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Sample records for finding srna generative

  1. Using small RNA (sRNA) deep sequencing to understand global virus distribution in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small RNAs (sRNAs), a class of regulatory RNAs, have been used to serve as the specificity determinants of suppressing gene expression in plants and animals. Next generation sequencing (NGS) uncovered the sRNA landscape in most organisms including their associated microbes. In the current study, w...

  2. A Novel Mechanism of Host-Pathogen Interaction through sRNA in Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Koeppen, Katja; Hampton, Thomas H.; Jarek, Michael; Scharfe, Maren; Gerber, Scott A.; Mielcarz, Daniel W.; Demers, Elora G.; Dolben, Emily L.; Hammond, John H.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-mediated delivery of proteins to host cells is an important mechanism of host-pathogen communication. Emerging evidence suggests that OMVs contain differentially packaged short RNAs (sRNAs) with the potential to target host mRNA function and/or stability. In this study, we used RNA-Seq to characterize differentially packaged sRNAs in Pseudomonas aeruginosa OMVs, and to show transfer of OMV sRNAs to human airway cells. We selected one sRNA for further study based on its stable secondary structure and predicted mRNA targets. Our candidate sRNA (sRNA52320), a fragment of a P. aeruginosa methionine tRNA, was abundant in OMVs and reduced LPS-induced as well as OMV-induced IL-8 secretion by cultured primary human airway epithelial cells. We also showed that sRNA52320 attenuated OMV-induced KC cytokine secretion and neutrophil infiltration in mouse lung. Collectively, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sRNA52320 in OMVs is a novel mechanism of host-pathogen interaction whereby P. aeruginosa reduces the host immune response. PMID:27295279

  3. Novel small RNA (sRNA) landscape of the starvation-stress response transcriptome of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shivam V; Roberts, Justin T; Patterson, Dillon G; Coley, Alexander B; Allred, Jonathan A; Denner, Jason M; Johnson, Justin P; Mullen, Genevieve E; O'Neal, Trenton K; Smith, Jason T; Cardin, Sara E; Carr, Hank T; Carr, Stacie L; Cowart, Holly E; DaCosta, David H; Herring, Brendon R; King, Valeria M; Polska, Caroline J; Ward, Erin E; Wise, Alice A; McAllister, Kathleen N; Chevalier, David; Spector, Michael P; Borchert, Glen M

    2016-03-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are short (∼50-200 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs that regulate cellular activities across bacteria. Salmonella enterica starved of a carbon-energy (C) source experience a host of genetic and physiological changes broadly referred to as the starvation-stress response (SSR). In an attempt to identify novel sRNAs contributing to SSR control, we grew log-phase, 5-h C-starved and 24-h C-starved cultures of the virulent Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 and comprehensively sequenced their small RNA transcriptomes. Strikingly, after employing a novel strategy for sRNA discovery based on identifying dynamic transcripts arising from "gene-empty" regions, we identify 58 wholly undescribed Salmonella sRNA genes potentially regulating SSR averaging an ∼1,000-fold change in expression between log-phase and C-starved cells. Importantly, the expressions of individual sRNA loci were confirmed by both comprehensive transcriptome analyses and northern blotting of select candidates. Of note, we find 43 candidate sRNAs share significant sequence identity to characterized sRNAs in other bacteria, and ∼70% of our sRNAs likely assume characteristic sRNA structural conformations. In addition, we find 53 of our 58 candidate sRNAs either overlap neighboring mRNA loci or share significant sequence complementarity to mRNAs transcribed elsewhere in the SL1344 genome strongly suggesting they regulate the expression of transcripts via antisense base-pairing. Finally, in addition to this work resulting in the identification of 58 entirely novel Salmonella enterica genes likely participating in the SSR, we also find evidence suggesting that sRNAs are significantly more prevalent than currently appreciated and that Salmonella sRNAs may actually number in the thousands. PMID:26853797

  4. Phage-mediated Delivery of Targeted sRNA Constructs to Knock Down Gene Expression in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Ariel B.; Wintermute, Edwin H.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-mediated knockdowns are widely used to control gene expression. This versatile family of techniques makes use of short RNA (sRNA) that can be synthesized with any sequence and designed to complement any gene targeted for silencing. Because sRNA constructs can be introduced to many cell types directly or using a variety of vectors, gene expression can be repressed in living cells without laborious genetic modification. The most common RNA knockdown technology, RNA interference (RNAi), makes use of the endogenous RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to mediate sequence recognition and cleavage of the target mRNA. Applications of this technique are therefore limited to RISC-expressing organisms, primarily eukaryotes. Recently, a new generation of RNA biotechnologists have developed alternative mechanisms for controlling gene expression through RNA, and so made possible RNA-mediated gene knockdowns in bacteria. Here we describe a method for silencing gene expression in E. coli that functionally resembles RNAi. In this system a synthetic phagemid is designed to express sRNA, which may designed to target any sequence. The expression construct is delivered to a population of E. coli cells with non-lytic M13 phage, after which it is able to stably replicate as a plasmid. Antisense recognition and silencing of the target mRNA is mediated by the Hfq protein, endogenous to E. coli. This protocol includes methods for designing the antisense sRNA, constructing the phagemid vector, packaging the phagemid into M13 bacteriophage, preparing a live cell population for infection, and performing the infection itself. The fluorescent protein mKate2 and the antibiotic resistance gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) are targeted to generate representative data and to quantify knockdown effectiveness. PMID:27023729

  5. The sRNA SorY confers resistance during photooxidative stress by affecting a metabolite transporter in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Fazal; Weber, Lennart; Klug, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to oxygen and light generates photooxidative stress by the bacteriochlorophyll a mediated formation of singlet oxygen (1O2) in the facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We have identified SorY as an sRNA, which is induced under several stress conditions and confers increased resistance against 1O2. SorY by direct interaction affects the takP mRNA, encoding a TRAP-T transporter. We present a model in which SorY reduces the metabolite flux into the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) by reducing malate import through TakP. It was previously shown that oxidative stress in bacteria leads to switch from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway and to reduced activity of the TCA cycle. As a consequence the production of the prooxidant NADH is reduced and production of the protective NADPH is enhanced. In R. sphaeroides enzymes for glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, Entner–Doudoroff pathway and gluconeogenesis are induced in response to 1O2 by the alternative sigma factor RpoHII. The same is true for the sRNA SorY. By limiting malate import SorY thus contributes to the balance of the metabolic fluxes under photooxidative stress conditions. This assigns a so far unknown function to an sRNA in oxidative stress response. PMID:25833751

  6. Assembly of the archaeal box C/D sRNP can occur via alternative pathways and requires temperature-facilitated sRNA remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Keith T; Zhang, Xinxin; Agris, Paul F; Maxwell, E Stuart

    2006-10-01

    Archaeal dual-guide box C/D small nucleolar RNA-like RNAs (sRNAs) bind three core proteins in sequential order at both terminal box C/D and internal C'/D' motifs to assemble two ribonuclear protein (RNP) complexes active in guiding nucleotide methylation. Experiments have investigated the process of box C/D sRNP assembly and the resultant changes in sRNA structure or "remodeling" as a consequence of sRNP core protein binding. Hierarchical assembly of the Methanocaldococcus jannaschii sR8 box C/D sRNP is a temperature-dependent process with binding of L7 and Nop56/58 core proteins to the sRNA requiring elevated temperature to facilitate necessary RNA structural dynamics. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and RNA thermal denaturation revealed an increased order and stability of sRNA folded structure as a result of L7 binding. Subsequent binding of the Nop56/58 and fibrillarin core proteins to the L7-sRNA complex further remodeled sRNA structure. Assessment of sR8 guide region accessibility using complementary RNA oligonucleotide probes revealed significant changes in guide region structure during sRNP assembly. A second dual-guide box C/D sRNA from M. jannaschii, sR6, also exhibited RNA remodeling during temperature-dependent sRNP assembly, although core protein binding was affected by sR6's distinct folded structure. Interestingly, the sR6 sRNP followed an alternative assembly pathway, with both guide regions being continuously exposed during sRNP assembly. Further experiments using sR8 mutants possessing alternative guide regions demonstrated that sRNA folded structure induced by specific guide sequences impacted the sRNP assembly pathway. Nevertheless, assembled sRNPs were active for sRNA-guided methylation independent of the pathway followed. Thus, RNA remodeling appears to be a common and requisite feature of archaeal dual-guide box C/D sRNP assembly and formation of the mature sRNP can follow different assembly pathways in generating catalytically active

  7. A new Vibrio cholerae sRNA modulates colonization and affects release of outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tianyan; Mika, Franziska; Lindmark, Barbro; Liu, Zhi; Schild, Stefan; Bishop, Anne; Zhu, Jun; Camilli, Andrew; Johansson, Jörgen; Vogel, Jörg; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2008-01-01

    We discovered a new small non-coding RNA (sRNA) gene, vrrA of Vibrio cholerae O1 strain A1552. A vrrA mutant overproduces OmpA porin, and we demonstrate that the 140 nt VrrA RNA represses ompA translation by base-pairing with the 5′ region of the mRNA. The RNA chaperone Hfq is not stringently required for VrrA action, but expression of the vrrA gene requires the membrane stress sigma factor, σE, suggesting that VrrA acts on ompA in response to periplasmic protein folding stress. We also observed that OmpA levels inversely correlated with the number of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), and that VrrA increased OMV production comparable to loss of OmpA. VrrA is the first sRNA known to control OMV formation. Moreover, a vrrA mutant showed a fivefold increased ability to colonize the intestines of infant mice as compared with the wild type. There was increased expression of the main colonization factor of V. cholerae, the toxin co-regulated pili, in the vrrA mutant as monitored by immunoblot detection of the TcpA protein. VrrA overproduction caused a distinct reduction in the TcpA protein level. Our findings suggest that VrrA contributes to bacterial fitness in certain stressful environments, and modulates infection of the host intestinal tract. PMID:18681937

  8. Compact continuum source finding for next generation radio surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, P. J.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M.; Hopkins, A.; Curran, J. R.

    2012-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of four of the most widely used radio source-finding packages in radio astronomy, and a program being developed for the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder telescope. The four packages: SEXTRACTOR, SFIND, IMSAD and SELAVY are shown to produce source catalogues with high completeness and reliability. In this paper we analyse the small fraction (˜1 per cent) of cases in which these packages do not perform well. This small fraction of sources will be of concern for the next generation of radio surveys which will produce many thousands of sources on a daily basis, in particular for blind radio transients surveys. From our analysis we identify the ways in which the underlying source-finding algorithms fail. We demonstrate a new source-finding algorithm AEGEAN, based on the application of a Laplacian kernel, which can avoid these problems and can produce complete and reliable source catalogues for the next generation of radio surveys.

  9. Differential sRNA Regulation in Leaves and Roots of Sugarcane under Water Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Thiebaut, Flávia; Grativol, Clícia; Tanurdzic, Milos; Carnavale-Bottino, Mariana; Vieira, Tauan; Motta, Mariana Romeiro; Rojas, Cristian; Vincentini, Renato; Chabregas, Sabrina Moutinho; Hemerly, Adriana Silva; Martienssen, Robert A.; Ferreira, Paulo Cavalcanti Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Plants have developed multiple regulatory mechanisms to respond and adapt to stress. Drought stress is one of the major constraints to agricultural productivity worldwide and recent reports have highlighted the importance of plant sRNA in the response and adaptation to water availability. In order to increase our understanding of the roles of sRNA in response to water depletion, cultivars of sugarcane were submitted to treatment of ceasing drip irrigation for 24 hours. Deep sequencing analysis was carried out to identify the sRNA regulated in leaves and roots of sugarcane cultivars with different drought sensitivities. The pool of sRNA selected allowed the analysis of different sRNA classes (miRNA and siRNA). Twenty-eight and 36 families of conserved miRNA were identified in leaf and root libraries, respectively. Dynamic regulation of miRNA was observed and the expression profiles of eight miRNA were verified in leaf samples from three biological replicates by stem-loop qRT-PCR assay using the cultivars: SP90–1638 - sensitive cultivar- and; SP83–2847 and SP83–5073 - tolerant cultivars. Altered miRNA regulation was correlated with changes in mRNA levels of specific targets. Two leaf libraries from individual sugarcane cultivars with contrasting drought-tolerance properties were also analyzed. An enrichment of 22-nt sRNA species was observed in leaf libraries. 22-nt miRNA triggered siRNA production by cleavage of their targets in response to water depletion. A number of genes of the sRNA biogenesis pathway were down-regulated in tolerant genotypes and up-regulated in sensitive in response to water depletion treatment. Our analysis contributes to increase the knowledge on the roles of sRNA in sugarcane submitted to water depletion. PMID:24695493

  10. A survey of sRNA families in α-proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    del Val, Coral; Romero-Zaliz, Rocío; Torres-Quesada, Omar; Peregrina, Alexandra; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, Jose I

    2012-02-01

    We have performed a computational comparative analysis of six small non-coding RNA (sRNA) families in α-proteobacteria. Members of these families were first identified in the intergenic regions of the nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont S. meliloti by a combined bioinformatics screen followed by experimental verification. Consensus secondary structures inferred from covariance models for each sRNA family evidenced in some cases conserved motifs putatively relevant to the function of trans-encoded base-pairing sRNAs i.e., Hfq-binding signatures and exposed anti Shine-Dalgarno sequences. Two particular family models, namely αr15 and αr35, shared own sub-structural modules with the Rfam model suhB (RF00519) and the uncharacterized sRNA family αr35b, respectively. A third sRNA family, termed αr45, has homology to the cis-acting regulatory element speF (RF00518). However, new experimental data further confirmed that the S. meliloti αr45 representative is an Hfq-binding sRNA processed from or expressed independently of speF, thus refining the Rfam speF model annotation. All the six families have members in phylogenetically related plant-interacting bacteria and animal pathogens of the order of the Rhizobiales, some occurring with high levels of paralogy in individual genomes. In silico and experimental evidences predict differential regulation of paralogous sRNAs in S. meliloti 1021. The distribution patterns of these sRNA families suggest major contributions of vertical inheritance and extensive ancestral duplication events to the evolution of sRNAs in plant-interacting bacteria. PMID:22418845

  11. A survey of sRNA families in α-proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Coral; Romero-Zaliz, Rocío; Torres-Quesada, Omar; Peregrina, Alexandra; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, Jose I

    2012-01-01

    We have performed a computational comparative analysis of six small non-coding RNA (sRNA) families in α-proteobacteria. Members of these families were first identified in the intergenic regions of the nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont S. meliloti by a combined bioinformatics screen followed by experimental verification. Consensus secondary structures inferred from covariance models for each sRNA family evidenced in some cases conserved motifs putatively relevant to the function of trans-encoded base-pairing sRNAs i.e., Hfq-binding signatures and exposed anti Shine-Dalgarno sequences. Two particular family models, namely αr15 and αr35, shared own sub-structural modules with the Rfam model suhB (RF00519) and the uncharacterized sRNA family αr35b, respectively. A third sRNA family, termed αr45, has homology to the cis-acting regulatory element speF (RF00518). However, new experimental data further confirmed that the S. meliloti αr45 representative is an Hfq-binding sRNA processed from or expressed independently of speF, thus refining the Rfam speF model annotation. All the six families have members in phylogenetically related plant-interacting bacteria and animal pathogens of the order of the Rhizobiales, some occurring with high levels of paralogy in individual genomes. In silico and experimental evidences predict differential regulation of paralogous sRNAs in S. meliloti 1021. The distribution patterns of these sRNA families suggest major contributions of vertical inheritance and extensive ancestral duplication events to the evolution of sRNAs in plant-interacting bacteria. PMID:22418845

  12. Identification of bacterial sRNA regulatory targets using ribosome profiling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Rennie, William; Liu, Chaochun; Carmack, Charles S; Prévost, Karine; Caron, Marie-Pier; Massé, Eric; Ding, Ye; Wade, Joseph T

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria express large numbers of non-coding, regulatory RNAs known as 'small RNAs' (sRNAs). sRNAs typically regulate expression of multiple target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) through base-pairing interactions. sRNA:mRNA base-pairing often results in altered mRNA stability and/or altered translation initiation. Computational identification of sRNA targets is challenging due to the requirement for only short regions of base-pairing that can accommodate mismatches. Experimental approaches have been applied to identify sRNA targets on a genomic scale, but these focus only on those targets regulated at the level of mRNA stability. Here, we utilize ribosome profiling (Ribo-seq) to experimentally identify regulatory targets of the Escherichia coli sRNA RyhB. We not only validate a majority of known RyhB targets using the Ribo-seq approach, but also discover many novel ones. We further confirm regulation of a selection of known and novel targets using targeted reporter assays. By mutating nucleotides in the mRNA of a newly discovered target, we demonstrate direct regulation of this target by RyhB. Moreover, we show that Ribo-seq distinguishes between mRNAs regulated at the level of RNA stability and those regulated at the level of translation. Thus, Ribo-seq represents a powerful approach for genome-scale identification of sRNA targets. PMID:26546513

  13. Identification of bacterial sRNA regulatory targets using ribosome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Rennie, William; Liu, Chaochun; Carmack, Charles S.; Prévost, Karine; Caron, Marie-Pier; Massé, Eric; Ding, Ye; Wade, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria express large numbers of non-coding, regulatory RNAs known as ‘small RNAs’ (sRNAs). sRNAs typically regulate expression of multiple target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) through base-pairing interactions. sRNA:mRNA base-pairing often results in altered mRNA stability and/or altered translation initiation. Computational identification of sRNA targets is challenging due to the requirement for only short regions of base-pairing that can accommodate mismatches. Experimental approaches have been applied to identify sRNA targets on a genomic scale, but these focus only on those targets regulated at the level of mRNA stability. Here, we utilize ribosome profiling (Ribo-seq) to experimentally identify regulatory targets of the Escherichia coli sRNA RyhB. We not only validate a majority of known RyhB targets using the Ribo-seq approach, but also discover many novel ones. We further confirm regulation of a selection of known and novel targets using targeted reporter assays. By mutating nucleotides in the mRNA of a newly discovered target, we demonstrate direct regulation of this target by RyhB. Moreover, we show that Ribo-seq distinguishes between mRNAs regulated at the level of RNA stability and those regulated at the level of translation. Thus, Ribo-seq represents a powerful approach for genome-scale identification of sRNA targets. PMID:26546513

  14. Identification of metE as a Second Target of the sRNA scr5239 in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Vockenhuber, Michael-Paul; Heueis, Nona; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-01-01

    While transcriptional regulation of the primary and secondary metabolism of the model organism Streptomyces coelicolor is well studied, little is still known about the role small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) play in regulating gene expression in this organism. Here, we report the identification of a second target of the sRNA scr5239, an sRNA highly conserved in streptomycetes. The 159 nt long sRNA binds its target, the mRNA of the cobalamin independent methionine synthase metE (SCO0985), at the 5’ end of its open reading frame thereby repressing translation. We show that a high methionine level induces expression of scr5239 itself. This leads, in a negative feedback loop, to the repression of methionine biosynthesis. In contrast to the first reported target of this sRNA, the agarase dagA, this interaction seems to be conserved in a wide number of streptomycetes. PMID:25785836

  15. The Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code for 3D proton dose distribution in voxelized geometry using CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilic, Radovan D.; Spasic-Jokic, Vesna; Belicev, Petar; Dragovic, Milos

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes the application of the SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material compositions. The SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The decay of proton induced compound nuclei was simulated by the Russian MSDM model and our own using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes: the SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in combinatorial geometry and the SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield's data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by multi-layer Faraday cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by the SRNA-2KG code and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in the SRNA package, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumour.

  16. The Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code for 3D proton dose distribution in voxelized geometry using CT data.

    PubMed

    Ilić, Radovan D; Spasić-Jokić, Vesna; Belicev, Petar; Dragović, Milos

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes the application of the SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material compositions. The SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The decay of proton induced compound nuclei was simulated by the Russian MSDM model and our own using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes: the SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in combinatorial geometry and the SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield's data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by multi-layer Faraday cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by the SRNA-2KG code and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in the SRNA package, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumour. PMID:15798273

  17. RNomics in Escherichia coli detects new sRNA species and indicates parallel transcriptional output in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Jörg; Bartels, Verena; Tang, Thean Hock; Churakov, Gennady; Slagter-Jäger, Jacoba G.; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Wagner, E. Gerhart H.

    2003-01-01

    Recent bioinformatics-aided searches have identified many new small RNAs (sRNAs) in the intergenic regions of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Here, a shot-gun cloning approach (RNomics) was used to generate cDNA libraries of small sized RNAs. Besides many of the known sRNAs, we found new species that were not predicted previously. The present work brings the number of sRNAs in E.coli to 62. Experimental transcription start site mapping showed that some sRNAs were encoded from independent genes, while others were processed from mRNA leaders or trailers, indicative of a parallel transcriptional output generating sRNAs co-expressed with mRNAs. Two of these RNAs (SroA and SroG) consist of known (THI and RFN) riboswitch elements. We also show that two recently identified sRNAs (RyeB and SraC/RyeA) interact, resulting in RNase III-dependent cleavage. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case of two non-coding RNAs interacting by a putative antisense mechanism. In addition, intracellular metabolic stabilities of sRNAs were determined, including ones from previous screens. The wide range of half-lives (<2 to >32 min) indicates that sRNAs cannot generally be assumed to be metabolically stable. The experimental characterization of sRNAs analyzed here suggests that the definition of an sRNA is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:14602901

  18. Regulation of CsrB/C sRNA decay by EIIA(Glc) of the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yuanyuan; Vakulskas, Christopher A; Zere, Tesfalem R; Pickering, Bradley S; Watnick, Paula I; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2016-02-01

    Csr is a conserved global regulatory system, which uses the sequence-specific RNA-binding protein CsrA to activate or repress gene expression by binding to mRNA and altering translation, stability and/or transcript elongation. In Escherichia coli, CsrA activity is regulated by two sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC, which bind to multiple CsrA dimers, thereby sequestering this protein away from its mRNA targets. Turnover of CsrB/C sRNAs is tightly regulated by a GGDEF-EAL domain protein, CsrD, which targets them for cleavage by RNase E. Here, we show that EIIA(Glc) of the glucose-specific PTS system is also required for the normal decay of these sRNAs and that it acts by binding to the EAL domain of CsrD. Only the unphosphorylated form of EIIA(Glc) bound to CsrD in vitro and was capable of activating CsrB/C turnover in vivo. Genetic studies confirmed that this mechanism couples CsrB/C sRNA decay to the availability of a preferred carbon source. These findings reveal a new physiological influence on the workings of the Csr system, a novel function for the EAL domain, and an important new way in which EIIA(Glc) shapes global regulatory circuitry in response to nutritional status. PMID:26507976

  19. Modularity of Escherichia coli sRNA regulation revealed by sRNA-target and protein network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background sRNAs, which belong to the non-coding RNA family and range from approximately 50 to 400 nucleotides, serve various important gene regulatory roles. Most are believed to be trans-regulating and function by being complementary to their target mRNAs in order to inhibiting translation by ribosome occlusion. Despite this understanding of their functionality, the global properties associated with regulation by sRNAs are not yet understood. Here we use topological analysis of sRNA targets in terms of protein-protein interaction and transcription-regulatory networks in Escherichia coli to shed light on the global correlation between sRNA regulation and cellular control networks. Results The analysis of sRNA targets in terms of their networks showed that some specific network properties could be identified. In protein-protein interaction network, sRNA targets tend to occupy more central positions (higher closeness centrality, p-val = 0.022) and more cliquish (larger clustering coefficient, p-val = 0.037). The targets of the same sRNA tend to form a network module (shorter characteristic path length, p-val = 0.015; larger density, p-val = 0.019; higher in-degree ratio, p-val = 0.009). Using the transcription-regulatory network, sRNA targets tend to be under multiple regulation (higher indegree, p-val = 0.013) and the targets usually are important to the transfer of regulatory signals (higher betweenness, p-val = 0.012). As was found for the protein-protein interaction network, the targets that are regulated by the same sRNA also tend to be closely knit within the transcription-regulatory network (larger density, p-val = 0.036), and inward interactions between them are greater than the outward interactions (higher in-degree ratio, p-val = 0.023). However, after incorporating information on predicted sRNAs and down-stream targets, the results are not as clear-cut, but the overall network modularity is still evident. Conclusions Our results indicate that sRNA

  20. Findings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue All Issues Explore Findings by Topic Cell Biology Cellular Structures, Functions, Processes, Imaging, Stress Response Chemistry ... Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, Modeling, Systems Biology, Data Visualization Diseases Cancer, ...

