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Sample records for fine chemicals iv

  1. MECHANISM OF CHEMICAL MUTAGENESIS IV.

    PubMed Central

    Lorkiewicz, Z.; Szybalski, Waclaw

    1961-01-01

    Lorkiewicz, Z. (University of Wisconsin, Madison), and Waclaw Szybalski. Mechanism of chemical mutagenesis. IV. Reaction between triethylene melamine and nucleic acid components. J. Bacteriol. 82: 195–201. 1961.—Triethylene melamine interacts primarily with phosphorylated intracellular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) precursors and not with DNA. It was found by direct chemical and chromatographic analysis that only pyrimidine precursors of nucleic acids are attacked by triethylene melamine. In the course of the triethylene melamine-deoxycytidine reaction the mutagenicity of the reaction mixture is lost, but the mutagenicity of the triethylene melamine-thymidine reaction products significantly increases above that of the reaction substrates. Several steps are postulated to explain the mechanism of the triethylene melamine-initiated mutagenic reaction: (i) Reaction I, semireversible uptake of triethylene melamine; (ii) reaction II, chemical interaction between triethylene melamine and intracellular thymidine mono- or triphosphate with the production of a functional analogue of the latter; (iii) incorporation of this fraudulent analogue into the newly formed DNA strand; (iv) occurrence of self-perpetuating errors in the sequence of natural bases during subsequent rounds of replication of the analogue-containing DNA strand. It is postulated that the mechanism of mutagenic responses to different types of mutagens can fit either a simplified (mutagenic base analogues) or extended version (radiation) of this schema. PMID:16561917

  2. Chemical and magnetic properties of rapidly cooled metastable ferri-ilmenite solid solutions - IV: the fine structure of self-reversed thermoremanent magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter; McEnroe, S. A.; Fabian, K.; Harrison, R. J.; Thomas, C. I.; Mukai, H.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic experiments, a Monte Carlo simulation and transmission electron microscopy observations combine to confirm variable chemical phase separation during quench and annealing of metastable ferri-ilmenite compositions, caused by inhomogeneous Fe-Ti ordering and anti-ordering. Separation begins near interfaces between growing ordered and anti-ordered domains, the latter becoming progressively enriched in ilmenite component, moving the Ti-impoverished hematite component into Fe-enriched diffusion waves near the interfaces. Even when disordered regions are eliminated, Fe-enriched waves persist and enlarge on anti-phase boundaries between growing and shrinking ordered and anti-ordered domains. Magnetic results and conceptual models show that magnetic ordering with falling T initiates in the Fe-enriched wave crests. Although representing only a tiny fraction of material, identified at highest Ts on a field-cooling curve, they control the `pre-destiny' of progressive magnetization at lower T. They can provide a positive magnetic moment in a minority of ordered ferrimagnetic material, which, by exchange coupling, then creates a self-reversed negative moment in the remaining majority. Four Ts or T ranges are recognized on typical field-cooling curves: TPD is the T range of `pre-destination'; TC is the predominant Curie T where major positive magnetization increases sharply; TMAX is where magnetization reaches a positive maximum, beyond which it is outweighed by self-reversed magnetization and TZM is the T where total magnetization passes zero. Disposition of these Ts on cooling curves indicate the fine structure of self-reversed thermoremanent magnetization. These results confirm much earlier suspicions that the `x-phase' responsible for self-reversed magnetization resides in Fe-enriched phase boundaries.

  3. Enhanced control of fine particles following Title IV coal switching and NOx control

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.; Baldrey, K.E.; Bustard, C.J.; Martin, C.

    1997-12-31

    Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) serve as the primary particle control devices for a majority of coal-fired power generating units in the United States. ESPs are used to collect particulate matter that range in size from less than one micrometer in diameter to several hundred micrometers. Many of the options that utilities will use to respond to Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments will result in changes to the ash that will be detrimental to the performance of the ESP causing increased emissions of fine particles and higher opacity. For example, a switch to low-sulfur coal significantly increases particle resistivity while low-NO{sub x} burners increase the carbon content of ashes. Both of these changes could result in derating of the boiler to comply with emissions standards. ADA has developed a chemical additive that is designed to improve the operation of ESI`s to bring these systems into compliance operation without the need for expensive capital modifications. The additives provide advantages over competing technologies in terms of low capital cost, easy to handle chemicals, and relatively non-toxic chemicals. In addition, the new additive is insensitive to ash chemistry which will allow the utility complete flexibility to select the most economical coal. Results from full-scale and pilot plant demonstrations are reported.

  4. Delay between the Circularly Polarized Components in Fine Structures during Solar Type IV Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, G. P.; Zlobec, P.

    1995-08-01

    We analyzed intermediately polarized (20 80%) fine structures (pulsations, sudden reductions, fiber bursts and zebras) that were recorded in type IV events. The mean polarization degree was practically the same for all the fine structures recorded in an interval lasting a few minutes and it was similar to the polarization of the continuum. A detailed analysis during the evolution of single structures reveals changes in polarization (in particular an ‘undulation’ at flux density minima) even stronger than 20%. They were caused by a delay, up to 0.1 s, between the two circularly polarized components. The weaker polarimetric component was delayed in 2 sets and the stronger one in 1 set. In the event of April 24, 1985 different types of fine structures were sporadically detected in more than one hour long time interval. Short delays of the stronger or of the weaker component were sometimes observed. The events characterized by fine structures are generally totally polarized in the ordinary mode. We assume that this holds also for the phenomena studied here. The observed intermediate polarization therefore requires a depolarization due to propagation effects. We discuss the mode coupling and the reflection of the original radio signal that could also generate the delay of the weaker and the stronger component respectively. The possibility of polarization variation due to the change of the angle between the direction of the propagation and the magnetic field in a quasi-transversal region and in a low intensity magnetic field in a current sheet is also given.

  5. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. PMID:26994015

  6. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Meadview, AZ.

    PubMed

    Eatough, Delbert J; Cui, Wenxuan; Hull, Jeffery; Farber, Robert J

    2006-12-01

    The concentration of fine particulate nitrate, sulfate, and carbonaceous material was measured for 12-hr day-night samples using diffusion denuder samplers during the Project Measurement of Haze and Visibility Effects (MOHAVE) July to August 1992 Summer Intensive study at Meadview, AZ, just west of Grand Canyon National Park. Organic material was measured by several techniques. Only the diffusion denuder method measured the semivolatile organic material. Fine particulate sulfate and nitrate (using denuder technology) determined by various groups agreed. Based on the various collocated measurements obtained during the Project MOHAVE study, the precision of the major fine particulate species was +/- 0.6 microg/m3 organic material, +/- 0.3 microg/m3 ammonium sulfate, and +/- 0.07 microg/m3 ammonium nitrate. Data were also available on fine particulate crustal material, fine and coarse particulate mass from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments sampling system, and relative humidity (RH), light absorption, particle scattering, and light extinction measurements from Project MOHAVE. An extinction budget was obtained using mass scattering coefficients estimated from particle size distribution data. Literature data were used to estimate the change in the mass scattering coefficients for the measured species as a function of RH and for the absorption of light by elemental carbon. Fine particulate organic material was the principal particulate contributor to light extinction during the study period, with fine particulate sulfate as the second most important contributor. During periods of highest light extinction, contributions from fine particulate organic material, sulfate, and light-absorbing carbon dominated the extinction of light by particles. Particle light extinction was dominated by sulfate and organic material during periods of lowest light extinction. Combination of the extinction data and chemical mass balance analysis of sulfur oxides

  7. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Meadview, AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Delbert J. Eatough; Wenxuan Cui; Jeffery Hull; Robert J. Farber

    2006-12-15

    The concentration of fine particulate nitrate, sulfate, and carbonaceous material was measured for 12-hr daynight samples using diffusion denuder samplers during the Project Measurement of Haze and Visibility Effects (MOHAVE) July to August 1992 Summer Intensive study at Meadview, AZ, just west of Grand Canyon National Park. Organic material was measured by several techniques. Only the diffusion denuder method measured the semivolatile organic material. Fine particulate sulfate and nitrate (using denuder technology) determined by various groups agreed. Based on the various collocated measurements obtained during the Project MOHAVE study, the precision of the major fine particulate species was {+-} 0.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3} organic material, {+-} 0.3 {mu}g/m{sup 3} ammonium sulfate, and {+-} 0.07 {mu}g/m{sup 3} ammonium nitrate. Fine particulate organic material was the principal particulate contributor to light extinction during the study period, with fine particulate sulfate as the second most important contributor. Particle light extinction was dominated by sulfate and organic material during periods of lowest light extinction. Combination of the extinction data and chemical mass balance analysis of sulfur oxides sources in the region indicate that the major anthropogenic contributors to light extinction were from the Los Angeles, CA, and Las Vegas, NV, urban areas. Mohave Power Project associated secondary sulfate was a negligible contributor to light extinction. 49 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Fine Structure of Metric Type IV Radio Bursts Observed with the ARTEMIS-IV Radio-Spectrograph: Association with Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouratzis, C.; Hillaris, A.; Alissandrakis, C. E.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Moussas, X.; Caroubalos, C.; Tsitsipis, P.; Kontogeorgos, A.

    2015-01-01

    Fine structures embedded in type IV burst continua may be used as diagnostics of the magnetic-field restructuring and the corresponding energy release associated with the low-corona development of flare or coronal mass ejection (CME) events. A catalog of 36 type IV bursts observed with the SAO receiver of the ARTEMIS-IV solar radio-spectrograph in the 450 - 270 MHz range at high cadence (0.01 sec) was compiled; the fine structures were classified into five basic classes with two or more subclasses each. The time of fine-structure emission was compared with the injection of energetic electrons as recorded by hard X-ray and microwave emission, the soft X-ray (SXR) light curves and the CME onset time. Our results indicate a very tight temporal association between energy release episodes and pulsations, spikes, narrow-band bursts of the type III family, and zebra bursts. Of the remaining categories, the featureless broadband continuum starts near the time of the first energy release, between the CME onset and the SXR peak, but extends for several tens of minutes after that, covering almost the full extent of the flare-CME event. The intermediate drift bursts, fibers in their majority, mostly follow the first energy release, but have a wider distribution than other fine structures.

  9. Fine Structure in Type IV Solar Radio Bursts during three major Solar Events of October-November 2003 observed by Artemis IV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitsipis, P.; Kontogeorgos, A.; Caroubalos, C.; Moussas, X.; Hillaris, A.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Alissandrakis, C.; Dumas, G.; Polygiannakis, J.

    The fine structure in three solar type IV radio bursts was studied using the French-Greek ARTEMIS-IV multichannel radio spectrograph. The bursts were recorded during three major solar events, on the 26 and 28 October.and 3 Nov. 2003; these we associated with intense flares and CMEs. The observed fine structure includes intermediate drift bursts (fibers) and pulsations. The complexity and overlapping of the various spectral characteristics necessitated the utilization of certain, 2D-FFT based, filtering processes, aiming firstly at structure detection in the frequency-time plane (ie the dynamic spectrum) and secondly in the separation of fibers and pulsations and the suppression of the type IV continuum. This methodology results also to the fibers frequency drift rate distributions and their evolution in time. These fiber frequency drift distributions may be interpreted as the exciter velocity distributions, using a Newkirk coronal density model; the latter may be used as diagnostics of the magnetic field restructuring and energy release during a solar energetic event (flare and/or CME). Artemis IV will provide complementary data to the STEREO/WAVES experiment.

  10. Catalytic conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fine chemicals and fuels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun-Hui; Xia, Xi; Lin, Chun-Xiang; Tong, Dong-Shen; Beltramini, Jorge

    2011-11-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant and bio-renewable resource with great potential for sustainable production of chemicals and fuels. This critical review provides insights into the state-of the-art accomplishments in the chemocatalytic technologies to generate fuels and value-added chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass, with an emphasis on its major component, cellulose. Catalytic hydrolysis, solvolysis, liquefaction, pyrolysis, gasification, hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation are the major processes presently studied. Regarding catalytic hydrolysis, the acid catalysts cover inorganic or organic acids and various solid acids such as sulfonated carbon, zeolites, heteropolyacids and oxides. Liquefaction and fast pyrolysis of cellulose are primarily conducted over catalysts with proper acidity/basicity. Gasification is typically conducted over supported noble metal catalysts. Reaction conditions, solvents and catalysts are the prime factors that affect the yield and composition of the target products. Most of processes yield a complex mixture, leading to problematic upgrading and separation. An emerging technique is to integrate hydrolysis, liquefaction or pyrolysis with hydrogenation over multifunctional solid catalysts to convert lignocellulosic biomass to value-added fine chemicals and bio-hydrocarbon fuels. And the promising catalysts might be supported transition metal catalysts and zeolite-related materials. There still exist technological barriers that need to be overcome (229 references). PMID:21863197

  11. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production.

    PubMed

    Pscheidt, Beate; Glieder, Anton

    2008-01-01

    This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient) production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta), Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. PMID:18684335

  12. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production

    PubMed Central

    Pscheidt, Beate; Glieder, Anton

    2008-01-01

    This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient) production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta), Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. PMID:18684335

  13. A 'Fine' chemical industry for life science products: green solutions to chemical challenges.

    PubMed

    Bruggink, A; Straathof, A J J; van der Wielen, L A M

    2003-01-01

    Modern biotechnology, in combination with chemistry and process technology, is crucial for the development of new clean and cost effective manufacturing concepts for fine-chemical, food specialty and pharmaceutical products. The impact of biocatalysis on the fine-chemicals industry is presented, where reduction of process development time, the number of reaction steps and the amount of waste generated per kg of end product are the main targets. Integration of biosynthesis and organic chemistry is seen as a key development. The advances in bioseparation technology need to keep pace with the rate of development of novel bio- or chemocatalytic process routes with revised demands on process technology. The need for novel integrated reactors is also presented. The necessary acceleration of process development and reduction of the time-to-market seem well possible, particularly by integrating high-speed experimental techniques and predictive modelling tools. This is crucial for the development of a more sustainable fine-chemicals industry. The evolution of novel 'green' production routes for semi-synthetic antibiotics (SSAs) that are replacing existing chemical processes serves as a recent and relevant case study of this ongoing integration of disciplines. We will also show some challenges in this specific field. PMID:12747542

  14. Relativistic calculations of radiative properties and fine structure constant varying sensitivity coefficients in the astrophysically relevant Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D. K.; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-03-01

    We have carried out calculations of the relativistic sensitivity coefficients, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, lifetimes and magnetic dipole hyperfine structure constants for a number of low-lying states in the Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions which are abundant in the distant quasars and various stellar plasmas. These spectroscopic data will be very useful for probing temporal variation of the fine structure constant (αe) and in the diagnostic processes of some of the astrophysical plasmas. We have employed all-order perturbative methods in the relativistic coupled-cluster framework using the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian to calculate the atomic wavefunctions of the considered ions. Reference states are constructed with the VN-1 and VN+1 potentials and then the electron-electron correlation effects are taken into account by constructing all possible singly and doubly excited configurations, involving both the core and valence electrons, from the respective reference states. We have also determined one electron affinities and ionization potentials of many excited states in these Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions. Except for a few states we have attained accuracies within 1 per cent for the energies compared with their experimental values. Our calculated sensitivity coefficients are estimated to have similar accuracies as of the calculated energies. Furthermore, combining our calculated transition matrix elements with the experimental wavelengths we evaluate transition probabilities, oscillator strengths and lifetimes of some of the excited states in these ions. These results are compared with the available data in a few cases and found to be in very good agreement among themselves. Using our reported hyperfine structure constants due to the dominant magnetic dipole interaction, it is possible to determine hyperfine splittings approximately in the above considered ions.

  15. Enhancing of chemical compound and drug name recognition using representative tag scheme and fine-grained tokenization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The functions of chemical compounds and drugs that affect biological processes and their particular effect on the onset and treatment of diseases have attracted increasing interest with the advancement of research in the life sciences. To extract knowledge from the extensive literatures on such compounds and drugs, the organizers of BioCreative IV administered the CHEMical Compound and Drug Named Entity Recognition (CHEMDNER) task to establish a standard dataset for evaluating state-of-the-art chemical entity recognition methods. Methods This study introduces the approach of our CHEMDNER system. Instead of emphasizing the development of novel feature sets for machine learning, this study investigates the effect of various tag schemes on the recognition of the names of chemicals and drugs by using conditional random fields. Experiments were conducted using combinations of different tokenization strategies and tag schemes to investigate the effects of tag set selection and tokenization method on the CHEMDNER task. Results This study presents the performance of CHEMDNER of three more representative tag schemes-IOBE, IOBES, and IOB12E-when applied to a widely utilized IOB tag set and combined with the coarse-/fine-grained tokenization methods. The experimental results thus reveal that the fine-grained tokenization strategy performance best in terms of precision, recall and F-scores when the IOBES tag set was utilized. The IOBES model with fine-grained tokenization yielded the best-F-scores in the six chemical entity categories other than the "Multiple" entity category. Nonetheless, no significant improvement was observed when a more representative tag schemes was used with the coarse or fine-grained tokenization rules. The best F-scores that were achieved using the developed system on the test dataset of the CHEMDNER task were 0.833 and 0.815 for the chemical documents indexing and the chemical entity mention recognition tasks, respectively. Conclusions The

  16. FINE SOLIDS REMOVAL FOLLOWING COMBINED CHEMICAL-TRICKLING FILTER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of settling ponds and several types of granular media filters for removing residual fine solids from the effluent of a conventional, high-rate, rock media trickling filter plant when alum is applied ahead of seconda...

  17. Combined Chemical Activation and Fenton Degradation to Convert Waste Polyethylene into High-Value Fine Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheuk-Fai; Wong, Wing-Leung; Ho, Keith Yat-Fung; Chan, Chung-Sum; Gong, Cheng-Bin

    2016-07-01

    Plastic waste is a valuable organic resource. However, proper technologies to recover usable materials from plastic are still very rare. Although the conversion/cracking/degradation of certain plastics into chemicals has drawn much attention, effective and selective cracking of the major waste plastic polyethylene is extremely difficult, with degradation of C-C/C-H bonds identified as the bottleneck. Pyrolysis, for example, is a nonselective degradation method used to crack plastics, but it requires a very high energy input. To solve the current plastic pollution crisis, more effective technologies are needed for converting plastic waste into useful substances that can be fed into the energy cycle or used to produce fine chemicals for industry. In this study, we demonstrate a new and effective chemical approach by using the Fenton reaction to convert polyethylene plastic waste into carboxylic acids under ambient conditions. Understanding the fundamentals of this new chemical process provides a possible protocol to solve global plastic-waste problems. PMID:27168079

  18. 78 FR 5500 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Ampac Fine Chemicals, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... FR 60145, AMPAC Fine Chemicals, LLC, Highway 50 and Hazel Avenue, Building 05001, Rancho Cordova... and history. Therefore, pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 823(a), and in accordance with 21 CFR 1301.33, the...

  19. Enhanced sensitivity to the fine-structure-constant variation in the Th IV atomic clock transition

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.; Porsev, S. G.

    2009-12-15

    Our calculations have shown that the 5f{sub 5/2}-7s{sub 1/2} 23 131 cm{sup -1} transition from the ground state in the ion Th{sup 3+} is very sensitive to the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant alpha=e{sup 2}/(Planck constant/2pi)c (q=-75 300 cm{sup -1}). The line is very narrow, the ion has been trapped and laser cooled, and the positive shifter line 5f{sub 5/2}-5f{sub 7/2} 4325 cm{sup -1} (q=+2900 cm{sup -1}) may be used as a reference. A comparison may also be made with a positive shifter in another atom or ion. This makes Th{sup 3+} a good candidate to search for the alpha variation.

  20. Chemical comminution: a better route to clean, fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, W.T.

    1982-06-01

    One approach to liberating pyrites is to treat the coal such that it will fracture preferentially along internal boundaries between the organic coal substance and such inorganic impurities as ash and pyrites. This process is called chemical comminution. It involves immersion of the coal in a liquid reactant or the injection of a liquid or gaseous material into coal. Such chemical treatment appears to cause selective breakage of the coal along the maceral boundaries and at the interface with foreign substances such as bands of pyrites. The tendency to fracture decreases as the coal rank increases, probably involving a half dozen coal properties; the exact mechanism of chemical comminution is not well understood; it appears to be physical in nature, since no chemical reactions have been observed between the coal substance and the treating material. The manner in which the coal fractures after such treatment is radically different from mechanical crushing; it provides a unique method for attaining a size consist favoring the liberation of pyrites and of extraneous ash particles for subsequent cleaning in a coal-preparation plant. Although the chemcal comminution patents discussed were issued in 1974 and 1975, the method has not been commercialized. Nevertheless, with our demand for coal increasing as a less expensive and readily available energy source, unique processes such as chemical comminution may yet be adopted.

  1. Creating pathways towards aromatic building blocks and fine chemicals.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brian; Machas, Michael; Nielsen, David R

    2015-12-01

    Aromatic compounds represent a broad class of chemicals with a range of industrial applications, all of which are conventionally derived from petroleum feedstocks. However, owing to a diversity of available pathway precursors along with natural and engineered enzyme 'parts', microbial cell factories can be engineered to create alternative, renewable routes to many of the same aromatic products. Drawing from the latest tools and strategies in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology, such efforts are becoming an increasingly systematic practice, while continued efforts promise to open new doors to an ever-expanding range and diversity of renewable chemical and material products. This short review will highlight recent and notable achievements related for the microbial production of aromatic chemicals. PMID:26264997

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V; Lutz, Victoriya A; Dontsova, Tatiana A; Astrelin, Igor M

    2016-12-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated. PMID:27456501

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V.; Lutz, Victoriya A.; Dontsova, Tatiana A.; Astrelin, Igor M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated.

  4. Fabrication of Fine-Grained Positive Temperature Coefficient Ceramics from Chemically Prepared Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Takeshi; Sumiyama, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Iwao; Kinugasa, Masanori; Igarashi, Hideji

    1991-09-01

    Fine barium titanate powders were prepared by chemical synthesis to fabricate positive temperature coefficient ceramics. The calcining condition adapted for the chemical powder was experimentally determined to be a lower temperature than that for conventional powders. Microstructure and temperature dependence of resistivity of the fired samples were examined as a function of firing temperature. Niobium ions doped at a synthesizing stage of barium titanate were homogeneously diffused into a titanium lattice at a low temperature of 1150°C, and fine-grained PTC ceramics with grain sizes of 2˜3 μm were fabricated at that temperature.

  5. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF WORLD TRADE CENTER FINE PARTICULATE MATTER FOR USE IN TOXICOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Analysis of World Trade Center Fine Particulate Matter for Use in Toxicological Assessment
    John K. McGee1, Lung Chi Chen2, Mitchell D. Cohen2, Glen R. Chee2, Colette M. Prophete2, Najwa Haykal-Coates1, Shirley J. Wasson3, Teri L. Conner4, Daniel L. Costa1, and Steph...

  6. Nanostructured Mg-Al hydrotalcite as catalyst for fine chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Basahel, Sulaiman N; Al-Thabaiti, Shaeel A; Narasimharao, Katabathini; Ahmed, Nesreen S; Mokhtar, Mohamed

    2014-02-01

    This paper reviews the recent research of nanostructured Mg-Al hydrotalcite (Mg-Al HT) and its application as an efficient solid base catalyst for the synthesis of fine chemicals. Mg-Al HT has many beneficial features, such as low cost, selectivity, catalytic properties, and wide range of preparation and modification methods. They hold promise for providing sought-after, environmentally friendly technologies for the 21st century. Replacement of currently used homogeneous alkaline bases for the synthesis of fine chemicals by a solid catalyst can result in catalyst re-use and waste stream reduction. We introduce briefly the structure, properties and characterization of the nanostructured Mg-Al HT. The efficacy and benign applications of Mg-Al HT as an alternative solid base to homogenous catalysts in the synthesis of fine chemicals are then reviewed. The challenges for the future applications of Mg-Al HT in the synthesis of fine chemicals in terms of green protocol processes are discussed. PMID:24749466

  7. Development of bio-based fine chemical production through synthetic bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Araki, Michihiro; Okai, Naoko; Wakai, Satoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Fine chemicals that are physiologically active, such as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, flavoring agents as well as additives for foods, feed, and fertilizer are produced by enzymatically or through microbial fermentation. The identification of enzymes that catalyze the target reaction makes possible the enzymatic synthesis of the desired fine chemical. The genes encoding these enzymes are then introduced into suitable microbial hosts that are cultured with inexpensive, naturally abundant carbon sources, and other nutrients. Metabolic engineering create efficient microbial cell factories for producing chemicals at higher yields. Molecular genetic techniques are then used to optimize metabolic pathways of genetically and metabolically well-characterized hosts. Synthetic bioengineering represents a novel approach to employ a combination of computer simulation and metabolic analysis to design artificial metabolic pathways suitable for mass production of target chemicals in host strains. In the present review, we summarize recent studies on bio-based fine chemical production and assess the potential of synthetic bioengineering for further improving their productivity. PMID:25494636

  8. Fine-scale chemical exposure differs in point and nonpoint source plumes.

    PubMed

    Lahman, Sara E; Moore, Paul A

    2015-05-01

    Increasing influxes of anthropogenic chemicals into aquatic ecosystems has led to growing global concern surrounding human and ecosystem health. As more freshwater systems are deemed not potable or usable for agricultural purposes, more attention is being paid to remediation and mitigation efforts. Predicting and preventing the impacts of the chemical inputs first requires a thorough understanding of the spatio-temporal distribution of chemical plumes in natural habitats. Plume dispersion is intimately tied to fluid mechanics; therefore, alterations in the way that chemical plumes are introduced to habitats can have profound effects on chemical distribution. Such alterations can subsequently alter the exposure to which organisms are subjected. This study examined the influence of point versus nonpoint sources in structuring the distribution of chemicals in a simulated flowing freshwater habitat. The fine-scale (molecular) spatio-temporal distribution of chemicals was measured in situ using an electrochemical detector. Molecular concentration at varying distance and height from the source was quantified using dopamine coupled with an electrochemical detection system. The fine-scale distribution of chemical plumes from point and nonpoint sources showed significant differences in how organisms will be exposed to chemicals. Overall, this study characterized plumes from nonpoint sources as having significantly longer peak lengths and rise times as well as greater peak heights and maximum slopes than plumes from point sources, thus providing a significantly different exposure paradigm. This quantification of how chemicals move differently throughout a fluid medium when introduced from point and nonpoint sources allows a greater understanding of how chemical plumes can potentially affect aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25552326

  9. Tailor-made biocatalysts enzymes for the fine chemical industry in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Tao, Rongsheng; Yang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    The Center of Industrial Biotechnology (CIBT) was established in Huzhou for fine chemicals in 2006 and CIBT Shanghai was founded for bulk chemicals in 2008. CIBT is a non-profit organization under auspices of the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Shanghai Branch of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and Huzhou Municipal Government. CIBT is affiliated with the CAS, which enables it to take advantage of the rich R&D resources and support from CAS; yet CIBT operates as an independent legal entity. The goal of CIBT is to incubate industrial biotechnologies and accelerate the commercialization of these technologies with corporate partners in China. PMID:27593705

  10. A structured approach to occupational hygiene in the design and operation of fine chemical plant.

    PubMed

    Money, C D

    1992-12-01

    In order to ensure appropriate occupational hygiene controls can be incorporated in the design and operation of fine chemical plant, a structured scheme has been developed based upon the intrinsic hazard of the materials in use. The scheme provides guidelines for managing the inherent risks to health presented by the operation of such plant, including basic recommendations on the selection and operation of selected plant equipment. Although the scheme has focused on a carcinogenic ranking system for aromatic amines and nitro compounds, with suitable modifications its underlying philosophy and principles should be capable of application to any toxicological scheme for ranking the relative hazard of chemical substances. PMID:1471813

  11. Chemical speciation and source apportionment of fine particulate matter in Santiago, Chile, 2013.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Ana M; Barraza, Francisco; Jorquera, Héctor; Schauer, James J

    2015-04-15

    Santiago is one of the largest cities in South America and has experienced high fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations in fall and winter months for decades. To better understand the sources of fall and wintertime pollution in Santiago, PM2.5 samples were collected for 24 h every weekday from March to October 2013 for chemical analysis. Samples were analyzed for mass, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), water soluble nitrogen (WSTN), secondary inorganic ions, and particle-phase organic tracers for source apportionment. Selected samples were analyzed as monthly composites for organic tracers. PM2.5 concentrations were considerably higher in the coldest months (June-July), averaging (mean ± standard deviation) 62±15 μg/m(3) in these two months. Average fine particle mass concentration during the study period was 40±20 μg/m(3). Organic matter during the peak winter months was the major component of fine particles comprising around 70% of the particle mass. Source contributions to OC were calculated using organic molecular markers and a chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model. The four combustion sources identified were wood smoke, diesel engine emission, gasoline vehicles, and natural gas. Wood smoke was the predominant source of OC, accounting for 58±42% of OC in fall and winter. Wood smoke and nitrate were the major contributors to PM2.5. In fall and winter, wood smoke accounted for 9.8±7.1 μg/m(3) (21±15%) and nitrate accounted for 9.1±4.8 μg/m(3) (20±10%) of fine PM. The sum of secondary inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium) represented about 30% of PM2.5 mass. Secondary organic aerosols contributed only in warm months, accounting for about 30% of fine PM during this time. PMID:25617780

  12. Mechanical and chemical compaction in fine-grained shallow-water limestones.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Robbin, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    Significant mechanical compaction resulted from pressures simulating less than 305 m of burial. Increasing loads to an equivalent of more than 3400 m did not significantly increase compaction or reduce sediment core length. Chemical compaction (pressure dissolution) was detected only in sediment cores compacted to pressures greater than 3400 m of burial. These short-term experiments suggest that chemical compaction would begin at much shallower depths given geologic time. Compaction experiments that caused chemical compaction lend support to the well-established hypothesis; that cement required to produce a low-porosity/low-permeability fine-grained limestone is derived internally. Dissolution, ion diffusion, and reprecipitation are considered the most likely processes for creating significant thicknesses of dense limestone in the geologic record. Continuation of chemical compaction after significant porosity reduction necessitates expulsion of connate fluids, possibly including hydrocarbons. -from Authors

  13. Sources and chemical composition of atmospheric fine and coarse particles in the Helsinki area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakkanen, Tuomo A.; Loukkola, Kati; Korhonen, Christina H.; Aurela, Minna; Mäkelä, Timo; Hillamo, Risto E.; Aarnio, Päivi; Koskentalo, Tarja; Kousa, Anu; Maenhaut, Willy

    During April 1996-June 1997 size-segregated atmospheric aerosol particles were collected at an urban and a rural site in the Helsinki area by utilising virtual impactors (VI) and Berner low-pressure impactors (BLPI). In addition, VI samples were collected at a semi-urban site during October 1996-May 1997. The average PM 2.3 (fine particle) concentrations at the urban and rural sites were 11.8 and 8.4 μg/m 3, and the PM 2.3-15 (coarse particle) concentrations were 12.8 and about 5 μg/m 3, respectively. The difference in fine particle mass concentrations suggests that on average, more than one third of the fine mass at the urban site is of local origin. Evaporation of fine particle nitrate from the VI Teflon filters during sampling varied similarly at the three sites, the average evaporation being about 50-60%. The average fine particle concentrations of the chemical components (25 elements and 13 ions) appeared to be fairly similar at the three sites for most components, which suggests that despite the long-range transport, the local emissions of these components were relatively evenly distributed in the Helsinki area. Exceptions were the average fine particles Ba, Fe, Sb and V concentrations that were clearly highest at the urban site pointing to traffic (Ba, Fe, Sb) and to combustion of heavy fuel oil (V) as the likely local sources. The average coarse particle concentrations for most components were highest at the urban site and lowest at the rural site. Average chemical composition of fine particles was fairly similar at the urban and rural sites: non-analysed fraction (mainly carbonaceous material and water) 43% and 37%, sulphate 21% and 25%, crustal matter 12% and 13%, nitrate 12% and 11%, ammonium 9% and 10% and sea-salt 2.5% and 3.2%, respectively. At the semi-urban site also, the average fine particle composition was similar. At the urban site, the year round average composition of coarse particles was dominated by crustal matter (59%) and the non

  14. X-Band Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Comparison of Mononuclear Mn(IV)-oxo and Mn(IV)-hydroxo Complexes and Quantum Chemical Investigation of Mn(IV) Zero-Field Splitting.

    PubMed

    Leto, Domenick F; Massie, Allyssa A; Colmer, Hannah E; Jackson, Timothy A

    2016-04-01

    X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to probe the ground-state electronic structures of mononuclear Mn(IV) complexes [Mn(IV)(OH)2(Me2EBC)](2+) and [Mn(IV)(O)(OH)(Me2EBC)](+). These compounds are known to effect C-H bond oxidation reactions by a hydrogen-atom transfer mechanism. They provide an ideal system for comparing Mn(IV)-hydroxo versus Mn(IV)-oxo motifs, as they differ by only a proton. Simulations of 5 K EPR data, along with analysis of variable-temperature EPR signal intensities, allowed for the estimation of ground-state zero-field splitting (ZFS) and (55)Mn hyperfine parameters for both complexes. From this analysis, it was concluded that the Mn(IV)-oxo complex [Mn(IV)(O)(OH)(Me2EBC)](+) has an axial ZFS parameter D (D = +1.2(0.4) cm(-1)) and rhombicity (E/D = 0.22(1)) perturbed relative to the Mn(IV)-hydroxo analogue [Mn(IV)(OH)2(Me2EBC)](2+) (|D| = 0.75(0.25) cm(-1); E/D = 0.15(2)), although the complexes have similar (55)Mn values (a = 7.7 and 7.5 mT, respectively). The ZFS parameters for [Mn(IV)(OH)2(Me2EBC)](2+) were compared with values obtained previously through variable-temperature, variable-field magnetic circular dichroism (VTVH MCD) experiments. While the VTVH MCD analysis can provide a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of D, the E/D values were poorly defined. Using the ZFS parameters reported for these complexes and five other mononuclear Mn(IV) complexes, we employed coupled-perturbed density functional theory (CP-DFT) and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations with second-order n-electron valence-state perturbation theory (NEVPT2) correction, to compare the ability of these two quantum chemical methods for reproducing experimental ZFS parameters for Mn(IV) centers. The CP-DFT approach was found to provide reasonably acceptable values for D, whereas the CASSCF/NEVPT2 method fared worse, considerably overestimating the magnitude of D in several cases. Both methods were poor in

  15. Nonlinear dendritic integration of electrical and chemical synaptic inputs drives fine-scale correlations

    PubMed Central

    Trenholm, Stuart; McLaughlin, Amanda J; Schwab, David J; Turner, Maxwell H; Smith, Robert G; Rieke, Fred; Awatramani, Gautam B

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the CNS, gap junction–mediated electrical signals synchronize neural activity on millisecond timescales via cooperative interactions with chemical synapses. However, gap junction–mediated synchrony has rarely been studied in the context of varying spatiotemporal patterns of electrical and chemical synaptic activity. Thus, the mechanism underlying fine-scale synchrony and its relationship to neural coding remain unclear. We examined spike synchrony in pairs of genetically identified, electrically coupled ganglion cells in mouse retina. We found that coincident electrical and chemical synaptic inputs, but not electrical inputs alone, elicited synchronized dendritic spikes in subregions of coupled dendritic trees. The resulting nonlinear integration produced fine-scale synchrony in the cells’ spike output, specifically for light stimuli driving input to the regions of dendritic overlap. In addition, the strength of synchrony varied inversely with spike rate. Together, these features may allow synchronized activity to encode information about the spatial distribution of light that is ambiguous on the basis of spike rate alone. PMID:25344631

  16. Applying the Fe(III) binding property of a chemical transferrin mimetic to Ti(IV) anticancer drug design.

    PubMed

    Parks, Timothy B; Cruz, Yahaira M; Tinoco, Arthur D

    2014-02-01

    As an endogenous serum protein binder of Ti(IV), transferrin (Tf) serves as an excellent vehicle to stabilize the hydrolysis prone metal ion and successfully transport it into cells. This transporting role is thought to be central to Ti(IV)'s anticancer function, but efforts to synthesize Ti(IV) compounds targeting transferrin have not produced a drug. Nonetheless, the Ti(IV) transferrin complex (Ti2Tf) greatly informs on a new Ti(IV)-based anticancer drug design strategy. Ti2Tf interferes with cellular uptake of Fe(III), which is particularly detrimental to cancer cells because of their higher requirement for iron. Ti(IV) compounds of chemical transferrin mimetic (cTfm) ligands were designed to facilitate Ti(IV) activity by attenuating Fe(III) intracellular levels. In having a higher affinity for Fe(III) than Ti(IV), these ligands feature the appropriate balance between stability and lability to effectively transport Ti(IV) into cancer cells, release Ti(IV) via displacement by Fe(III), and deplete the intracellular Fe(III) levels. The cTfm ligand N,N'-di(o-hydroxybenzyl)ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (HBED) was selected to explore the feasibility of the design strategy. Kinetic studies on the Fe(III) displacement process revealed that Ti(IV) can be transported and released into cells by HBED on a physiologically relevant time scale. Cell viability studies using A549 cancerous and MRC5 normal human lung cells and testing the cytotoxicity of HBED and its Ti(IV), Fe(III), and Ga(III) compounds demonstrate the importance of Fe(III) depletion in the proposed drug design strategy and the specificity of the strategy for Ti(IV) activity. The readily derivatized cTfm ligands demonstrate great promise for improved Ti(IV) anticancer drugs. PMID:24422475

  17. Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter and Associations between Particulate Chemical Constituents and Mortality in Seoul, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Son, Ji-Young; Lee, Jong-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Jung, Kweon

    2012-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have linked fine particles [≤ 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)] and health. Most studies focused on the total mass of the particles, although the chemical composition of the particles varies substantially. Which chemical components of fine particles that are the most harmful is not well understood, and research on the chemical composition of PM2.5 and the components that are the most harmful is particularly limited in Asia. Objectives: We characterized PM2.5 chemical composition and estimated the effects of cause-specific mortality of PM2.5 mass and constituents in Seoul, Korea. We compared the chemical composition of particles to those of the eastern and western United States. Methods: We examined temporal variability of PM2.5 mass and its composition using hourly data. We applied an overdispersed Poisson generalized linear model, adjusting for time, day of week, temperature, and relative humidity to investigate the association between risk of mortality and PM2.5 mass and its constituents in Seoul, Korea, for August 2008 through October 2009. Results: PM2.5 and chemical components exhibited temporal patterns by time of day and season. The chemical characteristics of Seoul’s PM2.5 were more similar to PM2.5 found in the western United States than in the eastern United States. Seoul’s PM2.5 had lower sulfate (SO4) contributions and higher nitrate (NO3) contributions than that of the eastern United States, although overall PM2.5 levels in Seoul were higher than in the United States. An interquartile range (IQR) increase in magnesium (Mg) (0.05 μg/m3) was associated with a 1.4% increase (95% confidence interval: 0.2%, 2.6%) in total mortality on the following day. Several components that were among the largest contributors to PM2.5 total mass—NO3, SO4, and ammonium (NH4)—were moderately associated with same-day cardiovascular mortality at the p < 0.10 level. Other components with smaller mass contributions [Mg and

  18. Global Chemical Composition of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter for Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic and health impact studies are inhibited by the paucity of global, long-term measurements of the chemical composition of fine particulate matter. We inferred PM2.5 chemical composition at 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution for 2004–2008 by combining aerosol optical depth retrieved from the MODIS and MISR satellite instruments, with coincident profile and composition information from the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Evaluation of the satellite-model PM2.5 composition data set with North American in situ measurements indicated significant spatial agreement for secondary inorganic aerosol, particulate organic mass, black carbon, mineral dust, and sea salt. We found that global population-weighted PM2.5 concentrations were dominated by particulate organic mass (11.9 ± 7.3 μg/m3), secondary inorganic aerosol (11.1 ± 5.0 μg/m3), and mineral dust (11.1 ± 7.9 μg/m3). Secondary inorganic PM2.5 concentrations exceeded 30 μg/m3 over East China. Sensitivity simulations suggested that population-weighted ambient PM2.5 from biofuel burning (11 μg/m3) could be almost as large as from fossil fuel combustion sources (17 μg/m3). These estimates offer information about global population exposure to the chemical components and sources of PM2.5. PMID:25343705

  19. Mapping the patent landscape of synthetic biology for fine chemical production pathways.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Pablo; Gök, Abdullah; Shapira, Philip; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2016-09-01

    A goal of synthetic biology bio-foundries is to innovate through an iterative design/build/test/learn pipeline. In assessing the value of new chemical production routes, the intellectual property (IP) novelty of the pathway is important. Exploratory studies can be carried using knowledge of the patent/IP landscape for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. In this paper, we perform an assessment of pathways as potential targets for chemical production across the full catalogue of reachable chemicals in the extended metabolic space of chassis organisms, as computed by the retrosynthesis-based algorithm RetroPath. Our database for reactions processed by sequences in heterologous pathways was screened against the PatSeq database, a comprehensive collection of more than 150M sequences present in patent grants and applications. We also examine related patent families using Derwent Innovations. This large-scale computational study provides useful insights into the IP landscape of synthetic biology for fine and specialty chemicals production. PMID:27489206

  20. Global chemical composition of ambient fine particulate matter for exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Philip, Sajeev; Martin, Randall V; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Lo, Jason Wai-Ho; Wang, Yuxuan; Chen, Dan; Zhang, Lin; Kasibhatla, Prasad S; Wang, Siwen; Zhang, Qiang; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G; Bittman, Shabtai; Macdonald, Douglas J

    2014-11-18

    Epidemiologic and health impact studies are inhibited by the paucity of global, long-term measurements of the chemical composition of fine particulate matter. We inferred PM2.5 chemical composition at 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution for 2004-2008 by combining aerosol optical depth retrieved from the MODIS and MISR satellite instruments, with coincident profile and composition information from the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Evaluation of the satellite-model PM2.5 composition data set with North American in situ measurements indicated significant spatial agreement for secondary inorganic aerosol, particulate organic mass, black carbon, mineral dust, and sea salt. We found that global population-weighted PM2.5 concentrations were dominated by particulate organic mass (11.9 ± 7.3 μg/m(3)), secondary inorganic aerosol (11.1 ± 5.0 μg/m(3)), and mineral dust (11.1 ± 7.9 μg/m(3)). Secondary inorganic PM2.5 concentrations exceeded 30 μg/m(3) over East China. Sensitivity simulations suggested that population-weighted ambient PM2.5 from biofuel burning (11 μg/m(3)) could be almost as large as from fossil fuel combustion sources (17 μg/m(3)). These estimates offer information about global population exposure to the chemical components and sources of PM2.5. PMID:25343705

  1. Global Chemical Composition of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter for Exposure Assessment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Philip, Sajeev; Martin, Randall V.; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Lo, Jason Wai-Ho; Wang, Yuxuan; Chen, Dan; Zhang, Lin; Kasibhatla, Prasad S.; Wang, Siwen; Zhang, Qiang; et al

    2014-10-24

    Epidemiologic and health impact studies are inhibited by the paucity of global, long-term measurements of the chemical composition of fine particulate matter. We inferred PM2.5 chemical composition at 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution for 2004–2008 by combining aerosol optical depth retrieved from the MODIS and MISR satellite instruments, with coincident profile and composition information from the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Evaluation of the satellite-model PM2.5 composition data set with North American in situ measurements indicated significant spatial agreement for secondary inorganic aerosol, particulate organic mass, black carbon, mineral dust, and sea salt. We found that global population-weighted PM2.5 concentrationsmore » were dominated by particulate organic mass (11.9 ± 7.3 μg/m3), secondary inorganic aerosol (11.1 ± 5.0 μg/m3), and mineral dust (11.1 ± 7.9 μg/m3). Secondary inorganic PM2.5 concentrations exceeded 30 μg/m3 over East China. Sensitivity simulations suggested that population-weighted ambient PM2.5 from biofuel burning (11 μg/m3) could be almost as large as from fossil fuel combustion sources (17 μg/m3). In conclusion, these estimates offer information about global population exposure to the chemical components and sources of PM2.5.« less

  2. Fine-structure resolved photoionization of metastable Be-like ionsC III, N IV, and O V

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, A.; Schippers, S.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Kilcoyne, A.L.D.; Brauning, H.; Schlachter, A.S.; McLaughlin, B.M.

    2006-09-01

    High-resolution photoionization experiments were carried outwith beams of C III, N IV, and O V containing roughly equal amounts ofground-state and metastable ions. The energy scales of the experimentsare calibrated with uncertainties of 1 to 10 meV depending on photonenergy. These data favorably compare with state-of-the-art R-matrixcalculations carried out on an energy grid with a spacing of 13.6 mueV.

  3. SYNBIOCHEM-a SynBio foundry for the biosynthesis and sustainable production of fine and speciality chemicals.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Pablo; Currin, Andrew; Dunstan, Mark; Fellows, Donal; Jervis, Adrian; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Robinson, Christopher J; Swainston, Neil; Vinaixa, Maria; Williams, Alan; Yan, Cunyu; Barran, Perdita; Breitling, Rainer; Chen, George Guo-Qiang; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Goble, Carole; Goodacre, Royston; Kell, Douglas B; Feuvre, Rosalind Le; Micklefield, Jason; Scrutton, Nigel S; Shapira, Philip; Takano, Eriko; Turner, Nicholas J

    2016-06-15

    The Manchester Synthetic Biology Research Centre (SYNBIOCHEM) is a foundry for the biosynthesis and sustainable production of fine and speciality chemicals. The Centre's integrated technology platforms provide a unique capability to facilitate predictable engineering of microbial bio-factories for chemicals production. An overview of these capabilities is described. PMID:27284023

  4. SYNBIOCHEM–a SynBio foundry for the biosynthesis and sustainable production of fine and speciality chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Pablo; Currin, Andrew; Dunstan, Mark; Fellows, Donal; Jervis, Adrian; Rattray, Nicholas J.W.; Robinson, Christopher J.; Swainston, Neil; Vinaixa, Maria; Williams, Alan; Yan, Cunyu; Barran, Perdita; Breitling, Rainer; Chen, George Guo-Qiang; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Goble, Carole; Goodacre, Royston; Kell, Douglas B.; Feuvre, Rosalind Le; Micklefield, Jason; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Shapira, Philip; Takano, Eriko; Turner, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The Manchester Synthetic Biology Research Centre (SYNBIOCHEM) is a foundry for the biosynthesis and sustainable production of fine and speciality chemicals. The Centre's integrated technology platforms provide a unique capability to facilitate predictable engineering of microbial bio-factories for chemicals production. An overview of these capabilities is described. PMID:27284023

  5. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL DISPERSANTS AND MINERAL FINES ON CRUDE OIL DISPERSION IN A WAVE TANK UNDER BREAKING WAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on the dispersion of oil and the ...

  6. Successful Growth of Conductive Highly Crystalline Sn-Doped α-Ga2O3 Thin Films by Fine-Channel Mist Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Dang, Giang T.; Furuta, Mamoru

    2012-04-01

    Highly crystalline α-phase gallium oxide (Ga2O3) thin films were grown by fine-channel mist chemical vapor deposition on c-sapphire substrates at 400 °C at a deposition rate of more than 20 nm/min. The thin films were doped with Sn(IV) atoms, which were obtained from Sn(II) chloride by the reaction SnCl2+ H2O2+ 2HCl→SnCl4+ 2H2O. Conductive α-phase Ga2O3 thin films were successfully grown from source solutions containing less than 10 at. % Sn(IV). The source solution containing 4 at. % Sn(IV) resulted in obtaining a thin film with an n-type conductivity as high as 0.28 S cm-1, a mobility of 0.23 cm2 V-1 s-1, a carrier concentration of 7×1018 cm-3, and a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the (0006) reflection X-ray rocking curve as low as 64 arcsec.

  7. Chemical characteristics of fine particles emitted from different gas cooking methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Siao Wei; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    Gas cooking is an important indoor source of fine particles (PM 2.5). The chemical characteristics of PM 2.5 emitted from different cooking methods, namely, steaming, boiling, stir-frying, pan-frying and deep-frying were investigated in a domestic kitchen. Controlled experiments were conducted to measure the mass concentration of PM 2.5 and its chemical constituents (elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals and ions) arising from these five cooking methods. To investigate the difference in particle properties of different cooking emissions, the amount and type of food, and the heat setting on the gas stove were kept constant during the entire course of the experiments. Results showed that deep-frying gave rise to the largest amount of PM 2.5 and most chemical components, followed by pan-frying, stir-frying, boiling, and steaming. Oil-based cooking methods released more organic pollutants (OC, PAHs, and organic ions) and metals, while water-based cooking methods accounted for more water-soluble (WS) ions. Their source profiles are also presented and discussed.

  8. Characterization of the chemical composition of PM2.5 emitted from on-road China III and China IV diesel trucks in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bobo; Shen, Xianbao; Cao, Xinyue; Yao, Zhiliang; Wu, Yunong

    2016-05-01

    The composition of diesel exhaust fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is of growing interest because of its impacts on health and climatic factors and its application in source apportionment and aerosol modeling. We characterized the detailed chemical composition of the PM2.5, including the organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble ions (WSIs), and elemental contents, emitted from China III and China IV diesel trucks (nine each) based on real-world measurements in Beijing using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS). Carbonaceous compounds were the dominant components (totaling approximately 87%) of the PM2.5, similar to the results (greater than 80% of the PM2.5) of our previous study of on-road China III diesel trucks. In general, the amounts of individual component groups (carbonaceous compounds, WSIs, and elements) and PM2.5 emissions for China IV diesel trucks were lower than those of China III diesel trucks of the same size, except for the WSIs and elements for the light- and medium-duty diesel trucks. The EC/OC mass ratios were strongly dependent on the emission standards, and the ratios of China IV diesel trucks were higher than those of China III diesel trucks of the same size. The chemical species in the PM2.5 were significantly affected by the driving conditions. Overall, the emission factors (EFs) of the PM2.5 and OC under non-highway (NHW) driving conditions were higher than those under highway (HW) driving conditions, and the EC/OC mass ratios presented an increasing trend, with decreasing OC/PM2.5 and increasing EC/PM2.5 from NHW to HW driving conditions; similar trends were reported in our previous study. In addition, Pearson's correlation coefficients among the PM2.5 species were analyzed to determine the relationships among the various chemical components. PMID:26897401

  9. Global Chemical Composition of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter for Exposure Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Sajeev; Martin, Randall V.; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Lo, Jason Wai-Ho; Wang, Yuxuan; Chen, Dan; Zhang, Lin; Kasibhatla, Prasad S.; Wang, Siwen; Zhang, Qiang; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G.; Bittman, Shabtai; Macdonald, Douglas J.

    2014-10-24

    Epidemiologic and health impact studies are inhibited by the paucity of global, long-term measurements of the chemical composition of fine particulate matter. We inferred PM2.5 chemical composition at 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution for 2004–2008 by combining aerosol optical depth retrieved from the MODIS and MISR satellite instruments, with coincident profile and composition information from the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Evaluation of the satellite-model PM2.5 composition data set with North American in situ measurements indicated significant spatial agreement for secondary inorganic aerosol, particulate organic mass, black carbon, mineral dust, and sea salt. We found that global population-weighted PM2.5 concentrations were dominated by particulate organic mass (11.9 ± 7.3 μg/m3), secondary inorganic aerosol (11.1 ± 5.0 μg/m3), and mineral dust (11.1 ± 7.9 μg/m3). Secondary inorganic PM2.5 concentrations exceeded 30 μg/m3 over East China. Sensitivity simulations suggested that population-weighted ambient PM2.5 from biofuel burning (11 μg/m3) could be almost as large as from fossil fuel combustion sources (17 μg/m3). In conclusion, these estimates offer information about global population exposure to the chemical components and sources of PM2.5.

  10. Electrolytic membrane extraction enables production of fine chemicals from biorefinery sidestreams.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Stephen J; Hennebel, Tom; Gildemyn, Sylvia; Coma, Marta; Desloover, Joachim; Berton, Jan; Tsukamoto, Junko; Stevens, Christian; Rabaey, Korneel

    2014-06-17

    Short-chain carboxylates such as acetate are easily produced through mixed culture fermentation of many biological waste streams, although routinely digested to biogas and combusted rather than harvested. We developed a pipeline to extract and upgrade short-chain carboxylates to esters via membrane electrolysis and biphasic esterification. Carboxylate-rich broths are electrolyzed in a cathodic chamber from which anions flux across an anion exchange membrane into an anodic chamber, resulting in a clean acid concentrate with neither solids nor biomass. Next, the aqueous carboxylic acid concentrate reacts with added alcohol in a water-excluding phase to generate volatile esters. In a batch extraction, 96 ± 1.6% of the total acetate was extracted in 48 h from biorefinery thin stillage (5 g L(-1) acetate) at 379 g m(-2) d(-1) (36% Coulombic efficiency). With continuously regenerated thin stillage, the anolyte was concentrated to 14 g/L acetic acid, and converted at 2.64 g (acetate) L(-1) h(-1) in the first hour to ethyl acetate by the addition of excess ethanol and heating to 70 °C, with a final total conversion of 58 ± 3%. This processing pipeline enables direct production of fine chemicals following undefined mixed culture fermentation, embedding carbon in industrial chemicals rather than returning them to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. PMID:24844669

  11. CHARACTERIZING THE SOURCES OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO MUTAGENIC AND CARCINOGENIC CHEMICALS IN AIRBORNE FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal and ambient exposures to airborne fine particles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and genotoxic activity has been studied in populations in the US, Japan, China, and the Czech Republic. Personal exposure monitors used to collect fine particles were extracted f...

  12. Chemical characterization and source apportionment of fine and coarse particulate matter in Lahore, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Elizabeth; Schauer, James; Quraishi, Tauseef A.; Mahmood, Abid

    2010-03-01

    Lahore, Pakistan is an emerging megacity that is heavily polluted with high levels of particle air pollution. In this study, respirable particulate matter (PM 2.5 and PM 10) were collected every sixth day in Lahore from 12 January 2007 to 19 January 2008. Ambient aerosol was characterized using well-established chemical methods for mass, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), ionic species (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, calcium, and potassium), and organic species. The annual average concentration (±one standard deviation) of PM 2.5 was 194 ± 94 μg m -3 and PM 10 was 336 ± 135 μg m -3. Coarse aerosol (PM 10-2.5) was dominated by crustal sources like dust (74 ± 16%, annual average ± one standard deviation), whereas fine particles were dominated by carbonaceous aerosol (organic matter and elemental carbon, 61 ± 17%). Organic tracer species were used to identify sources of PM 2.5 OC and chemical mass balance (CMB) modeling was used to estimate relative source contributions. On an annual basis, non-catalyzed motor vehicles accounted for more than half of primary OC (53 ± 19%). Lesser sources included biomass burning (10 ± 5%) and the combined source of diesel engines and residual fuel oil combustion (6 ± 2%). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was an important contributor to ambient OC, particularly during the winter when secondary processing of aerosol species during fog episodes was expected. Coal combustion alone contributed a small percentage of organic aerosol (1.9 ± 0.3%), but showed strong linear correlation with unidentified sources of OC that contributed more significantly (27 ± 16%). Brick kilns, where coal and other low quality fuels are burned together, are suggested as the most probable origins of unapportioned OC. The chemical profiling of emissions from brick kilns and other sources unique to Lahore would contribute to a better understanding of OC sources in this megacity.

