SNPs have important advantages compared to short tandem repeats (STRs). In this study a total of 131 non related individuals from the North of Portugal and 85 immigrant individuals from the Eastern Europe, mainly Ukrainians, equally non related and residing in Portugal, were typed for 52 loci included in the in the SNP for ID 52plex with the SNaPshot™ assay. PMID:24373741

  5. Skim-Based Genotyping by Sequencing Using a Double Haploid Population to Call SNPs, Infer Gene Conversions, and Improve Genome Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Philipp Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) is an emerging technology to rapidly call an abundance of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) using genome sequencing technology. Several different methodologies and approaches have recently been established, most of these relying on a specific preparation of data. Here we describe our GBS-pipeline, which uses high coverage reads from two parents and low coverage reads from their double haploid offspring to call SNPs on a large scale. The upside of this approach is the high resolution and scalability of the method. PMID:26519413

  6. Gradient Boosting as a SNP Filter: an Evaluation Using Simulated and Hair Morphology Data

    PubMed Central

    Lubke, GH; Laurin, C; Walters, R; Eriksson, N; Hysi, P; Spector, TD; Montgomery, GW; Martin, NG; Medland, SE; Boomsma, DI

    2013-01-01

    Typically, genome-wide association studies consist of regressing the phenotype on each SNP separately using an additive genetic model. Although statistical models for recessive, dominant, SNP-SNP, or SNP-environment interactions exist, the testing burden makes an evaluation of all possible effects impractical for genome-wide data. We advocate a two-step approach where the first step consists of a filter that is sensitive to different types of SNP main and interactions effects. The aim is to substantially reduce the number of SNPs such that more specific modeling becomes feasible in a second step. We provide an evaluation of a statistical learning method called “gradient boosting machine” (GBM) that can be used as a filter. GBM does not require an a priori specification of a genetic model, and permits inclusion of large numbers of covariates. GBM can therefore be used to explore multiple GxE interactions, which would not be feasible within the parametric framework used in GWAS. We show in a simulation that GBM performs well even under conditions favorable to the standard additive regression model commonly used in GWAS, and is sensitive to the detection of interaction effects even if one of the interacting variables has a zero main effect. The latter would not be detected in GWAS. Our evaluation is accompanied by an analysis of empirical data concerning hair morphology. We estimate the phenotypic variance explained by increasing numbers of highest ranked SNPs, and show that it is sufficient to select 10K-20K SNPs in the first step of a two-step approach. PMID:24404405

  7. Stack filter classifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B; Hush, Don

    2009-01-01

    Just as linear models generalize the sample mean and weighted average, weighted order statistic models generalize the sample median and weighted median. This analogy can be continued informally to generalized additive modeels in the case of the mean, and Stack Filters in the case of the median. Both of these model classes have been extensively studied for signal and image processing but it is surprising to find that for pattern classification, their treatment has been significantly one sided. Generalized additive models are now a major tool in pattern classification and many different learning algorithms have been developed to fit model parameters to finite data. However Stack Filters remain largely confined to signal and image processing and learning algorithms for classification are yet to be seen. This paper is a step towards Stack Filter Classifiers and it shows that the approach is interesting from both a theoretical and a practical perspective.

  8. Filter Press Building 

    E-print Network

    Bush, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    substantially lower operating costs and its concept matched the state of-the-art theme of the project and was developed with the full cooperation of the consultant. The final design, a state-of-the-art sludge dewatering system, resulted in a project with a...-of-the-art sludge dewatering system. This new system utilized an automatic filter press having the unique capability of removing 50% of , the water from the water pollution control , center's treated sludge. The new filter press would be among two state...

  9. NICMOS Filter Wheel Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiklind, Tommy

    2006-07-01

    This is an engineering test to verify the aliveness,functionality, operability, and electro-mechanical calibrationof the NICMOS filter wheel motors and assembly after NCS restartin January/February 2007. This test has been designed to obviate concerns overpossible deformation or breakage of the fitter wheel"soda-straw" shafts due to excess rotational drag torqueand/or bending moments which may be imparted due tochanges in the dewar metrology from warm-up/cool-down.This test should be executed after the NCS {and filter wheelhousing} has reached and approximately equilibrated to itsnominal operating temperature.

  10. NICMOS Filter Wheel Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Sangeeta

    2003-07-01

    This is an engineering test to verify the aliveness, functionality, operability, and electro-mechanical calibration of the NICMOS filter wheel motors and assembly after NCS restart in August 2003. This test has been designed to obviate concerns over possible deformation or breakage of the fitter wheel "soda-straw" shafts due to excess rotational drag torque and/or bending moments which may be imparted due to changes in the dewar metrology from warm-up/cool-down. This test should be executed after the NCS {and filter wheel housing} has reached and approximately equilibrated to its nominal Cycle 11 operating temperature.

  11. INTERIOR VIEW OF FILTER WHEEL MACHINE USED TO FILTER OUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF FILTER WHEEL MACHINE USED TO FILTER OUT AND SEPARATE BICARBONATE FROM AMMONIONATED BRINE. DISCHARGE FROM STRIPPER COLUMNS (SOLVAY COLUMNS). - Solvay Process Company, SA Wetside Building, Between Willis & Milton Avenue, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  12. Filter assembly for metallic and intermetallic tube filters

    DOEpatents

    Alvin, Mary Anne (113 Lehr Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15223); Lippert, Thomas E. (3205 Cambridge Rd., Murrysville, PA 15668); Bruck, Gerald J. (4469 Sardis Rd., Murrysville, PA 15668); Smeltzer, Eugene E. (R.D. 7, Box 267-I, Italy Rd., Export, PA 15632-9621)

    2001-01-01

    A filter assembly (60) for holding a filter element (28) within a hot gas cleanup system pressure vessel is provided, containing: a filter housing (62), said filter housing having a certain axial length and having a peripheral sidewall, said sidewall defining an interior chamber (66); a one piece, all metal, fail-safe/regenerator device (68) within the interior chamber (66) of the filter housing (62) and/or extending beyond the axial length of the filter housing, said device containing an outward extending radial flange (71) within the filter housing for seating an essential seal (70), the device also having heat transfer media (72) disposed inside and screens (80) for particulate removal; one compliant gasket (70) positioned next to and above the outward extending radial flange of the fail-safe/regenerator device; and a porous metallic corrosion resistant superalloy type filter element body welded at the bottom of the metal fail-safe/regenerator device.