  1. Acidic Residues in the Hfq Chaperone Increase the Selectivity of sRNA Binding and Annealing.

    PubMed

    Panja, Subrata; Santiago-Frangos, Andrew; Schu, Daniel J; Gottesman, Susan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    Hfq facilitates gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), thereby affecting bacterial attributes such as biofilm formation and virulence. Escherichia coli Hfq recognizes specific U-rich and AAN motifs in sRNAs and target mRNAs, after which an arginine patch on the rim promotes base pairing between their complementary sequences. In the cell, Hfq must discriminate between many similar RNAs. Here, we report that acidic amino acids lining the sRNA binding channel between the inner pore and rim of the Hfq hexamer contribute to the selectivity of Hfq's chaperone activity. RNase footprinting, in vitro binding and stopped-flow fluorescence annealing assays showed that alanine substitution of D9, E18 or E37 strengthened RNA interactions with the rim of Hfq and increased annealing of non-specific or U-tailed RNA oligomers. Although the mutants were less able than wild-type Hfq to anneal sRNAs with wild-type rpoS mRNA, the D9A mutation bypassed recruitment of Hfq to an (AAN)4 motif in rpoS, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that acidic residues normally modulate access of RNAs to the arginine patch. We propose that this selectivity limits indiscriminate target selection by E. coli Hfq and enforces binding modes that favor genuine sRNA and mRNA pairs. PMID:26196441

  2. Transcript analysis of nrrF, a Fur repressed sRNA of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Ducey, Thomas F.; Jackson, Lydgia; Orvis, Joshua; Dyer, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Like most microorganisms, Neisseria gonorrhoeae alters gene expression in response to iron availability. The ferric uptake regulator Fur has been shown to be involved in controlling this response, but the extent of this involvement remains unknown. It is known that in addition to working directly to repress gene expression, Fur may also work indirectly by controlling additional regulatory elements. Using in silico analysis, we identified a putative small RNA (sRNA) homolog of the meningococcal nrrF locus, and demonstrate that this sRNA is iron-repressible, suggesting that this is the gonococcal analog of the rhyB locus in Escherichia coli. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis indicates that this transcript may also be temporally regulated. Transcript analysis identified the 5′ start of the transcript, using a single reaction, fluorescent-based, primer extension assay. This protocol allows for the rapid identification of transcriptional start sites of RNA transcripts, and could be used for high-throughput transcript mapping. PMID:19162160

  3. Self-incompatibility: Smi silences through a novel sRNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, E Jean; Liang, Dacheng; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2011-05-01

    Self-incompatibility in Brassicaceae is determined by the interaction between S-Locus Protein 11 (SP11) on the pollen and S-receptor kinase (SRK) in the stigma. Pollen from heterozygotes generally displays products of both SP11 alleles, but in some heterozygotes SP11 expression is monoallelic, with one allele (SP11(R)) being silenced by promoter methylation. An exciting development in understanding the mechanism behind monoallelic silencing came recently when Y. Tarutani et al. [Nature 2010;466:983-986] identified a 24-nucleotide sRNA (termed Smi) derived from a non-coding gene within the dominant S-haplotype, and suggested that Smi directs promoter methylation. We propose that rather than having a direct effect on DNA methylation, Smi is the first step in a novel cis-acting siRNA pathway that directs widespread monoallelic SP11(R) promoter methylation. PMID:21306936

  4. 75 FR 61225 - Energy Northwest; Columbia Generating Station Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Energy Northwest; Columbia Generating Station Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is considering changes to the Emergency Plan, pursuant to 10 CFR 50.54, ``Conditions...

  5. 75 FR 10834 - Energy Northwest; Columbia Generating Station; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13926). There will be no change to radioactive effluents that affect radiation... impact [Part 73, Power Reactor Security Requirements, 74 FR 13926 (March 27, 2009)]. The NRC staff's... COMMISSION Energy Northwest; Columbia Generating Station; Environmental Assessment and Finding of...

  6. An inhibitor of eIF2 activity in the sRNA pool of eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Centrella, Michael; Porter, David L; McCarthy, Thomas L

    2011-08-15

    Eukaryotic protein synthesis is a multi-step and highly controlled process that includes an early initiation complex containing eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2), GTP, and methionine-charged initiator methionyl-tRNA (met-tRNAi). During studies to reconstruct formation of the ternary complex containing these molecules, we detected a potent inhibitor in low molecular mass RNA (sRNA) preparations of eukaryotic tRNA. The ternary complex inhibitor (TCI) was retained in the total sRNA pool after met-tRNAi was charged by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, co-eluted with sRNA by size exclusion chromatography, but resolved from met-tRNAi by ion exchange chromatography. The adverse effect of TCI was not overcome by high GTP or magnesium omission and was independent of GTP regeneration. Rather, TCI suppressed the rate of ternary complex formation, and disrupted protein synthesis and the accumulation of heavy polymeric ribosomes in reticulocyte lysates in vitro. Lastly, a component or components in ribosome depleted cell lysate significantly reversed TCI activity. Since assembly of the met-tRNAi/eIF2/GTP ternary complex is integral to protein synthesis, awareness of TCI is important to avoid confusion in studies of translation initiation. A clear definition of TCI may also allow a better appreciation of physiologic or pathologic situations, factors, and events that control protein synthesis in vivo. PMID:21640800

  7. An inhibitor of eIF2 activity in the sRNA pool of eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Centrella, Michael; Porter, David L.; McCarthy, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein synthesis is a multi-step and highly controlled process that includes an early initiation complex containing eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2), GTP, and methionine-charged initiator methionyl-tRNA (met-tRNAi). During studies to reconstruct formation of the ternary complex containing these molecules, we detected a potent inhibitor in low molecular mass RNA (sRNA) preparations of eukaryotic tRNA. The ternary complex inhibitor (TCI) was retained in the total sRNA pool after met-tRNAi was charged by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, co-eluted with sRNA by size exclusion chromatography, but resolved from met-tRNAi by ion exchange chromatography. The adverse effect of TCI was not overcome by high GTP or magnesium omission and was independent of GTP regeneration. Rather, TCI suppressed the rate of ternary complex formation, and disrupted protein synthesis and the accumulation of heavy polymeric ribosomes in reticulocyte lysates in vitro. Lastly, a component or components in ribosome depleted cell lysate significantly reversed TCI activity. Since assembly of the met-tRNAi/eIF2/GTP ternary complex is integral to protein synthesis, awareness of TCI is important to avoid confusion in studies of translation initiation. A clear definition of TCI may also allow a better appreciation of physiologic or pathologic situations factors and events that control protein synthesis in vivo. PMID:21640800

  8. Ms1, a novel sRNA interacting with the RNA polymerase core in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Jirát Matějčková, Jitka; Šiková, Michaela; Pospíšil, Jiří; Halada, Petr; Pánek, Josef; Krásný, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are molecules essential for a number of regulatory processes in the bacterial cell. Here we characterize Ms1, a sRNA that is highly expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis during stationary phase of growth. By glycerol gradient ultracentrifugation, RNA binding assay, and RNA co-immunoprecipitation, we show that Ms1 interacts with the RNA polymerase (RNAP) core that is free of the primary sigma factor (σA) or any other σ factor. This contrasts with the situation in most other species where it is 6S RNA that interacts with RNAP and this interaction requires the presence of σA. The difference in the interaction of the two types of sRNAs (Ms1 or 6S RNA) with RNAP possibly reflects the difference in the composition of the transcriptional machinery between mycobacteria and other species. Unlike Escherichia coli, stationary phase M. smegmatis cells contain relatively few RNAP molecules in complex with σA. Thus, Ms1 represents a novel type of small RNAs interacting with RNAP. PMID:25217589

  9. The CpxQ sRNA Negatively Regulates Skp To Prevent Mistargeting of β-Barrel Outer Membrane Proteins into the Cytoplasmic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Daria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The promoter most strongly induced upon activation of the Cpx two-component envelope stress response is the cpxP promoter. The 3′ untranscribed region (UTR) of the cpxP transcript is shown to produce a small RNA (sRNA), CpxQ. We investigated the role of CpxQ in combating envelope stress. Remarkably, the two effectors specified by the transcript are deployed to combat distinct stresses in different cellular compartments. CpxP acts in both a regulatory negative-feedback loop and as an effector that combats periplasmic protein misfolding. We find that CpxQ combats toxicity at the inner membrane (IM) by downregulating the synthesis of the periplasmic chaperone Skp. Our data indicate that this regulation prevents Skp from inserting β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) into the IM, a lethal event that likely collapses the proton motive force. Our findings suggest that Skp can fold and directly insert OMPs into a lipid bilayer in vivo without the aid of the Bam complex. PMID:27048800

  10. Verb generation in patients with focal frontal lesions: A neuropsychological test of neuroimaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.; Swick, Diane; Farah, Martha J.; D’Esposito, Mark; Kan, Irene P.; Knight, Robert T.

    1998-01-01

    What are the neural bases of semantic memory? Traditional beliefs that the temporal lobes subserve the retrieval of semantic knowledge, arising from lesion studies, have been recently called into question by functional neuroimaging studies finding correlations between semantic retrieval and activity in left prefrontal cortex. Has neuroimaging taught us something new about the neural bases of cognition that older methods could not reveal or has it merely identified brain activity that is correlated with but not causally related to the process of semantic retrieval? We examined the ability of patients with focal frontal lesions to perform a task commonly used in neuroimaging experiments, the generation of semantically appropriate action words for concrete nouns, and found evidence of the necessity of the left inferior frontal gyrus for certain components of the verb generation task. Notably, these components did not include semantic retrieval per se. PMID:9861060

  11. Management of Incidental Findings in the Era of Next-generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Heather L.; Schroeder, Bradley; Turner, Clesson; Shriver, Craig D.; Ellsworth, Darrell L.; Ellsworth, Rachel E.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies allow for the generation of whole exome or whole genome sequencing data, which can be used to identify novel genetic alterations associated with defined phenotypes or to expedite discovery of functional variants for improved patient care. Because this robust technology has the ability to identify all mutations within a genome, incidental findings (IF)- genetic alterations associated with conditions or diseases unrelated to the patient’s present condition for which current tests are being performed- may have important clinical ramifications. The current debate among genetic scientists and clinicians focuses on the following questions: 1) should any IF be disclosed to patients, and 2) which IF should be disclosed – actionable mutations, variants of unknown significance, or all IF? Policies for disclosure of IF are being developed for when and how to convey these findings and whether adults, minors, or individuals unable to provide consent have the right to refuse receipt of IF. In this review, we detail current NGS technology platforms, discuss pressing issues regarding disclosure of IF, and how IF are currently being handled in prenatal, pediatric, and adult patients. PMID:26069456

  12. sRNA roles in regulating transcriptional regulators: Lrp and SoxS regulation by sRNAs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jung; Gottesman, Susan

    2016-08-19

    Post-transcriptional regulation of transcription factors contributes to regulatory circuits. We created translational reporter fusions for multiple central regulators in Escherichia coli and examined the effect of Hfq-dependent non-coding RNAs on these fusions. This approach yields an 'RNA landscape,' identifying Hfq-dependent sRNAs that regulate a given fusion. No significant sRNA regulation of crp or fnr was detected. hns was regulated only by DsrA, as previously reported. Lrp and SoxS were both found to be regulated post-transcriptionally. Lrp, ' L: eucine-responsive R: egulatory P: rotein,' regulates genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and catabolism and other cellular functions. sRNAs DsrA, MicF and GcvB each independently downregulate the lrp translational fusion, confirming previous reports for MicF and GcvB. MicF and DsrA interact with an overlapping site early in the lrp ORF, while GcvB acts upstream at two independent sites in the long lrp leader. Surprisingly, GcvB was found to be responsible for significant downregulation of lrp after oxidative stress; MicF also contributed. SoxS, an activator of genes used to combat oxidative stress, is negatively regulated by sRNA MgrR. This study demonstrates that while not all global regulators are subject to sRNA regulation, post-transcriptional control by sRNAs allows multiple environmental signals to affect synthesis of the transcriptional regulator. PMID:27137887

  13. Retiring the Generation Gap: How Employees Young and Old Can Find Common Ground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Jennifer J.

    2007-01-01

    How different are the generations, really? Everybody knows that the "generation gap" between younger and older people causes stress and frustration at work. Are the differences people complain about just a big misunderstanding, or are they real? And most important, how can one use similarities and differences among the generations to be more…

  14. The multicopy sRNA LhrC controls expression of the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Susanne; Lund, Anja; Menendez-Gil, Pilar; Nielsen, Aaraby; Storm Mollerup, Maria; Lambert Nielsen, Stine; Buch Larsson, Pernille; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Johansson, Jörgen; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis. During infection, L. monocytogenes produces an array of non-coding RNAs, including the multicopy sRNA LhrC. These five, nearly identical sRNAs are highly induced in response to cell envelope stress and target the virulence adhesin lapB at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we demonstrate that LhrC controls expression of additional genes encoding cell envelope-associated proteins with virulence function. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we identified a set of genes affected by LhrC in response to cell envelope stress. Three targets were significantly down-regulated by LhrC at both the RNA and protein level: lmo2349, tcsA and oppA. All three genes encode membrane-associated proteins: A putative substrate binding protein of an amino acid ABC transporter (Lmo2349); the CD4+ T cell-stimulating antigen TcsA, and the oligopeptide binding protein OppA, of which the latter 2 are required for full virulence of L. monocytogenes. For OppA, we show that LhrC acts by direct base paring to the ribosome binding site of the oppA mRNA, leading to an impediment of its translation and a decreased mRNA level. The sRNA-mRNA interaction depends on 2 of 3 CU-rich regions in LhrC allowing binding of 2 oppA mRNAs to a single LhrC molecule. Finally, we found that LhrC contributes to infection in macrophage-like cells. These findings demonstrate a central role for LhrC in controlling the level of OppA and other virulence-associated cell envelope proteins in response to cell envelope stress. PMID:26176322

  15. The multicopy sRNA LhrC controls expression of the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, Susanne; Lund, Anja; Menendez-Gil, Pilar; Nielsen, Aaraby; Storm Mollerup, Maria; Lambert Nielsen, Stine; Buch Larsson, Pernille; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Johansson, Jörgen; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis. During infection, L. monocytogenes produces an array of non-coding RNAs, including the multicopy sRNA LhrC. These five, nearly identical sRNAs are highly induced in response to cell envelope stress and target the virulence adhesin lapB at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we demonstrate that LhrC controls expression of additional genes encoding cell envelope-associated proteins with virulence function. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we identified a set of genes affected by LhrC in response to cell envelope stress. Three targets were significantly down-regulated by LhrC at both the RNA and protein level: lmo2349, tcsA and oppA. All three genes encode membrane-associated proteins: A putative substrate binding protein of an amino acid ABC transporter (Lmo2349); the CD4+ T cell-stimulating antigen TcsA, and the oligopeptide binding protein OppA, of which the latter 2 are required for full virulence of L. monocytogenes. For OppA, we show that LhrC acts by direct base paring to the ribosome binding site of the oppA mRNA, leading to an impediment of its translation and a decreased mRNA level. The sRNA-mRNA interaction depends on 2 of 3 CU-rich regions in LhrC allowing binding of 2 oppA mRNAs to a single LhrC molecule. Finally, we found that LhrC contributes to infection in macrophage-like cells. These findings demonstrate a central role for LhrC in controlling the level of OppA and other virulence-associated cell envelope proteins in response to cell envelope stress. PMID:26176322

  16. The Seventh Generation: Native Students Speak about Finding the Good Path.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergstrom, Amy; Cleary, Linda Miller; Peacock, Thomas D.

    Many American Indian, First Nations, and Alaska Native cultures have prophecies about the "Seventh Generation"--young people who will have a spiritual and cultural awakening and lead the regeneration of the nations and the earth. This book honors the Seventh Generation. It draws on the words of 120 Native youth, interviewed in the United States…

  17. Generative Perspectives on Language Acquisition: Empirical Findings, Theoretical Considerations, and Crosslinguistic Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clahsen, Harald, Ed.

    The collection of essays and studies concerning generative grammar and first and second language acquisition includes: "The Optional-Infinitive Stage in Child English: Evidence from Negation" (Tony Harris, Ken Wexler); "Towards a Structure-Building Model of Acquisition" (Andrew Radford); "The Underspecification of Functional Categories in Early…

  18. Familial Dyslexia: Genetic and Medical Findings in Eleven Three-Generation Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubs, Herbert A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study of 11 3-generation families supported the hypothesis of autosomal dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance. Data did not support an increased frequency of males, left-handedness, or autoimmune disorders in dyslexics. Severity was greater in males. Long-term outcome was comparable in dyslexics and nondyslexics. (JDD)

  19. Next generation sequencing on patients with LGMD and nonspecific myopathies: Findings associated with ANO5 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Savarese, Marco; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Tasca, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Lucia; Janssens, Sandra; De Bleecker, Jan; Delpech, Marc; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio; Angelini, Corrado; Sacconi, Sabrina; Santoro, Lucio; Ricci, Enzo; Claes, Kathleen; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We studied 786 undiagnosed patients with LGMD or nonspecific myopathic features to investigate the role of ANO5 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) and in nonspecific myopathies using the next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. In 160 LGMD patients, we first sequenced hotspot exons 5 and 20 and then sequenced the remaining part of the coding region. Another 626 patients, recruited using broader inclusion criteria, were directly analyzed by targeted NGS. By combining NGS and Sanger sequencing, we identified 33/786 (4%) patients carrying putative pathogenic changes in both alleles and 23 ANO5 heterozygotes (3%). The phenotypic spectrum is broader than expected, from hyperCKemia to myopathies, with lack of genotype/phenotype correlations. In particular, this is currently the largest screening of the ANO5 gene. The large number of heterozygotes for damaging mutations suggests that anoctaminopathies should be frequent and often nonpenetrant. We propose the multiple genetic testing by targeted NGS as a first step to analyze patients with nonspecific myopathic presentations. This represents a straightforward approach to overcome the difficulties of clinical heterogeneity of ANO5 patients, and to test, at the same time, many other genes involved in neuromuscular disorders. PMID:25891276

  20. Next generation sequencing on patients with LGMD and nonspecific myopathies: Findings associated with ANO5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Savarese, Marco; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Tasca, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Lucia; Janssens, Sandra; De Bleecker, Jan; Delpech, Marc; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio; Angelini, Corrado; Sacconi, Sabrina; Santoro, Lucio; Ricci, Enzo; Claes, Kathleen; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2015-07-01

    We studied 786 undiagnosed patients with LGMD or nonspecific myopathic features to investigate the role of ANO5 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) and in nonspecific myopathies using the next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. In 160 LGMD patients, we first sequenced hotspot exons 5 and 20 and then sequenced the remaining part of the coding region. Another 626 patients, recruited using broader inclusion criteria, were directly analyzed by targeted NGS. By combining NGS and Sanger sequencing, we identified 33/786 (4%) patients carrying putative pathogenic changes in both alleles and 23 ANO5 heterozygotes (3%). The phenotypic spectrum is broader than expected, from hyperCKemia to myopathies, with lack of genotype/phenotype correlations. In particular, this is currently the largest screening of the ANO5 gene. The large number of heterozygotes for damaging mutations suggests that anoctaminopathies should be frequent and often nonpenetrant. We propose the multiple genetic testing by targeted NGS as a first step to analyze patients with nonspecific myopathic presentations. This represents a straightforward approach to overcome the difficulties of clinical heterogeneity of ANO5 patients, and to test, at the same time, many other genes involved in neuromuscular disorders. PMID:25891276

  1. Generation and control of cortical gamma: findings from simulation at two scales.

    PubMed

    Wright, J J

    2009-05-01

    A continuum model of electrocortical activity was applied separately at centimetric and macrocolumnar scales, permitting analysis of interaction between scales. State equations included effects of retrograde action potential propagation in dendritic trees, and kinetics of AMPA, GABA and NMDA receptors. Parameter values were provided from independent physiological and anatomical estimates. Realistic field potentials and pulse rates were obtained, including resonances in the alpha/theta and gamma ranges, 1/f(2) background activity, and autonomous gamma activity. Zero-lag synchrony and travelling waves occurred as complementary aspects of cortical transmission, and lead/lag relations between excitatory and inhibitory cell populations varied systematically around transition to autonomous gamma oscillation. Properties of the simulations can account for generation and control of gamma activity. All factors acting on excitatory/inhibitory balance controlled the onset and offset of gamma oscillation. Autonomous gamma was initiated by focal excitation of excitatory cells, and suppressed by laterally spreading trans-cortical excitation, which acted on both excitatory and inhibitory cell populations. Consequently, although spatially extensive non-specific reticular activation tended to suppress autonomous gamma, spatial variation of reticular activation could preferentially select fields of synchrony. PMID:19095406

  2. Summary and early findings from a second generation information monitoring and diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Bourassa, Norman; Kinney, Kristopher L.; Shockman, Christine

    2003-04-02

    Private sector commercial office buildings are challenging environments for energy efficiency projects. This challenge is related to the complexity of business environments that involve ownership, operation, and tenant relationships. This research project was developed to examine the environment for building operations and identify causes of inefficient use of energy related to technical and organizational issues. This paper discusses a second-generation Information Monitoring and Diagnostic System (IMDS) installed at a leased office building in Sacramento, California. The underlying principle of this project is that high quality building performance data can help show where energy is being used and how buildings systems actually perform. Such data are an important first step toward improving building energy efficiency. This project has demonstrated that the IMDS is valuable to the building operators at the Sacramento site. The building operators not only accept the technology, but it has become the core of their day-to-day building control concepts. One objective of this project was to evaluate the costs and benefits of the IMDS. The system cost about $0.70 per square foot, which includes the design, hardware, software, and installation, which is about 30% less than the previous IMDS in San Francisco. A number of operational problems have been identified with the IMDS.

