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Sample records for fine-structure constant wavelength

  1. The Fine-Structure Constant and Wavelength Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan

    The fine-structure constant is a fundamental constant of the universe--and widely thought to have an unchanging value. However, the past decade has witnessed a controversy unfold over the claimed detection that the fine-structure constant had a different value in the distant past. These astrophysical measurements were made with spectrographs at the world's largest optical telescopes. The spectrographs make precise measurements of the wavelength spacing of absorption lines in the metals in the gas between the quasar background source and our telescopes on Earth. The wavelength spacing gives a snapshot of the atomic physics at the time of the interaction. Whether the fine-structure constant has changed is determined by comparing the atomic physics in the distant past with the atomic physics of today. We present our contribution to the discussion by analyzing three nights data taken with the HIRES instrument (High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph) on the Keck telescope. We provide an independent measurement on the fine-structure constant from the Damped Lyman alpha system at a redshift of z =2.309 (10.8 billion years ago) quasar PHL957. We developed a new method for calibrating the wavelength scale of a quasar exposure to a much higher precision than previously achieved. In our subsequent analysis, we discovered unexpected wavelength calibration errors that has not been taken into account in the previously reported measurements. After characterizing the wavelength miscalibrations on the Keck-HIRES instrument, we obtained several nights of data from the main competing instrument, the VLT (Very Large Telescope) with UVES (Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph). We applied our new wavelength calibration method and uncovered similar in nature systematic errors as found on Keck-HIRES. Finally, we make a detailed Monte Carlo exploration of the effects that these miscalibrations have on making precision fine-structure constant measurements.

  2. Impact of long-range wavelength-scale distortion on fine-structure constant measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Vincent; Webb, John Kelvin

    2015-08-01

    New ideas in unification theories suggest space-time variations of dimensionless physical constants may exist and that they might be within reach of current instrumental precision available from the world's best observatories. State-of-the-art observations already hint at such an effect. If confirmed, fundamental revisions in standard physics would be required.Accurate calibrations are of course crucial in searches for space-time variations of dimensionless physical constants using spectroscopic observations from the world's best observatories. Several recent studies reveal wavelength distortions in optical echelle spectrographs. These are not yet understood and they have not yet been measured using the actual science data used to derive constraints on space-time variation of alpha (critical since they appear to vary with time). In this work we study the impact of such distortions on measurements of the fine structure constant, alpha, observed at high redshift using high-resolution quasar spectroscopy.We have carried out extensive high-performance computing calculations that quantify the effect accurately for the first time, using the same quasar spectra used to measure alpha at high redshift. The spectra we use were obtained using the Keck telescope in Hawaii and the European Southern Observatory's VLT.We explain the detailed methodologies required, using instrumental configuration information from each wavelength setting used in forming a final summed spectrum. Our results show that whilst long-range wavelength-scale distortions do exist, and hence contribute an additional systematic error, these systematics (measured directly from the science exposures themselves) are small and unlikely to explain the spatial variations alpha of reported recently.

  3. Selection of ThAr lines for wavelength calibration of echelle spectra and implications for variations in the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. T.; Tzanavaris, P.; Webb, J. K.; Lovis, C.

    2007-06-01

    Echelle spectrographs currently provide some of the most precise and detailed spectra in astronomy, the interpretation of which sometimes depends on the wavelength calibration accuracy. In some applications, such as constraining cosmological variations in the fundamental constants from quasar absorption lines, the wavelength calibration is crucial. Here we detail an algorithm for selecting thorium-argon (ThAr) emission lines for wavelength calibration which incorporates the properties of both a new laboratory wavelength list and the spectrograph of interest. We apply the algorithm to the Very Large Telescope Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) and demonstrate a factor of >~3 improvement in the wavelength calibration residuals (i.e. random errors) alone. It is also found that UVES spectra calibrated using a previous, widely distributed line-list contain systematic +/-30 -75 ms-1 distortions of the wavelength scale over both short and long wavelength ranges. These distortions have important implications for current UVES constraints on cosmological variations in the fine-structure constant. The induced systematic errors are most severe for Mg/FeII quasar absorbers in the redshift range 1.2 <~ zabs <~ 2.3, with individual absorbers studied by recent authors containing systematic errors up to four times larger than quoted statistical errors.