  13. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: COLLOID POLISHING FILTER METHOD - FILTER FLOW TECHNOLOGY, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Filter Flow Technology, Inc. (FFT) Colloid Polishing Filter Method (CPFM) was tested as a transportable, trailer mounted, system that uses sorption and chemical complexing phenomena to remove heavy metals and nontritium radionuclides from water. Contaminated waters can be pro...

  14. Novel Approach Identifies SNPs in SLC2A10 and KCNK9 with Evidence for Parent-of-Origin Effect on Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Hoggart, Clive J.; Venturini, Giulia; Mangino, Massimo; Gomez, Felicia; Ascari, Giulia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Teumer, Alexander; Winkler, Thomas W.; Tšernikova, Natalia; Luan, Jian'an; Mihailov, Evelin; Ehret, Georg B.; Zhang, Weihua; Lamparter, David; Esko, Tõnu; Macé, Aurelien; Rüeger, Sina; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Barcella, Matteo; Dauvilliers, Yves; Benyamin, Beben; Evans, David M.; Hayward, Caroline; Lopez, Mary F.; Franke, Lude; Russo, Alessia; Heid, Iris M.; Salvi, Erika; Vendantam, Sailaja; Arking, Dan E.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chambers, John C.; Fiorito, Giovanni; Grallert, Harald; Guarrera, Simonetta; Homuth, Georg; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Porteous, David; Moradpour, Darius; Iranzo, Alex; Hebebrand, Johannes; Kemp, John P.; Lammers, Gert J.; Aubert, Vincent; Heim, Markus H.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa; Santamaria, Joan; Negro, Francesco; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Scott, Robert A.; Spector, Tim D.; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Yuan, Wei; Bell, Jordana T.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Peters, Annette; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wallaschofski, Henri; Whitfield, John B.; Paccaud, Fred; Vollenweider, Peter; Bergmann, Sven; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Tafti, Mehdi; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Cusi, Daniele; Bochud, Murielle; Frayling, Timothy M.; Metspalu, Andres; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Scherag, André; Smith, George Davey; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Rousson, Valentin; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Rivolta, Carlo; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Kutalik, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    The phenotypic effect of some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) depends on their parental origin. We present a novel approach to detect parent-of-origin effects (POEs) in genome-wide genotype data of unrelated individuals. The method exploits increased phenotypic variance in the heterozygous genotype group relative to the homozygous groups. We applied the method to >56,000 unrelated individuals to search for POEs influencing body mass index (BMI). Six lead SNPs were carried forward for replication in five family-based studies (of ?4,000 trios). Two SNPs replicated: the paternal rs2471083-C allele (located near the imprinted KCNK9 gene) and the paternal rs3091869-T allele (located near the SLC2A10 gene) increased BMI equally (beta?=?0.11 (SD), P<0.0027) compared to the respective maternal alleles. Real-time PCR experiments of lymphoblastoid cell lines from the CEPH families showed that expression of both genes was dependent on parental origin of the SNPs alleles (P<0.01). Our scheme opens new opportunities to exploit GWAS data of unrelated individuals to identify POEs and demonstrates that they play an important role in adult obesity. PMID:25078964

  15. Novel approach identifies SNPs in SLC2A10 and KCNK9 with evidence for parent-of-origin effect on body mass index.

    PubMed

    Hoggart, Clive J; Venturini, Giulia; Mangino, Massimo; Gomez, Felicia; Ascari, Giulia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Teumer, Alexander; Winkler, Thomas W; Tšernikova, Natalia; Luan, Jian'an; Mihailov, Evelin; Ehret, Georg B; Zhang, Weihua; Lamparter, David; Esko, Tõnu; Macé, Aurelien; Rüeger, Sina; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Barcella, Matteo; Dauvilliers, Yves; Benyamin, Beben; Evans, David M; Hayward, Caroline; Lopez, Mary F; Franke, Lude; Russo, Alessia; Heid, Iris M; Salvi, Erika; Vendantam, Sailaja; Arking, Dan E; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chambers, John C; Fiorito, Giovanni; Grallert, Harald; Guarrera, Simonetta; Homuth, Georg; Huffman, Jennifer E; Porteous, David; Moradpour, Darius; Iranzo, Alex; Hebebrand, Johannes; Kemp, John P; Lammers, Gert J; Aubert, Vincent; Heim, Markus H; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa; Santamaria, Joan; Negro, Francesco; Schmidt, Carsten O; Scott, Robert A; Spector, Tim D; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J; Yuan, Wei; Bell, Jordana T; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Kooner, Jaspal S; Peters, Annette; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wallaschofski, Henri; Whitfield, John B; Paccaud, Fred; Vollenweider, Peter; Bergmann, Sven; Beckmann, Jacques S; Tafti, Mehdi; Hastie, Nicholas D; Cusi, Daniele; Bochud, Murielle; Frayling, Timothy M; Metspalu, Andres; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Scherag, André; Smith, George Davey; Borecki, Ingrid B; Rousson, Valentin; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Rivolta, Carlo; Loos, Ruth J F; Kutalik, Zoltán

    2014-07-01

    The phenotypic effect of some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) depends on their parental origin. We present a novel approach to detect parent-of-origin effects (POEs) in genome-wide genotype data of unrelated individuals. The method exploits increased phenotypic variance in the heterozygous genotype group relative to the homozygous groups. We applied the method to >56,000 unrelated individuals to search for POEs influencing body mass index (BMI). Six lead SNPs were carried forward for replication in five family-based studies (of ?4,000 trios). Two SNPs replicated: the paternal rs2471083-C allele (located near the imprinted KCNK9 gene) and the paternal rs3091869-T allele (located near the SLC2A10 gene) increased BMI equally (beta?=?0.11 (SD), P<0.0027) compared to the respective maternal alleles. Real-time PCR experiments of lymphoblastoid cell lines from the CEPH families showed that expression of both genes was dependent on parental origin of the SNPs alleles (P<0.01). Our scheme opens new opportunities to exploit GWAS data of unrelated individuals to identify POEs and demonstrates that they play an important role in adult obesity. PMID:25078964