  13. The chemical composition of fine ambient aerosol particles in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Gnauk, Thomas; Müller, Konrad; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    The strong economical growth in China during the last few decades led to heavy air pollution caused by significantly increased particle emissions. The aerosol particles affect not only the regional air quality and visibility, but can also influence cloud formation processes and the radiative balance of the atmosphere by their optical and microphysical properties. The ability to act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) is related to microphysical properties like the hygroscopic growth or the cloud droplet activation. The chemical composition of CCN plays an important role on these properties and varies strongly with the particle size and the time of day. Hygroscopic or surface active substances can increase the hygroscopicity and lower the surface tension of the particle liquid phase, respectively. The presence of such compounds may result in faster cloud droplet activation by faster water uptake. The DFG project HaChi (Haze in China) aimed at studying physical and chemical parameters of urban aerosol particles in the Beijing area in order to associate the chemical composition of aerosol particles with their ability to act as CCN. To this end, two measurement campaigns were performed at the Wuqing National Ordinary Meteorological Observing Station, which is a background site near Beijing. The winter campaign was realized in March 2009 and the summer campaign took place from mid July 2009 to mid August 2009. Fine particles with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than or equal 1 μm were continuously sampled for 24h over the two campaigns using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). The present contribution presents and discusses the results of the chemical characterization of the DIGITEL filters samples. The filters were analyzed for the mass concentration, inorganic ions and carbon sum parameters like elemental (EC), organic (OC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). The WSOC fraction was further characterized for hygroscopic substances like low molecular

  14. Chemical composition and quantitative relationship between meteorological condition and fine particles in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Li; Zhang, Yuan-Hang; Shao, Min; Liu, Xu-Lin; Zeng, Li-Min; Cheng, Cong-Lan; Xu, Xiao-Feng

    2004-01-01

    The recent year's monitor results of Beijing indicated that the pollution level of fine particles PM2.5 showed an increasing trend. To understand pollution characteristics of PM2.5 and its relationship with the meteorological conditions in Beijing, a one-year monitoring of PM2.5 mass concentration and correspondent meteorological parameters was performed in Beijing in 2001. The PM2.5 levels in Beijing were very high, the annual average PM2.5 concentration in 2001 was 7 times of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards proposed by US EPA. The major chemical compositions were organics, sulfate, crustals and nitrate. It was found that the mass concentrations of PM2.5 were influenced by meteorological conditions. The correlation between the mass concentrations of PM2.5 and the relative humidity was found. And the correlation became closer at higher relative humidity. And the mass concentrations of PM2.5 were negtive-correlated to wind speeds, but the correlation between the mass concentration of PM2.5 and wind speed was not good at stronger wind. PMID:15559829

  15. Possible Role of Metal(II) Octacyanomolybdate(IV) in Chemical Evolution: Interaction with Ribose Nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anand; Kamaluddin

    2013-02-01

    We have proposed that double metal cyanide compounds (DMCs) might have played vital roles as catalysts in chemical evolution and the origin of life. We have synthesized a series of metal octacyanomolybdates (MOCMos) and studied their interactions with ribose nucleotides. MOCMos have been shown to be effective adsorbents for 5'-ribonucleotides. The maximum adsorption level was found to be about 50 % at neutral pH under the conditions studied. The zinc(II) octacyanomolybdate(IV) showed larger adsorption compared to other MOCMos. The surface area seems to important parameter for the adsorption of nucleotides. The adsorption followed a Langmuir adsorption isotherms with an overall adsorption trends of the order of 5'-GMP > 5'-AMP > 5'-CMP > 5'-UMP. Purine nucleotides were adsorbed more strongly than pyrimidine nucleotides on all MOCMos possibly because of the additional binding afforded by the imidazole ring in purines. Infrared spectral studies of adsorption adducts indicate that adsorption takes place through interaction between adsorbate molecules and outer divalent ions of MOCMos.

  16. Development of a chemical process using nitric acid-cerium(IV) for decontamination of high-level waste canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.

    1988-06-01

    A simple and effective method was developed for contamination of high-level waste containers. This method of chemical decontamination is applicable to a wide variety of contaminated equipment found in the nuclear industry. The process employs a oxidant system (Ce(IV)) in nitric acid (HNO/sub 3/) solution to chemically mill a thin layer from the canister surface. Contaminated canisters are simply immersed in the solution at a controlled temperature and Ce(IV) concentration level. The spent solution is discarded to the high-level waste stream and added to subsequent glass batches. The Ce(IV)/HNO/sub 3/ solution has been shown to be effective in chemically milling the surface of stainless steel, similar to the electropolishing process, but without the need for an applied electrical current. West Valley (WV) staff had previously evaluated several canister decontamination methods, including electropolishing, liquid abrasive blast, high-pressure water wash, and ultrasonic cleaning, before the Ce(IV)/HNO/sub 3/ redox solution on treatment was selected. The initial concept involved continuous electrochemical regeneration of the ceric ion. Extensive in-cell pumping and close-coupled heat transfer and electrochemical equipment were required. The objective of this study, was to simplify the original concept. 2 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Friction and Wear of Ion-Beam-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon on Chemical-Vapor-Deposited, Fine-Grain Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Lanter, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films coated on chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD), fine-grain diamond coatings were examined in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air environments. The DLC films were produced by the direct impact of an ion beam (composed of a 3:17 mixture of Ar and CH4) at ion energies of 1500 and 700 eV and an RF power of 99 W. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical CVD diamond pins sliding on four different carbon-base coating systems: DLC films on CVD diamond; DLC films on silicon; as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond; and carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond on silicon. Results indicate that in ultrahigh vacuum the ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond (similar to the ion-implanted CVD diamond) greatly decrease both the friction and wear of fine-grain CVD diamond films and provide solid lubrication. In dry nitrogen and in humid air, ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond films also had a low steady-state coefficient of friction and a low wear rate. These tribological performance benefits, coupled with a wider range of coating thicknesses, led to longer endurance life and improved wear resistance for the DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond in comparison to the ion-implanted diamond films. Thus, DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond films can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating regardless of environment.

  18. Chemical characterization of fine organic aerosol for source apportionment at Monterrey, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancilla, Y.; Mendoza, A.; Fraser, M. P.; Herckes, P.

    2015-07-01

    , source attribution results obtained using the CMB model indicate that emissions from motor vehicle exhausts are the most important, accounting for the 64 % of the PM2.5. The vegetative detritus and biomass burning had the smallest contribution (2.2 % of the PM2.5). To our knowledge, this is the second study to explore the broad chemical characterization of fine organic aerosol in Mexico and the first for the MMA.

  19. Dust episodes in Beirut and their effect on the chemical composition of coarse and fine particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Malek; Baalbaki, Rima; Mrad, Raya; Daher, Nancy; Shihadeh, Alan; Sioutas, Constantinos; Saliba, Najat A

    2014-10-15

    Particles captured during dust episodes in Beirut originated from both the African and Arabian deserts. This particular air mixture showed an increase, over non-dust episodes, in particle volume distribution which was mostly noticed for particles ranging in sizes between 2.25 and 5 μm. It also resulted in an increase in average mass concentration by 48.5% and 14.6%, for the coarse and fine fractions, respectively. Chemical analysis of major aerosol components accounted for 93% of fine PM and 71% of coarse PM. Crustal material (CM) dominated the coarse PM fraction, contributing to 39 ± 15% of the total mass. Sea salt (SS) (11 ± 10%) and secondary ions (SI) (11 ± 7%) were the second most abundant elements. In the fine fraction, SI (36 ± 14%) were the most abundant PM constituent, followed by organic matter (OM) (33 ± 7%) and CM (13 ± 2%). Enrichment factors (EF) and correlation coefficients show that biogenic and anthropogenic sources contribute to the elemental composition of particles during dust episodes. This study emphasizes on the role played by the long-range transport of aerosols in changing the chemical composition of the organic and inorganic constituents of urban coarse and fine PM. The chemical reactions between aged urban and dust aerosols are enhanced during transport, leading to the formation of organo-nitrogenated and -sulfonated compounds. Their oligomeric morphologies are further confirmed by SEM-EDX measurements. PMID:25064715

  20. Chemical modeling of arsenic(III, V) and selenium(IV, VI) adsorption by soils surrounding ash disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, S.; Hyun, S.; Lee, L.S.

    2008-11-15

    Leachate derived from coal ash disposal facilities is a potential anthropogenic source of As and Se to the environment. To establish a practical framework for predicting attenuation and transport of As and Se in ash leachates, the adsorption of As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) had been characterized in prior studies for 18 soils obtained downgradient from ash landfill sites and representing a wide range of soil properties. The constant capacitance model was applied for the first time to describe As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) adsorption on soils as a function of equilibrium solution As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) concentrations. Prior applications of the model had been restricted to describing Se(IV) and As(V) adsorption by soils as a function of solution pH. The constant capacitance model was applied for the first time to describe As(III) and Se(VI) adsorption by soils. The model was able to describe adsorption of these ions on all soils as a function of solution ion concentration by optimizing only one adjustable parameter, the anion surface complexation constant. This chemical model represents an advancement over adsorption isotherm equation approaches that contain two empirical adjustable parameters. Incorporation of these anion surface complexation constants obtained with the constant capacitance model into chemical speciation transport models will allow simulation of soil solution anion concentrations under diverse environmental and agricultural conditions.

  1. Effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on crude oil dispersion in a wave tank under breaking waves.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengkai; Kepkay, Paul; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Boufadel, Michel C; Venosa, Albert D

    2007-07-01

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on the dispersion of oil and the formation of oil-mineral-aggregates (OMAs) in natural seawater. Results of ultraviolet spectrofluorometry and gas chromatography flame ionized detection analysis indicated that dispersants and mineral fines, alone and in combination, enhanced the dispersion of oil into the water column. Measurements taken with a laser in situ scattering and transmissometer (LISST-100X) showed that the presence of mineral fines increased the total concentration of the suspended particles from 4 to 10microl l(-1), whereas the presence of dispersants decreased the particle size (mass mean diameter) of OMAs from 50 to 10microm. Observation with an epifluorescence microscope indicated that the presence of dispersants, mineral fines, or both in combination significantly increased the number of particles dispersed into the water. PMID:17433372

  2. Permeability Enhancement in Fine-Grained Sediments by Chemically Induced Clay Fabric Shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesinghe, A M; Kansa, E J; Viani, B E; Blake, R G; Roberts, J J; Huber, R D

    2004-02-26

    The National Research Council [1] identified the entrapment of contaminants in fine-grained clay-bearing soils as a major impediment to the timely and cost-effective remediation of groundwater to regulatory standards. Contaminants trapped in low-permeability, low-diffusivity, high-sorptivity clays are not accessible to advective flushing by treatment fluids from permeable zones, and slowly diffuse out to recontaminate previously cleaned permeable strata. We propose to overcome this barrier to effective remediation by exploiting the ability of certain nontoxic EPA-approved chemicals (e.g., ethanol) to shrink and alter the fabric of clays, and thereby create macro-porosity and crack networks in fine-grained sediments. This would significantly reduce the distance and time scales of diffusive mass transport to advectively flushed boundaries, to yield orders of magnitude reduction in the time required to complete remediation. Given that effective solutions to this central problem of subsurface remediation do not yet exist, the cost and time benefits of successful deployment of this novel concept, both as a stand-alone technology and as an enabling pre-treatment for other remedial technologies that rely on advective delivery, is likely to be very large. This project, funded as a 1-year feasibility study by LLNL's LDRD Program, is a multi-directorate, multi-disciplinary effort that leverages expertise from the Energy & Environment Directorate, the Environmental Restoration Division, and the Manufacturing & Materials Evaluation Division of Mechanical Engineering. In this feasibility study, a ''proof-of-principle'' experiment was performed to answer the central question: ''Can clay shrinkage induced by ethanol in clay-bearing sediments overcome realistic confining stresses, crack clay, and increase its effective permeability by orders of magnitude within a time that is much smaller than the time required for diffusive mass transport of ethanol in the unaltered sediment

  3. Characterizing chemical transport of ozone and fine particles in the Great Lakes region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spak, Scott N.

    This dissertation presents a science framework relevant to evaluating impacts of land use policy scenarios, energy technologies, and climate on urban and regional air quality. Emerging from collaboration with urban planners, this work provides a means for employing atmospheric chemical transport modeling to understand environmental ramifications of long-term, spatially disaggregated changes in population and automobile emissions at the census tract level, and to assess the sensitivity of these changes to densification strategies. Toward these goals, the framework is used to evaluate model skill in resolving contemporary characteristics of ozone (O3) and speciated fine particles (PM2.5) in the Great Lakes region of North America, and to quantitatively explore meteorological processes that bring about observed features of these pollutants in the region. The Great Lakes were chosen due to a population concentrated in sprawling metropolitan areas, consistently high and widespread pollutant burdens, and seasonal effects of the lakes on the atmosphere. In annual simulation at 36 km resolution, the Community Multiscale Air Quality model is evaluated using speciated PM2.5 measurements taken at regulatory monitoring networks orientated to sample urban, rural, and remote areas. Performance relative to ad-hoc regional modeling goals and prior studies is average to excellent for most species throughout the year. Both pollution episodes and seasonality are captured. The Great Lakes affect pollution seasonality: strong winds advect aerosols around the deep marine boundary layer to lower surface PM2.5 in fall and winter, while O3 over the lakes is enhanced throughout the year, driven by temperature in the cool seasons and lake breeze circulation in spring and summer. Simulations confirm observational evidence that rural and small-city sources are responsible for most regional PM2.5. Sensitivities to urban and rural reductions are of comparable magnitude on a percentage basis

  4. Chemical analysis of World Trade Center fine particulate matter for use in toxicologic assessment.

    PubMed Central

    McGee, John K; Chen, Lung Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D; Chee, Glen R; Prophete, Colette M; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Wasson, Shirley J; Conner, Teri L; Costa, Daniel L; Gavett, Stephen H

    2003-01-01

    The catastrophic destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) on 11 September 2001 caused the release of high levels of airborne pollutants into the local environment. To assess the toxicity of fine particulate matter [particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5)], which may adversely affect the health of workers and residents in the area, we collected fallen dust samples on 12 and 13 September 2001 from sites within a half-mile of Ground Zero. Samples of WTC dust were sieved, aerosolized, and size-separated, and the PM2.5 fraction was isolated on filters. Here we report the chemical and physical properties of PM2.5 derived from these samples and compare them with PM2.5 fractions of three reference materials that range in toxicity from relatively inert to acutely toxic (Mt. St. Helens PM; Washington, DC, ambient air PM; and residual oil fly ash). X-ray diffraction of very coarse sieved WTC PM (< 53 microm) identified calcium sulfate (gypsum) and calcium carbonate (calcite) as major components. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that calcium-sulfur and calcium-carbon particles were also present in the WTC PM2.5 fraction. Analysis of WTC PM2.5 using X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation analysis, and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry showed high levels of calcium (range, 22-33%) and sulfur (37-43% as sulfate) and much lower levels of transition metals and other elements. Aqueous extracts of WTC PM2.5 were basic (pH range, 8.9-10.0) and had no evidence of significant bacterial contamination. Levels of carbon were relatively low, suggesting that combustion-derived particles did not form a significant fraction of these samples recovered in the immediate aftermath of the destruction of the towers. Because gypsum and calcite are known to cause irritation of the mucus membranes of the eyes and respiratory tract, inhalation of high doses of WTC PM2.5 could potentially cause toxic respiratory effects. PMID:12782501

  5. Fine particulate matter and visibility in the Lake Tahoe Basin: chemical characterization, trends, and source apportionment.

    PubMed

    Green, Mark C; Chen, L W Antony; DuBois, David W; Molenar, John V

    2012-08-01

    Speciated PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameterFine mass at SOLA is 2.5 times that at BLIS, mainly due to enhanced organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC). SOLA experiences a winter peak in PM25 mainly due to OC and EC from residential wood combustion, whereas BLIS experiences a summer peak in PM2.5 mainly due to OC and ECfrom wildfires. Carbonaceous aerosol dominates visibility impairment, causing about 1/2 the reconstructed aerosol light extinction at BLIS and 70% at SOLA. Trend analysis (1990-2009) showed statistically significant decreases in aerosol extinction at BLIS on 20% best and 60% middle visibility days and statistically insignificant upward trends on 20% worst days. SOLA (1990-2003) showed statistically significant decreases in aerosol extinction for all day categories, driven by decreasing OC and EC. From the regional haze rule baseline period of 2000-2004 until 2005-2009, BLIS saw 20% best days improving and 20% worst days getting worse due to increased wildfire effects. Receptor modeling was performed using positive matrix factorization (PMF) and chemical mass balance (CMB). It confirmed that (1) biomass burning dominanted PM25 sources at both sites with increasing importance over time; (2) low combustion efficiency burning accounts for most of the biomass burning contribution; (3) road dust and traffic contributions were much higher at SOLA than at BLIS; and (4) industrial combustion and salting were minor sources. PMID:22916443

  6. Chemical mass balance source apportionment of fine and PM10 in the Desert Southwest, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Desert Southwest Coarse Particulate Matter Study was undertaken in Pinal County, Arizona, to better understand the origin and impact of sources of fine and coarse particulate matter (PM) in rural, arid regions of the U.S. southwestern desert. The desert southwest experiences ...

  7. Quantum chemical and molecular dynamics study of the coordination of Th(IV) in aqueous solvent.

    PubMed

    Réal, Florent; Trumm, Michael; Vallet, Valérie; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Masella, Michel; Flament, Jean-Pierre

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the solvation of tetravalent thorium Th(IV) in aqueous solution using classical molecular dynamics simulations at the 10 ns scale and based on polarizable force-field approaches, which treat explicitly the covalent character of the metal-water interaction (and its inherent cooperative character). We have carried out a thorough analysis of the accuracy of the ab initio data that we used to adjust the force-field parameters. In particular, we show that large atomic basis sets combined with wave function-based methods (such as the MP2 level) have to be preferred to density functional theory when investigating Th(IV)/water aggregates in gas phase. The information extracted from trajectories in solution shows a well-structured Th(IV) first hydration shell formed of 8.25 ± 0.2 water molecules and located at about 2.45 ± 0.02 Å and a second shell of 17.5 ± 0.5 water molecules at about 4.75 Å. Concerning the first hydration sphere, our results correspond to the lower bounds of experimental estimates (which range from 8 to 12.7); however, they are in very good agreement with the average of existing experimental data, 2.45 ± 0.02 Å. All our results demonstrate the predictable character of the proposed approach, as well as the need of accounting explicitly for the cooperative character of charge-transfer phenomena affecting the Th(IV)/water interaction to build up reliable and accurate force-field approaches devoted to such studies. PMID:21070066

  8. Chemical diversity among fine-grained soils at Gale (Mars): a chemical transition as the rover is approaching the Bagnold Dunes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Agnès; Forni, Olivier; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Schroeder, Susanne; Gasnault, Olivier; Bridges, Nathan; Ehlmann, Bethany; Maurice, Sylvestre; Wiens, Roger

    2016-04-01

    The ChemCam instrument has the capability to study the chemical composition of soils at a sub-millimeter scale, thus providing an unpreceedented spatial resolution for their study. More than 300 soils have been sampled so far with ChemCam and these targets are analyzed frequently in order to monitor any change in composition along the traverse. Detailed chemical analysis as a function of grain size is of great importance in order to better constrain soils formation. Curiosity is approaching the Bagnold Dunes, the first active dune field accessible for in-situ analyses. One of the main goals is to determine or constrain the dune material chemistry as well as its provenance. This study is focusing on recent soils analyzed when ap-proaching the dunes, for a comparison with previous soil targets, and with dunes specifically. Chemical composition of fine-grained soils as we approach the Bagnold Dunes has been compared with previous fine-grained soils analyzed along the traverse. These new soils have an average sum of oxides that is significantly higher than what has been previously analyzed. This would suggest that these soils are less hydrated and probably less altered than previous ones.An enrichment in SiO2, FeO and alkali is also observed in these new fine-grained soils, which could be related to a contamination by local rocks due to erosion. Some coarser grains could correspond to an olivine component. This analysis is on-going and will be detailed as the dedicated Bagnold Dunes campaign starts. We will also report in the hydratation level of the dunes.

  9. ESCA studies of the surface chemistry of lunar fines. [Electron Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.; Grant, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents an ESCA analysis based on the use of a synthetic lunar-glass standard that allows determination of the surface composition of lunar samples with an accuracy that appears to be better than 10% of the amount present for all major elements except Ti. It is found that, on the average, grain surfaces in the lunar fines samples 10084 and 15301 are strongly enriched in Si, moderately enriched in Fe, moderately depleted in Al and Ca, and strongly depleted in Mg. This pattern could not be produced by the deposition of any expected meteoritic vapor. Neither could it be produced by simple inverse-mass-dependent element loss during sputtering. It is suggested that at least part of the pattern may be a simple consequence of agglutinate glass formation in the fines since there is some evidence that Si can become enriched on the surface of silicate melts. These results do not support the strong enrichments in Fe on grain surfaces reported from Auger studies.

  10. 77 FR 24988 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; ISP Freetown Fine Chemicals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Chemicals By Notice dated October 8, 2010, and published in the Federal Register on October 20, 2010, 75 FR... Amphetamine (1100) II Phenylacetone (8501) II The company plans to manufacture bulk API, for distribution...

  11. 77 FR 24985 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; ISP Freetown Fine Chemicals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Chemicals By Notice dated October 8, 2010, and published in the Federal Register on October 20, 2010, 75 FR... state and local laws, and a review of the company's background and history. Therefore, pursuant to 21...

  12. 77 FR 64142 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, ISP Freetown Fine Chemicals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... Chemicals By Notice dated July 2, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on July 11, 2012, 77 FR 40910... laws, and a review of the company's background and history. Therefore, pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 952(a)...

  13. Manipulating I-V Characteristics of a Molecular Switch with Chemical Modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, Julio L.; Cao, Chao; Zhang, X.-G.; Krstic, Predrag S; Krause, Jeffrey L.; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the effects of chemical modifications on the electron transport properties of the azobenzene molecule, which has been proposed as a component of a light-driven molecular switch. This molecule has two stable conformations (cis and trans) in the electronic ground state, with considerable differences in conductance. The electron transport properties were calculated using first-principles methods combining nonequilibrium Green s function techniques with density functional theory. Chemical modifications of the azobenzene consist of incorporation of electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups in meta and ortho positions with respect to the azo group. The results show that the transport properties in electronic devices at the molecular level can be manipulated, enhanced, or suppressed by a careful consideration of the effects of chemical modification, and such modifications become crucial in optimizing the electron transport properties of chemical structures.

  14. Development of Agriculture Left-Overs: Fine Organic Chemicals from Wheat Hemicellulose-Derived Pentoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Frédéric; Estrine, Boris; Plantier-Royon, Richard; Hoffmann, Norbert; Portella, Charles

    This review is dedicated to wheat hemicelluloses and its main components d-xylose and l-arabinose as raw materials for fine organic chemistry. The context of the wheat agro-industry, its by-products, and extraction and hydrolysis of hemicelluloses to produce the pentoses are considered. The straightforward preparation of pentose-based surfactants, their properties, and their situation in the field of carbohydrate-based surfactants are addressed. Multistep transformations of pentoses are also described, first from a methodology point of view, with the aim of producing multifunctional enantiopure building-blocks, then considering targeted natural and/or bioactive products. Selected reactions of furfural, an important dehydration product of pentoses, are also presented.

  15. Salmonella mutagenicity tests. IV. Results from the testing of 300 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiger, E.; Anderson, B.; Haworth, S.; Lawlor, T.; Mortelmans, K.

    1988-01-01

    Three hundred chemicals were tested for mutagenicity, under code, in Salmonella typhimurium, using a preincubation protocol. All tests were performed in the absence of exogenous metabolic activation, and in the presence of liver S-9 from Aroclor-induced male Sprague-Dawley rats and Syrian hamsters. The results and data from these tests are presented.

  16. Computers in Chemical Education Newsletter. Volume IV Numbers 1-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Donald, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Selections from volume 4 (numbers 1-4) of the Task Force on Computers in Chemical Education (TFCCE) Newsletter are presented. Number 1 includes an introduction to and objectives of the newsletter and TFCCE, a report on computer-related activities in the chemistry department at Eastern Michigan University, a list of TFCCE members, a discussion of a…

  17. Mutation measurement in mammalian cells. IV: Comparison of gamma-ray and chemical mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Puck, T T; Johnson, R; Webb, P; Yohrling, G

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of chemical mutagens with mammalian cells is much more complex than that of gamma-irradiation because of the different ways in which chemical agents react with cell and medium components. Nevertheless, the system previously described for analysis of mutagenesis by gamma-radiation appears applicable to chemical mutagenesis. The approach involves measurement of cell survival, use of caffeine to inhibit repair, analysis of mitotic index changes, and quantitation of microscopically visible structural changes in mitotic chromosomes. The behavior of a variety of chemical mutagens and nonmutagens in this system is described and compared with that of gamma-irradiation. The procedure is simple and the results reasonably quantitative though less so than those of gamma-irradiation. The procedure can be used for environmental monitoring, analysis of mutational events, and individual and epidemiological testing. Mutational events should be classified as primary or secondary depending on whether they represent initial genomic insult, or genomic changes resulting from primary mutation followed by structural changes due to metabolic actions. While caffeine has multiple effects on the mammalian genome, when used under the conditions specified here it appears to act principally as an inhibitor of mutation repair, and so affords a measure of the role of repair in the action of different mutagens on cells in the G2 phase of the life cycle. PMID:9776977

  18. Chemical composition of crystalline rock fragments from Luna 16 and Luna 20 fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimbalnikova, A.; Palivcova, M.; Frana, J.; Mastalka, A.

    1977-01-01

    The chemical composition (bulk, rare earth, and trace elements) of the Luna 16 mare regolith and luna 20 highland regolith is discussed. The rock samples considered are 14 basaltic rock fragments (Luna 16) and 13 rock fragments of the ANT suite (Luna 20). On the basis of bulk composition, two types of basaltic rocks have been differentiated and defined in the Luna 16 regolith: mare basalts (fundamental crystalline rocks of Mare Fecunditatis) and high-alumina basalts. The bulk analyses of rock fragments of the ANT suite also enabled distinction of two rock types: anorthositic norites and troctolites and/or spinal-troctolites (the most abundant crystalline rocks of the highland region, the landing site of luna 20), and anorthosites. The chemical compositions of Luna 16 and Luna 20 regolith samples are compared. Differences in the chemistry of the Luna 16 mare regolith and that of mare basalts are discussed. The chemical affinity between the Luna 20 highland regolith and (a) anorthositic norites and (b) troctolites and/or spinel-troctolites has been ascertained.

  19. Chemistry in disks. IV. Benchmarking gas-grain chemical models with surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.; Hersant, F.; Wakelam, V.; Dutrey, A.; Chapillon, E.; Guilloteau, St.; Henning, Th.; Launhardt, R.; Piétu, V.; Schreyer, K.

    2010-11-01

    Context. We describe and benchmark two sophisticated chemical models developed by the Heidelberg and Bordeaux astrochemistry groups. Aims: The main goal of this study is to elaborate on a few well-described tests for state-of-the-art astrochemical codes covering a range of physical conditions and chemical processes, in particular those aimed at constraining current and future interferometric observations of protoplanetary disks. Methods: We considered three physical models: a cold molecular cloud core, a hot core, and an outer region of a T Tauri disk. Our chemical network (for both models) is based on the original gas-phase osu_03_2008 ratefile and includes gas-grain interactions and a set of surface reactions for the H-, O-, C-, S-, and N-bearing molecules. The benchmarking was performed with the increasing complexity of the considered processes: (1) the pure gas-phase chemistry, (2) the gas-phase chemistry with accretion and desorption, and (3) the full gas-grain model with surface reactions. The chemical evolution is modeled within 109 years using atomic initial abundances with heavily depleted metals and hydrogen in its molecular form. Results: The time-dependent abundances calculated with the two chemical models are essentially the same for all considered physical cases and for all species, including the most complex polyatomic ions and organic molecules. This result, however, required a lot of effort to make all necessary details consistent through the model runs, e.g., definition of the gas particle density, density of grain surface sites, or the strength and shape of the UV radiation field. Conclusions: The reference models and the benchmark setup, along with the two chemical codes and resulting time-dependent abundances are made publicly available on the internet. This will facilitate and ease the development of other astrochemical models and provide nonspecialists with a detailed description of the model ingredients and requirements to analyze the cosmic

  20. Inter-Division IV/V WG on Chemically Peculiar and Related Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Werner W.

    2007-03-01

    A meeting of the IAU Working Group on Chemically Peculiar and Related Stars was held in Sydney on July 16th, 2003. The focus of the business session was on possible effects on our WG due to plans for restructuring the IAU. Working Groups are to be evaluated every 3 years and in general, will be limited to a period of 3 or 6 years.

  1. Wintertime chemical compositions of coarse and fine fractions of particulate matter in Bolu, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Fatma; Keleş, Melek

    2016-07-01

    Coarse (particulate matter (PM)2.5-10) and fine (PM2.5) fraction of PM samples were collected between December 2014 and February 2015 at an urban sampling site located at the Bolu plain, of the western Black Sea region of Turkey. The collected samples were analyzed in terms of metals (Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb, S, Si, Ti, V, and Zn); elemental carbon (EC); and organic carbon (OC). Elevated concentrations measured in this wintertime study were ∼7.8 μg/m(3) in sum of PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 for SO4 (2-) and ∼59.9 μg/m(3) in PM2.5 for OC. The contributions of primary and secondary OC (POC and SOC, respectively) to total OC mass were 60 and 40 %, respectively, while contribution of SOC to OC increased by up to 74 % in stable atmospheric conditions. The significantly high OC/EC ratio (∼10.1) found in this study relative to other wintertime studies was attributed to increased emissions from residential heating and lower mixing height observed during the study. Two and three factors were resolved by factor analysis for PM2.5-10 and PM2.5, respectively. Two Saharan dust episodes were observed on 31 January and 1 February, during which crustal PM components such as Mg, Si, and Al increased as much as three times their background concentrations. PMID:27048328

  2. ATSDR evaluation of health effects of chemicals. IV. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): understanding a complex problem.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, M M; George, J D; Gold, K W; Cibulas, W; DeRosa, C T

    1996-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of chemicals that are formed during the incomplete burning of coal, oil, gas, wood, garbage, or other organic substances, such as tobacco and charbroiled meat. There are more than 100 PAHs. PAHs generally occur as complex mixtures (for example, as part of products such as soot), not as single compounds. PAHs are found throughout the environment in the air, water, and soil. As part of its mandate, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) prepares toxicological profiles on hazardous chemicals, including PAHs (ATSDR, 1995), found at facilities on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) and which pose the most significant potential threat to human health, as determined by ATSDR and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These profiles include information on health effects of chemicals from different routes and durations of exposure, their potential for exposure, regulations and advisories, and the adequacy of the existing database. Assessing the health effects of PAHs is a major challenge because environmental exposures to these chemicals are usually to complex mixtures of PAHs with other chemicals. The biological consequences of human exposure to mixtures of PAHs depend on the toxicity, carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic, of the individual components of the mixture, the types of interactions among them, and confounding factors that are not thoroughly understood. Also identified are components of exposure and health effects research needed on PAHs that will allow estimation of realistic human health risks posed by exposures to PAHs. The exposure assessment component of research should focus on (1) development of reliable analytical methods for the determination of bioavailable PAHs following ingestion, (2) estimation of bioavailable PAHs from environmental media, particularly the determination of particle-bound PAHs, (3

  3. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sabloff, J A

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  4. Sources and Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Fine Particles in Rabigh, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayebare, S. R.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Siddique, A.; Hussain, M. M.; Zeb, J.; Khwaja, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Air pollution research in Saudi Arabia and the whole of Middle East is at its inception, making air pollution in the region a significant problem. This study presents the first detailed data on fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations of Black Carbon (BC), ions, and trace metals at Rabigh, Saudi Arabia, and assesses their sources. Results showed several characteristic aspects of air pollution at Rabigh. Daily levels of PM2.5 and BC showed significant temporal variability ranging from 12.2 - 75.9 µg/m3 and 0.39 - 1.31 µg/m3, respectively. More than 90% of the time, the daily PM2.5 exceeded the 24 h WHO guideline of 20 µg/m3. Sulfate, NO3-, and NH4+ dominated the identifiable components. Trace metals with significantly higher concentrations included Si, S, Ca, Al, Fe, Na, Cl, Mg, K, and Ti, with average concentrations of 3.1, 2.2, 1.6, 1.2, 1.1, 0.7, 0.7, 0.5, 0.4 and 0.1 µg/m3, respectively. Based on the Air Quality Index (AQI), there were 44% days of moderate air quality, 33% days of unhealthy air quality for sensitive groups, and 23% days of unhealthy air quality throughout the study period. Two categories of aerosol trace metal sources were defined: anthropogenic (S, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Cd, Sb, and Pb) and naturally derived elements (Si, Al, and Fe). The extent of anthropogenic contribution was estimated by the degree of enrichment of these elements compared to the crustal composition. Soil resuspension and/or mobilization is an important source of "natural" elements, while "anthropogenic" elements originate primarily from fossil fuel combustion and industries. Ni and V correlated strongly pointing to combustion of heavy fuel oil as the likely source. A positive matrix factorization (PMF) was used to obtain information about possible sources. Our study highlights the need for stringent laws on PM2.5 emission control to protect human health and the environment.

  5. Dissolution of cerium(IV)-lanthanide(III) oxides: Comparative effect of chemical composition, temperature, and acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Horlait, D.; Clavier, N.; Szenknect, S.; Dacheux, N.; Dubois, V.

    2012-03-15

    The dissolution of Ce{sub 1-x}Ln{sub x}O{sub 2-x/2} solid solutions was undertaken in various acid media in order to evaluate the effects of several physicochemical parameters such as chemical composition, temperature, and acidity on the reaction kinetics. The normalized dissolution rates (R{sub L,0}) were found to be strongly modified by the trivalent lanthanide incorporation rate, due to the presence of oxygen vacancies decreasing the samples cohesion. Conversely, the nature of the trivalent cation considered only weakly impacted the R{sub L,0} values. The dependence of the normalized dissolution rates on the temperature then appeared to be of the same order of magnitude than that of chemical composition. Moreover, it allowed determining the corresponding activation energy (E{sub A} ≅ 60-85 kJ.mol{sup -1}) which accounts for a dissolution driven by surface-controlled reactions. A similar conclusion was made regarding the acidity of the solution: the partial order related to (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) reaching about 0.7. Finally, the prevailing effect of the incorporation of aliovalent cations in the fluorite-type CeO{sub 2} matrix on the dissolution kinetics precluded the observation of slight effects such as those linked to the complexing agents or to the crystal structure of the samples. (authors)

  6. Child Development Associate Training Program. Unit IV: Motor Development in Young Children. Module 2: Fostering the Development of Fine Motor Skills in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Skills necessary for fostering fine motor development in young children are indicated and discussed in this training module for Child Development Associate (CDA) trainees. Trainees are taught to identify appropriate classroom equipment and materials, plan lessons and activities, assess children's skills, and finally teach a lesson or guide an…

  7. Mercury Speciation by X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy and Sequential Chemical Extractions: A Comparison of Speciation Methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.S.; Bloom, N.S.; Rytuba, J.J.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Determining the chemical speciation of mercury in contaminated mining and industrial environments is essential for predicting its solubility, transport behavior, and potential bioavailability as well as for designing effective remediation strategies. In this study, two techniques for determining Hg speciation-X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and sequential chemical extractions (SCE)-are independently applied to a set of samples with Hg concentrations ranging from 132 to 7539 mg/kg to determine if the two techniques provide comparable Hg speciation results. Generally, the proportions of insoluble HgS (cinnabar, metacinnabar) and HgSe identified by XAFS correlate well with the proportion of Hg removed in the aqua regia extraction demonstrated to remove HgS and HgSe. Statistically significant (> 10%) differences are observed however in samples containing more soluble Hg-containing phases (HgCl2, HgO, Hg3S2O 4). Such differences may be related to matrix, particle size, or crystallinity effects, which could affect the apparent solubility of Hg phases present. In more highly concentrated samples, microscopy techniques can help characterize the Hg-bearing species in complex multiphase natural samples.

  8. Source apportionment of ambient fine particle from combined size distribution and chemical composition data during summertime in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. R.; Wang, Y. S.; Liu, Q.; Hu, B.; Sun, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous particle number concentration and chemical composition data were collected over one month during summertime in Beijing to investigate the source apportionment of ambient fine particles. Particle size distributions from 15 nm to 2.5 μm in diameter and composition data, such as organic matter, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chlorine, and gaseous pollutants, were analyzed using positive matrix factorisation (PMF) which indentified eight factors: cooking, solid mode exhaust, nucleation mode exhaust, accumulation mode, secondary nitrate, secondary sulfate, coal-fired power plant and road dust. Nearly two-thirds of particle number concentrations were attributed to cooking (22.8%) and motor vehicle (37.5%), whereas road dust, coal-fired power plant and regional sources contributed 69.0% to particle volume concentrations. Local and remote sources were distinguished using size distributions associated with each factor. Local sources were generally characterised by unimodal or bimodal number distributions, consisting mostly of particles less 0.1 μm in diameter, and regional sources were defined by mostly accumulation mode particles. Nearly one third of secondary nitrate and secondary sulfate was transported from the surrounding areas of Beijing during study period. Overall the introduction of combination of particle number concentration and chemical composition in PMF model is successful at separating the components and quantifying relative contributions to the particle number and volume population in a complex urban atmosphere.

  9. Clarifying the chemical state of additives in membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells by X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Toshihiro; Itoh, Takanori

    2016-02-01

    Cerium and manganese compounds are used in the membrane for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) as radical scavengers to mitigate chemical degradation of the membrane. The chemical states of cerium and manganese in the membrane were investigated using a fluorescence X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to open circuit voltage (OCV) condition, under which hydroxyl radicals attack the membrane; a shift in absorption energy in X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra was compared between Ce- and Mn-containing membranes before and after OCV testing. In the case of the Ce-containing MEA, there was no significant difference in XANES spectra before and after OCV testing, whereas in the case of the Mn-containing MEA, there was an obvious shift in XANES absorption energy after OCV testing, indicating that Mn atoms with higher valence state than 2+ exist in the membrane after OCV testing. This can be attributed to the difference in the rate of reduction; the reaction of Ce4+ with ·OOH is much faster than that of Mn3+ with ·OOH, leaving some of the Mn atoms with higher valence state. It was confirmed that cerium and manganese redox couples reduced the attack from radicals, mitigating membrane degradation.

  10. Chemical characterization of indoor and outdoor fine particulate matter in an occupied apartment in Rome, Italy.

    PubMed

    Perrino, C; Tofful, L; Canepari, S

    2016-08-01

    The daily concentration and chemical composition of PM2.5 was determined in indoor and outdoor 24-h samples simultaneously collected for a total of 5 weeks during a winter and a summer period in an apartment sited in Rome, Italy. The use of a specifically developed very quiet sampler (<35 dB) allowed the execution of the study while the family living in the apartment led its normal life. The indoor concentration of PM2.5 showed a small seasonal variation, while outdoor values were much higher during the winter study. Outdoor sources were found to contribute significantly to indoor PM concentration especially during the summer, when the apartment was naturally ventilated by opening the windows. During the winter the infiltration of outdoor PM components was lower and mostly regulated by the particle dimensions. Organics displayed In/Out ratios higher than unity during both periods; their indoor production increased significantly during the weekends, where the family stayed mostly at home. PM components were grouped into macrosources (soil, sea, secondary inorganics, traffic, organics). During the summer the main contributions to outdoor PM2.5 came from soil (30%), secondary inorganics (29%) and organics (22%). Organics dominated both indoor PM2.5 during the summer (60%) and outdoor and indoor PM2.5 during the winter (51% and 66%, respectively). PMID:26184798

  11. Airborne fine particulate pollution in Jinan, China: Concentrations, chemical compositions and influence on visibility impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lingxiao; Zhou, Xuehua; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Yang; Cheng, Shuhui; Xu, Pengju; Gao, Xiaomei; Nie, Wei; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Wenxing

    2012-08-01

    Daily PM2.5 samples were collected simultaneously at an urban site (SD) and a rural site (MP) in Jinan, China from March 2006 to February 2007. The samples were analyzed for major inorganic and organic water-soluble ions, 24 elements and carbonaceous species to determine the spatial and temporal variations of PM2.5 mass concentrations and chemical compositions and evaluate their contributions to visibility impairment. The annual average concentrations of PM2.5 were 148.71 μg m-3 and 97.59 μg m-3 at SD and MP, respectively. The predominant component of PM2.5 was (NH4)2SO4 at SD and organic mass at MP, which accounted for 28.71% and 37.25% of the total mass, respectively. The higher SOR (sulfur oxidation ratio) and ratios of OC/EC at SD indicated that the formation of secondary inorganic ions and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) could be accelerated in the urban area. Large size (NH4)2SO4 and large size organic mass were the most important contributors to visibility impairment at SD and MP, accounting for 43.80% and 41.02% of the light extinction coefficient, respectively.

  12. Surface study of fine MgFe 2O 4 ferrite powder prepared by chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aono, Hiromichi; Hirazawa, Hideyuki; Naohara, Takashi; Maehara, Tsunehiro

    2008-02-01

    To study surface behaviors, MgFe 2O 4 ferrite materials having different grain sizes were synthesized by two different chemical methods, i.e., a polymerization method and a reverse coprecipitation method. The single phase of the cubic MgFe 2O 4 was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction method for both the precursors decomposed at 600-1000 °C except for a very small peak of Fe 2O 3 was detected for the samples calcined at 600 and 700 °C by the polymerization method. The crystal size and particle size increased with an increase in the sintering temperature using both methods. The conductance of the MgFe 2O 4 decreased when the atmosphere was changed from ambient air to air containing 10.0 ppm NO 2. The conductance change, C = G(air)/ G(10 ppm NO 2), was reduced with an increase in the operating temperature. For the polymerization method, the maximum C-value was ca. 40 at 300 °C for the samples sintered at 900 °C. However, the samples sintered at 1000 °C showed a low conductance change in the 10 ppm NO 2 gas, because the ratio of the O 2 gas adsorption sites on the particle surface is smaller than those of the samples having a high C-value. The low Mg content on the surface affects the low ratio of the gas adsorption sites. For the reverse coprecipitation method, the particle size was smaller than that of the polymerization method. Although a stable conductance was obtained for the sample sintered at 900 and 1000 °C, its conductance change was less than that of the polymerization method.

  13. Chemical pathology of homocysteine. IV. Excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2009-01-01

    This review considers recent advances in the chemical pathology of homocysteine in atherogenesis, oxidative metabolism, and carcinogenesis. Homocysteine is a potent excitatory neurotransmitter that binds to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and leads to oxidative stress, cytoplasmic calcium influx, cellular apoptosis, and endothelial dysfunction. According to the adsorption-induction theory, cytoplasmic calcium influx leads to depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by reaction with cytoplasmic phosphate, leading to calcium apatite deposition. Oxidative stress is caused by failure of ATP synthesis and accumulation of reactive oxygen radicals, theoretically because of inhibition of thioretinaco ozonide function within mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. The toxicity of oxygen difluoride is theoretically explained by the displacement of ozone from thioretinaco ozonide, leading to inhibition of cellular respiration. Depletion of thioretinaco ozonide from cellular membranes is suggested to underlie the carcinogenic and atherogenic effects of fluoride and other electrophilic carcinogens. In atherogenesis the acute inflammatory response is related to cellular apoptosis and necrosis, autoantibodies to proteins containing peptide-bound homocysteine and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL), and microbial products and antigens originating from homocysteinylated LDL aggregates trapped within vasa vasorum of developing atherosclerotic plaques. The trapping of lipoprotein aggregates and obstruction of the lumen of vasa vasorum are enhanced by high tissue pressure and by endothelial dysfunction because of narrowing of the lumen by swollen and hyperplastic endothelial cells, leading to the creation of vulnerable plaques. PMID:19667406

  14. The stellar populations of M33's outer regions - IV. Inflow history and chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Michael K.; Sarajedini, A.

    2008-10-01

    We have modelled the observed colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) at one location in M33's outskirts under the framework of a simple chemical evolution scenario which adopts instantaneous and delayed recycling for the nucleosynthetic products of Type II and Ia supernovae. In this scenario, interstellar gas forms stars at a rate modulated by the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation and gas outflow occurs at a rate proportional to the star formation rate (SFR). With this approach, we put broad constraints on the role of gas flows during this region's evolution and compare its [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] relation with that of other Local Group systems. We find that models with gas inflow are significantly better than the closed-box model at reproducing the observed distribution of stars in the CMD. The best models have a majority of gas inflow taking place in the last 7 Gyr, and relatively little in the last 3 Gyr. These models predict most stars in this region to have [α/Fe] ratios lower than the bulk of the Milky Way's halo. The predictions for the present-day SFR, gas mass and oxygen abundance compare favourably to independent empirical estimates. Our results paint a picture in which M33's outer disc formed from the protracted inflow of gas over several Gyr with at least half of the total inflow occurring since z ~ 1.

  15. Chemical Composition and Emission Sources of the Fine Particulate Matters in a Southeast Asian Mega City (Dhaka, Bangladesh)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution has significant impact on human health, climate change, agriculture, visibility reduction, and also on the atmospheric chemistry. There are many studies already reported about the direct relation of the human mortality and morbidity with the increase of the atmospheric particulate matters. Especially, fine particulate matters can easily enter into the human respiratory system and causes many diseases. Particulate matters have the properties to absorb the solar radiation and impact on the climate. Dhaka, Bangladesh is a densely populated mega-city in the world. About 16 million inhabitants are living within an area of 360 square kilometers. Air quality situation has been degrading due to unplanned growth, increasing vehicles, severe traffic jams, brick kilns, industries, construction, and also transboundary air pollution. A rapidly growing number of vehicles has worsen the air quality in spite of major policy interventions, e.g., ban of two-stroke and three-wheeled vehicles, phase out of 20 years old vehicles, conversion to compressed natural gas (CNGs), etc. Introduction of CNGs to reduce air pollution was not the solution for fine particles at all, as evidence shows that CNGs and diesel engines are the major sources of fine particles. High concentration of the air pollutants in Dhaka city such as PM, carbonaceous species (black and organic carbon), CO, etc. has already been reported. PM2.5 mass, chemical composition (e.g., BC, OC, SO42-, NO3-, trace elements, etc.), aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and emission sources of our recent measurements at the highly polluted south East Asian Mega city (Dhaka) Bangladesh will be presented in the conference. PM2.5 samples were collected on filters with Digital PM2.5 sampler (Switzerland) and Air photon, USA. BC was measured from filters (with thermal and optical method) and also real time with an Aethalometer AE42 (Magee Scitific., USA). Water soluble ions were determined from filters with ion chromatogram. AOD

  16. The Nainital-Cape Survey. IV. A search for pulsational variability in 108 chemically peculiar stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, S.; Martinez, P.; Chowdhury, S.; Chakradhari, N. K.; Joshi, Y. C.; van Heerden, P.; Medupe, T.; Kumar, Y. B.; Kuhn, R. B.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Nainital-Cape Survey is a dedicated ongoing survey program to search for and study pulsational variability in chemically peculiar (CP) stars to understand their internal structure and evolution. Aims: The main aims of this survey are to find new pulsating Ap and Am stars in the northern and southern hemisphere and to perform asteroseismic studies of these new pulsators. Methods: The survey is conducted using high-speed photometry. The candidate stars were selected on the basis of having Strömgren photometric indices similar to those of known pulsating CP stars. Results: Over the last decade a total of 337 candidate pulsating CP stars were observed for the Nainital-Cape Survey, making it one of the longest ground-based surveys for pulsation in CP stars in terms of time span and sample size. The previous papers of this series presented seven new pulsating variables and 229 null results. In this paper we present the light curves, frequency spectra and various astrophysical parameters of the 108 additional CP stars observed since the last reported results. We also tabulated the basic physical parameters of the known roAp stars. As a part of establishing the detection limits in the Nainital-Cape Survey, we investigated the scintillation noise level at the two observing sites used in this survey, Sutherland and Nainital, by comparing the combined frequency spectra stars observed from each location. Our analysis shows that both the sites permit the detection of variations of the order of 0.6 milli-magnitude (mmag) in the frequency range 1-4 mHz, Sutherland is on average marginally better. The dataset is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A116

  17. Chemical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX) 1 to 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses the need for detailed chemical information on the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) generated by commercial aviation engines. The exhaust plumes of nine engine models were sampled during the three test campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (AP...

  18. Micro-chemical and metallurgical study of Samnite bronze belts from ancient Abruzzo (central Italy, VIII-IV BC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccucci, Cristina; Ingo, Gabriel Maria; Faustoferri, Amalia; Pierigè, Maria Isabella; Parisi, Erica Isabella; Di Carlo, Gabriella; De Caro, Tilde; Faraldi, Federica

    2013-12-01

    The Samnite bronze belts and the chest disk cuirasses (VIII-IV BC) are the distinctive defensive weapons of the Samnite warriors having likely also a symbolic relevance. These artefacts were mainly found during the archaeological excavations of warriors' graves from ancient Abruzzo (central Italy). Their chemical composition, metallurgical features and corrosion products formed during the long-term burial have been studied by means of the combined use of analytical techniques such as optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray micro-analysis (SEM-EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The micro-chemical and structural results show that the bronze belts have often been produced by using unusual high-tin bronze alloys achieving a silver-like appearance and by performing tailored cycles of thermal treatments under reducing conditions and hot mechanical working aimed to shape the high-tin alloys in the form of a thin bronze sheet. Furthermore, the investigation has shown that the main alloying elements have been transformed during the burial into mineral species giving rise to the formation of stratified structures constituted by different mineral phases such as tin oxides, cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and copper carbonates (azurite (Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2 and malachite (CuCO3Cu(OH)2)) as well as dangerous chlorine-based compounds such as nantokite (CuCl) and atacamite (Cu2(OH)3Cl) polymorphs. This information evidences the strict interaction of the alloying elements with the soil components as well as the occurrence of the copper cyclic corrosion as a post-burial degradation phenomenon. The present study confirms that the combined micro-chemical and micro-structural investigation techniques such as SEM-EDS, XPS, XRD and OM can be successfully used to investigate the technological production processes of the ancient artefacts and to achieve the detailed micro-chemical and structural description of the

  19. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-07-01

    Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. Intercomparison of two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21) indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the filter-adjusted continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Correlations of the ACSM NR-PM1 (non-refractory particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 1 μm) plus elemental carbon (EC) with tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) PM2.5 and Federal Reference Method (FRM) PM1 mass are strong with r2 > 0.7 and r2 > 0.8, respectively. Discrepancies might be attributed to evaporative losses of semi-volatile species from the filter measurements used to adjust the collocated continuous measurements. This suggests that adjusting the ambient aerosol continuous measurements with results from filter analysis introduced additional bias to the measurements. We also recommend to calibrate the ambient aerosol monitoring instruments using aerosol standards rather than gas-phase standards. The fitting approach for ACSM relative ionization for sulfate was shown to improve the comparisons between ACSM and collocated measurements in the absence of calibrated values, suggesting the importance of adding sulfate calibration into the ACSM calibration routine.

  20. Direct micellar systems as a tool to improve the efficiency of aromatic substrate conversion for fine chemicals production.

    PubMed

    Berti, D; Randazzo, D; Briganti, F; Baglioni, P; Scozzafava, A; Di Gennaro, P; Galli, E; Bestetti, G

    2000-04-01

    Whole-cell bioconversion of naphthalene to (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene by Escherichia coli JM109(pPS1778) recombinant strain, carrying naphthalene dioxygenase and regulatory genes cloned from Pseudomonas fluorescens N3, in direct micellar systems is optimized as an example of fine chemicals bioproduction from scarcely water-soluble substrates. The oxygen insertion into the aromatic substrate, which stops at the enantiomerically pure cis dihydroxylated product, is performed in direct microemulsion systems, where a non-ionic surfactant stabilizes naphthalene containing oil droplets in an aqueous medium. These media provide an increased substrate solubility so that a homogeneous reaction can be carried out, while not affecting bacteria viability and performances. The influence of the chemical nature of the oil is investigated. The phase behavior of the direct microemulsion system was monitored for three different oils as a function their volume fraction and characterized through light scattering. The addition of isopropyl palmitate, oleic acid, or glyceryl trioleate, 0.6-1.2% v/v to the micellar systems, led to an increase of the substrate concentration in the solution and particularly its bioavailability, allowing faster catalytic conversions. All these systems resulted in being suitable for catalytic conversions of aromatic compounds. Although the nature of the oil does have a deep effect on the phase behavior of the micellar systems, in the present investigation no differences in the yields and in the rates of product formation of the enzymatic system were observed on changing the oil, thus showing that in this case the substrate concentration or bioavailability is not the rate-limiting step. PMID:10830854

  1. Spatial and Temporal Variation in Fine Particulate Matter Mass and Chemical Composition: The Middle East Consortium for Aerosol Research Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdeen, Ziad; Heo, Jongbae; Wu, Bo; Shpund, Jacob; Vanger, Arye; Sharf, Geula; Moise, Tamar; Brenner, Shmuel; Nassar, Khaled; Saleh, Rami; Al-Mahasneh, Qusai M.; Sarnat, Jeremy A.; Schauer, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) samples were collected from January to December 2007 to investigate the sources and chemical speciation in Palestine, Jordan, and Israel. The 24-h PM2.5 samples were collected on 6-day intervals at eleven urban and rural sites simultaneously. Major chemical components including metals, ions, and organic and elemental carbon were analyzed. The mass concentrations of PM2.5 across the 11 sites varied from 20.6 to 40.3 μg/m3, with an average of 28.7 μg/m3. Seasonal variation of PM2.5 concentrations was substantial, with higher average concentrations (37.3 μg/m3) in the summer (April–June) months compared to winter (October–December) months (26.0 μg/m3) due mainly to high contributions of sulfate and crustal components. PM2.5 concentrations in the spring were greatly impacted by regional dust storms. Carbonaceous mass was the most abundant component, contributing 40% to the total PM2.5 mass averaged across the eleven sites. Crustal components averaged 19.1% of the PM2.5 mass and sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate accounted for 16.2%, 6.4%, and 3.7%, respectively, of the total PM2.5 mass. The results of this study demonstrate the need to better protect the health and welfare of the residents on both sides of the Jordan River in the Middle East. PMID:25045751

  2. Chemical composition of fine particles in fresh smoke plumes from boreal wild-land fires in Europe.

    PubMed

    Saarnio, Karri; Aurela, Minna; Timonen, Hilkka; Saarikoski, Sanna; Teinilä, Kimmo; Mäkelä, Timo; Sofiev, Mikhail; Koskinen, Jarkko; Aalto, Pasi P; Kulmala, Markku; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Hillamo, Risto

    2010-05-15

    A series of smoke plumes was detected in Helsinki, Finland, during a one-month-lasting period in August 2006. The smoke plumes originated from wildfires close to Finland, and they were short-term and had a high particulate matter (PM) concentration. Physical and chemical properties of fine particles in those smokes were characterised by a wide range of real-time measurements that enabled the examination of individual plume events. Concurrently PM(1) filter samples were collected and analysed off-line. Satellite observations employing MODIS sensor on board of NASA EOS Terra satellite with the dispersion model SILAM and the Fire Assimilation System were used for evaluation of the emission fluxes from wildfires. The model predicted well the timing of the plumes but the predicted PM concentrations differed from the observed. The measurements showed that the major growth in PM concentration was caused by submicrometer particles consisting mainly of particulate organic matter (POM). POM had not totally oxidised during the transport based on the low WSOC-to-OC ratio. The fresh plumes were compared to another major smoke episode that was observed in Helsinki during April-May 2006. The duration and the source areas of the two episode periods differed. The episode in April-May was a period of nearly constantly upraised level of long-range transported PM and it was composed of aged particles when arriving in Helsinki. The two episodes had differences also in the chemical composition of PM. The mass concentrations of biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan, potassium, and oxalate) increased during both the episodes but different concentration levels of elemental carbon and potassium indicated that the episodes differed in the form of burning as well as in the burning material. In spring dry crop residue and hay from the previous season were burnt whereas in August smokes from smouldering and incomplete burning of fresh vegetation were detected. PMID:20359735

  3. Magnetic properties of Sr-La system M-type ferrite fine particles prepared by controlling the chemical coprecipitation method

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Seki, Hirota

    1999-09-01

    Single phase Sr-La M-type ferrite fine particles were prepared by the chemical coprecipitation and subsequent heat-treatment methods. Optimum magnetic properties were achieved with materials of composition Sr{sub 0.794}{sup 2+}La{sub 0.172}{sup 3+}Fe{sub 0.335}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 11.74}{sup 3+}O{sub 19}, and heat-treatment of 950 C x 2h in air. The magnetic and physical properties are {sigma}{sub s} = 90.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} Wb {center{underscore}dot} m/kg (72.0emu/g), H{sub cJ} = 505.3 kA/m (6.35 kOe), Tc = 454.4 C, the lattice constants a = 0.5882nm, c = 2.303nm, the activation energy = 230.9kJ/mol(55.2kcal/mol), and the average particle size = 0.3{micro}m.

  4. Characterization of chemical components and bioreactivity of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during incense burning.