  4. The fine structure constant and habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandora, McCullen

    2016-08-01

    We use the existence of habitable planets to impose anthropic requirements on the fine structure constant, α. To this effect, we present two considerations that restrict its value to be very near the one observed. The first, that the end product of stellar fusion is iron and not one of its neighboring elements, restricts α‑1 to be 145± 50. The second, that radiogenic heat in the Earth's interior remains adequately productive for billions of years, restricts it to be 145±9. A connection with the grand unified theory window is discussed, effectively providing a route to probe ultra-high energy physics with upcoming advances in planetary science.

  5. What is Fine-structure Constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2008-10-01

    Equation in [1] α>= 1/ ln λ, linking fine-structure constant and cosmological constant derived by using S = k ln W, the total number of microstates used (W) is 10^60, justified based on a unique age tag attached to each Planck time. The OPEN and CLOSED states of the particle's mouth illustrated in [1] could be two different types of entropic repositioning pulses, say attractive and repulsive. They need not be confused as affecting the number of microstates. The characteristics of a microstate need not change the number of microstates. Mathematically then, W = N! / n!(N-n)!; where N = 10^60 and n =1; giving W = 10^60, used in [1]. There are reasons to consider each Planck time as unique microstate based on its unique age. While investigating the proposal in terms of other theories, one has to be to keep in mind that the knowledge that created one problem cannot solve another. Refer to [1] Goradia, Shantilal, ``What is Fine-structure Constant?'' http://www.arXiv.org/pdf/physics/0210040v3.

  6. A New Physical Meaning of Sommerfeld Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    2015-04-01

    Identifying physical space or Casimir vacuum as a compressible tachyon fluid, Planck compressible ether, leads to stochastic definitions of Planck h = mk <λk > c and Boltzmann k = mk <νk > c constants, finite photon mass mk = (hk/c3)1/2 , amu = mk c2 = (hkc)1/2 , and modified Avogadro-Loschmidt number No = 1/(hkc)1/2 = 6.03766 x1023 mole-1 . Thus, Lorentz-FitzGerald contractions now result from compressibility of physical space and become causal (Pauli) in accordance with Poincaré-Lorentz dynamic theory of relativity as opposed to Einstein kinematic theory of relativity. At thermodynamic equilibrium he = me <λe > ve = hk = mk <λk > c = h, Compton wavelength can be expressed as λc = h/me c = (ve /c)h <λe > /(me <λe > ve) = αλe . Hence, Sommerfeld fine structure constant α is identified as the ratio of electron to photon speeds α = e2/(2ɛo hc) = ve/c = 1/137.036. The mean thermal speed of electron at equilibrium with photon gas is ve = 2.187640x106 m/s and its de Broglie wavelength is λe = 3.3250x10-10 m. Also, electron kinetic energy for oscillations in two directions < x + > and < x- > or ɛe = hνe = me ve2= kTe results in electron temperature Te = 3.15690x105 K.

  7. A simple cosmology with a varying fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Sandvik, Håvard Bunes; Barrow, John D; Magueijo, João

    2002-01-21

    We investigate the cosmological consequences of a theory in which the electric charge e can vary. In this theory the fine structure "constant," alpha, remains almost constant in the radiation era, undergoes a small increase in the matter era, but approaches a constant value when the universe starts accelerating because of a positive cosmological constant. This model satisfies geonuclear, nucleosynthesis, and cosmic microwave background constraints on time variation in alpha, while fitting the observed accelerating Universe and evidence for small alpha variations in quasar spectra. It also places specific restrictions on the nature of the dark matter. Further tests, involving stellar spectra and Eötvös experiments, are proposed. PMID:11801051

  8. Topological Quantization in Units of the Fine Structure Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejko, Joseph; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Drew, H.Dennis; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-11-11

    Fundamental topological phenomena in condensed matter physics are associated with a quantized electromagnetic response in units of fundamental constants. Recently, it has been predicted theoretically that the time-reversal invariant topological insulator in three dimensions exhibits a topological magnetoelectric effect quantized in units of the fine structure constant {alpha} = e{sup 2}/{h_bar}c. In this Letter, we propose an optical experiment to directly measure this topological quantization phenomenon, independent of material details. Our proposal also provides a way to measure the half-quantized Hall conductances on the two surfaces of the topological insulator independently of each other.