  16. Characterization of a long-chain fatty acid-CoA ligase 1 gene and association between its SNPs and growth traits in the clam Meretrix meretrix.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ping; Huan, Pin; Wang, Hongxia; Lu, Xia; Liu, Baozhong

    2015-07-25

    Long-chain fatty acid-CoA ligases (ACSLs) play crucial roles in fatty acid (FA) metabolism. They convert free long-chain FA into acyl-CoAs, which are key intermediates in both anabolic and catabolic pathways. A long-chain fatty acid-CoA ligase gene was cloned in the clam Meretrix meretrix (MmeACSL1), with a full-length cDNA of 1865 bp encoding 475 amino acids. Its expression was only detected in hepatopancreas by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Expression level of MmeACSL1 exhibited a significant increase in a starvation experiment (P<0.05). This indicates that MmeACSL1 plays an important role in normal metabolism of M. meretrix and may be involved in energy supply and storage. Two exon SNPs and six intron SNPs were developed in this gene by direct sequencing. A marker-trait association analysis showed that five of these SNPs were significantly associated with growth traits (P<0.05). Also, haplotypes comprised of the five SNPs were revealed to be significantly growth-related (P<0.05), which further corroborates the relationship of this gene to growth traits of M. meretrix. PMID:25900031

  17. Genetic contribution to iron status: SNPs related to iron deficiency anaemia and fine mapping of CACNA2D3 calcium channel subunit.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Richer, Carlos; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Blanco-Rojo, Ruth; Toxqui, Laura; Remacha, Angel; Vaquero, M Pilar; López-Parra, Ana M

    2015-12-01

    Numerous studies associate genetic markers with iron- and erythrocyte-related parameters, but few relate them to iron-clinical phenotypes. Novel SNP rs1375515, located in a subunit of the calcium channel gene CACNA2D3, is associated with a higher risk of anaemia. The aim of this study is to further investigate the association of this SNP with iron-related parameters and iron-clinical phenotypes, and to explore the potential role of calcium channel subunit region in iron regulation. Furthermore, we aim to replicate the association of other SNPs reported previously in our population. We tested 45 SNPs selected via systematic review and fine mapping of CACNA2D3 region, with haematological and biochemical traits in 358 women of reproductive age. Multivariate analyses include back-step logistic regression and decision trees. The results replicate the association of SNPs with iron-related traits, and also confirm the protective effect of both A allele of rs1800562 (HFE) and G allele of rs4895441 (HBS1L-MYB). The risk of developing anaemia is increased in reproductive age women carriers of A allele of rs1868505 (CACNA2D3) and/or T allele of rs13194491 (HIST1H2BJ). Association of SNPs from fine mapping with ferritin and serum iron suggests that calcium channels could be a potential pathway for iron uptake in physiological conditions. PMID:26460247

  18. X Chromosome SNPs Were Heavily Involved In Epistasis Effects Of Net Merit Component Traits In Contemporary U.S. Holstein Cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pairwise epistasis effects of net merit and its eight component traits were tested in 1654 contemporary U.S. Holstein cows using the BovineSNP50 (45,878 SNPs). A large number of epistasis effects exceeded the genome-wide significance of 5% type-I error with the Bonferroni correction and a QTL map of...

  19. Soft morphological filters: a robust morphological filtering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, Lasse; Astola, Jaakko T.

    1994-01-01

    We introduce new morphological filters, called soft morphological filters. They maintain most of the desirable properties of standard morphological operations yet are less sensitive to additive noise and to small variations in the shapes of the objects to be filtered. The main difference from standard morphological filters is that maximum and minimum operations are replaced by more general weighted-order statistics. This results in the loss of some algebraic properties but improved performance under noisy conditions.

  20. Impact of the Interaction between 3?-UTR SNPs and microRNA on the Expression of Human Xenobiotic Metabolism Enzyme and Transporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Rongrong; Yang, Fan; Urban, Thomas J.; Li, Lang; Chalasani, Naga; Flockhart, David A.; Liu, Wanqing

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variation in the expression of human xenobiotic metabolism enzymes and transporters (XMETs) leads to inter-individual variability in metabolism of therapeutic agents as well as differed susceptibility to various diseases. Recent expression quantitative traits loci (eQTL) mapping in a few human cells/tissues have identified a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with mRNA expression of many XMET genes. These eQTLs are therefore important candidate markers for pharmacogenetic studies. However, questions remain about whether these SNPs are causative and in what mechanism these SNPs may function. Given the important role of microRNAs (miRs) in gene transcription regulation, we hypothesize that those eQTLs or their proxies in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) altering miR targeting are likely causative SNPs affecting gene expression. The aim of this study is to identify eQTLs potentially regulating major XMETs via interference with miR targeting. To this end, we performed a genome-wide screening for eQTLs for 409 genes encoding major drug metabolism enzymes, transporters and transcription factors, in publically available eQTL datasets generated from the HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines and human liver and brain tissue. As a result, 308 eQTLs significantly (p?SNPs in strong LD (r2???0.8) with these eQTLs using the 1,000 Genome SNP data. Among these 8,177 SNPs, 27 are located in the 3?-UTR of 14 genes. Using two algorithms predicting miR-SNP interaction, we found that almost all these SNPs (26 out of 27) were predicted to create, abolish, or change the target site for miRs in both algorithms. Many of these miRs were also expressed in the same tissue that the eQTL were identified. Our study provides a strong rationale for continued investigation for the functions of these eQTLs in pharmacogenetic settings. PMID:23181071

  1. Analysis of non-synonymous SNPs of the porcine SERPINA6 gene as potential causal variants for a QTL affecting plasma cortisol levels on SSC7.