    PubMed

    Lui, K H; Bandowe, Benjamin A Musa; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Cao, Jun-Ji; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Lee, S C; Hu, Di; Ho, K F

    2016-06-01

    The chemical and bioreactivity properties of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emitted during controlled burning of different brands of incense were characterized. Incenses marketed as being environmentally friendly emitted lower mass of PM2.5 particulates than did traditional incenses. However, the environmentally friendly incenses produced higher total concentrations of non-volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and some oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs). Human alveolar epithelial A549 cells were exposed to the collected PM2.5, followed by determining oxidative stress and inflammation. There was moderate to strong positive correlation (R > 0.60, p < 0.05) between selected PAHs and OPAHs against oxidative-inflammatory responses. Strong positive correlation was observed between interleukin 6 (IL-6) and summation of total Group B2 PAHs/OPAHs (∑7PAHs/ΣOPAHs). The experimental data indicate that emissions from the environmentally friendly incenses contained higher concentrations of several PAH and OPAH compounds than did traditional incense. Moreover, these PAHs and OPAHs were strongly correlated with inflammatory responses. The findings suggest a need to revise existing regulation of such products. PMID:26994327

  5. Fine particulate matter source apportionment for the chemical speciation trends network site at Birmingham, Alabama, using positive matrix factorization

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, K.; Jayanty, R.K.; Flanagan, J.B.

    2008-01-15

    The Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model version 1.1 was used with data from the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) Chemical Speciation Trends Network (STN) to estimate source contributions to ambient PM2.5 in a highly industrialized urban setting in the southeastern United States. Model results consistently resolved 10 factors that are interpreted as two secondary, five industrial, one motor vehicle, one road dust, and one biomass burning sources. It was found that most PMF factors did not cleanly represent single source types and instead are 'contaminated' by other sources. Secondary particulate matter formed by atmospheric processes, such as sulfate and secondary OC, contribute the majority of ambient PM2.5 and exhibit strong seasonality 37 {+-} 10% winter vs. 55 {+-} 16% summer average. Motor vehicle emissions constitute the biggest primary PM2.5 mass contribution. In summary, this study demonstrates the utility of the EC tracer method to effectively blank-correct the OC concentrations in the STN dataset. In addition, examination of the effect of input uncertainty estimates on model results indicates that the estimated uncertainties currently being provided with the STN data may be somewhat lower than the levels needed for optimum modeling results. An appendix , available to members on the website www.awma lists stationary sources of PM2.5 within 10 km of the NHBM site and PM2.5 emissions greater than 1 ton per year. 71 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Fluorinated Cerium(IV) Enaminolates: Alternative Precursors for Chemical Vapor Deposition of CeO2 Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Schläfer, J; Graf, D; Fornalczyk, G; Mettenbörger, A; Mathur, S

    2016-06-01

    High-yield synthesis of four new fluorinated enaminones LH2 (RfC(O)C2H2NH)2C2H4 (Rf = CF3 (2a), C2F5 (2b), C3F7 (2c)) and (F3CC(O)C2H2NH)2C3H6 (2a') as dianionic ligands is described. The ligands were characterized in solution (via nuclear magnetic resoannce (NMR)) as well as in the solid state (via X-ray diffraction (XRD)). The ligating ability of the enaminones was verified by reacting them with [Ce2(O(i)Pr)8(HO(i)Pr)2], which resulted in monomeric cerium(IV) complexes [CeL2] (3a-c, 3a') based on tetradentate chelation of the ligands. Cerium enaminolates were comprehensively analyzed by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and single-crystal XRD studies to verify their monomeric nature. High stability under ambient conditions and high volatility makes them a potential precursor for the gas-phase synthesis of CeO2. Complexes 3a and 3b were applied as precursors in thermal and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to obtain crystalline ceria films with different surface morphologies. The purity and surface states of the films were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which revealed a high amount of Ce(3+) on the subsurface of CeO2 films. PMID:27159551

  7. Structural Analysis of the Mn(IV)/Fe(III) Cofactor of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Younker, Jarod M.; Krest, Courtney M.; Jiang, Wei; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J. Martin; Green, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    The class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) uses a stable Mn(IV)/Fe(III) cofactor to initiate nucleotide reduction by a free-radical mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to postulate a structure for this cofactor. Fe and Mn K-edge EXAFS data yield an intermetallic distance of ~2.92 Å. The Mn data also suggest the presence of a short 1.74 Å Mn—O bond. These metrics are compared to the results of DFT calculations on 12 cofactor models derived from the crystal structure of the inactive Fe2(III/III) form of the protein. Models are differentiated by the protonation states of their bridging and terminal OHX ligands as well as the location of the Mn(IV) ion (site 1 or 2). The models that agree best with experimental observation feature a µ-1,3-carboxylate bridge (E120), terminal solvent (H2O/OH) to site 1, one µ-O bridge, and one µ-OH bridge. The site-placement of the metal ions cannot be discerned from the available data. PMID:18937466

  8. Characterization of chemical composition and concentration of fine particulate matter during a transit strike in Ottawa, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Luyi; Chan, Tak Wai; Ke, Fu; Wang, Daniel K. W.

    2014-06-01

    From December 10, 2008 to February 9, 2009, a strike stopped the public transit services in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. To understand the changes in air quality associated with the transit strike, the chemical composition and concentration of the fine particulate matter with diameters less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5), collected before, during, and after the transit strike period, were evaluated. The collected PM2.5 samples were analyzed to determine the particulate matter mass, the levels of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), as well as the particulate non-polar semi-volatiles, e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, and steranes. Particle number size distributions measured during and after the transit strike period were also compared. Results indicated that during transit strike months, particle number size distributions were entirely dominated by nucleation mode particles leading to an increase in total particle number concentration by about 79%. In addition, particulate matter, organic carbon, and elemental carbon mass concentrations also increased by over 100%. The average total PAH levels during the strike months were higher by a factor of about 7. Elevated concentrations of high molecular weight PAHs (i.e., PAH with 5 and 6 rings) observed during the strike months suggested that there were more gasoline-powered vehicles on the roads over that period. The level of carcinogenic benzo[a]pyrene was higher by a factor of 5. Mass concentrations of hopanes and steranes were 30-98% higher during the strike months than non-strike months and exhibited strong correlations with EC suggesting the primary origin of these compounds. These results indicated that the increased traffic volume due to the passenger vehicles and the change in driving pattern during the transit strike period reduced the local air quality.

  9. Physico-chemical properties of the new generation IV iron preparations ferumoxytol, iron isomaltoside 1000 and ferric carboxymaltose.

    PubMed

    Neiser, Susann; Rentsch, Daniel; Dippon, Urs; Kappler, Andreas; Weidler, Peter G; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Wilhelm, Maria; Braitsch, Michaela; Funk, Felix; Philipp, Erik; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    The advantage of the new generation IV iron preparations ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), ferumoxytol (FMX), and iron isomaltoside 1000 (IIM) is that they can be administered in relatively high doses in a short period of time. We investigated the physico-chemical properties of these preparations and compared them with those of the older preparations iron sucrose (IS), sodium ferric gluconate (SFG), and low molecular weight iron dextran (LMWID). Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy indicated akaganeite structures (β-FeOOH) for the cores of FCM, IIM and IS, and a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) structure for that of FMX. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies confirmed the structure of the carbohydrate of FMX as a reduced, carboxymethylated, low molecular weight dextran, and that of IIM as a reduced Dextran 1000. Polarography yielded significantly different fingerprints of the investigated compounds. Reductive degradation kinetics of FMX was faster than that of FCM and IIM, which is in contrast to the high stability of FMX towards acid degradation. The labile iron content, i.e. the amount of iron that is only weakly bound in the polynuclear iron core, was assessed by a qualitative test that confirmed decreasing labile iron contents in the order SFG ≈ IS > LMWID ≥ FMX ≈ IIM ≈ FCM. The presented data are a step forward in the characterization of these non-biological complex drugs, which is a prerequisite to understand their cellular uptake mechanisms and the relationship between the structure and physiological safety as well as efficacy of these complexes. PMID:25801756

  10. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in Downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was recently developed to provide long-term real-time continuous measurements of ambient non-refractory (i.e., organic, sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, and chloride) submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1). Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the ACSM against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. The collocated measurements included a second ACSM, continuous and integrated sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium measurements, as well as a semi-continuous Sunset organic carbon/elemental carbon (OC/EC) analyzer, continuous tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM), 24 h integrated Federal Reference Method (FRM) filters, and continuous scanning electrical mobility system-mixing condensation particle counter (SEMS-MCPC). Intercomparison of the two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21); mass concentration for all chemical species agreed within ±27%, indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. Chemical constituents measured by the ACSM are also compared with those obtained from the continuous measurements from JST. Since the continuous measurement concentrations are adjusted to match the integrated filter measurements, these comparisons reflect the combined uncertainties of the ACSM, continuous, and filter measurements. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Differences between ACSM mass concentrations and the filter-adjusted JST continuous data are 5-27%, 4

  11. Transport of intranasally instilled fine Fe2O3 particles into the brain: micro-distribution, chemical states, and histopathological observation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Feng, Wei Y; Wang, Meng; Shi, Jun W; Zhang, Fang; Ouyang, Hong; Zhao, Yu L; Chai, Zhi F; Huang, Yu Y; Xie, Ya N; Wang, Hai F; Wang, Jing

    2007-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that inhaled fine (d < 2.5 microm) and ultrafine (d < 100 nm) particles produce more severe toxicity than coarse particles. Some recent data support the concept that the central nervous system (CNS) may be a target for the inhaled fine particulates. This work describes initial observation of the transport of intranasally instilled fine ferric oxide (Fe2O3) particles in animal brain. The iron micro-distribution and chemical state in the mice olfactory bulb and brain stem on day 14 after intranasal instillation of fine Fe2O3 particle (280 +/- 80 nm) suspension at a single dose of 40 mg/kg body weight were analyzed by synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The micro-distribution map of iron in the olfactory bulb and brain stem shows an obvious increase of Fe contents in the olfactory nerve and the trigeminus of brain stem, suggesting that Fe2O3 particles were possibly transported via uptake by sensory nerve endings of the olfactory nerve and trigeminus. The XANES results indicate that the ratios of Fe (III)/Fe (II) were increased in the olfactory bulb and brain stem. The further histopathological observation showed that the neuron fatty degeneration occurred in the CA3 area of hippocampus. Such results imply an adverse impact of inhalation of fine Fe2O3 particles on CNS. PMID:17916926

  12. Pelletization of fine coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1995-12-31

    Coal is one of the most abundant energy resources in the US with nearly 800 million tons of it being mined annually. Process and environmental demands for low-ash, low-sulfur coals and economic constraints for high productivity are leading the coal industry to use such modern mining methods as longwall mining and such newer coal processing techniques as froth flotation, oil agglomeration, chemical cleaning and synthetic fuel production. All these processes are faced with one common problem area--fine coals. Dealing effectively with these fine coals during handling, storage, transportation, and/or processing continues to be a challenge facing the industry. Agglomeration by the unit operation of pelletization consists of tumbling moist fines in drums or discs. Past experimental work and limited commercial practice have shown that pelletization can alleviate the problems associated with fine coals. However, it was recognized that there exists a serious need for delineating the fundamental principles of fine coal pelletization. Accordingly, a research program has been carried involving four specific topics: (i) experimental investigation of coal pelletization kinetics, (ii) understanding the surface principles of coal pelletization, (iii) modeling of coal pelletization processes, and (iv) simulation of fine coal pelletization circuits. This report summarizes the major findings and provides relevant details of the research effort.

  13. Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments

    DOEpatents

    Kansa, E.J.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1997-01-14

    The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculants and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude. 8 figs.

  14. Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments

    DOEpatents

    Kansa, Edward J.; Wijesinghe, Ananda M.; Viani, Brian E.

    1997-01-01

    The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculents and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude.

  15. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A HIGH-VOLUME DICHOTOMOUS SAMPLER FOR CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF COARSE AND FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the development and field evaluation of a compact high-volume dichotomous sampler (HVDS) that collects coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter. In its primary configuration as tested, the sampler size-fractionates PM10 into...

  16. Chemical modeling of Arsenic(III, V) and Selenium(IV, VI) adsorption by soils surrounding ash disposal facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leachate derived from coal ash disposal facilities is a potential anthropogenic source of arsenic and selenium to the environment. To establish a practical framework for predicting attenuation and transport of As and Se in ash leachates, the adsorption of As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) had been...

  17. Organo- and nano-catalyst in greener reaction medium: Microwave-assisted expedient synthesis of fine chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of emerging microwave (MW) -assisted chemistry techniques is dramatically reducing chemical waste and reaction times in several organic syntheses and chemical transformations. A brief account of our experiences in developing MW-assisted organic transformations, which invo...

  18. Update on the Chemical Composition Of Crystalline, Smectite, and Amorphous Components for Rocknest Soil and John Klein and Cumberland Mudstone Drill Fines at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Rampe, E. B.; Treiman, A. H.; Yen, A. S.; Achilles, C. N.; Archer, P. D.; Bristow, T. F.; Cavanaugh, P.; Fenrdrich, K.; Crisp, J. A.; Des Marais, D. J.; Farmer, J. D.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; McAdam, A. C.; Morookian, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously calculated the chemical compositions of the X-ray-diffraction (XRD) amorphous component of three solid samples (Rocknest (RN) soil, John Klein (JK) drill fines, and Cumberland (CB) drill fines) using major-element chemistry (APXS), volatile-element chemistry (SAM), and crystalline- phase mineralogy (CheMin) obtained by the Curiosity rover as a part of the ongoing Mars Science Laboratory mission in Gale Crater. According to CheMin analysis, the RN and the JK and CB samples are mineralogically distinct in that RN has no detectable clay minerals and both JK and CB have significant concentrations of high-Fe saponite. The chemical composition of the XRD amorphous component is the composition remaining after mathematical removal of the compositions of crystalline components, including phyllosilicates if present. Subsequent to, we have improved the unit cell parameters for Fe-forsterite, augite, and pigeonite, resulting in revised chemical compositions for the XRD-derived crystalline component (excluding clay minerals). We update here the calculated compositions of amorphous components using these revised mineral compositions.

  19. pH-metric chemical speciation modeling and studies of in vitro antidiabetic effects of bis[(imidazolyl)carboxylato]oxidovanadium(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Gundhla, Isaac Z; Walmsley, Ryan S; Ugirinema, Vital; Mnonopi, Nandipha O; Hosten, Eric; Betz, Richard; Frost, Carminita L; Tshentu, Zenixole R

    2015-04-01

    A range of bidentate N,O-donor ligands of the imidazolyl-carboxylate moiety, which partially mimic naturally occurring bioligands, were prepared and reacted with the oxidovanadium(IV) ion to form the corresponding bis-coordinated oxidovanadium(IV) complexes. The aqueous pH-metric chemical speciation was investigated using glass electrode potentiometry, which allowed for the determination of protonation and stability constants of the ligands and complexes, respectively. The species distribution diagrams generated from this information gave evidence that the bis[(imidazolyl)carboxylato]oxovanadium(IV) complexes possess a broad pH-metric stability. The complexes improved glucose uptake in cell cultures using 3T3-L1 adipocytes, C2C12 muscle cells and Chang liver cells. The PTP inhibition studies indicated that the mechanism underlying insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was possibly via the protein tyrosine phosphorylation through the inhibition of the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B). The vanadium compounds also demonstrated the inhibition of D-dimer formation, suggesting that these compounds could potentially relieve a hypercoagulative state in diabetic patients. PMID:25594947

  20. WATEQF; a FORTRAN IV version of WATEQ : a computer program for calculating chemical equilibrium of natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L. Niel; Jones, Blair F.; Truesdell, Alfred Hemingway

    1976-01-01

    WATEQF is a FORTRAN IV computer program that models the thermodynamic speciation of inorganic ions and complex species in solution for a given water analysis. The original version (WATEQ) was written in 1973 by A. H. Truesdell and B. F. Jones in Programming Language/one (PL/1.) With but a few exceptions, the thermochemical data, speciation, coefficients, and general calculation procedure of WATEQF is identical to the PL/1 version. This report notes the differences between WATEQF and WATEQ, demonstrates how to set up the input data to execute WATEQF, provides a test case for comparison, and makes available a listing of WATEQF. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Effect of gas residence time on near-edge X-ray absorption fine structures of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lingyun; Sugiura, Hirotsugu; Kondo, Hiroki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Oda, Osamu; Sekine, Makoto; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Hori, Masaru

    2016-04-01

    In hydrogenated amorphous carbon films, deposited using a radical-injection plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, the chemical bonding structure was analyzed by near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy. With a change in the residence times of source gases in a reactor, whereby total gas flow rates of H2/CH4 increased from 50 to 400 sccm, sp2-C fractions showed the minimum value at 150 sccm, while H concentration negligibly changed according to the results of secondary ion mass spectroscopy. On the other hand, widths of σ* C-C peaks increased with decreasing gas residence time, which indicates an increase in the fluctuation of bonding structures.

  2. Evidence of fine-grained sediment transport and deposition in Sheboygan River, Wisconsin, based on sediment core chemical tracer profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdusek, Philip A.; Lu, Jianhang; Christensen, Erik R.

    2005-04-01

    Fine-grained sediment transport and deposition is observed in nine dated sediment cores obtained from the Sheboygan River. The sediment cores were dated by 137Cs and 210Pb methods. Sediment dating was supported by a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) analysis and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) hydrographic surveys from 1976 to 2002. Plots of 137Cs activity versus depth show distinct peaks related to peak Sheboygan River discharges in the years 1966, 1975, 1979, and 1989. These peaks result from the scouring of sediments during storm discharges and the increased deposition of the fine-grained fraction of particles, including colloidal clay particles (associated with 137Cs and, to some extent, PCBs), in place of the scoured sediments. Core SR1a, upstream of the Pennsylvania Avenue Bridge, and cores SR5-SR8, farther downstream, show continuous sedimentation (1.2-11.8 cm/yr) since the late 1950s, whereas net sediment accumulation virtually ceased after 1988 at the intermediate sites of cores SR1-SR4. The maximum PCB concentration (161 ppm) occurs in 1969 in core SR4.

  3. Size distribution, chemical composition, and hygroscopicity of fine particles emitted from an oil-fired heating plant.

    PubMed

    Happonen, Matti; Mylläri, Fanni; Karjalainen, Panu; Frey, Anna; Saarikoski, Sanna; Carbone, Samara; Hillamo, Risto; Pirjola, Liisa; Häyrinen, Anna; Kytömäki, Jorma; Niemi, Jarkko V; Keskinen, Jorma; Rönkkö, Topi

    2013-12-17

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) is a commonly used fuel in industrial heating and power generation and for large marine vessels. In this study, the fine particle emissions of a 47 MW oil-fired boiler were studied at 30 MW power and with three different fuels. The studied fuels were HFO, water emulsion of HFO, and water emulsion of HFO mixed with light fuel oil (LFO). With all the fuels, the boiler emitted considerable amounts of particles smaller than 200 nm in diameter. Further, these small particles were quite hygroscopic even as fresh and, in the case of HFO+LFO emulsion, the hygroscopic growth of the particles was dependent on particle size. The use of emulsions and the addition of LFO to the fuel had a reducing effect on the hygroscopic growth of particles. The use of emulsions lowered the sulfate content of the smallest particles but did not affect significantly the sulfate content of particles larger than 42 nm and, further, the addition of LFO considerably increased the black carbon content of particulate matter. The results indicate that even the fine particles emitted from HFO based combustion can have a significant effect on cloud formation, visibility, and air quality. PMID:24245691

  4. Inter-comparison of Seasonal Variation, Chemical Characteristics, and Source Identification of Atmospheric Fine Particles on Both Sides of the Taiwan Strait.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsung-Chang; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Huang, Hu-Ching; Lee, Chon-Lin; Wu, Shui-Ping; Tong, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal distribution and chemical composition of atmospheric fine particles in areas around the Taiwan Strait were firstly investigated. Fine particles (PM2.5) were simultaneously collected at two sites on the west-side, one site at an offshore island, and three sites on the east-side of the Taiwan Strait in 2013-2014. Field sampling results indicated that the average PM2.5 concentrations at the west-side sampling sites were generally higher than those at the east-side sampling sites. In terms of chemical composition, the most abundant water-soluble ionic species of PM2.5 were SO4(2-), NO3(-), and NH4(+), while natural crustal elements dominated the metallic content of PM2.5, and the most abundant anthropogenic metals of PM2.5 were Pb, Ni and Zn. Moreover, high OC/EC ratios of PM2.5 were commonly observed at the west-side sampling sites, which are located at the downwind of major stationary sources. Results from CMB receptor modeling showed that the major sources of PM2.5 were anthropogenic sources and secondary aerosols at the both sides, and natural sources dominated PM2.5 at the offshore site. A consistent decrease of secondary sulfate and nitrate contribution to PM2.5 suggested the transportation of aged particles from the west-side to the east-side of the Taiwan Strait. PMID:26973085

  5. Inter-comparison of Seasonal Variation, Chemical Characteristics, and Source Identification of Atmospheric Fine Particles on Both Sides of the Taiwan Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tsung-Chang; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Huang, Hu-Ching; Lee, Chon-Lin; Wu, Shui-Ping; Tong, Chuan

    2016-03-01

    The spatiotemporal distribution and chemical composition of atmospheric fine particles in areas around the Taiwan Strait were firstly investigated. Fine particles (PM2.5) were simultaneously collected at two sites on the west-side, one site at an offshore island, and three sites on the east-side of the Taiwan Strait in 2013–2014. Field sampling results indicated that the average PM2.5 concentrations at the west-side sampling sites were generally higher than those at the east-side sampling sites. In terms of chemical composition, the most abundant water-soluble ionic species of PM2.5 were SO42‑, NO3‑, and NH4+, while natural crustal elements dominated the metallic content of PM2.5, and the most abundant anthropogenic metals of PM2.5 were Pb, Ni and Zn. Moreover, high OC/EC ratios of PM2.5 were commonly observed at the west-side sampling sites, which are located at the downwind of major stationary sources. Results from CMB receptor modeling showed that the major sources of PM2.5 were anthropogenic sources and secondary aerosols at the both sides, and natural sources dominated PM2.5 at the offshore site. A consistent decrease of secondary sulfate and nitrate contribution to PM2.5 suggested the transportation of aged particles from the west-side to the east-side of the Taiwan Strait.

  6. Inter-comparison of Seasonal Variation, Chemical Characteristics, and Source Identification of Atmospheric Fine Particles on Both Sides of the Taiwan Strait

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tsung-Chang; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Huang, Hu-Ching; Lee, Chon-Lin; Wu, Shui-Ping; Tong, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal distribution and chemical composition of atmospheric fine particles in areas around the Taiwan Strait were firstly investigated. Fine particles (PM2.5) were simultaneously collected at two sites on the west-side, one site at an offshore island, and three sites on the east-side of the Taiwan Strait in 2013–2014. Field sampling results indicated that the average PM2.5 concentrations at the west-side sampling sites were generally higher than those at the east-side sampling sites. In terms of chemical composition, the most abundant water-soluble ionic species of PM2.5 were SO42−, NO3−, and NH4+, while natural crustal elements dominated the metallic content of PM2.5, and the most abundant anthropogenic metals of PM2.5 were Pb, Ni and Zn. Moreover, high OC/EC ratios of PM2.5 were commonly observed at the west-side sampling sites, which are located at the downwind of major stationary sources. Results from CMB receptor modeling showed that the major sources of PM2.5 were anthropogenic sources and secondary aerosols at the both sides, and natural sources dominated PM2.5 at the offshore site. A consistent decrease of secondary sulfate and nitrate contribution to PM2.5 suggested the transportation of aged particles from the west-side to the east-side of the Taiwan Strait. PMID:26973085

  7. A nanotree-like CdS/ZnO nanocomposite with spatially branched hierarchical structure for photocatalytic fine-chemical synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqi; Yang, Min-Quan; Tang, Zi-Rong; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2014-06-01

    Branched hierarchical CdS/ZnO nanocomposites have been synthesized for application toward photocatalytic fine-chemical synthesis. Growing ZnO nanorods on the surface of CdS nanowires boosts the light harvesting efficiency and charge separation as well as fast charge transport and collection. A Z-scheme mechanism under artificial solar light is also proposed.Branched hierarchical CdS/ZnO nanocomposites have been synthesized for application toward photocatalytic fine-chemical synthesis. Growing ZnO nanorods on the surface of CdS nanowires boosts the light harvesting efficiency and charge separation as well as fast charge transport and collection. A Z-scheme mechanism under artificial solar light is also proposed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, photographs of the experimental setups for photocatalytic activity testing, zeta potential analysis, X-ray diffractometer (XRD) patterns, the incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) spectra, blank experiments (without light or photocatalyst), time-online data, BET surface data and adsorption experiments. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01227e

  8. Exploration of DNA binding mode, chemical nuclease, cytotoxic and apoptotic potentials of diketone based oxovanadium(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Poonam Rajiv; Sheela, Angappan

    2015-05-01

    Two diketone based oxovanadium complexes, viz., bis(4,4,4-trifluoro-1-phenylbutane-1,3-dionato)oxovanadium(IV) (1) and bis(1,1,1-trifluoropentane-2,4-dionato)oxovanadium(IV) (2), have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The DNA binding and the cleaving ability of the complexes is assessed by UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscometry and gel electrophoretic studies. The DNA binding constant values (Kb) are found to be 1.95 ± 0.16 × 10(3)M(-1) for complex 1 and 1.064 ± 0.17 × 10(3)M(-1) for complex 2, respectively. Based on the results of the spectral and viscosity studies, it is observed that the complexes, interestingly, have preferred minor groove binding with DNA. Further, the concentration-dependent oxidative cleavage pattern of pBR322 in the presence of the activating reagent, hydrogen peroxide, has also been discussed. In addition, the complexes have shown moderate cytotoxic activity by inducing apoptosis against the cervical cancer cell line, HeLa. The results of in silico analysis and logP predictions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations. Thus, synthesized oxovanadium complexes have displayed promising DNA binding behavior and DNA cleavage activity with moderately cytotoxic nature. PMID:25720830

  9. Probing the solvent shell with 195Pt chemical shifts: density functional theory molecular dynamics study of Pt(II) and Pt(IV) anionic complexes in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Truflandier, Lionel A; Autschbach, Jochen

    2010-03-17

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (aiMD) simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed on a set of five anionic platinum complexes in aqueous solution. (195)Pt nuclear magnetic shielding constants were computed with DFT as averages over the aiMD trajectories, using the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) in order to treat relativistic effects on the Pt shielding tensors. The chemical shifts obtained from the aiMD averages are in good agreement with experimental data. For Pt(II) and Pt(IV) halide complexes we found an intermediate solvent shell interacting with the complexes that causes pronounced solvent effects on the Pt chemical shifts. For these complexes, the magnitude of solvent effects on the Pt shielding constant can be correlated with the surface charge density. For square-planar Pt complexes the aiMD simulations also clearly demonstrate the influence of closely coordinated non-equatorial water molecules on the Pt chemical shift, relating the structure of the solution around the complex to the solvent effects on the metal NMR chemical shift. For the complex [Pt(CN)(4)](2-), the solvent effects on the Pt shielding constant are surprisingly small. PMID:20166712

  10. First structural characterization of Pa(iv) in aqueous solution and quantum chemical investigations of the tetravalent actinides up to Bk(IV): the evidence of a curium break.

    PubMed

    Banik, Nidhu lal; Vallet, Valérie; Réal, Florent; Belmecheri, Réda Mohamed; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Rothe, Jörg; Marsac, Rémi; Lindqvist-Reis, Patric; Walther, Clemens; Denecke, Melissa A; Marquardt, Christian M

    2016-01-14

    More than a century after its discovery the structure of the Pa(4+) ion in acidic aqueous solution has been investigated for the first time experimentally and by quantum chemistry. The combined results of EXAFS data and quantum chemically optimized structures suggest that the Pa(4+) aqua ion has an average of nine water molecules in its first hydration sphere at a mean Pa-O distance of 2.43 Å. The data available for the early tetravalent actinide (An) elements from Th(4+) to Bk(4+) show that the An-O bonds have a pronounced electrostatic character, with bond distances following the same monotonic decreasing trend as the An(4+) ionic radii, with a decrease of the hydration number from nine to eight for the heaviest ions Cm(4+) and Bk(4+). Being the first open-shell tetravalent actinide, Pa(4+) features a coordination chemistry very similar to its successors. The electronic configuration of all open-shell systems corresponds to occupation of the valence 5f orbitals, without contribution from the 6d orbitals. Our results thus demonstrate that Pa(iv) resembles its early actinide neighbors. PMID:26465740

  11. Fine particle emissions in three different combustion conditions of a wood chip-fired appliance - Particulate physico-chemical properties and induced cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskinen, J.; Tissari, J.; Uski, O.; Virén, A.; Torvela, T.; Kaivosoja, T.; Lamberg, H.; Nuutinen, I.; Kettunen, T.; Joutsensaari, J.; Jalava, P. I.; Sippula, O.; Hirvonen, M.-R.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2014-04-01

    A biomass combustion reactor with a moving grate was utilised as a model system to produce three different combustion conditions corresponding to efficient, intermediate, and smouldering combustion. The efficient conditions (based on a CO level of approximately 7 mg MJ-1) corresponded to a modern pellet boiler. The intermediate conditions (CO level of approximately 300 mg MJ-1) corresponded to non-optimal settings in a continuously fired biomass combustion appliance. The smouldering conditions (CO level of approximately 2200 mg MJ-1) approached a batch combustion situation. The gaseous and particle emissions were characterised under each condition. Moreover, the ability of fine particles to cause cell death was determined using the particle emissions samples. The physico-chemical properties of the emitted particles and their toxicity were considerably different between the studied combustion conditions. In the efficient combustion, the emitted particles were small in size and large in number. The PM1 emission was low, and it was composed of ash species. In the intermediate and smouldering combustion, the PM1 emission was higher, and the particles were larger in size and smaller in number. In both of these conditions, there were high-emission peaks that produced a significant fraction of the emissions. The PAH emissions were the lowest in the efficient combustion. The smouldering combustion conditions produced the largest PAH emissions. In efficient combustion conditions, the emitted fine particles had the highest potential to cause cell death. This finding was most likely observed because these fine particles were mainly composed of inorganic ash species, and their relative contents of Zn were high. Thus, even the PM1 from optimal biomass combustion might cause health effects, but in these conditions, the particle emissions per energy unit produced were considerably lower.

  12. Chemical constituents of fine particulate air pollution and pulmonary function in healthy adults: the Healthy Volunteer Natural Relocation study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Deng, Furong; Hao, Yu; Shima, Masayuki; Wang, Xin; Zheng, Chanjuan; Wei, Hongying; Lv, Haibo; Lu, Xiuling; Huang, Jing; Qin, Yu; Guo, Xinbiao

    2013-09-15

    The study examined the associations of 32 chemical constituents of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM₂.₅) with pulmonary function in a panel of 21 college students. Study subjects relocated from a suburban area to an urban area with changing ambient air pollution levels and contents in Beijing, China, and provided daily morning/evening peak expiratory flow (PEF) and forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV₂₁) measurements over 6 months in three study periods. There were significant reductions in evening PEF and morning/evening FEV₂₁ associated with various air pollutants and PM₂.₅ constituents. Four PM₂.₅ constituents (copper, cadmium, arsenic and stannum) were found to be most consistently associated with the reductions in these pulmonary function measures. These findings provide clues for the respiratory effects of specific particulate chemical constituents in the context of urban air pollution. PMID:23747477

  13. Chemical characteristics and source apportionment of fine particulate organic carbon in Hong Kong during high particulate matter episodes in winter 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun-Chun; Yu, Jian Zhen; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Schauer, James J.; Yuan, Zibing; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Louie, Peter K. K.

    2013-02-01

    PM2.5 samples were collected at six general stations and one roadside station in Hong Kong in two periods of high particulate matter (PM) in 2003 (27 October-4 November and 30 November-13 December). The highest PM2.5 reached 216 μg m- 3 during the first high PM period and 113 μg m- 3 during the second high PM period. Analysis of synoptic weather conditions identified individual sampling days under dominant influence of one of three types of air masses, that is, local, regional and long-range transported (LRT) air masses. Roadside samples were discussed separately due to heavy influences from vehicular emissions. This research examines source apportionment of fine organic carbon (OC) and contribution of secondary organic aerosol on high PM days under different synoptic conditions. Six primary OC (POC) sources (vehicle exhaust, biomass burning, cooking, cigarette smoke, vegetative detritus, and coal combustion) were identified on the basis of characteristic organic tracers. Individual POC source contributions were estimated using chemical mass balance model. In the roadside and the local samples, OC was dominated by the primary sources, accounting for more than 74% of OC. In the samples influenced by regional and LRT air masses, secondary OC (SOC), which was approximated to be the difference between the total measured OC and the apportioned POC, contributed more than 54% of fine OC. SOC was highly correlated with water-soluble organic carbon and sulfate, consistent with its secondary nature.

  14. Halogen-induced organic aerosol (XOA): a study on ultra-fine particle formation and time-resolved chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Ofner, Johannes; Kamilli, Katharina A; Held, Andreas; Lendl, Bernhard; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    The concurrent presence of high values of organic SOA precursors and reactive halogen species (RHS) at very low ozone concentrations allows the formation of halogen-induced organic aerosol, so-called XOA, in maritime areas where high concentrations of RHS are present, especially at sunrise. The present study combines aerosol smog-chamber and aerosol flow-reactor experiments for the characterization of XOA. XOA formation yields from alpha-pinene at low and high concentrations of chlorine as reactive halogen species (RHS) were determined using a 700 L aerosol smog-chamber with a solar simulator. The chemical transformation of the organic precursor during the aerosol formation process and chemical aging was studied using an aerosol flow-reactor coupled to an FTIR spectrometer. The FTIR dataset was analysed using 2D correlation spectroscopy. Chlorine induced homogeneous XOA formation takes place at even 2.5 ppb of molecular chlorine, which was photolysed by the solar simulator. The chemical pathway of XOA formation is characterized by the addition of chlorine and abstraction of hydrogen atoms, causing simultaneous carbon-chlorine bond formation. During further steps of the formation process, carboxylic acids are formed, which cause a SOA-like appearance of XOA. During the ozone-free formation of secondary organic aerosol with RHS a special kind of particulate matter (XOA) is formed, which is afterwards transformed to SOA by atmospheric aging or degradation pathways. PMID:24601001

  15. Geochemistry of fine-grained sediments in the Yangtze River and the implications for provenance and chemical weathering in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mengying; Zheng, Hongbo; Clift, Peter D.; Tada, Ryuji; Wu, Weihua; Luo, Chao

    2015-12-01

    In order to interpret the marine clastic record preserved in the sedimentary basins of the East Asian marginal seas, it is important to understand how sediment transport and chemical weathering affect the composition of sediment enroute to its sink. Here we present a new data set for fine-grained sediment (<63 μm) from the Yangtze River and its major tributaries, which represents a baseline for interpreting sediment in the East China Sea. We demonstrate that there is no significant coherent downstream variation in the major element contents, which are generally more enriched than the average upper continental crust, except for water-soluble elements including Sr, Rb, Na, and K. Nd isotopes show that most of the sediment comes from the eastern and middle Yangtze Craton, as well as the Songpan-Garze Terrane. Chemical weathering varies significantly across the basin with upstream tributary sediments being relatively unweathered compared to those in the lower reaches. However, sediments in the main Yangtze stream show no trend in chemical weathering along its course, with some of the least weathered materials being found closest to the delta. Grain size and the abundance of hydrodynamically sorted heavy minerals affect the bulk geochemistry, especially the rare earth elements (REEs).

  16. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Final report. Part IV. A petrographic and chemical model for the evolution of the Tradewater Formation coals in Western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Graese, A.M.; Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A depositional model for the coals of the Tradewater Formation and associated rock units was constructed as a predictive device for the occurrence of economically important low sulfur coal. Twenty-one cores were examined and ninety-eight coal samples were analyzed for maceral, ash, and sulfur contents. These data were then analyzed to determine regional variation as well as vertical variation in single coal columns. Core data indicate that the majority of the Tradewater rocks consist of irregularly distributed, coarsening-upward, fine-grained detrital material which was deposited in shallow bodies of water. Minor fossiliferous shales and limestones suggest a marine influence. Less common coarse-grained, fining-upward sequences appear to be deposits of meandering channels. Like the detrital rocks, the coal seams are also irregularly distributed and exhibit variable petrographic and chemical properties reflecting changes in the Eh and pH of the coal swamp waters as well as detrital influx into the swamps. These swamps were relatively limited in extent and probably occupied the upper reaches of the tidal zone. The lack of significant stratigraphic and geographic trends in the regional data suggests that this mode of deposition was widespread and continued for a long period of time. 42 references, 19 figures, 9 tables.

  17. Estimation of crystallization kinetics for an organic fine chemical using a modified continuous cooling mixed suspension mixed product removal (MSMPR) crystallizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kougoulos, E.; Jones, A. G.; Wood-Kaczmar, M. W.

    2005-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of an important organic fine chemical was determined using a modified laboratory scale continuous cooling mixed suspension mixed product removal (MSMPR) crystallizer with a product recycle loop designed for use with limited quantities of available material. A convenient method of monitoring steady state in the MSMPR using lasentec focussed beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) is also described. The effect of supersaturation, suspension density of the crystallizer content, impeller velocity (turnover time) and configuration on the growth and nucleation rates was studied. An observed deviation from the McCabe Δ L law for small crystal sizes was attributed to either size-dependent growth (SDG) or growth rate dispersion (GRD) mechanisms and hence complicated the estimation of growth and nucleation rates. SDG was successfully modelled using a three-parameter exponential SDG model. Growth rates estimated from the SDG model were compared to a GRD model using discrete growth probability distributions.

  18. Chemical, biochemical, and environmental fiber sensors IV; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 8, 9, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Robert A.

    Various paper on chemical, biochemical, and environmental fiber sensors are presented. Some of the individual topics addressed include: evanescent-wave fiber optic (FO) biosensor, refractive-index sensors based on coupling to high-index multimode overlays, advanced technique in FO sensors, design of luminescence-based temperature sensors, NIR fluorescence in FO applications, FO sensor based on microencapsulated reagents, emitters and detectors for optical gas and chemical sensing, tunable fiber laser source for methane detection at 1.68 micron, FO fluorometer based on a dual-wavelength laser excitation source, thin polymer films as active components of FO chemical sensors, submicron optical sources for single macromolecule detection, nanometer optical fiber pH sensor. Also discussed are: microfabrication of optical sensor array, luminescent FO sensor for the measurement of pH, time-domain fluorescence methods as applied to pH sensing, characterization of a sol-gel-entrapped artificial receptor, FO technology for nuclear waste cleanup, spectroscopic gas sensing with IR hollow waveguides, dissolved-oxygen quenching of in situ fluorescence measurements.

  19. Chemical, biochemical, and environmental fiber sensors IV; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 8, 9, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Various paper on chemical, biochemical, and environmental fiber sensors are presented. Some of the individual topics addressed include: evanescent-wave fiber optic (FO) biosensor, refractive-index sensors based on coupling to high-index multimode overlays, advanced technique in FO sensors, design of luminescence-based temperature sensors, NIR fluorescence in FO applications, FO sensor based on microencapsulated reagents, emitters and detectors for optical gas and chemical sensing, tunable fiber laser source for methane detection at 1.68 micron, FO fluorometer based on a dual-wavelength laser excitation source, thin polymer films as active components of FO chemical sensors, submicron optical sources for single macromolecule detection, nanometer optical fiber pH sensor. Also discussed are: microfabrication of optical sensor array, luminescent FO sensor for the measurement of pH, time-domain fluorescence methods as applied to pH sensing, characterization of a sol-gel-entrapped artificial receptor, FO technology for nuclear waste cleanup, spectroscopic gas sensing with IR hollow waveguides, dissolved-oxygen quenching of in situ fluorescence measurements.

  20. Chemical speciation of Fe and Ni in residual oil fly ash fine particulate matter using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sidhartha; Huggins, Frank E; Huffman, Gerald P

    2012-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked residual oil fly ash fine particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm (ROFA PM(2.5)) to morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses. Bioavailable transition metals within PM have been cited as one of the components that induce such illnesses. By combining synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy with leaching experiment, we studied the effect of residual oil compositions and combustion conditions on the speciation of Fe and Ni in ROFA PM(2.5) and the implication of these species for human health and environment. PM(2.5) samples were obtained from two types of combustors, a fire tube boiler (FTB) and a refractory line combustor (RLC). The study reveals that only Fe(2)(SO(4))(3)·nH(2)O is present in RLC PM(2.5) while Fe(2)(SO(4))(3)·nH(2)O predominates in FTB PM(2.5) with inclusion of varying amounts of nickel ferrite. The finding that RLC PM(2.5) is more bioavailable and hence more toxic than FTB PM(2.5) is significant. The reduction of toxicity of FTB PM(2.5) is due to the immobilization of a portion of Fe and Ni in the formation of an insoluble NiFe(2)O(4). This may explain the variation of toxicity from exposure to different ROFA PM(2.5). Additionally, the speciation data are sought for developing emission inventories for source apportionment study and understanding the mechanism of PM formation. PMID:23126560

  1. Source apportionment of ambient fine particulate matter in Dearborn, Michigan, using hourly resolved PM chemical composition data.

    PubMed

    Pancras, Joseph Patrick; Landis, Matthew S; Norris, Gary A; Vedantham, Ram; Dvonch, J Timothy

    2013-03-15

    High time-resolution aerosol sampling was conducted for one month during July-August 2007 in Dearborn, MI, a non-attainment area for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Measurements of more than 30 PM2.5 species were made using a suite of semi-continuous sampling and monitoring instruments. Dynamic variations in the sub-hourly concentrations of source 'marker' elements were observed when discrete plumes from local sources impacted the sampling site. Hourly averaged PM2.5 composition data for 639 samples were used to identify and apportion PM2.5 emission sources using the multivariate receptor modeling techniques EPA Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) v4.2 and EPA Unmix v6.0. Source contribution estimates from PMF and Unmix were then evaluated using the Sustained Wind Instance Method (SWIM), which identified plausible source origins. Ten sources were identified by both PMF and Unmix: (1) secondary sulfate, (2) secondary nitrate characterized by a significant diurnal trend, (3) iron and steel production, (4) a potassium-rich factor attributable to iron/steel slag waste processing, (5) a cadmium-rich factor attributable to incineration, (6) an oil refinery characterized by La/Ce>1 specific to south wind, (7) oil combustion, (8) coal combustion, (9) motor vehicles, and (10) road dust enriched with organic carbon. While both models apportioned secondary sulfate, oil refinery, and oil combustion PM2.5 masses closely, the mobile and industrial source apportionments differed. Analyses were also carried out to help infer time-of-day variations in the contributions of local sources. PMID:23302684

  2. Concentrations and chemical compositions of fine particles (PM2.5) during haze and non-haze days in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Huang, Wei; Cai, Tianqi; Fang, Dongqing; Wang, Yuqin; Song, Jian; Hu, Min; Zhang, Yuanxun

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the chemical properties of PM2.5 and put forward reasonable control measures, daily samples of PM2.5 were collected at an urban site in Beijing from August 4 to September 3 of 2012 using two 2-channel samplers. Chemical analysis was conducted for eight water soluble inorganic ions (WSII, including Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2 +, Ca2 +, Cl-, NO3-, and SO42 -), organic carbon (OC) and elementary carbon (EC). PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 8.8 to 218.6 μg m- 3, with an average concentration of 80.6 ± 57.3 μg m- 3. WSII, the most dominant PM2.5 constituents contributing 60 ± 18% of its mass, ranged from 3.1 to 172.2 μg m- 3. SO42 -, NO3-, and NH4+ dominated WSII (90 ± 28%) and their concentrations were 1.3-105.7 μg m- 3, 0.5-52.7 μg m- 3 and 0.3-33.5 μg m- 3, respectively. The concentrations of OC and EC were 3.0-28.8 μgC m- 3 and 0.8-7.4 μgC m- 3, constituting 17.6% and 4.9% of PM2.5, respectively. Three serious pollution episodes (haze days) occurred during the campaign. PM2.5 and its chemical species showed substantial increases during haze episodes. The greater enhancement factors for SO42 - (4.5), NO3- (4.0), and NH4+ (4.2) during haze days compared to non-haze days were obtained, suggesting that these secondary inorganic ions play important roles in the formation of haze. The average ratio of NO3-/SO42 - was 0.52. Ion balance calculations showed that PM2.5 samples were acidic during haze periods and close to neutral during non-haze days. Correlation analysis between the major ions was conducted and the results suggested that the main forms of NH4+ might be (NH4)2SO4. In addition, the variations between haze days and non-haze days for OC, EC, and the ratio of OC/EC were discussed.

  3. Modeling of the chemical composition of fine particulate matter: Development and performance assessment of EASYWRF-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Lebègue, P.; Visez, N.; Fèvre-Nollet, V.; Crenn, V.; Riffault, V.; Petitprez, D.

    2016-03-01

    The European emission Adaptation SYstem for the WRF-Chem model (EASYWRF-Chem) has been developed to generate chemical information supporting the WRF-Chem requirements from any emission inventory based on the CORINAIR methodology. Using RADM2 and RACM2 mechanisms, "emission species" are converted into "model species" thanks to the SAPRC methodology for gas phase pollutant and the PM10 and PM2.5 fractions. Furthermore, by adapting US EPA PM2.5 profiles, the processing of aerosol chemical speciation profiles separates the unspeciated PM2.5 emission into five chemical families: sulfates, nitrates, elemental carbon, organic aerosol and unspeciated aerosol. The evaluation of the model has been performed by separately comparing model outcomes with (i) meteorological measurements; (ii) NO2, O3, PM10 and PM2.5 mass concentrations from the regional air quality monitoring network; (iii) hourly-resolved data from four field campaign measurements, in winter and in summer, on two sites in the French northern region. In the latter, a High Resolution - Time of Flight - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) provided non-refractory PM1 concentrations of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium ions as well as organic matter (OM), while an aethalometer provided black carbon (BC) concentrations in the PM2.5 fraction. Meteorological data (temperature, wind, relative humidity) are well simulated for all the time series data except for specific events as wind direction changes or rainfall. For particulate matter, results are presented by considering firstly the total mass concentration of PM2.5 and PM10. EASYWRF-Chem simulations overestimated the PM10 mass concentrations by + 22% and + 4% for summer and winter periods respectively, whereas for the finer PM2.5 fraction, mass concentrations were overestimated by + 20% in summer and underestimated by - 13% in winter. Simulated sulfate concentrations were underestimated and nitrate concentrations were overestimated but hourly variations were well

  4. Chemical Genetics Reveals Bacterial and Host Cell Functions Critical for Type IV Effector Translocation by Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Charpentier, Xavier; Gabay, Joëlle E.; Reyes, Moraima; Zhu, Jing W.; Weiss, Arthur; Shuman, Howard A.

    2009-01-01

    Delivery of effector proteins is a process widely used by bacterial pathogens to subvert host cell functions and cause disease. Effector delivery is achieved by elaborate injection devices and can often be triggered by environmental stimuli. However, effector export by the L. pneumophila Icm/Dot Type IVB secretion system cannot be detected until the bacterium encounters a target host cell. We used chemical genetics, a perturbation strategy that utilizes small molecule inhibitors, to determine the mechanisms critical for L. pneumophila Icm/Dot activity. From a collection of more than 2,500 annotated molecules we identified specific inhibitors of effector translocation. We found that L. pneumophila effector translocation in macrophages requires host cell factors known to be involved in phagocytosis such as phosphoinositide 3-kinases, actin and tubulin. Moreover, we found that L. pneumophila phagocytosis and effector translocation also specifically require the receptor protein tyrosine phosphate phosphatases CD45 and CD148. We further show that phagocytosis is required to trigger effector delivery unless intimate contact between the bacteria and the host is artificially generated. In addition, real-time analysis of effector translocation suggests that effector export is rate-limited by phagocytosis. We propose a model in which L. pneumophila utilizes phagocytosis to initiate an intimate contact event required for the translocation of pre-synthesized effector molecules. We discuss the need for host cell participation in the initial step of the infection and its implications in the L. pneumophila lifestyle. Chemical genetic screening provides a novel approach to probe the host cell functions and factors involved in host–pathogen interactions. PMID:19578436

  5. Synthetic fluid inclusions in natural quartz. IV. Chemical analyses of fluid inclusions by SEM/EDA: Evaluation of method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Frederick M.; Sterner, S. Michael; Bodnar, Robert J.

    1988-05-01

    The compositions of individual synthetic fluid inclusions in the systems NaCl-KCl, NaCl-CaCl 2 and NaCl-KCl-CaCl 2 have been semi-quantitatively determined by energy dispersive analysis of precipitates produced during thermal decrepitation. Inclusions containing known mixtures of 20 wt.% total salinity were synthesized by healing fractures in natural quartz at 600-700°C and 5-7 kbars for 7-10 days. The two-phase, daughter-free inclusions homogenized at 170-250°C, began to decrepitate after about 100° of overheating and by 360-420°C a significant number of decrepitates had formed on the polished surface. Peak heights generated by EDA (raster mode) of these decrepitates were standardized using both single and mixed salt standards evaporated to dryness in a vacuum. Although the mixed salt standards better approximated the decrepitate compositions, difficulties were encountered in producing micronscale homogeneity and the single salts yielded more reliable results. Eight different solutions of 20-23 wt.% total salinity were run and in all the samples the average compositions of 10-20 discrete, single inclusion decrepitates fell with 6 wt.% (0.2 to 5.2) of the actual composition, suggesting that the decrepitates were chemically representative of their precursor inclusions. However, not all decrepitates analyzed provided similarly accurate results. Electron mapping revealed that fracture-aligned decrepitates were often chemically inhomogeneous and thus had to be avoided. A sample decrepitated at 500°C yielded spurious results suggesting that chloride volatility may become a significant problem when temperatures in excess of 450°C are required for decrepitation. Decrepitates with diameters between 10 and 30 μm yielded more consistent and accurate results than smaller or larger decrepitates on the same samples.

  6. First light of the VLT planet finder SPHERE. IV. Physical and chemical properties of the planets around HR8799

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefoy, M.; Zurlo, A.; Baudino, J. L.; Lucas, P.; Mesa, D.; Maire, A.-L.; Vigan, A.; Galicher, R.; Homeier, D.; Marocco, F.; Gratton, R.; Chauvin, G.; Allard, F.; Desidera, S.; Kasper, M.; Moutou, C.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Antichi, J.; Baruffolo, A.; Baudrand, J.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Boccaletti, A.; Cantalloube, F.; Carbillet, M.; Charton, J.; Claudi, R. U.; Costille, A.; Dohlen, K.; Dominik, C.; Fantinel, D.; Feautrier, P.; Feldt, M.; Fusco, T.; Gigan, P.; Girard, J. H.; Gluck, L.; Gry, C.; Henning, T.; Janson, M.; Langlois, M.; Madec, F.; Magnard, Y.; Maurel, D.; Mawet, D.; Meyer, M. R.; Milli, J.; Moeller-Nilsson, O.; Mouillet, D.; Pavlov, A.; Perret, D.; Pujet, P.; Quanz, S. P.; Rochat, S.; Rousset, G.; Roux, A.; Salasnich, B.; Salter, G.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Schmid, H. M.; Sevin, A.; Soenke, C.; Stadler, E.; Turatto, M.; Udry, S.; Vakili, F.; Wahhaj, Z.; Wildi, F.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The system of fourplanets discovered around the intermediate-mass star HR8799 offers a unique opportunity to test planet formation theories at large orbital radii and to probe the physics and chemistry at play in the atmospheres of self-luminous young (~30 Myr) planets. We recently obtained new photometry of the four planets and low-resolution (R ~ 30) spectra of HR8799 d and e with the SPHERE instrument (Paper III). Aims: In this paper (Paper IV), we aim to use these spectra and available photometry to determine how they compare to known objects, what the planet physical properties are, and how their atmospheres work. Methods: We compare the available spectra, photometry, and spectral energy distribution (SED) of the planets to field dwarfs and young companions. In addition, we use the extinction from corundum, silicate (enstatite and forsterite), or iron grains likely to form in the atmosphere of the planets to try to better understand empirically the peculiarity of their spectrophotometric properties. To conclude, we use three sets of atmospheric models (BT-SETTL14, Cloud-AE60, Exo-REM) to determine which ingredients are critically needed in the models to represent the SED of the objects, and to constrain their atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, M/H). Results: We find that HR8799d and e properties are well reproduced by those of L6-L8 dusty dwarfs discovered in the field, among which some are candidate members of young nearby associations. No known object reproduces well the properties of planets b and c. Nevertheless, we find that the spectra and WISE photometry of peculiar and/or young early-T dwarfs reddened by submicron grains made of corundum, iron, enstatite, or forsterite successfully reproduce the SED of these planets. Our analysis confirms that only the Exo-REM models with thick clouds fit (within 2σ) the whole set of spectrophotometric datapoints available for HR8799 d and e for Teff = 1200 K, log g in the range 3.0-4.5, and M/H = +0.5. The

  7. Chemical composition and source of fine and nanoparticles from recent direct injection gasoline passenger cars: Effects of fuel and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fushimi, Akihiro; Kondo, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Shinji; Fujitani, Yuji; Saitoh, Katsumi; Takami, Akinori; Tanabe, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Particle number, mass, and chemical compositions (i.e., elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), elements, ions, and organic species) of fine particles emitted from four of the recent direct injection spark ignition (DISI) gasoline passenger cars and a port fuel injection (PFI) gasoline passenger car were measured under Japanese official transient mode (JC08 mode). Total carbon (TC = EC + OC) dominated the particulate mass (90% on average). EC dominated the TC for both hot and cold start conditions. The EC/TC ratios were 0.72 for PFI and 0.88-1.0 (average = 0.92) for DISI vehicles. A size-resolved chemical analysis of a DISI car revealed that the major organic components were the C20-C28 hydrocarbons for both the accumulation-mode particles and nanoparticles. Contribution of engine oil was estimated to be 10-30% for organics and the sum of the measured elements. The remaining major fraction likely originated from gasoline fuel. Therefore, it is suggested that soot (EC) also mainly originated from the gasoline. In experiments using four fuels at three ambient temperatures, the emission factors of particulate mass were consistently higher with regular gasoline than with premium gasoline. This result suggest that the high content of less-volatile compounds in fuel increase particulate emissions. These results suggest that focusing on reducing fuel-derived EC in the production process of new cars would effectively reduce particulate emission from DISI cars.