  9. New Tests for Variations of the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant, by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atomos with different atomic number Z. H- maser, Cs and Hg+ clocks have a different dependence on ia relativistic contributions of order (Z. Recent H-maser vs Hg+ clock comparison data improves laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to giveFuture laser cooled clocks (Be+, Rb, Cs, Hg+, etc.), when compared, will yield the most senstive of all tests for.

  10. Atomic Clocks and Variations of the FIne Structure Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant alpha by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atoms with different atomic number Z. H-maser, Cs, and Hg(+) clocks have a different dependence on alpha via relativistic contributions of order (Z-alpha)(sup 2). Recent H-maser vs Hg(+) clock comparison data improve laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to give dot-alpha less than or equal to 3.7 x 10(exp -14)/yr. Future laser cooled clocks (Be(+), Rb, Cs, Hg(+), etc.), when compared, will yield the most sensitive of all tests for dot-alpha/alpha.

  11. Varying fine structure 'constant' and charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.; Schiffer, Marcelo

    2009-12-15

    Speculation that the fine-structure constant {alpha} varies in spacetime has a long history. We derive, in 4-D general relativity and in isotropic coordinates, the solution for a charged spherical black hole according to the framework for dynamical {alpha} J. D. Bekenstein, Phys. Rev. D 25, 1527 (1982).. This solution coincides with a previously known one-parameter extension of the dilatonic black hole family. Among the notable properties of varying-{alpha} charged black holes are adherence to a 'no hair' principle, the absence of the inner (Cauchy) horizon of the Reissner-Nordstroem black holes, the nonexistence of precisely extremal black holes, and the appearance of naked singularities in an analytic extension of the relevant metric. The exteriors of almost extremal electrically (magnetically) charged black holes have simple structures which makes their influence on applied magnetic (electric) fields transparent. We rederive the thermodynamic functions of the modified black holes; the otherwise difficult calculation of the electric potential is done by a shortcut. We confirm that variability of {alpha} in the wake of expansion of the universe does not threaten the generalized second law.

  12. The apparent fine-tuning of the cosmological, gravitational and fine structure constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaves, Laurence

    2016-02-01

    A numerical coincidence relating the values of the cosmological, gravitational and electromagnetic fine structure constants is presented and discussed in relation to the apparent anthropic fine-tuning of these three fundamental constants of nature.

  13. Measurement of. cap alpha. /sub s/. [Strong fine structure constant

    SciTech Connect

    Clavelli, L.

    1983-01-01

    We point out that a number of QCD tests, relatively free of obvious nonperturbative corrections and other theoretical problems, are now available in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation. By focusing on these tests, one can see the beginning of a confirmation of the running of the strong-coupling constant predicted by the renormalization group.

  14. Impact of instrumental systematic errors on fine-structure constant measurements with quasar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new `supercalibration' technique for measuring systematic distortions in the wavelength scales of high-resolution spectrographs. By comparing spectra of `solar twin' stars or asteroids with a reference laboratory solar spectrum, distortions in the standard thorium-argon calibration can be tracked with ˜10 m s-1 precision over the entire optical wavelength range on scales of both echelle orders (˜50-100 Å) and entire spectrographs arms (˜1000-3000 Å). Using archival spectra from the past 20 yr, we have probed the supercalibration history of the Very Large Telescope-Ultraviolet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph (VLT-UVES) and Keck-High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (HIRES) spectrographs. We find that systematic errors in their wavelength scales are ubiquitous and substantial, with long-range distortions varying between typically ±200 m s-1 per 1000 Å. We apply a simple model of these distortions to simulated spectra that characterize the large UVES and HIRES quasar samples which previously indicated possible evidence for cosmological variations in the fine-structure constant, α. The spurious deviations in α produced by the model closely match important aspects of the VLT-UVES quasar results at all redshifts and partially explain the HIRES results, though not self-consistently at all redshifts. That is, the apparent ubiquity, size and general characteristics of the distortions are capable of significantly weakening the evidence for variations in α from quasar absorption lines.