    PubMed

    Görres, A; Ponsuksili, S; Wimmers, K; Muráni, E

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the SERPINA6 gene encoding corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) has been proposed as a candidate gene for a quantitative trait locus (QTL) affecting cortisol level on pig chromosome 7. The QTL was repeatedly detected in different lines, including a Piétrain × (German Landrace × German Large White) cross (PiF1) and purebred German Landrace (LR). In this study, we investigated whether the known non-synonymous polymorphisms c.44G>T, c.622C>T, c.770C>T, c.793G>A, c.832G>A and c.919G>A of SERPINA6 are sufficient to explain the QTL in these two populations. Our investigations revealed that SNPs c.44G>T, c.622C>T, c.793G>A and c.919G>A are associated with cortisol level in PiF1 (P < 0.01). Haplotype analysis showed that these associations are largely attributable to differences between a major haplotype carrying SNPs c.793G>A and c.919G>A and a haplotype carrying SNPs c.44G>T and c.622C>T. Furthermore, some SNPs, particularly c.44G>T and c.622C>T and the carrier haplotype, showed association with meat quality traits including pH and conductivity (P < 0.05). In LR, the non-synonymous SNPs segregate at very low frequency (<5%) and/or show only weak association with cortisol level (SNPs c.832G>A and c.919G>A; P < 0.05). These findings suggest that the non-synonymous SNPs are not sufficient to explain the QTL across different breeds. Therefore, we examined whether the expression of SERPINA6 is affected by cis-regulatory polymorphisms in liver, the major organ for CBG production. We found allelic expression imbalance of SERPINA6, which suggests that its expression is indeed affected by genetic variation in cis-acting elements. This represents candidate causal variation for future studies of the molecular background of the QTL. PMID:25754835

  2. OPTIMIZATION OF ADVANCED FILTER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Newby; M.A. Alvin; G.J. Bruck; T.E. Lippert; E.E. Smeltzer; M.E. Stampahar

    2002-06-30

    Two advanced, hot gas, barrier filter system concepts have been proposed by the Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation to improve the reliability and availability of barrier filter systems in applications such as PFBC and IGCC power generation. The two hot gas, barrier filter system concepts, the inverted candle filter system and the sheet filter system, were the focus of bench-scale testing, data evaluations, and commercial cost evaluations to assess their feasibility as viable barrier filter systems. The program results show that the inverted candle filter system has high potential to be a highly reliable, commercially successful, hot gas, barrier filter system. Some types of thin-walled, standard candle filter elements can be used directly as inverted candle filter elements, and the development of a new type of filter element is not a requirement of this technology. Six types of inverted candle filter elements were procured and assessed in the program in cold flow and high-temperature test campaigns. The thin-walled McDermott 610 CFCC inverted candle filter elements, and the thin-walled Pall iron aluminide inverted candle filter elements are the best candidates for demonstration of the technology. Although the capital cost of the inverted candle filter system is estimated to range from about 0 to 15% greater than the capital cost of the standard candle filter system, the operating cost and life-cycle cost of the inverted candle filter system is expected to be superior to that of the standard candle filter system. Improved hot gas, barrier filter system availability will result in improved overall power plant economics. The inverted candle filter system is recommended for continued development through larger-scale testing in a coal-fueled test facility, and inverted candle containment equipment has been fabricated and shipped to a gasifier development site for potential future testing. Two types of sheet filter elements were procured and assessed in the program through cold flow and high-temperature testing. The Blasch, mullite-bonded alumina sheet filter element is the only candidate currently approaching qualification for demonstration, although this oxide-based, monolithic sheet filter element may be restricted to operating temperatures of 538 C (1000 F) or less. Many other types of ceramic and intermetallic sheet filter elements could be fabricated. The estimated capital cost of the sheet filter system is comparable to the capital cost of the standard candle filter system, although this cost estimate is very uncertain because the commercial price of sheet filter element manufacturing has not been established. The development of the sheet filter system could result in a higher reliability and availability than the standard candle filter system, but not as high as that of the inverted candle filter system. The sheet filter system has not reached the same level of development as the inverted candle filter system, and it will require more design development, filter element fabrication development, small-scale testing and evaluation before larger-scale testing could be recommended.

  3. Counting digital filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zohar, S. (inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Several embodiments of a counting digital filter of the non-recursive type are disclosed. In each embodiment two registers, at least one of which is a shift register, are included. The shift register received j sub x-bit data input words bit by bit. The kth data word is represented by the integer.

  4. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  5. Digital hum filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Ralph W.; Anderson, Neil L.

    1994-06-01

    Data may be overprinted by a steady-state cyclical noise (hum). Steady-state indicates that the noise is invariant with time; its attributes, frequency, amplitude, and phase, do not change with time. Hum recorded on seismic data usually is powerline noise and associated higher harmonics; leakage from full-waveform rectified cathodic protection devices that contain the odd higher harmonics of powerline frequencies; or vibrational noise from mechanical devices. The fundamental frequency of powerline hum may be removed during data acquisition with the use of notch filters. Unfortunately, notch filters do not discriminate signal and noise, attenuating both. They also distort adjacent frequencies by phase shifting. Finally, they attenuate only the fundamental mode of the powerline noise; higher harmonics and frequencies other than that of powerlines are not removed. Digital notch filters, applied during processing, have many of the same problems as analog filters applied in the field. The method described here removes hum of a particular frequency. Hum attributes are measured by discrete Fourier analysis, and the hum is canceled from the data by subtraction. Errors are slight and the result of the presence of (random) noise in the window or asynchrony of the hum and data sampling. Error is minimized by increasing window size or by resampling to a finer interval. Errors affect the degree of hum attenuation, not the signal. The residual is steady-state hum of the same frequency.

  6. Filter Component Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.; Smeltzer, E.E.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced particulate filtration systems are currently being developed at Westinghouse for use in both coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems. To date, Westinghouse has demonstrated 5855 hours of successful operation of first generation monolithic filter elements in PFBC applications when ash bridging or process thermal transient excursions are avoided. Alternate advanced monolithic and second generation fiber reinforced, filament wound and vacuum infiltrated filters are also being developed which are considered to have enhanced high temperature creep resistance, improved fracture toughness, or enhanced thermal shock characteristics, respectively. Mechanical and component fabrication improvements, as well as degradation mechanisms for each filter element have been identified by Westinghouse during exposure to simulated PFBC operating conditions and alkali-containing steam/air environments. Additional effort is currently being focused on determining the stability of the advanced monolithic high temperature creep resistant clay bonded silicon carbide (SiC) materials, alumina/mullite, and chemically vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC materials during operation in the Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (W-APF) system at Foster Wheeler`s pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion (PCFBC) test facility in Karhula, Finland. Select advanced filter materials are being defined for additional long-term exposure in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) gas streams. The results of these efforts are summarized in this paper. 6 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Soft morphological filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, Lasse; Astola, Jaakko T.; Neuvo, Yrjo A.