  3. Dual-function sRNA encoded peptide SR1P modulates moonlighting activity of B. subtilis GapA

    PubMed Central

    Gimpel, Matthias; Brantl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT SR1 is a dual-function sRNA from B. subtilis that acts as a base-pairing regulatory RNA and as a peptide-encoding mRNA. Both functions of SR1 are highly conserved. Previously, we uncovered that the SR1 encoded peptide SR1P binds the glycolytic enzyme GapA resulting in stabilization of gapA mRNA. Here, we demonstrate that GapA interacts with RNases Y and J1, and this interaction was RNA-independent. About 1% of GapA molecules purified from B. subtilis carry RNase J1 and about 2% RNase Y. In contrast to the GapA/RNase Y interaction, the GapA/RNaseJ1 interaction was stronger in the presence of SR1P. GapA/SR1P-J1/Y displayed in vitro RNase activity on known RNase J1 substrates. Moreover, the RNase J1 substrate SR5 has altered half-lives in a ΔgapA strain and a Δsr1 strain, suggesting in vivo functions of the GapA/SR1P/J1 interaction. Our results demonstrate that the metabolic enzyme GapA moonlights in recruiting RNases while GapA bound SR1P promotes binding of RNase J1 and enhances its activity. PMID:27449348

  4. The low-resolution solution structure of Vibrio cholerae Hfq in complex with Qrr1 sRNA.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Helen A; Henderson, Charlotte A; Stone, Carlanne M; Cary, Peter D; Gowers, Darren M; Sobott, Frank; Taylor, James E; Callaghan, Anastasia J

    2012-09-01

    In Vibrio cholerae, the RNA binding protein and chaperone Hfq (VcHfq) facilitates the pairing of the quorum regulatory RNA (Qrr) small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) to the 5' untranslated regions of the mRNAs for a number of global regulators that modulate the expression of virulence genes. This Qrr-mediated sRNA circuit is an attractive antimicrobial target, but characterization at the molecular level is required for this to be realized. Here, we investigate the interactions between VcHfq and the Qrr sRNAs using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques. We show that the ring-shaped VcHfq hexamer binds the Qrrs with 1:1 stoichiometry through its proximal face, and the molecular envelope of the VcHfq-Qrr complex is experimentally determined from small angle scattering data to present the first structural glimpse of a Hfq-sRNA complex. This structure reveals that the VcHfq protein does not change shape on complex formation but the RNA does, suggesting that a chaperone role for VcHfq is a critical part of the VcHfq-Qrr interaction. Overall, these studies enhance our understanding of VcHfq-Qrr interactions. PMID:22730296

  5. Antagonistic functions between the RNA chaperone Hfq and an sRNA regulate sensitivity to the antibiotic colicin

    PubMed Central

    Salvail, Hubert; Caron, Marie-Pier; Bélanger, Justine; Massé, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The RNA chaperone Hfq is a key regulator of the function of small RNAs (sRNAs). Hfq has been shown to facilitate sRNAs binding to target mRNAs and to directly regulate translation through the action of sRNAs. Here, we present evidence that Hfq acts as the repressor of cirA mRNA translation in the absence of sRNA. Hfq binding to cirA prevents translation initiation, which correlates with cirA mRNA instability. In contrast, RyhB pairing to cirA mRNA promotes changes in RNA structure that displace Hfq, thereby allowing efficient translation as well as mRNA stabilization. Because CirA is a receptor for the antibiotic colicin Ia, in addition to acting as an Fur (Ferric Uptake Regulator)-regulated siderophore transporter, translational activation of cirA mRNA by RyhB promotes colicin sensitivity under conditions of iron starvation. Altogether, these results indicate that Fur and RyhB modulate an unexpected feed-forward loop mechanism related to iron physiology and colicin sensitivity. PMID:24065131

  6. Steam generator fretting-wear damage: A summary of recent findings

    SciTech Connect

    Guerout, F.M.; Fisher, N.J.

    1999-08-01

    Flow-induced vibration of steam generator (SG) tubes may sometimes result in fretting-wear damage at the tube-to-support locations. Fretting-wear damage predictions are largely based on experimental data obtained at representative test conditions. Fretting-wear of SG materials has been studied at the Chalk River Laboratories for two decades. Tests are conducted in fretting-wear test machines that simulate SG environmental conditions and tube-to-support dynamic interactions. A new high-temperature force and displacement measuring system was developed to monitor tube-to-support interaction (i.e., work-rate) at operating conditions. This improvement in experimental fretting-wear technology was used to perform a comprehensive study of the effect of various environment and design parameters on SG tube wear damage. This paper summarizes the results of tests performed over the past 4 yr to study the effect of temperature, water chemistry, support geometry, and tube material on fretting-wear. The results show a significant effect of temperature on tube wear damage. Therefore, fretting-wear tests must be performed at operating temperatures in order to be relevant. No significant effect of the type of water treatment on tube wear damage was observed. For predominantly impacting motion, the wear of SG tubes in contact with 410 stainless steel is similar regardless of whether Alloy 690 or Alloy 800 is used as tubing material or whether lattice bars or broached hole supports are used. Based on results presented in this paper, an average wear coefficient value is recommended that is used for the prediction of SG tube wear depth versus time.

  7. The green tea polyphenol EGCG inhibits E. coli biofilm formation by impairing amyloid curli fibre assembly and downregulating the biofilm regulator CsgD via the σ(E) -dependent sRNA RybB.

    PubMed

    Serra, Diego O; Mika, Franziska; Richter, Anja M; Hengge, Regine

    2016-07-01

    In bacterial biofilms, which are often involved in chronic infections, cells are surrounded by a self-produced extracellular matrix that contains amyloid fibres, exopolysaccharides and other biopolymers. The matrix contributes to the pronounced resistance of biofilms against antibiotics and host immune systems. Being highly inflammatory, matrix amyloids such as curli fibres of Escherichia coli can also play a role in pathogenicity. Using macrocolony biofilms of commensal and pathogenic E. coli as a model system, we demonstrate here that the green tea polyphenol epigallocatachin gallate (EGCG) is a potent antibiofilm agent. EGCG virtually eliminates the biofilm matrix by directly interfering with the assembly of curli subunits into amyloid fibres, and by triggering the σ(E) cell envelope stress response and thereby reducing the expression of CsgD - a crucial activator of curli and cellulose biosynthesis - due to csgD mRNA targeting by the σ(E) -dependent sRNA RybB. These findings highlight EGCG as a potential adjuvant for antibiotic therapy of biofilm-associated infections. Moreover, EGCG may support therapies against pathogenic E. coli that produce inflammatory curli fibres along with Shigatoxin. PMID:26992034

  8. The Impact of 18 Ancestral and Horizontally-Acquired Regulatory Proteins upon the Transcriptome and sRNA Landscape of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Aoife M.; Diard, Médéric; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Puente, José L.; Sivasankaran, Sathesh K.; Hokamp, Karsten; Hinton, Jay C. D.

    2016-01-01

    We know a great deal about the genes used by the model pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to cause disease, but less about global gene regulation. New tools for studying transcripts at the single nucleotide level now offer an unparalleled opportunity to understand the bacterial transcriptome, and expression of the small RNAs (sRNA) and coding genes responsible for the establishment of infection. Here, we define the transcriptomes of 18 mutants lacking virulence-related global regulatory systems that modulate the expression of the SPI1 and SPI2 Type 3 secretion systems of S. Typhimurium strain 4/74. Using infection-relevant growth conditions, we identified a total of 1257 coding genes that are controlled by one or more regulatory system, including a sub-class of genes that reflect a new level of cross-talk between SPI1 and SPI2. We directly compared the roles played by the major transcriptional regulators in the expression of sRNAs, and discovered that the RpoS (σ38) sigma factor modulates the expression of 23% of sRNAs, many more than other regulatory systems. The impact of the RNA chaperone Hfq upon the steady state levels of 280 sRNA transcripts is described, and we found 13 sRNAs that are co-regulated with SPI1 and SPI2 virulence genes. We report the first example of an sRNA, STnc1480, that is subject to silencing by H-NS and subsequent counter-silencing by PhoP and SlyA. The data for these 18 regulatory systems is now available to the bacterial research community in a user-friendly online resource, SalComRegulon. PMID:27564394

  9. The Impact of 18 Ancestral and Horizontally-Acquired Regulatory Proteins upon the Transcriptome and sRNA Landscape of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Aoife M; Kröger, Carsten; Diard, Médéric; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Puente, José L; Sivasankaran, Sathesh K; Hokamp, Karsten; Hinton, Jay C D

    2016-08-01

    We know a great deal about the genes used by the model pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to cause disease, but less about global gene regulation. New tools for studying transcripts at the single nucleotide level now offer an unparalleled opportunity to understand the bacterial transcriptome, and expression of the small RNAs (sRNA) and coding genes responsible for the establishment of infection. Here, we define the transcriptomes of 18 mutants lacking virulence-related global regulatory systems that modulate the expression of the SPI1 and SPI2 Type 3 secretion systems of S. Typhimurium strain 4/74. Using infection-relevant growth conditions, we identified a total of 1257 coding genes that are controlled by one or more regulatory system, including a sub-class of genes that reflect a new level of cross-talk between SPI1 and SPI2. We directly compared the roles played by the major transcriptional regulators in the expression of sRNAs, and discovered that the RpoS (σ38) sigma factor modulates the expression of 23% of sRNAs, many more than other regulatory systems. The impact of the RNA chaperone Hfq upon the steady state levels of 280 sRNA transcripts is described, and we found 13 sRNAs that are co-regulated with SPI1 and SPI2 virulence genes. We report the first example of an sRNA, STnc1480, that is subject to silencing by H-NS and subsequent counter-silencing by PhoP and SlyA. The data for these 18 regulatory systems is now available to the bacterial research community in a user-friendly online resource, SalComRegulon. PMID:27564394

  10. Random number generation in bilingual Balinese and German students: preliminary findings from an exploratory cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Strenge, Hans; Lesmana, Cokorda Bagus Jaya; Suryani, Luh Ketut

    2009-08-01

    Verbal random number generation is a procedurally simple task to assess executive function and appears ideally suited for the use under diverse settings in cross-cultural research. The objective of this study was to examine ethnic group differences between young adults in Bali (Indonesia) and Kiel (Germany): 50 bilingual healthy students, 30 Balinese and 20 Germans, attempted to generate a random sequence of the digits 1 to 9. In Balinese participants, randomization was done in Balinese (native language L1) and Indonesian (first foreign language L2), in German subjects in the German (L1) and English (L2) languages. 10 of 30 Balinese (33%), but no Germans, were unable to inhibit habitual counting in more than half of the responses. The Balinese produced significantly more nonrandom responses than the Germans with higher rates of counting and significantly less occurrence of the digits 2 and 3 in L1 compared with L2. Repetition and cycling behavior did not differ between the four languages. The findings highlight the importance of taking into account culture-bound psychosocial factors for Balinese individuals when administering and interpreting a random number generation test. PMID:19831087

  11. Identification of sRNA interacting with a transcript of interest using MS2-affinity purification coupled with RNA sequencing (MAPS) technology

    PubMed Central

    Lalaouna, David; Massé, Eric

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNAseq) technology recently allowed the identification of thousands of small RNAs (sRNAs) within the prokaryotic kingdom. However, drawing the comprehensive interaction map of a sRNA remains a challenging task. To address this problem, we recently developed a method called MAPS (MS2 affinity purification coupled with RNA sequencing) to characterize the full targetome of specific sRNAs. This method enabled the identification of target RNAs interacting with sRNAs, regardless of the type of regulation (positive or negative), type of targets (mRNA, tRNA, sRNA) or their abundance. We also demonstrated that we can use this technology to perform a reverse MAPS experiment, where an RNA fragment of interest is used as bait to identify interacting sRNAs. Here, we demonstrated that RybB and MicF sRNAs co-purified with internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of metZ–metW–metV tRNA transcript, confirming results obtained with MS2-RybB MAPS. Both raw and analyzed RNAseq data are available in GEO database (GSE66517). PMID:26484242

  12. Small RNAs in angiosperms: sequence characteristics, distribution and generation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dijun; Meng, Yijun; Ma, Xiaoxia; Mao, Chuanzao; Bai, Youhuang; Cao, Junjie; Gu, Haibin; Wu, Ping; Chen, Ming

    2010-06-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) has opened up a new era for small RNA (sRNA) exploration. Using HTS data for a global survey of sRNAs in 26 angiosperms, elevated GC contents were detected in the monocots, whereas the 5(')-terminal compositions were quite uniform among the angiosperms. Chromosome-wide distribution patterns of sRNAs were investigated by using scrolling-window analysis. We performed de novo natural antisense transcript (NAT) prediction, and found that the overlapping regions of trans-NATs, but not cis-NATs, were hotspots for sRNA generation. One cis-NAT generates phased natural antisense short interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs) specifically from flowers in Arabidopsis, while one in rice produces phased nat-siRNAs from grains, suggesting their organ-specific regulatory roles. PMID:20378553

  13. Transcription of eucaryotic tRNA1met and 5SRNA genes by RNA polymerase III is blocked by base mismatches in the intragenic control regions.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M A; Folk, W R

    1987-01-01

    We have constructed duplex DNAs containing single G-T or A-C mismatches in the X. laevis tRNA1met gene. Mismatches within regions of this gene which are bound by transcription factor TFIIIC prevent transcription by RNA polymerase III. Homoduplexes with G-C----A-T mutations at some of the same sites, however, are transcribed efficiently in oocytes. Mismatches outside of the tRNA1met gene have no effect upon transcription. A survey of several point mutants in the Syrian hamster 5SRNA gene indicates that mismatches outside the internal control region somewhat reduce transcription, but a mismatch within the internal control region blocks transcription. Thus, the presence of mismatched bases in the region of DNA which interacts with RNA polymerase III transcription factors blocks transcription, perhaps by interfering with DNA renaturation following transit of the RNA polymerase. Images PMID:3645544

  14. Dissecting the role of conserved box C/D sRNA sequences in di-sRNP assembly and function

    PubMed Central

    Bleichert, Franziska; Baserga, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    In all three kingdoms of life, nucleotides in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) are post-transcriptionally modified. One type of chemical modification is 2′-O-ribose methylation, which is, in eukaryotes and archaea, performed by box C/D small ribonucleoproteins (box C/D sRNPs in archaea) and box C/D small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins (box C/D snoRNPs in eukaryotes), respectively. Recently, the first structure of any catalytically active box C/D s(no)RNP determined by electron microscopy and single particle analysis surprisingly demonstrated that they are dimeric RNPs. Mutational analyses of the Nop5 protein interface suggested that di-sRNP formation is also required for the in vitro catalytic activity. We have now analyzed the functional relevance of the second interface, the sRNA interface, within the box C/D di-sRNP. Mutations in conserved sequence elements of the sRNA, which allow sRNP assembly but which severely interfere with the catalytic activity of box C/D sRNPs, prevent formation of the di-sRNP. In addition, we can observe the dimeric box C/D sRNP architecture with a different box C/D sRNP, suggesting that this architecture is conserved. Together, these results provide further support for the functional relevance of the di-sRNP architecture and also provide a structural explanation for the observed defects in catalysis of 2′-O-ribose methylation. PMID:20693534

  15. The sRNA RyhB Regulates the Synthesis of the Escherichia coli Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase MsrB but Not MsrA

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Julia; Duverger, Yohann; Thouvenot, Benoît; Chiaruttini, Claude; Branlant, Christiane; Springer, Mathias; Charpentier, Bruno; Barras, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Controlling iron homeostasis is crucial for all aerobically grown living cells that are exposed to oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS), as free iron increases the production of ROS. Methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr) are key enzymes in repairing ROS-mediated damage to proteins, as they reduce oxidized methionine (MetSO) residues to methionine. E. coli synthesizes two Msr, A and B, which exhibit substrate diastereospecificity. The bacterial iron-responsive small RNA (sRNA) RyhB controls iron metabolism by modulating intracellular iron usage. We show in this paper that RyhB is a direct regulator of the msrB gene that encodes the MsrB enzyme. RyhB down-regulates msrB transcripts along with Hfq and RNaseE proteins since mutations in the ryhB, fur, hfq, or RNaseE-encoded genes resulted in iron-insensitive expression of msrB. Our results show that RyhB binds to two sequences within the short 5′UTR of msrB mRNA as identified by reverse transcriptase and RNase and lead (II) protection assays. Toeprinting analysis shows that RyhB pairing to msrB mRNA prevents efficient ribosome binding and thereby inhibits translation initiation. In vivo site directed-mutagenesis experiments in the msrB 5′UTR region indicate that both RyhB-pairing sites are required to decrease msrB expression. Thus, this study suggests a novel mechanism of translational regulation where a same sRNA can basepair to two different locations within the same mRNA species. In contrast, expression of msrA is not influenced by changes in iron levels. PMID:23671689

  16. The sRNA RyhB regulates the synthesis of the Escherichia coli methionine sulfoxide reductase MsrB but not MsrA.

    PubMed

    Bos, Julia; Duverger, Yohann; Thouvenot, Benoît; Chiaruttini, Claude; Branlant, Christiane; Springer, Mathias; Charpentier, Bruno; Barras, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Controlling iron homeostasis is crucial for all aerobically grown living cells that are exposed to oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS), as free iron increases the production of ROS. Methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr) are key enzymes in repairing ROS-mediated damage to proteins, as they reduce oxidized methionine (MetSO) residues to methionine. E. coli synthesizes two Msr, A and B, which exhibit substrate diastereospecificity. The bacterial iron-responsive small RNA (sRNA) RyhB controls iron metabolism by modulating intracellular iron usage. We show in this paper that RyhB is a direct regulator of the msrB gene that encodes the MsrB enzyme. RyhB down-regulates msrB transcripts along with Hfq and RNaseE proteins since mutations in the ryhB, fur, hfq, or RNaseE-encoded genes resulted in iron-insensitive expression of msrB. Our results show that RyhB binds to two sequences within the short 5'UTR of msrB mRNA as identified by reverse transcriptase and RNase and lead (II) protection assays. Toeprinting analysis shows that RyhB pairing to msrB mRNA prevents efficient ribosome binding and thereby inhibits translation initiation. In vivo site directed-mutagenesis experiments in the msrB 5'UTR region indicate that both RyhB-pairing sites are required to decrease msrB expression. Thus, this study suggests a novel mechanism of translational regulation where a same sRNA can basepair to two different locations within the same mRNA species. In contrast, expression of msrA is not influenced by changes in iron levels. PMID:23671689

  17. Finding Purpose in Pain: Using Logotherapy as a Method for Addressing Survivor Guilt in First-Generation College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Kevin A.; Williams, Cyrus, III; Harden, Dia

    2013-01-01

    First-generation college students face a variety of academic and personal challenges, including survivor guilt (Piorkowski, 1983). Survivor guilt for these students involves negative emotions related to leaving family and friends "behind" in difficult contexts and lived experiences. This article provides (a) an overview of first-generation college…

  18. Improving Mathematics Learning by Integrating Curricular Activities with Innovative and Developmentally Appropriate Digital Apps: Findings from the Next Generation Preschool Math Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presser, Ashley Lewis; Vahey, Philip; Dominguez, Ximena

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes findings from a blocked randomized design (BRD) field study conducted to examine the "Next Generation Preschool Math" (NGPM) program's implementation in preschool classrooms and promise in improving young children's mathematic learning. NGPM integrates traditional preschool activities with developmentally appropriate…

  19. The cag-pathogenicity island encoded CncR1 sRNA oppositely modulates Helicobacter pylori motility and adhesion to host cells.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Andrea; Roncarati, Davide; Danielli, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are emerging as key post-transcriptional regulators in many bacteria. In the human pathobiont Helicobacter pylori a plethora of trans- and cis-encoded sRNAs have been pinpointed by a global transcriptome study. However, only two have been studied in depth at the functional level. Here we report the characterization of CncR1, an abundant and conserved sRNA encoded by the virulence-associated cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) of H. pylori. Growth-phase dependent transcription of CncR1 is directed by the PcagP promoter, which resulted to be a target of the essential transcriptional regulator HsrA (HP1043). We demonstrate that the 213 nt transcript arising from this promoter ends at an intrinsic terminator, few bases upstream of the annotated cagP open reading frame, establishing CncR1 as the predominant gene product encoded by the cagP (cag15) locus. Interestingly, the deletion of the locus resulted in the deregulation en masse of σ(54)-dependent genes, linking CncR1 to flagellar functions. Accordingly, the enhanced motility recorded for cncR1 deletion mutants was complemented by ectopic reintroduction of the allele in trans. In silico prediction identified fliK, encoding a flagellar checkpoint protein, as likely regulatory target of CncR1. The interaction of CncR1 with the fliK mRNA was thus further investigated in vitro, demonstrating the formation of strand-specific interactions between the two RNA molecules. Accordingly, the full-length translational fusions of fliK with a lux reporter gene were induced in a cncR1 deletion mutant in vivo. These data suggest the involvement of CncR1 in the post-transcriptional modulation of H. pylori motility functions through down-regulation of a critical flagellar checkpoint factor. Concurrently, the cncR1 mutant revealed a decrease of transcript levels for several H. pylori adhesins, resulting in a phenotypically significant impairment of bacterial adhesion to a host gastric cell line. The data