  15. CONSTRAINTS ON SPATIAL VARIATIONS IN THE FINE-STRUCTURE CONSTANT FROM PLANCK

    SciTech Connect

    O'Bryan, Jon; Smidt, Joseph; De Bernardis, Francesco; Cooray, Asantha

    2015-01-01

    We use the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data from Planck to constrain the spatial fluctuations of the fine-structure constant α at a redshift of 1100. We use a quadratic estimator to measure the four-point correlation function of the CMB temperature anisotropies and extract the angular power spectrum fine-structure constant spatial variations projected along the line of sight at the last scattering surface. At tens of degree angular scales and above, we constrain the fractional rms fluctuations of the fine-structure constant to be (δα/α){sub rms} < 3.4 × 10{sup –3} at the 68% confidence level. We find no evidence for a spatially varying α at a redshift of 10{sup 3}.

  16. Measuring the fine structure constant with Bragg diffraction and Bloch oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chenghui; Estey, Brian; Parker, Richard; Dudley, Jordan; Müller, Holger

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated a new scheme for atom interferometry based on large-momentum-transfer Bragg beam splitters and Bloch oscillations. In this new scheme, we have achieved a resolution of δα / α =0.25ppb in the fine structure constant measurement, which gives up to 4.4 million radians of phase difference between freely evolving matter waves. We have suppressed many systematic effects known in most atom interferometers with Raman beam splitters such as light shift, Zeeman effect shift as well as vibration. We have also simulated multi-atom Bragg diffraction to understand sub-ppb systematic effects, and implemented spatial filtering to further suppress systematic effects. We present our recent progress toward a measurement of the fine structure constant, which will provide a stringent test of the standard model of particle physics.

  17. Measuring h /mCs and the Fine Structure Constant with Bragg Diffraction and Bloch Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Richard

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated a new scheme for atom interferometry based on large-momentum-transfer Bragg beam splitters and Bloch oscillations. In this new scheme, we have achieved a resolution of δα / α =0.25ppb in the fine structure constant measurement, which gives up to 4.4 million radians of phase difference between freely evolving matter waves. We suppress many systematic effects, e.g., Zeeman shifts and effects from Earth's gravity and vibrations, use Bloch oscillations to increase the signal and reduce the diffraction phase, simulate multi-atom Bragg diffraction to understand sub-ppb systematic effects, and implement spatial filtering to further suppress systematic effects. We present our recent progress toward a measurement of the fine structure constant, which will provide a stringent test of the standard model of particle physics.

  18. Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods applied to measuring the fine structure constant from quasar spectroscopy .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. A.; Mortlock, D. J.; Webb, J. K.; Murphy, M. T.

    Recent attempts to constrain cosmological variation in the fine structure constant, alpha , using quasar absorption lines have yielded two statistical samples which initially appear to be inconsistent. One of these samples was subsequently demonstrated to not pass consistency tests; it appears that the optimisation algorithm used to fit the model to the spectra failed. Nevertheless, the results of the other hinge on the robustness of the spectral fitting program VPFIT, which has been tested through simulation but not through direct exploration of the likelihood function. We present the application of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods to this problem, and demonstrate that VPFIT produces similar values and uncertainties for Delta alpha /alpha , the fractional change in the fine structure constant, as our MCMC algorithm, and thus that VPFIT is reliable.

  19. Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods applied to measuring the fine structure constant from quasar spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Julian; Mortlock, Daniel; Webb, John; Murphy, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Recent attempts to constrain cosmological variation in the fine structure constant, α, using quasar absorption lines have yielded two statistical samples which initially appear to be inconsistent. One of these samples was subsequently demonstrated to not pass consistency tests; it appears that the optimisation algorithm used to fit the model to the spectra failed. Nevertheless, the results of the other hinge on the robustness of the spectral fitting program VPFIT, which has been tested through simulation but not through direct exploration of the likelihood function. We present the application of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods to this problem, and demonstrate that VPFIT produces similar values and uncertainties for Δα/α, the fractional change in the fine structure constant, as our MCMC algorithm, and thus that VPFIT is reliable.