    1991-07-01

    New morphological operations, called soft morphological operations, are introduced. They maintain most of the properties of standard morphological operations, yet give improved performance under certain conditions. The main difference to standard morphological operations is that soft morphological operations are less sensitive to additive noise and to small variations in the shape of the objects to be filtered.

  8. Digital hum filtering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knapp, R.W.; Anderson, N.L.

    1994-01-01

    Data may be overprinted by a steady-state cyclical noise (hum). Steady-state indicates that the noise is invariant with time; its attributes, frequency, amplitude, and phase, do not change with time. Hum recorded on seismic data usually is powerline noise and associated higher harmonics; leakage from full-waveform rectified cathodic protection devices that contain the odd higher harmonics of powerline frequencies; or vibrational noise from mechanical devices. The fundamental frequency of powerline hum may be removed during data acquisition with the use of notch filters. Unfortunately, notch filters do not discriminate signal and noise, attenuating both. They also distort adjacent frequencies by phase shifting. Finally, they attenuate only the fundamental mode of the powerline noise; higher harmonics and frequencies other than that of powerlines are not removed. Digital notch filters, applied during processing, have many of the same problems as analog filters applied in the field. The method described here removes hum of a particular frequency. Hum attributes are measured by discrete Fourier analysis, and the hum is canceled from the data by subtraction. Errors are slight and the result of the presence of (random) noise in the window or asynchrony of the hum and data sampling. Error is minimized by increasing window size or by resampling to a finer interval. Errors affect the degree of hum attenuation, not the signal. The residual is steady-state hum of the same frequency. ?? 1994.

  9. Magnetic-Optical Filter

    E-print Network

    I. Formicola; A. Longobardo; C. Pinto; P. Cerulo

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic-Optical Filter (MOF) is an instrument suited for high precision spectral measurements for its peculiar characteristics. It is employed in Astronomy and in the field of the telecommunications (it is called FADOF there). In this brief paper we summarize its fundamental structure and functioning.

  10. High temperature filter materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvin, M. A.; Lippert, T. E.; Bachovchin, D. M.; Tressler, R. E.

    Objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating system environments have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life. We have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100 C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. Testing has typically been performed in two continuous flow-through, high temperature test facilities at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, using 7 cm diameter times 6.4 mm thick discs. (Alvin, 1992) Each disc of ceramic filter material is exposed for periods of 100 to 3,000 hours in duration. Additional efforts have been performed at Westinghouse to broaden our understanding of the stability of cordierite, cordierite-silicon nitride, reaction and sintered silicon nitride, and clay bonded silicon carbide under similar simulated advanced coal fired process conditions. The results of these efforts are presented in this paper.

  11. Ozone decomposing filter

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F. (Farragut, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN); Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L. (Dublin, CA)

    1999-01-01

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  12. Ozone decomposing filter

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.; Whinnery, L.L. Jr.

    1999-11-02

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  13. Foam For Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Like nature's honeycomb, foam is a structure of many-sided cells, apparently solid but actually only three percent material and 97 percent air. Foam is made by a heat-producing chemical reaction which expands a plastic material in a manner somewhat akin to the heat-induced rising of a loaf of bread. The resulting structure of interconnected cells is flexible yet strong and extremely versatile in applicati6n. Foam can, for example, be a sound absorber in one form, while in another it allows sound to pass through it. It can be a very soft powder puff material and at the same time a highly abrasive scrubber. A sampling of foam uses includes stereo speaker grilles, applying postage meter ink, filtering lawnmower carburetor air; deadening noise in trucks and tractors, applying cosmetics, releasing fabric softener and antistatic agents in home clothes dryers, painting, filtering factory heating and ventilating systems, shining shoes, polishing cars, sponge-mopping floors, acting as pre-operative surgical scrubbers-the list is virtually limitless. The process by which foam is made produces "windows," thin plastic membranes connecting the cell walls. Windowed foam is used in many applications but for certain others-filtering, for example-it is desirable to have a completely open network. Scott Paper Company's Foam Division, Chester, Pennsylvania, improved a patented method of "removing the windows," to create an open structure that affords special utility in filtering applications. NASA technology contributed to Scott's improvement.

  14. High temperature filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Tressler, R.E.

    1992-12-01

    Objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating system environments have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life. We have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100{degrees}C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. Testing has typically been performed in two continuous flow-through, high temperature test facilities at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, using 7 cm diameter {times} 6.4 mm thick discs. (Alvin, 1992) Each disc of ceramic filter material is exposed for periods of 100 to 3,000 hours in duration. Additional efforts have been performed at Westinghouse to broaden our understanding of the stability of cordierite, cordierite-silicon nitride, reaction and sintered silicon nitride, and clay bonded silicon carbide under similar simulated advanced coal fired process conditions. The results of these efforts are presented in this paper.

  15. High temperature filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M. . Science and Technology Center); Tressler, R.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating system environments have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life. We have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100[degrees]C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. Testing has typically been performed in two continuous flow-through, high temperature test facilities at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, using 7 cm diameter [times] 6.4 mm thick discs. (Alvin, 1992) Each disc of ceramic filter material is exposed for periods of 100 to 3,000 hours in duration. Additional efforts have been performed at Westinghouse to broaden our understanding of the stability of cordierite, cordierite-silicon nitride, reaction and sintered silicon nitride, and clay bonded silicon carbide under similar simulated advanced coal fired process conditions. The results of these efforts are presented in this paper.

  16. Rotating drum filter

    DOEpatents

    Anson, Donald (Worthington, OH)

    1990-01-01

    A perforated drum (10) rotates in a coaxial cylindrical housing (18) having three circumferential ports (19,22,23), and an axial outlet (24) at one end. The axis (11) is horizontal. A fibrous filter medium (20) is fed through a port (19) on or near the top of the housing (81) by a distributing mechanism (36) which lays a uniform mat (26) of the desired thickness onto the rotating drum (10). This mat (26) is carried by the drum (10) to a second port (23) through which dirty fluid (13) enters. The fluid (13) passes through the filter (26) and the cleaned stream (16) exits through the open end (15) of the drum (10) and the axial port (24) in the housing (18). The dirty filter material (20) is carried on to a third port (22) near the bottom of the housing (18) and drops into a receiver (31) from which it is continuously removed, cleaned (30), and returned (32) to the charging port (36) at the top. To support the filter mat, the perforated cylinder may carry a series of tines (40), shaped blades (41), or pockets, so that the mat (26) will not fall from the drum (10) prematurely. To minimize risk of mat failure, the fluid inlet port (23) may be located above the horizontal centerline (11).