  20. Mitochondrial COI and 16sRNA Evidence for a Single Species Hypothesis of E. vitis, J. formosana and E. onukii in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian-Yu; Han, Bao-Yu; Xiao, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Tea green leafhopper is one of the most damaging tea pests in main tea production regions of East Asia. For lack of recognized morphological characters, the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan have always been named as Empoasca vitis Göthe, Jacobiasca formosana Paoli and Empoasca onukii MATSUDA, respectively. Furthermore, nothing is known about the genetic relationships among them. In this study, we collected six populations from Mainland China, four populations from Japan and one population from Taiwan, and examined the genetic distances in the COI and 16sRNA regions of mtDNA among them. The results showed that the genetic distances based on single gene or the combined sequences among eleven leafhopper populations were 0.3–1.2%, which were all less than the species boundary of 2%. Moreover, there were at least two haplotypes shared by two distinct populations from different regions. The phylogenetic analysis based on single gene or combined sets also supported that tea green leafhoppers from Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan were closely related to each other, and there were at least two specimens from different regions clustered ahead of those from the same region. Therefore, we propose that the view of recognizing the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in three adjacent tea production regions of East Asia as different species is unreliable or questionable and suggest that they are a single species. PMID:25506929

  1. MicL, a new σE-dependent sRNA, combats envelope stress by repressing synthesis of Lpp, the major outer membrane lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Monica S.; Updegrove, Taylor B.; Gogol, Emily B.; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Gross, Carol A.; Storz, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    In enteric bacteria, the transcription factor σE maintains membrane homeostasis by inducing synthesis of proteins involved in membrane repair and two small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that down-regulate synthesis of abundant membrane porins. Here, we describe the discovery of a third σE-dependent sRNA, MicL (mRNA-interfering complementary RNA regulator of Lpp), transcribed from a promoter located within the coding sequence of the cutC gene. MicL is synthesized as a 308-nucleotide (nt) primary transcript that is processed to an 80-nt form. Both forms possess features typical of Hfq-binding sRNAs but surprisingly target only a single mRNA, which encodes the outer membrane lipoprotein Lpp, the most abundant protein of the cell. We show that the copper sensitivity phenotype previously ascribed to inactivation of the cutC gene is actually derived from the loss of MicL and elevated Lpp levels. This observation raises the possibility that other phenotypes currently attributed to protein defects are due to deficiencies in unappreciated regulatory RNAs. We also report that σE activity is sensitive to Lpp abundance and that MicL and Lpp comprise a new σE regulatory loop that opposes membrane stress. Together MicA, RybB, and MicL allow σE to repress the synthesis of all abundant outer membrane proteins in response to stress. PMID:25030700

  2. Mitochondrial COI and 16sRNA evidence for a single species hypothesis of E. vitis, J. formosana and E. onukii in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian-Yu; Han, Bao-Yu; Xiao, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Tea green leafhopper is one of the most damaging tea pests in main tea production regions of East Asia. For lack of recognized morphological characters, the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan have always been named as Empoasca vitis Göthe, Jacobiasca formosana Paoli and Empoasca onukii MATSUDA, respectively. Furthermore, nothing is known about the genetic relationships among them. In this study, we collected six populations from Mainland China, four populations from Japan and one population from Taiwan, and examined the genetic distances in the COI and 16sRNA regions of mtDNA among them. The results showed that the genetic distances based on single gene or the combined sequences among eleven leafhopper populations were 0.3-1.2%, which were all less than the species boundary of 2%. Moreover, there were at least two haplotypes shared by two distinct populations from different regions. The phylogenetic analysis based on single gene or combined sets also supported that tea green leafhoppers from Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan were closely related to each other, and there were at least two specimens from different regions clustered ahead of those from the same region. Therefore, we propose that the view of recognizing the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in three adjacent tea production regions of East Asia as different species is unreliable or questionable and suggest that they are a single species. PMID:25506929

  3. Waking Up the Mind: Qualitative Study Findings About the Process Through Which Programs Combining Income Generation and Health Education Can Empower Indigenous Guatemalan Women.

    PubMed

    Gurman, Tilly A; Ballard, Anne; Kerr, Samantha; Walsh, Janée; Petrocy, Amy

    2016-01-01

    We explored the process through which two income-generation programs that include health education empower indigenous Guatemalan women artisans. Both artisans (n = 44) and program staff (n = 11) participated in semistructured interviews. Respondents expressed that women gained support about personal issues and experienced an awakening of the mind (despertar la mente). Through active participation, women's fear of strangers and speaking in public decreased. Women also gained mobility, awareness of their rights as women, and self-confidence from earning and managing their own income. Given our findings, we suggest that programs combining income generation and health education have the potential to empower women. PMID:25635700

  4. The generation of purinome-targeted libraries as a means to diversify ATP-mimetic chemical classes for lead finding.

    PubMed

    Felder, Eduard R; Badari, Alessandra; Disingrini, Teresa; Mantegani, Sergio; Orrenius, Christian; Avanzi, Nilla; Isacchi, Antonella; Salom, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    The generation of novel chemotypes in support of our oncology research projects expanded in recent years from a canonical design of kinase-targeted compound libraries to a broader interpretation of purinome-targeted libraries (PTL) addressing the specificity of cancer relevant targets such as kinases and ATPases. Successful screening of structurally diverse ATP-binding targets requires compound libraries covering multiple design elements, which may include phosphate surrogate moieties in ATPase inhibitors or far reaching lipophilic residues stabilizing inactive kinase conformations. Here, we exemplify the design and preparation of drug-like combinatorial libraries and report significantly enhanced screening performance on purinomic targets. We compared overall hit rates of PTL with a simultaneously tested unbiased collection of 200,000 compounds and found consistent superiority of the targeted libraries in all cases. We also analyzed the performance of the largest targeted libraries in comparison with each other and often found striking differences in how a specific target responds to various chemotypes and to whole collections. PMID:22350112

  5. The sRNA NsiR4 is involved in nitrogen assimilation control in cyanobacteria by targeting glutamine synthetase inactivating factor IF7.

    PubMed

    Klähn, Stephan; Schaal, Christoph; Georg, Jens; Baumgartner, Desirée; Knippen, Gernot; Hagemann, Martin; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2015-11-10

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in biological nitrogen assimilation, is regulated in multiple ways in response to varying nitrogen sources and levels. Here we show a small regulatory RNA, NsiR4 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 4), which plays an important role in the regulation of GS in cyanobacteria. NsiR4 expression in the unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and in the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is stimulated through nitrogen limitation via NtcA, the global transcriptional regulator of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. NsiR4 is widely conserved throughout the cyanobacterial phylum, suggesting a conserved function. In silico target prediction, transcriptome profiling on pulse overexpression, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments using a heterologous reporter system showed that NsiR4 interacts with the 5'UTR of gifA mRNA, which encodes glutamine synthetase inactivating factor (IF)7. In Synechocystis, we observed an inverse relationship between the levels of NsiR4 and the accumulation of IF7 in vivo. This NsiR4-dependent modulation of gifA (IF7) mRNA accumulation influenced the glutamine pool and thus [Formula: see text] assimilation via GS. As a second target, we identified ssr1528, a hitherto uncharacterized nitrogen-regulated gene. Competition experiments between WT and an ΔnsiR4 KO mutant showed that the lack of NsiR4 led to decreased acclimation capabilities of Synechocystis toward oscillating nitrogen levels. These results suggest a role for NsiR4 in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria, especially for the adaptation to rapid changes in available nitrogen sources and concentrations. NsiR4 is, to our knowledge, the first identified bacterial sRNA regulating the primary assimilation of a macronutrient. PMID:26494284

  6. The sRNA NsiR4 is involved in nitrogen assimilation control in cyanobacteria by targeting glutamine synthetase inactivating factor IF7

    PubMed Central

    Klähn, Stephan; Schaal, Christoph; Georg, Jens; Baumgartner, Desirée; Knippen, Gernot; Hagemann, Martin; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M.; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in biological nitrogen assimilation, is regulated in multiple ways in response to varying nitrogen sources and levels. Here we show a small regulatory RNA, NsiR4 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 4), which plays an important role in the regulation of GS in cyanobacteria. NsiR4 expression in the unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and in the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is stimulated through nitrogen limitation via NtcA, the global transcriptional regulator of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. NsiR4 is widely conserved throughout the cyanobacterial phylum, suggesting a conserved function. In silico target prediction, transcriptome profiling on pulse overexpression, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments using a heterologous reporter system showed that NsiR4 interacts with the 5′UTR of gifA mRNA, which encodes glutamine synthetase inactivating factor (IF)7. In Synechocystis, we observed an inverse relationship between the levels of NsiR4 and the accumulation of IF7 in vivo. This NsiR4-dependent modulation of gifA (IF7) mRNA accumulation influenced the glutamine pool and thus NH4+ assimilation via GS. As a second target, we identified ssr1528, a hitherto uncharacterized nitrogen-regulated gene. Competition experiments between WT and an ΔnsiR4 KO mutant showed that the lack of NsiR4 led to decreased acclimation capabilities of Synechocystis toward oscillating nitrogen levels. These results suggest a role for NsiR4 in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria, especially for the adaptation to rapid changes in available nitrogen sources and concentrations. NsiR4 is, to our knowledge, the first identified bacterial sRNA regulating the primary assimilation of a macronutrient. PMID:26494284

  7. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  8. Integration Host Factor Is Required for RpoN-Dependent hrpL Gene Expression and Controls Motility by Positively Regulating rsmB sRNA in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Zhao, Youfu

    2016-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora requires an hrp-type III secretion system (T3SS) to cause disease. It has been reported that HrpL, the master regulator of T3SS, is transcriptionally regulated by sigma factor 54 (RpoN), YhbH, and HrpS. In this study, the role of integration host factor (IHF) in regulating hrpL and T3SS gene expression was investigated. IHF is a nucleoid-associated protein that regulates gene expression by influencing nucleoid structure and DNA bending. Our results showed that both ihfA and ihfB mutants of E. amylovora did not induce necrotic lesions on pear fruits. Growth of both mutants was greatly reduced, and expression of the hrpL and T3SS genes was significantly down-regulated as compared with those of the wild type. In addition, expression of the ihfA, but not the ihfB gene, was under auto-suppression by IHF. Furthermore, both ihfA and ihfB mutants were hypermotile, due to significantly reduced expression of small RNA (sRNA) rsmB. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay further confirmed that IHF binds to the promoters of the hrpL and ihfA genes, as well as the rsmB sRNA gene. These results indicate that IHF is required for RpoN-dependent hrpL gene expression and virulence, and controls motility by positively regulating the rsmB sRNA in E. amylovora. PMID:26368515

  9. Final environmental assessment and Finding-of-No-Significant-Impact - drum storage facility for interim storage of materials generated by environmental restoration operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0995, for the construction and operation of a drum storage facility at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for construction of the facility was generated in response to current and anticipated future needs for interim storage of waste materials generated by environmental restoration operations. A public meeting was held on July 20, 1994, at which the scope and analyses of the EA were presented. The scope of the EA included evaluation of alternative methods of storage, including no action. A comment period from July 5, 1994 through August 4, 1994, was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to submit written comment on the EA. No written comments were received regarding this proposed action, therefore no comment response is included in the Final EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  10. Evaluation of a binary optimization approach to find the optimum locations of energy storage devices in a power grid with stochastically varying loads and wind generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, Zamiyad

    The prices in the electricity market change every five minutes. The prices in peak demand hours can be four or five times more than the prices in normal off peak hours. Renewable energy such as wind power has zero marginal cost and a large percentage of wind energy in a power grid can reduce the price significantly. The variability of wind power prevents it from being constantly available in peak hours. The price differentials between off-peak and on-peak hours due to wind power variations provide an opportunity for a storage device owner to buy energy at a low price and sell it in high price hours. In a large and complex power grid, there are many locations for installation of a storage device. Storage device owners prefer to install their device at locations that allow them to maximize profit. Market participants do not possess much information about the system operator's dispatch, power grid, competing generators and transmission system. The publicly available data from the system operator usually consists of Locational Marginal Prices (LMP), load, reserve prices and regulation prices. In this thesis, we develop a method to find the optimum location of a storage device without using the grid, transmission or generator data. We formulate and solve an optimization problem to find the most profitable location for a storage device using only the publicly available market pricing data such as LMPs, and reserve prices. We consider constraints arising due to storage device operation limitations in our objective function. We use binary optimization and branch and bound method to optimize the operation of a storage device at a given location to earn maximum profit. We use two different versions of our method and optimize the profitability of a storage unit at each location in a 36 bus model of north eastern United States and south eastern Canada for four representative days representing four seasons in a year. Finally, we compare our results from the two versions of our

  11. Generation of a high resolution map of sRNAs from Fusarium graminearum and analysis of responses to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuangchao; Li, Pengfei; Zhang, Jingze; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we characterized F. graminearum hypovirus 1 (FgHV1) and F. graminearum hypovirus 2 (FgHV2), which are the only two hypoviruses in F. graminearum that are closely related to Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 (CHV1) and Cryphonectria hypovirus 2 (CHV2) in the Hypoviridae family. In this study, we preliminarily elucidated the RNA silencing mechanism of the F. graminearum/hypovirus system from a small RNA (sRNA) perspective by using HiSeq deep sequencing. The length distributions of F. graminearum sRNA were altered by hypoviral infection. Potential microRNA-like (milRNA) candidates were differentially expressed between the hypovirus-free and hypovirus-infected library types. Extensive virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) were also principally defined. The 1,831,081 and 3,254,758 total reads generated from the FgHV1 and FgHV2 genomes in F. graminearum yielded the first high-resolution sRNA maps of fungal viruses. In addition, extensive bioinformatics searches identified a large number of transcripts that are potentially targeted by vsiRNAs, several of which were effectively down-regulated. In particular, the RNA silencing-related genes FgDicer1 and FgRdRp5 were predicted targets of FgHV1- and FgHV2-derived siRNAs, possibly revealing a novel anti-RNA silencing strategy employed by mycoviruses. PMID:27189438

  12. Generation of a high resolution map of sRNAs from Fusarium graminearum and analysis of responses to viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuangchao; Li, Pengfei; Zhang, Jingze; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we characterized F. graminearum hypovirus 1 (FgHV1) and F. graminearum hypovirus 2 (FgHV2), which are the only two hypoviruses in F. graminearum that are closely related to Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 (CHV1) and Cryphonectria hypovirus 2 (CHV2) in the Hypoviridae family. In this study, we preliminarily elucidated the RNA silencing mechanism of the F. graminearum/hypovirus system from a small RNA (sRNA) perspective by using HiSeq deep sequencing. The length distributions of F. graminearum sRNA were altered by hypoviral infection. Potential microRNA-like (milRNA) candidates were differentially expressed between the hypovirus-free and hypovirus-infected library types. Extensive virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) were also principally defined. The 1,831,081 and 3,254,758 total reads generated from the FgHV1 and FgHV2 genomes in F. graminearum yielded the first high-resolution sRNA maps of fungal viruses. In addition, extensive bioinformatics searches identified a large number of transcripts that are potentially targeted by vsiRNAs, several of which were effectively down-regulated. In particular, the RNA silencing-related genes FgDicer1 and FgRdRp5 were predicted targets of FgHV1- and FgHV2-derived siRNAs, possibly revealing a novel anti-RNA silencing strategy employed by mycoviruses. PMID:27189438

  13. Does war contribute to family violence against children? Findings from a two-generational multi-informant study in Northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Saile, Regina; Ertl, Verena; Neuner, Frank; Catani, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    After 20 years of civil war in Northern Uganda, the continuity of violence within the family constitutes a major challenge to children's healthy development in the post-conflict era. Previous exposure to trauma and ongoing psychopathology in guardians potentially contribute to parental perpetration against children and dysfunctional interactions in the child's family ecology that increase children's risk of maltreatment. In order to investigate distal and proximal risk factors of child victimization, we first aimed to identify factors leading to more self-reported perpetration in guardians. Second, we examined factors in the child's family environment that promote child-reported experiences of maltreatment. Using a two-generational design we interviewed 368 children, 365 female guardians, and 304 male guardians from seven war-affected rural communities in Northern Uganda on the basis of standardized questionnaires. We found that the strongest predictors of self-reported aggressive parenting behaviors toward the child were guardians' own experiences of childhood maltreatment, followed by female guardians' victimization experiences in their intimate relationship and male guardians' posttrautmatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and alcohol-related problems. Regarding children's self-report of victimization in the family, proximal factors including violence between adults in the household and male guardians' PTSD symptom severity level predicted higher levels of maltreatment. Distal variables such as female guardians' history of childhood victimization and female guardians' exposure to traumatic war events also increased children's report of maltreatment. The current findings suggest that in the context of organized violence, an intergenerational cycle of violence persists that is exacerbated by female guardians' re-victimization experiences and male guardians' psychopathological symptoms. PMID:24239222

  14. The Generation R Study: A Review of Design, Findings to Date, and a Study of the 5-HTTLPR by Environmental Interaction from Fetal Life Onward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiemeier, Henning; Velders, Fleur P.; Szekely, Eszter; Roza, Sabine J.; Dieleman, Gwen; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; White, Tonya J. H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Hofman, Albert; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Hudziak, James J.; Verhulst, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: First, we give an overview of child psychiatric research in the Generation R Study, a population-based cohort from fetal life forward. Second, we examine within Generation R whether the functional polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) in the promoter of the serotonin transporter gene interacts with prenatal maternal chronic difficulties, prenatal…

  15. TECHNICAL SUPPORT DOCUMENT: NATIONAL-SCALE MERCURY RISK ASSESSMENT SUPPORTING THE APPROPRIATE AND NECESSARY FINDING FOR COAL- AND OIL-FIRED ELECTRIC GENERATING UNITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA has completed a national-scale risk assessment for mercury to inform the appropriate and necessary determination for electric utility steam generating unites in the United States (U.S. EGU's), persuant to Section 112(n)(1)(A) of the Clean Air Act. This document describes...

  16. Parental Influences on Adolescent Marijuana Use and the Baby Boom Generation: Findings from the 1979-1996 National Household Surveys on Drug Abuse. Analytic Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandel, Denise B.; Griesler, Pamela C.; Lee, Gang; Davies, Mark; Schaffsan, Christine

    This report uses the 1979-1996 National Household Surveys on Drug Abuse to investigate the role of parents, especially members of the baby boom generation, on the marijuana use of children. The association of marijuana use between parents and children, the differences among parental birth cohorts, and the determinants of child marijuana use are…

  17. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  18. Direction finding of half-gyrofrequency VLF emissions in the off-equatorial region of the magnetosphere and their generation and propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, H.; Hayakawa, M. ); Parrot, M.; Lefeuvre, F. )

    1987-07-01

    The spectra of VLF/ELF emissions in the off-equatorial region in the outer magnetosphere are, on occasion, found to consist of upper and lower bands with a frequency gap between them. The wave normal directions of the upper band VLF emissions have been determined by means of wave distribution function analyses based first on the measurement of three magnetic field components only, and then with the additional use of an electric field component. It is found that the wave distribution functions are composed of two peaks whose central wave normal angles {theta} with respect to the magnetic field at a geomagnetic latitude of {approximately} 17{degree} are close to the local oblique resonance cone {theta}{sub res} but whose values of {theta} are always about 15{degree}-20{degree} less than {theta}{sub res} at a higher latitude of {approximately}26{degree}. This observed wave normal behavior is compared with the theoretical prediction from direct ray tracing studies using the hypothesis deduced from a previous investigation that the waves are generated at the equator with wave normals close to {theta}{sub res}. A combination of this comparison and inverse ray tracing in which the initial wave normal directions are those determined from the wave distribution analysis has yielded the results that the {theta} values of the upper band VLF emissions are very close to {theta}{sub res} at the equator and that the normalized frequency there, {Lambda}{sub eq}, is above 0.5. Hence the upper band VLF emissions are identified as being half-gyrofrequency VLF emissions generated in the vicinity of the magnetic equator, with their wave normals close to {theta}{sub res}. The characteristics of propagation between the equatorial source region and the observing positions have been investigated by direct ray tracing. The generation mechanism is also discussed.

  19. Finding a Potential Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4) Inhibitor for Type-2 Diabetes Treatment Based on Molecular Docking, Pharmacophore Generation, and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Meduru, Harika; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Chen, Yu-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) is the vital enzyme that is responsible for inactivating intestinal peptides glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), which stimulates a decline in blood glucose levels. The aim of this study was to explore the inhibition activity of small molecule inhibitors to DPP-4 following a computational strategy based on docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations. The thorough docking protocol we applied allowed us to derive good correlation parameters between the predicted binding affinities (pKi) of the DPP-4 inhibitors and the experimental activity values (pIC50). Based on molecular docking receptor-ligand interactions, pharmacophore generation was carried out in order to identify the binding modes of structurally diverse compounds in the receptor active site. Consideration of the permanence and flexibility of DPP-4 inhibitor complexes by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation specified that the inhibitors maintained the binding mode observed in the docking study. The present study helps generate new information for further structural optimization and can influence the development of new DPP-4 inhibitors discoveries in the treatment of type-2 diabetes. PMID:27304951

  20. Finding a Potential Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4) Inhibitor for Type-2 Diabetes Treatment Based on Molecular Docking, Pharmacophore Generation, and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Meduru, Harika; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Tsai, Jeffrey J. P.; Chen, Yu-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) is the vital enzyme that is responsible for inactivating intestinal peptides glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), which stimulates a decline in blood glucose levels. The aim of this study was to explore the inhibition activity of small molecule inhibitors to DPP-4 following a computational strategy based on docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations. The thorough docking protocol we applied allowed us to derive good correlation parameters between the predicted binding affinities (pKi) of the DPP-4 inhibitors and the experimental activity values (pIC50). Based on molecular docking receptor-ligand interactions, pharmacophore generation was carried out in order to identify the binding modes of structurally diverse compounds in the receptor active site. Consideration of the permanence and flexibility of DPP-4 inhibitor complexes by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation specified that the inhibitors maintained the binding mode observed in the docking study. The present study helps generate new information for further structural optimization and can influence the development of new DPP-4 inhibitors discoveries in the treatment of type-2 diabetes. PMID:27304951

  1. A randomized, double-blind, dose-finding Phase II study to evaluate immunogenicity and safety of the third generation smallpox vaccine candidate IMVAMUNE®

    PubMed Central

    von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Vollmar, Jens; Pokorny, Rolf; Rapp, Petra; Wulff, Niels; Petzold, Barbara; Handley, Amanda; Mateo, Lyn; Siersbol, Henriette; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Chaplin, Paul

    2009-01-01

    IMVAMUNE® is a Modified Vaccinia Ankara-based virus that is being developed as a safer 3rd generation smallpox vaccine. In order to determine the optimal dose for further development, a double-blind, randomized Phase II trial was performed testing three different doses of IMVAMUNE® in 164 healthy volunteers. All three IMVAMUNE® doses displayed a favourable safety profile, with local reactions as the most frequent observation. The 1×108 TCID50 IMVAMUNE® dose induced a total antibody response in 94% of the subjects following the first vaccination and the highest peak seroconversion rates by ELISA (100%) and PRNT (71%). This IMVAMUNE® dose was considered to be optimal for the further clinical development of this highly attenuated poxvirus as a safer smallpox vaccine. PMID:19944151

  2. Numerical investigation for finding the appropriate design parameters of a fin-and-tube heat exchanger with delta-winglet vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behfard, M.; Sohankar, A.