  20. Constraints on field theoretical models for variation of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles L.

    2005-02-01

    Recent theoretical ideas and observational claims suggest that the fine structure constant α may be variable. We examine a spectrum of models in which α is a function of a scalar field. Specifically, we consider three scenarios: oscillating α, monotonic time variation of α, and time-independent α that is spatially varying. We examine the constraints imposed upon these theories by cosmological observations, particle detector experiments, and “fifth force” experiments. These constraints are very strong on models involving oscillation but cannot compete with bounds from the Oklo subnuclear reactor on models with monotonic timelike variation of α. One particular model with spatial variation is consistent with all current experimental and observational measurements, including those from two seemingly conflicting measurements of the fine structure constant using the many multiplet method on absorption lines.

  1. 21-cm radiation: a new probe of variation in the fine-structure constant.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D

    2007-03-16

    We investigate the effect of variation in the value of the fine-structure constant (alpha) at high redshifts (recombination > z > 30) on the absorption of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 21 cm hyperfine transition of the neutral atomic hydrogen. We find that the 21 cm signal is very sensitive to the variations in alpha and it is so far the only probe of the fine-structure constant in this redshift range. A change in the value of alpha by 1% changes the mean brightness temperature decrement of the CMB due to 21 cm absorption by >5% over the redshift range z < 50. There is an effect of similar magnitude on the amplitude of the fluctuations in the brightness temperature. The redshift of maximum absorption also changes by approximately 5%. PMID:17501040

  2. Enhanced effect of temporal variation of the fine-structure constant in diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-03-15

    We show that the relative effect of variation of the fine-structure constant in microwave transitions between very close and narrow rotational-hyperfine levels may be enhanced 2-3 orders of magnitude in diatomic molecules with unpaired electrons like LaS, LaO, LuS, LuO, YbF, and similar molecular ions. The enhancement is result of cancellation between the hyperfine and rotational intervals.

  3. Fine Structure in the Mm-Wavelength Spectra of the Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, H. S.; Cecatto, J. R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Faltan observaciones solares espectrosc6picas en la longitud de onda milimetrica. Hay sugerencias de que se puede superponer una fi na estructura en frecuencia a la componente-S de la regi6n solar activa, asi como a la componente del brote en las longitudes de onda milimetri- cas. Se ha desarrollado un receptor de alta sensibilidad de pasos de frecuencia que opera en el intervalo de 23-18 GHz con una resoluci6n de 1 GHz y resoluci6n de tiempo variable entre 1.2 y 96 sec, usando la an- tena de Itapetinga de 13.7-m para estudiar la estructura fina en frecuencia y tiempo. Discutimos el espectro en longitud de onda-mm en re- giones activas y su evoluci6n en el tiempo. El estudio de Ia evoluci6n en el tiempo de la regi6n activa en AR 5569 observada el 29 de junio de 1989, sugiere la existencia de estructuras finas como funci6n deltiempo. ABSTRACT. There is a lack of mm-wavelength spectroscopic solar observations. There are suggestions that a fine structure in frequency may be superimposed on the S-component of solar active region as well as on the burst component at inm-wavelengths. To study fine structure in frequency and time, a high sensitivity step frequency receiver operating in the frequency range 23-18 GHz with frequency resolution of 1 GHz and variable time resolution 1.2 to 96 sec, using 13.7 m diameter Itapetinga radome covered antenna, has been developed. Here, we discuss mm-wavelength spectra of active regions and their time evolution. Study of time evolution of an active region AR 5569 observed on 29th June, 1989 suggests existence of fine structures as a function of time. ( Ck : SUN-ACTIVITY - SUN-RADIO RADIATION