  17. Extrapolating the effect of deleterious nsSNPs in the binding adaptability of flavopiridol with CDK7 protein: a molecular dynamics approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent reports suggest the role of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) gene associated with defect in the DNA repair mechanism that may contribute to cancer risk. Among the various inhibitors developed so far, flavopiridol proved to be a potential antitumor drug in the phase-III clinical trial for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Here, we described a theoretical assessment for the discovery of new drugs or drug targets in CDK7 protein owing to the changes caused by deleterious nsSNPs. Methods Three nsSNPs (I63R, H135R, and T285M) were predicted to have functional impact on protein function by SIFT, PolyPhen2, I-Mutant3, PANTHER, SNPs&GO, PhD-SNP, and screening for non-acceptable polymorphisms (SNAP). Furthermore, we analyzed the native and proposed mutant models in atomic level 10 ns simulation using the molecular dynamics (MD) approach. Finally, with the aid of Autodock 4.0 and PatchDock, we analyzed the binding efficacy of flavopiridol with CDK7 protein with respect to the deleterious mutations. Results By comparing the results of all seven prediction tools, three nsSNPs (I63R, H135R, and T285M) were predicted to have functional impact on the protein function. The results of protein stability analysis inferred that I63R and H135R exhibited less deviation in root mean square deviation in comparison with the native and T285M protein. The flexibility of all the three mutant models of CDK7 protein is diverse in comparison with the native protein. Following to that, docking study revealed the change in the active site residues and decrease in the binding affinity of flavopiridol with mutant proteins. Conclusion This theoretical approach is entirely based on computational methods, which has the ability to identify the disease-related SNPs in complex disorders by contrasting their costs and capabilities with those of the experimental methods. The identification of disease related SNPs by computational methods has the potential to create personalized tools for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of diseases. Lay abstract Cell cycle regulatory protein, CDK7, is linked with DNA repair mechanism which can contribute to cancer risk. The main aim of this study is to extrapolate the relationship between the nsSNPs and their effects in drug-binding capability. In this work, we propose a new methodology which (1) efficiently identified the deleterious nsSNPs that tend to have functional effect on protein function upon mutation by computational tools, (2) analyze d the native protein and proposed mutant models in atomic level using MD approach, and (3) investigated the protein-ligand interactions to analyze the binding ability by docking analysis. This theoretical approach is entirely based on computational methods, which has the ability to identify the disease-related SNPs in complex disorders by contrasting their costs and capabilities with those of the experimental methods. Overall, this approach has the potential to create personalized tools for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of diseases. PMID:23561625

  18. Web Content Filtering 1 User Guidelines Web content filter guidelines

    E-print Network

    Swain, Peter

    Web Content Filtering 1 User Guidelines Web content filter guidelines Introduction The basic criterion for blocking a Web page Categories of material which will be blocked Requesting the unblocking of Aberdeen applies a Web Content Filtering service to all web pages accessed from the undergraduate network

  19. Cannabis-Dependence Risk Relates to Synergism between Neuroticism and Proenkephalin SNPs Associated with Amygdala Gene Expression: Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Jacobs, Michelle M.; Yiannoulos, Georgia; Roussos, Panos; Bitsios, Panos; Nomura, Yoko; Liu, Xun; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many young people experiment with cannabis, yet only a subgroup progress to dependence suggesting individual differences that could relate to factors such as genetics and behavioral traits. Dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) and proenkephalin (PENK) genes have been implicated in animal studies with cannabis exposure. Whether polymorphisms of these genes are associated with cannabis dependence and related behavioral traits is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Healthy young adults (18–27 years) with cannabis dependence and without a dependence diagnosis were studied (N?=?50/group) in relation to a priori-determined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the DRD2 and PENK genes. Negative affect, Impulsive Risk Taking and Neuroticism-Anxiety temperamental traits, positive and negative reward-learning performance and stop-signal reaction times were examined. The findings replicated the known association between the rs6277 DRD2 SNP and decisions associated with negative reinforcement outcomes. Moreover, PENK variants (rs2576573 and rs2609997) significantly related to Neuroticism and cannabis dependence. Cigarette smoking is common in cannabis users, but it was not associated to PENK SNPs as also validated in another cohort (N?=?247 smokers, N?=?312 non-smokers). Neuroticism mediated (15.3%–19.5%) the genetic risk to cannabis dependence and interacted with risk SNPs, resulting in a 9-fold increase risk for cannabis dependence. Molecular characterization of the postmortem human brain in a different population revealed an association between PENK SNPs and PENK mRNA expression in the central amygdala nucleus emphasizing the functional relevance of the SNPs in a brain region strongly linked to negative affect. Conclusions/Significance Overall, the findings suggest an important role for Neuroticism as an endophenotype linking PENK polymorphisms to cannabis-dependence vulnerability synergistically amplifying the apparent genetic risk. PMID:22745721

  20. Toward a genome-wide approach for detecting hybrids: informative SNPs to detect introgression between domestic cats and European wildcats (Felis silvestris).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Randi, E; Mattucci, F; Kurushima, J D; Lyons, L A; Alves, P C

    2015-09-01

    Endemic gene pools have been severely endangered by human-mediated hybridization, which is posing new challenges in the conservation of several vertebrate species. The endangered European wildcat is an example of this problem, as several natural populations are suffering introgression of genes from the domestic cat. The implementation of molecular methods for detecting hybridization is crucial for supporting appropriate conservation programs on the wildcat. In this study, genetic variation at 158 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was analyzed in 139 domestic cats, 130 putative European wildcats and 5 captive-bred hybrids (N=274). These SNPs were variable both in wild (HE=0.107) and domestic cats (HE=0.340). Although we did not find any SNP that was private in any population, 22 SNPs were monomorphic in wildcats and pairwise FCT values revealed marked differences between domestic and wildcats, with the most divergent 35 loci providing an average FCT>0.74. The power of all the loci to accurately identify admixture events and discriminate the different hybrid categories was evaluated. Results from simulated and real genotypes show that the 158 SNPs provide successful estimates of admixture, with 100% hybrid individuals (two to three generations in the past) being correctly identified in STRUCTURE and over 92% using the NEWHYBRIDS' algorithm. None of the unclassified cats were wrongly allocated to another hybrid class. Thirty-five SNPs, showing the highest FCT values, provided the most parsimonious panel for robust inferences of parental and first generations of admixed ancestries. This approach may be used to further reconstruct the evolution of wildcat populations and, hopefully, to develop sound conservation guidelines for its legal protection in Europe. PMID:26103945