    2016-01-01

    A numerical simulation is performed to investigate the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of three-row inline tube bundles as a part of a heat exchanger (Re = 1000, Pr = 4.29). To enhance heat transfer, two pairs of delta winglet-type vortex generators (VGs) installed beside the first row and between the first and second rows of the tube bundles. The diameter of the second row of the tubes is chosen smaller than those of the first and third. A comprehensive study on the effects of various geometrical parameters such as transverse and longitudinal positions of VGs, length and height of VGs and angle of attack of the delta winglets is performed to augment heat transfer. Based on this study the best values of these design parameters are determined. The results showed that the best model increases the convective heat transfer ratio and thermal performance factor about 59 and 43 %, respectively, in compare with the geometry without VG.

  3. Mortality from Alzheimer's, motor neuron and Parkinson's disease in relation to magnetic field exposure: findings from the study of UK electricity generation and transmission workers, 1973–2004

    PubMed Central

    Sorahan, T; Kheifets, L

    2007-01-01

    Background There are a number of reports linking magnetic field exposure to increased risks of Alzheimer's disease and motor neuron disease. Methods The mortality experienced by a cohort of 83 997 employees of the former Central Electricity Generating Board of England and Wales was investigated for the period 1973–2004. All employees were employed for at least six months with some employment in the period 1973–82. Computerised work histories were available for 79 972 study subjects for the period 1971–93. Information on job and facility (location) were used to estimate exposures to magnetic fields. Two analytical approaches were used to evaluate risks, indirect standardisation (n = 83 997) and Poisson regression (n = 79 972). Results Based on serial mortality rates for England and Wales, deaths from Alzheimer's disease and motor neuron disease were unexceptional. There was an excess of deaths from Parkinson's disease of borderline significance. No statistically significant trends were shown for risks of any of these diseases to increase with lifetime cumulative exposure to magnetic fields (RR per 10 μT-y: Alzheimer's disease 1.10 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.33); motor neuron disease 1.06 (95% CI 0.86 to 1.32); Parkinson's disease 0.88 (95% CI 0.74 to 1.05)) Conclusions There is no convincing evidence that UK electricity generation and transmission workers have suffered increased risks from neurodegenerative diseases as a consequence of exposure to magnetic fields. PMID:17626136

  4. Child Find

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This brochure describes "Child Find," a component of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) that requires states to identify, locate, and evaluate all children with disabilities, aged birth through 21, who are in need of early intervention or special education services.

  5. Finding food

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Ann; Lytle, Leslie; Riper, David Van

    2011-01-01

    A significant amount of travel is undertaken to find food. This paper examines challenges in measuring access to food using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), important in studies of both travel and eating behavior. It compares different sources of data available including fieldwork, land use and parcel data, licensing information, commercial listings, taxation data, and online street-level photographs. It proposes methods to classify different kinds of food sales places in a way that says something about their potential for delivering healthy food options. In assessing the relationship between food access and travel behavior, analysts must clearly conceptualize key variables, document measurement processes, and be clear about the strengths and weaknesses of data. PMID:21837264

  6. An Integrated Approach for Finding Overlooked Genes in Shigella

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Junping; Yang, Jian; Jin, Qi

    2011-01-01

    Background The completion of numerous genome sequences introduced an era of whole-genome study. However, many genes are missed during genome annotation, including small RNAs (sRNAs) and small open reading frames (sORFs). In order to improve genome annotation, we aimed to identify novel sRNAs and sORFs in Shigella, the principal etiologic agents of bacillary dysentery. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified 64 sRNAs in Shigella, which were experimentally validated in other bacteria based on sequence conservation. We employed computer-based and tiling array-based methods to search for sRNAs, followed by RT-PCR and northern blots, to identify nine sRNAs in Shigella flexneri strain 301 (Sf301) and 256 regions containing possible sRNA genes. We found 29 candidate sORFs using bioinformatic prediction, array hybridization and RT-PCR verification. We experimentally validated 557 (57.9%) DOOR operon predictions in the chromosomes of Sf301 and 46 (76.7%) in virulence plasmid.We found 40 additional co-expressed gene pairs that were not predicted by DOOR. Conclusions/Significance We provide an updated and comprehensive annotation of the Shigella genome. Our study increased the expected numbers of sORFs and sRNAs, which will impact on future functional genomics and proteomics studies. Our method can be used for large scale reannotation of sRNAs and sORFs in any microbe with a known genome sequence. PMID:21483688

  7. miRMOD: a tool for identification and analysis of 5′ and 3′ miRNA modifications in Next Generation Sequencing small RNA data

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged to be important regulators of gene expression across various species. Several studies have confirmed different types of post-transcriptional modifications at terminal ends of miRNAs. The reports indicate that miRNA modifications are conserved and functionally significant as it may affect miRNA stability and ability to bind mRNA targets, hence affecting target gene repression. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) of the small RNA (sRNA) provides an efficient and reliable method to explore miRNA modifications. The need for dedicated software, especially for users with little knowledge of computers, to determine and analyze miRNA modifications in sRNA NGS data, motivated us to develop miRMOD. miRMOD is a user-friendly, Microsoft Windows and Graphical User Interface (GUI) based tool for identification and analysis of 5′ and 3′ miRNA modifications (non-templated nucleotide additions and trimming) in sRNA NGS data. In addition to identification of miRNA modifications, the tool also predicts and compares the targets of query and modified miRNAs. In order to compare binding affinities for the same target, miRMOD utilizes minimum free energies of the miRNA:target and modified-miRNA:target interactions. Comparisons of the binding energies may guide experimental exploration of miRNA post-transcriptional modifications. The tool is available as a stand-alone package to overcome large data transfer problems commonly faced in web-based high-throughput (HT) sequencing data analysis tools. miRMOD package is freely available at http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/miRMOD. PMID:26623179

  8. Find a Surgeon

    MedlinePlus

    ... find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring teeth ... find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring teeth ...

  9. [Explosive "Roman find"].

    PubMed

    Stiel, Michael; Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Madea, Burkhard

    2006-01-01

    A case of a 40-year-old hobby archeologist is presented who searched for remains from Roman times. After finding an oblong, cylindrical object, he opened it with a saw to examine it, which triggered an explosion killing the man. The technical investigation of the remains showed that the find was actually a grenade from the 2nd World War. The autopsy findings and the results of the criminological investigation are presented. PMID:16529179

  10. Find a Midwife

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Find a Midwife practice locator is a web-based service that allows you to find midwifery practices in ... practice name, address, phone number, e-mail address, web site and a map of the ... reproductive health services, or gynecologic health, you may leave the birth ...

  11. Find a Physical Therapist

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, and students of physical therapy. Other Popular Resources: - Member Directory - Annual Reports Careers & Education Find Jobs Courses & Conferences About PT/PTA Careers Career Management ...

  12. Find a Cancer Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Status message Locating you... The Find an Oncologist Database is made available by ASCO as an informational resource for patients and caregivers. The database includes the names of physicians and other health ...

  13. Find a Physical Therapist

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are numerous benefits to treatment by a physical therapist. Go There » For Patients Choosing Your PT Preparing ... need to know before your appointment with your physical therapist. Go There » Find a PT For Health Professionals ...

  14. Find an ACFAS Physician

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Text Size Print Bookmark Find an ACFAS Physician Acceptance Policy By clicking on the "I Accept" ... Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Dem People's Rep Korea, Rebublic Of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan ...

  15. Find a Therapist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts Find Help News and Research Tips for Soldiers and Veterans Tips for Families and Friends Take ... questions to ask for yourself and for your child . If we can be of further assistance Contact ...

  16. Finding New Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) Initial findings are presented for several new variable stars that have been identified using CCD photometry done with the 0.9-meter telescope located at the BYU West Mountain Observatory.

  17. ASGE: Find a Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join ASGE Event Calendar Cart LOG IN MEMBERS HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS PATIENTS ADVOCACY Advocacy Agenda Legislation Regulation Take Action ... New Members GI-Related Links MEMBERS Find A Doctor About ASGE Members ASGE physicians and surgeons have ...

  18. Finding a Neurosurgeon

    MedlinePlus

    ... The first step in getting proper treatment for Chiari is to find the right doctor. While many ... neurologist, given that the only real treatment for Chiari is surgical, Conquer Chiari recommends that patients see ...

  19. Finding Your Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author offers ways on how to find a voice when telling or sharing stories in print or in person. To find a voice, someone must: (1) Trust themselves; (2) Trust their audience whether they know they can trust them or not; (3) Be respectful in their inventions; (4) Listen to and read the stories of others; (5) Make mistakes; (6)…

  20. Finding the engram.

    PubMed

    Josselyn, Sheena A; Köhler, Stefan; Frankland, Paul W

    2015-09-01

    Many attempts have been made to localize the physical trace of a memory, or engram, in the brain. However, until recently, engrams have remained largely elusive. In this Review, we develop four defining criteria that enable us to critically assess the recent progress that has been made towards finding the engram. Recent 'capture' studies use novel approaches to tag populations of neurons that are active during memory encoding, thereby allowing these engram-associated neurons to be manipulated at later times. We propose that findings from these capture studies represent considerable progress in allowing us to observe, erase and express the engram. PMID:26289572

  1. Find a Periodontist

    MedlinePlus

    Search form Search Search form Search Select a Page Home About Us Vision and Mission AAP Membership Benefits of Membership AAP Benefits Details ... a Periodontist - Advanced Search Find a Periodontist - Advanced Search U.S. Zip Code Search The best way to ...

  2. Find a Massage Therapist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Workplace Options Business Finances Career Path Quiz Job Bank Job Bank AMTA's Customized Job Bank Works for You Search massage therapy jobs in ... open positions and resumes for free. AMTA Job Bank » Get Started Find Jobs Sign up for Job ...

  3. Find a Podiatrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virgin Islands Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Yukon Territory Zip / Postal Code: The closest podiatrist may not be in your zip code. Please use the mile radius search OR enter just the first 3 digits of your zip code to find the ...

  4. Tooth Tutoring: The Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cone, Richard; And Others

    Findings are reported on a three year cross-age tutoring program in which undergraduate dental hygiene students and college students from other disciplines trained upper elementary students to tutor younger students in the techniques of dental hygiene. Data includes pre-post scores on the Oral Hygiene Index of plaque for both experimental and…

  5. Finding Those Missing Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Holly

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author stresses not to give up on a site when a URL returns an error message. Many web sites can be found by using strategies such as URL trimming, searching cached sites, site searching and searching the WayBack Machine. Methods and tips for finding web sites are contained within this article.

  6. Find a Dentist

    MedlinePlus

    ... AGD. It shall not be used for any commercial purpose without the express, written permission, and consent of the AGD. Misuse of this service will result in prosecution to the fullest extent of all applicable law. Home | InfoBites | Find an AGD Dentist | Your Family's ...

  7. Finding scientific topics

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Thomas L.; Steyvers, Mark

    2004-01-01

    A first step in identifying the content of a document is determining which topics that document addresses. We describe a generative model for documents, introduced by Blei, Ng, and Jordan [Blei, D. M., Ng, A. Y. & Jordan, M. I. (2003) J. Machine Learn. Res. 3, 993-1022], in which each document is generated by choosing a distribution over topics and then choosing each word in the document from a topic selected according to this distribution. We then present a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for inference in this model. We use this algorithm to analyze abstracts from PNAS by using Bayesian model selection to establish the number of topics. We show that the extracted topics capture meaningful structure in the data, consistent with the class designations provided by the authors of the articles, and outline further applications of this analysis, including identifying “hot topics” by examining temporal dynamics and tagging abstracts to illustrate semantic content. PMID:14872004

  8. CT findings in leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1984-12-01

    Review of 84 computed tomographic (CT) scans in leukemic patients demonstrate a wide spectrum of abnormalities. Findings caused by leukemia were lymphadenopathy, visceral enlargement, focal defects, and tissue infiltration. Hemorrhage was by far the most common complication and could usually be characterized on the noncontrast CT scan. The distinction between old hematomas, foci of infection, and leukemia infiltration could not be made with certainty without CT-guided aspiration. Unusual instances of sepsis, such as microabscesses of the liver and typhlitis, were seen.

  9. Sonographic Findings of Hydropneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Nations, Joel Anthony; Smith, Patrick; Parrish, Scott; Browning, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound is increasingly being used in examination of the thorax. The sonographic features of normal aerated lung, abnormal lung, pneumothorax, and intrapleural fluid have been published. The sonographic features of uncommon intrathoracic syndromes are less known. Hydropneumothorax is an uncommon process in which the thoracic cavity contains both intrapleural air and water. Few published examples of the sonographic findings in hydropneumothorax exist. We present 3 illustrative cases of the sonographic features of hydropneumothorax with comparative imaging and a literature review of the topic. PMID:27556194

  10. MRI Findings in Neuroferritinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Emiko; Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Neuroferritinopathy is a neurodegenerative disease which demonstrates brain iron accumulation caused by the mutations in the ferritin light chain gene. On brain MRI in neuroferritinopathy, iron deposits are observed as low-intensity areas on T2WI and as signal loss on T2∗WI. On T2WI, hyperintense abnormalities reflecting tissue edema and gliosis are also seen. Another characteristic finding is the presence of symmetrical cystic changes in the basal ganglia, which are seen in the advanced stages of this disorder. Atrophy is sometimes noted in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The variety in the MRI findings is specific to neuroferritinopathy. Based on observations of an excessive iron content in patients with chronic neurologic disorders, such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease, the presence of excess iron is therefore recognized as a major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. The future development of multimodal and advanced MRI techniques is thus expected to play an important role in accurately measuring the brain iron content and thereby further elucidating the neurodegenerative process. PMID:21808735

  11. [Silicosis: computed tomography findings].

    PubMed

    González Vázquez, M; Trinidad López, C; Castellón Plaza, D; Calatayud Moscoso Del Prado, J; Tardáguila Montero, F

    2013-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease, which is caused by the inhalation of silica and affects a wide range of jobs. There are many clinical forms of silicosis: acute silicosis, results from exposure to very large amounts of silica dust over a period of less than 2 years. Simple chronic silicosis, the most common type that we see today, results from exposure to low amounts of silica between 2 and 10 years. Chronic silicosis complicated, with silicotic conglomerates. In many cases the diagnosis of silicosis is made according to epidemiological and radiological data, without a histological confirmation. It is important to know the various radiological manifestations of silicosis to differentiate it from other lung diseases and to recognize their complications. The objective of this work is to describe typical and atypical radiological findings of silicosis and their complications in helical and high resolution (HRCT) thorax CT. PMID:22884889

  12. Finding the Next Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Kepler Team

    2013-01-01

    Twenty years ago, we knew of no planets orbiting other Sun-like stars, yet today, the roll call is nearly 1,000 strong. Statistical studies of exoplanet populations are possible, and words like "habitable zone" are heard around the dinner table. Theorists are scrambling to explain not only the observed physical characteristics but also the orbital and dynamical properties of planetary systems. The taxonomy is diverse but still reflects the observational biases that dominate the detection surveys. We've yet to find another planet that looks anything like home. The scene changed dramatically with the launch of the Kepler spacecraft in 2009 to determine, via transit photometry, the fraction of stars harboring earth-size planets in or near the Habitable Zone of their parent star. Early catalog releases hint that nature makes small planets efficiently: over half of the sample of 2,300 planet candidates discovered in the first two years are smaller than 2.5 times the Earth's radius. I will describe Kepler's milestone discoveries and progress toward an exo-Earth census. Humankind's speculation about the existence of other worlds like our own has become a veritable quest.

  13. Scintigraphic findings in schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Orduña, E; Silva, F

    1995-12-01

    Schistosomiasis mansoni is a tropical parasitic disease caused by a blood fluke which inhabits the portal system of humans. Fifteen pediatric patients with the acute disease were evaluated with liver and spleen scintigraphy (LSS). Clinical history, physical examination, and serum chemistries failed to reveal any other underlying systemic disease. Liver and spleen scintigraphies were performed before therapy, 7 months and 9 years after therapy with oxamniquine. LSS initially showed hepatomegaly in 93% of the patients. In the first follow up study a reactive spleen was evident in 78% of the cases, with an unchanged hepatic image. Long term follow up revealed that from the initially enlarged livers, 93% became normal. However, 47% of the spleens were abnormal. The scintigraphic changes observed in the liver over the years were those expected for an acute infection. The findings in the spleen might indicate the persistence of an immunologic reaction with a continuous trigger, probably an antibody. These observations suggest that the LSS can be used in the evaluation and follow-up of these patients. PMID:8637963

  14. Experimental design, preprocessing, normalization and differential expression analysis of small RNA sequencing experiments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the advent of new, deep sequencing methods, small RNA (sRNA) discovery was dependent on Sanger sequencing, which was time-consuming and limited knowledge to only the most abundant sRNA. The innovation of large-scale, next-generation sequencing has exponentially increased knowledge of the biology, diversity and abundance of sRNA populations. In this review, we discuss issues involved in the design of sRNA sequencing experiments, including choosing a sequencing platform, inherent biases that affect sRNA measurements and replication. We outline the steps involved in preprocessing sRNA sequencing data and review both the principles behind and the current options for normalization. Finally, we discuss differential expression analysis in the absence and presence of biological replicates. While our focus is on sRNA sequencing experiments, many of the principles discussed are applicable to the sequencing of other RNA populations. PMID:21356093

  15. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  16. Pulmonary talcosis: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Edson; Lourenço, Sílvia; Gasparetto, Taisa Davaus; Zanetti, Gláucia; Mano, Cláudia Mauro; Nobre, Luiz Felipe

    2010-04-01

    Talc is a mineral widely used in the ceramic, paper, plastics, rubber, paint, and cosmetic industries. Four distinct forms of pulmonary disease caused by talc have been defined. Three of them (talcosilicosis, talcoasbestosis, and pure talcosis) are associated with aspiration and differ in the composition of the inhaled substance. The fourth form, a result of intravenous administration of talc, is seen in drug users who inject medications intended for oral use. The disease most commonly affects men, with a mean age in the fourth decade of life. Presentation of patients with talc granulomatosis can range from asymptomatic to fulminant disease. Symptomatic patients typically present with nonspecific complaints, including progressive exertional dyspnea, and cough. Late complications include chronic respiratory failure, emphysema, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and cor pulmonale. History of occupational exposure or of drug addiction is the major clue to the diagnosis. The high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) finding of small centrilobular nodules associated with heterogeneous conglomerate masses containing high-density amorphous areas, with or without panlobular emphysema in the lower lobes, is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis. The characteristic histopathologic feature in talc pneumoconiosis is the striking appearance of birefringent, needle-shaped particles of talc seen within the giant cells and in the areas of pulmonary fibrosis with the use of polarized light. In conclusion, computed tomography can play an important role in the diagnosis of pulmonary talcosis, since suggestive patterns may be observed. The presence of these patterns in drug abusers or in patients with an occupational history of exposure to talc is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis. PMID:20155272

  17. Generational diversity.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Linda W

    2010-01-01

    Generational diversity has proven challenges for nurse leaders, and generational values may influence ideas about work and career planning. This article discusses generational gaps, influencing factors and support, and the various generational groups present in today's workplace as well as the consequences of need addressing these issues. The article ends with a discussion of possible solutions. PMID:20395729

  18. Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra; Coles, Adrienne D.

    1998-01-01

    Studies on race-based admissions, sports and sex, and religion and drugs suggest that: affirmative action policies were successful regarding college admissions; boys who play sports are more likely to be sexually active than their peers, with the opposite true for girls; and religion is a major factor in whether teens use cigarettes, alcohol, and…

  19. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association

  20. Going Local to Find Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story: Traumatic Brain Injury Going Local to Find Help Past Issues / ... the time. From the MedlinePlus page on Traumatic Brain Injury, you can use Go Local to find ...

  1. Radiographic findings of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Nishant Mukesh; Davalos, Eric A.; Varma, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    The extremely rare Proteus Syndrome is a hamartomatous congenital syndrome with substantial variability between clinical patient presentations. The diagnostic criteria consist of a multitude of clinical findings including hemihypertrophy, macrodactyly, epidermal nevi, subcutaneous hamartomatous tumors, and bony abnormalities. These clinical findings correlate with striking radiographic findings. PMID:27186241

  2. Lupus Nephritis: An Overview of Recent Findings

    PubMed Central

    de Zubiria Salgado, Alberto; Herrera-Diaz, Catalina

    2012-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is one of the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) since it is the major predictor of poor prognosis. In susceptible individuals suffering of SLE, in situ formation and deposit of immune complexes (ICs) from apoptotic bodies occur in the kidneys as a result of an amplified epitope immunological response. IC glomerular deposits generate release of proinflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules causing inflammation. This leads to monocytes and polymorphonuclear cells chemotaxis. Subsequent release of proteases generates endothelial injury and mesangial proliferation. Presence of ICs promotes adaptive immune response and causes dendritic cells to release type I interferon. This induces maturation and activation of infiltrating T cells, and amplification of Th2, Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes. Each of them, amplify B cells and activates macrophages to release more proinflammatory molecules, generating effector cells that cannot be modulated promoting kidney epithelial proliferation and fibrosis. Herein immunopathological findings of LN are reviewed. PMID:22536486

  3. Wind Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    When Enerpro, Inc. president, Frank J. Bourbeau, attempted to file a patent on a system for synchronizing a wind generator to the electric utility grid, he discovered Marshall Space Flight Center's Frank Nola's power factor controller. Bourbeau advanced the technology and received a NASA license and a patent for his Auto Synchronous Controller (ASC). The ASC reduces generator "inrush current," which occurs when large generators are abruptly brought on line. It controls voltage so the generator is smoothly connected to the utility grid when it reaches its synchronous speed, protecting the components from inrush current damage. Generator efficiency is also increased in light winds by applying lower than rated voltage. Wind energy is utilized to drive turbines to generate electricity for utility companies.