  4. Constraining the variation of the fine-structure constant with observations of narrow quasar absorption lines

    SciTech Connect

    Songaila, A.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-01

    The unequivocal demonstration of temporal or spatial variability in a fundamental constant of nature would be of enormous significance. Recent attempts to measure the variability of the fine-structure constant α over cosmological time, using high-resolution spectra of high-redshift quasars observed with 10 m class telescopes, have produced conflicting results. We use the many multiplet (MM) method with Mg II and Fe II lines on very high signal-to-noise, high-resolution (R = 72, 000) Keck HIRES spectra of eight narrow quasar absorption systems. We consider both systematic uncertainties in spectrograph wavelength calibration and also velocity offsets introduced by complex velocity structure in even apparently simple and weak narrow lines and analyze their effect on claimed variations in α. We find no significant change in α, Δα/α = (0.43 ± 0.34) × 10{sup –5}, in the redshift range z = 0.7-1.5, where this includes both statistical and systematic errors. We also show that the scatter in measurements of Δα/α arising from absorption line structure can be considerably larger than assigned statistical errors even for apparently simple and narrow absorption systems. We find a null result of Δα/α = (– 0.59 ± 0.55) × 10{sup –5} in a system at z = 1.7382 using lines of Cr II, Zn II, and Mn II, whereas using Cr II and Zn II lines in a system at z = 1.6614 we find a systematic velocity trend that, if interpreted as a shift in α, would correspond to Δα/α = (1.88 ± 0.47) × 10{sup –5}, where both results include both statistical and systematic errors. This latter result is almost certainly caused by varying ionic abundances in subcomponents of the line: using Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II in the analysis changes the result to Δα/α = (– 0.47 ± 0.53) × 10{sup –5}. Combining the Mg II and Fe II results with estimates based on Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II gives Δα/α = (– 0.01 ± 0.26) × 10{sup –5}. We conclude that spectroscopic measurements of

  5. Constraining the Variation of the Fine-structure Constant with Observations of Narrow Quasar Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songaila, A.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-01

    The unequivocal demonstration of temporal or spatial variability in a fundamental constant of nature would be of enormous significance. Recent attempts to measure the variability of the fine-structure constant α over cosmological time, using high-resolution spectra of high-redshift quasars observed with 10 m class telescopes, have produced conflicting results. We use the many multiplet (MM) method with Mg II and Fe II lines on very high signal-to-noise, high-resolution (R = 72, 000) Keck HIRES spectra of eight narrow quasar absorption systems. We consider both systematic uncertainties in spectrograph wavelength calibration and also velocity offsets introduced by complex velocity structure in even apparently simple and weak narrow lines and analyze their effect on claimed variations in α. We find no significant change in α, Δα/α = (0.43 ± 0.34) × 10-5, in the redshift range z = 0.7-1.5, where this includes both statistical and systematic errors. We also show that the scatter in measurements of Δα/α arising from absorption line structure can be considerably larger than assigned statistical errors even for apparently simple and narrow absorption systems. We find a null result of Δα/α = (- 0.59 ± 0.55) × 10-5 in a system at z = 1.7382 using lines of Cr II, Zn II, and Mn II, whereas using Cr II and Zn II lines in a system at z = 1.6614 we find a systematic velocity trend that, if interpreted as a shift in α, would correspond to Δα/α = (1.88 ± 0.47) × 10-5, where both results include both statistical and systematic errors. This latter result is almost certainly caused by varying ionic abundances in subcomponents of the line: using Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II in the analysis changes the result to Δα/α = (- 0.47 ± 0.53) × 10-5. Combining the Mg II and Fe II results with estimates based on Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II gives Δα/α = (- 0.01 ± 0.26) × 10-5. We conclude that spectroscopic measurements of quasar absorption lines are not yet capable of

  6. Precise Measurements of the Masses of Cs, Rb and Na A New Route to the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainville, Simon; Bradley, Michael P.; Porto, James V.; Thompson, James K.; Pritchard, David E.

    2001-01-01

    We report new values for the atomic masses of the alkali 133Cs, 87Rb, 85Rb, and 23Na with uncertainties ≤ 0.2 ppb. These results, obtained using Penning trap single ion mass spectrometry, are typically two orders of magnitude more accurate than previously measured values. Combined with values of h/m atom from atom interferometry measurements and accurate wavelength measurements for different atoms, these values will lead to new ppb-level determinations of the molar Planck constant N A h and the fine structure constant α. This route to α is based on simple physics. It can potentially achieve the several ppb level of accuracy needed to test the QED determination of α extracted from measurements of the electron g factor. We also demonstrate an electronic cooling technique that cools our detector and ion below the 4 K ambient temperature. This technique improves by about a factor of three our ability to measure the ion's axial motion.