  1. Catalyzed diesel particulate filter modeling

    E-print Network

    Koltsakis, Grigorios; Haralampous, Onoufrios; Depcik, Christopher; Ragone, J. Colter

    2013-02-01

    An increasing environmental concern for diesel particulate emissions has led to the development of efficient and robust diesel particulate filters (DPF). Although the main function of a DPF is to filter solid particles, the beneficial effects...

  2. Active resistance capacitance filter design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerwin, W. J.

    1970-01-01

    Filters, formed by combinations of distributed RC elements with positive-feedback voltage amplifiers, provide transfer functions similar to those the heavier LC filters ordinarily employ. They also provide signal amplification.

  3. TAMGeS: a Three-Array Method for Genotyping of SNPs by a dual-colour approach

    PubMed Central

    Cozza, Arianna; Morandin, Francesco; Galfrè, Silvia Giulia; Mariotti, Veronica; Marangoni, Roberto; Pellegrini, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Background Many of the most effective high-throughput protocols for SNP genotyping employ microarrays. Genotypes are assessed by comparing the signal intensities that derive from the hybridization of different allele-specific probes labelled either by using four fluorescent dyes, one for each base, or by using only two dyes and investigating the polymorphic alleles two by two on separate arrays. The employment of only two dyes makes it possible to use a dual-laser scanner, which has the advantage of being present in every microarray laboratory. However, this protocol may present some drawbacks. To infer all the six possible genotypes it is necessary to compare signals from two arrays, but this comparison not always is successful. A number of systematic errors in the experimental protocol, in fact, may differently affect signal intensities on separate arrays. Here we present TAMGeS (Three-Array Method for Genotyping of SNPs), an exhaustive method for SNP genotyping through SBE (Single Base Extension) and dual-colour microarrays, which makes the comparison of signals on distinct arrays reliable by using a third array and a data handling method for signal normalization based on bilinear regression theory. Results We tested the effectiveness of the proposed method by evaluating the results obtained from the direct comparison of the two arrays or by applying TAMGeS, both on experimental and synthetic data. With synthetic data, TAMGeS reduced the frequency of errors by an order of magnitude, when the incidence of systematic errors was not negligible. With the experimental data, produced by genotyping 25 SNPs in 437 subjects, TAMGeS reduced the percentage of missing genotypes from 54% (Two-Array Method) to 14.5%. Allelic and genotypic call rates were 99.3% and 99.5%, respectively. The normalization procedure takes into account also systematic errors, which can be generated by a time-delayed assay, thus making the protocol more flexible. Conclusion TAMGeS represents an innovative method, which proved to be very effective in producing reliable SNP genotyping data by dual-colour microarrays. The requirement of a third array is well balanced by the strong enhancement in data quality and by the greater flexibility of the experimental protocol. PMID:17212826

  4. The Magnetic Centrifugal Mass Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-08-04

    Mass filters using rotating plasmas have been considered for separating nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel. We propose a new mass filter that utilizes centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions in a way similar to the asymmetric centrifugal trap. This magnetic centrifugal mass filter is shown to be more proliferation resistant than present technology. This filter is collisional and produces well confined output streams, among other advantages. __________________________________________________

  5. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.; Im, K.H.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this project include the development of analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters, and to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  6. STATISTICAL FILTERING* John B. Moore~

    E-print Network

    Moore, John Barratt

    . In the late 1950's and 1960's, a statistical filtering theory was #12;1.2 developed [3-6] which did networks. The nonstationary statistical theory soon became known as Kalman filter theory. Since the theorySTATISTICAL FILTERING* by John B. Moore~ September, 1977 * Work supported by the Australian

  7. Drive Diagnostic Filter Wheel Control

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-07-17

    DrD Filter Wheel Control is National Instrument's Labview software that drives a Drive Diagnostic filter wheel. The software can drive the filter wheel between each end limit, detect the positive and negative limit and each home position and post the stepper motot values to an Excel spreadsheet. The software can also be used to cycle the assembly between the end limits.

  8. Twisted Filter Banks Andreas Klappenecker

    E-print Network

    Klappenecker, Andreas

    convolution operations, possibly followed by sampling rate reductions. We extend this idea to filter banks additional scalar factors in the multiplication operations. We discuss basic properties of these filter banksTwisted Filter Banks Andreas Klappenecker Texas A&M University, Department of Computer Science

  9. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Geyer, Howard K.; Im, Kwan H.; Zhu, Chao; Shelleman, David; Tressler, Richard E.

    The objectives of this project are (1) to develop analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters; and (2) to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  10. BMP FILTERS: UPFLOW VS. DOWNFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater filters are typically operated in a downflow mode. This research had two objectives: 1) to determine the increased life of a filter operated in an upflow mode, and 2) to determine if the operation of a downflow, mixed-media filter could be modeled using the power equat...

  11. Quick-change filter cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX)

    1995-01-01

    A quick-change filter cartridge. In sampling systems for measurement of airborne materials, a filter element is introduced into the sampled airstream such that the aerosol constituents are removed and deposited on the filter. Fragile sampling media often require support in order to prevent rupture during sampling, and careful mounting and sealing to prevent misalignment, tearing, or creasing which would allow the sampled air to bypass the filter. Additionally, handling of filter elements may introduce cross-contamination or exposure of operators to toxic materials. Moreover, it is desirable to enable the preloading of filter media into quick-change cartridges in clean laboratory environments, thereby simplifying and expediting the filter-changing process in the field. The quick-change filter cartridge of the present invention permits the application of a variety of filter media in many types of instruments and may also be used in automated systems. The cartridge includes a base through which a vacuum can be applied to draw air through the filter medium which is located on a porous filter support and held there by means of a cap which forms an airtight seal with the base. The base is also adapted for receiving absorbing media so that both particulates and gas-phase samples may be trapped for investigation, the latter downstream of the aerosol filter.