  8. Eight-year (2007-2014) trends in ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and its chemical components in the Capital Region of Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bari, Md Aynul; Kindzierski, Warren B

    2016-05-01

    Currently there have been questions about ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) levels in the Capital Region of Alberta, Canada. An investigation of temporal trends in PM2.5 and its chemical components was undertaken in the City of Edmonton within the Capital Region over an 8-year period (2007-2014). A non-parametric trend detection method was adopted to characterize trends in ambient concentrations. No statistically significant change was observed for ambient PM2.5 concentrations during 2007-2014, while significant decreasing trends were found for organic carbon, elemental carbon, oxalate, barium, lead and cadmium. A statistically significant increasing trend was observed for sodium chloride indicating an increase of de-icing salt contribution for winter road maintenance in recent years. Concentrations of potassium ion and zinc exhibited strong and significant seasonal variability with higher concentrations in winter than in summer likely reflecting wood smoke origins more than other potential sources in Edmonton and the surrounding region. No statistically significant changes were observed for all other chemical components examined. Notwithstanding robust population growth that has occurred in Edmonton, these findings reveal that particulate air quality and corresponding trace elements in Edmonton's air has been unchanged or improved over the investigated period (2007-2014). Longer-term air quality monitoring at least over several decades is needed to establish whether trends reported here are actually occurring. PMID:26949866

  9. Reduced in vitro toxicity of fine particulate matter collected during the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing: the roles of chemical and biological components.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yu; Zhu, Tong; Lenz, Anke-Gabriele; Frankenberger, Birgit; Tian, Feng; Chen, Chenyong; Stoeger, Tobias

    2013-10-01

    Beijing has implemented systematic air pollution control legislation to reduce particulate emissions and improve air quality during the 2008 Summer Olympics, but whether the toxicity of fine fraction of particles (PM(2.5)) would be changed remains unclear. In present study we compared in vitro biological responses of PM(2.5) collected before and during the Olympics and tried to reveal possible correlations between its chemical components and toxicological mechanism(s). We measured cytotoxicity, cytokines/chemokines, and related gene expressions in murine alveolar macrophages, MH-S, after treated with 20 PM(2.5) samples. Significant, dose-dependent effects on cell viability, cytokine/chemokine release and mRNA expressions were observed. The cytotoxicity caused at equal mass concentration of PM(2.5) was notably reduced (p<0.05) by control measures, and significant association was found for viability and elemental zinc in PM(2.5). Endotoxin content in PM(2.5) correlated with all of the eight detected cytokines/chemokines; elemental and organic carbon correlated with four; arsenic and chromium correlated with six and three, respectively; iron and barium showed associations with two; nickel, magnesium, potassium, and calcium showed associations with one. PM(2.5) toxicity in Beijing was substantially dependent on its chemical components, and lowering the levels of specific components in PM(2.5) during the 2008 Olympics resulted in reduced biological responses. PMID:23962744

  10. Fine Particle Sources and Cardiorespiratory Morbidity: An Application of Chemical Mass Balance and Factor Analytical Source-Apportionment Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sarnat, Jeremy A.; Marmur, Amit; Klein, Mitchel; Kim, Eugene; Russell, Armistead G.; Sarnat, Stefanie E.; Mulholland, James A.; Hopke, Philip K.; Tolbert, Paige E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Interest in the health effects of particulate matter (PM) has focused on identifying sources of PM, including biomass burning, power plants, and gasoline and diesel emissions that may be associated with adverse health risks. Few epidemiologic studies, however, have included source-apportionment estimates in their examinations of PM health effects. We analyzed a time-series of chemically speciated PM measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, and conducted an epidemiologic analysis using data from three distinct source-apportionment methods. Objective The key objective of this analysis was to compare epidemiologic findings generated using both factor analysis and mass balance source-apportionment methods. Methods We analyzed data collected between November 1998 and December 2002 using positive-matrix factorization (PMF), modified chemical mass balance (CMB-LGO), and a tracer approach. Emergency department (ED) visits for a combined cardiovascular (CVD) and respiratory disease (RD) group were assessed as end points. We estimated the risk ratio (RR) associated with same day PM concentrations using Poisson generalized linear models. Results There were significant, positive associations between same-day PM2.5 (PM with aero-dynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) concentrations attributed to mobile sources (RR range, 1.018–1.025) and biomass combustion, primarily prescribed forest burning and residential wood combustion, (RR range, 1.024–1.033) source categories and CVD-related ED visits. Associations between the source categories and RD visits were not significant for all models except sulfate-rich secondary PM2.5 (RR range, 1.012–1.020). Generally, the epidemiologic results were robust to the selection of source-apportionment method, with strong agreement between the RR estimates from the PMF and CMB-LGO models, as well as with results from models using single-species tracers as surrogates of the source-apportioned PM2.5 values. Conclusions Despite differences among the

  11. Fast changes in chemical composition and size distribution of fine particles during the near-field transport of industrial plumes.

    PubMed

    Marris, Hélène; Deboudt, Karine; Augustin, Patrick; Flament, Pascal; Blond, François; Fiani, Emmanuel; Fourmentin, Marc; Delbarre, Hervé

    2012-06-15

    Aerosol sampling was performed inside the chimneys and in the close environment of a FeMn alloys manufacturing plant. The number size distributions show a higher abundance of ultrafine aerosols (10-100 nm) inside the plume than upwind of the plant, indicating the emissions of nanoparticles by the industrial process. Individual analysis of particles collected inside the plume shows a high proportion of metal bearing particles (Mn-/Fe-) consisting essentially of internally mixed aluminosilicate and metallic compounds. These particles evolve rapidly (in a few minutes) after emission by adsorption of VOC gas and sulfuric acid emitted by the plant but also by agglomeration with pre-existing particles. At the moment, municipalities require a monitoring of industrial emissions inside the chimneys from manufacturers. However those measures are insufficient to report such rapid changes in chemical composition and thus to evaluate the real impact of industrial plumes in the close environment of plants (when those particles leave the industrial site). Consequently, environmental authorities will have to consider such fast evolutions and then to adapt future regulations on air pollution sources. PMID:22542297

  12. Genotoxicity, inflammation and physico-chemical properties of fine particle samples from an incineration energy plant and urban air.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Rank, Jette; White, Paul A; Lundstedt, Staffan; Gagne, Remi; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Kristiansen, Jesper; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan

    2007-10-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) was sampled by use of an electrostatic sampler in an oven hall and a receiving hall in a waste-incineration energy plant, and from urban air in a heavy-traffic street and from background air in Copenhagen. PM was sampled for 1-2 weeks, four samples at each site. The samples were extracted and examined for mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, YG1041 and YG5161, for content of inorganic elements and for the presence of eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The induction of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression and the presence of DNA damage - tested by the comet assay - were determined after 24-h incubations with human A549 lung epithelial cells. The PM(2.5) concentration was about twofold greater in the oven hall than in the receiving hall. The particle size distribution in the receiving hall was similar to that in street air (maximum mode at about 25nm), but the distribution was completely different in the oven hall (maximum mode at about 150nm). Also chemically, the samples from the oven hall were highly different from the other samples. PM extracts from the receiving hall, street and background air were more mutagenic than the PM extracts from the oven hall. PM from all four sites caused similar levels of DNA damage in A549 cells; only the oven hall samples gave results that were statistically significantly different from those obtained with street-air samples. The receiving hall and the urban air samples were similarly inflammatory (relative IL-8 mRNA expression), whereas the oven hall did not cause a statistically significant increase in IL-8 mRNA expression. A principal component analysis separated the oven hall and the receiving hall by the first principal component. These two sites were separated from street and background air with the second principal component. Several clusters of constituents were identified. One cluster consisted of all the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), several groups of metals and one

  13. Fine structure and chemical analysis of the metathoracic scent gland secretion in Graphosoma lineatum (Linnaeus, 1758) (Heteroptera, Pentatomidae).

    PubMed

    Durak, Dilek; Kalender, Yusuf

    2009-01-01

    Morphology and ultrastructure of metathoracic scent glands (MTGs) of Graphosoma lineatum (Heteroptera, Pentatomidae) were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Extracts of the volatile fraction of the MTG secretion from males and females were subjected to initial analysis. One pair of the MTG is composed of a reservoir and a pair of lateral glands connected to the reservoir with a duct. MTGs are open in between the meso- and metacoxae, on evaporation areas with a mushroom-like structure. Reservoir walls embody two types of cells, type I and type II, respectively. Cells of type I have numerous organelles, while type II cells have only been found in a certain area of the reservoir wall. They have large secretory ducts lined by a cuticular intima layer. The lateral glands connected to reservoir have two further types of cells. Lateral glands are lined by type A secretory cells and secretory duct is found in their cytoplasm. Type B cells are poor in organelles and are smaller than type A cells. Coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry examinations revealed that both in males and females of G. lineatum MTGs 14 chemical compounds occur, among which only 10 are common. These secretions indicate information such as defensive and pheromonal activities, other functions could be attributed to the secretion of the MTG of G. lineatum by comparison with other closely related bug species. In the analyses of MTGs of females of G. lineatum, n-octadecanoic acid was observed at the most and n-undecane was determined at lowest level, while males of G. lineatum n-tridecane was determined at the highest level; and (E)-2-hexenyl acetate has been observed at the lowest. PMID:19200924

  14. A one-year comprehensive chemical characterisation of fine aerosol (PM2.5) at urban, suburban and rural background sites in the region of Paris (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressi, M.; Sciare, J.; Ghersi, V.; Bonnaire, N.; Nicolas, J. B.; Petit, J.-E.; Moukhtar, S.; Rosso, A.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Féron, A.

    2013-08-01

    Studies describing the chemical composition of fine aerosol (PM2.5) in urban areas are often conducted for a few weeks only and at one sole site, giving thus a narrow view of their temporal and spatial characteristics. This paper presents a one-year (11 September 2009-10 September 2010) survey of the daily chemical composition of PM2.5 in the region of Paris, which is the second most populated "Larger Urban Zone" in Europe. Five sampling sites representative of suburban (SUB), urban (URB), northeast (NER), northwest (NWR) and south (SOR) rural backgrounds were implemented. The major chemical components of PM2.5 were determined including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and the major ions. OC was converted to organic matter (OM) using the chemical mass closure methodology, which leads to conversion factors of 1.95 for the SUB and URB sites, and 2.05 for the three rural ones. On average, gravimetrically determined PM2.5 annual mass concentrations are 15.2, 14.8, 12.6, 11.7 and 10.8 μg m-3 for SUB, URB, NER, NWR and SOR sites, respectively. The chemical composition of fine aerosol is very homogeneous at the five sites and is composed of OM (38-47%), nitrate (17-22%), non-sea-salt sulfate (13-16%), ammonium (10-12%), EC (4-10%), mineral dust (2-5%) and sea salt (3-4%). This chemical composition is in agreement with those reported in the literature for most European environments. On an annual scale, Paris (URB and SUB sites) exhibits its highest PM2.5 concentrations during late autumn, winter and early spring (higher than 15 μg m-3 on average, from December to April), intermediates during late spring and early autumn (between 10 and 15 μg m-3 during May, June, September, October, and November) and the lowest during summer (below 10 μg m-3 during July and August). PM levels are mostly homogeneous on a regional scale, during the whole project (e.g. for URB plotted against NER sites: slope = 1.06, r2=0.84, n=330), suggesting the importance of mid- or long

  15. A one-year comprehensive chemical characterisation of fine aerosol (PM2.5) at urban, suburban and rural background sites in the region of Paris (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressi, M.; Sciare, J.; Ghersi, V.; Bonnaire, N.; Nicolas, J. B.; Petit, J.-E.; Moukhtar, S.; Rosso, A.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Féron, A.

    2012-11-01

    Studies describing the chemical composition of fine aerosol (PM2.5) in urban areas are often conducted during few weeks only, and at one sole site, giving thus a narrow view of their temporal and spatial characteristics. This paper presents a one-year (11 September 2009-10 September 2010) survey of the daily chemical composition of PM2.5 in the region of Paris, which is the second most populated "Larger Urban Zone" in Europe. Five sampling sites representative of suburban (SUB), urban (URB), northeast (NER), northwest (NWR) and south (SOR) rural backgrounds were implemented. The major chemical components of PM2.5 were determined including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and the major ions. OC was converted to organic matter (OM) using the chemical mass closure methodology, which leads to conversion factors of 1.95 for the SUB and URB sites, and 2.05 for the three rural ones. On average, gravimetrically determined PM2.5 annual mass concentrations are 15.2, 14.8, 12.6, 11.7 and 10.8 μg m-3 for SUB, URB, NER, NWR and SOR sites, respectively. The chemical composition of fine aerosol is very homogeneous at the five sites and is composed of OM (38-47%), nitrate (17-22%), non-sea-salt sulfate (13-16%), ammonium (10-12%), EC (4-10%), mineral dust (2-5%) and sea salt (3-4%). This chemical composition is in agreement with those reported in the literature for most European environments. On the annual scale, Paris (URB and SUB sites) exhibits its highest PM2.5 concentrations during late autumn, winter and early spring (higher than 15 μg m-3 on average, from December to April), intermediates during late spring and early autumn (between 10 and 15 μg m-3 during May, June, September, October, and November) and the lowest during summer (below 10 μg m-3 during July and August). PM levels are mostly homogeneous at the regional scale, on the whole duration of the project (e.g. for URB plotted against NER sites: slope = 1.06, r2 = 0.84, n = 330), suggesting the

  16. Associations between Long-Term Exposure to Chemical Constituents of Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) and Mortality in Medicare Enrollees in the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Dominici, Francesca; Wang, Yun; Coull, Brent A.; Bell, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    mortality. These results provide new evidence that chemical composition can partly explain the differential toxicity of PM2.5. Citation: Chung Y, Dominici F, Wang Y, Coull BA, Bell ML. 2015. Associations between long-term exposure to chemical constituents of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mortality in Medicare enrollees in the eastern United States. Environ Health Perspect 123:467–474; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307549 PMID:25565179

  17. Chemical Composition of the Aerosol Fine Fraction during African Dust Events as part of the Dust ATtACk Experiment in the Caribbean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallejo, Pamela; Formenti, Paola; Desboeufs, Karine; Quiñones, Mariana; Chevaillier, Servanne; Santos, Stephanie; Andrews, Elizabeth; Ogren, John A.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

    2015-04-01

    We present results on the assessment of aerosols' chemical composition at the atmospheric observatory of Cabezas de San Juan in Fajardo, Puerto Rico, during the summers of 2011 and 2012, where periods in the presence and absence of dust were studied under the framework of the Dust-ATtACk (Dust- Aging and Transport, from Africa to the Caribbean) experiment. Dust events were identified through observation and using air-mass back-trajectories, Saharan Air Layer images, measurements of aerosol optical thickness (AOT), in situ scattering and absorption coefficients, and chemical analyses. Results obtained for intense dust events were characterized by higher concentration of coarse particles, higher scattering and absorption coefficients (up to 100 Mm-1 and 5 Mm-1 at 550 and 530 nm, respectively), higher AOT (from 0.4 to 0.8) values, and higher concentration of elements associated with mineral dust (e.g., Si μ3 g/m3 compared to background concentrations of 0.15 μg/m3, obtained from XRF analysis). Elemental composition of the fine fraction (Dp < 1.8 μm), analyzed by ICP-OES, also yielded higher average concentrations during dust events of, for example, Fe (0.045 μg m-3, vs 0.016 μg m-3 during low or no dust). Detailed results of the submicron fraction composition for the carbonaceous aerosol (total carbon, organic carbon, black carbon), total nitrogen, the water-soluble organic carbon, water-soluble ions, and the elemental composition with their possible sources will be presented at the meeting.

  18. Chemical Characterization and Source Apportionment of Indoor and Outdoor Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) in Retirement Communities of the Los Angeles Basin

    PubMed Central

    Hasheminassab, Sina; Daher, Nancy; Shafer, Martin M.; Schauer, James J.; Delfino, Ralph J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent indoor and outdoor measurements of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were conducted at three retirement homes in the Los Angeles Basin during two separate phases (cold and warm) between 2005 and 2006. Indoor-to-outdoor relationships of PM2.5 chemical constituents were determined and sources of indoor and outdoor PM2.5 were evaluated using a molecular marker-based chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) model. Indoor levels of elemental carbon (EC) along with metals and trace elements were found to be significantly affected by outdoor sources. EC, in particular, displayed very high indoor-to-outdoor (I/O) mass ratios accompanied by strong I/O correlations, illustrating the significant impact of outdoor sources on indoor levels of EC. Similarly, indoor levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, and steranes were strongly correlated with their outdoor components and displayed I/O ratios close to unity. On the other hand, concentrations of n-alkanes and organic acids inside the retirement communities were dominated by indoor sources (e.g. food cooking and consumer products), as indicated by their I/O ratios, which exceeded unity. Source apportionment results revealed that vehicular emissions were the major contributor to both indoor and outdoor PM2.5, accounting for 39 and 46% of total mass, respectively. Moreover, the contribution of vehicular sources to indoor levels was generally comparable to its corresponding outdoor estimate. Other water-insoluble organic matter (other WIOM), which accounts for emissions from uncharacterized primary biogenic sources, displayed a wider range of contributions, varying from 2 to 73% of PM2.5, across all sites and phases of the study. Lastly, higher indoor than outdoor contribution of other water-soluble organic matter (other WSOM) was evident at some of the sites, suggesting the production of secondary aerosols as well as direct emissions from primary sources (including cleaning or other consumer products) at the

  19. In situ chemical oxidation of contaminated groundwater by persulfate: decomposition by Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-containing oxides and aquifer materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haizhou; Bruton, Thomas A; Doyle, Fiona M; Sedlak, David L

    2014-09-01

    Persulfate (S2O8(2-)) is being used increasingly for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of organic contaminants in groundwater, despite an incomplete understanding of the mechanism through which it is converted into reactive species. In particular, the decomposition of persulfate by naturally occurring mineral surfaces has not been studied in detail. To gain insight into the reaction rates and mechanism of persulfate decomposition in the subsurface, and to identify possible approaches for improving its efficacy, the decomposition of persulfate was investigated in the presence of pure metal oxides, clays, and representative aquifer solids collected from field sites in the presence and absence of benzene. Under conditions typical of groundwater, Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides catalytically converted persulfate into sulfate radical (SO4(•-)) and hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) over time scales of several weeks at rates that were 2-20 times faster than those observed in metal-free systems. Amorphous ferrihydrite was the most reactive iron mineral with respect to persulfate decomposition, with reaction rates proportional to solid mass and surface area. As a result of radical chain reactions, the rate of persulfate decomposition increased by as much as 100 times when benzene concentrations exceeded 0.1 mM. Due to its relatively slow rate of decomposition in the subsurface, it can be advantageous to inject persulfate into groundwater, allowing it to migrate to zones of low hydraulic conductivity where clays, metal oxides, and contaminants will accelerate its conversion into reactive oxidants. PMID:25133603

  20. In Situ Chemical Oxidation of Contaminated Groundwater by Persulfate: Decomposition by Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-Containing Oxides and Aquifer Materials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Persulfate (S2O82–) is being used increasingly for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of organic contaminants in groundwater, despite an incomplete understanding of the mechanism through which it is converted into reactive species. In particular, the decomposition of persulfate by naturally occurring mineral surfaces has not been studied in detail. To gain insight into the reaction rates and mechanism of persulfate decomposition in the subsurface, and to identify possible approaches for improving its efficacy, the decomposition of persulfate was investigated in the presence of pure metal oxides, clays, and representative aquifer solids collected from field sites in the presence and absence of benzene. Under conditions typical of groundwater, Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides catalytically converted persulfate into sulfate radical (SO4•–) and hydroxyl radical (HO•) over time scales of several weeks at rates that were 2–20 times faster than those observed in metal-free systems. Amorphous ferrihydrite was the most reactive iron mineral with respect to persulfate decomposition, with reaction rates proportional to solid mass and surface area. As a result of radical chain reactions, the rate of persulfate decomposition increased by as much as 100 times when benzene concentrations exceeded 0.1 mM. Due to its relatively slow rate of decomposition in the subsurface, it can be advantageous to inject persulfate into groundwater, allowing it to migrate to zones of low hydraulic conductivity where clays, metal oxides, and contaminants will accelerate its conversion into reactive oxidants. PMID:25133603

  1. Fine-tuning of catalytic tin nanoparticles by the reverse micelle method for direct deposition of silicon nanowires by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour technique.

    PubMed

    Poinern, Gérrard E J; Ng, Yan-Jing; Fawcett, Derek

    2010-12-15

    The reverse micelle method was used for the reduction of a tin (Sn) salt solution to produce metallic Sn nanoparticles ranging from 85 nm to 140 nm in diameter. The reverse micellar system used in this process was hexane-butanol-cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The diameters of the Sn nanoparticles were proportional to the concentration of the aqueous Sn salt solution. Thus, the size of the Sn nanoparticles can easily be controlled, enabling a simple, reproducible mechanism for the growth of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Both the Sn nanoparticles and silicon nanowires were characterised using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Further characterisations of the SiNW's were made using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In addition, dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to investigate particle size distributions. This procedure demonstrates an economical route for manufacturing reproducible silicon nanowires using fine-tuned Sn nanoparticles for possible solar cell applications. PMID:20887996

  2. Fine Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danzer, Gerald A.; Newman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of fine arts as sources to enrich the study of history. Suggests that such works will serve as barometers of change, examples of cross-cultural influences, and political messages. Includes suggestions of works and artists from different historic periods. (DK)

  3. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  4. Chemical fractionation of arsenic and heavy metals in fine particle matter and its implications for risk assessment: A case study in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huiming; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Qin'geng; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yu; Yang, Meng; Li, Fengying; Lu, Hao; Wang, Cheng

    2015-02-01

    A four-step sequential extraction procedure was used to study the chemical fractionation of As and heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected from Nanjing, China. The mass concentrations of most PM2.5 samples exceeded the 24 h standard (75 μg/m3) recommended by the new national ambient air quality standard of China. The most abundant elements were Fe, Zn and Pb, while As and Cd were present at the lowest concentrations. As, Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn were mostly present in the two mobile fractions, including the soluble and exchangeable fraction (F1), and carbonates, oxides and reducible fraction (F2). Fe had the highest proportion present in the residual fraction (F4). Relatively high proportions of the metals Ni and Cr were present in the oxidizable and sulfidic fraction (F3). High proportions of Zn, As and Cu and lower proportions of Cd, Cr and Fe were present in the potentially mobile phases. The enrichment factor, contamination factor and risk assessment code were calculated to analyze the main sources and assess the environmental risks of the metals in PM2.5. The carcinogenic risks of As, Cd, Ni and Pb were all lower than the accepted criterion of 10-6, whereas the carcinogenic risks of Cr for children and As and Cr for adults were higher than 10-6. The non-carcinogenic health risk of As and heavy metals because of PM2.5 exposure for children and adults were lower than but close to the safe level of 1.

  5. Chemical compositions responsible for inflammation and tissue damage in the mouse lung by coarse and fine particulate samples from contrasting air pollution in Europe.

    PubMed

    Happo, Mikko S; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Halinen, Arja I; Jalava, Pasi I; Pennanen, Arto S; Sillanpaa, Markus; Hillamo, Risto; Salonen, Raimo O

    2008-11-01

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism in mortality and morbidity associated with exposures of cardiorespiratory patients to urban air particulate matter. We investigated the association of the chemical composition and sources of urban air fine (PM(2.5-0.2)) and coarse (PM(10-2.5)) particulate samples with the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung. The particulate samples were collected during selected seasons in six European cities using a high-volume cascade impactor. Healthy C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally instilled with a single dose (10 mg/kg) of the particulate samples. At 4, 12, and 24 h after the exposure, the lungs were lavaged and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assayed for indicators of inflammation and tissue damage: cell number, total protein, and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha, interleukin [IL]-6, and KC). Dicarboxylic acids and transition metals, especially Ni and V, in PM(2.5-0.2) correlated positively and some secondary inorganic ions (NO3(-), NH4(+)) negatively with the inflammatory activity. Total organic matter and SO4(2-) had no consistent correlations. In addition, the soil-derived constituents (Ca2+, Al, Fe, Si) showed positive correlations with the PM(2.5-0.2)-induced inflammatory activity, but their role in PM(10-2.5) remained obscure, possibly due to largely undefined biogenic material. Markers of poor biomass and coal combustion, i.e., monosaccharide anhydrides and As, were associated with elevated PAH contents in PM(2.5-0.2) and a consistent immunosuppressive effect. Overall, our results support epidemiological findings that the local sources of incomplete combustion and resuspended road dust are important in urban air particulate pollution-related health effects. PMID:18855153

  6. Impacts of chemical amendment and plant growth on lead speciation and enzyme activities in a shooting range soil: an x-ray absorption fine structure investigation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yohey; Matsufuru, Hiroki; Takaoka, Masaki; Tanida, Hajime; Sato, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    In situ chemical immobilization is a practical remediation technology for metal-contaminated soils because of its capability to reduce cost and environmental impacts. We assessed the immobilization effects of poultry waste amendment and plant growth (Panicum maximum Jacq.) on Pb speciation and enzyme activities in shooting range soils. Soil contaminated with Pb was obtained from the top 20 cm of a shooting range. To evaluate Pb mobility in the soil profile treated with plants and immobilizing amendment, we used large columns filled with Pb-contaminated soil (0-20 cm, surface soils) and non-contaminated soil (20-75 cm, subsurface soils). The column study demonstrated that the amendment reduced the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure-extractable Pb in the surface soil by 90% of the Control soil. Lead mobility from the surface to subsurface profiles was significantly attenuated by plant growth but was promoted by the amendment without plant application. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis revealed that the amendment reduced the proportion of PbCO(3) and Pb-organic complexes and transformed them into a more geochemically stable species of Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl with 30 to 35% of the total Pb species. Applications of plant and amendment increased activities of dehydrogenase and phosphatase in the surface soil with 2.7- and 1.1-fold greater than those in Control, respectively. The use of amendments in combination with plant growth may have potential as an integrated remediation strategy that enables Pb immobilization and soil biological restoration in shooting range soils. PMID:19465717

  7. Fine particles (PM2.5) at a CAWNET background site in Central China: Chemical compositions, seasonal variations and regional pollution events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Cheng, Hai-rong; Wang, Zu-wu; Lv, Xiao-pu; Zhu, Zhong-min; Zhang, Gan; Wang, Xin-ming

    2014-04-01

    Fine particle (PM2.5) samples were collected at Jinsha (JSH), a regional background China Atmosphere Watch Network (CAWNET) site in Central China from March 2012 to March 2013. The mass concentrations of water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in PM2.5 were measured. The average PM2.5 mass concentration was 48.7 ± 26.9 μg m-3, exceeding the Chinese National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) (35 μg m-3), implying that PM2.5 is a pollutant of regional concern in Central China. The average concentrations of total WSIIs, OC and EC were 26.1 ± 18.8, 7.5 ± 3.5 and 0.7 ± 0.5 μg m-3, accounting for 53.5%, 15.1% and 1.5% of the PM2.5 concentrations at JSH, respectively. Clear seasonal variations in PM2.5 and the levels of its main chemical species were observed in the following order: winter > autumn > spring > summer. Backward air trajectory analysis and potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis implied that the areas north and northeast of JSH contributed significantly to the levels of SO42-, NO3-, NH4+ and OC, while sandstorms originating from Mongolia and traveling across Northwest China may have contributed significantly to the levels of Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in PM2.5 at JSH. Two pollution events, related to regional biomass burning and haze, respectively, were recorded at JSH during the sampling campaign.

  8. Chemical Characterisation of the Coarse and Fine Particulate Matter in the Environment of an Underground Railway System: Cytotoxic Effects and Oxidative Stress—A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Ottria, Gianluca; Perdelli, Fernanda; Cristina, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exposure to the particulate matter produced in underground railway systems is arousing increasing scientific interest because of its health effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the airborne concentrations of PM10 and three sub-fractions of PM2.5 in an underground railway system environment in proximity to platforms and in underground commercial areas within the system, and to compare these with the outdoor airborne concentrations. We also evaluated the metal components, the cytotoxic properties of the various fractions of particulate matter (PM) and their capacity to induce oxidative stress. Method: We collected the coarse fraction (5–10 µm) and the fine fractions (1–2.5 µm; 0.5–1 µm; 0.25–0.5 µm). Chemical characterisation was determined by means of spectrometry. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) assessment. Results: The concentrations of both PM10 and PM2.5 proved to be similar at the three sampling sites. Iron and other transition metals displayed a greater concentration at the subway platform than at the other two sites. The 2.5–10 µm and 1–2.5 µm fractions of PM from all three sampling sites determined a greater increase in ROS; the intensity of oxidative stress progressively declined as particle diameter diminished. Moreover, ROS concentrations were correlated with the concentrations of some transition metals, namely Mn, Cr, Ti, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni and Mo. All particulate matter fractions displayed lower or similar ROS values between platform level and the outdoor air. Conclusions: The present study revealed that the underground railway environment at platform level, although containing higher concentrations of some particularly reactive metallic species, did not display higher cytotoxicity and oxidative stress levels than the outdoor air. PMID:25872016

  9. Chemical compositions responsible for inflammation and tissue damage in the mouse lung by coarse and fine particulate samples from contrasting air pollution in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Happo, M.S.; Hirvonen, M.R.; Halinen, A.I.; Jalava, P.I.; Pennanen, A.S.; Sillanpaa, M.; Hillamo, R.; Salonen, R.O.

    2008-07-01

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism in mortality and morbidity associated with exposures of cardiorespiratory patients to urban air particulate matter. We investigated the association of the chemical composition and sources of urban air fine (PM2.5-0.2) and coarse (PM10-2.5) particulate samples with the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung. The particulate samples were collected during selected seasons in six European cities using a high-volume cascade impactor. Healthy C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally instilled with a single dose (10 mg/kg) of the particulate samples. At 4, 12, and 24 h after the exposure, the lungs were lavaged and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assayed for indicators of inflammation and tissue damage: cell number, total protein, and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and KC). Dicarboxylic acids and transition metals, especially Ni and V, in PM2.5-0.2 correlated positively and some secondary inorganic ions (NO{sub 3}{sup -}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}) negatively with the inflammatory activity. Total organic matter and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} had no consistent correlations. In addition, the soil-derived constituents (Ca{sup 2+}, Al, Fe, Si) showed positive correlations with the PM2.5-0.2-induced inflammatory activity, but their role in PM10 (2.5) remained obscure, possibly due to largely undefined biogenic material. Markers of poor biomass and coal combustion, i.e., monosaccharide anhydrides and As, were associated with elevated PAH contents in PM2.5 (0.2) and a consistent immunosuppressive effect. Overall, our results support epidemiological findings that the local sources of incomplete combustion and resuspended road dust are important in urban air particulate pollution-related health effects.

  10. IVS Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  11. Characteristics and Influence of Biosmoke on the Fine-Particle Ionic Composition Measured in Asian Outflow during the Transport and Chemical Evolution Over the Pacific (TRACE-P) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y.; Weber, R. J.; Lee, Y.-N.; Orsini, D. A.; Maxwell-Meier, K.; Thornton, D. C.; Bandy, A. R.; Clarke, A. D.; Blake, D. R.; Sachse, G. W.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the sources, prevalence, and fine-particle inorganic composition of biosmoke over the western Pacific Ocean between 24 February and 10 April 2001. The analysis is based on highly time-resolved airborne measurements of gaseous and fine- particle inorganic chemical composition made during the NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) experiment. At latitudes below approximately 25 deg. N, relatively pure biomass burning plumes of enhanced fine-particle potassium, nitrate, ammonium, light-absorbing aerosols, and CO concentrations were observed in plumes that back trajectories and satellite fire map data suggest originated from biomass burning in southeast Asia. Fine-particle water-soluble potassium (K+) is confirmed to be a unique biosmoke tracer, and its prevalence throughout the experiment indicates that approximately 20% of the TRACE-P Asian outflow plumes were influenced, to some extent, by biomass or biofuel burning emissions. At latitudes above 25 deg. N, highly mixed urban/industrial and biosmoke plumes, indicated by SO(sup 2, sub 4) and K+, were observed in 5 out of 53 plumes. Most plumes were found in the Yellow Sea and generally were associated with much higher fine-particle loadings than plumes lacking a biosmoke influence. The air mass back trajectories of these mixed plumes generally pass through the latitude range of between 34 deg. and 40 deg. N on the eastern China coast, a region that includes the large urban centers of Beijing and Tianjin. A lack of biomass burning emissions based on fire maps and high correlations between K+ and pollution tracers (e.g., S(sup 2, sub 4) suggest biofuel sources. Ratios of fine-particle potassium to sulfate are used to provide an estimate of relative contributions of biosmoke emissions to the mixed Asian plumes. The ratio is highly correlated with fine-particle volume (r(sup 2) = 0.85) and predicts that for the most polluted plume encounter in TRACE-P, approximately 60% of the

  12. Dewatering of fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Fine coal dewatering is one of the most pressing problem facing the coal cleaning industry. This project was undertaken with the objective of improving the dewatering process with surface chemical activation by primarily understanding the fundamental and process engineering aspects of vacuum filtration. Specific tasks for this project included -- development of an experimental apparatus and procedure to yield highly reproducible results and extensive data from each test, detailed experimental investigation of the dewatering characteristics of coal fines with and without the addition of flocculants and surfactants, and under different operating conditions, and finally identification and establishment of the physical limits of mechanical dewatering. Following are the significant conclusions from the study: Fineness and size distribution of the coal fines have the most significant influence on the coal dewatering process; usage of flocculants and surfactants is almost essential in reducing the cake moisture and in increasing the filter throughputs; based on the experimental data and the literature information, the existence of an asymptotic limit for filter cake moisture correlatable with a capillary number of the filter cake was identified. 66 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Thorium nanochemistry: the solution structure of the Th(IV)-hydroxo pentamer

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, Clemens; Rothe, Jörg; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Fuss, Markus

    2012-10-10

    Tetravalent thorium exhibits a strong tendency towards hydrolysis and subsequent polymerization. Polymeric species play a crucial role in understanding thorium solution chemistry, since their presence causes apparent solubility several orders of magnitude higher than predicted by thermodynamic data bases. Although electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI MS) identifies Th(IV) dimers and pentamers unequivocally as dominant species close to the solubility limit, the molecular structure of Th5(OH)y polymers was hitherto unknown. In the present study, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, high energy X-ray scattering (HEXS) measurements, and quantum chemical calculations are combined to solve the pentamer structure. The most favourable structure is represented by two Th(IV) dimers linked by a central Th(IV) cation through hydroxide bridges.

  14. Formation of uranium(IV)-silica colloids at near-neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreissig, Isabell; Weiss, Stephan; Hennig, Christoph; Bernhard, Gert; Zänker, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Evidence is provided by photon correlation spectroscopy, ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation that uranium(IV) can form silicate-containing colloids of a size of ⩽20 nm. A concentration of up to 10 -3 M of colloid-borne U(IV) was observed. The particles are generated in near-neutral to slightly alkaline solutions containing background chemicals of geogenic nature (carbonate, silicate, sodium ions). They remain stable in aqueous suspension over years. Electrostatic repulsion due to a negative zeta potential in the near-neutral to alkaline pH range caused by the silicate stabilizes the U(IV) colloids. The isoelectric point of the nanoparticles is shifted toward lower pH values by the silicate. The mechanism of the colloidal stabilization can be regarded as "sequestration" by silicate, a phenomenon well known from heavy metal ions of high ion potential such as iron(III) or manganese(III,IV), but never reported for uranium(IV) so far. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy showed that U-O-Si bonds, which increasingly replace the U-O-U bonds of the amorphous uranium(IV) oxyhydroxide with increasing silicate concentrations, make up the internal structure of the colloids. The next-neighbor coordination of U(IV) in the U(IV)-silica colloids is comparable with that of coffinite, USiO 4. The assessment of uranium behavior in the aquatic environment should take the possible existence of U(IV)-silica colloids into consideration. Their occurrence might influence uranium migration in anoxic waters.

  15. Structural Analysis of the Mn(IV)/Fe(III) Cofactor of Chlamydia Trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase By Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy And Density Functional Theory Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, J.M.; Krest, C.M.; Jiang, W.; Krebs, C.; Bollinger, J.M.Jr.; Green, M.T.

    2009-05-28

    The class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from Chlamydia trachomatis (C{bar A}) uses a stable Mn(lV)/ Fe(lll) cofactor to initiate nucleotide reduction by a free-radical mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to postulate a structure for this cofactor. Fe and Mn K-edge EXAFS data yield an intermetallic distance of -2.92 {angstrom}. The Mn data also suggest the presence of a short 1.74 {angstrom} Mn-O bond. These metrics are compared to the results of DFT calculations on 12 cofactor models derived from the crystal structure of the inactive Fe2(lll/ III) form of the protein. Models are differentiated by the protonation states of their bridging and terminal OH{sub x} ligands as well as the location of the Mn(lV) ion (site 1 or 2). The models that agree best with experimental observation feature a{mu}-1, 3-carboxylate bridge (E120), terminal solvent (H{sub 2}O/OH) to site 1, one {mu}-O bridge, and one {mu}-OH bridge. The site-placement of the metal ions cannot be discerned from the available data.

  16. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  17. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  18. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Canyonlands National Park using organic particulate material concentrations obtained with a multisystem, multichannel diffusion denuder sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatough, Delbert J.; Eatough, David A.; Lewis, Laura; Lewis, Edwin A.

    1996-08-01

    The concentration of fine particulate carbonaceous material has been measured over a 1-year period at the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) Canyonlands National Park, Utah sampling site using a Brigham Young University organic sampling system (BOSS) multisystem, multichannel diffusion denuder sampler. Samples were collected on the IMPROVE schedule of a 24-hour sample every Wednesday and Saturday. The concentrations of particulate C, determined using only a quartz filter pack sampling system, were low by an average of 39%, as a result of the loss of semi-volatile organic compounds from the particles collected on quartz filters during sampling. The loss was higher during the summer than during the winter sampling periods. The BOSS and IMPROVE quartz filter carbon measurements were in agreement except for a few samples collected during the summer. The fine particulate carbonaceous material concentrations determined using the BOSS have been combined with concentrations of particulate elemental C (soot), sulfate, nitrate, crustal material, and fine and coarse particulate mass from the IMPROVE sampling system, as well as relative humidity, light absorption, and transmissometer measurements of light extinction from IMPROVE. Extinction budgets have been calculated using multilinear regression analyses of the data set. Literature data were used to estimate the change in the mass extinction coefficients for the measured species as a function of relative humidity. The results show carbonaceous material to be the principal contributor to light extinction due to particles during the study period, with the major contributor to light extinction being light-absorbing carbonaceous material. However, the periods of maximum light extinction are associated with high humidity and the associated increased scattering of light due to particulate sulfate during the winter. The effect of particulate organic compounds on light extinction is greatest in the

  19. Band Gap Characters and Ferromagnetic/Antiferromagnetic Coupling in Group-IV Monolayers Tuned by Chemical Species and Hydrogen Adsorption Configurations.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Zhe; Yan, Jia-An; Gao, Shang-Peng

    2015-12-01

    One-side semihydrogenated monolayers of carbon, silicon, germanium, and their binary compounds with different configurations of hydrogen atoms are investigated by density functional theory. Among three considered configurations, zigzag, other than the most studied chair configuration, is energetically the most favorable structure of one-side semihydrogenation. Upon semihydrogenation, the semimetallic silicene, germanene, and SiGe become semiconductors, while the band gap in semiconducting SiC and GeC is reduced. Semihydrogenated silicene, germanene, SiGe, and GeC with chair configuration are found to be ferromagnetic semiconductors. For semihydrogenated SiC, it is ferromagnetic when all hydrogen atoms bond with silicon atoms, while an antiferromagnetic coupling is predicted when all hydrogen atoms bond with carbon atoms. The effect of interatomic distance between two neighboring magnetic atoms to the ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic coupling is studied. For comparison, properties of one-side and both-side fully hydrogenated group-IV monolayers are also calculated. All fully hydrogenated group-IV monolayers are nonmagnetic semiconductors with band gaps larger than those of their semihydrogenated counterparts. PMID:26334543

  20. Characterization of Caramel Colour IV.

    PubMed

    Licht, B H; Shaw, K; Smith, C; Mendoza, M; Orr, J; Myers, D V

    1992-05-01

    A large number of commercial Caramel Colour IV samples were characterized in order to assess the uniformity of the class and to provide data to be used in specifications development. Owing to the chemical and physical complexity of caramel colour it was not feasible to perform detailed analysis of all constituents for assessment of uniformity. Instead, selected parameters were evaluated and judgements were made with respect to compositional uniformity based on the similarities of these parameters among the various samples. As Caramel Colour IV is required by the food industry in a range of colour intensities, there must be a range of properties that differ from sample to sample, but that are sufficiently similar for the material to still be considered as part of the Caramel Colour IV class. Fractions as well as whole caramel were analysed using selected spectrophotometric, chromatographic and chemical techniques. Samples were fractionated based on molecular weight and polarity. The data presented here provide evidence for the uniformity in composition of Caramel Colour IV with respect to molecular weight distribution, to nitrogen and sulphur content and their distribution throughout the fractions, to absorbance properties and to specific low molecular weight compounds. Thus, it can be concluded that Caramel Colour IV exhibits compositional uniformity within the range of colour intensity required by the food industry worldwide. PMID:1644377

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF WESTERN COAL SURFACE MINING. PART IV--CHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF A SURFACE COAL MINE SETTLING POND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical and microbiological investigations of the settling pond system at the West Decker Coal Mine in southeastern Montana were undertaken during 1975-1977. Concentrations of total dissolved solids, bicarbonate, sodium, sulfate, and nitrogen species in pond water were elevated ...

  2. Anomalous C IV and Si IV resonance lines in 36 Lyncis

    SciTech Connect

    Sadakane, K.

    1984-03-01

    Of the anomalously strong C IV and Si IV resonance lines found in the UV spectrum of the chemically peculiar star 36 Lyncis, the C IV lines near 1550 A are noted to be absent in about 40 other middle or late B-type main sequence stars. Also found is a peculiar intensity ratio between C IV and Si IV lines, where the former are stronger. The continuous energy distribution of 36 Lyn in the UV region fits with those of late B-type stars, and the presence of a hot, chromospheric or coronal gas is suggested. 14 references.

  3. FINE P M EMISSIONS CHARACTERIZATION--BIOMASS

    EPA Science Inventory

    FINE PM EMISSIONS CHARACTERIZATION -- BIOMASS The APPCD fine particle research team was funded (FY 2000) to perform emission characterization and source chemical profile analysis of major particle source emissions in the U.S. The focus of this task is to analyze these data on ai...

  4. A method for the concentration of fine-grained rutile (TiO2) from sediment and sedimentary rocks by chemical leaching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Commeau, Judith A.; Valentine, Page C.

    1991-01-01

    Most of the sample analyzed by the method described were marine muds collected from the Gulf of Maine (Valentine and Commeau, 1990). The silt and clay fraction (up to 99 wt% of the sediment) is composed of clay minerals (chiefly illite-mica and chlorite), silt-size quartz and feldspar, and small crystals (2-12 um) of rutile and hematite. The bulk sediment samples contained an average of 2 to 3 wt percent CaCO3. Tiher samples analyzed include red and gray Carboniferous and Triassic sandstones and siltstones exposed around the Bay of Fundy region and Paleozoic sandstones, siltstones, and shales from northern Maine and New Brunswick. These rocks are probable sources for the fine-grained rutile found in the Gulf of Maine.

  5. Selenium(IV) uptake by maghemite (γ-Fe2O3).

    PubMed

    Jordan, Norbert; Ritter, Aline; Scheinost, Andreas C; Weiss, Stephan; Schild, Dieter; Hübner, René

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of selenium(IV) uptake by maghemite was investigated on both the macroscopic and the molecular level. Maghemite nanoparticles exhibited fast adsorption kinetics toward selenium(IV). Batch experiments showed a decreased sorption with increasing pH (3.5-11). Ionic strength variations (0.01 to 0.1 M NaCl) had no significant influence on selenium(IV) uptake. Electrophoretic mobility measurements revealed a significant shift toward lower values of the isoelectric point of maghemite upon selenium(IV) uptake, suggesting the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes. At the molecular level, using X-ray Absorption Fine-Structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS), the formation of both bidentate binuclear corner-sharing ((2)C) and bidentate mononuclear edge-sharing ((1)E) inner-sphere surface complexes was observed, with a trend toward solely (1)E complexes at high pH. The absence of a tridentate surface complex as observed for arsenic(III) and antimonite(III) might be due to the relatively small size of the Se(IV)O3 unit. These new spectroscopic results can be implemented in reactive transport models to improve the prediction of selenium migration behavior in the environment as well as its monitoring through its interaction with maghemite or maghemite layers at the surface of magnetite. Due to its chemical stability even at low pH and its magnetization properties allowing magnetic separation, maghemite is a promising sorbing phase for the treatment of Se polluted waters. PMID:24422437

  6. Making Pure Fine-Grained Inorganic Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.

    1985-01-01

    Sustained arc plasma chemical reactor fabricates very-fine-grained inorganic solids having low thermal conductivity. Powder fabrication method, based on plasma tube technique produces pure solids without contamination commonly produced by grinding.

  7. Chemical Variations Among L-Chondrites--IV. Analyses, with Petrographic Notes, of 13 L-group and 3 LL-group Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosewich, E.; Dodd, R. T.

    1985-03-01

    We review our procedures for selecting, preparing and analyzing meteorite samples, present new analyses of 16 ordinary chondrites, and discuss variations of Fe, S and Si in the L-group. A tendency for Fe/Mg, S/Mg and Si/Mg to be low in L chondrites of facies d to f testifies that post-metamorphic shock melting played a significant role in the chemical diversification of the L-group. However, these ratios also vary widely and sympathetically in melt-free chondrites, indicating that much of the L-group's chemical variation arose prior to thermal metamorphism and is in that sense primary. If all L chondrites come from one parent body, type-correlated chemical trends suggest: 1) that the body had a traditional "onion skin" structure, with metamorphic intensity increasing with depth; and 2) that it formed from material that became more homogeneous, slightly poorer in iron, and significantly richer in sulfur as accretion proceeded.

  8. Layered silicate as an excellent partner of a TiO2 photocatalyst for efficient and selective green fine-chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ide, Yusuke; Torii, Masato; Sano, Tsuneji

    2013-08-14

    When the partial oxidation of benzene to phenol, which is one of the most important reactions in chemical industry, was conducted using TiO2 in the presence of a phenol-philic adsorbent derived from a layered silicate, phenol was recovered in unprecedentedly high yield and purity. This resulted from the fact that the adsorbent captured the generated phenol promptly, selectively, and effectively to prevent the overoxidation, after which the captured phenol could be easily eluted. PMID:23902420

  9. Parallel computation of unsteady, three-dimensional, chemically reacting, nonequilibrium flow using a time-split finite-volume method on the Illiac IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of the split finite-volume method which is a viable numerical procedure for performing with the aid of a modern special purpose vector computer numerical simulation studies of complicated flow fields, including chemical reactions, about geometrically complex bodies. Such numerical studies are needed for the development of atmospheric entry vehicles such as the space shuttle. The equations which are approximated are quite general and can be used in studies of combustion, pollution, and other chemically reacting flow phenomena, where convective transport effects dominate the influence of radiative, viscous, and other transport mechanisms. The shock perturbed flow about a shuttle orbiter flying at a large angle of attack during atmospheric entry is illustrated. The method uses a time splitting of the convection differencing operator to achieve efficient data management.

  10. Surface Structure and Chemical Switching of Thioctic Acid Adsorbed on Au(111) as Observed Using Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Meulenberg, R W; van Buuren, T; Vance, A L; Terminello, L J; Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; Fadley, C S

    2004-01-06

    Thioctic acid (alpha-lipoic acid) is a molecule with a large disulfide-containing base, a short alkyl-chain with four CH{sub 2} units, and a carboxyl termination. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of thioctic acid adsorbed on Au(111) have been investigated with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine film quality, bonding and morphology. Using standard preparation protocols for SAMs, that is, dissolving thioctic acid in ethanol and exposing gold to the solution, results in poor films. These films are highly disordered, contain a mixture of carboxyl and carboxylate terminations, have more than monolayer coverage, and exhibit unbound disulfide. Conversely, forming films by dissolving 1 mmol thioctic acid into 5% acetic acid in ethanol (as previously reported with carboxyl-terminated alkyl-thiols) forms ordered monolayers with small amounts of unbound sulfur. NEXAFS indicates tilted over endgroups with the carboxyl group normal on average 38{sup o} from the surface normal. Slight dichroism in other features indicates alkyl chains statistically more upright than prostrate on the surface. Reflection-absorption Fourier transform infrared (RA-FTIR) spectra indicate hydrogen bonding between neighboring molecules. In such well-formed monolayers, a stark reorientation occurs upon deprotonation of the endgroup by rinsing in a KOH solution. The carboxylate plane normal is now about 66{sup o} from sample normal, a much more upright orientation. Data indicate this reorientation may also cause a more upright orientation to the alkyl portion of the molecules.

  11. Source apportionment of fine particles and its chemical components over the Yangtze River Delta, China during a heavy haze pollution episode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; An, J. Y.; Zhou, M.; Yan, R. S.; Huang, C.; Lu, Q.; Lin, L.; Wang, Y. J.; Tao, S. K.; Qiao, L. P.; Zhu, S. H.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    contributors to organic carbon. Results show that the Yangtze River Delta region should focus on the joint pollution control of industrial processing, combustion emissions, mobile source emissions, and fugitive dust. Regional transport of air pollution among the cities are prominent, and the implementation of regional joint prevention and control of air pollution will help to alleviate fine particulate matter concentrations under heavy pollution case significantly.

  12. Characterizing phosphorus speciation of Chesapeake Bay sediments using chemical extraction, 31P NMR, and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Joshi, Sunendra R; Hou, Guangjin; Burdige, David J; Sparks, Donald L; Jaisi, Deb P

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient contamination has been one of the lingering issues in the Chesapeake Bay because the bay restoration is complicated by temporally and seasonally variable nutrient sources and complex interaction between imported and regenerated nutrients. Differential reactivity of sedimentary phosphorus (P) pools in response to imposed biogeochemical conditions can record past sediment history and therefore a detailed sediment P speciation may provide information on P cycling particularly the stability of a P pool and the formation of one pool at the expense of another. This study examined sediment P speciation from three sites in the Chesapeake Bay: (i) a North site in the upstream bay, (ii) a middle site in the central bay dominated by seasonally hypoxic bottom water, and (iii) a South site at the bay-ocean boundary using a combination of sequential P extraction (SEDEX) and spectroscopic techniques, including (31)P NMR, P X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES), and Fe extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Results from sequential P extraction reveal that sediment P is composed predominantly of ferric Fe-bound P and authigenic P, which was further confirmed by solid-state (31)P NMR, XANES, and EXAFS analyses. Additionally, solution (31)P NMR results show that the sediments from the middle site contain high amounts of organic P such as monoesters and diesters, compared to the other two sites, but that these compounds rapidly decrease with sediment depth indicating remineralized P could have precipitated as authigenic P. Fe EXAFS enabled to identify the changes in Fe mineral composition and P sinks in response to imposed redox condition in the middle site sediments. The presence of lepidocrocite, vermiculite, and Fe smectite in the middle site sediments indicates that some ferric Fe minerals can still be present along with pyrite and vivianite, and that ferric Fe-bound P pool can be a major P sink in anoxic sediments. These results provide

  13. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  14. Long-term trends of chemical characteristics and sources of fine particle in Foshan City, Pearl River Delta: 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jihua; Duan, Jingchun; Ma, Yongliang; He, Kebin; Cheng, Yuan; Deng, Si-Xin; Huang, Yan-Ling; Si-Tu, Shu-Ping

    2016-09-15

    Foshan is a major international ceramic center and the most polluted city in the Pearl River Delta (PRD). Here we present the results of the first long-term PM2.5 (particles <2.5μm) sampling and chemical characterization study of the city. A total of 2774 samples were collected at six sites from 2008 to 2014, and analyzed for water soluble species, elements and carbonaceous species. The major constituents of PM2.5 were sulfate, OC (Organic Carbon), nitrate, ammonium and EC (Elemental Carbon), which accounted for 50%-88% of PM2.5. PM2.5 and the most abundant chemical species decreased from 2008 to 2011, but rebounded in 2012-2013. After 2008, the chemical composition of PM2.5 changed dramatically due to the implementation of pollution control measures. From 2008 to 2011, SO4(2-) and NO3(-) were the two largest components; subsequently, however, OC was the largest component. The respective contributions of SO4(2-), NO3(-) and OC to the sum of water soluble species and carbonaceous species were 30.5%, 22.9% and 19.9% in 2008; and 20.2%, 16.5% and 30.2% in 2014. Distinct differences in nitrate and sulfate, and in mass ratio [NO3(-)]/[SO4(2-)] imply that mobile sources tended to more important in Foshan during 2012-2014. The results indicate that pollution control measures implemented during 2008-2014 had a large effect on anthropogenic elements (Pb, As, Cd, Zn and Cu) and water soluble species, but little influence on crustal elements (V, Mn, Ti, Ba and Fe) and carbonaceous species. The PMF method was used for source apportionment of PM2.5. Industry (including the ceramic industry and coal combustion), vehicles and dust were the three most important sources and comprised 39.2%, 20.0% and 18.4% of PM2.5 in 2008, respectively. However, secondary aerosols, vehicles and industry were the three most important sources and comprised 29.5%, 22.4% and 20.4% of PM2.5 in 2014, respectively. During the seven year study interval, the contributions of primary sources (industry and

  15. Fine motor control

    MedlinePlus

    ... figure out the child's developmental age. Children develop fine motor skills over time, by practicing and being taught. To have fine motor control, children need: Awareness and planning Coordination ...

  16. The associations between birth weight and exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and its chemical constituents during pregnancy: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Luo, Xiping; Zhao, Chunmei; Zhang, Bo; Tao, Jun; Yang, Zuyao; Ma, Wenjun; Liu, Tao

    2016-04-01

    We performed this meta-analysis to estimate the associations of maternal exposure to PM2.5 and its chemical constituents with birth weight and to explore the sources of heterogeneity in regard to the findings of these associations. A total of 32 studies were identified by searching the MEDLINE, PUBMED, Embase, China Biological Medicine and Wanfang electronic databases before April 2015. We estimated the statistically significant associations of reduced birth weight (β = -15.9 g, 95% CI: -26.8, -5.0) and LBW (OR = 1.090, 95% CI: 1.032, 1.150) with PM2.5 exposure (per 10 μg/m(3) increment) during the entire pregnancy. Trimester-specific analyses showed negative associations between birth weight and PM2.5 exposure during the second (β = -12.6 g) and third (β = -10.0 g) trimesters. Other subgroup analyses indicated significantly different pooled-effect estimates of PM2.5 exposure on birth weight in studies with different exposure assessment methods, study designs and study settings. We further observed large differences in the pooled effect estimates of the PM2.5 chemical constituents for birth weight decrease and LBW. We concluded that PM2.5 exposure during pregnancy was associated with lower birth weight, and late pregnancy might be the critical window. Some specific PM2.5 constituents may have larger toxic effects on fetal weight. Exposure assessment methods, study designs and study settings might be important sources of the heterogeneity among the included studies. PMID:26736054

  17. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  18. Ultraviolet observations of solar fine structure.

    PubMed

    Dere, K P; Bartoe, J D; Brueckner, G E; Cook, J W; Socker, D G

    1987-11-27

    The High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph was flown on the Spacelab-2 shuttle mission to perform extended observations of the solar chromosphere and transition zone at high spatial and temporal resolution. Ultraviolet spectroheliograms show the temporal development of macrospicules at the solar limb. The C IV transition zone emission is produced in discrete emission elements that must be composed of exceedingly fine (less than 70 kilometers) subresolution structures. PMID:17744366

  19. Incorporation and retention of 99-Tc(IV) in magnetite under high pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Timothy A; Morris, Katherine; Law, Gareth T W; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Bots, Pieter; Parry, Stephen A; Shaw, Samuel

    2014-10-21

    Technetium incorporation into magnetite and its behavior during subsequent oxidation has been investigated at high pH to determine the technetium retention mechanism(s) on formation and oxidative perturbation of magnetite in systems relevant to radioactive waste disposal. Ferrihydrite was exposed to Tc(VII)(aq) containing cement leachates (pH 10.5-13.1), and crystallization of magnetite was induced via addition of Fe(II)aq. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), chemical extraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques provided direct evidence that Tc(VII) was reduced and incorporated into the magnetite structure. Subsequent air oxidation of the magnetite particles for up to 152 days resulted in only limited remobilization of the incorporated Tc(IV). Analysis of both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data indicated that the Tc(IV) was predominantly incorporated into the magnetite octahedral site in all systems studied. On reoxidation in air, the incorporated Tc(IV) was recalcitrant to oxidative dissolution with less than 40% remobilization to solution despite significant oxidation of the magnetite to maghemite/goethite: All solid associated Tc remained as Tc(IV). The results of this study provide the first direct evidence for significant Tc(IV) incorporation into the magnetite structure and confirm that magnetite incorporated Tc(IV) is recalcitrant to oxidative dissolution. Immobilization of Tc(VII) by reduction and incorporation into magnetite at high pH and with significant stability upon reoxidation has clear and important implications for limiting technetium migration under conditions where magnetite is formed including in geological disposal of radioactive wastes. PMID:25236360

  20. Energy levels and lifetimes of Nd IV, Pm IV, Sm IV, and Eu IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.

    2003-09-01

    To address the shortage of experimental data for electron spectra of triply ionized rare-earth elements we have calculated energy levels and lifetimes of 4f{sup n+1} and 4f{sup n}5d configurations of Nd IV (n=2), Pm IV (n=3), Sm IV (n=4), and Eu IV (n=5) using Hartree-Fock and configuration-interaction methods. To control the accuracy of our calculations we also performed similar calculations for Pr III, Nd III, and Sm III, for which experimental data are available. The results are important, in particular, for physics of magnetic garnets.