  4. The New Second Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portes, Alejandro, Ed.

    This book compiles findings on the children of recent immigrants to the United States. The dearth of accessible census data and the tendency for school records and scholarly surveys to compress second-generation youth into a classificatory scheme that obliterates their history have obscured a major phenomenon in U.S. society--a rapidly growing…

  5. Generative Semantics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagha, Karim Nazari

    2011-01-01

    Generative semantics is (or perhaps was) a research program within linguistics, initiated by the work of George Lakoff, John R. Ross, Paul Postal and later McCawley. The approach developed out of transformational generative grammar in the mid 1960s, but stood largely in opposition to work by Noam Chomsky and his students. The nature and genesis of…

  6. Energy generator

    SciTech Connect

    Krisko, P.

    1989-08-01

    The patent describes a power booster. It comprises: at least one pendulum means suspended at one end to oscillate about the point of suspension; power generating means; mass means connected to one end of the pendulum means; spring means disposed in operative cooperation with the mass means to impart energy into the pendulum means and assist the pendulum means in oscillating about the point of suspension; and energy transfer linkage means between the pendulum means and the power generating means for transferring energy between the pendulum means and the power generating means.

  7. Histological findings in human brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, A. C.; Bothwell, P. W.

    1967-01-01

    The histological findings in 14 cases of brucellosis are described. Unusual findings include the occurrence of brucellosis in a patient with Hodgkin's disease and in another with lymphosarcoma. A patient with hepatic cirrhosis apparently due to brucellosis is included in the series. Images PMID:5632572

  8. Empirical Findings and Educational Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotter, Ludwig

    1988-01-01

    Sketches relevant issues of the relationship between findings in the field of educational science and decisions to be taken in educational policy. Discusses possible interaction models, identifying factors relevant to their realization. States that the identification of factors determining the application of research findings remains an important…

  9. Finding the object'' proceedings addendum

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, M.A.; Devaney, D.M.

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to discuss finding the object -- that is, how software engineers imagine, invent, design, or recycle objects and their behaviors for object-oriented software engineering. The workshop organizers (and, as we subsequently discovered, several of the workshop participants) felt that this issue is crucial to successful object-oriented software engineering (after all, finding objects is what the projects is all about, isn't it ). Unfortunately, when previous workshops have had the opportunity to review and discuss techniques practitioners use to find objects, too often the results were heated debates on what is an object '' which becomes all consuming. We believed that, given appropriate control over the question of which kind of object'' is being discussed (which meant tell us what object you are trying to find, then tell us your method), a workshop to concentrate on techniques for finding objects would be quite appropriate. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Mesh generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecer, A.

    1987-05-01

    Computational grids for complex three dimensional flow geometries, and a finite element grid generation scheme based on multiple block structures are introduced. The procedure can handle arbitrary geometries and is not restricted to modeling single shapes.

  11. Generation Wrecked.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Noshua

    2002-01-01

    Young adults in Generation X are facing financial problems. Because of their college and credit card debt, many in worse financial shape than anyone since the Depression and have little or no retirement savings. (JOW)

  12. Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T.

    1985-01-01

    Small modular alkali metal thermoelectric generator with no moving parts directly converts heat to electrical energy with efficiency of 20 to 40 percent. Unit uses closed regenerative electrochemical concentration cell based on sodium-ion conductor beta alumina.

  13. Vibration generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lerwill, W.E.

    1980-09-16

    Apparatus for generating vibrations in a medium, such as the ground, comprises a first member which contacts the medium, means , preferably electromagnetic, which includes two relatively movable members for generating vibrations in the apparatus and means operatively connecting the said two members to said first member such that the relatively amplitudes of the movements of said three members can be adjusted to match the impedances of the apparatus and the medium.

  14. Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2012-09-11

    NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

  15. Finding an Eye Care Professional

    MedlinePlus

    ... article rating hospitals in the United States. Website: http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals For More Information ... ophthalmologists in the United States and abroad. Website: https://secure.aao.org/aao/find-ophthalmologist The American ...

  16. Visual direction finding by fishes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waterman, T. H.

    1972-01-01

    The use of visual orientation, in the absence of landmarks, for underwater direction finding exercises by fishes is reviewed. Celestial directional clues observed directly near the water surface or indirectly at an asymptatic depth are suggested as possible orientation aids.

  17. A Family Finds Its Way

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cover Story: Traumatic Brain Injury A Family Finds Its Way Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... spoke recently with NIH MedlinePlus ' Christopher Klose. At its heart, TBI, hearing loss, any health condition is ...

  18. Going Local to Find Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story: Traumatic Brain Injury Going Local to Find Help Past Issues / Fall ... local health and social services for survivors of TBI is as important as knowing about the medical ...

  19. Find a NCCAOM Certified Practitioner

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCCAOM Certification Get Certified Get Recertified PDA Search Engine Find A Practitioner State Licensing Helpful NCCAOM Links ... My Status State Licensure Diplomates Recertification PDA Search Engine State Licensure Consumers Diplomate of Acupuncture Diplomate of ...

  20. SoFiA: Source Finding Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Paolo; Westmeier, Tobias; Giese, Nadine; Jurek, Russell; Flöer, Lars; Popping, Attila; Winkel, Benjamin; van der Hulst, Thijs; Meyer, Martin; Koribalski, Bärbel; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Courtois, Hélène

    2014-12-01

    SoFiA is a flexible source finding pipeline designed to detect and parameterise sources in 3D spectral-line data cubes. SoFiA combines several powerful source finding and parameterisation algorithms, including wavelet denoising, spatial and spectral smoothing, source mask optimisation, spectral profile fitting, and calculation of the reliability of detections. In addition to source catalogues in different formats, SoFiA can also generate a range of output data cubes and images, including source masks, moment maps, sub-cubes, position-velocity diagrams, and integrated spectra. The pipeline is controlled by simple parameter files and can either be invoked on the command line or interactively through a modern graphical user interface.

  1. Radiographic findings in liveborn triploidy.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K G; Houston, C S; Newman, D E; Wood, B J

    1989-01-01

    The detailed radiographic features of triploidy, a fatal congenital disorder with 69 chromosomes, have not previously been reported. Radiographs of ten liveborn infants with chromosomally confirmed triploidy showed six findings highly suggestive of this diagnosis: harlequin orbits, small anterior fontanelle, gracile ribs, diaphyseal overtubulation of long bones, upswept clavicles and antimongoloid pelvis. Sixteen other less specific findings showed many similarities to those found in trisomy 18. PMID:2748230

  2. Stochastic Generator of Chemical Structure. 3. Reaction Network Generation

    SciTech Connect

    FAULON,JEAN-LOUP; SAULT,ALLEN G.

    2000-07-15

    A new method to generate chemical reaction network is proposed. The particularity of the method is that network generation and mechanism reduction are performed simultaneously using sampling techniques. Our method is tested for hydrocarbon thermal cracking. Results and theoretical arguments demonstrate that our method scales in polynomial time while other deterministic network generator scale in exponential time. This finding offers the possibility to investigate complex reacting systems such as those studied in petroleum refining and combustion.

  3. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  4. Microwave generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  5. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Another spinoff from spacecraft fuel cell technology is the portable hydrogen generator shown. Developed by General Electric Company, it is an aid to safer operation of systems that use hydrogen-for example, gas chromatographs, used in laboratory analysis of gases. or flame ionization detectors used as $ollution monitors. The generator eliminates the need for high-pressure hydrogen storage bottles, which can be a safety hazard, in laboratories, hospitals and industrial plants. The unit supplies high-purity hydrogen by means of an electrochemical process which separates the hydrogen and oxygen in distilled water. The oxygen is vented away and the hydrogen gas is stored within the unit for use as needed. GE's Aircraft Equipment Division is producing about 1,000 of the generators annually.

  6. Generation Next

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, B. Denise

    2010-01-01

    There is a shortage of accounting professors with Ph.D.s who can prepare the next generation. To help reverse the faculty deficit, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) has created the new Accounting Doctoral Scholars program by pooling more than $17 million and soliciting commitments from more than 70 of the nation's…

  7. Finding the Future That Fits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Alison

    In 2000, a government-supported foundation called Careers the Next Generation (CNG) in Alberta, Canada, began coordinating summer internships for high school students in information and computer technology (ICT). The participating firms represented a mix of large and small private and public organizations in high-tech and other industries in the…

  8. CT findings of atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, F.; Kohno, A.; Saitoh, R.; Shigeta, A.

    1984-04-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of six atrial myxomas was analyzed. Five of the myxomas were located in the left atrium and one was in the right atrium. The margin of the myxoma was at least slightly lobulated in five cases and the content was inhomogeneous in all. Calcification was demonstrated in three cases. The site of attachment of the myxoma was demonstrated by CT to be the arial septum in all cases. The CT finding correlated well with the operative findings. It is concluded that it is possible with CT to diagnose atrial myxoma by the location and nature of the intracardiac mass and to differentiate it from thrombus.

  9. Peak finding using biorthogonal wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.

    2000-02-01

    The authors show in this paper how they can find the peaks in the input data if the underlying signal is a sum of Lorentzians. In order to project the data into a space of Lorentzian like functions, they show explicitly the construction of scaling functions which look like Lorentzians. From this construction, they can calculate the biorthogonal filter coefficients for both the analysis and synthesis functions. They then compare their biorthogonal wavelets to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) wavelets when used for peak finding in noisy data. They will show that in this instance, their filters perform much better than the FBI wavelets.

  10. 1980-1981 Evaluation Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    This volume summarizes the results of evaluation and testing activities carried out in the Austin, Texas, Independent School District (AISD) during the 1980-81 school year. The text consists of five parts: Section one highlights important findings in the areas of Title I Schoolwide Projects, compensatory programs, early childhood programs,…

  11. MR imaging findings of endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Cornelius, Rebecca; Cunnane, Mary Beth; Golnik, Karl; Morales, Humberto

    2016-04-01

    Endophthalmitis is a sight-threatening ophthalmologic emergency. The clinical diagnosis is often challenging, and delayed diagnosis may exacerbate the poor visual prognosis. B-scan ultrasonography or spectral domain optical coherence tomography are imaging aids at the clinician's office. Cross-sectional imaging such as CT and particularly MRI can also help in the assessment of disease extent or complications. MR imaging findings are rarely described in the literature. Here, we discuss the spectrum of imaging findings of endophthalmitis and correlate them with key anatomic and pathophysiologic details of the globe. Early disease is often subtle on MR imaging with thick uveal enhancement, while advanced disease demonstrates retinal/choroidal detachment, vitreal exudates and peribulbar inflammation. Other noninfectious inflammatory diseases of the globe can show similar findings; however, MR diffusion-weighted images help identify infectious exudates and evaluate response to therapy. Knowledge of the spectrum of imaging findings of this disease is important for radiologists and help in the management decision process. PMID:26915896

  12. Writing audit findings: Be reasonable

    SciTech Connect

    Girvin, N.W.

    1992-05-01

    A customary approach to auditing and reporting deficiencies is to keep a running list of those that are found, evaluate the severity of each, and based on the evidence, document findings or observations or concerns in an audit report. The report is issued and the auditee is normally requested to address root cause'' as part of their corrective action. This paper describes a root problems'' approach to documenting audit findings that is designed not only to put the QA auditor in a more favorable light, but to more effectively enable the auditee to identify root cause and meaningful corrective action. The positive results of this approach are considerable. You will have fewer findings but those you do have will be substantial. You will cite requirements that sound reasonable and make arguments difficult. If some of the supporting deficiencies (examples) prove to be incorrect, you will still have ample support for the original finding. You will be seen as reasonable individual who can help lead the auditee towards identification of root cause without taking away part of the responsibility. You even have a fair chance of fostering a sense of commitment to quality improvement on the auditee's part. This in itself, is its own reward.

  13. Writing audit findings: Be reasonable!

    SciTech Connect

    Girvin, N.W.

    1992-05-01

    A customary approach to auditing and reporting deficiencies is to keep a running list of those that are found, evaluate the severity of each, and based on the evidence, document findings or observations or concerns in an audit report. The report is issued and the auditee is normally requested to address ``root cause`` as part of their corrective action. This paper describes a ``root problems`` approach to documenting audit findings that is designed not only to put the QA auditor in a more favorable light, but to more effectively enable the auditee to identify root cause and meaningful corrective action. The positive results of this approach are considerable. You will have fewer findings but those you do have will be substantial. You will cite requirements that sound reasonable and make arguments difficult. If some of the supporting deficiencies (examples) prove to be incorrect, you will still have ample support for the original finding. You will be seen as reasonable individual who can help lead the auditee towards identification of root cause without taking away part of the responsibility. You even have a fair chance of fostering a sense of commitment to quality improvement on the auditee`s part. This in itself, is its own reward.

  14. MEMS AO for Planet Finding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti; Wallace, J. Kent; Shao, Mike; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Levine, B. Martin; Samuele, Rocco; Lane, Benjamin; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy; Hicks, Brian; Jung, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for planet finding using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) Adaptive Optics (AO). The use of a deformable mirror (DM) is described as a part of the instrument that was designed with a nulling interferometer. The strategy that is used is described in detail.

  15. Finding Geography Using Found Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Ellen J.

    2012-01-01

    Functional literacy is important in both English/language arts and geography. Using the "found poetry" strategy, students will summarize a piece of text, identify main ideas and find geographic connections. While using young adult literature is a great way to incorporate geography into English/language arts classroom, understanding of geography…

  16. Findings from ATSDR's Health Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susten, Allan S.

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes findings from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry concerning the evaluation of data about hazardous substance release into the environment. Identifies the hazardous substances, exposure, health effects, and public health impact from 951 facilities identified on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the Environmental…

  17. Finding a Voice through Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Jose; Vizcaino, Alida

    2006-01-01

    One question guided this experimental study: What impact does the change from teacher training to educational research have on university teachers' methodology and attitudes to teaching? To find answers to this question, the researchers selected five teachers of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at the language centre of a private university on…

  18. Multi-Criteria Path Finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, E.; Hunter, A.

    2012-07-01

    Path finding solutions are becoming a major part of many GIS applications including location based services and web-based GIS services. Most traditional path finding solutions are based on shortest path algorithms that tend to minimize the cost of travel from one point to another. These algorithms make use of some cost criteria that is usually an attribute of the edges in the graph network. Providing one shortest path limits user's flexibility when choosing a possible route, especially when more than one parameter is utilized to calculate cost (e.g., when length, number of traffic lights, and number of turns are used to calculate network cost.) K shortest path solutions tend to overcome this problem by providing second, third, and Kth shortest paths. These algorithms are efficient as long as the graphs edge weight does not change dynamically and no other parameters affect edge weights. In this paper we try to go beyond finding shortest paths based on some cost value, and provide all possible paths disregarding any parameter that may affect total cost. After finding all possible paths, we can rank the results by any parameter or combination of parameters, without a substantial increase in time complexity.

  19. Organizing pneumonia: chest HRCT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Igor Murad; Zanetti, Gláucia; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Araujo-Neto, Cesar Augusto; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of HRCT findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma of patients with organizing pneumonia. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of the HRCT scans of 36 adult patients (26 females and 10 males) with biopsy-proven organizing pneumonia. The patients were between 19 and 82 years of age (mean age, 56.2 years). The HRCT images were evaluated by two independent observers, discordant interpretations being resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The most common HRCT finding was that of ground-glass opacities, which were seen in 88.9% of the cases. The second most common finding was consolidation (in 83.3% of cases), followed by peribronchovascular opacities (in 52.8%), reticulation (in 38.9%), bronchiectasis (in 33.3%), interstitial nodules (in 27.8%), interlobular septal thickening (in 27.8%), perilobular pattern (in 22.2%), the reversed halo sign (in 16.7%), airspace nodules (in 11.1%), and the halo sign (in 8.3%). The lesions were predominantly bilateral, the middle and lower lung fields being the areas most commonly affected. CONCLUSIONS: Ground-glass opacities and consolidation were the most common findings, with a predominantly random distribution, although they were more common in the middle and lower thirds of the lungs. PMID:26176521

  20. Finding Cryptography in Object Code

    SciTech Connect

    Jason L. Wright

    2008-10-01

    Finding and identifying Cryptography is a growing concern in the malware analysis community. In this paper, a heuristic method for determining the likelihood that a given function contains a cryptographic algorithm is discussed and the results of applying this method in various environments is shown. The algorithm is based on frequency analysis of opcodes that make up each function within a binary.

  1. Magnetocumulative generator

    DOEpatents

    Pettibone, J.S.; Wheeler, P.C.

    1981-06-08

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing providing a housing chamber with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber, from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  2. Thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Pryslak, N.E.

    1974-02-26

    A thermoelectric generator having a rigid coupling or stack'' between the heat source and the hot strap joining the thermoelements is described. The stack includes a member of an insulating material, such as ceramic, for electrically isolating the thermoelements from the heat source, and a pair of members of a ductile material, such as gold, one each on each side of the insulating member, to absorb thermal differential expansion stresses in the stack. (Official Gazette)

  3. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  4. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  5. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  6. Electric generator

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Jr., John S.; Wilson, James R.; McDonald, Jr., Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  7. Finding Diamonds in the Rough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    HighTower Software, Inc. has developed a commercial software application originally designed at JPL that helps users identify deviations from norms out of massive quantities of data. The commercial product is known as CyberGrid and the same software is still supporting NASA's Voyager, Galileo and Cassini missions. CyberGrid generates 3-D graphs of data and has been used in AIDS research as well as e-commerce applications.

  8. [Typical findings of maltreated children].

    PubMed

    Rauch, E; Zinka, B; Schneider, K; Penning, R; Eisenmenger, W

    2006-06-15

    Childhood maltreatment manifests in a variety of forms and the underlying causes are manifold. In contrast to other offences involving physical injury, reporting behavior has, statistically speaking, remained unchanged. Patterns of injury must first be established and documented, and this involves a complete examination of the child's body. Depending on the constellation of findings, a radiological diagnosis is usually necessary. When all the findings have been collected, the further steps to be taken--where indicated a report to the police--must be discussed. All the evidence must be recorded, and photos obtained of all externally visible injuries before they fade. It is not the task of the physician to develop criminalistic ambitions, for example, by grilling (a parent) on the cause of the injuries. However, he/she has a duty to do everything necessary to protect the well-being of the child. PMID:16850804

  9. Breast Ultrasound: Indications and Findings.

    PubMed

    Gundry, Kathleen R

    2016-06-01

    Breast ultrasound is a widely used adjuvant to mammography for the detection of breast cancer. This chapter will review some of the basic ultrasound technical factors and techniques, describe findings on ultrasound with an emphasis on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System terminology, and present the indications for breast ultrasound. New innovations in breast ultrasound, such as elastography, ultrasound contrast, 3-dimensional, and automated whole-breast ultrasound, will be reviewed. Ultrasound-guided breast procedures are also presented. PMID:26974219

  10. Radiological Findings of Michel Aplasia

    PubMed Central

    Umul, Ayse; Demirtas, Hakan; Celik, Ahmet Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital abnormalities of the inner ear is the most common cause of neurosensory hearing loss. Michel inner ear deformity is a rare developmental anomaly refers to the total aplasia of the inner ear. It is caused by developmental arrest of otic placode early during the third week of gestational age. Case report: We have discussed here that three year old girl diagnosed Michel aplasia with temporal bone computed tomography (CT) and temporal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. PMID:27482139

  11. Angiographic Findings in Biliary Atresia

    SciTech Connect

    Uflacker, Renan Pariente, Daniele M.

    2004-09-15

    We present the angiographic findings of 46 patients with biliary atresia (BA). There were 25 males and 21 females, with a mean age of 22.5 months (range - 1.5 to 141 months). Hepatic and mesenteric angiography were obtained as part of a liver transplantation work-up or as part of the treatment of clinical events. All patients had a histological diagnosis of BA. The portal vein was patent in 43 patients, with a mean size of 4.1 mm, using the arterial catheter as comparison. Portal hepatopetal flow was observed in 20 patient and hepatofugal flow was observed in 21 patients. Presence of gastroesophageal varices was observed in 41 patients. The hepatic artery was enlarged in all patients. In all 46 patients studied, the intrahepatic peripheral hepatic artery branches presented with irregularities in contour, including encasement, strictures, dilatation and angulation, and images suggestive of peripheral occlusion. Angiographic vascular 'tuft-like' blush surrounding the irregular or occluded peripheral arterial segments was observed in 40 patients. The injection of Microfil (registered) in one case showed a marked vascular proliferation within the portal tract, apparently derived from arterial and portal connections, filling the entire portal space. We conclude that the presence of angiographically demonstrable perivascular arterial tufts in the periphery of the hepatic arterial circulation is a common finding in cases of BA, and may be a characteristic diagnostic angiographic finding.

  12. Tide generator

    SciTech Connect

    Feltenberger, B.D.

    1981-06-16

    A tidewater power system consisting of a high tide reservoir and a low tide reservoir. The high tide reservoir has an inlet adapted to be supported at high tide level and an outlet with a water wheel and generator between the outlet of the high tide reservoir and the low tide reservoir. The low tide reservoir has an outlet at the low tide level. The outlet from the high tide reservoir is adjustable to control the flow rate and the high tide reservoir can be closed at high tide to retain water for use over a period of time.

  13. HEAT GENERATION

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1963-12-01

    Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

  14. Piezoelectrostatic generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A piezoelectrostatic generator includes a plurality of elongated piezoelectric elements having first and second ends, with the first ends fixedly mounted in a cylindrical housing and the second extending radially inwardly toward an axis. A shaft movable along the axis is connected to the inner ends of the elements to produce bending forces in piezoelectric strips within the elements. Each element includes a pair of strips mounted in surface contact and in electrical series to produce a potential upon bending. Electrodes spaced from the strips by a solid dielectric material act as capacitor plates to collect the potential charge.

  15. Magnetocumulative generator

    DOEpatents

    Pettibone, Joseph S.; Wheeler, Paul C.

    1983-01-01

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing (100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105) providing a housing chamber (106) with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber (106) forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber (106), from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers (107, 108) disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber (106) which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  16. Adult Hirschprung disease: radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Mindelzun, R E; Hicks, S M

    1986-09-01

    Hirschprung disease is usually diagnosed in infancy. Occasionally patients reach adulthood without diagnosis or treatment. Four cases of adult Hirschprung disease are described. The principal radiographic findings are a markedly dilated, feces-filled colon above the zone of transition; a narrowed rectum; a cone- or funnel-shaped zone of transition; and a mosaic colonic pattern caused by collapsed redundant mucosa after colonic cleansing. In an adult, identification on a barium enema examination of an abrupt, smooth transition zone in the rectum with proximal colonic dilatation, in conjunction with an appropriate clinical history, should suggest the diagnosis of adult Hirschprung disease. PMID:3737900

  17. ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC FINDINGS IN BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, M. Mohsen; El-Said, Galal M.