  7. Enhanced Laboratory Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant using Highly Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2010-09-17

    We study atomic systems that are in the frequency range of optical atomic clocks and have enhanced sensitivity to potential time variation of the fine-structure constant {alpha}. The high sensitivity is due to coherent contributions from three factors: high nuclear charge Z, high ionization degree, and significant differences in the configuration composition of the states involved. Configuration crossing keeps the frequencies in the optical range despite the large ionization energies. We discuss a few promising examples that have the largest {alpha} sensitivities seen in atomic systems.

  8. Time evolution of the fine structure constant in a two-field quintessence model

    SciTech Connect

    Bento, M.C.; Bertolami, O.; Santos, N.M.C.

    2004-11-15

    We examine the variation of the fine structure constant in the context of a two-field quintessence model. We find that, for solutions that lead to a transient late period of accelerated expansion, it is possible to fit the data arising from quasar spectra and comply with the bounds on the variation of {alpha} from the Oklo reactor, meteorite analysis, atomic clock measurements, cosmic microwave background radiation, and big bang nucleosynthesis. That is more difficult if we consider solutions corresponding to a late period of permanent accelerated expansion.

  9. On the fine-structure constant in a plasma model of the fluctuating vacuum substratum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cragin, B. L.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of an intimate connection between the quivering motion of electrons and positrons (Zitterbewegung), predicted by the Dirac equation, and the zero-point fluctuations of the vacuum is suggested. The nature of the proposed connection is discussed quantitatively, and an approximate self-consistency relation is derived, supplying a purely mathematical expression that relates the dimensionless coupling strengths (fine-structure constants) alpha sub e and alpha sub g of electromagnetism and gravity. These considerations provide a tentative explanation for the heretofore puzzling number 1/alpha sub e of about 137.036 and suggest that attempts to unify gravity with the electroweak and strong interactions will ultimately prove successful.

  10. Atomic calculations and search for variation of the fine-structure constant in quasar absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    A brief review of the search for variation of the fine structure constant in quasar absorption spectra is presented. Special consideration is given to the role of atomic calculations in the analysis of the observed data. A range of methods which allow to perform calculations for atoms or ions with different electron structure and which cover practically all periodic table of elements is discussed. Critical compilation of the results of the calculations as well as a review of the most recent results of the analysis are presented.

  11. The variation of the fine-structure constant from disformal couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Mifsud, Jurgen; Nunes, Nelson J.

    2015-12-01

    We study a theory in which the electromagnetic field is disformally coupled to a scalar field, in addition to a usual non-minimal electromagnetic coupling. We show that disformal couplings modify the expression for the fine-structure constant, α. As a result, the theory we consider can explain the non-zero reported variation in the evolution of α by purely considering disformal couplings. We also find that if matter and photons are coupled in the same way to the scalar field, disformal couplings itself do not lead to a variation of the fine-structure constant. A number of scenarios are discussed consistent with the current astrophysical, geochemical, laboratory and the cosmic microwave background radiation constraints on the cosmological evolution of α. The models presented are also consistent with the current type Ia supernovae constraints on the effective dark energy equation of state. We find that the Oklo bound in particular puts strong constraints on the model parameters. From our numerical results, we find that the introduction of a non-minimal electromagnetic coupling enhances the cosmological variation in α. Better constrained data is expected to be reported by ALMA and with the forthcoming generation of high-resolution ultra-stable spectrographs such as PEPSI, ESPRESSO, and ELT-HIRES. Furthermore, an expected increase in the sensitivity of molecular and nuclear clocks will put a more stringent constraint on the theory.

  12. New constraints on variations of the fine structure constant from CMB anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Menegoni, Eloisa; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Galli, Silvia; Bartlett, James G.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2009-10-15

    We demonstrate that recent measurements of cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy made by the ACBAR, QUAD, and BICEP experiments substantially improve the cosmological constraints on possible variations of the fine structure constant in the early universe. This data, combined with the five year observations from the WMAP mission, yield the constraint {alpha}/{alpha}{sub 0}=0.987{+-}0.012 at 68% C.L. The inclusion of the new Hubble Space Telescope constraints on the Hubble constant further increases the accuracy to {alpha}/{alpha}{sub 0}=1.001{+-}0.007 at 68% C.L., bringing possible deviations from the current value below the 1% level and improving previous constraints by a factor of {approx}3.