  1. Flow-injection chemiluminescence determination of enrofloxacin using the Ru(phen)3(2+)-Ce(IV) system and central composite design for the optimization of chemical variables.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, B; Mokhtari, A

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to develop an inexpensive, simple, rapid and sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) method for the determination of enrofloxacin (ENRO) using a flow-injection system. This method is based on rapid reduction of Ru(phen)(3)(3+), which is produced in the reaction between Ru(phen)(3)(2+) and acidic Ce(IV) by ENRO, producing strong CL. A central composite design (CCD) was used for optimization of the chemical variables. Regression analysis of the data from the CCD demonstrated that a second-order polynomial model is an adequate description of the surface over the factor limits studied. Optimization using CCD gave approximately four-fold better results than the single-factor-at-a-time method. Under optimal experimental conditions, the CL response was proportional to the concentration of ENRO over a wide range (0.008-3.6 microg/mL) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9986 and a detection limit of 0.003 microg/mL (3sigma). The relative standard deviation for 11 repeated determinations of 0.14 microg/mL ENRO was 4.2%. This method was successfully applied to the analysis of commercial formulations, spiked plasma and spiked poultry tissue. Sample analyses showed good recovery percentages for drugs and spiked plasma (95.1-103.9%). Recovery percentages for spiked poultry tissue were in the range 77.6-87.3%. The minimum sampling rate was 100 samples/h. PMID:18500697

  2. Association of chemical constituents and pollution sources of ambient fine particulate air pollution and biomarkers of oxidative stress associated with atherosclerosis: A panel study among young adults in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Yang, Di; Wei, Hongying; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jing; Li, Hongyu; Shima, Masayuki; Deng, Furong; Guo, Xinbiao

    2015-09-01

    Ambient particulate air pollution has been associated with increased oxidative stress and atherosclerosis, but the chemical constituents and pollution sources behind the association are unclear. We investigated the associations of various chemical constituents and pollution sources of ambient fine particles (PM2.5) with biomarkers of oxidative stress in a panel of 40 healthy university students. Study participants underwent repeated blood collections for 12 times before and after relocating from a suburban campus to an urban campus with high air pollution levels in Beijing, China. Air pollution data were obtained from central air-monitoring stations, and plasma levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) and soluble CD36 (sCD36) were determined in the laboratory (n=464). Linear mixed-effects models were used to estimate the changes in biomarkers in association with exposure variables. PM2.5 iron and nickel were positively associated with Ox-LDL (p<0.05). For each interquartile range increase in iron (1-day, 0.51 μg/m(3)) and nickel (2-day, 2.5 ng/m(3)), there were a 1.9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.2%, 3.7%] increase and a 1.8% (95% CI: 0.2%, 3.4%) increase in Ox-LDL, respectively. We also found that each interquartile range increase in calcium (1-day, 0.7 μg/m(3)) was associated with a 4.8% (95% CI: 0.7%, 9.1%) increase in sCD36. Among the pollution sources, PM2.5 from traffic emissions and coal combustion were suggestively and positively associated with Ox-LDL. Our findings suggest that a subset of metals in airborne particles may be the major air pollution components that contribute to the increased oxidative stress associated with atherosclerosis. PMID:25981523

  3. Catalyst Chemical State during CO Oxidation Reaction on Cu(111) Studied with Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Near Edge X-ray Adsorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eren, Baran; Heine, Christian; Bluhm, Hendrik; Somorjai, Gabor A; Salmeron, Miquel

    2015-09-01

    The chemical structure of a Cu(111) model catalyst during the CO oxidation reaction in the CO+O2 pressure range of 10-300 mTorr at 298-413 K was studied in situ using surface sensitive X-ray photoelectron and adsorption spectroscopy techniques [X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS)]. For O2:CO partial pressure ratios below 1:3, the surface is covered by chemisorbed O and by a thin (∼1 nm) Cu2O layer, which covers completely the surface for ratios above 1:3 between 333 and 413 K. The Cu2O film increases in thickness and exceeds the escape depth (∼3-4 nm) of the XPS and NEXAFS photoelectrons used for analysis at 413 K. No CuO formation was detected under the reaction conditions used in this work. The main reaction intermediate was found to be CO2(δ-), with a coverage that correlates with the amount of Cu2O, suggesting that this phase is the most active for CO oxidation. PMID:26275662

  4. Using PLATO IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meller, David V.

    This beginning reference manual describes PLATO IV hardware for prospective users and provides an introduction to PLATO for new authors. The PLATO terminal is described in detail in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 provides a block diagram of the PLATO IV system. Procedures for getting on line are described in Chapter 3, and Chapter 4 provides references to…

  5. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 hours a day. If there is a problem with the IV, you can call your home health care agency for help. If the IV comes out of ... bleeding stops. Then call the home health care agency or the doctor right away.

  6. Dewatering of fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, R.

    1995-10-01

    The factors which control the dewatering of fine coal by gravity/centrifugal drainage and by gas displacement (vacuum/hyperbaric filtration) are evaluated. A generalized model is presented and used to describe dewatering kinetics and to establish dewatering limits. Applications to the design of dewatering systems for fine coal dewatering are discussed.

  7. Inhibitory Effect of Dissolved Silica on the H2O2 Decomposition by Iron(III) and Manganese(IV) Oxides: Implications for H2O2-based In Situ Chemical Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Anh Le-Tuan; Doyle, Fiona M.; Sedlak, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The decomposition of H2O2 on iron minerals can generate •OH, a strong oxidant that can transform a wide range of contaminants. This reaction is critical to In Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) processes used for soil and groundwater remediation, as well as advanced oxidation processes employed in waste treatment systems. The presence of dissolved silica at concentrations comparable to those encountered in natural waters decreases the reactivity of iron minerals toward H2O2, because silica adsorbs onto the surface of iron minerals and alters catalytic sites. At circumneutral pH values, goethite, amorphous iron oxide, hematite, iron-coated sand and montmorillonite that were pre-equilibrated with 0.05 – 1.5 mM SiO2 were significantly less reactive toward H2O2 decomposition than their original counterparts, with the H2O2 loss rates inversely proportional to the SiO2 concentration. In the goethite/H2O2 system, the overall •OH yield, defined as the percentage of decomposed H2O2 producing •OH, was almost halved in the presence of 1.5 mM SiO2. Dissolved SiO2 also slows the H2O2 decomposition on manganese(IV) oxide. The presence of dissolved SiO2 results in greater persistence of H2O2 in groundwater, lower H2O2 utilization efficiency and should be considered in the design of H2O2-based treatment systems. PMID:22129132

  8. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... Often, home health care nurses will come to your home to give you the medicine. Sometimes, a family member, a friend, or ...

  9. GCF Mark IV development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark IV ground communication facility (GCF) as it is implemented to support the network consolidation program is reviewed. Changes in the GCF are made in the area of increased capacity. Common carrier circuits are the medium for data transfer. The message multiplexing in the Mark IV era differs from the Mark III era, in that all multiplexing is done in a GCF computer under GCF software control, which is similar to the multiplexing currently done in the high speed data subsystem.

  10. Modeling sulfur dioxide absorption by fine water spray

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng-Hsiung Huang

    2005-07-01

    A novel theoretical model was developed to determine the removal efficiency of sulfur dioxide using fine water spray. The droplet pH, diameter, S(IV) concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, and liquid-to-gas ratio are found to influence the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the fine water spray. The results demonstrate that the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the fine water spray increases as the droplet diameter falls. The concentration gradient between the interface of the gaseous and liquid phases causes the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the droplets to increase as the initial S(IV) concentration decreases or the sulfur dioxide concentration increases. The results indicate that the performance of the fine water spray in removing sulfur dioxide is generally improved by reducing the droplet diameter or the initial S(IV) concentration, or by increasing the sulfur dioxide concentration, the droplet pH or the liquid-to-gas ratio. The proposed model reveals the parameters that should be controlled in using a fine water spray device and a method for improving its performance in removing sulfur dioxide.

  11. A "Fine" Relationship: OSHA and Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Steve

    2001-01-01

    To avoid California schools' experience with Occupational Safety and Health Administration fines, principals should comply with safety regulations, establish quick-response procedures, take care of chemicals, prepare site personnel for state OSHA visits, inform safety personnel about procedures for appealing citations, keep good records, and work…

  12. Adsorption of sulfur(IV) oxide by amide sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Nikandrov, I.S.; Kogtev, S.E.; Kazimirov, O.E.; Pavlova, I.V.

    1994-04-10

    Adsorption of sulfur(IV) oxide by industrial amide plastics has been studied. Sorption capacity of the sorbents studied has been determined under static and dynamic conditions. Physical and chemical interaction has been demonstrated to take place between sulfur(IV) oxide and the sorbent studied.

  13. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  14. Tuning of electronic properties in IV-VI colloidal nanostructures by alloy composition and architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashchiuk, Aldona; Yanover, Diana; Rubin-Brusilovski, Anna; Maikov, Georgy I.; Čapek, Richard K.; Vaxenburg, Roman; Tilchin, Jenya; Zaiats, Gary; Lifshitz, Efrat

    2013-08-01

    Colloidal lead chalcogenide (IV-VI) quantum dots and rods are of widespread scientific and technological interest, owing to their size tunable energy band gap at the near-infrared optical regime. This article reviews the development and investigation of IV-VI derivatives, consisting of a core (dot or rod) coated with an epitaxial shell, when either the core or the shell (or both) has an alloy composition, so the entire structure has the chemical formula PbSexS1-x/PbSeyS1-y (0 <= x(y) <= 1). The article describes synthesis procedures and an examination of the structures' chemical and temperature stability. The investigation of the optical properties revealed information about the quantum yield, radiative lifetime, emission's Stokes shift and electron-phonon interaction, on the variation of composition, core-to-shell division, temperature and environment. The study reflected the unique properties of core-shell heterostructures, offering fine electronic tuning (at a fixed size) by changing their architecture. The optical observations are supported by the electronic band structure theoretical model. The challenges related to potential applications of the colloidal lead chalcogenide quantum dots and rods are also briefly addressed in the article.

  15. One-pot conversion of levan prepared from Serratia levanicum NN to difructose anhydride IV by Arthrobacter nicotinovorans levan fructotransferase.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Hiroto; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Nagura, Taizo; Aritsuka, Tsutomu; Tomita, Fusao; Yokota, Atsushi

    2010-03-01

    The newly established difructose anhydride IV (DFA IV) production system is comprised of the effective production of levan from sucrose by Serratia levanicum NN, the conversion of the levan into DFA IV by levan fructotransferase from Arthrobacter nicotinovorans GS-9, which is highly expressed in an Escherichiacoli transformant, and a practical purification step. The chemical properties of DFA IV were also investigated. PMID:20159571

  16. FINE PARTICLE CHARGING DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the changing of fine particles by unipolar ions in an electric field, and evaluation of a specially designed small pilot-scale (600-1000 acfm) precharging device. Following an extensive review of the lit...

  17. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  18. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  19. The PLATO IV Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based instructional system consists of a large scale centrally located CDC 6400 computer and a large number of remote student terminals. This is a brief and general description of the proposed input/output hardware necessary to interface the student terminals with the computer's central processing unit (CPU) using available…

  20. Internal Fine Structure of Ellerman Bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuki; Kitai, Reizaburo; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Satoru; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Ishii, Takako T.; Hagino, Masaoki; Komori, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Takuma; Otsuji, Kenichi; Nakamura, Tahei; Kawate, Tomoko; Watanabe, Hiroko; Shibata, Kazunari

    2010-08-01

    We conducted coordinated observations of Ellerman bombs (EBs) between Hinode Satellite and Hida Observatory (HOP12). CaII H broad-band filter images of NOAA 10966 on 2007 August 9 and 10 were obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode Satellite, and many bright points were observed. We identified a total of 4 bright points as EBs, and studied the temporal variation of their morphological fine structures and spectroscopic characteristics. With high-resolution CaII H images of SOT, we found that the EBs, thus far thought of as single bright features, are composed of a few of fine subcomponents. Also, by using Stokes I/V filtergrams with Hinode/SOT, and CaII H spectroheliograms with Hida/Domeless Solar Telescope (DST), our observation showed: (1) The mean duration, the mean width, the mean length, and the mean aspect ratio of the subcomponents were 390 s, 170 km, 450 km, and 2.7, respectively. (2) Subcomponents started to appear on the magnetic neutral lines, and extended their lengths from the original locations. (3) When the CaII H line of EBs showed the characteristic blue asymmetry, they are associated with the appearance or re-brightening of subcomponents. Summarizing our results, we obtained an observational view that elementary magnetic reconnections take place one by one successively and intermittently in EBs, and that their manifestation is the fine subcomponents of the EB phenomena.

  1. Thorium(IV) hydrous oxide solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.L.; Rai, D.

    1987-12-02

    The results of a study of the solubility of amorphous, hydrous ThO/sub 2/ over the pH range 3.5 - 14.2 are reported. The solubility is high at pH 3.5 and decreases rapidly at pH 4.5. The chemical modes of solubility over various pH ranges are discussed. No conclusive evidence for any amphoteric behavior of Th(IV) is reported. 22 references, 1 figure.

  2. A sputnik IV saga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    2009-12-01

    The Sputnik IV launch occurred on May 15, 1960. On May 19, an attempt to deorbit a 'space cabin' failed and the cabin went into a higher orbit. The orbit of the cabin was monitored and Moonwatch volunteer satellite tracking teams were alerted to watch for the vehicle demise. On September 5, 1962, several team members from Milwaukee, Wisconsin made observations starting at 4:49 a.m. of a fireball following the predicted orbit of Sputnik IV. Requests went out to report any objects found under the fireball path. An early morning police patrol in Manitowoc had noticed a metal object on a street and had moved it to the curb. Later the officers recovered the object and had it dropped off at the Milwaukee Journal. The Moonwarch team got the object and reported the situation to Moonwatch Headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. A team member flew to Cambridge with the object. It was a solid, 9.49 kg piece of steel with a slag-like layer attached to it. Subsequent analyses showed that it contained radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic ray exposure in space. The scientists at the Observatory quickly recognized that measurements of its induced radioactivity could serve as a calibration for similar measurements of recently fallen nickel-iron meteorites. Concurrently, the Observatory directorate informed government agencies that a fragment from Sputnik IV had been recovered. Coincidently, a debate in the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space involved the issue of liability for damage caused by falling satellite fragments. On September 12, the Observatory delivered the bulk of the fragment to the US Delegation to the UN. Two days later, the fragment was used by US Ambassador Francis Plimpton as an exhibit that the time had come to agree on liability for damage from satellite debris. He offered the Sputnik IV fragment to USSR Ambassador P.D. Morozov, who refused the offer. On October 23, Drs. Alla Massevitch and E.K. Federov of the USSR visited the

  3. A Mn(IV)/Fe(IV) Intermediate in Assembly of the Mn(IV)/Fe(III) Cofactor of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase†

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Hoffart, Lee M.; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J. Martin

    2008-01-01

    We recently showed that the class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from the human pathogen, Chlamydia trachomatis, uses a MnIV/FeIII cofactor to generate protein and substrate radicals in its catalytic mechanism [Jiang, W., Yun, D., Saleh, L., Barr, E. W., Xing, G., Hoffart, L. M., Maslak, M.-A., Krebs, C., and Bollinger, J. M., Jr. (2007) Science 316, 1188-1191]. Here, we have dissected the mechanism of formation of this novel heterobinuclear redox cofactor from the MnII/FeII cluster and O2. An intermediate with a g = 2 EPR signal that shows hyperfine coupling to both 55Mn and 57Fe accumulates almost quantitatively in a second order reaction between O2 and the reduced R2 complex. The otherwise slow decay of the intermediate to the active MnIV/FeIII-R2 complex is accelerated by the presence of the one-electron reductant, ascorbate, implying that the intermediate is more oxidized than MnIV/FeIII. Mössbauer spectra show that the intermediate contains a high-spin FeIV center. Its chemical and spectroscopic properties establish that the intermediate is a MnIV/FeIV-R2 complex with an S = 1/2 electronic ground state arising from antiferromagnetic coupling between the MnIV (SMn = 3/2) and high-spin FeIV (SFe = 2) sites. PMID:17616152

  4. Washability of fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the theoretical beneficiation potential of US coals when pulverized down to 44 microns, (2) to determine the effects of fine grinding on the liberation of ash, pyritic sulfur, and other impurities, and (3) to assess the impact of their removal on oil and gas replacement, environmental regulations, and specification feedstocks for emerging coal utilization technologies. With the emphasis on fine coal cleaning, we have developed a centrifugal float-sink technique for coals crushed down to 44 microns. Employing this technique will provide a complete fine coal gravimetric evaluation of US coals crushed down to 44 microns. Parallel research is being conducted through in-house studies by PETC, and contracts with the University of Alaska, the University of North Dakota, and Commercial Testing and Engineering, Inc. Results thus far have been encouraging for selected Northern Appalachian Region Coals (NAR), which have shown pyritic sulfur, SO/sub 2/ emission, and ash reductions of 94, 60, and 82%, respectively, for the float 1.30 specific gravity product. However, the data evaluated for several samples indicate a possible problem in the yield/ash relationship for the float 1.30 specific gravity products for samples crushed to 75 and 44 microns top size. Thus, testing was begun to try to resolve these anomalies in the data. Test results using surface active agents, a reverse order of float-sink, and sample pre-heat techniques have been promising. These modifications to the standard technique resulted in an increase in weight recovery of float 1.30 specific gravity material and a decrease in ash content for each of the other specific gravity fractions, thus showing an improvement in the yield/ash relationship.

  5. Finessing fuel fineness

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, R.F.

    2008-10-15

    Most of today's operating coal plants began service at least a generation ago and were designed to burn eastern bituminous coal. A switch to Powder River Basin coal can stress those plants' boiler systems, especially the pulverisers, beyond their design limits and cause no end of operational and maintenance problems. Many of those problems are caused by failing to maintain good fuel fineness when increasing fuel throughput. This article concerns the proper management of the fuel component of the combustion equation in an eight step plan. 8 figs.

  6. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  7. 78 FR 2390 - CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Complaint Take notice... IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC and CSOLAR IV North, LLC...

  8. Granulation of fine powder

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2016-08-09

    A mixture of fine powder including thorium oxide was converted to granulated powder by forming a first-green-body and heat treating the first-green-body at a high temperature to strengthen the first-green-body followed by granulation by crushing or milling the heat-treated first-green-body. The granulated powder was achieved by screening through a combination of sieves to achieve the desired granule size distribution. The granulated powder relies on the thermal bonding to maintain its shape and structure. The granulated powder contains no organic binder and can be stored in a radioactive or other extreme environment. The granulated powder was pressed and sintered to form a dense compact with a higher density and more uniform pore size distribution.

  9. Fine-scale Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 May 2003

    This image shows fine-scale textures around a crater southwest of Athabasca Vallis. These fine scale ridges are most likely the remnants of older flood eroded layered rocks and not longitudinal grooves carved out of the landscape by flooding. These features are ridges and not grooves. Also note the layers visible on the southeast side of the island.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 9.6, Longitude 155.9 East (204.1). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. The Illiac IV

    SciTech Connect

    Hord, M.

    1982-01-01

    The story of the Illiac IV is also in part the story of the Institute for Advanced Computation. This is the government organization formed in 1971 by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center to develop and operate this computer. The Institute provides access to the Illiac through a connection to the ARPANET, a national communication network. The Institute also performs software development, maintenance, and research in various advanced computation topics. Considerable effort has been invested by the Institute in documenting the evolution of the Illiac system and providing those publications to the user community. This material has experienced quite limited circulation and to most of the computer world the Illiac remains mysterious. This attitude is fostered by the lack of a thorough summary of the Illiac's environment, design and capabilities. It is in response to that information gap that this book is addressed.

  11. Panel Discussion IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, F.; Batten, A.; Budding, E.; Devinney, E.; Eggleton, P.; Hatzes, A.; Hubeny, I.; Kley, W.; Lammer, H.; Linnell, A.; Trimble, V.; Wilson, R. E.

    2012-04-01

    I. Hubeny Welcome to the last panel meeting. We invite general comments either from the audience or from the panelists. V. Trimble Well, Mercedes started us with a vocabulary item and I think I would like to end with a vocabulary item. When they were first discovered, we called them `extra solar system planets' which was descriptive and fine, but it's just rather cumbersome. At some point they became `extra solar planets.' Now I have never seen a planet inside the Sun. And therefore `extrasolar' is not a good descriptor. `Exoplanets' is OK, but now that there are so many of them that perhaps they are simply `the planets.' When you want to specialize to ours, you could say `solar system planets.' Think how much ink it would save.

  12. Automated Camera Array Fine Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clouse, Daniel; Padgett, Curtis; Ansar, Adnan; Cheng, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Using aerial imagery, the JPL FineCalibration (JPL FineCal) software automatically tunes a set of existing CAHVOR camera models for an array of cameras. The software finds matching features in the overlap region between images from adjacent cameras, and uses these features to refine the camera models. It is not necessary to take special imagery of a known target and no surveying is required. JPL FineCal was developed for use with an aerial, persistent surveillance platform.

  13. Continuous fine ash depressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Guohai; Peng, Wan Wang; Vimalchand, Pannalal

    2011-11-29

    A system for depressurizing and cooling a high pressure, high temperature fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein. In one aspect, the system has an apparatus for cooling the high pressure, high temperature fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein and a pressure letdown device for depressurization by separating the cooled fine solid particles from a portion of the fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein, resulting in a lower temperature, lower pressure outlet of solid particles for disposal or handling by downstream equipment.

  14. The BALDER Beamline at the MAX IV Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementiev, K.; Norén, K.; Carlson, S.; Sigfridsson Clauss, K. G. V.; Persson, I.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) includes well-established methods to study the local structure around the absorbing element - extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and the effective oxidation number or to quantitatively determine the speciation of an element in a complex matrix - X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The increased brilliance and intensities available at the new generation of synchrotron light sources makes it possible to study, in-situ and in-operando, much more dilute systems with relevance for natural systems, as well as the micro-scale variability and dynamics of chemical reactions on the millisecond time-scale. The design of the BALDER beamline at the MAX IV Laboratory 3 GeV ring has focused on a high flux of photons in a wide energy range, 2.4-40 keV, where the K-edge is covered for the elements S to La, and the L 3-edge for all elements heavier than Sb. The overall design of the beamline will allow large flexibility in energy range, beam size and data collection time. The other focus of the beamline design is the possibility to perform multi-technique analyses on samples. Development of sample environment requires focus on implementation of auxiliary methods in such a way that techniques like Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and/or mass spectrometry can be performed simultaneously as the XAS study. It will be a flexible system where different instruments can be plugged in and out depending on the needs for the particular investigation. Many research areas will benefit from the properties of the wiggler based light source and the capabilities to perform in-situ and in-operando measurements, for example environmental and geochemical sciences, nuclear chemistry, catalysis, materials sciences, and cultural heritage.

  15. Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rittenhouse, P.; Ren, W.

    2005-03-29

    A Gen IV Materials Handbook is being developed to provide an authoritative single source of highly qualified structural materials information and materials properties data for use in design and analyses of all Generation IV Reactor Systems. The Handbook will be responsive to the needs expressed by all of the principal government, national laboratory, and private company stakeholders of Gen IV Reactor Systems. The Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan provided here addresses the purpose, rationale, attributes, and benefits of the Handbook and will detail its content, format, quality assurance, applicability, and access. Structural materials, both metallic and ceramic, for all Gen IV reactor types currently supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) will be included in the Gen IV Materials Handbook. However, initial emphasis will be on materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Descriptive information (e.g., chemical composition and applicable technical specifications and codes) will be provided for each material along with an extensive presentation of mechanical and physical property data including consideration of temperature, irradiation, environment, etc. effects on properties. Access to the Gen IV Materials Handbook will be internet-based with appropriate levels of control. Information and data in the Handbook will be configured to allow search by material classes, specific materials, specific information or property class, specific property, data parameters, and individual data points identified with materials parameters, test conditions, and data source. Details on all of these as well as proposed applicability and consideration of data quality classes are provided in the Implementation Plan. Website development for the Handbook is divided into six phases including (1) detailed product analysis and specification, (2) simulation and design, (3) implementation and testing, (4) product release, (5) project/product evaluation, and (6) product

  16. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  17. Fine Tuning Your Lease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    What is the optimum lease arrangement for the no-till farmer? No-till farmers will many times have more "up front" chemical input costs than a conventional till farmer. Do these differences warrant a different lease arrangement? An easy to use spreadsheet tool was developed to enable a farmer to ...

  18. CHAPTER IV-2 BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic bacteria provide an alternative to chemical pesticides used in insect control programs. Today, the principal microbial insecticides utilize spore forming bacteria or toxins produced by these bacteria as their active ingredients, either in formulations or by incorporation of toxin g...

  19. NATIONAL COASTAL CONDITION REPORT IV

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Condition Report IV (NCCR IV) is the fourth in a series of environmental assessments of U.S. coastal waters and the Great Lakes. The report includes assessments of all the nation’s estuaries in the contiguous 48 states and Puerto Rico, south-eastern Alaska, ...

  20. Fine-Tuning Corrective Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong

    2001-01-01

    Explores the notion of "fine-tuning" in connection with the corrective feedback process. Describes a longitudinal case study, conducted in the context of Norwegian as a second a language, that shows how fine-tuning and lack thereof in the provision of written corrective feedback differentially affects a second language learner's restructuring of…

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF FINE PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Size distribution data processing and fitting
    Ultrafine, very fine and fine PM were collected nearly continuously from December 2000 through March 2003 at a Washington State Department of Ecology site on Beacon Hill in Seattle. Particle size distributio...

  2. Dewatering studies of fine clean coal

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.

    1991-01-01

    The main objective of the present research program is to study and understand dewatering characteristics of ultrafine clean coal obtained using the advanced column flotation technique from the Kerr-McGee's Galatia preparation plant fine coal waste stream. It is also the objective of the research program to utilize the basic study results, i.e., surface chemical, particle shape particle size distribution, etc., in developing a cost-effective dewatering method. The ultimate objective is to develop process criteria to obtain a dewatered clean coal product containing less that 20 percent moisture, using the conventional vacuum dewatering equipment. (VC)

  3. Chemical characterization of outdoor and subway fine (PM(2.5-1.0)) and coarse (PM(10-2.5)) particulate matter in Seoul (Korea) by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM).

    PubMed

    Byeon, Sang-Hoon; Willis, Robert; Peters, Thomas M

    2015-02-01

    Outdoor and indoor (subway) samples were collected by passive sampling in urban Seoul (Korea) and analyzed with computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX). Soil/road dust particles accounted for 42%-60% (by weight) of fine particulate matter larger than 1 µm (PM(2.5-1.0)) in outdoor samples and 18% of PM2.5-1.0 in subway samples. Iron-containing particles accounted for only 3%-6% in outdoor samples but 69% in subway samples. Qualitatively similar results were found for coarse particulate matter (PM(10-2.5)) with soil/road dust particles dominating outdoor samples (66%-83%) and iron-containing particles contributing most to subway PM(10-2.5) (44%). As expected, soil/road dust particles comprised a greater mass fraction of PM(10-2.5) than PM(2.5-1.0). Also as expected, the mass fraction of iron-containing particles was substantially less in PM(10-2.5) than in PM(2.5-1.0). Results of this study are consistent with known emission sources in the area and with previous studies, which showed high concentrations of iron-containing particles in the subway compared to outdoor sites. Thus, passive sampling with CCSEM-EDX offers an inexpensive means to assess PM(2.5-1.0) and PM(10-2.5) simultaneously and by composition at multiple locations. PMID:25689348

  4. Type IV Pilin Proteins: Versatile Molecular Modules

    PubMed Central

    Giltner, Carmen L.; Nguyen, Ylan

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Type IV pili (T4P) are multifunctional protein fibers produced on the surfaces of a wide variety of bacteria and archaea. The major subunit of T4P is the type IV pilin, and structurally related proteins are found as components of the type II secretion (T2S) system, where they are called pseudopilins; of DNA uptake/competence systems in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive species; and of flagella, pili, and sugar-binding systems in the archaea. This broad distribution of a single protein family implies both a common evolutionary origin and a highly adaptable functional plan. The type IV pilin is a remarkably versatile architectural module that has been adopted widely for a variety of functions, including motility, attachment to chemically diverse surfaces, electrical conductance, acquisition of DNA, and secretion of a broad range of structurally distinct protein substrates. In this review, we consider recent advances in this research area, from structural revelations to insights into diversity, posttranslational modifications, regulation, and function. PMID:23204365

  5. Aqueous complexation of thorium(IV), uranium(IV), neptunium(IV), plutonium(III/IV), and cerium(III/IV) with DTPA.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Alex; Paulenova, Alena; Gelis, Artem V

    2012-07-16

    Aqueous complexation of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(III/IV), and Ce(III/IV) with DTPA was studied by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, and cyclic voltammetry at 1 M ionic strength and 25 °C. The stability constants for the 1:1 complex of each trivalent and tetravalent metal were calculated. From the potentiometric data, we report stability constant values for Ce(III)DTPA, Ce(III)HDTPA, and Th(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 20.01 ± 0.02, log β(111) = 22.0 ± 0.2, and log β(101) = 29.6 ± 1, respectively. From the absorption spectrophotometry data, we report stability constant values for U(IV)DTPA, Np(IV)DTPA, and Pu(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 31.8 ± 0.1, 32.3 ± 0.1, and 33.67 ± 0.02, respectively. From the cyclic voltammetry data, we report stability constant values for Ce(IV) and Pu(III) of log β(101) = 34.04 ± 0.04 and 20.58 ± 0.04, respectively. The values obtained in this work are compared and discussed with respect to the ionic radius of each cationic metal. PMID:22738207

  6. Chemical Characterization of Outdoor and Subway Fine (PM2.5–1.0) and Coarse (PM10–2.5) Particulate Matter in Seoul (Korea) by Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM)

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Sang-Hoon; Willis, Robert; Peters, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor and indoor (subway) samples were collected by passive sampling in urban Seoul (Korea) and analyzed with computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX). Soil/road dust particles accounted for 42%–60% (by weight) of fine particulate matter larger than 1 µm (PM2.5–1.0) in outdoor samples and 18% of PM2.5–1.0 in subway samples. Iron-containing particles accounted for only 3%–6% in outdoor samples but 69% in subway samples. Qualitatively similar results were found for coarse particulate matter (PM10–2.5) with soil/road dust particles dominating outdoor samples (66%–83%) and iron-containing particles contributing most to subway PM10–2.5 (44%). As expected, soil/road dust particles comprised a greater mass fraction of PM10–2.5 than PM2.5–1.0. Also as expected, the mass fraction of iron-containing particles was substantially less in PM10–2.5 than in PM2.5–1.0. Results of this study are consistent with known emission sources in the area and with previous studies, which showed high concentrations of iron-containing particles in the subway compared to outdoor sites. Thus, passive sampling with CCSEM-EDX offers an inexpensive means to assess PM2.5–1.0 and PM10-2.5 simultaneously and by composition at multiple locations. PMID:25689348

  7. Analysis of cadmium in undissolved anode materials of Mark-IV electro-refiner

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Tae-Sic; Fredrickson, G.L.; Vaden, D.; Westphal, B.

    2013-07-01

    The Mark-IV electro-refiner (Mk-IV ER) is a unit process in the FCF (Fuel Conditioning Facility), which is primarily assigned to treating the used driver fuels. Mk-IV ER contains an electrolyte/molten cadmium system for refining uranium electrochemically. Typically, the anode of the Mk-IV ER consists of the chopped sodium-bonded metallic driver fuels, which have been primarily U-10Zr binary fuels. Chemical analysis of the residual anode materials after electrorefining indicates that a small amount of cadmium is removed from the Mk-IV ER along with the undissolved anode materials. Investigation of chemical analysis data indicates that the amount of cadmium in the undissolved anode materials is strongly correlated with the anode rotation speeds and the residence time of the anode in the Mk-IV ER. Discussions are given to explain the prescribed correlation. (authors)

  8. Uprated fine guidance sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Future orbital observatories will require star trackers of extremely high precision. These sensors must maintain high pointing accuracy and pointing stability simultaneously with a low light level signal from a guide star. To establish the fine guidance sensing requirements and to evaluate candidate fine guidance sensing concepts, the Space Telescope Optical Telescope Assembly was used as the reference optical system. The requirements review was separated into three areas: Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), Fine Guidance Sensing and astrometry. The results show that the detectors should be installed directly onto the focal surface presented by the optics. This would maximize throughput and minimize point stability error by not incoporating any additional optical elements.

  9. 'RAT' Leaves a Fine Mess

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the light signatures, or spectra, of two sides of the rock dubbed 'Bounce,' located at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The spectra were taken by the miniature thermal emission spectrometer on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The left side of this rock is covered by fine dust created when the rover drilled into the rock with its rock abrasion tool. These 'fines' produce a layer of pyroxene dust that can be detected here in the top spectrum. The right side of the rock has fewer fines and was used to investigate the composition of this basaltic rock.

  10. EVALUATION OF THE PILLS IV

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of theoretical and experimental investigations of the operating characteristics of the PILLS IV (Particulate Instrumentation by Laser Light Scattering) in situ particle sizing instrument. Results of both investigations show large errors in sizing particle...

  11. New fine structure cooling rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  12. Oscillator strengths and transition probabilities from the Breit–Pauli R-matrix method: Ne IV

    SciTech Connect

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2014-09-15

    The atomic parameters–oscillator strengths, line strengths, radiative decay rates (A), and lifetimes–for fine structure transitions of electric dipole (E1) type for the astrophysically abundant ion Ne IV are presented. The results include 868 fine structure levels with n≤ 10, l≤ 9, and 1/2≤J≤ 19/2 of even and odd parities, and the corresponding 83,767 E1 transitions. The calculations were carried out using the relativistic Breit–Pauli R-matrix method in the close coupling approximation. The transitions have been identified spectroscopically using an algorithm based on quantum defect analysis and other criteria. The calculated energies agree with the 103 observed and identified energies to within 3% or better for most of the levels. Some larger differences are also noted. The A-values show good to fair agreement with the very limited number of available transitions in the table compiled by NIST, but show very good agreement with the latest published multi-configuration Hartree–Fock calculations. The present transitions should be useful for diagnostics as well as for precise and complete spectral modeling in the soft X-ray to infra-red regions of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. -- Highlights: •The first application of BPRM method for accurate E1 transitions in Ne IV is reported. •Amount of atomic data (n going up to 10) is complete for most practical applications. •The calculated energies are in very good agreement with most observed levels. •Very good agreement of A-values and lifetimes with other relativistic calculations. •The results should provide precise nebular abundances, chemical evolution etc.

  13. Theoretical study of fabrication of line-and-space patterns with 7 nm quarter-pitch using electron beam lithography with chemically amplified resist process: IV. Comparison with experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    Electron beam (EB) lithography is a key technology for nanofabrication. We have investigated the feasibility of the fabrication of line-and-space patterns with a 7 nm quarter-pitch (7 nm space width and 21 nm line width), using the simulation based on the sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified EB resists. In this study, simulation results were compared with experimental results to check the validity of the simulation model used in previous studies. 3:1 [on the computer-aided design (CAD)] line-and-space patterns were fabricated on quartz masks for different pitches and exposure doses. The measured space width and line edge roughness were well reproduced by the simulation.

  14. Monitoring pool-tail fines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Potyondy, J. P.; Abt, S. R.; Swingle, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    Fine sediment < 2 and < 6 mm deposited in pool-tail areas of mountain streams is often measured to monitor changes in the supply of fines (e.g., by dam removal, bank erosion, or watershed effects including fires and road building) or to assess the status and trend of aquatic ecosystems. Grid counts, pebble counts, and volumetric bedmaterial samples are typically used to quantify pool-tail fines. Grid-count results exhibit a high degree of variability not only among streams and among operators, but also among crews performing a nearly identical procedure (Roper et al. 2010). Variability is even larger when diverse methods are employed, each of which quantifies fines in a different way: grid counts visually count surface fines on small patches within the pool-tail area, pebble counts pick up and tally surface particles along (riffle) transects, and volumetric samples sieve out fines from small-scale bulk samples; and even when delimited to pool-tail areas, individual methods focus on different sampling locales. Two main questions were analyzed: 1) Do pool-tail fines exhibit patterns of spatial variability and are some grid count schemes more likely to provide accurate results than others. 2) How and why does the percentage of fines vary among grid counts, pebble counts, and volumetric samples. In a field study, grids were placed at 7 locales in two rows across the wetted width of 10 pool tails in a 14-m wide 3rd order coarse gravel-bed mountain stream with <4% sand and <8% < 6 mm. Several pebble count transects were placed across each pool-tail area, and three volumetric samples were collected in each of three pool tails. Pebble and grid counts both indicated a fining trend towards one or both banks, sometimes interrupted by a secondary peak of fines within the central half of the wetted width. Among the five sampling schemes tested, grid counts covering the wetted width with 7 locales produced the highest accuracy and the least variability among the pools of the

  15. Complexation of thorium(IV) with acetate at variable temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rao, Linfeng; Zhang, Zhicheng; Zanonato, PierLuigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Bismondo, Arturo; Clark, Sue B

    2004-09-21

    The complexation between Th(IV) and acetate in 1.05 mol kg(-1) NaClO4 was studied at variable temperatures (10, 25, 40, 55 and 70 degrees C). The formation constants of five successive complexes, Th(Ac)j(4-j)+ where Ac = CH3COO- and j = 1-5, and the molar enthalpies of complexation were determined by potentiometry and calorimetry. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) provided additional information on the complexes in solution. The effect of temperature on the stability of the complexes is discussed in terms of the electrostatic model. PMID:15349159

  16. Narrowband frequency-drift structures in solar type IV bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Yukio; Ono, Takayuki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Misawa, Hiroaki; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Katoh, Yuto; Masuda, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2013-12-01

    We have established the Zao Solar Radiospectrograph (ZSR), a new solar radio observation system, at the Zao observatory of Tohoku University, Japan. We observed narrowband fine structures with type IV bursts with ZSR on 2 and 3 November 2008. The observed fine structures are similar to fiber bursts in terms of the drift rates and the existence of emission and absorption stripes. Statistical analysis of the drift rates, however, shows that the observed fine structures are different from the ordinary fiber bursts as regards the sense and the magnitude of their drift rates. First, the observed drift rates include both positive and negative rates, whereas ordinary fiber bursts are usually characterized by negative drift rates. Second, the absolute values of the observed drift rates are tens of MHz s-1, whereas the typical drift rate of fiber bursts at 325 MHz is approximately -9 MHz s-1. In addition, all fine structures analyzed have narrow emission bands of less than 17 MHz. We also show that the observed narrowband emission features with drift rates of approximately 40 MHz s-1 can be interpreted as the propagation of whistler-mode waves, which is the same process as that underlying fiber bursts.

  17. Surface and chemical properties of surface-modified UHMWPE powder and mechanical and thermal properties of its impregnated PMMA bone cement, IV: effect of MMA/accelerator on the surface modification of UHMWPE powder.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Hyeok; Ko, Jong Tae; Kim, Yong Sik; Kim, Moon Suk; Shin, Hyung Sik; Rhee, John M; Khang, Gilson; Lee, Hai Bang

    2006-01-01

    In our previous study, we manufactured a reinforced poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement with 3 wt% of the surface-modified ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder to improve its poor mechanical and thermal properties resulting from unreacted methylmethacrylate (MMA), the generation of bubble and shrinkage, and high curing temperature. In the present study, the effect of ratios of MMA and N,N'-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMPT) solutions in redox polymerization system was investigated for the surface modification of UHMWPE powder. We characterized physical and chemical properties of surface-modified UHMWPE powder and reinforced bone cements by a scanning electron microscope, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and curing temperature (Tmax). It was found that UTSs (41.3-51.3 MPa) of the reinforced PMMA bone cements were similar to those (44.5 MPa) of conventional PMMA bone cement (control), as well as significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those (33.8 MPa) of 3 wt% unmodified UHMWPE powder-impregnated bone cement. In particular, the UTS of redox polymerization system using MMA/DMPT solution was better than that of radical system using MMA/xylene solution. Also, Tmax of the reinforced PMMA bone cements decreased from 103 to 72-84 degrees C. From these results, we confirmed that the surface-modified UHMWPE powder can be used as reinforcing agent to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of conventional PMMA bone cement. PMID:16909947

  18. Measurements of cotton fiber maturity and fineness: method comparisons and fiber growth analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maturity (degree of secondary wall development) and fineness (linear density) are important cotton fiber quality and processing properties. Most maturity and fineness measurements are slow, laborious, require chemicals, and/or require expensive instruments. The Cottonscope is a small-footprint instr...

  19. Standard Missile Block IV battery

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.

    1996-11-01

    During the 1980`s a trend in automatic primary battery technologies was the replacement of silver-zinc batteries by thermal battery designs. The Standard missile (SM 2) Block IV development is a noteworthy reversal of this trend. The SM2, Block IV battery was originally attempted as a thermal battery with multiple companies attempting to develop a thermal battery design. These attempts resulted in failure to obtain a production thermal battery. A decision to pursue a silver-zinc battery design resulted in the development of a battery to supply the SM 2, Block IV (thermal battery design goal) and also the projected power requirements of the evolving SM 2, Block IVA in a single silver-zinc battery design. Several advancements in silver-zinc battery technology were utilized in this design that improve the producibility and extend the boundaries of silver-zinc batteries.

  20. Comparison of gene expression profiles induced by coarse, fine, and ultrafile particulate matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coarse, fine, and ultrafine particulate matter (PM) fractions possess different physical properties and chemical compositions and may produce different adverse health effects. Studies were undertaken to determine whether or not gene expression patterns may be used to discriminate...

  1. On the use of speciation techniques and ab initio modelling to understand tetravalent actinide behavior in a biological medium: An(IV)DTPA case.

    PubMed

    Aupiais, J; Bonin, L; Den Auwer, C; Moisy, P; Siberchicot, B; Topin, S

    2016-03-01

    In the case of an accidental nuclear event, contamination of human bodies by actinide elements may occur. Such elements have the particularity to exhibit both radiological and chemical toxicities that may induce severe damages at several levels, depending on the biokinetics of the element. In order to eliminate the actinide elements before they are stored in target organs (liver, kidneys, or bone, depending on the element), sequestering agents must be quickly injected. However, to date, there is still no ideal sequestering agent, despite the recent interest in this topic due to contamination concerns. DTPA (diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) is currently generating interest for the development of oral or alternative self-administrable forms. Although biokinetics data are mostly available, molecular scale characterization of actinide-DTPA complexes is still scarce. Nevertheless, strong interest is growing in the characterization of An(IV)DTPA(-) complexes at the molecular level because this opens the way for predicting the stability constants of unknown systems or even for developing new analytical strategies aimed at better and more selective decorporation. For this purpose, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics (AIMD) investigations were undertaken and compared with capillary electrophoresis (CE) used in a very unusual way. Indeed, it is commonly believed that CE is incapable of extracting structural information. In capillary electrophoresis, the electrophoretic mobility of an ion is a function of its charge and size. Despite very similar ratios, partial separations between An(IV)DTPA(-) species (An(IV) = Th, U, Np, Pu) were obtained. A linear relationship between the electrophoretic mobility and the actinide--oxygen distance calculated by AIMD was evidenced. As an example, the interpolated U-O distances in U(IV)DTPA(-) from CE-ICPMS experiments, EXAFS, AIMD, and the relationship between the stability constants and

  2. Analysis of Cadmium in Undissolved Anode Materials of Mark-IV Electrorefiner

    SciTech Connect

    Tae-Sic Yoo; Guy L. Fredrickson; DeeEarl Vaden; Brian R. Westphal

    2013-10-01

    The Mark-IV electrorefiner (Mk-IV ER) contains an electrolyte/molten cadmium system for refining uranium electrochemically. Typically, the anode of the Mk-IV ER consists of the chopped sodium-bonded metallic driver fuels, which have been primarily U-10Zr binary fuels. Chemical analysis of the residual anode materials after electrorefining indicates that a small amount of cadmium is removed from the Mk-IV ER along with the undissolved anode materials. Investigation of chemical analysis data indicates that the amount of cadmium in the undissolved anode materials is strongly correlated with the anode rotation speeds and the residence time of the anode in the Mk-IV ER. Discussions are given to explain the prescribed correlation.

  3. Fine Arts Education. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2006-01-01

    What are the benefits of a Fine Arts education? With the advent of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2000, extreme pressure has been put on schools to concentrate the majority of their efforts and resources on reading, math and science skills. Yet, NCLB also states that every child should be well-versed in the arts. Some research has shown that when…

  4. Fine Arts. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, Bernard, Ed.

    This document contains two papers on fine arts from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference. "Expanding the Boundaries of the Music Education of the Elementary Teacher Classroom with Information Technology" (Cheryl Jackson) reports on how information technology is used in a music methods course for…

  5. Fine Arts in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Frederick B., Jr., Ed.

    In this anthology the issues related to the fine arts (music, theater, visual arts) in the elementary secondary curriculum are examined. The fifteen articles, ranging in length from one to seven pages, are followed by a biographical page briefly identifying the contributors. The articles are: "What's It All About?" (Frederick B. Tuttle, Jr.);…

  6. Fine Particle Scrubbing: A Proceedings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Air Pollution Control Association, 1974

    1974-01-01

    These articles deal with the proceedings of a 1974 symposium on the use of wet scrubbers for the control of fine particle air pollutants. Various wet scrubbers, their engineering, performance, efficiency, and future are discussed. Tables, formulas, and models are included. (TK)

  7. Regional Background Fine Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modeling system composed of the global model GEOS-Chem providing hourly lateral boundary conditions to the regional model CMAQ was used to calculate the policy relevant background level of fine particulate: matter. Simulations were performed for the full year of 2004 over the d...

  8. Swedish discovery: magnetic fines recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hervol, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    A Swedish device, the Magnadisc, which recovers magnetite fines normally lost in tailings is described. The system was developed in the 1970s, but has reached the US only recently. Tests carried out by EPRI are reported and the results are presented. These indicate that the machine can recover a significant percentage of magnetite currently discharged in the tailings from magnetic drum separators.

  9. The PLATO IV Communications System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Bruce Arne; Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based educational system contains its own communications hardware and software for operating plasma-panel graphics terminals. Key echoing is performed by the central processing unit: every key pressed at a terminal passes through the entire system before anything appears on the terminal's screen. Each terminal is guaranteed…

  10. Title IV: Improving Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Kipp A.

    The Indian Education Act of 1972, Title IV, has improved Native American education by emphasizing Native American control; it comes after 400 years of Euro-American involvement in Indian education during which assimilation was the primary goal. In 1568 Jesuit priests began "civilizing" and Christianizing the "savage" Indians; in 1794 the first…

  11. Some characteristics of fine beryllium particle combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, D. A.; Kholopova, O. V.; Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-08-01

    Beryllium dust will be produced under plasma interaction with beryllium armor of the first wall in ITER. Exothermal reaction of this dust with water steam or air, which can leak into the reactor vacuum chamber in some accidents, gives concern in respect to reactor safety. Results of studies devoted to combustion of fine beryllium particles are reviewed in the paper. A chemically active medium and elevated temperature are prerequisite to the combustion of beryllium particles. Their ignition is hampered by oxide films, which form a diffusion barrier on the particle surface as a result of pre-flame oxidation. The temperature to initiate combustion of particles depends on flame temperature, particle size, composition of combustible mixture, heating rate and other factors. In mixtures enriched with combustible, the flame temperature necessary to ignite individual particles approaches the beryllium boiling temperature.

  12. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV-Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Silver Carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Val.) Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Ran; Chen, Xiling; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2016-02-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV)-inhibitory bioactivity of silver carp protein (SCP) hydrolysates were investigated, and their containing efficacious DPP-IV-inhibitory peptides were explored by in silico hydrolysis analysis, peptide separation combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identification, and chemical synthesis. SCP hydrolysates generated by six proteases all showed efficient DPP-IV-inhibitory activities, and Neutrase-generated hydrolysates had the greatest DPP-IV inhibition (IC50 of 1.12 mg/mL). In silico Neutrase hydrolysis revealed hundreds of fragments released from myosin, actin, and collagen of SCPs, which include different Pro-motif peptides but only three reported peptidic DPP-IV inhibitors with moderate or weak bioactivity. In addition, three new DPP-IV-inhibitory peptides were identified using LC-MS/MS; in particular, LPIIDI and APGPAGP showed high DPP-IV-inhibitory activity with IC50 of 105.44 and 229.14 μM, respectively, and behaved in competitive/non-competitive mixed-type DPP-IV inhibition mode. The results indicate that the SCP-derived DPP-IV-inhibitory peptides could be potential functional ingredients in the diabetic diet. PMID:26758401

  13. On the original igneous source of Martian fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, A. K.; Clark, B. C.

    1981-01-01

    The composition of the silicate portion of Martian regolith fines indicates derivation of the fines from mafic to ultramafic rocks, probably rich in pyroxene. Rock types similar in chemical and mineralogical composition include terrestrial Archean basalts and certain achondrite meteorites. If these igneous rocks weathered nearly isochemically, the nontronitic clays proposed earlier as an analog to Martian fines could be formed. Flood basalts of pyroxenitic lavas may be widespread and characteristic of early volcanism on Mars, analogous to maria flood basalts on the moon and early Precambrian basaltic komatiites on earth. Compositional differences between lunar, terrestrial, and Martian flood basalts may be related to differences in planetary sizes and mantle compositions of the respective planetary objects.

  14. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T.; Naka, T.; Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R&D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion.

  15. Facile Routes to Th(IV), U(IV), and Np(IV) Phosphites and Phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Eric M.; Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-08-05

    Three actinide(IV) phosphites and a NpIV phosphate, AnIV(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) and Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂, respectively, were synthesized using mild hydrothermal conditions. The first three phases are isotypic and were obtained using similar reaction conditions. Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ was synthesized using an analogous method to that of Np(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂. However, this fourth phase is quite different in comparison to the other phases in both composition and structure. The structure of Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ is constructed from double layers of neptunium(IV) phosphate with caesium cations in the interlayer region. In contrast, An(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) form dense 3D networks. The actinide contraction is detected in variety of metrics obtained from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Changes in the oxidation state of the neptunium starting materials yield different products.

  16. U(VI) reduction to mononuclear U(IV) by Desulfitobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Kelly E; Boyanov, Maxim I; Thomas, Sara H; Wu, Qingzhong; Kemner, Kenneth M; Löffler, Frank E

    2010-06-15

    The bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) affects uranium mobility and fate in contaminated subsurface environments and is best understood in Gram-negative model organisms such as Geobacter and Shewanella spp. This study demonstrates that U(VI) reduction is a common trait of Gram-positive Desulfitobacterium spp. Five different Desulfitobacterium isolates reduced 100 microM U(VI) to U(IV) in <10 days, whereas U(VI) remained soluble in abiotic and heat-killed controls. U(VI) reduction in live cultures was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis. Interestingly, although bioreduction of U(VI) is almost always reported to yield the uraninite mineral (UO(2)), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in the Desulfitobacterium cultures was not UO(2). The EXAFS data indicated that the U(IV) product was a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms closely surrounded by light element shells. This atomic arrangement likely results from inner-sphere bonds between U(IV) and C/N/O- or P/S-containing ligands, such as carbonate or phosphate. The formation of a distinct U(IV) phase warrants further study because the characteristics of the reduced material affect uranium stability and fate in the contaminated subsurface. PMID:20469854

  17. Respiratory complications of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Hatake, Katsuhiko; Morimura, Yoshifumi; Kudo, Risa; Kawashima, Wataru; Kasuda, Shogo; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV in a male in early half in his twenties, who experienced recurrent and eventually fatal pulmonary hemorrhage. EDS type IV is a rare disorder of type III collagen synthesis that is characterized by unusual facies, thin translucent skin with a venous vascular pattern, easy bruising, and hypermobility of the small joints. Autopsy findings showed hypermobility of the joints and distensibility of the skin. Microscopically, the abdominal skin showed substantially decreased dermal thickness. Moreover, the reticular dermis showed fine collagen bundles and large interstitial spaces compared with the skin from a normal control that showed large collagen bundles. Individual elastic fibers were also thicker than those observed in the skin of a normal control. The thoracic aorta showed thin adventitia and a relative increase in elastic fibers. The parenchyma of both the lungs showed markedly diffuse hemorrhage with hemosiderin-laden alveolar macrophages or old thrombi and organized thrombi in the small bronchi. Furthermore, both sections of the lung showed multiple fibrous nodules containing benign metaplastic bone. Vascular wall disruption and tearing of the vessel walls in the lung parenchyma were also observed. We concluded that EDS type IV led to the patient's death because of pulmonary hemorrhage. Because this syndrome resulted in the patient's death from arterial and bowel rupture, it is important to consider EDS as a potential cause of sudden death. PMID:22940417

  18. Wetter for fine dry powder

    DOEpatents

    Hall, James E.; Williams, Everett H.

    1977-01-01

    A system for wetting fine dry powders such as bentonite clay with water or other liquids is described. The system includes a wetting tank for receiving water and a continuous flow of fine powder feed. The wetting tank has a generally square horizontal cross section with a bottom end closure in the shape of an inverted pyramid. Positioned centrally within the wetting tank is a flow control cylinder which is supported from the walls of the wetting tank by means of radially extending inclined baffles. A variable speed motor drives a first larger propeller positioned immediately below the flow control cylinder in a direction which forces liquid filling the tank to flow downward through the flow control cylinder and a second smaller propeller positioned below the larger propeller having a reverse pitch to oppose the flow of liquid being driven downward by the larger propeller.

  19. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bradley E.; Kabir, Md. E.; Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  20. Recent Applications of Alkene Metathesis in Fine Chemical Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicchielli, Dario; Borguet, Yannick; Delaude, Lionel; Demonceau, Albert; Dragutan, Ileana; Dragutan, Valerian; Jossifov, Christo; Kalinova, Radostina; Nicks, François; Sauvage, Xavier

    During the last decade or so, the emergence of the metathesis reaction in organic synthesis has revolutionised the strategies used for the construction of complex molecular structures. Olefin metathesis is indeed particularly suited for the construction of small open-chain molecules and macrocycles using crossmetathesis and ring-closing metathesis, respectively. These reactions serve, inter alia, as key steps in the synthesis of various agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals such as macrocyclic peptides, cyclic sulfonamides, novel macrolides, or insect pheromones. The present chapter is aiming at illustrating the great synthetic potential of metathesis reactions. Shortcomings, such as the control of olefin geometry and the unpredictable effect of substituents on the reacting olefins, will also be addressed. Examples to be presented include epothilones, amphidinolides, spirofungin A, and archazolid. Synthetic approaches involving silicon-tethered ring-closing metathesis, relay ring-closing metathesis, sequential reactions, domino as well as tandem metathesis reactions will also be illustrated.

  1. Dense, finely, grained composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Holt, Joseph B.; Kingman, Donald D.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  2. Excitation of heliumlike B IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, K.-H.; Koenig, R.; Kunze, H.-J.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements are reported for line-intensity ratios emitted from heliumlike B IV ions in a plasma with electron density, N(e) = 1.5 x 10 to the 16th/cu cm and electron temperature, kT(e) = 175 eV. The plasma was produced in a theta-pinch discharge. The analysis supports theoretical excitation rates calculated in the distorted-wave approximation, which include the effect of resonances.

  3. Chemicals from Cradle to Grave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2005

    2005-01-01

    About two years ago, an urban school district had planned for the disposal of some hazardous chemicals. It contracted with a chemical recycling company that was considered to be reputable. The school district, along with several other companies, was charged and fined by the Environmental Protection Agency for improperly releasing hazardous…

  4. Fine-particle characterization — An important recycling tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindblom, Bo; Samuelsson, Caisa; Sandström, Åke; Ye, Guozhu

    2002-12-01

    This paper summarizes the results from different research projects on fine-particle characterization of metallurgical residues, such as hydroxide sludge, electric-arc furnace dust, and copper-converter dust. These studies demonstrated that characterization is essential for developing new recycling strategies. The basic knowledge of the chemical and physical properties of the residues obtained by the characterizations also provides necessary information on potential problems that could be encountered during the processing of such materials.

  5. Choice of fineness of pulverized coal

    SciTech Connect

    E.N. Tolchinskii; A.Yu. Lavrent'ev

    2002-11-15

    Various methods for choosing the fineness of power plant coal dust are reviewed and analytical expressions for determining the fineness are presented. It is shown that the use of the yield of combustibles as a parameter is not always suitable for evaluating the fineness of pulverized coal. The suggested expression for computing the fineness bears composite parameters that allow for the heat value of the volatiles and for the internal surface of the fuel particles.

  6. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910... DEVELOPMENT AREA Standards Uniformly Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts... of art which are appropriate for the development. For information and guidance, a...

  7. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910... DEVELOPMENT AREA Standards Uniformly Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts... of art which are appropriate for the development. For information and guidance, a...