    1978-01-01

    Fifteen echocardiographic recordings in nine patients with bacterial endocarditis revealed vegetations in six cases. The vegetations appeared as uneven, irregular thickening of a valve, a mass of shaggy, dense echoes attached to a leaflet or cusp, or a mass of irregular dense echoes in the cavity or outflow tract of the left ventricle. Such findings were seen only on the echocardiograms of very sick patients with severe valvular lesions. Three patients had flail mitral valves. Echocardiography was not helpful in differentiating between active and healed lesions. Problems in the identification and differential diagnosis of vegetations shown on echocardiograms are discussed. Images PMID:15216037

  18. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  19. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology*

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  20. A compilation of jet finding algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.; Meier, K.

    1992-12-31

    Technical descriptions of jet finding algorithms currently in use in p{anti p} collider experiments (CDF, UA1, UA2), e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments and Monte-Carlo event generators (LUND programs, ISAJET) have been collected. For the hadron collider experiments, the clustering methods fall into two categories: cone algorithms and nearest-neighbor algorithms. In addition, UA2 has employed a combination of both methods for some analysis. While there are clearly differences between the cone and nearest-neighbor algorithms, the authors have found that there are also differences among the cone algorithms in the details of how the centroid of a cone cluster is located and how the E{sub T} and P{sub T} of the jet are defined. The most commonly used jet algorithm in electron-positron experiments is the JADE-type cluster algorithm. Five various incarnations of this approach have been described.

  1. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, J.M.; Baker, W.R.

    1963-09-17

    This invention is a magnetohydrodynamic device for generating a highly ionized ion-electron plasma at a region remote from electrodes and structural members, thus avoiding contamination of the plasma. The apparatus utilizes a closed, gas-filled, cylindrical housing in which an axially directed magnetic field is provided. At one end of the housing, a short cylindrical electrode is disposed coaxially around a short axial inner electrode. A radial electrical discharge is caused to occur between the inner and outer electrodes, creating a rotating hydromagnetic ionization wave that propagates aiong the magnetic field lines toward the opposite end of the housing. A shorting switch connected between the electrodes prevents the wave from striking the opposite end of the housing. (AEC)

  2. Triboelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong L; Fan, Fengru; Lin, Long; Zhu, Guang; Pan, Caofeng; Zhou, Yusheng

    2015-11-03

    A generator includes a thin first contact charging layer and a thin second contact charging layer. The thin first contact charging layer includes a first material that has a first rating on a triboelectric series. The thin first contact charging layer has a first side with a first conductive electrode applied thereto and an opposite second side. The thin second contact charging layer includes a second material that has a second rating on a triboelectric series that is more negative than the first rating. The thin first contact charging layer has a first side with a first conductive electrode applied thereto and an opposite second side. The thin second contact charging layer is disposed adjacent to the first contact charging layer so that the second side of the second contact charging layer is in contact with the second side of the first contact charging layer.

  3. Imaging Findings of Congestive Hepatopathy.

    PubMed

    Wells, Michael L; Fenstad, Eric R; Poterucha, Joseph T; Hough, David M; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A; Ehman, Richard L; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K

    2016-01-01

    Congestive hepatopathy (CH) refers to hepatic abnormalities that result from passive hepatic venous congestion. Prolonged exposure to elevated hepatic venous pressure may lead to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Liver dysfunction and corresponding clinical signs and symptoms typically manifest late in the disease process. Recognition of CH at imaging is critical because advanced liver fibrosis may develop before the condition is suspected clinically. Characteristic findings of CH on conventional images include dilatation of the inferior vena cava and hepatic veins; retrograde hepatic venous opacification during the early bolus phase of intravenous contrast material injection; and a predominantly peripheral heterogeneous pattern of hepatic enhancement due to stagnant blood flow. Extensive fibrosis can be seen in chronic or severe cases. Hyperenhancing regenerative nodules that may retain hepatobiliary contrast agents are often present. Magnetic resonance (MR) elastography can show elevated liver stiffness and may be useful in evaluation of fibrosis in CH because it can be incorporated easily into routine cardiac MR imaging. Preliminary experience with MR elastography suggests its future use in initial evaluation of patients suspected of having CH, for monitoring of disease, and for assessment after therapy. To facilitate appropriate workup and treatment, radiologists should be familiar with findings suggestive of CH at radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, MR imaging, and MR elastography. In addition, knowledge of underlying pathophysiology, comparative histologic abnormalities, and extrahepatic manifestations is useful to avoid diagnostic pitfalls and suggest appropriate additional diagnostic testing. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27284758

  4. Liposome adhesion generates traction stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrell, Michael P.; Voituriez, Raphaël; Joanny, Jean-François; Nassoy, Pierre; Sykes, Cécile; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2014-02-01

    Mechanical forces generated by cells modulate global shape changes required for essential life processes, such as polarization, division and spreading. Although the contribution of the cytoskeleton to cellular force generation is widely recognized, the role of the membrane is considered to be restricted to passively transmitting forces. Therefore, the mechanisms by which the membrane can directly contribute to cell tension are overlooked and poorly understood. To address this, we directly measure the stresses generated during liposome adhesion. We find that liposome spreading generates large traction stresses on compliant substrates. These stresses can be understood as the equilibration of internal, hydrostatic pressures generated by the enhanced membrane tension built up during adhesion. These results underscore the role of membranes in the generation of mechanical stresses on cellular length scales and that the modulation of hydrostatic pressure due to membrane tension and adhesion can be channelled to perform mechanical work on the environment.

  5. Research Findings on Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Phani B.; Patra, Sayani

    2015-01-01

    Several physiopathologic conditions lead to the manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB). These conditions include ageing, diabetes mellitus, bladder outlet obstruction, spinal cord injury, stroke and brain injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, interstitial cystitis, stress and depression. This review has discussed research findings in human and animal studies conducted on the above conditions. Several structural and functional changes under these conditions have not only been observed in the lower urinary tract, but also in the brain and spinal cord. Significant changes were observed in the following areas: neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, nerve growth factor, Rho-kinase, interstitial cells of Cajal, and ion and transient receptor potential channels. Interestingly, alterations in these areas showed great variation in each of the conditions of the OAB, suggesting that the pathophysiology of the OAB might be different in each condition of the disease. It is anticipated that this review will be helpful for further research on new and specific drug development against OAB. PMID:26195957

  6. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: neuroradiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Kelly, W M; Brant-Zawadzki, M

    1983-11-01

    Central nervous system complications depicted by CT in ten patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are described. Three patients had multifocal intra-axial enhancing lesions representing atypical brain abscesses (two with toxoplasmosis, one with candidiasis). A fourth patient with multifocal "ring" lesions whose biopsy was interpreted as suggestive of toxoplasmosis responded poorly to treatment. Following his death three months later of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, autopsy revealed primary intracerebral immunoblastic lymphoma. One patient had Kaposi sarcoma involving the right frontal lobe (seen as an enhancing mass on the CT scan). CT findings in the remaining five patients revealed mild to moderate enlargement of cerebrospinal fluid spaces (including ventricles and basal cisternae) as a result of cryptococcal meningitis in three patients and "aseptic" meningitis in two. The two patients in whom early biopsy confirmed toxoplasmosis responded well to anti-infective therapy, resulting in dramatic clinical recoveries. PMID:6622693

  7. Magellan: Principal Venus science findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. Stephen

    1993-01-01

    This is a brief summary of the science findings of the Magellan mission, principally based on data from the radar system. Future plans for Magellan include acquisition of high resolution gravity data from a nearly circular orbit and atmospheric drag and occultation experiments. The Magellan science results represent the combined effort of more than 100 Magellan investigators and their students and colleagues. More extensive discussions can be found in the August and October, 1992 issues of the Journal of Geophysical Research, Planets. The Magellan mission's scientific objectives were to provide a global characterization of landforms and tectonic features; to distinguish and understand impact processes; to define and explain erosion, deposition, and chemical processes; and to model the interior density distribution. All but the last objective, which requires new global gravity data, have been accomplished, or we have acquired the data that are required to accomplish them.

  8. Thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Shakun, W.; Bearden, J.H.; Henderson, D.R.

    1988-03-29

    A thermoelectric generator unit is described comprising: a hot side heat exchanger including a plate having extruded retention posts projecting from one surface of the plate, and fins adapted for contact with a heating source. The fins are positioned between two of the retention posts. Retention rods are inserted between the retention posts and the base of the fins to retain the fin in thermal contact with the plate surface upon insertion of the retention rod between the engaging surface of the post and the corresponding fin. Thermoelectric semi-conductor modules are in thermal contact with the opposite side of the hot side heat exchanger plate from the contact with the fins. The modules are arranged in a grid pattern so that heat flow is directed into each of the modules from the hot side heat exchanger. The modules are connected electrically so as to combine their electrical output; and a cold side heat exchanger is in thermal contact with the modules acting as a heat sink on the opposite side of the module from the hot side heat exchanger plate so as to produce a thermal gradient across the modules.

  9. Finding and Not Finding Rat Perirhinal Neuronal Responses to Novelty.

    PubMed

    von Linstow Roloff, Eva; Muller, Robert U; Brown, Malcolm W

    2016-08-01

    There is much evidence that the perirhinal cortex of both rats and monkeys is important for judging the relative familiarity of visual stimuli. In monkeys many studies have found that a proportion of perirhinal neurons respond more to novel than familiar stimuli. There are fewer studies of perirhinal neuronal responses in rats, and those studies based on exploration of objects, have raised into question the encoding of stimulus familiarity by rat perirhinal neurons. For this reason, recordings of single neuronal activity were made from the perirhinal cortex of rats so as to compare responsiveness to novel and familiar stimuli in two different behavioral situations. The first situation was based upon that used in "paired viewing" experiments that have established rat perirhinal differences in immediate early gene expression for novel and familiar visual stimuli displayed on computer monitors. The second situation was similar to that used in the spontaneous object recognition test that has been widely used to establish the involvement of rat perirhinal cortex in familiarity discrimination. In the first condition 30 (25%) of 120 perirhinal neurons were visually responsive; of these responsive neurons 19 (63%) responded significantly differently to novel and familiar stimuli. In the second condition eight (53%) of 15 perirhinal neurons changed activity significantly in the vicinity of objects (had "object fields"); however, for none (0%) of these was there a significant activity change related to the familiarity of an object, an incidence significantly lower than for the first condition. Possible reasons for the difference are discussed. It is argued that the failure to find recognition-related neuronal responses while exploring objects is related to its detectability by the measures used, rather than the absence of all such signals in perirhinal cortex. Indeed, as shown by the results, such signals are found when a different methodology is used. © 2016 The Authors

  10. Finding and Not Finding Rat Perirhinal Neuronal Responses to Novelty

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Robert U.; Brown, Malcolm W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is much evidence that the perirhinal cortex of both rats and monkeys is important for judging the relative familiarity of visual stimuli. In monkeys many studies have found that a proportion of perirhinal neurons respond more to novel than familiar stimuli. There are fewer studies of perirhinal neuronal responses in rats, and those studies based on exploration of objects, have raised into question the encoding of stimulus familiarity by rat perirhinal neurons. For this reason, recordings of single neuronal activity were made from the perirhinal cortex of rats so as to compare responsiveness to novel and familiar stimuli in two different behavioral situations. The first situation was based upon that used in “paired viewing” experiments that have established rat perirhinal differences in immediate early gene expression for novel and familiar visual stimuli displayed on computer monitors. The second situation was similar to that used in the spontaneous object recognition test that has been widely used to establish the involvement of rat perirhinal cortex in familiarity discrimination. In the first condition 30 (25%) of 120 perirhinal neurons were visually responsive; of these responsive neurons 19 (63%) responded significantly differently to novel and familiar stimuli. In the second condition eight (53%) of 15 perirhinal neurons changed activity significantly in the vicinity of objects (had “object fields”); however, for none (0%) of these was there a significant activity change related to the familiarity of an object, an incidence significantly lower than for the first condition. Possible reasons for the difference are discussed. It is argued that the failure to find recognition‐related neuronal responses while exploring objects is related to its detectability by the measures used, rather than the absence of all such signals in perirhinal cortex. Indeed, as shown by the results, such signals are found when a different methodology is used.

  11. Seq and You Will Find.

    PubMed

    Schonrock, Nicole; Jonkhout, Nicky; Mattick, John S

    2016-01-01

    The human genome sequence is freely available, nearly complete and is providing a foundation of research opportunities that are overturning our current understanding of human biology. The advent of next generation sequencing has revolutionized the way we can interrogate the genome and its transcriptional products and how we analyze, diagnose, monitor and even treat human disease. Personal genetic profiles are increasing dramatically in medical value as researchers accumulate more and more knowledge about the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the onset of common disorders. As the cost of sequencing plummets, whole genome sequencing of individuals is becoming a reality and the field of personalized genomic medicine is rapidly developing. Now there is great need for accurate annotation of all functionally important sequences in the human genome and the variations within them that contribute to health and disease. The vast majority of our genome gives rise to RNA transcripts. This extraordinarily versatile molecule not only encodes protein information but also has great structural dynamics and plasticity, capacity for DNA/RNA/protein interactions and catalytic activity. It is a key regulator of biological networks with clear links to human disease and a more comprehensive understanding of its function is needed to maximise its use in medical practice. This review focuses on the complexity of our genome and the impact of sequencing technologies in understanding its many products and functions in health and disease. PMID:27216913

  12. Solar thermoelectric generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The methods, the findings and the conclusions of a study for the design of a Solar Thermoelectric Generator (STG) intended for use as a power source for a spacecraft orbiting the planet Mercury are discussed. Several state-of-the-art thermoelectric technologies in the intended application were considered. The design of various STG configurations based on the thermoelectric technology selected from among the various technologies was examined in detail and a recommended STG design was derived. The performance characteristics of the selected STG technology and associated design were studied in detail as a function of the orbital characteristics of the STG in Mercury and throughout the orbit of Mercury around the sun.

  13. Next Generation Data Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinness, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    We live in an era of data proliferation - more instruments are capturing data, more entities are publishing data, often making the data discoverable and widely available. Along with the data explosion, more tools and strategies are emerging for finding, using, and making sense of this next generation of widely available, massively growing datasets. In this contribution, we will take one of current use cases - environmentally motivated water research - and use this scenario to describe some current challenges around data interoperability and often unanticipated usage issues in the evolving data ecosystems. We will also discuss some emerging semantic strategies for data usage in broad and diverse settings and then discuss evolving trends.

  14. Knowledge translation of research findings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the most consistent findings from clinical and health services research is the failure to translate research into practice and policy. As a result of these evidence-practice and policy gaps, patients fail to benefit optimally from advances in healthcare and are exposed to unnecessary risks of iatrogenic harms, and healthcare systems are exposed to unnecessary expenditure resulting in significant opportunity costs. Over the last decade, there has been increasing international policy and research attention on how to reduce the evidence-practice and policy gap. In this paper, we summarise the current concepts and evidence to guide knowledge translation activities, defined as T2 research (the translation of new clinical knowledge into improved health). We structure the article around five key questions: what should be transferred; to whom should research knowledge be transferred; by whom should research knowledge be transferred; how should research knowledge be transferred; and, with what effect should research knowledge be transferred? Discussion We suggest that the basic unit of knowledge translation should usually be up-to-date systematic reviews or other syntheses of research findings. Knowledge translators need to identify the key messages for different target audiences and to fashion these in language and knowledge translation products that are easily assimilated by different audiences. The relative importance of knowledge translation to different target audiences will vary by the type of research and appropriate endpoints of knowledge translation may vary across different stakeholder groups. There are a large number of planned knowledge translation models, derived from different disciplinary, contextual (i.e., setting), and target audience viewpoints. Most of these suggest that planned knowledge translation for healthcare professionals and consumers is more likely to be successful if the choice of knowledge translation strategy is informed by

  15. Why Do First-Generation Students Fail?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Sanjay S.; Newbold, John J.; O'Rourke, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have determined factors contributing to first-generation student success. This study finds that first-generation students are less involved, have less social and financial support, and do not show a preference for active coping strategies. First-generation students report less social and academic satisfaction as well as lower…

  16. Somatosensory findings in postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed Central

    Nurmikko, T; Bowsher, D

    1990-01-01

    Somatic sensory perception thresholds (warm, cold, hot pain, touch, pinprick, vibration, two-point discrimination), allodynia and skin temperature were assessed in the affected area of 42 patients with unilateral postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and 20 patients who had had unilateral shingles not followed by PHN (NoPHN), and in the mirror-image area on the other side. There was no difference between the two groups for age or length of time after the acute herpes zoster infection. The PHN group showed significant changes in all sensory threshold measurements when the affected area was compared with the mirror-image area on the unaffected side, while the NoPHN group exhibited no threshold changes. Mechanical allodynia was present in 87% of the PHN group; half of the 12 patients with ophthalmic PHN showed extension of allodynia to the maxillary distribution. No differences in skin temperature were recorded between affected and unaffected regions in either group. Our findings show a deficit of sensory functions mediated by both large and small primary afferent fibres and also suggest major central involvement in the pathophysiology of the condition. If PHN does not occur following acute herpes zoster, recovery of neural functions appears to be good. PMID:2313300

  17. Generation of extreme ultraviolet vortex beams using computer generated holograms.

    PubMed

    Terhalle, Bernd; Langner, Andreas; Päivänranta, Birgit; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; David, Christian; Ekinci, Yasin

    2011-11-01

    We fabricate computer generated holograms for the generation of phase singularities at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths using electron beam lithography and demonstrate their ability to generate optical vortices in the nonzero diffraction orders. To this end, we observe the characteristic intensity distribution of the vortex beam and verify the helical phase structure interferometrically. The presented method forms the basis for further studies on singular light fields in the EUV frequency range, i.e., in EUV interference lithography. Since the method is purely achromatic, it may also find applications in various fields of x ray optics. PMID:22048345

  18. Saving the "Lost Generation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beebe, Anthony E.

    2007-01-01

    Since the beginning of the American experience, labels have been used to describe generations. Among them are the "Puritan generation," the "greatest generation," the "baby boomer generation" and the "MTV generation." Today, people are creating a new generation--the "lost generation." The lost generation represents a large and growing population…

  19. Pollution! Find a STEM solution!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takač, Danijela; Moćan, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Primary and secondary school Pantovčak is an innovative school in downtown Zagreb, Croatia. The school is involved in many projects concerning STEM education. Pollution! Find a STEM solution! is a two year long cross-curricular project that grew out of identified need to develop STEM and ICT skills more. Pisa results make evident that students' knowledge is poor and motivation for math and similar subjects is low. Implying priorities of European Commission, like e-learning, raises motivation and also develops basic skills and improves knowledge in science, math, physic, ICT. Main objectives are to increase students' interest in STEM education and careers and introduce them to all available new trends in technology, engineering and science in their region by visiting clean technology industries and strengthening links with them, to introduce some future digital jobs and prepare students for rapid technological changes by integrating ICT into classroom practice more, to highlight the importance of global environmental issues and improve the knowledge in the areas of sustainable development and renewable energy, to develop collaborative partnership between schools and the wider community in formal, non-formal and informal learning, to support multilingualism by publishing Open Educational Resources in 8 different languages and to strengthen the professional profile of the teaching profession. The project brings together 231 teachers and 2729 students from five different European countries in learning to think globally and work on activities that contribute to the community's well-being. There are altogether 33 activities, divided in 4 categories. STEM activities are focused on students building the devices for measuring air, light and noise pollution in their school and homes. They use the scientific method to analyze the data and compare the results with their peers to find a solution. Eskills, digital literacy and digital jobs are focused on introducing career

  20. Skin findings in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kozel, Beth A; Bayliss, Susan J; Berk, David R; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H; Danback, Joshua R; Pober, Barbara R

    2014-09-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the skin and vascular elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%), and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity), and E (Young's modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. PMID:24920525

  1. Skin Findings in Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, Beth A.; Bayliss, Susan J.; Berk, David R.; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H.; Danback, Joshua R.; Pober, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the Skin and Vascular Elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%) and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity) and E (Young’s modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. PMID:24920525

  2. Transmyocardial laser revascularization: histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Dedic, K; Klima, T; Cooley, D A; Frazier, O H; Kadipasaoglu, K A; Cihan, H B

    1998-01-01

    Transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMLR) is a new surgical technique clinically tested in patients with advanced severe coronary arteriosclerosis when classic routine treatment by medicaments, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), or aorto-coronary bypass surgery does not improve symptoms of ischemic heart disease. During the procedure high-energy CO 2 laser performs 35-40 transmyocardial channels via left-sided thoracotomy. Channels are drilled from the epicardial side of the heart through the myocardium into the left ventricle cavity. Impulses are synchronized with EKG (diastole), the channel diameter is about 1 mm. Transmural laser penetration is confirmed by intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). This technique is based on a theory that channels allow blood supply from left ventricle directly into the intramyocardial vessels (possibly capillaries) and so improve oxygenation of ischemic myocardium. Presented are gross and microscopic findings in a 75-year-old woman who suffered from classic class IV angina with shortness of breath. She had a history of an inferior myocardial infarct, ventricular tachyarrhythmia, aorto-coronary bypass, and mitral valvuloplasty. Her ejection fraction by echocardiography was 25%. Angiographically, she had multiple occlusions of native coronary arteries and diffuse distal stenosis in the graft of the left internal mammary artery (LIMA) to the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Thirty six of forty laser pulses were confirmed by TEE as transmural. The patient died suddenly of ventricular fibrillation 5 days after TMLR surgery. The autopsy was performed 6 hours after death. After cross-sectioning of the heart all the laser-bored channels were found partially or completely filled by fibrin and cell infiltrate composed mainly of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Patent channels were found within myocardial scars, channels performed through viable myocardium appeared to be partially

  3. Leveraging Rigorous Local Evaluations to Understand Contradictory Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulay, Beth; Martin, Carlos; Zief, Susan; Granger, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Contradictory findings from "well-implemented" rigorous evaluations invite researchers to identify the differences that might explain the contradictions, helping to generate testable hypotheses for new research. This panel will examine efforts to ensure that the large number of local evaluations being conducted as part of four…

  4. Empowerment: Finding Voices and Strategies To Combat Globalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Te Momo, Fiona; Prihantinah, Tri Lisiani; Marinova, Dora; Stocker, Laura; Muchira, Lydiah Mumbi

    2002-01-01

    Three practice-based articles highlight common experiences and challenges in dealing with the impact of globalization: "Maori Volunteers: Finding a Voice for the Voiceless" (Te Momo); "Empowering Women through Income-generating Projects: Evidence from Indonesia" (Prihantinah, Marinova, Stocker); and "Empowering Kenyan Youth through African…

  5. Postmortem perianal findings in children.

    PubMed

    McCann, J; Reay, D; Siebert, J; Stephens, B G; Wirtz, S

    1996-12-01

    The postmortem finding of anal dilation or an exposed pectinate line in children who have died under suspicious circumstances continues to raise the concern of possible sexual abuse. The following multicenter, collaborative study was designed to help address that question. Sixty-five subjects, ranging in age from birth to 17 years, were autopsied at three different sites. A standard protocol along with 35-mm cameras were used to record the results. Thirty-eight (58%) subjects were boys, and 27 (42%) were girls. Forty-two (65%) were white, 10 (15%) African-American, five (8%) Asian, three (5%) white Hispanic and five (8%) other. Fifty-seven (88%) were in Tanner stage I of secondary sexual development. Thirty-four (52%) died of natural causes, 26 (40%) from accidental injuries, three (5%) from other causes, and four (6%) as a result of a homicide. Forty-eight subjects (74%) had some dilation of the anal sphincters. In 21 children (32%), the entire anal canal, including the rectal ampulla, could be visualized. In another 21 (32%) subjects, the pectinate line was exposed. Only the outer portion of the anal canal opened in six children (10%), whereas 17 (26%) had no dilatation of the anus. Anal laxity led to flattened skin folds in 50 (77%), a shallow anal canal in 40 (62%), the exposure of both the pectinate line in 38 (59%), and the anal mucosa in 24 (37%). Venous congestion was present in 14 (22%), venous pooling in three (5%), erythema in six (9%), and increased pigmentation in eight (12%). Funneling was found in two (3%). Blood was present in three (5%), and an abrasion was discovered in one (2%). No fissures, lacerations, hemorrhoids, or scars were found in any of the children. Anal orifice size varied with the age of the child, the amount of traction applied to the buttocks, and a history of a CNS injury at the time of death. It is suggested, finally, that anal dilatation alone cannot be used a marker for prior sexual abuse and the exposure of the pectinate line

  6. Researchers Find a Mechanism for Schizophrenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... exit disclaimer . Subscribe Researchers Find a Mechanism for Schizophrenia Scientists uncovered a mechanism behind genetic variations previously linked to schizophrenia. The findings may lead to new clinical approaches. ...