  12. Improvement in birefringent filters. 4: The alternate partial polarizer filter.

    PubMed

    Title, A M

    1976-11-01

    A design for a birefringent filter is proposed in which alternate polarizers are partial polarizers. Calculated performance characteristics of alternate partial polarizer filters (APP) are compared with those of Lyot and contrast element Lyot filters. These calculations show that the APP design has significant advantages in both transmission and profile shape. Using pulse techniques, partial polarizer systems are shown to be a natural evolution from the standard Lyot and contrast element Lyot systems. The APP filter using achromatic waveplates discussed in earlier papers of this series has been used to construct a universal alternate partial polarizer filter. This filter has a measured full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 0.09 A at 5500 A and a transmission in polarized light of 38%. It is tunable from 4500 A to 8500 A. The measured characteristics of the filter agree well with theoretical predictions. PMID:20165504

  13. Siphon filter assessment for Northern Ghana

    E-print Network

    Ziff, Sara Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The siphon filter is a household water filter developed by the Basic Water Needs Foundation based on the design of ceramic candle filters. The siphon filter is marketed under brand names CrystalPur and Tulip and is sold ...

  14. Lack of association between SNPs in the NEUROD2 gene and alcohol dependence in a German patient sample.

    PubMed

    Zill, Peter; Preuss, Ulrich W; Koller, Gabrielle; Bondy, Brigitta; Soyka, Michael

    2011-05-15

    Results of a human post mortem study performed by our own group have suggested that the transcription factor NEUROD2, which plays a role in neuronal development, as well as in the development of anxiety and risk behavior in mice, might be a susceptibility factor for addictive disorders. Therefore the aim of the present study was to analyze a possible relation between genetic variants in the NEUROD2 gene and alcohol dependence in a sample of the Munich Gene Bank of Alcoholism (MGBA). We performed single SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) and haplotype studies in 430 alcohol-dependent patients and 365 healthy controls with four SNPs covering the gene region of NEUROD2. Neither single SNP nor haplotype analysis could detect significant associations with alcohol dependence. Additionally we could not detect any relation of the analyzed genetic variants to Cloninger's Type 1/2 or Babor's Type A/B classification, to the age of onset or to the amount of alcohol intake. Our results do not provide evidence for an involvement of NEUROD2 polymorphisms in the pathophysiology of alcohol dependence. Further association studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:20880594

  15. Identification and Association of SNPs in TBC1D1 Gene with Growth Traits in Two Rabbit Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-Juan; Fu, Lu; Zhang, Gong-Wei; Yang, Yu; Chen, Shi-Yi; Wang, Jie; Lai, Song-Jia

    2013-01-01

    The TBC1D1 plays a key role in body energy homeostasis by regulating the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. The present study aimed to identify the association between genetic polymorphisms of TBC1D1 and body weight (BW) in rabbits. Among the total of 12 SNPs detected in all 20 exons, only one SNP was non-synonymous (c.214G>A. p.G72R) located in exon 1. c.214G>A was subsequently genotyped among 491 individuals from two rabbit breeds by the high-resolution melting method. Allele A was the predominant allele with frequencies of 0.7780 and 0.6678 in European white rabbit (EWR, n = 205) and New Zealand White rabbit (NZW, n = 286), respectively. The moderate polymorphism information content (0.250.05). Our results implied that the c.214G>A of TBC1D1 gene might be one of the candidate loci affecting the trait of 35 d BW in the rabbit. PMID:25049738

  16. Truncated outlier filtering.

    PubMed

    Costa, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The statistical analysis of data can be heavily influenced by measurements of extreme value. If such measurements are contained in the remote tail ends of the true population distribution from which they are drawn, they are referred to as outliers. Neglecting to filter outliers from a sample can distort statistical computations and result in faulty conclusions. Conventional techniques identify measurements, whose distances from the mean exceed a selected multiple of the sample standard deviation, as outliers. Such approaches, however, can fail to classify measurements with large normalized distances as outliers. The truncated outlier filtering method first replaces the minimum and maximum of the population before computing the exclusion criterion. This mitigates the influence of abnormally large (or small) measurements on the normalized distance and hence yields a more compact criterion for outlier determination. Moreover, the method generalizes to two or more dimensions. Simulated one-dimensional and multidimensional data are analyzed. A discussion of the results is also presented. PMID:24915513

  17. The affine matched filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaum, A.; Priest, Richard

    2009-05-01

    The hyperspectral matched filter (MF) is a popular tool in remote sensing problems for locating objects that extend over several pixels. However, it is ideally suited only for the detection of sub-pixel targets with known mean signature in radiance space. Here we develop an alternative affine matched filter (AMF) that is more appropriate for detecting extended targets, and which accommodates practical uncertainties in target signature knowledge. In particular, AMF is ideal when used in conjunction with another new method we develop, called Virtual Relative Calibration (VRC), for generating a radiance space representation of a laboratory reflectance signature. VRC is related to the QUick Atmospheric Correction(QuAC) method but is much simpler. We also devise and test an extension of AMF that is meant to reduce false alarms caused by dark pixels. This Joint AMF (JAMF) expands the standard statistical model of hyperspectral backgrounds to accommodate variable illumination levels, analogously to how AMF treats target level uncertainty.

  18. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  19. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA); Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  20. Drilling fluid filter

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Garner, Kory

    2007-01-23

    A drilling fluid filter for placement within a bore wall of a tubular drill string component comprises a perforated receptacle with an open end and a closed end. A hanger for engagement with the bore wall is mounted at the open end of the perforated receptacle. A mandrel is adjacent and attached to the open end of the perforated receptacle. A linkage connects the mandrel to the hanger. The linkage may be selected from the group consisting of struts, articulated struts and cams. The mandrel operates on the hanger through the linkage to engage and disengage the drilling fluid filter from the tubular drill string component. The mandrel may have a stationary portion comprising a first attachment to the open end of the perforated receptacle and a telescoping adjustable portion comprising a second attachment to the linkage. The mandrel may also comprise a top-hole interface for top-hole equipment.