  8. Considering Fine Art and Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafini, Frank

    2015-01-01

    There has been a close association between picturebook illustrations and works of fine art since the picturebook was first conceived, and many ways these associations among works of fine art and picturebook illustrations and design play out. To make sense of all the various ways picturebook illustrations are associated with works of fine art,…

  9. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910... DEVELOPMENT AREA Standards Uniformly Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts... of art which are appropriate for the development. For information and guidance, a...

  10. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910... DEVELOPMENT AREA Standards Uniformly Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts... of art which are appropriate for the development. For information and guidance, a...

  11. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910... DEVELOPMENT AREA Standards Uniformly Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts... of art which are appropriate for the development. For information and guidance, a...

  12. Geochemistry of Fine-grained Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sageman, B. B.; Lyons, T. W.

    2003-12-01

    The nature of detrital sedimentary (siliciclastic) rocks is determined by geological processes that occur in the four main Earth surface environments encountered over the sediment's history from source to final sink: (i) the site of sediment production (provenance), where interactions among bedrock geology, tectonic uplift, and climate control weathering and erosion processes; (ii) the transport path, where the medium of transport, gradient, and distance to the depositional basin may modify the texture and composition of weathered material; (iii) the site of deposition, where a suite of physical, chemical, and biological processes control the nature of sediment accumulation and early burial modification; and (iv) the conditions of later burial, where diagenetic processes may further alter the texture and composition of buried sediments. Many of these geological processes leave characteristic geochemical signatures, making detrital sedimentary rocks one of the most important archives of geochemical data available for reconstructions of ancient Earth surface environments. Although documentation of geochemical data has long been a part of the study of sedimentation (e.g., Twenhofel, 1926, 1950; Pettijohn, 1949; Trask, 1955), the development and application of geochemical methods specific to sedimentary geological problems blossomed in the period following the Second World War ( Degens, 1965; Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971) and culminated in recent years, as reflected by the publication of various texts on marine geochemistry (e.g., Chester, 1990, 2000), biogeochemistry (e.g., Schlesinger, 1991; Libes, 1992), and organic geochemistry (e.g., Tissot and Welte, 1984; Engel and Macko, 1993).Coincident with the growth of these subdisciplines a new focus has emerged in the geological sciences broadly represented under the title of "Earth System Science" (e.g., Kump et al., 1999). Geochemistry has played the central role in this revolution (e.g., Berner, 1980; Garrels and Lerman

  13. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a clinical tool for extending the…

  14. Predicting Selenite Adsorption by Soils Using Soil Chemical Parameters in the Constant Capacitance Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The constant capacitance model, a chemical surface complexation model, was applied to selenite, Se(IV), adsorption on 36 soils selected for variation in soil chemical properties. The constant capacitance model was able to fit Se(IV) adsorption by optimizing one monodentate Se(IV) surface complexati...

  15. Fine Mode Aerosol over the United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. E.; Piketh, S. J.; Reid, J. S.; Reid, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    The aerosol loading of the atmosphere over the Arabian Gulf region is extremely diverse and is composed not only of dust, but also of pollution that is derived largely from oil-related activities. Fine mode pollution particles are most efficient at scattering incoming solar radiation and have the potential to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and may therefore have implications for climate change. The smaller aerosols may also pose a health hazard if present in high concentrations. The United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2) was designed to investigate aerosol and meteorological characteristics over the region using ground-based, aircraft and satellite measurements, and was conducted in August and September 2004. Aerosol chemical composition has been obtained from filters that were collected at the site of the Mobile Atmospheric Aerosol and Radiation Characterization Observatory (MAARCO) on the coast of the UAE between Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Filter samples were also collected on an airborne platform in order to assess how aerosol chemical composition varies across the region and throughout the depth of the boundary layer. Results of the analysis of the PM2.5 coastal samples show that ammonium sulphate is the most prevalent constituent of the fine mode aerosol in the region (>50% of the mass), followed by organic matter, alumino-silicates, calcium carbonate and black carbon. Source apportionment indicates that most of the fine aerosol mass is derived from fossil fuel combustion, while mineral dust and local vehicle emissions also contribute to the fine aerosol loading. The organic carbon-to-total carbon ratio of the aerosol is 0.65, which is typical of fossil fuel combustion. The dominance of sulphates means that the fine mode aerosol in the region is probably responsible for a negative radiative forcing, and that the polluting emissions significantly elevate the concentration of CCN.

  16. Anaerobic digestion of fines from recovered paper processing - Influence of fiber source, lignin and ash content on biogas potential.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Friedrich; Requejo, Ana; Ewald, Christian; Janzon, Ron; Saake, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    Fines concentration harms paper machine runability and output quality in recovered paper processing, hence, their extraction would be fundamentally beneficial. In this study, separated fines from an industrial recycled fiber pulp (RFP) were characterized and evaluated for their potential biogas yields with a focus on understanding the role of varying lignin and ash contents. Further, these results were compared with biogas yields from conventional chemical and mechanical pulps. Overall, methane yields of fines from mechanical pulps (21-28mL/gVS) and RFP (127mL/gVS) are relatively low compared to the high methane yields of 375mL/gVS from the chemical pulp fines. However, it was shown that the high ash content in RFP fines (up to 50%) did not negatively influence overall yield, rather, it was the presence of slowly biodegrading lignin-rich fiber fines. PMID:26520490

  17. Stage IV-S neuroblastoma. Results with definitive therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, S.H.; Thomas, P.R.; Perez, C.A.; Vietti, T.J.

    1984-05-15

    The results of management of 14 patients with Stage IV-S neuroblastoma are reported. The treatment policy, although not consistent over this time span, in general used a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy or infrequently one modality alone. Twelve of 14 (86%) survived more than 6 years. One patient, with a solitary mediastinal primary tumor, died of rapidly progressive disease at three months. The other death occurred in a 4.5-year-old presenting with hepatomegaly at diagnosis followed by skeletal dissemination 2.5 years later. Thirteen of the patients were younger than 1 year of age. Of the 11 patients that received radiotherapy, 4 experienced mild asymptomatic scoliosis or kyphoscoliosis at 3 to 12 years after initial therapy. A review of the literature indicates that spontaneous regression in this tumor is very frequent; therefore, it is recommended that for the common presentation of massive hepatomegaly in an infant, close observation is warranted, unless life threatening complications occur. However, initial therapeutic intervention may be indicated in those patients with life threatening presentations. This data did not substantiate the necessity for complete surgical excision of the primary tumor, as has been suggested by others.

  18. Coal fines consolidation. [269 references

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, A.

    1984-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to survey existing methods and techniques for consolidating coal fines into lump coal which would be suitable as feed to fixed bed gasifiers. Another objective was to characterize the properties of consolidated coal which would establish its suitability for use in such gasifiers. To accomplish these objectives, a search of the technical literature was conducted in the pertinent subject areas. In addition, a survey was made of industrial and research organizations which have been active in the field of coal consolidation. The literature search mainly covered the period from 1970 to the present, although certain basic references were dated in the early 1900's. Approximately 250 from a total of about 1500 references were identified as relevant to the scope of this study. Information on coal consolidation was solicited from about thirty organizations and a response of about 50% was obtained. A review and evaluation of the relevant technical literature was made and is summarized, along with information provided by the survey responses, in the body of this report. Three primary methods for mechanically consolidating coal fines were identified; briquetting, pelletizing, and extrusion. Based on the limited experience reported, it appears that the technical feasibility of consolidating coal fines as feed to fixed bed gasifiers has been demonstrated. Costs for producing coal agglomerates, as reported in the literature, vary over a wide range, from about 7 to about 30 dollars per ton of product. The low cost range might be acceptable in terms of an overall gasification project but further effort is required to determine if such costs are attainable in practice. 269 references.

  19. SPECIATION OF GAS-PHASE AND FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM BURNING OF FOLIAR FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle size distributions (10-1000 nm aerodynamic diameter), physical and chemical properties of fine particle matter (PM2.5) with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 micrometers, and gas-phase emissions from controlled open burning of assorted taxa were measured. Chemical speciation of ...

  20. A nonheme manganese(IV)-oxo species generated in photocatalytic reaction using water as an oxygen source.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiujuan; Yang, Xiaonan; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Sun, Licheng

    2015-03-01

    A nonheme manganese(IV)-oxo complex, [Mn(IV)(O)(BQCN)](2+), was generated in the photochemical and chemical oxidation of [Mn(II)(BQCN)](2+) with water as an oxygen source, respectively. The photocatalytic oxidation of organic substrates, such as alcohol and sulfide, by [Mn(II)(BQCN)](2+) has been demonstrated in both neutral and acidic media. PMID:25658677

  1. Luna 24 regolith breccias: A possible source of the fine size material of the Luna 24 regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rode, O. D.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    The regolith breccias from the Luna 24 core were analyzed. The Luna 24 regolith is a mixture of fine and coarse grain materials. The comparable analysis of the grain size distributions, the modal and chemical compositions of the breccias, and the regolith from the same levels show that the friable slightly litificated breccia with a friable fine grain matrix may be a source of fine grain material of the Luna 24 present day regolith.

  2. Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley Williamson

    2003-05-31

    This final project report presents experimental details, results and analysis of continuous onsite ambient fine particulate data at the North Birmingham sampling site during the October, 2001-September, 2002 study period.The host site for these measurement activities is the North Birmingham PM monitoring station by the Jefferson County Health Department in Birmingham, AL.The continuous data include PM{sub 2.5} mass concentrations measured by TEOM, particle sulfate using the R&P 8400S monitor, particle size distributions measured by SMPS and APS monitors, and PM{sub 2.5} light scattering extinction coefficient as measured by nephelometer. During the course of the project, measurement intercomparison data were developed for these instruments and several complementary measurements at the site. The report details the instrument set and operating procedures and describes the resulting data. Report subsections present an overview summary of the data, followed by detailed description of the systematic time behavior of PM{sub 2.5} and other specific particulate size fractions. Specific subsections are included for particle size distribution, light scattering, and particle sulfate data. The final subsection addresses application of the measurements to the practical questions of fine PM generation and transport, source attribution, and PM{sub 2.5} management strategies.

  3. Taming Tin(IV) Polyazides.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Rory; Davis, Martin F; Fazakerley, Mathew; Portius, Peter

    2015-12-14

    The first charge-neutral Lewis base adducts of tin(IV) tetraazide, [Sn(N3)4(bpy)], [Sn(N3)4(phen)] and [Sn(N3)4(py)2], and the salt bis{bis(triphenylphosphine)iminium} hexa(azido)stannate [(PPN)2Sn(N3)6] (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; py = pyridine; PPN = N(PPh3)2) have been prepared using covalent or ionic azide-transfer reagents and ligand-exchange reactions. The azides were isolated on the 0.3 to 1 g scale and characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopies, microanalytical and thermal methods and their molecular structures determined by single-crystal XRD. All complexes have a distorted octahedral Sn[N]6 coordination geometry and possess greater thermal stability than their Si and Ge homologues. The nitrogen content of the adducts of up to 44% exceed any Sn(IV) compound known hitherto. PMID:26767331

  4. Prediction of the effect of fine grit on the MLVSS/MLSS ratio of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianping; Ji, Fangying; Xu, Xiaoyi; Wang, Ying; Yan, Dachao; Xu, Xuan; Chen, Qingkong; Xiong, Jingzhong; He, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigated the suspension properties of fine grit with different particle sizes in a bioreactor and developed a model to predict its effect on the ratio of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids to the mixed liquor suspended solids (MLVSS/MLSS) of activated sludge. The experimental results revealed that a smaller particle size corresponds to a larger suspension ratio, defined as the proportion of fine grit brought in by influent that is suspended in the activated sludge, and a smaller MLVSS/MLSS ratio. The model demonstrated that the effect of fine grit on the MLVSS/MLSS ratio is related to the fine grit concentration and chemical oxygen demand in influent and the observed sludge yield. However, fine grit has no influence on the activity of microorganisms. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) can adjust MLSS based on the MLVSS/MLSS ratio to ensure the stability of MLVSS, which can achieve the stable operation of WWTPs. PMID:25919937

  5. Geometric and electronic structures of the His–Fe(IV)=O and His–Fe(IV)–Tyr hemes of MauG

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Lyndal M. R.; Meharenna, Yergalem T.; Davidson, Victor L.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Hedman, Britt

    2012-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor activates the enzyme methylamine dehydrogenase. The diheme enzyme MauG catalyzes O-atom insertion and cross-linking of two Trp residues to complete TTQ synthesis. Solution optical and Mössbauer spectroscopic studies have indicated that the reactive form of MauG during turnover is an unusual bisFe(IV) intermediate, which has been formulated as a His-ligated ferryl heme [Fe(IV)=O] (heme A), and an Fe(IV) heme with an atypical His/Tyr ligation (heme B). In this study, Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies have been combined with density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT methods to solve the geometric and electronic structures of each heme site in the MauG bisFe(IV) redox state. The ferryl heme site (heme A) is compared with the well-characterized compound I intermediate of cytochrome c peroxidase. Heme B is unprecedented in biology, and is shown to have a six-coordinate, S = 1 environment, with a short (1.85-Å) Fe–O(Tyr) bond. Experimentally calibrated DFT calculations are used to reveal a strong covalent interaction between the Fe and the O(Tyr) ligand of heme B in the high-valence form. A large change in the Fe–O(Tyr) bond distance on going from Fe(II) (2.02 Å) to Fe(III) (1.89 Å) to Fe(IV) (1.85 Å) signifies increasing localization of spin density on the tyrosinate ligand upon sequential oxidation of heme B to Fe(IV). As such, O(Tyr) plays an active role in attaining and stabilizing the MauG bisFe(IV) redox state. PMID:23053529

  6. Synthesis, composition, and ion-exchange behavior of thermally stable Zr(IV) and Ti(IV) arsenophosphates: separation of metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Premadas, A.

    1981-01-01

    Two new inorganic ion-exchange materials, Zr(IV) and Ti(IV) arsenophosphates, have been synthesized. They are reproducible in behavior and possess excellent thermal stability. Their tentative structures have been proposed based on pH titrations, thermogravimetry, chemical analysis, ir studies, and other ion-exchange properties. Distribution studies of some metal ions have also been made on the basis of which several useful binary separations have been achieved such as Fe(III) from VO(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II); Pb(II) from Cu(II), Hg(II), and Zn(II); Ti(IV) from UO/sub 2/(II) and Ce(IV); and Mg(II) from Sr(II) and Ba(II).

  7. Rat 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type IV is a novel peroxisome proliferator-inducible gene.

    PubMed

    Corton, J C; Bocos, C; Moreno, E S; Merritt, A; Marsman, D S; Sausen, P J; Cattley, R C; Gustafsson, J A

    1996-11-01

    To better understand the molecular mechanisms of the pleiotropic responses induced by exposure to peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPCs), we conducted a systematic search for genes whose mRNA levels are modulated by the PPC WY-14,643 (WY) in rat liver. The sequence of one up-regulated cDNA (2480 bp) was predicted to encode a protein of 735 aa with 82% identity to the porcine 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type IV (HSD IV). Like the porcine enzyme, the rat HSD IV contains' a region homologous to yeast hydratase-dehydrogenase-epimerases and to sterol carrier proteins, indicating that the rat HSD IV has broad substrate specificity and contributes to cholesterol metabolism. The rat HSD IV was regulated by diverse PPCs via two distinct mechanisms. Induction of HSD IV and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) proteins in rat liver at different treatment times and concentrations of gemfibrozil and di-n-butyl phthalate were almost identical, indicating that HSD IV mRNA induction involves the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, a regulator of ACO. In contrast, HSD IV protein levels were only weakly induced by WY, a strong inducer of ACO protein, even though the levels of HSD IV and ACO mRNA were strongly stimulated by WY and gemfibrozil. Thus, HSD IV protein levels were uniquely regulated pretranslationally by WY via a novel mechanism. Increased conversion of estradiol to the less-active estrone by HSD IV induction may explain how phthalate exposure leads to decreases in serum estradiol levels and suppression of ovulation. PMID:8913347

  8. IVS contribution to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Sabine; Thaller, Daniela; Roggenbuck, Ole; Lösler, Michael; Messerschmitt, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Every few years the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) Center of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) decides to generate a new version of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). For the upcoming ITRF2014 the official contribution of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) comprises 5796 combined sessions in SINEX file format from 1979.6 to 2015.0 containing 158 stations, overall. Nine AC contributions were included in the combination process, using five different software packages. Station coordinate time series of the combined solution show an overall repeatability of 3.3 mm for the north, 4.3 mm for the east and 7.5 mm for the height component over all stations. The minimum repeatabilities are 1.5 mm for north, 2.1 mm for east and 2.9 mm for height. One of the important differences between the IVS contribution to the ITRF2014 and the routine IVS combination is the omission of the correction for non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading (NTAL). Comparisons between the amplitudes of the annual signals derived by the VLBI observations and the annual signals from an NTAL model show that for some stations, NTAL has a high impact on station height variation. For other stations, the effect of NTAL is low. Occasionally other loading effects have a higher influence (e.g. continental water storage loading). External comparisons of the scale parameter between the VTRF2014 (a TRF based on combined VLBI solutions), DTRF2008 (DGFI-TUM realization of ITRS) and ITRF2008 revealed a significant difference in the scale. A scale difference of 0.11 ppb (i.e. 0.7 mm on the Earth's surface) has been detected between the VTRF2014 and the DTRF2008, and a scale difference of 0.44 ppb (i.e. 2.8 mm on the Earth's surface) between the VTRF2014 and ITRF2008. Internal comparisons between the EOP of the combined solution and the individual solutions from the AC contributions show a WRMS in X- and Y-Pole between

  9. IVS contribution to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Sabine; Thaller, Daniela; Roggenbuck, Ole; Lösler, Michael; Messerschmitt, Linda

    2016-04-01

    Every few years the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) Center of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) decides to generate a new version of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). For the upcoming ITRF2014 the official contribution of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) comprises 5796 combined sessions in SINEX file format from 1979.6 to 2015.0 containing 158 stations, overall. Nine AC contributions were included in the combination process, using five different software packages. Station coordinate time series of the combined solution show an overall repeatability of 3.3 mm for the north, 4.3 mm for the east and 7.5 mm for the height component over all stations. The minimum repeatabilities are 1.5 mm for north, 2.1 mm for east and 2.9 mm for height. One of the important differences between the IVS contribution to the ITRF2014 and the routine IVS combination is the omission of the correction for non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading (NTAL). Comparisons between the amplitudes of the annual signals derived by the VLBI observations and the annual signals from an NTAL model show that for some stations, NTAL has a high impact on station height variation. For other stations, the effect of NTAL is low. Occasionally other loading effects have a higher influence (e.g. continental water storage loading). External comparisons of the scale parameter between the VTRF2014 (a TRF based on combined VLBI solutions), DTRF2008 (DGFI-TUM realization of ITRS) and ITRF2008 revealed a significant difference in the scale. A scale difference of 0.11 ppb (i.e. 0.7 mm on the Earth's surface) has been detected between the VTRF2014 and the DTRF2008, and a scale difference of 0.44 ppb (i.e. 2.8 mm on the Earth's surface) between the VTRF2014 and ITRF2008. Internal comparisons between the EOP of the combined solution and the individual solutions from the AC contributions show a WRMS in X- and Y-Pole between

  10. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures. PMID:10859129

  11. Fine structure of plasmaspheric hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Danny; Omura, Yoshiharu; Nakamura, Satoko; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2014-11-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss has been widely regarded as a broadband, structureless, incoherent emission. In this study, by examining burst-mode vector waveform data from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science instrument on the Van Allen Probes mission, we show that plasmaspheric hiss is a coherent emission with complex fine structure. Specifically, plasmaspheric hiss appears as discrete rising tone and falling tone elements. Our study comprises the analysis of two 1 h samples within which a total of eight 1 s samples were analyzed. By means of waveform analysis on two samples, we identify typical amplitudes, phase profiles, and sweep rates of the rising and falling tone elements. The exciting new observations reported here can be expected to fuel a reexamination of the properties of plasmaspheric hiss, including a further reanalysis of the generation mechanism for hiss.

  12. FINE: fisher information nonparametric embedding.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kevin M; Raich, Raviv; Finn, William G; Hero, Alfred O

    2009-11-01

    We consider the problems of clustering, classification, and visualization of high-dimensional data when no straightforward euclidean representation exists. In this paper, we propose using the properties of information geometry and statistical manifolds in order to define similarities between data sets using the Fisher information distance. We will show that this metric can be approximated using entirely nonparametric methods, as the parameterization and geometry of the manifold is generally unknown. Furthermore, by using multidimensional scaling methods, we are able to reconstruct the statistical manifold in a low-dimensional euclidean space; enabling effective learning on the data. As a whole, we refer to our framework as Fisher Information Nonparametric Embedding (FINE) and illustrate its uses on practical problems, including a biomedical application and document classification. PMID:19762935

  13. Dilithium hexaorganostannate(IV) compounds.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Ireen; Zeckert, Kornelia; Zahn, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Hypercoordination of main-group elements such as the heavier Group 14 elements (silicon, germanium, tin, and lead) usually requires strong electron-withdrawing ligands and/or donating groups. Herein, we present the synthesis and characterization of two hexaaryltin(IV) dianions in form of their dilithium salts [Li2(thf)2{Sn(2-py(Me))6}] (py(Me)=C5H3N-5-Me) (2) and [Li2{Sn(2-py(OtBu))6}] (py(OtBu)=C5H3N-6-OtBu) (3). Both complexes are stable in the solid state and solution under inert conditions. Theoretical investigations of compound 2 reveal a significant valence 5s-orbital contribution of the tin atom forming six strongly polarized tin-carbon bonds. PMID:25314245

  14. Group-IV semiconductor compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Berding, M.A.; Sher, A.; van Schilfgaarde, M.

    1997-08-01

    Properties of ordered group-IV compounds containing carbon, silicon, and germanium are calculated within the local density approximation. Twenty-seven fully relaxed compounds represented by seven different compound structures are compared and, with the exception of SiC, all compounds are found to be metastable. Two trends emerge: carbon-germanium bonds are disfavored, and compounds that have carbon on a common sublattice are the least unbound because of their relatively low strain. When carbon shares a sublattice with silicon or germanium, the large strain results in a narrowing of the band gap, and in some cases the compound is metallic. The most promising structures with the lowest excess energy contain carbon on one sublattice and although they do not lattice match to silicon, they match rather well to silicon carbide. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Optical and Infrared Interferometry IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Jayadev K.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Malbet, Fabien

    2014-08-01

    Optical and IR Interferometry IV at the SPIE 2014 symposium in Montreal had a strong and vibrant program. After initial fears about budget cuts and travel-funding constraints, the Program Committee had to work hard to accommodate as many quality submissions as possible. Innovative, creative and visionary work ensured that the field has progressed well, despite the bleak funding climate felt in the US, Europe and elsewhere. Montreal proved an excellent venue for this, the largest of Interferometry conferences and the only one that brings together practitioners from the world over. Let us summarize a few highlights to convey a glimpse of the excitement that is detailed in the rest of these Proceedings.

  16. Curium analysis in plutonium uranium mixed oxide by x-ray fluorescence and absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Degueldre, C; Borca, C; Cozzo, C

    2013-10-15

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are being used in commercial nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regards to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the local occurrence, speciation and next-neighbour environment of curium (Cm) in the (Pu,U)O2 lattice within an irradiated (60 MW d kg(-1) average burn-up) MOX sample was performed employing micro-x-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-x-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Cm (≈ 0.7 wt% in the rim and ≈ 0.03 wt% in the centre) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its centre and peripheral (rim) zones of the fuel. Curium occurrence is also reduced from the centre (hot) to the periphery (colder) because of the condensation of these volatile oxides. In the irradiated sample Cm builds up as Cm(3+) species (>90%) within a [CmO8](13-) or [CmO7](11-) coordination environment and no (<10%) Cm(IV) can be detected in the rim zone. Curium dioxide is reduced because of the redox buffering activity of the uranium dioxide matrix and of its thermodynamic instability. PMID:24054692

  17. 28 CFR 571.52 - Procedures-committed fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the inmate's commitment, staff shall inform the inmate that there is a committed fine, or fine and... the fine, or fine and costs is paid, except— (i) The inmate may spend money from his/her trust fund.... (b) If the inmate pays the committed fine, or fine and costs, or staff have verified payment,...

  18. Fine structure of track-plated Au-Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.; Staudhammer, K.P.

    1982-01-01

    The burnishing process, i.e., mechanical rubbing of the deposit during electrodeposition, produces continuous nucleation of new grains during deposition which effectively prevents large columnar grains and macroporosity. In addition, track plating produces a uniform subgrain and substructure. By the use of STEM and TEM we were able to define a number of structural features of this material. Evident from the micrographs is the non-uniform polishing of the layers resulting from the chemical variation in the plating process. Microstructural features of the Au rich regions are shown. The unit size of this structure is about 22 nm. The fine-grained structure does not have well defined boundaries but does contain a slight amount of preferred alignment. Each equivalent unit has periodic fine structure measurable to approx. 2 nm.

  19. The Apollo 15 coarse fines (4-10 mm)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham; Sherman, Sarah Bean

    1989-01-01

    A new catalog of the Apollo 15 coarse fines particles is presented. Powell's macroscopic descriptions, resulting from his 1972 particle by particle binocular examination of all of the Apollo 15 4 to 10 mm fines samples, are retained. His groupings are also retained, but petrographic, chemical, and other data from later analyses are incorporated into this catalog to better characterize individual particles and describe the groups. A large number of particles have no characterization beyond that done by Powell. Complete descriptions of the particles and all known references are provided. The catalog is intended for anyone interested in the rock types collected by Dave Scott and Jim Irwin in the Hadley-Appenine region, and particularly for researchers requiring sample allocations.

  20. Modelling fines mobilization, migration and clogging

    SciTech Connect

    Wennberg, K.E.; Batrouni, G.; Hansen, A.

    1995-12-31

    The authors introduce and discuss a model for fines mobilization, migration and clogging in porous media based on the convection-diffusion equation. Their model contains two fields: The concentration of fine particles deposited on the pore walls and the concentration of fines suspended in the ambient liquid. The model contains four parameters--or seven if certain nonlinearities in the clogging process are important. They discuss the physical contents of the model and test it numerically in two dimensions.

  1. Fused silica fine grinding with low roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lei; Gu, Yongqiang; Wu, Di

    2014-08-01

    Lithography-optics is one of the most complex optical systems. The fine grinding process is the most important step before polishing. Roughness and sub-surface damage (SSD) are essential outputs of fine grinding. We demonstrate the method that use fix abrasive cup tool with CNC grinding machine to complete the fine grinding process, even instead of lapping process. And experiment sample roughness can reach 23.40nm rms and Ra 18.554nm. The SSD estimate is about 2 μm which is also smaller than commercial lapping process. The fine grinding output can satisfy the lithography optic fabrication demands and efficiently reduce the polishing time.

  2. Advanced Fine Particulate Characterization Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Benson; Lingbu Kong; Alexander Azenkeng; Jason Laumb; Robert Jensen; Edwin Olson; Jill MacKenzie; A.M. Rokanuzzaman

    2007-01-31

    The characterization and control of emissions from combustion sources are of significant importance in improving local and regional air quality. Such emissions include fine particulate matter, organic carbon compounds, and NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} gases, along with mercury and other toxic metals. This project involved four activities including Further Development of Analytical Techniques for PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} Characterization and Source Apportionment and Management, Organic Carbonaceous Particulate and Metal Speciation for Source Apportionment Studies, Quantum Modeling, and High-Potassium Carbon Production with Biomass-Coal Blending. The key accomplishments included the development of improved automated methods to characterize the inorganic and organic components particulate matter. The methods involved the use of scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis for the inorganic fraction and a combination of extractive methods combined with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure to characterize the organic fraction. These methods have direction application for source apportionment studies of PM because they provide detailed inorganic analysis along with total organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) quantification. Quantum modeling using density functional theory (DFT) calculations was used to further elucidate a recently developed mechanistic model for mercury speciation in coal combustion systems and interactions on activated carbon. Reaction energies, enthalpies, free energies and binding energies of Hg species to the prototype molecules were derived from the data obtained in these calculations. Bimolecular rate constants for the various elementary steps in the mechanism have been estimated using the hard-sphere collision theory approximation, and the results seem to indicate that extremely fast kinetics could be involved in these surface reactions. Activated carbon was produced from a blend of lignite coal from the Center Mine in North Dakota and

  3. Structure and synthesis of a lipid-containing bacteriophage. Amphiphilic properties of protein IV of bacteriophage PM2.

    PubMed

    Satake, H; Kania, M; Franklin, R M

    1981-03-01

    Interactions between lipids and the DNA-binding protein (protein IV) purified from bacteriophage PM2 were studied in vitro. The efficiency of incorporation of protein IV into single-walled liposomes was more than 90%. Protein IV embedded in liposomes interacted more strongly with PM2 DNA than protein IV alone. The DNA--protein-IV--liposome complex was relatively stable as observed by sedimentation behavior on a sucrose gradient. The interaction between DNA and the protein-IV--liposome was abolished by tryptic digestion, even though 40% of the protein remained in the vesicle. More than 70% of the amino acids of this embedded peptide segment were hydrophobic. Carboxypeptidase digestion of the protein-IV--liposome caused a release of 20% of the radioactivity of the vesicle without changing the DNA-binding ability of the complexes. Modification of the protein-IV--liposome with the chemical probe, 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene, and analysis of the tryptic peptides released from the protein-IV--liposome demonstrated that the N-terminal basic amino acid cluster segment responsible for the DNA binding was located on the outer surface of the bilayer. These results support an earlier model in which protein IV anchors itself in the inner leaflet of the PM2 bilayer membrane, interacting with the DNA in the virion. PMID:6263621

  4. Quantitative separation of monomeric U(IV) from UO2 in products of U(VI) reduction

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Daniel S.; Uster, Benjamin; Veeramani, Harish; Suvorova, Elena I.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2012-01-01

    The reduction of soluble hexavalent uranium to tetravalent uranium can be catalyzed by bacteria and minerals. The end-product of this reduction is often the mineral uraninite, which was long assumed to be the only product of U(VI) reduction. However, recent studies report the formation of other species including an adsorbed U(IV) species, operationally referred to as monomeric U(IV). The discovery of monomeric U(IV) is important because the species is likely to be more labile and more susceptible to reoxidation than uraninite. Because there is a need to distinguish between these two U(IV) species, we propose here a wet chemical method of differentiating monomeric U(IV) from uraninite in environmental samples. To calibrate the method, U(IV) was extracted from known mixtures of uraninite and monomeric U(IV) and testted using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Monomeric U(IV) was efficiently removed from biomass and Fe(II)-bearing phases by bicarbonate extraction, without affecting uraninite stability. After confirming that the method effectively separates monomeric U(IV) and uraninite, it is further evaluated for a system containing those reduced U species and adsorbed U(VI). The method provides a rapid complement, and in some cases alternative, to XAS analyses for quantifying monomeric U(IV), uraninite, and adsorbed U(VI) species in environmental samples. PMID:22540966

  5. The apparent fine-tuning of the cosmological, gravitational and fine structure constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaves, Laurence

    2016-02-01

    A numerical coincidence relating the values of the cosmological, gravitational and electromagnetic fine structure constants is presented and discussed in relation to the apparent anthropic fine-tuning of these three fundamental constants of nature.

  6. Belowground Biomass Sampling to Estimate Fine Root Mass across NEON Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, J. J.; Meier, C. L.; Abercrombie, H.; Everhart, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Production of belowground biomass is an important and relatively uncharacterized component of the net primary productivity (NPP) of ecosystems. Fine root productivity makes up a significant portion of total belowground production because fine roots turn over rapidly, and therefore contribute disproportionately to annual estimates of belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). One of the major goals of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is to quantify above- and below-ground NPP at 60 sites within 20 different eco-climactic regions. NEON's Terrestrial Observation System will carry out belowground biomass sampling throughout the life of the observatory to estimate fine root production. However, belowground biomass sampling during NEON operations will be constrained to a maximum depth of 50cm. This limited depth range leaves the question of what proportion of total fine root mass is being collected and how to optimally characterize belowground biomass given sampling depth limitations. During the construction period, NEON is characterizing fine root biomass distribution at depth down to 2m at each site, as well as physical and chemical properties in each soil horizon. Each sampling unit is a pit (2m deep and approximately 1.5m wide), dug in the site's dominant vegetation type where fine root biomass sampling will also occur during Operations. To sample fine root biomass in each pit, soil samples of a known volume are taken from three vertical profiles down the face of the pit. Samples are then wet sieved to extract fine root mass, and roots are dried at 65°C for 48 hours and then weighed. The soil pit data are used to estimate the proportion of total fine root biomass from each site as a function of depth. Non-linear curves are fitted to the data to calculate total fine root mass at depth and to provide estimates of the proportion of the total fine root mass that is sampled at each site during NEON's 30 year operational sampling. The belowground

  7. Fine Structure of Plasmaspheric Hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, D.; Omura, Y.; Nakamura, S.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss plays a key role in controlling the structure and dynamics of Earth's radiation belts.The quiet time slot region between the inner and outer belts can be explained as a steady-state balance between earthward radial diffusion and pitch-angle scattering loss of energetic electrons to the atmosphere induced by plasmaspheric hiss. Plasmaspheric hiss can also induce gradual precipitation loss of MeV electrons from the outer radiation belt. Plasmaspheric hiss has been widely regarded as a broadband,structureless,incoherent emission. Here, by examining burst-mode vector waveform data from the EMFISIS instrument on the Van Allen Probes mission,we show that plasmaspheric hiss is a coherent emission with complex fine structure. Specifically, plasmaspheric hiss appears as discrete rising tone and falling tone elements. By means of waveform analysis we identify typical amplitudes,phase profiles,and sweep rates of the rising and falling tone elements. The new observations reported here can be expected to fuel a re-examination of the properties of plasmaspheric hiss, including a further re-analysis of the generation mechanism for hiss.

  8. Stark broadening of B IV spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Christova, Magdalena; Simić, Zoran; Kovačević, Andjelka; Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Stark broadening parameters for 157 multiplets of helium-like boron (B IV) have been calculated using the impact semiclassical perturbation formalism. Obtained results have been used to investigate the regularities within spectral series. An example of the influence of Stark broadening on B IV lines in DO white dwarfs is given.

  9. Stark broadening of B IV spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Christova, Magdalena; Simić, Zoran; Kovačević, Andjelka; Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie

    2016-05-01

    Stark broadening parameters for 157 multiplets of helium like boron (B IV) have been calculated using the impact semiclassical perturbation formalism. Obtained results have been used to investigate the regularities within spectral series. An example of the influence of Stark broadening on B IV lines in DO white dwarfs is given.

  10. CHLORINE ABSORPTION IN S(IV) SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of chlorine (Cl2) absorption into aqueous sulfite/bisulfite [S(IV)] solutions was measured at ambient temperature using a highly characterized stirred cell reactor. The reactor media were 0 to 10 mM S(IV) with pH ranging from 3.5 to 8.5. Experiments were performed using ...

  11. Metsahovi Radio Observatory - IVS Network Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uunila, Minttu; Zubko, Nataliya; Poutanen, Markku; Kallunki, Juha; Kallio, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, Metsahovi Radio Observatory together with Finnish Geodetic Institute officially became an IVS Network Station. Eight IVS sessions were observed during the year. Two spacecraft tracking and one EVN X-band experiment were also performed. In 2012, the Metsahovi VLBI equipment was upgraded with a Digital Base Band Converter, a Mark 5B+, a FILA10G, and a FlexBuff.

  12. IVS Working Group 4: VLBI Data Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gipson, John

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 the IVS Directing Board established IVS Working Group 4 on VLBI Data Structures. This note discusses the current VLBI data format, goals for a new format, the history and formation of the Working Group, and a timeline for the development of a new VLBI data format.

  13. CHLORINE ABSORPTION IN S(IV) SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of measurements of the rate of Chlorine (Cl2) absorption into aqueous sulfite/bisulfite -- S(IV) -- solutions at ambient temperature using a highly characterized stirred-cell reactor. The reactor media were 0 to 10 mM S(IV) with pHs of 3.5-8.5. Experiment...

  14. Modeling of Fine-Particle Formation in Turbulent Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Venkat; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of nanostructured particles in high-temperature flames is important both for the control of emissions from combustion devices and for the synthesis of high-value chemicals for a variety of applications. The physiochemical processes that lead to the production of fine particles in turbulent flames are highly sensitive to the flow physics and, in particular, the history of thermochemical compositions and turbulent features they encounter. Consequently, it is possible to change the characteristic size, structure, composition, and yield of the fine particles by altering the flow configuration. This review describes the complex multiscale interactions among turbulent fluid flow, gas-phase chemical reactions, and solid-phase particle evolution. The focus is on modeling the generation of soot particles, an unwanted pollutant from automobile and aircraft engines, as well as metal oxides, a class of high-value chemicals sought for specialized applications, including emissions control. Issues arising due to the numerical methods used to approximate the particle number density function, the modeling of turbulence-chemistry interactions, and model validation are also discussed.

  15. Mucolipidosis Type IV: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyo; Gustafson, Ann Marie; Sidransky, Ellen; Goldin, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a neurodevelopmental as well as neurodegenerative disorder with severe psychomotor developmental delay, progressive visual impairment, and achlorydria. It is characterized by the presence of lysosomal inclusions in many cell types in patients. MLIV is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in MCOLN1, which encodes for mucolipin-1, a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel family. Although approximately 70-80% of patients identified are Ashkenazi Jewish, MLIV is a pan-ethnic disorder. Importantly, while MLIV is thought to be a rare disease, its frequency may be greater than currently appreciated, for its common presentation as a cerebral palsy-like encephalopathy can lead to misdiagnosis. Moreover, patients with milder variants are often not recognized as having MLIV. This review provides an update on the ethnic distribution, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, methods of diagnosis, molecular genetics, differential diagnosis, and treatment of patients with MLIV. An enhanced awareness of the manifestations of this disorder may help to elucidate the true frequency and range of symptoms associated with MLIV, providing insight into the pathogenesis of this multi-system disease. PMID:21763169

  16. ADVANCING FINE ROOT RESEARCH WITH MINIRHIZOTRONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Minirhizotrons provide a nondestructive, in situ method for directly viewing and studying fine roots. Although many insights into fine roots have been gained using minirhizotrons, it is clear from the literature that there is still wide variation in how minirhizotrons and minirhi...

  17. FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS INFORMATION SYSTEM REFERENCE MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a basic reference manual on the Fine Particle Emissions Information System (FPEIS), a computerized database on primary fine particle emissions to the atmosphere from stationary point sources. The FPEIS is a component of the Environmental Assessment Data Systems (EAD...

  18. Biased experimental fineness and maturity results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Part I of this series, models were developed and computer simulations were performed to understand the variability in coefficients of determination (R2) between fineness and maturity, micronaire and fineness, and micronaire and maturity of cotton. Part II concentrated on derivation and testing of...

  19. 34 CFR 668.84 - Fine proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fine proceedings. 668.84 Section 668.84 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Fine, Limitation, Suspension and...

  20. 33 CFR 153.205 - Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fines. 153.205 Section 153.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION CONTROL OF POLLUTION BY OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES, DISCHARGE REMOVAL Notice of the Discharge of Oil or a Hazardous Substance § 153.205 Fines....

  1. Fine-Sediment Loadings to Lake Tahoe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past 35 years, a trend of decreasing water clarity has been documented in Lake Tahoe, attributable in part to the delivery of fine-grained sediments emanating from upland and channel sources. The overall objective of the research reported here was to determine the amount of fine sediment de...

  2. The Relationship between Fine-Motor Play and Fine-Motor Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marr, Deborah; Cermak, Sharon; Cohn, Ellen S.; Henderson, Anne

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between free-play choices and fine-motor skill in 4-year-old children attending Head Start. Children with poor fine-motor skill were matched for age and gender with children in the same classroom that exhibited good fine-motor skill. Each pair was observed during free-play sessions to examine the degree of…

  3. Get out of Fines Free: Recruiting Student Usability Testers via Fine Waivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockenberry, Benjamin; Blackburn, Kourtney

    2016-01-01

    St. John Fisher College's Lavery Library's Access Services and Systems departments began a pilot project in which students with overdue fines tested usability of library Web sites in exchange for fine waivers. Circulation staff promoted the program and redeemed fine waiver vouchers at the Checkout Desk, while Systems staff administered testing and…

  4. 32 CFR 634.35 - Chemical testing policies and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chemical testing policies and procedures. 634.35... Chemical testing policies and procedures. (a) Validity of chemical testing. Results of chemical testing are... instruction manual. (iv) Perform preventive maintenance as required by the instruction manual. (c)...

  5. 32 CFR 634.35 - Chemical testing policies and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Chemical testing policies and procedures. 634.35... Chemical testing policies and procedures. (a) Validity of chemical testing. Results of chemical testing are... instruction manual. (iv) Perform preventive maintenance as required by the instruction manual. (c)...

  6. 32 CFR 634.35 - Chemical testing policies and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Chemical testing policies and procedures. 634.35... Chemical testing policies and procedures. (a) Validity of chemical testing. Results of chemical testing are... instruction manual. (iv) Perform preventive maintenance as required by the instruction manual. (c)...

  7. 32 CFR 634.35 - Chemical testing policies and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Chemical testing policies and procedures. 634.35... Chemical testing policies and procedures. (a) Validity of chemical testing. Results of chemical testing are... instruction manual. (iv) Perform preventive maintenance as required by the instruction manual. (c)...

  8. Actinide(IV) Deposits on Bone: Potential Role of the Osteopontin-Thorium Complex.

    PubMed

    Creff, Gaëlle; Safi, Samir; Roques, Jérôme; Michel, Hervé; Jeanson, Aurélie; Solari, Pier-Lorenzo; Basset, Christian; Simoni, Eric; Vidaud, Claude; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In case of a nuclear event, contamination (broad or limited) of the population or of specific workers might occur. In such a senario, the fate of actinide contaminants may be of first concern, in particular with regard to human target organs like the skeleton. To improve our understanding of the toxicological processes that might take place, a mechanistic approach is necessary. For instance, ∼50% of Pu(IV) is known from biokinetic data to accumulate in bone, but the underlining mechanisms are almost unknown. In this context, and to obtain a better description of the toxicological mechanisms associated with actinides(IV), we have undertaken the investigation, on a molecular scale, of the interaction of thorium(IV) with osteopontin (OPN) a hyperphosphorylated protein involved in bone turnover. Thorium is taken here as a simple model for actinide(IV) chemistry. In addition, we have selected a phosphorylated hexapeptide (His-pSer-Asp-Glu-pSer-Asp-Glu-Val) that is representative of the peptidic sequence involved in the bone interaction. For both the protein and the biomimetic peptide, we have determined the local environment of Th(IV) within the bioactinidic complex, combining isothermal titration calorimetry, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, theoretical calculations with density functional theory, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at the Th LIII edge. The results demonstrate a predominance of interaction of metal with the phosphate groups and confirmed the previous physiological studies that have highlighted a high affinity of Th(IV) for the bone matrix. Data are further compared with those of the uranyl case, representing the actinyl(V) and actinyl(VI) species. Last, our approach shows the importance of developing simplified systems [Th(IV)-peptide] that can serve as models for more biologically relevant systems. PMID:26684435

  9. Development of Platinum(iv) Complexes as Anticancer Prodrugs: the Story so Far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Daniel Yuan Qiang; Ang, Wee Han

    2012-06-01

    The serendipitous discovery of the antitumor properties of cisplatin by Barnett Rosenberg some forty years ago brought about a paradigm shift in the field of medicinal chemistry and challenged conventional thinking regarding the role of potentially toxic heavy metals in drugs. Platinum(II)-based anticancer drugs have since become some of the most effective and widely-used drugs in a clinician's arsenal and have saved countless lives. However, they are limited by high toxicity, severe side-effects and the incidence of drug resistance. In recent years, attention has shifted to stable platinum(IV) complexes as anticancer prodrugs. By exploiting the unique chemical and structural attributes of their scaffolds, these platinum(IV) prodrugs offer new strategies of targeting and killing cancer cells. This review summarizes the development of anticancer platinum(IV) prodrugs to date and some of the exciting strategies that utilise the platinum(IV) construct as targeted chemotherapeutic agents against cancer.

  10. Surprising Coordination Geometry Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Raymond, Kenneth; Szigethy, Geza; Xu, Jide; Gorden, Anne E.V.; Teat, Simon J.; Shuh, David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-12

    As part of a study to characterize the detailed coordination behavior of Pu(IV), single crystal X-ray diffraction structures have been determined for Pu(IV) and Ce(IV) complexes with the naturally-occurring ligand maltol (3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one) and its derivative bromomaltol (5-bromo-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one). Although Ce(IV) is generally accepted as a structural analog for Pu(IV), and the maltol complexes of these two metals are isostructural, the corresponding bromomaltol complexes are strikingly different with respect to ligand orientation about the metal ion: All complexes exhibit trigonal dodecahedral coordination geometry but the Ce(IV)-bromomaltol complex displays an uncommon ligand arrangement not mirrored in the Pu(IV) complex, although the two metal species are generally accepted to be structural analogs.

  11. Autonomous patterning of cells on microstructured fine particles.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Iwori; Kawanabe, Masato; Kaneko, Arata

    2015-05-01

    Regularly patterned cells can clarify cellular function and are required in some biochip applications. This study examines cell patterning along microstructures and the effect of microstructural geometry on selective cellular adhesion. Particles can be autonomously assembled on a soda-lime glass substrate that is chemically patterned by immersion in a suspension of fine particles. By adopting various sizes of fine particles, we can control the geometry of the microstructure. Cells adhere more readily to microstructured fine particles than to flat glass substrate. Silica particles hexagonally packed in 5-40 μm line and space microstructures provide an effective cell scaffold on the glass substrate. Cultured cells tend to attach and proliferate along the microstructured region while avoiding the flat region. The difference in cell adhesion is attributed to their geometries, as both of the silica particles and soda-lime glass are hydrophilic related with cell adhesiveness. After cell seeding, cells adhered to the flat region migrated toward the microstructured region. For most of the cells to assemble on the scaffold, the scaffolding microstructures must be spaced by at most 65 μm. PMID:25746259

  12. Modifying the properties of finely ground limestone by tumbling granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, Oliver; Eckert, Maroš; Tomášová, Barbora; Peciar, Peter; Ščasný, Martin; Fekete, Roman; Peciar, Marián

    2016-06-01

    Calcium carbonate in the form of finely ground limestone is a material that has found its application in a wide range of industries, in the chemical, rubber, agricultural, and paper industries, is used for desulfurization of boilers and other. In civil engineering, ground limestone is used for the production of building materials, plaster and mortar mixtures, as a filler in concrete mixtures, in road construction, and as an essential component of mastic asphalt. This paper deals with examining the modification of the properties of finely ground limestone by the tumbling agglomeration method. It has been shown that the components of concrete with a round grain have a positive effect on the pumping of concrete in comparison with an elongated grain or the rough surface of crushed stone. The experiments will be carried out on a granulation plate using a variety of granulation liquid. The agglomerates and their properties were compared with untreated finely ground limestone, with a focus on detecting changes in compressibility, density and particle size. The output of this paper is a description and graphical representation of the changes in the properties of ground limestone before and after the agglomeration process.

  13. Manifestation of Quasilinear Diffusion on Whistlers in the Fine-Structure Radio Sources of Solar Radio Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, G.P.

    2005-04-15

    The zebra structure and fiber bursts in the dynamic spectra of the solar type IV radio burst recorded on October 25, 1994, are analyzed using observational data from ground-based stations and Earth-orbiting satellites. The fine structure is observed when new hot magnetic loops, in which high- and low-frequency plasma instabilities develop, ascend to the solar corona. The frequency range of the fine structure is determined by the dimensions of these loops. The main features of the zebra structure are analyzed in terms of the interaction of plasma waves with whistlers. The results obtained are compared to the predictions from the double plasma resonance model.

  14. Cognitive-enhancing effects of angiotensin IV

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    Angiotensin IV is a derivative of the potent vasoconstrictor angiotensin II and it has been shown to enhance acquisition, consolidation and recall in animal models of learning and memory when administered centrally or peripherally. Whether changes in angiotensin IV activity underlie the cognitive effects of those cardiovascular drugs designed to disrupt the peripheral renin-angiotensin system in humans remains undetermined, but angiotensin IV appears to be a worthy candidate for consideration in drug development programmes. The mechanism of action of angiotensin IV is still debated, although its AT4 receptor has been convincingly identified as being insulin-regulated amino peptidase, which is also known as oxytocinase and placental leucine aminopeptidase. It is speculated that angiotensin IV may interact with insulin-regulated amino peptidase to enhance neuronal glucose uptake, prevent metabolism of other neuroactive peptides, induce changes in extracellular matrix molecules, or induce release of acetylcholine and/or dopamine. All of these things may be responsible for the beneficial effects on cognition, but none of them are yet proven. Importantly, strain differences in murine responses to angiotensin IV suggest that some individuals may benefit from drugs targeted to the AT4 receptor whilst others may be refractory. At present it thus appears that those individuals with the poorest baseline cognition may receive greatest benefit, but possible genetic differences in responses to angiotensin IV cannot be ruled-out. PMID:19090988

  15. Stage IV work hardening in cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Rollett, A.D.; Kocks, U.F.; Doherty, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The work hardening of fcc metals at large strains is discussed with reference to the linear stress-strain behavior often observed at large strains and known as Stage IV. The experimental evidence shows that Stage IV is a work hardening phenomenon that is found quite generally, even in pure fcc metals subjected to homogeneous deformation. A simple model for Stage IV in pure metals is presented, based on the accumulation of dislocation debris. Experiments are described for large strain torsion tests on four aluminum alloys. The level and extent of Stage IV scaled with the saturation stress that would represent the end of Stage III in the absence of a Stage IV. Reversing the torsion after large prestrains produced transient reductions in the work hardening. The strain rate sensitivity was also measured before and during the transient and found not to vary significantly. The microstructure observed at large strains in an Mg alloy suggest that Stage IV can occur in the absence of microband formation. Previous proposals for the cause of Stage IV are reviewed and found to be not supported by recent experimental data.

  16. Fine Guidance Sensing for Coronagraphic Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James W.; Trauger, John T.; Moody, Dwight C.

    2011-01-01

    Three options have been developed for Fine Guidance Sensing (FGS) for coronagraphic observatories using a Fine Guidance Camera within a coronagraphic instrument. Coronagraphic observatories require very fine precision pointing in order to image faint objects at very small distances from a target star. The Fine Guidance Camera measures the direction to the target star. The first option, referred to as Spot, was to collect all of the light reflected from a coronagraph occulter onto a focal plane, producing an Airy-type point spread function (PSF). This would allow almost all of the starlight from the central star to be used for centroiding. The second approach, referred to as Punctured Disk, collects the light that bypasses a central obscuration, producing a PSF with a punctured central disk. The final approach, referred to as Lyot, collects light after passing through the occulter at the Lyot stop. The study includes generation of representative images for each option by the science team, followed by an engineering evaluation of a centroiding or a photometric algorithm for each option. After the alignment of the coronagraph to the fine guidance system, a "nulling" point on the FGS focal point is determined by calibration. This alignment is implemented by a fine alignment mechanism that is part of the fine guidance camera selection mirror. If the star images meet the modeling assumptions, and the star "centroid" can be driven to that nulling point, the contrast for the coronagraph will be maximized.

  17. Identification of Novel Human Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitors of Natural Origin (Part II): In Silico Prediction in Antidiabetic Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, Laura; Sala, Esther; Ojeda, María José; Valls, Cristina; Bladé, Cinta; Mulero, Miquel; Blay, Mayte; Ardévol, Anna; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Pujadas, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Background Natural extracts play an important role in traditional medicines for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and are also an essential resource for new drug discovery. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors are potential candidates for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the effectiveness of certain antidiabetic extracts of natural origin could be, at least partially, explained by the inhibition of DPP-IV. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an initial set of 29,779 natural products that are annotated with their natural source and an experimentally validated virtual screening procedure previously developed in our lab (Guasch et al.; 2012) [1], we have predicted 12 potential DPP-IV inhibitors from 12 different plant extracts that are known to have antidiabetic activity. Seven of these molecules are identical or similar to molecules with described antidiabetic activity (although their role as DPP-IV inhibitors has not been suggested as an explanation for their bioactivity). Therefore, it is plausible that these 12 molecules could be responsible, at least in part, for the antidiabetic activity of these extracts through their inhibitory effect on DPP-IV. In addition, we also identified as potential DPP-IV inhibitors 6 molecules from 6 different plants with no described antidiabetic activity but that share the same genus as plants with known antidiabetic properties. Moreover, none of the 18 molecules that we predicted as DPP-IV inhibitors exhibits chemical similarity with a group of 2,342 known DPP-IV inhibitors. Conclusions/Significance Our study identified 18 potential DPP-IV inhibitors in 18 different plant extracts (12 of these plants have known antidiabetic properties, whereas, for the remaining 6, antidiabetic activity has been reported for other plant species from the same genus). Moreover, none of the 18 molecules exhibits chemical similarity with a large group of known DPP-IV inhibitors. PMID:23028712

  18. Source apportionment of airborne fine particulate matter in an underground mine.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jacob D; Zielinska, Barbara; Sagebiel, John C; McDaniel, Mark R; Mousset-Jones, Pierre

    2003-04-01

    The chemical mass balance source apportionment technique was applied to an underground gold mine to assess the contribution of diesel exhaust, rock dust, oil mists, and cigarette smoke to airborne fine (<2.5 microm) particulate matter (PM). Apportionments were conducted in two locations in the mine, one near the mining operations and one near the exit of the mine where the ventilated mine air was exhausted. Results showed that diesel exhaust contributed 78-98% of the fine particulate mass and greater than 90% of the fine particle carbon, with rock dust making up the remainder. Oil mists and cigarette smoke contributions were below detection limits for this study. The diesel exhaust fraction of the total fine PM was higher than the recently implemented mine air quality standards based on total carbon at both sample locations in the mine. PMID:12708502

  19. Comparison of sulfur measurements from a regional fine particle network with concurrent acid modes network results

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.L.; Stockburger, L.; Barnes, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 micrometers) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Enviromental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during the two year period in 1988-90. The 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the most predominant chemical element concentrations determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis. Statistical summaries of the fine mass and sulfur concentrations by site and season were prepared. The availability of simultaneous particulate sulfate measurements from independent collection and analytical procedures provided an opportunity to examine their agreement and provide a more reliable data base for evaluation of regional particulate models and estimation of contribution to urban aerosol concentration.

  20. High energy collimating fine grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrieta, Victor M.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Laferla, Raffaele

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the fabrication of extremely tight tolerance collimating grids using a high-Z material, specifically tungsten. The approach taken was to fabricate grids by a replication method involving the coating of a silicon grid substrate with tungsten by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A negative of the desired grid structure was fabricated in silicon using highly wafering techniques developed for the semiconductor industry and capable of producing the required tolerances. Using diamond wafering blades, a network of accurately spaced slots was machined into a single-crystal silicon surface. These slots were then filled with tungsten by CVD, via the hydrogen reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Following tungsten deposition, the silicon negative was etched away to leave the tungsten collimating grid structure. The project was divided into five tasks: (1) identify materials of construction for the replica and final collimating grid structures; (2) identify and implement a micromachining technique for manufacturing the negative collimator replicas (performed by NASA/JPL); (3) develop a CVD technique and processing parameters suitable for the complete tungsten densification of the collimator replicas; (4) develop a chemical etching technique for the removal of the collimator replicas after the tungsten deposition process; and (5) fabricate and deliver tungsten collimating grid specimens.

  1. GSFC IVS Technology Development Center Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himwich, Ed; Vandenberg, Nancy; Clark, Tom

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC's) International Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) Service (IVS)Technology Development Center from the establishment of IVS to the end of 2000. The report forecasts activities planned for the year 2001. The GSFC IVS Technology Development Center (TDC) develops station software including the Field System (FS), scheduling software (SKED), hardware including tools for station timing and meteorology, scheduling algorithms, operational procedures, and provides a pool of individuals to assist with station implementation, check-out, upgrades, and training.