  7. A Generation Immersed in Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzam, Amy M.

    2006-01-01

    This article briefly reports the findings of "Generation M: Media in the Lives of 8-18 Year-Olds," a study conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation and Stanford University researchers. The report studied media use a nationally representative sample of more than 2,000 3rd through 12th graders in the United States. The study found that although the…

  8. Evaluation of findings in Crouzon's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Ayse Gül Koçak; Gül Aksoy, Fatma Gül; Altintas, Cumhur S.; Midillioglu, Inci Koçak; Duman, Sunay

    1999-12-01

    PURPOSE. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ocular, facial and radiological signs of Crouzon's syndrome in a group of older patients who had not undergone previous craniofacial surgery. METHODS. Six cases of Crouzon's syndrome, four of whom belonged to a three-generation family, were examined systemically, ophthalmologically and roentgenographically; five of these cases were additionally evaluated with computed tomography and compared with Apert syndrome. RESULTS. On radiologic evaluation, all cases had synostosis of all cranial sutures and fontanelles and brachycephalic skulls, crowding of the upper teeth due to maxillary hypoplasia, and serious nasal septum deviation. Bilateral ethmoidal, maxillary and sphenoidal chronic sinusitis was found in 50% of cases. Three patients had hypertelorism and two others had a tendency toward hypertelorism. The typical facial appearance with shallow orbits, globe protrusion and exorbitism was present in all cases. Two of them had V-pattern exotropia while the other four were orthophoric. The single case with mental retardation had bilateral cataract. CONCLUSION. Crouzon's syndrome can present with different findings and must be evaluated multidisciplinarly. PMID:12045969

  9. Finding forced trends in oceanic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Matthew C.; Deutsch, Curtis; Ito, Taka

    2016-02-01

    Anthropogenically forced trends in oceanic dissolved oxygen are evaluated in Earth system models in the context of natural variability. A large ensemble of a single Earth system model is used to clearly identify the forced component of change in interior oxygen distributions and to evaluate the magnitude of this signal relative to noise generated by internal climate variability. The time of emergence of forced trends is quantified on the basis of anomalies in oxygen concentrations and trends. We find that the forced signal should already be evident in the southern Indian Ocean and parts of the eastern tropical Pacific and Atlantic basins; widespread detection of forced deoxygenation is possible by 2030-2040. In addition to considering spatially discrete metrics of detection, we evaluate the similarity of the spatial structures associated with natural variability and the forced trend. Outside of the subtropics, these patterns are not wholly distinct on the isopycnal surfaces considered, and therefore, this approach does not provide significantly advanced detection. Our results clearly demonstrate the strong impact of natural climate variability on interior oxygen distributions, providing an important context for interpreting observations.

  10. Cost Finding: Why It Is Important.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielke, Linda

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the importance of cost finding for public libraries and the relationship of cost finding to output measures. A cost finding study conducted on the cost of gift books is described; several worksheets from the study are included. Suggestions are offered for beginning a cost-finding project. (three references) (MES)

  11. 38 CFR 41.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audit findings. 41.510... OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 41.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in a schedule...

  12. 7 CFR 3052.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Audit findings. 3052.510 Section 3052.510 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  13. 29 CFR 99.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Audit findings. 99.510 Section 99.510 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  14. 38 CFR 41.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings. 41.510... OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 41.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in a schedule...

  15. 38 CFR 41.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Audit findings. 41.510... OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 41.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in a schedule...

  16. 29 CFR 99.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings. 99.510 Section 99.510 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  17. 29 CFR 99.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Audit findings. 99.510 Section 99.510 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  18. 29 CFR 99.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audit findings. 99.510 Section 99.510 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  19. 7 CFR 3052.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audit findings. 3052.510 Section 3052.510 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  20. 7 CFR 3052.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit findings. 3052.510 Section 3052.510 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  1. 38 CFR 41.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Audit findings. 41.510... OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 41.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in a schedule...

  2. 7 CFR 3052.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit findings. 3052.510 Section 3052.510 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  3. Incidental findings on brain and spine imaging in children.

    PubMed

    Maher, Cormac O; Piatt, Joseph H

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the utilization of diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine in children has increased dramatically, leading to a corresponding increase in the detection of incidental findings of the central nervous system. Patients with unexpected findings on imaging are often referred for subspecialty evaluation. Even with rational use of diagnostic imaging and subspecialty consultation, the diagnostic process will always generate unexpected findings that must be explained and managed. Familiarity with the most common findings that are discovered incidentally on diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine will assist the pediatrician in providing counseling to families and in making recommendations in conjunction with a neurosurgeon, when needed, regarding additional treatments and prognosis. PMID:25825535

  4. Examining Alternatives to Wavelet Denoising for Astronomical Source Finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurek, R.; Brown, S.

    2012-08-01

    The Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders ASKAP and MeerKAT will produce prodigious amounts of data that necessitate automated source finding. The performance of automated source finders can be improved by pre-processing a dataset. In preparation for the WALLABY and DINGO surveys, we have used a test HI datacube constructed from actual Westerbork Telescope noise and WHISP HI galaxies to test the real world improvement of linear smoothing, the Duchamp source finder's wavelet denoising, iterative median smoothing and mathematical morphology subtraction, on intensity threshold source finding of spectral line datasets. To compare these pre-processing methods we have generated completeness-reliability performance curves for each method and a range of input parameters. We find that iterative median smoothing produces the best source finding results for ASKAP HI spectral line observations, but wavelet denoising is a safer pre-processing technique. In this paper we also present our implementations of iterative median smoothing and mathematical morphology subtraction.

  5. Net Generation or Digital Natives: Is There a Distinct New Generation Entering University?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Chris; Ramanau, Ruslan; Cross, Simon; Healing, Graham

    2010-01-01

    This article reports key findings from the first phase of a research project investigating Net generation age students as they encounter e-learning at five universities in England. We take a critical view of the idea of a distinct generation which has been described using various terms including Net generation and Digital Natives and explore age…

  6. Small regulatory RNA-induced growth rate heterogeneity of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Mars, Ruben A T; Nicolas, Pierre; Ciccolini, Mariano; Reilman, Ewoud; Reder, Alexander; Schaffer, Marc; Mäder, Ulrike; Völker, Uwe; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Denham, Emma L

    2015-03-01

    Isogenic bacterial populations can consist of cells displaying heterogeneous physiological traits. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) could affect this heterogeneity since they act by fine-tuning mRNA or protein levels to coordinate the appropriate cellular behavior. Here we show that the sRNA RnaC/S1022 from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can suppress exponential growth by modulation of the transcriptional regulator AbrB. Specifically, the post-transcriptional abrB-RnaC/S1022 interaction allows B. subtilis to increase the cell-to-cell variation in AbrB protein levels, despite strong negative autoregulation of the abrB promoter. This behavior is consistent with existing mathematical models of sRNA action, thus suggesting that induction of protein expression noise could be a new general aspect of sRNA regulation. Importantly, we show that the sRNA-induced diversity in AbrB levels generates heterogeneity in growth rates during the exponential growth phase. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that the resulting subpopulations of fast- and slow-growing B. subtilis cells reflect a bet-hedging strategy for enhanced survival of unfavorable conditions. PMID:25790031

  7. Development of automated detection of radiology reports citing adrenal findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zopf, Jason; Langer, Jessica; Boonn, William; Kim, Woojin; Zafar, Hanna

    2011-03-01

    Indeterminate incidental findings pose a challenge to both the radiologist and the ordering physician as their imaging appearance is potentially harmful but their clinical significance and optimal management is unknown. We seek to determine if it is possible to automate detection of adrenal nodules, an indeterminate incidental finding, on imaging examinations at our institution. Using PRESTO (Pathology-Radiology Enterprise Search tool), a newly developed search engine at our institution that mines dictated radiology reports, we searched for phrases used by attendings to describe incidental adrenal findings. Using these phrases as a guide, we designed a query that can be used with the PRESTO index. The results were refined using a modified version of NegEx to eliminate query terms that have been negated within the report text. In order to validate these findings we used an online random date generator to select two random weeks. We queried our RIS database for all reports created on those dates and manually reviewed each report to check for adrenal incidental findings. This survey produced a ground- truth dataset of reports citing adrenal incidental findings against which to compare query performance. We further reviewed the false positives and negatives identified by our validation study, in an attempt to improve the performance query. This algorithm is an important step towards automating the detection of incidental adrenal nodules on cross sectional imaging at our institution. Subsequently, this query can be combined with electronic medical record data searches to determine the clinical significance of these findings through resultant follow-up.

  8. GENERATE: A Natural Language Sentence Generator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackenburg, Robert G.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses GENERATE, a computer program designed to help the beginning linguistics student understand the rules and processes of transformational generative grammar. Many problems and possibilities involving the program and TG interface (the algorithm) are pointed out. (Author/SED)

  9. Generational Dynamics and Librarianship: Managing Generation X.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Julie F.; Cooper, Eric A.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the abilities of Generation X (individuals born 1961 to 1981) librarians to respond to the evolving needs of society. Highlights include age demographics, generational attributes, technology, and the seniority system. (PEN)

  10. Tsunami Generation Above a Sill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanakis, Themistoklis S.; Dias, Frédéric; Synolakis, Costas

    2015-03-01

    The generation of surface waves by seafloor displacement is a classic problem that arises in the study of tsunamis. The generation of waves in a two-dimensional domain of uniform depth by uplift or subsidence of a portion of a flat bottom boundary has been elegantly studied by Hammack (Tsunamis: a model of their generation and propagation, Ph.D. thesis, California Institute of Technology, 1972), for idealized motions. The physical problem of tsunami generation is more complex; even when the final displacement is known from seismic analysis, the deforming seafloor includes relief features such as mounts and trenches. Here, following Kajiura (J Oceanogr Soc Jpn 28:260-277, 1972), we investigate analytically the effect of bathymetry on the surface wave generation, by solving the forced linear shallow water equation. While Kajiura's geometry consisted of a step-type bottom bathymetry with a rectangular uplift to understand the effect of the continental shelf on tsunami generation, our model bathymetry consists of an uplifting cylindrical sill initially resting on a flat bottom, a geometry which helps evaluate the effect of seamounts on tsunami generation. We find that as the sill height increases, partial wave trapping reduces the wave height in the far field, while amplifying it above the sill.

  11. Where will we find tomorrow's leaders?

    PubMed

    Hill, Linda A

    2008-01-01

    Unless we challenge long-held assumptions about how business leaders are supposed to act and where they're supposed to come from, many people who could become effective global leaders will remain invisible, warns Harvard Business School professor Hill. Instead of assuming that leaders must exhibit take-charge behavior, broaden the definition of leadership to include creating a context in which other people are willing and able to guide the organization. And instead of looking for the next generation of global leaders in huge Western corporations and elite business schools, expand the search to developing countries. In this conversation with HBR senior editor Paul Hemp, Hill describes the changing nature of leadership and what we can learn from parts of the world where people have not, until recently, had opportunities to become globally savvy executives. In South Africa, for instance, the African National Congress has provided rigorous leadership preparation for many black executives. Hill has also observed two approaches--in developed and developing economies alike--that she believes will be necessary in an increasingly complex business environment. The first, leading from behind, involves letting people hand off the reins to one another, depending on their strengths, as situations change. The second, leadership as collective genius, calls for both unleashing and harnessing individuals' collective talents, particularly to spur innovation. Through her descriptions of these approaches in such companies as Sekunjalo Investments, HCL Technologies, and IBM, Hill highlights the challenges of finding and preparing people who can lead by stepping back and letting others come forward to make their own judgments and take risks. PMID:18271324

  12. Efficient grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seki, Rycichi

    1989-01-01

    Because the governing equations in fluid dynamics contain partial differentials and are too difficult in most cases to solve analytically, these differentials are generally replaced by finite difference terms. These terms contain terms in the solution at nearby states. This procedure discretizes the field into a finite number of states. These states, when plotted, form a grid, or mesh, of points. It is at these states, or field points, that the solution is found. The optimum choice of states, the x, y, z coordinate values, minimizes error and computational time. But the process of finding these states is made more difficult by complex boundaries, and by the need to control step size differences between the states, that is, the need to control the spacing of field points. One solution technique uses a different set of state variables, which define a different coordinate system, to generate the grid more easily. A new method, developed by Dr. Joseph Steger, combines elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations into a mapping function between the physical and computational coordinate systems. This system of equations offers more control than either equation provides alone. The Steger algorithm was modified in order to allow bodies with stronger concavities to be used, offering the possibility of generating a single grid about multiple bodies. Work was also done on identifying areas where grid breakdown occurs.

  13. Target surface finding using 3D SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiter, Jason R.; Burns, Joseph W.; Subotic, Nikola S.

    2005-05-01

    Methods of generating more literal, easily interpretable imagery from 3-D SAR data are being studied to provide all weather, near-visual target identification and/or scene interpretation. One method of approaching this problem is to automatically generate shape-based geometric renderings from the SAR data. In this paper we describe the application of the Marching Tetrahedrons surface finding algorithm to 3-D SAR data. The Marching Tetrahedrons algorithm finds a surface through the 3-D data cube, which provides a recognizable representation of the target surface. This algorithm was applied to the public-release X-patch simulations of a backhoe, which provided densely sampled 3-D SAR data sets. The performance of the algorithm to noise and spatial resolution were explored. Surface renderings were readily recognizable over a range of spatial resolution, and maintained their fidelity even under relatively low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) conditions.

  14. Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158510.html Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds Men take in an average ... new government report finds most are getting enough water each day. The data, from the U.S. National ...

  15. Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158510.html Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds Men take in an average ... new government report finds most are getting enough water each day. The data, from the U.S. National ...

  16. CDC Study Finds Fecal Contamination in Pools

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communication (404) 639-3286 CDC study finds fecal contamination in pools A study of public pools done ... The E. coli is a marker for fecal contamination. Finding a high percentage of E. coli-positive ...

  17. National Assessment Findings and Educational Policy Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Rexford

    This paper addresses 11 commonly asked educational policy questions by referring to National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) findings in five learning areas. The paper is organized for quick reference to the 63 findings, which are, in turn, indexed to the NAEP reports in which they originally appeared. Findings in reading, literature,…

  18. 10 CFR 1022.14 - Findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... findings to the State in accordance with 10 CFR part 1005—Intergovernmental Review of Department of Energy... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.14 Findings. (a) If DOE finds that no...

  19. 10 CFR 1022.14 - Findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... findings to the State in accordance with 10 CFR part 1005—Intergovernmental Review of Department of Energy... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.14 Findings. (a) If DOE finds that no...

  20. 10 CFR 1022.14 - Findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... findings to the State in accordance with 10 CFR part 1005—Intergovernmental Review of Department of Energy... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.14 Findings. (a) If DOE finds that no...

  1. 10 CFR 1022.14 - Findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... findings to the State in accordance with 10 CFR part 1005—Intergovernmental Review of Department of Energy... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.14 Findings. (a) If DOE finds that no...

  2. 10 CFR 1022.14 - Findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... findings to the State in accordance with 10 CFR part 1005—Intergovernmental Review of Department of Energy... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.14 Findings. (a) If DOE finds that no...

  3. Electrical power generating system. [for windpowered generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An alternating current power generation system adopted to inject power in an already powered power line is discussed. The power generating system solves to adjustably coup an induction motor, as a generator, to an ac power line wherein the motor and power line are connected through a triac. The triac is regulated to normally turn on at a relatively late point in each half cycle of its operation, whereby at less than operating speed, and thus when the induction motor functions as a motor rather than as a generator, power consumption from the line is substantially reduced. The principal application will be for windmill powered generation.

  4. Talkin' 'bout My Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickes, Persis C.

    2010-01-01

    The monikers are many: (1) "Generation Y"; (2) "Echo Boomers"; (3) "GenMe"; (4) the "Net Generation"; (5) "RenGen"; and (6) "Generation Next". One name that appears to be gaining currency is "Millennials," perhaps as a way to better differentiate the current generation from its predecessor, Generation X. Millennials are those individuals born…

  5. Nurbs and grid generation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R.E.; Farin, G.; Hamann, B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides a basic overview of NURBS and their application to numerical grid generation. Curve/surface smoothing, accelerated grid generation, and the use of NURBS in a practical grid generation system are discussed.

  6. MHD Power Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Arthur; Rosa, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the operation of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator and advantages of the system over coal, oil or nuclear powered generators. Details the development of MHD generators in the United States and Soviet Union. (CP)

  7. Cosmic Shell-Seekers Find a Beauty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Two scientists have discovered a distinctive shell of hot gas around the site of a distant supernova explosion by combining 150 hours of archived data collected by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This discovery is a significant step forward in solving a decades-old puzzle as to why some stellar explosions display shells and others do not. "The likely answer is that the explosion of every massive star sends a sonic boom rumbling through interstellar space," said Samar Safi-Harb of the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, who is a coauthor with Heather Matheson on a paper describing the research that appears in the journal Advances in Space Research. "It's just that, some of the shells are harder to find than others because of the environment where the explosion occurs." The shell marks a sonic boom, or shock wave, generated by the supernova. Gas is heated to millions of degrees by the shock wave and produces X-rays, but little visible light. By examining the properties of the shell with an X-ray telescope, astronomers can work back to deduce the age (a few thousand years), and energy of the explosion, as well as information about the state of the star a million years before it exploded. Animation of a Supernova Explosion Animation of a Supernova Explosion It is likely that the star that produced the supernova remnant and shell was about 10 times as massive as the Sun. The absence of a detectable shell around this and similar supernova remnants had led astronomers to speculate that another, weaker type of explosion had occurred there. Now this hypothesis seems unlikely. Although many supernovas leave behind bright shells, others do not. This supernova remnant, identified as G21.5-0.9 by radio astronomers 30 years ago, was considered to be one that had no shell. A diffuse cloud of X-rays around the source was detected about 5 years ago by another group of astronomers and independently by Safi-Harb and colleagues using Chandra, but it took the careful

  8. NASA's Chandra Finds Black Holes Are "Green"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-04-01

    Black holes are the most fuel efficient engines in the Universe, according to a new study using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. By making the first direct estimate of how efficient or "green" black holes are, this work gives insight into how black holes generate energy and affect their environment. The new Chandra finding shows that most of the energy released by matter falling toward a supermassive black hole is in the form of high-energy jets traveling at near the speed of light away from the black hole. This is an important step in understanding how such jets can be launched from magnetized disks of gas near the event horizon of a black hole. Illustration of Fuel for a Black Hole Engine Illustration of Fuel for a Black Hole Engine "Just as with cars, it's critical to know the fuel efficiency of black holes," said lead author Steve Allen of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. "Without this information, we cannot figure out what is going on under the hood, so to speak, or what the engine can do." Allen and his team used Chandra to study nine supermassive black holes at the centers of elliptical galaxies. These black holes are relatively old and generate much less radiation than quasars, rapidly growing supermassive black holes seen in the early Universe. The surprise came when the Chandra results showed that these "quiet" black holes are all producing much more energy in jets of high-energy particles than in visible light or X-rays. These jets create huge bubbles, or cavities, in the hot gas in the galaxies. Animation of Black Hole in Elliptical Galaxy Animation of Black Hole in Elliptical Galaxy The efficiency of the black hole energy-production was calculated in two steps: first Chandra images of the inner regions of the galaxies were used to estimate how much fuel is available for the black hole; then Chandra images were used to estimate the power required to produce

  9. Thermally cascaded thermoelectric generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaherty, R.

    1970-01-01

    High efficiency thermoelectric generator utilizes a high-temperature thermoelectric material in thermal series with a low-temperature material. A thermally cascaded generator increases system efficiency.

  10. Cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies in children.

    PubMed

    Goskowicz, M; Eichenfield, L F

    1993-08-01

    Nutritional deficiencies may be associated with a variety of cutaneous findings in children. This review emphasizes new developments relating to cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies. Zinc deficiency, acrodermatitis enteropathica, and acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruptions are seen with a variety of conditions including cystic fibrosis, anorexia nervosa, and breastfeeding. Similar cutaneous findings not related to zinc deficiency may also occur with such metabolic disorders as methylmalonic aciduria, multiple carboxylase deficiency, essential fatty acid deficiency and other amino acid deficiencies. Vitamin K deficiency is associated with hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and coagulopathy. Vitamin A deficiency presents with a variety of systemic findings and distinctive dermatologic findings. Acute vitamin A deficiency may be seen in children infected with measles and is associated with more severe disease. The systemic and cutaneous findings of vitamin C deficiency, scurvy, are discussed. PMID:8374671