  2. Phospholipids accumulation in mucolipidosis IV cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bargal, R; Bach, G

    1988-01-01

    Cultured fibroblasts from mucolipidosis IV patients accumulated phospholipids when compared to normal controls or cells from other genotypes. The major stored compounds were identified as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and to a larger extent lysophosphatidylcholine and lysobisphosphatidic acid. Pulse chase experiments of 32P-labelled phospholipids showed increased retention of these compounds in the mucolipidosis IV lines throughout the pulse and chase periods. Phospholipase A1, A2, C, D and lysophospholipase showed normal activity in the mucolipidosis IV lines and thus the metabolic cause for this storage remains to be identified. PMID:3139925

  3. Human fine body hair enhances ectoparasite detection

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Isabelle; Siva-Jothy, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Although we are relatively naked in comparison with other primates, the human body is covered in a layer of fine hair (vellus and terminal hair) at a relatively high follicular density. There are relatively few explanations for the evolutionary maintenance of this type of human hair. Here, we experimentally test the hypothesis that human fine body hair plays a defensive function against ectoparasites (bed bugs). Our results show that fine body hair enhances the detection of ectoparasites through the combined effects of (i) increasing the parasite's search time and (ii) enhancing its detection. PMID:22171023

  4. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... enzymes, GAGs accumulate within cells, specifically inside the lysosomes . Lysosomes are compartments in the cell that break down ... that cause molecules to build up inside the lysosomes are called lysosomal storage disorders. In MPS IV, ...

  5. IV&V Project Assessment Process Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driskell, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) will launch NASA's Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). This launch vehicle will provide American launch capability for human exploration and travelling beyond Earth orbit. SLS is designed to be flexible for crew or cargo missions. The first test flight is scheduled for December 2017. The SLS SRR/SDR provided insight into the project development life cycle. NASA IV&V ran the standard Risk Based Assessment and Portfolio Based Risk Assessment to identify analysis tasking for the SLS program. This presentation examines the SLS System Requirements Review/System Definition Review (SRR/SDR), IV&V findings for IV&V process validation correlation to/from the selected IV&V tasking and capabilities. It also provides a reusable IEEE 1012 scorecard for programmatic completeness across the software development life cycle.

  6. Optimizing IV and V for Mature Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhman, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    NASA is intending for its future software development agencies to have at least a Level 3 rating in the Carnegie Mellon University Capability Maturity Model (CMM). The CMM has built-in Verification and Validation (V&V) processes that support higher software quality. Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of software developed by mature agencies can be therefore more effective than for software developed by less mature organizations. How is Independent V&V different with respect to the maturity of an organization? Knowing a priori the maturity of an organization's processes, how can IV&V planners better identify areas of need choose IV&V activities, etc? The objective of this research is to provide a complementary set of guidelines and criteria to assist the planning of IV&V activities on a project using a priori knowledge of the measurable levels of maturity of the organization developing the software.

  7. Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  8. DESIGN INFORMATION ON FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted over several years at municipal wastewater treatment plants employing line pore diffused aeration systems. These studies were designed to produce reliable information on the performance and operational requirements of fine pore devices under process ...

  9. TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF FINE BUBBLE AERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technology assessment addresses design and evaluation of fine bubble aeration equipment. It discusses the associated gas transfer theory used as the basis for measuring water and wastewater oxygenation efficiency. Mixing requirements are also discussed. While bubble aeration...

  10. Fine needle aspiration of the thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid nodule fine needle aspirate biopsy; Biopsy - thyroid - skinny-needle; Skinny-needle thyroid biopsy ... cleaned. A thin needle is inserted into the thyroid, and a sample of thyroid cells and fluid ...

  11. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-04-06

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

  12. DESIGN MANUAL: FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual presents the best current practices for selecting, designing, operating, maintaining, and controlling fine pore aeration systems used in the treatment of municipal wastewater. It was prepared by the American Society of Civil Engineers Committee on Oxygen Transfer unde...

  13. Fine needle aspiration of the thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid nodule fine needle aspirate biopsy; Biopsy - thyroid - skinny-needle; Skinny-needle thyroid biopsy ... under your shoulders and your neck extended. The biopsy site is cleaned. A thin needle is inserted ...

  14. The Protonation States of Oxo-Bridged MnIV-Dimers Resolved by Experimental and Computational Mn K Pre-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Krewald, Vera; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Boron, Thaddeus T.; Pollock, Christopher J.; Kern, Jan; Beckwith, Martha A.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.; Yano, Junko; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2013-01-01

    In nature, the protonation of oxo bridges is a commonly encountered mechanism for fine-tuning chemical properties and reaction pathways. Often, however, the protonation states are difficult to establish experimentally. This is of particular importance in the oxygen evolving complex of Photosystem II, where identification of the bridging oxo protonation states is one of the essential requirements toward unraveling the mechanism. In order to establish a combined experimental and theoretical protocol for the determination of protonation states, we have systematically investigated a series of Mn model complexes by Mn K pre-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. An ideal test case for selective bis-μ-oxo-bridge protonation in a Mn-dimer is represented by the system [MnIV2(salpn)2(μ-OH(n))2](n+). Although the three species [MnIV2(salpn)2(μ-O)2], [MnIV2(salpn)2(μ-O)(μ-OH)]+ and [MnIV2(salpn)2(μ-OH)2]2+ differ only in the protonation of the oxo bridges, they exhibit distinct differences in the pre-edge region while maintaining the same edge energy. The experimental spectra are correlated in detail to theoretical ly calculated spectra. A time-dependent density functional theory approach for calculating the pre-edge spectra of molecules with multiple metal centers is presented, using both high-spin (HS) and broken-symmetry (BS) electronic structure solutions. The most intense pre-edge transitions correspond to an excitation of the Mn-1s core electrons into the unoccupied orbitals of local eg character (dz2 and dxy based in the chosen coordinate system). The lowest by energy experimental feature is dominated by excitations of 1s-α electrons and the second observed feature is primarily attributed to 1s-β electron excitations. The observed energetic separation is due to spin polarization effects in spin-unrestricted density functional theory and models final state multiplet effects. The effects of spin polarization on the calculated Mn K pre-edge spectra, in both the HS

  15. [Pu(IV) behavior in the serum].

    PubMed

    Surova, Z I

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the results of studies of the hydrolysis and polymerization of Pu(IV) in blood serum. With nitrite Pu(IV) solutions incubated with blood serum 20-34% of the nuclide were precipitated as hydroxide and 11-36% converted into polymeric forms bound by high molecular weight proteins. For citrate solutions, these values were 3.8 and 3.0%, respectively. PMID:6505160

  16. Group-IV midinfrared plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, Paolo; Frigerio, Jacopo; Samarelli, Antonio; Gallacher, Kevin; Baldassarre, Leonetta; Sakat, Emilie; Calandrini, Eugenio; Millar, Ross W.; Giliberti, Valeria; Isella, Giovanni; Paul, Douglas J.; Ortolani, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The use of heavily doped semiconductors to achieve plasma frequencies in the mid-IR has been recently proposed as a promising way to obtain high-quality and tunable plasmonic materials. We introduce a plasmonic platform based on epitaxial n-type Ge grown on standard Si wafers by means of low-energy plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Due to the large carrier concentration achieved with P dopants and to the compatibility with the existing CMOS technology, SiGe plasmonics hold promises for mid-IR applications in optoelectronics, IR detection, sensing, and light harvesting. As a representative example, we show simulations of mid-IR plasmonic waveguides based on the experimentally retrieved dielectric constants of the grown materials.

  17. Chemical Properties of Combustion Aerosols: An Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of pyrogenic and anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is remarkably complex. ...

  18. Interaction of fine sediment with alluvial streambeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, H.E.; Carey, W.P.

    1989-01-01

    An alluvial streambed can have a large capacity to store fine sediments that are extracted from the flow when instream concentrations are high and it can gradually release fine sediment to the flow when the instream concentrations are low. Several types of storage mechanisms are available depending on the relative size distribution of the suspended load and bed material, as well as the flow hydraulics. -from Authors

  19. NUMERICAL MODELING OF FINE SEDIMENT PHYSICAL PROCESSES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1985-01-01

    Fine sediment in channels, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters undergo several physical processes including flocculation, floc disruption, deposition, bed consolidation, and resuspension. This paper presents a conceptual model and reviews mathematical models of these physical processes. Several general fine sediment models that simulate some of these processes are reviewed. These general models do not directly simulate flocculation and floc disruption, but the conceptual model and existing functions are shown to adequately model these two processes for one set of laboratory data.

  20. Uptake of Np(IV) by C-S-H phases and cement paste: an EXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Gaona, Xavier; Dähn, Rainer; Tits, Jan; Scheinost, Andreas C; Wieland, Erich

    2011-10-15

    Nuclear waste disposal concepts developed worldwide foresee the use of cementitious materials for the immobilization of long-lived intermediate level waste (ILW). This waste form may contain significant amounts of neptunium-237, which is expected to be present as Np(IV) under the reducing conditions encountered after the closure of the repository. Predicting the release of Np(IV) from the cementitious near field of an ILW repository requires a sufficiently detailed understanding of its interaction with the main sorbing components of hardened cement paste (HCP). In this study, the uptake of Np(IV) by calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) and HCP has been investigated using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The EXAFS studies on Np(IV)-doped C-S-H and HCP samples reveal that Np(IV) is predominantly incorporated in the structure of C-S-H phases having different Ca:Si ratios. The two main species identified correspond to Np(IV) in C-S-H with a Ca:Si mol ratio of 1.65 as in fresh cement and with a Ca:Si mol ratio of 0.75 as in highly degraded cement. The local structure of Np(IV) changes with the Ca:Si mol ratio and does not depend on pH. Furthermore, Np(IV) shows the same coordination environment in C-S-H and HCP samples. This study shows that C-S-H phases are responsible for the Np(IV) uptake by cementitious materials and further that incorporation in the interlayer of the C-S-H structure is the dominant uptake mechanism. PMID:21879756

  1. FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS INFORMATION SYSTEM: SUMMARY REPORT (SUMMER 1976)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the initial loading of data into the Fine Particle Emissions Information System (FPEIS), a computerized database on primary fine particle emissions to the atmosphere from stationary sources, designed to assist engineers and scientists engaged in fine particl...

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid An ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy ... Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? During a fine needle aspiration ...

  3. MECHANISMS BY WHICH ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE PARTICLES CAUSE ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small number of recent studies suggest that different size particles may cause different health effects. There are clearly differences in the chemical makeup of coarse, fine, and ultrafine particles, and this different chemistry may well drive different health responses. The ...

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF FINE PARTICLE ASSOCIATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON AND DEVELOPMENT OF STANDARD REFERENCE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic chemicals adsorbed to fine particulate matter (PM) in the ambient air account for a major component of the mass and include source tracers as well as toxic compounds that may contribute to adverse human health effects. The US EPA has established a PM 2.5 research progr...

  5. Experimental Study of the Possibility to Make a Mortar with Ternary Sand (Natural and Artificial Fine Aggregates)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baali, L.; Naceri, A.; Rahmouni, Z.; Mehidi, M. W. Noui

    This experimental study investigates the possibility to make a mortar with a ternary sand (natural and artificial fine aggregates). This method is utilized to correct the particle size distribution of various sands used in mortar. For this investigation, three sands have been used: a dune sand (DS), a slag sand (SS), and brick sand (BS) at different proportions in mortar. After crushing, the artificial fine aggregate (blast furnace slag and waste brick fine aggregate) was sifted in order to use it as fine aggregate. The effect of the quality and grain size distribution of natural fine aggregate (i.e., DS) and artificial fine aggregates (i.e., SS and BS) on the physical properties of ternary sand confected (density, porosity, fineness modulus, equivalent sand, particle size distribution, water absorption) and properties of fresh and hardened mortar were analysed. In the same way for this study, the physical properties and chemical compositions of DS, SS, BS and cement were investigated. The results obtained show that the mechanical strength on mortar depends of the nature and particle size distribution of sand studied. The reuse of this recycled material (slag blast furnace and waste brick) in the industry would contribute to the protection of the environment. This study shows the potential of this method to make mortar with ternary sand (natural and artificial fine aggreagates) in order to improve the physical properties of sand. Utilising natural and artificial fine aggregates to produce quality mortar should yield significant environmental benefits.

  6. Emissions of fine particle fluoride from biomass burning.

    PubMed

    Jayarathne, Thilina; Stockwell, Chelsea E; Yokelson, Robert J; Nakao, Shunsuke; Stone, Elizabeth A

    2014-11-01

    The burning of biomasses releases fluorine to the atmosphere, representing a major and previously uncharacterized flux of this atmospheric pollutant. Emissions of fine particle (PM2.5) water-soluble fluoride (F-) from biomass burning were evaluated during the fourth Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-IV) using scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and ion chromatography with conductivity detection. F- was detected in 100% of the PM2.5 emissions from conifers (n=11), 94% of emissions from agricultural residues (n=16), and 36% of the grasses and other perennial plants (n=14). When F- was quantified, it accounted for an average (±standard error) of 0.13±0.02% of PM2.5. F- was not detected in remaining samples (n=15) collected from peat burning, shredded tire combustion, and cook-stove emissions. Emission factors (EF) of F- emitted per kilogram of biomass burned correlated with emissions of PM2.5 and combustion efficiency, and also varied with the type of biomass burned and the geographic location where it was harvested. Based on recent evaluations of global biomass burning, we estimate that biomass burning releases 76 Gg F- yr(-1) to the atmosphere, with upper and lower bounds of 40-150 Gg F- yr(-1). The estimated F- flux from biomass burning is comparable to total fluorine emissions from coal combustion plus other anthropogenic sources. These data demonstrate that biomass burning represents a major source of fluorine to the atmosphere in the form of fine particles, which have potential to undergo long-range transport. PMID:25275955

  7. Complexation Behavior of the Tri-n-butyl Phosphate Ligand with Pu(IV) and Zr(IV): A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Gopakumar, Gopinadhanpillai; Sreenivasulu, B; Suresh, A; Brahmmananda Rao, C V S; Sivaraman, N; Joseph, M; Anoop, Anakuthil

    2016-06-23

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), used as the extractant in nuclear fuel reprocessing, shows superior extraction abilities for Pu(IV) over a large number of fission products including Zr(IV). We have applied density functional theory (DFT) calculations to explain this selectivity by investigating differences in electronic structures of Pu(NO3)4·2TBP and Zr(NO3)4·2TBP complexes. On the basis of our quantum chemical calculations, we have established the lowest energy electronic states for both complexes; the quintet is the ground state for the former, whereas the latter exists in the singlet spin state. The calculated structural parameters for the optimized geometry of the plutonium complex are in agreement with the experimental results. Atoms in Molecules analysis revealed a considerable amount of ionic character to M-O{TBP} and M-O{NO3} bonds. Additionally, we have also investigated the extraction behavior of TBP for metal nitrates and have estimated the extraction energies to be -73.1 and -57.6 kcal/mol for Pu(IV) and Zr(IV), respectively. The large extraction energy of Pu(IV) system is in agreement with the observed selectivity in the extraction of Pu. PMID:27248966

  8. Relative Reactivity of Biogenic and Chemogenic Uraninite and Biogenic Non Crystalline U(IV)

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, José M.; Ashner, Matthew N.; Alessi, Daniel S.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Bargar, John R.; Giammar, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous chemical extractions and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analyses were conducted to investigate the reactivity of chemogenic uraninite, nanoparticulate biogenic uraninite, and biogenic monomeric U(IV) species. The analyses were conducted in systems containing a total U concentration that ranged from 1.48 to 2.10 mM. Less than 0.02% of the total U was released to solution in extractions that targeted water soluble and ion exchangeable fractions. Less than 5% of the total U was solubilized via complexation with a 0.1 M solution of NaF. Greater than 90% of the total U was extracted from biogenic uraninite and monomeric U(IV) after 6 hours of reaction in an oxidizing solution of 50 mM K2S2O8. Additional oxidation experiments with lower concentrations (2 mM and 10 mM) of K2S2O8 and 8.2 mg L−1 dissolved oxygen suggested that monomeric U(IV) species are more labile than biogenic uraninite; chemogenic uraninite was much less susceptible to oxidation than either form of biogenic U(IV). These results suggest that non-crystalline forms of U(IV) may be more labile than uraninite in subsurface environments. This work helps fill critical gaps in our understanding of the behavior of solid-associated U(IV) species in bioremediated sites and natural uranium ore deposits. PMID:23906226

  9. Modification of collagen IV by glucose or methylglyoxal alters distinct mesangial cell functions.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Ambra; Zent, Roy; Chetyrkin, Sergei; Borza, Corina; Bulus, Nada; Chuang, Peale; Chen, Dong; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2009-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) affects both glomerular cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM), yet the pathogenic mechanisms involving cell-matrix interactions are poorly understood. Glycation alters integrin-dependent cell-ECM interactions, and perturbation of these interactions results in severe renal pathology in diabetic animals. Here, we investigated how chemical modifications of the ECM by hyperglycemia and carbonyl stress, two major features of the diabetic milieu, affect mesangial cell functions. Incubation of collagen IV with pathophysiological levels of either the carbonyl compound methylglyoxal (MGO) or glucose resulted in modification of arginine or lysine residues, respectively. Mouse mesangial cells plated on MGO-modified collagen IV showed decreased adhesion and migration. Cells plated on glucose-modified collagen IV showed reduced proliferation and migration and increased collagen IV production. Inhibiting glucose-mediated oxidative modification of collagen IV lysine residues rescued the alterations in cell growth, migration, and collagen synthesis. We propose that diabetic ECM affects mesangial cell functions via two distinct mechanisms: modification of arginine residues by MGO inhibits cell adhesion, whereas oxidative modification of lysine residues by glucose inhibits cell proliferation and increases collagen IV production. These mechanisms may contribute to mesangial cell hypertrophy and matrix expansion in DN. PMID:19608705

  10. Modification of Collagen IV by Glucose or Methylglyoxal Alters Distinct Mesangial Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Ambra; Zent, Roy; Chetyrkin, Sergei; Borza, Corina; Bulus, Nada; Chuang, Peale; Chen, Dong; Hudson, Billy

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) affects both glomerular cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM), yet the pathogenic mechanisms involving cell-matrix interactions are poorly understood. Glycation alters integrin-dependent cell-ECM interactions, and perturbation of these interactions results in severe renal pathology in diabetic animals. Here, we investigated how chemical modifications of the ECM by hyperglycemia and carbonyl stress, two major features of the diabetic milieu, affect mesangial cell functions. Incubation of collagen IV with pathophysiological levels of either the carbonyl compound methylglyoxal (MGO) or glucose resulted in modification of arginine or lysine residues, respectively. Mouse mesangial cells plated on MGO-modified collagen IV showed decreased adhesion and migration. Cells plated on glucose-modified collagen IV showed reduced proliferation and migration and increased collagen IV production. Inhibiting glucose-mediated oxidative modification of collagen IV lysine residues rescued the alterations in cell growth, migration, and collagen synthesis. We propose that diabetic ECM affects mesangial cell functions via two distinct mechanisms: modification of arginine residues by MGO inhibits cell adhesion, whereas oxidative modification of lysine residues by glucose inhibits cell proliferation and increases collagen IV production. These mechanisms may contribute to mesangial cell hypertrophy and matrix expansion in DN. PMID:19608705

  11. Determination of uranium(IV) by derivative spectrophotometry of its complexes with hydroethylidenediphosphomic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Perfil'ev, V.A.; Mishchenko, V.T.; Poluektov, N.S.

    1985-05-20

    This paper reports on a study of the spectral characteristics of complex compounds of uranium-(IV) with a ligand containing the phosphonic groups - hydroxyethyllidenediphosphonic acid (HEDPA) - and its possible use for analysis. The method of derivative spectrophotometry has been used since absorption bands corresponding to a mixture of compounds can thus be resolved into absorption bands of the individual components, and their fine structure can be studied. The method ensures accuracy and reproducibility of the analysis of the mixture of compounds. It was found that, depending on the ratio of the components in the solution, compounds with composition of U(IV) . HEDPA . and U(IV) . 2 HEDPA are formed. It is shown that the complexes studied can be used for the determination of uraniun(IV) in pure salts (C /SUB min/ = 0.05 ..mu..g/ml) and also in the presence of iron (II) ions. In this latter case, the second derivatives of the absorption spectra were used.

  12. Hydration structures of U(III) and U(IV) ions from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2012-08-21

    We apply DFT+U-based ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to study the hydration structures of U(III) and U(IV) ions, pertinent to redox reactions associated with uranium salts in aqueous media. U(III) is predicted to be coordinated to 8 water molecules, while U(IV) has a hydration number between 7 and 8. At least one of the innershell water molecules of the hydrated U(IV) complex becomes spontaneously deprotonated. As a result, the U(IV)-O pair correlation function exhibits a satellite peak at 2.15 A associated with the shorter U(IV)-(OH{sup -}) bond. This feature is not accounted for in analysis of extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray adsorption near edge structure measurements, which yield higher estimates of U(IV) hydration numbers. This suggests that it may be useful to include the effect of possible hydrolysis in future interpretation of experiments, especially when the experimental pH is close to the reported hydrolysis equilibrium constant value.

  13. Fine Shades of a Sombrero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    In addition to their scientific value, many of the exposures now being obtained by visiting astronomers to ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) are also very beautiful. This is certainly true for this new image of the famous early-type spiral galaxy Messier 104 , widely known as the "Sombrero" (the Mexican hat) because of its particular shape. The colour image was made by a combination of three CCD images from the FORS1 multi-mode instrument on VLT ANTU , recently obtained by Peter Barthel from the Kapteyn Institute (Groningen, The Netherlands) during an observing run at the Paranal Observatory. He and Mark Neeser , also from the Kapteyn Institute, produced the composite images. The galaxy fits perfectly into the 6.8 x 6.8 arcmin 2 field-of-view of the FORS1 camera. A great amount of fine detail is revealed, from the structures in the pronounced dust band in the equatorial plane, to many faint background galaxies that shine through the outer regions. The "Sombrero" is located in the constellation Virgo (The Virgin), at a distance of about 50 million light-years. The overall "sharpness" of this colour image corresponds to about 0.7 arcsec which translates into a resolution of about 170 light-years at that distance. About Messier 104 Messier 104 is the 104th object in the famous catalogue of nebulae by French astronomer Charles Messier (1730 - 1817). It was not included in the first two editions (with 45 objects in 1774; 103 in 1781), but Messier soon thereafter added it by hand in his personal copy as a "very faint nebula". The recession velocity, about 1000 km/sec, was first measured by American astronomer Vesto M. Slipher at the Lowell Observatory in 1912; he was also the first to detect the galaxy's rotation. ESO Press Photo 07c/00 ESO Press Photo 07c/00 [Preview; JPEG: 400 x 307; 59k] [Normal; JPEG: 800 x 614; 308k] [Full-Res; JPEG: 2028 x 1556; 2.3Mb] PR Photo 07c/00 has been processed to show the numerous dust bands in the central plane of the Sombrero galaxy (see

  14. Fine Shades of a Sombrero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    In addition to their scientific value, many of the exposures now being obtained by visiting astronomers to ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) are also very beautiful. This is certainly true for this new image of the famous early-type spiral galaxy Messier 104 , widely known as the "Sombrero" (the Mexican hat) because of its particular shape. The colour image was made by a combination of three CCD images from the FORS1 multi-mode instrument on VLT ANTU , recently obtained by Peter Barthel from the Kapteyn Institute (Groningen, The Netherlands) during an observing run at the Paranal Observatory. He and Mark Neeser , also from the Kapteyn Institute, produced the composite images. The galaxy fits perfectly into the 6.8 x 6.8 arcmin 2 field-of-view of the FORS1 camera. A great amount of fine detail is revealed, from the structures in the pronounced dust band in the equatorial plane, to many faint background galaxies that shine through the outer regions. The "Sombrero" is located in the constellation Virgo (The Virgin), at a distance of about 50 million light-years. The overall "sharpness" of this colour image corresponds to about 0.7 arcsec which translates into a resolution of about 170 light-years at that distance. About Messier 104 Messier 104 is the 104th object in the famous catalogue of nebulae by French astronomer Charles Messier (1730 - 1817). It was not included in the first two editions (with 45 objects in 1774; 103 in 1781), but Messier soon thereafter added it by hand in his personal copy as a "very faint nebula". The recession velocity, about 1000 km/sec, was first measured by American astronomer Vesto M. Slipher at the Lowell Observatory in 1912; he was also the first to detect the galaxy's rotation. ESO Press Photo 07c/00 ESO Press Photo 07c/00 [Preview; JPEG: 400 x 307; 59k] [Normal; JPEG: 800 x 614; 308k] [Full-Res; JPEG: 2028 x 1556; 2.3Mb] PR Photo 07c/00 has been processed to show the numerous dust bands in the central plane of the Sombrero galaxy (see

  15. Irradiation effects in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys for Gen. IV nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oono, Naoko; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kondo, Sosuke; Hashitomi, Okinobu; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    Oxide particle dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys are irradiated by using simulation technique (Fe/He dual-ion irradiation) to investigate the reliability to Gen. IV high-temperature reactors. The fine oxide particles with less than 10 nm in average size and approximately 8.0 × 1022 m-3 in number density remained after 101 dpa irradiation. The tiny helium bubbles were inside grains, not at grain-boundaries; it is advantageous effect of oxide particles which trap the helium atoms at the particle-matrix interface. Ni-base ODS alloys demonstrated their great ability to overcome He embrittlement.

  16. Briquetting of fine coal with a binder

    SciTech Connect

    Young, B.C.

    1996-12-31

    The increased level of fines generated by mechanized mining and modem cleaning techniques for coal is a major problem in terms of lost revenue and their potential negative impact on the environment. The largest volume of fines generation occurs in the mining and preparation of high-rank coal. Handeability issues often result from the amount of wet fines remaining from coal cleaning. Consequently, large stockpiles or tailings darns, frequently containing high-quality coal, especially from the less efficient coal preparation plants, are a tremendous resource for briquetting and, in particular, for niche markets such as stoker fuels. Herein lies the challenge to recover the huge coal fines resource cost-effectively. The use of binders in briquetting fine coal has had a long history, virtually as long as that of briquetting itself. The purpose of using a binder is to form a strong, durable, and stable agglomerated product from fine coal particles, using the minimum quantity of the least expensive suitable binder. Numerous binders have been utilized, including naturally available materials, waste residues, and synthetically or specially derived materials. Several attempts have been made to categorize binders according to form, type, function, or underlying mechanistic action. From a practical viewpoint, the selection of a binder depends on at least the following factors: nature of the bonding process, imparted strength, water resistance, handling durability, benign environmental properties, quantity required, cost, and the end application for the coal briquettes. Assuming binder compatibility with the coal, it is the cost that is probably the limiting factor in commercial briquetting of coal with a binder. This paper addresses the technical and economic issues of fine coal recovery with the aid of binder briquetting technology and illustrates the potential of the latter with project examples.

  17. Dynamic Reorganization and Enzymatic Remodeling of Type IV Collagen at Cell-Biomaterial Interface.

    PubMed

    Coelho, N M; Llopis-Hernández, V; Salmerón-Sánchez, M; Altankov, G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular basement membrane remodeling involves assembly and degradation of its main constituents, type IV collagen (Col IV) and laminin, which is critical during development, angiogenesis, and tissue repair. Remodeling can also occur at cell-biomaterials interface altering significantly the biocompatibility of implants. Here we describe the fate of adsorbed Col IV in contact with endothelial cells adhering on positively charged NH2 or hydrophobic CH3 substrata, both based on self-assembly monolayers (SAMs) and studied alone or mixed in different proportions. AFM studies revealed distinct pattern of adsorbed Col IV, varying from single molecular deposition on pure NH2 to network-like assembly on mixed SAMs, turning to big globular aggregates on bare CH3. Human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) interact better with Col IV adsorbed as single molecules on NH2 surface and readily rearrange it in fibril-like pattern that coincide with secreted fibronectin fibrils. The cells show flattened morphology and well-developed focal adhesion complexes that are rich on phosphorylated FAK while expressing markedly low pericellular proteolytic activity. Conversely, on hydrophobic CH3 substrata HUVECs showed abrogated spreading and FAK phosphorylation, combined with less reorganization of the aggregated Col IV and significantly increased proteolytic activity. The later involves both MMP-2 and MMP-9, as measured by zymography and FITC-Col IV release. The mixed SAMs support intermediate remodeling activity. Taken together these results show that chemical functionalization combined with Col IV preadsorption provides a tool for guiding the endothelial cells behavior and pericellular proteolytic activity, events that strongly affect the fate of cardiovascular implants. PMID:27567485

  18. Mathematics Achievement, Comparative Study Phase IV IGE Evaluation Project. Phase IV, Project Paper 80-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Norman L.; Nerenz, Anne G.

    This is one of a series of reports which provide definitions of and descriptive data on the variables used in the Comparative Study of Phase IV of the Individually Guided Education (IEG) Evaluation Project. Phase IV investigated three curriculum programs specifically designed to be compatible with instructional programming for the individual…

  19. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Delyana I.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Schindler, Dwayne; Messier, Claude

    2013-01-01

    New editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence and Memory scales are now available. Yet, given the significant changes in these new releases and the skepticism that has met them, independent evidence on their psychometric properties is much needed but currently lacking. We administered the WAIS-IV and the Older Adult version of the WMS-IV to 145…

  20. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 150 - Data Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Data Sheet IV Appendix IV to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 150—Data Sheet EC02FE91.080 EC02FE91.081...

  1. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 150 - Data Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Data Sheet IV Appendix IV to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 150—Data Sheet EC02FE91.080 EC02FE91.081...

  2. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 150 - Data Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Data Sheet IV Appendix IV to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 150—Data Sheet EC02FE91.080 EC02FE91.081...

  3. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 150 - Data Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Data Sheet IV Appendix IV to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 150—Data Sheet EC02FE91.080 EC02FE91.081...

  4. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 150 - Data Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Data Sheet IV Appendix IV to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 150—Data Sheet EC02FE91.080 EC02FE91.081...

  5. 45 CFR 1355.21 - E and IV-B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    1996-10-01

    ... compliance with the Department's regulations listed in 45 CFR 1355.30. (c) The State plans and plan... requirements for titles IV PUBLIC WELFARE Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN.... 1355.21 State plan requirements for titles IV-E and IV-B. (a) The State plans for titles IV-E and...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 265 - Tests for Significance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tests for Significance IV Appendix IV to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Pt. 265, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 265—Tests for Significance As required in §...

  7. Photoactivation of Diiodido-Pt(IV) Complexes Coupled to Upconverting Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Perfahl, Stefanie; Natile, Marta M; Mohamad, Heba S; Helm, Christiane A; Schulzke, Carola; Natile, Giovanni; Bednarski, Patrick J

    2016-07-01

    The preparation, characterization, and surface modification of upconverting lanthanide-doped hexagonal NaGdF4 nanocrystals attached to light sensitive diiodido-Pt(IV) complexes is presented. The evaluation for photoactivation and cytotoxicity of the novel carboxylated diiodido-Pt(IV) cytotoxic prodrugs by near-infrared (NIR) light (λ = 980 nm) is also reported. We attempted two different strategies for attachment of light-sensitive diiodido-Pt(IV) complexes to Yb,Er- and Yb,Tm-doped β-NaGdF4 upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) in order to provide nanohybrids, which offer unique opportunities for selective drug activation within the tumor cells and subsequent spatiotemporal controlled drug release by NIR-to-visible light-upconversion: (A) covalent attachment of the Pt(IV) complex via amide bond formation and (B) carboxylate exchange of oleate on the surface of the UCNPs with diiodido-Pt(IV) carboxylato complexes. Initial feasibility studies showed that NIR applied by a 980 nm laser had only a slight effect on the stability of the various diiodido-Pt(IV) complexes, but when UCNPs were present more rapid loss of the ligand-metal-charge transfer (LMCT) bands of the diiodido-Pt(IV) complexes was observed. Furthermore, Pt released from the Pt(IV) complexes platinated calf-thymus DNA (ct-DNA) more rapidly when NIR was applied compared to dark controls. Of the two attachment strategies, method A with the covalently attached diiodido-Pt(IV) carboxylates via amide bond formation proved to be the most effective method for generating UCNPs that release Pt when irradiated with NIR; the released Pt was also able to bind irreversibly to calf thymus DNA. Nonetheless, only ca. 20% of the Pt on the surface of the UCNPs was in the Pt(IV) oxidation state, the rest was Pt(II), indicating chemical reduction of the diiodido-Pt(IV) prodrug by the UCNPs. Cytotoxicity studies with the various UCNP-Pt conjugates and constructs, tested on human leukemia HL60 cells in culture, indicated a

  8. High resolution observations with Artemis-IV and the NRH. I. Type IV associated narrow-band bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouratzis, C.; Hillaris, A.; Alissandrakis, C. E.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Moussas, X.; Caroubalos, C.; Tsitsipis, P.; Kontogeorgos, A.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Narrow-band bursts appear on dynamic spectra from microwave to decametric frequencies as fine structures with very small duration and bandwidth. They are believed to be manifestations of small scale energy release through magnetic reconnection. Aims: We analyzed 27 metric type IV events with embedded narrow-band bursts, which were observed by the ARTEMIS-IV radio spectrograph from 30 June 1999 to 1 August 2010. We examined the morphological characteristics of isolated narrow-band structures (mostly spikes) and groups or chains of structures. Methods: The events were recorded with the SAO high resolution (10 ms cadence) receiver of ARTEMIS-IV in the 270-450 MHz range. We measured the duration, spectral width, and frequency drift of ~12 000 individual narrow-band bursts, groups, and chains. Spike sources were imaged with the Nançay radioheliograph (NRH) for the event of 21 April 2003. Results: The mean duration of individual bursts at fixed frequency was ~100 ms, while the instantaneous relative bandwidth was ~2%. Some bursts had measurable frequency drift, either positive or negative. Quite often spikes appeared in chains, which were closely spaced in time (column chains) or in frequency (row chains). Column chains had frequency drifts similar to type-IIId bursts, while most of the row chains exhibited negative frequently drifts with a rate close to that of fiber bursts. From the analysis of NRH data, we found that spikes were superimposed on a larger, slowly varying, background component. They were polarized in the same sense as the background source, with a slightly higher degree of polarization of ~65%, and their size was about 60% of their size in total intensity. Conclusions: The duration and bandwidth distributions did not show any clear separation in groups. Some chains tended to assume the form of zebra, lace stripes, fiber bursts, or bursts of the type-III family, suggesting that such bursts might be resolved in spikes when viewed with high

  9. Seafloor earthquake measurement system, SEMS IV

    SciTech Connect

    Platzbecker, M.R.; Ehasz, J.P.; Franco, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    Staff of the Telemetry Technology Development Department (2664) have, in support of the U.S. Interior Department Mineral Management Services (MMS), developed and deployed the Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System IV (SEMS IV). The result of this development project is a series of three fully operational seafloor seismic monitor systems located at offshore platforms: Eureka, Grace, and Irene. The instrument probes are embedded from three to seven feet into the seafloor and hardwired to seismic data recorders installed top side at the offshore platforms. The probes and underwater cables were designed to survive the seafloor environment with an operation life of five years. The units have been operational for two years and have produced recordings of several minor earthquakes in that time. Sandia Labs will transfer operation of SEMS IV to MMS contractors in the coming months. 29 figs., 25 tabs.

  10. Fines in fluidized bed silane pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G.; Hogle, R.; Rohatgi, N.; Morrison, A.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon deposition on silicon seed particles by silane pyrolysis in a fluidized-bed reactor is investigated as a low-cost, high-throughput method to produce high-purity polysilicon for solar-cell applications. Studies of fines, particles 0.1-10 microns diam, initiated from homogeneous decomposition in the reactor were conducted using 2 and 6-in-diam fluidized beds. The studies show functional dependences of fines elutriation on silane feed concentration, temperature, gas velocity, and bubble size. The observation that the fines elutriation is generally below 10 percent of the silicon-in-silane feed is attributed to scavenging by large particles in an environment of less free space for homogeneous nucleation. Preliminary results suggest that, with proper conditions and distributor design, high-silane-concentration (over 50 percent SiH4 in H2) feed may be used.

  11. Towards gloss control in fine art reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baar, Teun; Brettel, Hans; Ortiz Segovia, Maria V.

    2015-03-01

    The studies regarding fine art reproduction mainly focus on the accuracy of colour and the recreation of surface texture properties. Since reflection properties other than colour are neglected, important details of the artwork are lost. For instance, gloss properties, often characteristic to painters and particular movements in the history of art, are not well reproduced. The inadequate reproduction of the different gloss levels of a piece of fine art leads to a specular reflection mismatch in printed copies with respect to the original works that affects the perceptual quality of the printout. We used different print parameters of a 3D high resolution printing setup to control the gloss level on a printout locally. Our method can be used to control gloss automatically and in crucial applications such as fine art reproduction.

  12. Effect of particle fineness on the finely disseminated iron ore for beneficiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, T. S.; Zhang, W. X.; Fang, X. H.; Gao, G. K.

    2013-06-01

    This paper focused on Oolitic hematite ore which consists of extremely unequal disseminated particles that are fine-grained and easy to become muddy, It presents the effect of particle fineness, roasting temperature and roasting time and other variables on the beneficiation of this ore. The effect of particle fineness on the concentrate quality was also studied after magnetic roasting, the so-called process of "magnetic roasting-stage grinding-low intensity magnetic separation-cationic reverse flotation" was adopted to treat the raw ore under various experimental conditions including particle fineness, roasting temperature and roasting time, etc. it is found the concentrate grade of TFe of raw ore can be increased from 48.32%(original) to 61.30% at a recovery rate of 80.73%. Results show that the effect of particle fineness on mineral processing indexes is significant.

  13. Origin of zoned fine-grained inclusions in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgurie, Anne V.; Hashimoto, Akihiko

    1989-01-01

    The mineral and bulk compositions in the three zones of the fine-grained Ca-Al-rich inclusion in the Allende meteorite are studied. Mineral analyses for the inclusions are presented and the principle mineral composition for the three zones of the inclusions are described. The nature of the alteration and the physical and chemical environment which caused the three-fold zonation are examined. An alteration and origin of zonation for the Allende inclusions are proposed. It is noted that the fine-grained inclusions display alteration processes such as Ca-Fe-silicate condensation and characteristics of the primary inclusion such as different rim type.

  14. Analysis of vegetable seedlings grown in contact with Apollo 14 lunar surface fines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkinshaw, C. H.; Johnson, P. H.

    1971-01-01

    Study of plant seedlings treated with lunar material, grown for 14 to 21 days, and then subjected to chemical analyses and other measurements. The purpose of the study was to determine whether plants growing in contact with lunar-surface fines contained a different elemental composition compared with untreated seedlings. The results indicate a direct interaction between germfree plants and lunar material. Treated plants dissolved and absorbed significant quantities of Al, Fe, and Ti from the lunar fines. Cabbage and Brussel sprouts were particularly efficient in the dissolution and absorption of Mn.

  15. Sources and geographical origins of fine aerosols in Paris (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressi, M.; Sciare, J.; Ghersi, V.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Petit, J.-E.; Nicolas, J. B.; Moukhtar, S.; Rosso, A.; Féron, A.; Bonnaire, N.; Poulakis, E.; Theodosi, C.

    2013-12-01

    The present study aims at identifying and apportioning the major sources of fine aerosols in Paris (France) - the second largest megacity in Europe -, and determining their geographical origins. It is based on the daily chemical composition of PM2.5 characterised during one year at an urban background site of Paris (Bressi et al., 2013). Positive Matrix Factorization (EPA PMF3.0) was used to identify and apportion the sources of fine aerosols; bootstrapping was performed to determine the adequate number of PMF factors, and statistics (root mean square error, coefficient of determination, etc.) were examined to better model PM2.5 mass and chemical components. Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) and Conditional Probability Function (CPF) allowed the geographical origins of the sources to be assessed; special attention was paid to implement suitable weighting functions. Seven factors named ammonium sulfate (A.S.) rich factor, ammonium nitrate (A.N.) rich factor, heavy oil combustion, road traffic, biomass burning, marine aerosols and metals industry were identified; a detailed discussion of their chemical characteristics is reported. They respectively contribute 27, 24, 17, 14, 12, 6 and 1% of PM2.5 mass (14.7 μg m-3) on the annual average; their seasonal variability is discussed. The A.S. and A.N. rich factors have undergone north-eastward mid- or long-range transport from Continental Europe, heavy oil combustion mainly stems from northern France and the English Channel, whereas road traffic and biomass burning are primarily locally emitted. Therefore, on average more than half of PM2.5 mass measured in the city of Paris is due to mid- or long-range transport of secondary aerosols stemming from continental Europe, whereas local sources only contribute a quarter of the annual averaged mass. These results imply that fine aerosols abatement policies conducted at the local scale may not be sufficient to notably reduce PM2.5 levels at urban background sites in

  16. Sources and geographical origins of fine aerosols in Paris (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressi, M.; Sciare, J.; Ghersi, V.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Petit, J.-E.; Nicolas, J. B.; Moukhtar, S.; Rosso, A.; Féron, A.; Bonnaire, N.; Poulakis, E.; Theodosi, C.

    2014-08-01

    The present study aims at identifying and apportioning fine aerosols to their major sources in Paris (France) - the second most populated "larger urban zone" in Europe - and determining their geographical origins. It is based on the daily chemical composition of PM2.5 examined over 1 year at an urban background site of Paris (Bressi et al., 2013). Positive matrix factorization (EPA PMF3.0) was used to identify and apportion fine aerosols to their sources; bootstrapping was performed to determine the adequate number of PMF factors, and statistics (root mean square error, coefficient of determination, etc.) were examined to better model PM2.5 mass and chemical components. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) and conditional probability function (CPF) allowed the geographical origins of the sources to be assessed; special attention was paid to implement suitable weighting functions. Seven factors, namely ammonium sulfate (A.S.)-rich factor, ammonium nitrate (A.N.)-rich factor, heavy oil combustion, road traffic, biomass burning, marine aerosols and metal industry, were identified; a detailed discussion of their chemical characteristics is reported. They contribute 27, 24, 17, 14, 12, 6 and 1% of PM2.5 mass (14.7 μg m-3) respectively on the annual average; their seasonal variability is discussed. The A.S.- and A.N.-rich factors have undergone mid- or long-range transport from continental Europe; heavy oil combustion mainly stems from northern France and the English Channel, whereas road traffic and biomass burning are primarily locally emitted. Therefore, on average more than half of PM2.5 mass measured in the city of Paris is due to mid- or long-range transport of secondary aerosols stemming from continental Europe, whereas local sources only contribute a quarter of the annual averaged mass. These results imply that fine-aerosol abatement policies conducted at the local scale may not be sufficient to notably reduce PM2.5 levels at urban background sites in

  17. 76 FR 31307 - Commission of Fine Arts; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS Commission of Fine Arts; Notice of Meeting The next meeting of the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts is scheduled... oral statements should be addressed to Thomas Luebke, Secretary, U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, at...

  18. Incommensurate Structure of Phosphorus Phase IV

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Mami; Takeya, Satoshi; Honda, Kazumasa; Akahama, Yuichi; Kawamura, Haruki; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2007-04-27

    There are six known phases for phosphorus at room temperature under high pressure. Only the structure of phase IV, which exists from 107 GPa to 137 GPa, remains unsolved. We performed a powder x-ray diffraction experiment and a Rietveld analysis and successfully determined its structure to be an incommensurately modulated structure by only 1 site of atomic position. High-pressure phases of halogens and chalcogens have previously been shown to have a similar modulated structure; however, phosphorus phase IV is different from them and was shown to be the third case.

  19. Optimizing the fine lock performance of the Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, David J.; Whittlesey, Richard; Abramowicz-Reed, Linda; Zarba, Robert

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes the on-orbit performance to date of the three Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS's) in Fine Lock mode, with respect to acquisition success rate, ability to maintain lock, and star brightness range. The process of optimizing Fine Lock performance, including the reasoning underlying the adjustment of uplink parameters, and the effects of optimization are described. The Fine Lock optimization process has combined theoretical and experimental approaches. Computer models of the FGS have improved understanding of the effects of uplink parameters and fine error averaging on the ability of the FGS to acquire stars and maintain lock. Empirical data have determined the variation of the interferometric error characteristics (so-called 's-curves') between FGS's and over each FGS field of view, identified binary stars, and quantified the systematic error in Coarse Track (the mode preceding Fine Lock). On the basis of these empirical data, the values of the uplink parameters can be selected more precisely. Since launch, optimization efforts have improved FGS Fine Lock performance, particularly acquisition, which now enjoys a nearly 100 percent success rate. More recent work has been directed towards improving FGS tolerance of two conditions that exceed its original design requirements. First, large amplitude spacecraft jitter is induced by solar panel vibrations following day/night transitions. This jitter is generally much greater than the FGS's were designed to track, and while the tracking ability of the FGS's has been shown to exceed design requirements, losses of Fine Lock after day/night transitions are frequent. Computer simulations have demonstrated a potential improvement in Fine Lock tracking of vehicle jitter near terminator crossings. Second, telescope spherical aberration degrades the interferometric error signal in Fine Lock, but use of the FGS two-thirds aperture stop restores the transfer function with a corresponding loss of

  20. A fine resolution multifrequency polarimetric FM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bredow, J.; Gogineni, S.; Leung, T.; Moore, R. K.

    1988-01-01

    A fine resolution polarimetric FM SAR was developed for optimization of polarimetric SARs and interpretation of SAR data via controlled experiments with surface-base sensors. The system is designed for collecting polarimetric data at 5.3 and 10 GHz over incidence angles from 0 to 60 deg. Features of the system include broad bandwidth to obtain fine range resolution, phase stabilization and linearization loop circuitry, and digital signal processing capability. The system is used in a research program to collect polarimetric backscatter data from artificial sea ice research and design trade-offs, laboratory and field evaluation, as well as results from experiments on artificial sea ice are presented.

  1. Fine-Water-Mist Multiple-Orientation-Discharge Fire Extinguisher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butz, James R.; Turchi, Craig S.; Kimball, Amanda; McKinnon, Thomas; Riedel, Edward

    2010-01-01

    A fine-water-mist fire-suppression device has been designed so that it can be discharged uniformly in any orientation via a high-pressure gas propellant. Standard fire extinguishers used while slightly tilted or on their side will not discharge all of their contents. Thanks to the new design, this extinguisher can be used in multiple environments such as aboard low-gravity spacecraft, airplanes, and aboard vehicles that may become overturned prior to or during a fire emergency. Research in recent years has shown that fine water mist can be an effective alternative to Halons now banned from manufacture. Currently, NASA uses carbon dioxide for fire suppression on the International Space Station (ISS) and Halon chemical extinguishers on the space shuttle. While each of these agents is effective, they have drawbacks. The toxicity of carbon dioxide requires that the crew don breathing apparatus when the extinguishers are deployed on the ISS, and Halon use in future spacecraft has been eliminated because of international protocols on substances that destroy atmospheric ozone. A major advantage to the new system on occupied spacecraft is that the discharged system is locally rechargeable. Since the only fluids used are water and nitrogen, the system can be recharged from stores of both carried aboard the ISS or spacecraft. The only support requirement would be a pump to fill the water and a compressor to pressurize the nitrogen propellant gas. This system uses a gaseous agent to pressurize the storage container as well as to assist in the generation of the fine water mist. The portable fire extinguisher hardware works like a standard fire extinguisher with a single storage container for the agents (water and nitrogen), a control valve assembly for manual actuation, and a discharge nozzle. The design implemented in the proof-of-concept experiment successfully extinguished both open fires and fires in baffled enclosures.

  2. A force-dependent switch reverses type IV pilus retraction.

    PubMed

    Maier, Berenike; Koomey, Michael; Sheetz, Michael P

    2004-07-27

    Type IV pilus dynamics is important for virulence, motility, and DNA transfer in a wide variety of prokaryotes. The type IV pilus system constitutes a very robust and powerful molecular machine that transports pilus polymers as well as DNA through the bacterial cell envelope. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, pilus retraction is a highly irreversible process that depends on PilT, an AAA ATPase family member. However, when levels of PilT are reduced, the application of high external forces (F = 110 +/- 10 pN) induces processive pilus elongation. At forces of >50 pN, single pili elongate at a rate of v = 350 +/- 50 nm/s. For forces of <50 pN, elongation velocity depends strongly on force and relaxation causes immediate retraction. Both pilus retraction and force-induced elongation can be modeled by chemical kinetics with same step length for the rate-limiting translocation step. The model implies that a force-dependent molecular switch can induce pilus elongation by reversing the retraction mechanism. PMID:15256598

  3. Characterization of the nitrate complexes of Pu(IV) using absorption spectroscopy, {sup 15}N NMR, and EXAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, D.K.; Smith, C.A.; Zwick, B.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Conradson, S.D.

    1993-12-01

    Nitrate complexes of Pu(IV) are studied in solutions containing nitrate up to 13 molar (M). Three major nitrato complexes are observed and identified using absorption spectroscopy, {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) as Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+}, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}. The possibility that Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 1}{sup 3+}, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 1+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}{sup 1{minus}} are major species in solution is not consistent with these results and an upper limit of 0.10 can be set on the fraction for each of these three nitrate complexes in nitrate containing solutions. Fraction of the three major species in nitric acid over the 1--13 M range were calculated from absorption spectra data. The fraction of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} as a function of nitric acid concentration is in good agreement with the literature, whereas the fraction of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} species differ from previous studies. We have modeled the chemical equilibria up to moderate ionic strength ( < 6 molal) using the specific ion interaction theory (SM. Comparison of our experimental observations to literature stability constants that assume the presence of mononitrate species is poor. Stability constant at zero ionic strength for the dinitrato complex is determined to be log({beta}{sub 2}{sup 0})=3.77 {plus_minus} 0.14 (2{sigma}).

  4. 34 CFR 668.92 - Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., hearing official, and Secretary take into account— (1) (i) The gravity of an institution's or third-party... Title IV of the HEA; or (ii) The gravity of the institution's or servicer's misrepresentation; (2) The... systemic unintentional error. (b) In determining the gravity of the institution's or servicer's...

  5. 34 CFR 668.92 - Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., hearing official, and Secretary take into account— (1) (i) The gravity of an institution's or third-party... Title IV of the HEA; or (ii) The gravity of the institution's or servicer's misrepresentation; (2) The... systemic unintentional error. (b) In determining the gravity of the institution's or servicer's...

  6. 34 CFR 668.92 - Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., hearing official, and Secretary take into account— (1) (i) The gravity of an institution's or third-party... Title IV of the HEA; or (ii) The gravity of the institution's or servicer's misrepresentation; (2) The... systemic unintentional error. (b) In determining the gravity of the institution's or servicer's...

  7. 34 CFR 668.92 - Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., hearing official, and Secretary take into account— (1) (i) The gravity of an institution's or third-party... Title IV of the HEA; or (ii) The gravity of the institution's or servicer's misrepresentation; (2) The... systemic unintentional error. (b) In determining the gravity of the institution's or servicer's...

  8. 34 CFR 668.92 - Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., hearing official, and Secretary take into account— (1) (i) The gravity of an institution's or third-party... Title IV of the HEA; or (ii) The gravity of the institution's or servicer's misrepresentation; (2) The... systemic unintentional error. (b) In determining the gravity of the institution's or servicer's...

  9. Constraints on chondrule agglomeration from fine-grained chondrule rims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, K.; Bischoff, A.

    1994-01-01

    Fine-grained rims around chondrules, Ca,Al-rich inclusions, and other coarse-grained components occur in most types of unequilibrated chondrites, most prominently in carbonaceous chondrites of the CM group. Based on mineralogical and petrographic investigations, it was suggested that rim structures in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites could have formed in the solar nebula by accretion of dust on the surfaces of the chondrules. Dust mantles in CM chondrites seem to have formed by accretion of dust on the surfaces of chondrules and other components during their passage through dust-rich regions in the solar nebula. Concentric mantles with compositionally different layers prove the existence of various distinct dust reservoirs in the vicinity of the accreting parent body. Despite mineralogical and chemical differences, fine-grained rims from other chondrite groups principally show striking similarities to dust mantle textures in CM chondrite. This implies that the formation of dust mantles was a cosmically significant event like the chondrule formation itself. Dust mantles seem to have formed chronologically between chondrule-producing transient heating events and the agglomeration of chondritic parent bodies. For this reason the investigation of dust mantle structures may help to answer the question of how a dusty solar nebula was transformed into a planetary system.

  10. Group IV nanoparticles: synthesis, properties, and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiyang; Chu, Paul K

    2010-10-01

    In this review, the emerging roles of group IV nanoparticles including silicon, diamond, silicon carbide, and germanium are summarized and discussed from the perspective of biologists, engineers, and medical practitioners. The synthesis, properties, and biological applications of these new nanomaterials have attracted great interest in the past few years. They have gradually evolved into promising biomaterials due to their innate biocompatibility; toxic ions are not released when they are used in vitro or in vivo, and their wide fluorescence spectral regions span the near-infrared, visible, and near-ultraviolet ranges. Additionally, they generally have good resistance against photobleaching and have lifetimes on the order of nanoseconds to microseconds, which are suitable for bioimaging. Some of the materials possess unique mechanical, chemical, or physical properties, such as ultrachemical and thermal stability, high hardness, high photostability, and no blinking. Recent data have revealed the superiority of these nanoparticles in biological imaging and drug delivery. PMID:20730824

  11. The O IV and S IV intercombination lines in solar and stellar ultraviolet spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Keenan, F. P.; Dufton, P. L.; Kingston, A. E.; Pradhan, A. K.; Zhang, H. L.; Doyle, J. G.; Hayes, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    New calculations of O IV electron density diagnostic emission-line ratios involving the 1399.8, 1401.2, 1404.8, and 14076.4 A transitions are presented. A comparison of these calculations with observational data from a quiet solar region, a sunspot, and an active region obtained with the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS), two flares observed with the SO82B spectrograph on board Skylab, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations by the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) of Capella, gives good results using the ratio R(sub 1) = I(1407.4 A)/I(1401.2 A). However, the electron density obtained using the ratio R(sub 2) = I(1407.4 A)/I(1404.8 A) is often an order of magnitude smaller. The O IV 1404.8 A line is blended with the S IV 1404.8 A line, and we investigate whether this ratio may still be used as a density diagnostic if the S IV 1406.1 A line intensity is used to correct for the presence of S IV 1404.8 A, using previous S IV calculations by Dufton et al. We still find systematic differences compared to density determinations from line ratios that do not involve the O IV 1404.8 A line, which we suggest are due to errors in earlier theoretical calculations of the S IV atomic data, and also possibly to previously unconsidered fluorescent pumping of the upper level of the S IV 1404.8 A transition.

  12. Painlevé IV coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, David; Contreras-Astorga, Alonso; Fernández C, David J.

    2014-11-15

    A simple way to find solutions of the Painlevé IV equation is by identifying Hamiltonian systems with third-order differential ladder operators. Some of these systems can be obtained by applying supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY QM) to the harmonic oscillator. In this work, we will construct families of coherent states for such subset of SUSY partner Hamiltonians which are connected with the Painlevé IV equation. First, these coherent states are built up as eigenstates of the annihilation operator, then as displaced versions of the extremal states, both involving the related third-order ladder operators, and finally as extremal states which are also displaced but now using the so called linearized ladder operators. To each SUSY partner Hamiltonian corresponds two families of coherent states: one inside the infinite subspace associated with the isospectral part of the spectrum and another one in the finite subspace generated by the states created through the SUSY technique. - Highlights: • We use SUSY QM to obtain Hamiltonians with third-order differential ladder operators. • We show that these systems are related with the Painlevé IV equation. • We apply different definitions of coherent states to these Hamiltonians using the third-order ladder operators and some linearized ones. • We construct families of coherent states for such systems, which we called Painlevé IV coherent states.

  13. Leveraging Information Technology. Track IV: Support Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Seven papers from the 1987 CAUSE conference's Track IV, Support Services, are presented. They include: "Application Development Center" (John F. Leydon); "College Information Management System: The Design and Implementation of a Completely Integrated Office Automation and Student Information System" (Karen L. Miselis); "Improving Managerial…

  14. Intelsat IV-F5 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An Atlas-Centaur space vehicle lifted off at 5:53 p.m. EDT, June 13, 1972, from Complex 36B carrying an Intelsat Communications Satellite, (Intelsat IV-F5) into Earth orbit. Visible in the foreground is the lighthouse located at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

  15. DSM IV, Culture and Child Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Cécile; Measham, Toby; Bathiche-Suidan, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Objective The expanding cultural diversity of children and families with mental health needs raises questions about the cultural appropriateness of diagnostic classifications like the DSM IV. This paper briefly surveys the literature on culture and DSM-IV in child psychiatry, presenting ADHD as an example of the relationship between diagnostic categories and cultural issues, and illustrating some of the clinical dilemmas of differential diagnosis in a migration context. Method a literature review was performed and analysed, and a case vignette was constructed to illustrate key points. Results The literature does not provide a definite answer about the DSM IV cultural validity in child psychiatry. On the one hand it suggests that all diagnostic categories may be found universally. On the other, variations in prevalence rates support the hypothesis of a role for social and cultural factors in the diagnostic process. The clinical formulation may be a useful tool to address the validity issue by modulating the process of diagnosis with a cultural understanding of the symptoms, the patient-therapist alliance and the appropriateness of treatment recommendations. Conclusion Although the DSM IV diagnostic categories may be found cross culturally, clinicians need to be aware of how culture may influence the diagnostic process in child psychiatry. PMID:18516309

  16. Day Camp Manual: Program. Book IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, William

    Book IV in a 5-book day camp manual discusses the camp program. Section I describes the organization, definition, and elements essential to successful day camp programs. Section II, which addresses the benefits and special considerations of mass programs, includes rainy day contingencies, materials to have on hand, and activity suggestions.…

  17. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-29

    The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

  18. HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL FINE PM EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine PM emissions from diesel powered vehicles continues to be a concern for those responsible for implementating the PM-2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Diesel generated PM is nanometer in size, incorporates a number of toxic air pollutants (including carcinog...

  19. The Fine Arts and the Paideia Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Anthony J.

    1984-01-01

    Briefly examines fine arts curricula in public schools with relation to Mortimer Adler's Paideia Proposal, whose basic premise is that America has a democratic promise to fulfill--not only that all should be educated, but that all ought to receive the same education. Summaries of the proposal's chapters are presented. (MH)

  20. FINE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS FROM CANDLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives reulst of testing five types of candles, purchased from local stores, for fine particulate matter (PM) emissions under close-to-realistic conditions in a research house. The test method allows for determination of both the emission and deposition rates. Most tes...

  1. Understanding the Fine Tuning in Our Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bernard L.

    2008-01-01

    It is often stated that the physical properties of our universe are "fine tuned"--that is, they must be almost exactly as they are to make the development of intelligent life possible. The implications of this statement, called the "anthropic principle," have been widely discussed in a philosophical context, but the scientific basis for the…

  2. Bibliography/1. Fine Arts Reference Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauck, Alice; Markey, Karen

    This annotated bibliography of art reference books in the Eisenhower Library's Art Reference Department at Johns Hopkins University serves as the culmination of a joint venture between the General Reference Department and History of Art Department. The library's Art Reference room is adjacent to the Fine Arts stacks in the library and serves…

  3. System for utilizing oil shale fines

    DOEpatents

    Harak, Arnold E.

    1982-01-01

    A system is provided for utilizing fines of carbonaceous materials such as particles or pieces of oil shale of about one-half inch or less diameter which are rejected for use in some conventional or prior surface retorting process, which obtains maximum utilization of the energy content of the fines and which produces a waste which is relatively inert and of a size to facilitate disposal. The system includes a cyclone retort (20) which pyrolyzes the fines in the presence of heated gaseous combustion products, the cyclone retort having a first outlet (30) through which vapors can exit that can be cooled to provide oil, and having a second outlet (32) through which spent shale fines are removed. A burner (36) connected to the spent shale outlet of the cyclone retort, burns the spent shale with air, to provide hot combustion products (24) that are carried back to the cyclone retort to supply gaseous combustion products utilized therein. The burner heats the spent shale to a temperature which forms a molten slag, and the molten slag is removed from the burner into a quencher (48) that suddenly cools the molten slag to form granules that are relatively inert and of a size that is convenient to handle for disposal in the ground or in industrial processes.

  4. Chapter 16. Fine-root Growth Response

    SciTech Connect

    J. Devereux Joslin; Mark H. Wolfe

    2002-07-31

    As part of a multiyear study to evaluate the affects of altered water inputs to an upland forest many aspects of tree growth physiology were studied. Chapter 16 of this book deals with fine root growth as studied over a 7 year period using a variety of methods. This chapter summarizes the results and conclusions from those efforts.

  5. PARTICULATE CONTROL HIGHLIGHTS: FINE PARTICLE SCRUBBER RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives highlights of fine particle scrubber research performed by, or under the direction of, EPA's Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory (IERL-RTP) at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The U.S. EPA has been actively involved in research and development in ...

  6. Krypton and xenon in lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basford, J. R.; Dragon, J. C.; Pepin, R. O.; Coscio, M. R., Jr.; Murthy, V. R.

    1973-01-01

    Data from grain-size separates, stepwise-heated fractions, and bulk analyses of 20 samples of fines and breccias from five lunar sites are used to define three-isotope and ordinate intercept correlations in an attempt to resolve the lunar heavy rare gas system in a statistically valid approach. Tables of concentrations and isotope compositions are given.

  7. BIOREMEDIATION OF OIL-CONTAMINATED FINE SEDIMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation of oil contamination has been shown to be effective for cobble and sandy shorelines. To assess the operational limitations of this technology, this project studied its potential to treat buried oil in fine sediments. The effectiveness of bioremediation by nutrient ...

  8. Pulverizer fineness and capacity enhancements at Danskammer

    SciTech Connect

    Slezak, I.; Dube, R.J.; Thorn, G.H.; Etta, T.P.

    1999-07-01

    Dynamic classifiers were retrofitted at Central Hudson Gas and Electric's Danskammer Station to increase the capacity and improve the fineness of the existing pulverizers. The dynamic classifiers, which went on line in April 1995, replaced the existing static centrifugal cone type classifiers in CE Raymond Mills. The new dynamic classifiers consist of five main components; the drive, fixed vane inlet louvers, rotating cage assembly, reject cone, and classifier discharge. Classifier speed is controlled by a variable frequency AC motor controller. The rotational speed of the classifier can be varied with boiler load or with changes in coal characteristics to better match the fineness with the furnace requirements. Inherently, the rotational effects of the dynamic classifier and better fineness improve coal and air distribution to the coal pipes and to the burners. Improved coal and air distribution allows operation at lower excess air, which results in increased boiler and plant efficiency and reduced NOx. Better fineness has a positive impact on combustion efficiency by reducing flyash LOI.

  9. SPATIAL PREDICTION OF FINE PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new national monitoring network for the measurement of fine particular matter (PM2.5) is currently under development. A primary goal of this network is to collect monitoring data in residential communities for the evaluation of compliance with particulate air quality standards...

  10. Fine droplet generation using tunable electrohydrodynamic pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Ba, Zhengyu; Xiong, Zhenhua

    2015-07-01

    High-efficiency generation of fine droplets is significant for many microfluidic chips and sensor applications. To produce fine droplets, nozzles with small diameters are needed, which results in a high cost for nozzles and low efficiency of droplet generation. In this paper, a tunable electrohydrodynamic pulsation method which can generate fine droplets with high frequency and controllable size is presented using low conductivity liquids. The effects of flow rates and voltage parameters with respect to deposition frequency and droplet size are investigated. The influence of these parameters on Taylor cone formation time are also discussed and simple scaling laws are proposed to reveal and guide the droplet generation process. Experimental results show that single cycle deposition frequency decreases with increasing voltage frequency, but is only slightly influenced by the flow rates. The droplet size also decreases with voltage frequency, while large flow rates can make this decline gradual allowing better control. Moreover, the Taylor cone formation time may greatly affect the stability of the deposition frequency when the voltage frequency is larger than 30 Hz. Due to the short cycle time of high voltage frequencies, the hydrodynamic behavior in the emission process may be considerably affected by the increase of volume, which is also related to the flow rates. Tunable micropatterns consisting of fine droplets can be achieved by using this method in combination with motion stages.

  11. The Alabama School of Fine Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifted Child Quarterly, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The article describes the Alabama School of Fine Arts, a public secondary school offering, in addition to basic academics, intensive training in the areas of music, dance, drama, creative writing, and visual arts to talented and motivated junior and senior high school students in Birmingham. (Author/DLS)

  12. Effective flocculation of fine mineral suspensions using Moringa oleifera seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using Moringa oleifera seeds, or the active components of the seeds, in the clarification of waters containing suspended mineral fines. In comparative testing using a hematite suspension, the flocculating activity of Moringa oleifera seeds was better than alum. Twenty milligrams of seed powder was sufficient to clarify the hematite to near zero turbidity, while the same amount of alum had a minimal effect on turbidity. Extracts were prepared from the seeds in an attempt to separate the proteins. A crude protein extract was enriched by lowering the pH to 6.0. Only 0.08 mg/L of the enriched extract was required to flocculate a minusil suspension. Environmentally friendly protein flocculants could theoretically be produced and enhanced with recombinant DNA techniques as an alternative to chemical flocculants currently used in water treatment.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of fine grain diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Richard L. C.; Rai, A. K.; Garscadden, Alan; Kee, Patrick; Desai, Hemant D.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1992-01-01

    A fine grain diamond film has been developed by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition. Various analytical techniques, including Rutherford backscattering, proton recoil analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, were utilized to characterize the diamond films. The grain size of the film was determined from bright and dark field electron micrographs, and found to be 200-1000 A. The films exhibited good optical transmission between 2.5 and 10 microns, with a calculated absorption coefficient of 490/cm. The friction coefficients of this film were found to be 0.035 and 0.030 at dry nitrogen and humid air environments, respectively, and the films had low wear rates.

  14. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure of bimetallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary Electronic and magnetic properties strongly depend on the structure of the material, especially on the crystal symmetry and chemical environment. In nanoparticles, the break of symmetry at the surface may yield different physical properties with respect to the corresponding bulk material. A useful tool to investigate the electronic structure, magnetic behaviour and local crystallographic structure is X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this review, recent developments in the field of extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements and in the analysis methods for structural investigations of bimetallic nanoparticles are highlighted. The standard analysis based on Fourier transforms is compared to the relatively new field of wavelet transforms that have the potential to outperform traditional analysis, especially in bimetallic alloys. As an example, the lattice expansion and inhomogeneous alloying found in FePt nanoparticles is presented, and this is discussed below in terms of the influence of employed density functional theory calculations on the magnetic properties. PMID:21977436

  15. Fine Motor Activities Program to Promote Fine Motor Skills in a Case Study of Down's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lersilp, Suchitporn; Putthinoi, Supawadee; Panyo, Kewalin

    2016-01-01

    Children with Down's syndrome have developmental delays, particularly regarding cognitive and motor development. Fine motor skill problems are related to motor development. They have impact on occupational performances in school-age children with Down's syndrome because they relate to participation in school activities, such as grasping, writing, and carrying out self-care duties. This study aimed to develop a fine motor activities program and to examine the efficiency of the program that promoted fine motor skills in a case study of Down's syndrome. The case study subject was an 8 -year-old male called Kai, who had Down's syndrome. He was a first grader in a regular school that provided classrooms for students with special needs. This study used the fine motor activities program with assessment tools, which included 3 subtests of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, second edition (BOT-2) that applied to Upper-limb coordination, Fine motor precision and Manual dexterity; as well as the In-hand Manipulation Checklist, and Jamar Hand Dynamometer Grip Test. The fine motor activities program was implemented separately and consisted of 3 sessions of 45 activities per week for 5 weeks, with each session taking 45 minutes. The results showed obvious improvement of fine motor skills, including bilateral hand coordination, hand prehension, manual dexterity, in-hand manipulation, and hand muscle strength. This positive result was an example of a fine motor intervention program designed and developed for therapists and related service providers in choosing activities that enhance fine motor skills in children with Down's syndrome. PMID:27357876

  16. The superior lithium storage capabilities of ultra-fine rutile TiO 2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun Song; Lou, Xiong Wen

    The lithium storage capabilities of ultra-fine rutile TiO 2 nanoparticles have been studied. Ultra-fine rutile TiO 2 nanoparticles with only several nanometers in size have been prepared by a modified wet-chemical method with a high yield. Unexpectedly, the rutile TiO 2 nanoparticles with 3 nm in size exhibit superior lithium storage properties. Specifically, they show long term cycling stability upon extended cycling for at least 300 cycles with a capacity loss of only 0.17% per cycle, and good rate capability up to a 30 C rate. The excellent reversible lithium storage capabilities could be attributed to the ultra-fine size giving rise to a very short diffusion path, and the relatively large surface area which provides more sites for lithium insertion.

  17. The influence of clay fineness upon sludge recycling in a ceramic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szőke, A. M.; Muntean, M.; Sándor, M.; Brotea, L.

    2016-04-01

    The feasibility of sludge recycling in the ceramic manufacture was evaluated through laboratory testing. Such residues have similar chemical and mineralogical composition with the raw mixture of the green ceramic body used in construction. Several ceramic masses with clay and various proportion of sludge have been synthesized and then characterized by their physical-mechanical properties. The fineness of the clay, the main component of the green ceramic body, has been considered for every raw mixture. The proportion of the sludge waste addition depends on the clay fineness and the sintering capacity also, increases with the clay fineness. The ceramic properties, particularly, the open porosity, and mechanical properties, in presence of small sludge proportion (7, 20%) shows small modification. The introduction of such waste into building ceramic matrix (bricks, tiles, and plates) has a very good perspective.

  18. Magnetic circular dichroism and computational study of mononuclear and dinuclear iron(IV) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Genqiang; Krivokapic, Itana; Petrenko, Taras

    2015-01-01

    High-valent iron(IV)-oxo species are key intermediates in the catalytic cycles of a range of O2-activating iron enzymes. This work presents a detailed study of the electronic structures of mononuclear ([FeIV(O)(L)(NCMe)]2+, 1, L = tris(3,5-dimethyl-4-methoxylpyridyl-2-methyl)amine) and dinuclear ([(L)FeIV(O)(μ-O)FeIV(OH)(L)]3+, 2) iron(IV) complexes using absorption (ABS), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy and wave-function-based quantum chemical calculations. For complex 1, the experimental MCD spectra at 2–10 K are dominated by a broad positive C-term band between 12000 and 18000 cm−1. As the temperature increases up to ~20 K, this feature is gradually replaced by a derivative-shaped signal. The computed MCD spectra are in excellent agreement with experiment, which reproduce not only the excitation energies and the MCD signs of key transitions but also their temperature-dependent intensity variations. To further corroborate the assignments suggested by the calculations, the individual MCD sign for each transition is independently determined from the corresponding electron donating and accepting orbitals. Thus, unambiguous assignments can be made for the observed transitions in 1. The ABS/MCD data of complex 2 exhibit ten features that are assigned as ligand-field transitions or oxo- or hydroxo-to-metal charge transfer bands, based on MCD/ABS intensity ratios, calculated excitation energies, polarizations, and MCD signs. In comparison with complex 1, the electronic structure of the FeIV=O site is not significantly perturbed by the binding to another iron(IV) center. This may explain the experimental finding that complexes 1 and 2 have similar reactivities toward C-H bond activation and O-atom transfer. PMID:26417426

  19. Ultra-fine grinding of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shoulu; Wang Xinguo; Gao Ying

    1997-12-31

    Clean coal is known by its low ash content. Most coals contain a large amount of ash, some of which are finely distributed in the coal matrix. With the conventional cleaning process, such ash can not be removed efficiently. From existing coal preparation plants, much middling and high-ash slime come out as by-products and are used only as inferior fuel. Beijing Graduate School, China University of Mining and Technology, has developed a process for deep-cleaning of coal. This process includes ultra-fine grinding of coal to liberate the locked ash minerals followed by efficient separation with selective coagulation-flotation. With this process, concentrate can be extracted from inferior coal or ultra-clean coal can be obtained from conventional concentrate. Tumbling and vibrating ball mills are conventional for general grinding. However, for ultra-fine grinding they are inefficient and consume much more power. This paper gives some aspects of an ultra-fine grinding mill developed by Beijing Graduate School. The Ultra-Fine Grinding Mill is a JMI series wet grinding mill, and consists of a static horizontal closed tube with a rotor inside. The rotor assembly includes: a horizontal shaft, two vaned disks being fixed apart at the shaft, and longitudinal bar deflectors fixed across the disks. Sufficient clearance is allowed between the disk and end plates of the tube and between the disk rim and tube wall. This configuration enables free passage of grinding medium and pulp within the mill. While the mill is in operation, four principal movements of grinding medium and pulp are created: inward radially by deflectors, oppositely axial by vanes, tangential by rotation, and vibrating due to vortices behind the deflectors.

  20. A Mononuclear Non-Heme Manganese(IV)-Oxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Metal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Junying; Lee, Yong-Min; Davis, Katherine M.; Wu, Xiujuan; Seo, Mi Sook; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Yoon, Heejung; Park, Young Jun; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Pushkar, Yulia N.; Nam, Wonwoo

    2013-05-29

    Redox-inactive metal ions play pivotal roles in regulating the reactivities of high-valent metal–oxo species in a variety of enzymatic and chemical reactions. A mononuclear non-heme Mn(IV)–oxo complex bearing a pentadentate N5 ligand has been synthesized and used in the synthesis of a Mn(IV)–oxo complex binding scandium ions. The Mn(IV)–oxo complexes were characterized with various spectroscopic methods. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)–oxo complex are markedly influenced by binding of Sc3+ ions in oxidation reactions, such as a ~2200-fold increase in the rate of oxidation of thioanisole (i.e., oxygen atom transfer) but a ~180-fold decrease in the rate of C–H bond activation of 1,4-cyclohexadiene (i.e., hydrogen atom transfer). The present results provide the first example of a non-heme Mn(IV)–oxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions that shows a contrasting effect of the redox-inactive metal ions on the reactivities of metal–oxo species in the oxygen atom transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions.

  1. Role of Conserved Proline Residues in Human Apolipoprotein A-IV Structure and Function*

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiaodi; Walker, Ryan G.; Morris, Jamie; Davidson, W. Sean; Thompson, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo)A-IV is a lipid emulsifying protein linked to a range of protective roles in obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. It exists in several states in plasma including lipid-bound in HDL and chylomicrons and as monomeric and dimeric lipid-free/poor forms. Our recent x-ray crystal structure of the central domain of apoA-IV shows that it adopts an elongated helical structure that dimerizes via two long reciprocating helices. A striking feature is the alignment of conserved proline residues across the dimer interface. We speculated that this plays important roles in the structure of the lipid-free protein and its ability to bind lipid. Here we show that the systematic conversion of these prolines to alanine increased the thermodynamic stability of apoA-IV and its propensity to oligomerize. Despite the structural stabilization, we noted an increase in the ability to bind and reorganize lipids and to promote cholesterol efflux from cells. The novel properties of these mutants allowed us to isolate the first trimeric form of an exchangeable apolipoprotein and characterize it by small-angle x-ray scattering and chemical cross-linking. The results suggest that the reciprocating helix interaction is a common feature of all apoA-IV oligomers. We propose a model of how self-association of apoA-IV can result in spherical lipoprotein particles, a model that may have broader applications to other exchangeable apolipoprotein family members. PMID:25733664

  2. Occurrence of organic pollutants in recovered soil fines from construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Jang, Y C; Townsend, T G

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize recovered soil fines from construction and demolition (C&D) waste recycling facilities for trace organic pollutants. Over a period of 18 months, five sampling trips were made to 14 C&D waste recycling facilities in Florida. Screened soil fines were collected from older stockpiles and newly generated piles at the sites. The samples were analyzed for the total concentration (mg/kg) of a series of volatile organic compound (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (semi-VOCs). The synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) test was also performed to evaluate the leachability of the trace organic chemicals. During the total analysis only a few volatile organic compounds were commonly found in the samples (trichlorofluoromethane, toluene, 4-isopropyltoluene, trimethylbenzene, xylenes, and methylene chloride). A total of nine VOCs were detected in the leaching test. Toluene showed the highest leachability among the compounds (61.3-92.0%), while trichlorofluoromethane, the most commonly detected compound from both the total and leaching tests, resulted in the lowest leachability (1.4-39.9%). For the semi-VOC analysis, three base-neutral semi-VOC compounds (bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, butyl benzyl phthalate, and di-n-butyl phthalate) and several PAHs (acenaphthene, pyrene, fluoranthene, and phenanthrene) were commonly detected in C&D fines samples. These compounds also leached during the SPLP leaching test (0.1-25%). No acid extractable compounds, pesticides, or PCBs were detected. The results of this study were further investigated to assess risk from land applied recovered soil fines by comparing total and leaching concentrations of recovered soil fines samples to risk-based standards. The results of this indicate that the organic chemicals in recovered soil fines from C&D debris recycling facilities were not of a major concern in terms of human risk and leaching risk to groundwater under reuse and contact scenarios

  3. Enhanced performance of electrostatic precipitators through chemical modification of particle resistivity and cohesion

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.; Baldrey, K.E.; Bustard, C.J.

    1995-11-01

    Control of fine particles, including particulate air toxics, from utility boilers is required near-term by state and federal air regulations. Electrostatic precipitators (ESP) serve as the primary air pollution control device for the majority of coal-fired utility boilers in the Eastern and Midwestern united States. Cost-effective retrofit technologies for fine particle control, including flue gas conditioning, are needed for the large base of existing ESPs. Flue has conditioning is an attractive option because it requires minimal structural changes and lower capital costs. For flue gas conditioning to be effective for fine particle control, cohesive and particle agglomerating agents are needed to reduce reentrainment losses, since a large percentage of particulate emissions from well-performing ESPs are due to erosion, rapping, and non-rapping reentrainment. A related and somewhat ironic development is that emissions reductions of SO{sub 2} from utility boilers, as required by the Title IV acid rain program of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments, has the potential to substantially increase particulate air toxics from existing ESPs. The switch to low-sulfur coals as an SO{sub 2} control strategy by many utilities has exacerbated ESP performance problems associated with high resistivity flyash. The use of flue gas conditioning has increased in the past several years to maintain adequate performance in ESPs which were not designed for high resistivity ash. However, commercially available flue gas conditioning systems, including NH{sub 3}/SO{sub 3} dual gas conditioning systems, have problems and inherent drawbacks which create a need for alternative conditioning agents. in particular, NH{sub 3}/SO{sub 3} systems can create odor and ash disposal problems due to ammonia outgassing. In addition, there are concerns over chemical handling safety and the potential for accidental releases.

  4. Annotations on Mexico's WISC-IV: a validity study.

    PubMed

    Fina, Anthony D; Sánchez-Escobedo, Pedro; Hollingworth, Liz

    2012-01-01

    This project seeks to provide evidence on the internal structure of the Escala Wechsler de Inteligencia para Niños-IV (EWIN-IV; Wechsler, 2007a ) through a confirmatory factor analysis and intercorrelational study. Also provided is information on the adaptation process and other sources of validity evidence in support of the EWIN-IV norms. The standardization data for the EWIN-IV were used for all analyses. The factor loadings and correlational patterns found on the EWIN-IV are comparable to those seen in the American versions of the test. The proposed factor and scoring structure of the EWIN-IV was supported. PMID:23428273

  5. Origin and course of the coronary arteries in normal mice and in iv/iv mice

    PubMed Central

    ICARDO, JOSÉ M.; COLVEE, ELVIRA

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on the origin and distribution of the coronary arteries in normal mice and in mice of the iv/iv strain, which show situs inversus and heterotaxia. The coronary arteries were studied by direct observation of the aortic sinuses with the scanning electron microscope, and by examination of vascular corrosion casts. In the normal mouse, the left and right coronaries (LC, RC) arise from the respective Valsalva sinus and course along the ventricular borders to reach the heart apex. Along this course the coronary arteries give off small branches at perpendicular or acute angles to supply the ventricles. The ventricular septum is supplied by the septal artery, which arises as a main branch from the right coronary. Conus arteries arise from the main coronary trunks, from the septal artery and/or directly from the Valsalva sinus. The vascular casts demonstrate the presence of intercoronary anastomoses. The origin of the coronary arteries was found to be abnormal in 84% of the iv/iv mice. These anomalies included double origin, high take-off, slit-like openings and the presence of a single coronary orifice. These anomalies occurred singly or in any combination, and were independent of heart situs. The septal artery originated from RC in most cases of situs solitus but originated predominantly from LC in situs inversus hearts. Except for this anomalous origin no statistical correlation was found between the coronary anomalies and heart situs or a particular mode of heterotaxia. The coronary anomalies observed in the iv/iv mice are similar to those found in human hearts. Most coronary anomalies appear to be due to defective connections between the aortic root and the developing coronaries. iv/iv mice may therefore constitute a good model to study the development of similar anomalies in the human heart. PMID:11693308

  6. POC-SCALE TESTING OF OIL AGGLOMERATION TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT FOR FINE COAL PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the technical progress achieved from October 1, 1997 to December 31, 1997 on the POC-Scale Testing of Oil Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing project. Experimental test procedures and the results related to the processing of coal fines originating from process streams generated at the Shoal Creek Mine preparation plant, owned and operated by the Drummond Company Inc. of Alabama, are described. Two samples of coal fines, namely Cyclone Overflow and Pond Fines were investigated. The batch test results showed that by applying the Aglofloat technology a significant ash removal might be achieved at a very high combustible matter recovery: · for the Cyclone Overflow sample the ash reduction was in the range 50 to 55% at combustible matter recovery about 98% · for the Pond Fines sample the ash reduction was up to 48% at combustible matter recovery up to 85%. Additional tests were carried out with the Alberta origin Luscar Mine coal, which will be used for the parametric studies of agglomeration equipment at the 250 kg/h pilot plant. The Luscar coal is very similar to the Mary Lee Coal Group (processed at Shoal Creek Mine preparation plant) in terms of rank and chemical composition.

  7. The stability of surficial fine sediment deposits in lowland chalk streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Robert C.; Wotton, Roger; Droppo, Ian; Davies, Grieg; Wharton, Geraldene

    2010-05-01

    Lowland chalk streams in the UK are experiencing increased deposition of fine sediment due to changes in land-use practices, channel modifications, and groundwater abstraction. The fine sediment is linked to benthic habitat degradation, the obstruction of surface-groundwater flow, and the storage of contaminants, such as pesticides and heavy metals. While research has been conducted on the provenance, transport, deposition, and storage of fine sediment in chalk streams, none has expressly investigated erosion. Therefore a key step is missing in our understanding of sediment dynamics in these systems. A yearlong field survey was conducted in two reaches in the Frome-Piddle Catchment (Dorset, England) to quantify the stability of surficial fine sediment deposits. Sediment stability is dependent on both hydrodynamic conditions and sediment erodibility, so water flow velocities and in situ erodibility measurements were recorded. These measurements were paired with sediment cores for analysis of the physical, chemical and biological properties of the sediment. The results indicate that hydrodynamic conditions vary spatially and temporally as a result of the distinctive annual hydrograph and seasonal macrophyte growth. Sediment erodibility exhibits seasonal variations, with low thresholds for erosion in winter and high thresholds in spring and late summer. Consequently, the stability of fine sediment deposits varies substantially over space and time, which has important implications for sediment transport models.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Pt(IV) Fluorescein Conjugates to Investigate Pt(IV) Intracellular Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ying; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Yeung, Jessica S.; Royzen, Maksim; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Pt(IV) anticancer compounds typically operate as prodrugs that are reduced in the hypoxic environment of cancer cells, losing two axial ligands in the process to generate active Pt(II) species. Here we report the synthesis of two fluorescent Pt(IV) prodrugs of cisplatin in order to image and evaluate the Pt(IV) reduction process in simulated and real biological environments. Treatment of the complexes dissolved in PBS buffer with reducing agents typically encountered in cells, glutathione or ascorbate, afforded a 3- to 5-fold fluorescence turn-on owing to reduction and loss of their fluorescein-based axial ligands, which are quenched when bound to platinum. Both Pt(IV) conjugates displayed moderate cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines, with IC50 values higher than that of cisplatin. Immunoblotting and DNA flow cytometry analyses of one of the complexes, Pt(IV)FL2, revealed that it damages DNA, causing cell cycle arrest in S or G2/M depending on exposure time, with ultimately triggering of apoptotic cell death. Fluorescence microscopic studies prove that Pt(IV)FL2 enters cells intact and undergoes reduction intracellularly. The results are best interpreted in terms of a model in which the axial fluorescein ligands are expelled through lysosomes, with the platinum(II) moiety generated in the process binding to genomic DNA, which results in cell death. PMID:23957697

  9. Type IV Creep Damage Behavior in Gr.91 Steel Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki; Watanabe, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (ASME Grade 91 steel) is used as a key structural material for boiler components in ultra-supercritical (USC) thermal power plants at approximately 873 K (600 °C). The creep strength of welded joints of this steel decreases as a result of Type IV creep cracking that forms in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) under long-term use at high temperatures. The current article aims to elucidate the damage processes and microstructural degradations that take place in the HAZ of these welded joints. Long-term creep tests for base metal, simulated HAZ, and welded joints were conducted at 823 K, 873 K, and 923 K (550 °C, 600 °C, and 650 °C). Furthermore, creep tests of thick welded joint specimens were interrupted at several time steps at 873 K (600 °C) and 90 MPa, after which the distribution and evolution of creep damage inside the plates were measured quantitatively. It was found that creep voids are initiated in the early stages (0.2 of life) of creep rupture life, which coalesce to form a crack at a later stage (0.8 of life). In a fine-grained HAZ, creep damage is concentrated chiefly in an area approximately 20 pct below the surface of the plate. The experimental creep damage distributions coincide closely with the computed results obtained by damage mechanics analysis using the creep properties of a simulated fine-grained HAZ. Both the concentration of creep strain and the high multiaxial stress conditions in the fine-grained HAZ influence the distribution of Type IV creep damage.

  10. Bioreduction of U(VI)-Phthalate to a Polymeric U(IV)-Phthalate Colloid

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, G.; Dodge, C; Francis, A

    2009-01-01

    Phthalic acid, a ubiquitous organic ligand, formed soluble mono- and biligand complexes with a uranyl ion that was then reduced to a U(IV)-phthalate by a Clostridium species under anaerobic conditions. We confirmed the reduction of the hexavalent uranium to the tetravalent oxidation state by UV-vis absorption and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. Sequential micro- and ultrafiltration of the solution revealed that the bioreduced uranium was present as a colloid with particles between 0.03 and 0.45 {mu}m. Analysis with extended X-ray absorption fine structure revealed the association of the reduced uranium with the phthalic acid as a repeating biligand 1:2 U(IV):phthalic acid polymer. This is the first report of the formation of a U(IV) complexed to two phthalic acid molecules in the form of a polymeric colloid. Although it was proposed that the bioreduction and the precipitation of uranium might be an invaluable strategy to immobilize uranium in contaminated environments, our results suggest that the organic ligands present there might hinder the precipitation of the bioreduced uranium under anaerobic conditions and, thereby, enhance its environmental mobility as uranium organic complexes or colloids.

  11. Dirac R-matrix calculations of photoionization cross-sections of Ca IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazir, R. T.; Bari, M. A.; Sardar, S.; Bilal, M.; Salahuddin, M.; Nasim, M. H.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper total photoionization cross sections in the ground (^2P^o_{3/2}) and two meta-stable states (^2P^o_{1/2},^2S_{1/2}) of Ca IV are reported using the relativistic Dirac Atomic R-matrix Codes (DARC) in the photon energy range 67-122 eV. The target wavefunctions are constructed with fully relativistic atomic structure GRASP package. A total of lowest lying 48 fine-structure levels arising from the four main configuration (3s23p4, 3s3p5 3s23p33d, 3p6) are considered for the target wavefunctions expansion. Our calculated eigenvalues of the core ion Ca V show reasonable agreement with available experimental and theoretical results. It is found that present ionization threshold energies of first three levels of Ca IV are in excellent agreement with NIST energies and experimental measurements. The photoionization cross sections of Ca IV are calculated with an appropriate energy step (0.1× 10-3 eV) to describe the resonance structures in vivid details. A comparison for the statistically weighted mixture of states (^2P^o_{3/2},^2P^o_{1/2}) with other experimental measurements including term-resolved ground state theoretical calculations is presented. Our computed photoionization cross sections agree better with the measured cross sections than the other theoretical approaches and are potentially more accurate.

  12. Mariner IV Mission to Mars. Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Jack N.

    1965-01-01

    This technical report is a series of individual papers documenting the Mariner-Mars project from its beginning in 1962 following the successful Mariner-Venus mission. Part I is pre-encounter data. It includes papers on the design, development, and testing of Mariner IV, as well as papers detailing methods of maintaining communication with and obtaining data from the spacecraft during flight, and expected results during encounter with Mars. Part 11, post-encounter data, to be published later, will consist of documentation of the events taking place during Mariner IV's encounter with Mars and thereafter. The Mariner-Mars mission, the culmination of an era of spacecraft development, has contributed much new technology to be used in future projects.

  13. Giant piezoelectricity of monolayer group IV monochalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Ruixiang; Li, Wenbin; Li, Ju; Yang, Li

    We predict enormous, anisotropic piezoelectric effects in intrinsic monolayer group IV monochalcogenides (MX, M =Sn or Ge, X =Se or S), including SnSe, SnS, GeSe, and GeS. Using first-principle simulations based on the modern theory of polarization, we find that their piezoelectric coefficients are about one to two orders of magnitude larger than those of other 2D materials, such as MoS2 and GaSe, and bulk quartz and AlN which are widely used in industry. This enhancement is a result of the unique ``puckered'' C2v symmetry and electronic structure of monolayer group IV monochalcogenides. Given the achieved experimental advances in the fabrication of monolayers, their flexible character, and ability to withstand enormous strain, these 2D structures with giant piezoelectric effects may be promising for a broad range of applications such as nano-sized sensors, piezotronics, and energy harvesting in portable electronic devices.

  14. [Type IV of hypersensitivity and its subtypes].

    PubMed

    Czarnobilska, Ewa; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Wsołek, Katarzyna

    2007-01-01

    Type IV of hypersensitivity reaction is usually manifested in the skin in different clinical pattern. According to traditional Gell and Coombs classification, the mechanism of IV type of allergic reaction has been associated with contact allergy with the activity of lymphocytes Th1 secreting interferon gamma. Now, this vision seems to be too simplified. In the last years there were publications, which can throw a new light on these complicated mechanisms leading to the development of the type IV of allergy, especially to drugs, nickel and other haptens and also can explain the differentiation of clinical pattern in respective patients. The skin symptoms in type IV of hypersensitivity are triggered by activation of specific T-cell CD4+ and CD8+. Immunohistochemical and functional analysis of reactive T-cell has shown that the delayed hypersensitivity reaction depends on the secreted cytokines. For example maculo-papular exanthema may be either triggered by Th1 or Th2 in nature and cytokines interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alfa or interleukin-4, 5 and 13. Bullous reactions (i.e. Stevens-Johnsons Syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis) are characterized by widespread keratinocyte apoptosis, a consequence of high CD8+ T-cell involvement and the molecular cytotoxicity of Fas, perforin and granzyme B. Pustular exanthema reactions are stimulated via the T-cell release of 11-8 and granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulatig factor (GM-CSF). For the better understanding of these inflammatory cascades deleted type IV of hypersensitivity reactions have been re-classified into four main subtypes: 1. IVa with Th1 and monocyte directed and cytokines: IFNgamma, IL-1, IL-2, 2. IVb with Th2 and eosinophils directed and cytokines: L-5, IL-4, IL-13, 3. IVc with T CD8+ directed and cytokines: perforin, granzyme B, Fas Ligand, 4. IVd with T CD4+, CD8+ and neutrophil directed and cytokines: IL8, GM-CSF. Clinically delayed hypersensitivity eruptions are often an overlap of cytokine

  15. Dewatering studies of fine clean coal

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.

    1991-01-01

    Physical cleaning of ultra-fine coal using an advanced froth flotation technique provides a low ash product, however, the amount of water associated with clean coal is high. Economic removal of water from the froth will be important for commercial applicability of advanced froth flotation processes. The main objective of the present research program is to study and understand the dewatering characteristics of ultra-fine clean coal and to develop the process parameters to effectively reduce the moisture to less than 20 percent in the clean coal product. The research approach under investigation utilizes synergistic effects of metal ions and surfactant to lower the moisture of clean coal using a conventional vacuum dewatering technique. During the last year's effort, it was reported that a combination of metal ion and surfactant provided a 22 percent moisture filter cake.

  16. Structure and Elongation of fine Ladies’ Hosiery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozo, M.; Vrljicak, Z.

    2016-07-01

    On a sock-knitting machine with diameter of cylindrical needle bed 100 mm (4e") that knitted with 400 needles, samples of fine women's hosiery were made from four PA filament yarns in counts 20 dtex f 20, 30 dtex f 34, 40 dtex f 40 and 60 dtex f 60. Each type of yarns was used to make hosiery samples with four loop sinking depths of unit values in a computer program 400, 550, 700 and 850. For all the samples, parameters of yarn structure were analyzed and elongation properties of knitted fabric were measured. During the elongation of knitted fabric, areas of knitted fabric elasticity, beginning of permanent deformation and elongation at break were measured. Elongation of knitted fabric in the wale direction, i.e. transverse hosiery elongation and elongation of knitted fabric in the course direction, or longitudinal direction of hosiery were measured. Yarn fineness and loop sinking depth significantly influence the elongation properties of hosiery.

  17. Jamming threshold of dry fine powders.

    PubMed

    Valverde, J M; Quintanilla, M A S; Castellanos, A

    2004-06-25

    We report a novel experimental study on the jamming transition of dry fine powders with controlled attractive energy and particle size. Like in attractive colloids dry fine particles experience diffusion-limited clustering in the fluidlike regime. At the jamming threshold fractal clusters crowd in a metastable state at volume fractions depending on attractive energy and close to the volume fraction of hard nonattractive spheres at jamming. Near the phase transition the stress-(volume fraction) relationship can be fitted to a critical-like functional form for a small range of applied stresses sigma approximately (phi-phi(J))(beta) as measured on foams, emulsions, and colloidal systems and predicted by numerical simulations on hard spheres. PMID:15245067

  18. Interaction between Escherichia coli and lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    A sample of mature lunar fines (10084.151) was solubilized to a high degree (about 17 percent) by the chelating agent salicylic acid (0.01. M). The neutralized (pH adjusted to 7.0) leachate was found to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli (ATCC 259922) in a minimial mineral salts glucose medium; however, the inhibition was somewhat less than that caused by neutralized salicylic acid alone. The presence of lunar fines in the minimal medium was highly stimulatory to growth of E. coli following an early inhibitory response. The bacterium survived less well in the lunar leachate than in distilled water, no doubt because of the salicylate. It was concluded that the sample of lunar soil tested has nutritional value to E. coli and that certain products of fermentation helped to solubilize the lunar soil.

  19. Shape study of fine coal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.C.; Cavallaro, J.A.; Wizzard, J.T.; Rohar, P.C.

    1985-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental and computational result on a three-dimensional shape model of fine coal particles, and an approach to describe and classify particle shape in terms of the elliptical approximation to their two-dimensional cross-sectional contours. The major semi-axis, minor semi-axis, orientation and tracing phase of each component ellipse, up to four harmonic components, were used as features to classify shapes of coal and pyrite particles. The semi-axes ratio of the fundamental ellipse indicates the elongation of the particle cross-sectional contour, while the harmonic content reflects the angularity of the contour or particle surface. The shape distribution obtained by such an analysis will provide an important physical characteristic of fine coal particles, which is needed in developing the advanced coal beneficiation processes. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  20. IVS contribution to the next ITRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Sabine; Messerschmitt, Linda; Thaller, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    Generating the contribution of the International VLBI Service (IVS) to the next ITRF (ITRF2013 or ITRF2014) was the main task of the IVS Combination Center at the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG, Germany) in 2014. Starting with the ITRF2005, the IVS contribution to the ITRF is an intra-technique combined solution using multiple individual contributions from different institutions. For the upcoming ITRF ten international institutions submitted data files for a combined solution. The data files contain 24h VLBI sessions from the late 1970s until the end of 2014 in SINEX file format containing datum free normal equations with station coordinates and Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP). All contributions have to meet the IVS standards for ITRF contribution in order to guarantee a consistent combined solution. In the course of the generation of the intra-technique combined solution, station coordinate time series for each station as well as a Terrestrial Reference Frame based on the contributed VLBI data (VTRF) were generated and analyzed. Preliminary results using data until the end of 2013 show a scaling factor of -0.47 ppb resulting from a 7-parameter Helmert transformation of the VTRF w.r.t. ITRF2008, which is comparable to the scaling factor that was determined in the precedent ITRF generation. An internal comparison of the EOPs between the combined solution and the individual contributions as well as external comparisons of the EOP series were carried out in order to assure a consistent quality of the EOPs. The data analyses, the combination procedure and results of the combined solution for station coordinates and EOP will be presented.

  1. The IVS data input to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nothnagel, Axel; Alef, Walter; Amagai, Jun; Andersen, Per Helge; Andreeva, Tatiana; Artz, Thomas; Bachmann, Sabine; Barache, Christophe; Baudry, Alain; Bauernfeind, Erhard; Baver, Karen; Beaudoin, Christopher; Behrend, Dirk; Bellanger, Antoine; Berdnikov, Anton; Bergman, Per; Bernhart, Simone; Bertarini, Alessandra; Bianco, Giuseppe; Bielmaier, Ewald; Boboltz, David; Böhm, Johannes; Böhm, Sigrid; Boer, Armin; Bolotin, Sergei; Bougeard, Mireille; Bourda, Geraldine; Buttaccio, Salvo; Cannizzaro, Letizia; Cappallo, Roger; Carlson, Brent; Carter, Merri Sue; Charlot, Patrick; Chen, Chenyu; Chen, Maozheng; Cho, Jungho; Clark, Thomas; Collioud, Arnaud; Colomer, Francisco; Colucci, Giuseppe; Combrinck, Ludwig; Conway, John; Corey, Brian; Curtis, Ronald; Dassing, Reiner; Davis, Maria; de-Vicente, Pablo; De Witt, Aletha; Diakov, Alexey; Dickey, John; Diegel, Irv; Doi, Koichiro; Drewes, Hermann; Dube, Maurice; Elgered, Gunnar; Engelhardt, Gerald; Evangelista, Mark; Fan, Qingyuan; Fedotov, Leonid; Fey, Alan; Figueroa, Ricardo; Fukuzaki, Yoshihiro; Gambis, Daniel; Garcia-Espada, Susana; Gaume, Ralph; Gaylard, Michael; Geiger, Nicole; Gipson, John; Gomez, Frank; Gomez-Gonzalez, Jesus; Gordon, David; Govind, Ramesh; Gubanov, Vadim; Gulyaev, Sergei; Haas, Ruediger; Hall, David; Halsig, Sebastian; Hammargren, Roger; Hase, Hayo; Heinkelmann, Robert; Helldner, Leif; Herrera, Cristian; Himwich, Ed; Hobiger, Thomas; Holst, Christoph; Hong, Xiaoyu; Honma, Mareki; Huang, Xinyong; Hugentobler, Urs; Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Iddink, Andreas; Ihde, Johannes; Ilijin, Gennadiy; Ipatov, Alexander; Ipatova, Irina; Ishihara, Misao; Ivanov, D. V.; Jacobs, Chris; Jike, Takaaki; Johansson, Karl-Ake; Johnson, Heidi; Johnston, Kenneth; Ju, Hyunhee; Karasawa, Masao; Kaufmann, Pierre; Kawabata, Ryoji; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Kawai, Eiji; Kaydanovsky, Michael; Kharinov, Mikhail; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kokado, Kensuke; Kondo, Tetsuro; Korkin, Edward; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Krasna, Hana; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Kurdubov, Sergey; Kurihara, Shinobu; Kuroda, Jiro; Kwak, Younghee; La Porta, Laura; Labelle, Ruth; Lamb, Doug; Lambert, Sébastien; Langkaas, Line; Lanotte, Roberto; Lavrov, Alexey; Le Bail, Karine; Leek, Judith; Li, Bing; Li, Huihua; Li, Jinling; Liang, Shiguang; Lindqvist, Michael; Liu, Xiang; Loesler, Michael; Long, Jim; Lonsdale, Colin; Lovell, Jim; Lowe, Stephen; Lucena, Antonio; Luzum, Brian; Ma, Chopo; Ma, Jun; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Machida, Morito; MacMillan, Dan; Madzak, Matthias; Malkin, Zinovy; Manabe, Seiji; Mantovani, Franco; Mardyshkin, Vyacheslav; Marshalov, Dmitry; Mathiassen, Geir; Matsuzaka, Shigeru; McCarthy, Dennis; Melnikov, Alexey; Michailov, Andrey; Miller, Natalia; Mitchell, Donald; Mora-Diaz, Julian Andres; Mueskens, Arno; Mukai, Yasuko; Nanni, Mauro; Natusch, Tim; Negusini, Monia; Neidhardt, Alexander; Nickola, Marisa; Nicolson, George; Niell, Arthur; Nikitin, Pavel; Nilsson, Tobias; Ning, Tong; Nishikawa, Takashi; Noll, Carey; Nozawa, Kentarou; Ogaja, Clement; Oh, Hongjong; Olofsson, Hans; Opseth, Per Erik; Orfei, Sandro; Pacione, Rosa; Pazamickas, Katherine; Petrachenko, William; Pettersson, Lars; Pino, Pedro; Plank, Lucia; Ploetz, Christian; Poirier, Michael; Poutanen, Markku; Qian, Zhihan; Quick, Jonathan; Rahimov, Ismail; Redmond, Jay; Reid, Brett; Reynolds, John; Richter, Bernd; Rioja, Maria; Romero-Wolf, Andres; Ruszczyk, Chester; Salnikov, Alexander; Sarti, Pierguido; Schatz, Raimund; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Schiavone, Francesco; Schreiber, Ulrich; Schuh, Harald; Schwarz, Walter; Sciarretta, Cecilia; Searle, Anthony; Sekido, Mamoru; Seitz, Manuela; Shao, Minghui; Shibuya, Kazuo; Shu, Fengchun; Sieber, Moritz; Skjaeveland, Asmund; Skurikhina, Elena; Smolentsev, Sergey; Smythe, Dan; Sousa, Don; Sovers, Ojars; Stanford, Laura; Stanghellini, Carlo; Steppe, Alan; Strand, Rich; Sun, Jing; Surkis, Igor; Takashima, Kazuhiro; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Tanir, Emine; Tao, An; Tateyama, Claudio; Teke, Kamil; Thomas, Cynthia; Thorandt, Volkmar; Thornton, Bruce; Tierno Ros, Claudia; Titov, Oleg; Titus, Mike; Tomasi, Paolo; Tornatore, Vincenza; Trigilio, Corrado; Trofimov, Dmitriy; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Tuccari, Gino; Tzioumis, Tasso; Ujihara, Hideki; Ullrich, Dieter; Uunila, Minttu; Venturi, Tiziana; Vespe, Francesco; Vityazev, Veniamin; Volvach, Alexandr; Vytnov, Alexander; Wang, Guangli; Wang, Jinqing; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Na; Wang, Shiqiang; Wei, Wenren; Weston, Stuart; Whitney, Alan; Wojdziak, Reiner; Yatskiv, Yaroslav; Yang, Wenjun; Ye, Shuhua; Yi, Sangoh; Yusup, Aili; Zapata, Octavio; Zeitlhoefler, Reinhard; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Xiuzhong; Zhao, Rongbing; Zheng, Weimin; Zhou, Ruixian; Zubko, Nataliya

    2015-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a primary space-geodetic technique for determining precise coordinates on the Earth, for monitoring the variable Earth rotation and orientation with highest precision, and for deriving many other parameters of the Earth system. The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS, http://ivscc.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The datasets published here are the results of individual Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions in the form of normal equations in SINEX 2.0 format (http://www.iers.org/IERS/EN/Organization/AnalysisCoordinator/SinexFormat/sinex.html, the SINEX 2.0 description is attached as pdf) provided by IVS as the input for the next release of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRF): ITRF2014. This is a new version of the ITRF2008 release (Bockmann et al., 2009). For each session/ file, the normal equation systems contain elements for the coordinate components of all stations having participated in the respective session as well as for the Earth orientation parameters (x-pole, y-pole, UT1 and its time derivatives plus offset to the IAU2006 precession-nutation components dX, dY (https://www.iau.org/static/resolutions/IAU2006_Resol1.pdf). The terrestrial part is free of datum. The data sets are the result of a weighted combination of the input of several IVS Analysis Centers. The IVS contribution for ITRF2014 is described in Bachmann et al (2015), Schuh and Behrend (2012) provide a general overview on the VLBI method, details on the internal data handling can be found at Behrend (2013).

  2. Genome Sequencing and Analysis Conference IV

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    J. Craig Venter and C. Thomas Caskey co-chaired Genome Sequencing and Analysis Conference IV held at Hilton Head, South Carolina from September 26--30, 1992. Venter opened the conference by noting that approximately 400 researchers from 16 nations were present four times as many participants as at Genome Sequencing Conference I in 1989. Venter also introduced the Data Fair, a new component of the conference allowing exchange and on-site computer analysis of unpublished sequence data.

  3. In vitro removal of actinide (IV) ions

    DOEpatents

    Weitl, Frederick L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    1982-01-01

    A compound of the formula: ##STR1## wherein X is hydrogen or a conventional electron-withdrawing group, particularly --SO.sub.3 H or a salt thereof; n is 2, 3, or 4; m is 2, 3, or 4; and p is 2 or 3. The present compounds are useful as specific sequestering agents for actinide (IV) ions. Also described is a method for the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamidation of azaalkanes.

  4. Thermal conductivity of Apollo 16 lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cremers, C. J.; Hsia, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    The vacuum thermal conductivity of the Apollo 16 fines is presented as a function of temperature for the approximate range of diurnal temperatures on the moon. The density used is 1500 kg/cu m, which is approximately the density of the core-tube samples returned from the landing site. The thermal diffusivity was calculated from the conductivity, density, and specific heat and is also presented.

  5. Proton-beam technique dates fine wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumé, Belle

    2008-10-01

    Nuclear physicists in France have invented a way to authenticate the vintage of rare wine without needing a sommelier's keen nose or even a corkscrew. The technique, which involves firing high-energy protons at wine bottles, can determine how old the bottles are and even where they come from. The new method could help unmask counterfeit wines - a growing problem in the fine-wine industry, where a bottle can sell for thousands of Euros.

  6. Dewatering of fine coal using hyperbaric filter

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Wang, X.H.; Parekh, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    Removal of moisture from ultra-fine clean coal (minus 100 mesh) to below 20% level is difficult using conventional dewatering equipment. This paper describes a couple of dewatering approaches which were found to be effective in providing filter cakes containing less than 20% moisture. These approaches involve addition of metal ion-surfactant, and split size dewatering of coal without addition of any reagent.

  7. Resistive Fine Tuning of Resonant Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Simple fixed-inductance/fixed-capacitance tank circuit modified for fine adjustment of resonant frequency by addition of small inductance with potentiometer across it. Additional winding built into full winding as integral part or added externally. Technique provides quick way of tuning reactance out of power-transformer circuit to maximize power transfer or to adjust frequency of oscillator. Applications include rotary transformers, servo amplifiers, and analog computer modules.

  8. Process for treating moisture laden coal fines

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Burl E.; Henry, Raymond M.; Trivett, Gordon S.; Albaugh, Edgar W.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for making a free flowing granular product from moisture laden caked coal fines, such as wet cake, by mixing a water immiscible substance, such as oil, with the caked coal, preferably under low shear forces for a period of time sufficient to produce a plurality of free flowing granules. Each granule is preferably comprised of a dry appearing admixture of one or more coal particle, 2-50% by weight water and the water immiscible substance.

  9. Synthesis of fine-grained TATB

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Kien-Yin; Kennedy, James E.

    2003-04-15

    A method for producing fine-grained triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB) powders having improved detonation-spreading performance and hence increased shock sensitivity when compared with that for ultrafine TATB is described. A single-step, sonochemical amination of trichloro-trinitrobenzene using ammonium hydroxide solution in a sealed vessel yields TATB having approximately 6 .mu.m median particle diameter and increased shock sensitivity.

  10. Fine needle aspiration cytology of gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, D. C.; Irwin, S. T.

    1997-01-01

    Four patients between 58 and 81 years of age undergoing investigation and endoscopic biopsy for gastric carcinoma also were subjected to direct-vision fine needle aspiration cytology of their mucosal lesions which yielded malignant cells. The relevance of this technique is discussed regarding both intrinsic and extrinsic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract. Images Fig 1. (a) Fig 1. (b) Fig 2. (a) Fig 2. (b) PMID:9414941

  11. Planning a Kinetic and Mechanistic Study with Cerium (IV)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Samir B.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Presents a kinetic study that utilizes a method for varying the concentrations of the possible Ce(IV) species and computing the concentration distribution of the sulfato and hydroxo species of Ce(IV). (MLH)

  12. Generation-IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Harold

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear power technology has evolved through roughly three generations of system designs: a first generation of prototypes and first-of-a-kind units implemented during the period 1950 to 1970; a second generation of industrial power plants built from 1970 to the turn of the century, most of which are still in operation today; and a third generation of evolutionary advanced reactors which began being built by the turn of the 20^th century, usually called Generation III or III+, which incorporate technical lessons learned through more than 12,000 reactor-years of operation. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a cooperative international endeavor to develop advanced nuclear energy systems in response to the social, environmental and economic requirements of the 21^st century. Six Generation IV systems under development by GIF promise to enhance the future contribution and benefits of nuclear energy. All Generation IV systems aim at performance improvement, new applications of nuclear energy, and/or more sustainable approaches to the management of nuclear materials. High-temperature systems offer the possibility of efficient process heat applications and eventually hydrogen production. Enhanced sustainability is achieved primarily through adoption of a closed fuel cycle with reprocessing and recycling of plutonium, uranium and minor actinides using fast reactors. This approach provides significant reduction in waste generation and uranium resource requirements.

  13. 45 CFR 302.33 - Services to individuals not receiving title IV-A assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... application under this section; or (ii) Is a non-IV-A Medicaid recipient; or (iii) Has been receiving IV-D services and is no longer eligible for assistance under the title IV-A, IV-E foster care, and Medicaid... IV-A, IV-E foster care, and Medicaid programs, the IV-D agency must notify the family, within...

  14. Optimization of calcium phosphate fine ceramic powders preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezanova, K.; Tepavitcharova, S.; Rabadjieva, D.; Gergulova, R.; Ilieva, R.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of biomimetic synthesis method, reaction medium and further precursor treatments on the chemical and phase composition, crystal size and morphology of calcium phosphates was examined. Nanosized calcium phosphate precursors were biomimetically precipitated by the method of continuous precipitation in three types of reaction media at pH 8: (i) SBF as an inorganic electrolyte system; (ii) organic (glycerine) modified SBF (volume ratio of 1:1); (iii) polymer (10 g/l xanthan gum or 10 g/l guar gum) modified SBF (volume ratio of 1:1). After maturation (24 h) the samples were lyophilized, calcinated at 300°C for 3 hours, and washed with water, followed by new gelation, lyophilization and step-wise (200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000°C, each for 3 hours) sintering. The reaction medium influenced the chemical composition and particle size but not the morphology of the calcium phosphate powders. In all studied cases bi-phase calcium phosphate fine powders with well-shaped spherical grains, consisting of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) with a Ca/P ratio of 1.3 - 1.6 were obtained. The SBF modifiers decreased the particle size of the product in the sequence guar gum ˜ xanthan gum < glycerin < SBF medium.

  15. FINE PARTICLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY: CONVENTIONAL AND NOVEL DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews the development of technology in fine particle control. Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), scrubbers, fabric filters, and novel devices were assessed to determine their efficiency. ESPs were found to be excellent in controlling fine particles: with an efficien...

  16. INVESTIGATIONS INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser process performance parameters. Fine pore diffusers were obtained from five municipal wastewa...

  17. Biomass - chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaly, K.A.

    1982-08-01

    A host of industrial chemicals, specialty items, solvents, plastics, elastomers, fibers and films can be produced from agricultural crops, wood, paper mill wastes, food processing wastes, municipal waste and sewage. Existing chemical processes based on readily renewable plant materials are reviewed. These include ethanol and acetone-butanol fermentations, oilseed chemicals, furfural and cellulosics. (Refs. 16).

  18. Chemical sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  19. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reserved IV Appendix IV to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Appendix IV to Part 600...

  20. 29 CFR 4022.63 - Estimated title IV benefit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Estimated title IV benefit. 4022.63 Section 4022.63 Labor... PAYABLE IN TERMINATED SINGLE-EMPLOYER PLANS Benefit Reductions in Terminating Plans § 4022.63 Estimated... administrator shall determine each participant's estimated title IV benefit. The estimated title IV...