  13. Enhanced sensitivity to the fine-structure-constant variation in the Th IV atomic clock transition

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.; Porsev, S. G.

    2009-12-15

    Our calculations have shown that the 5f{sub 5/2}-7s{sub 1/2} 23 131 cm{sup -1} transition from the ground state in the ion Th{sup 3+} is very sensitive to the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant alpha=e{sup 2}/(Planck constant/2pi)c (q=-75 300 cm{sup -1}). The line is very narrow, the ion has been trapped and laser cooled, and the positive shifter line 5f{sub 5/2}-5f{sub 7/2} 4325 cm{sup -1} (q=+2900 cm{sup -1}) may be used as a reference. A comparison may also be made with a positive shifter in another atom or ion. This makes Th{sup 3+} a good candidate to search for the alpha variation.

  14. Limits on the dependence of the fine-structure constant on gravitational potential from white-dwarf spectra.

    PubMed

    Berengut, J C; Flambaum, V V; Ong, A; Webb, J K; Barrow, John D; Barstow, M A; Preval, S P; Holberg, J B

    2013-07-01

    We propose a new probe of the dependence of the fine-structure constant α on a strong gravitational field using metal lines in the spectra of white-dwarf stars. Comparison of laboratory spectra with far-UV astronomical spectra from the white-dwarf star G191-B2B recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph gives limits of Δα/α=(4.2±1.6)×10(-5) and (-6.1±5.8)×10(-5) from FeV and NiV spectra, respectively, at a dimensionless gravitational potential relative to Earth of Δφ≈5×10(-5). With better determinations of the laboratory wavelengths of the lines employed these results could be improved by up to 2 orders of magnitude. PMID:23862989

  15. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Moritake, Y; Kanamori, Y; Hane, K

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers. PMID:27622503

  16. Is the possible fine-structure constant drift also a test of a time-dependent Planck constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztas, A. M.; Smith, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The recent publication of spatial and distance variation of the fine-structure constant, α, derived from astronomical data of quasar emissions (QE) is exciting. The decreasing value of α over time, derived from data obtained from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, encourages the search for other possible running constants. We surmise that emissions from distant supernovae, type Ia (SNe Ia), which are more blue than predictions are best explained by a decreasing Planck constant with increasing lookback time. We present some results from our theoretical work and comparison to the astronomical observations and suggest that both α and h might be running constants. More data are required to answer several questions about the origin of the "drifting" α and the possible time dependence of h. Astronomical tools such as SNe and QE may be the best means to secure the exacting data needed to confirm or deny these hypotheses.

  17. Constraints on the Time Variation of the Fine Structure Constant by the 5-Year WMAP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, M.; Nagata, R.; Yokoyama, J.

    2008-12-01

    The constraints on the time variation of the fine structure constant at recombination epoch relative to its present value, Δα/α ≡ (α_{rec} - α_{now})/α_{now}, are obtained from the analysis of the 5-year WMAP cosmic microwave background data. As a result of Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo analysis, it is found that, contrary to the analysis based on the previous WMAP data, the mean value of Δα/α = -0.0009 does not change significantly whether we use the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) measurement of the Hubble parameter as a prior or not. The resultant 95% confidence ranges of Δα/α are -0.028 < Δα/α < 0.026 with HST prior and -0.050 < Δα/α < 0.042 without HST prior.

  18. Highly charged ions for atomic clocks and search for variation of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We review a number of highly charged ions which have optical transitions suitable for building extremely accurate atomic clocks. This includes ions from Hf 12+ to U 34+, which have the 4 f 12 configuration of valence electrons, the Ir 17+ ion, which has a hole in almost filled 4 f subshell, the Ho 14+, Cf 15+, Es 17+ and Es 16+ ions. Clock transitions in most of these ions are sensitive to variation of the fine structure constant, α (α = e2/hbar c). E.g., californium and einsteinium ions have largest known sensitivity to α-variation while holmium ion looks as the most suitable ion for experimental study. We study the spectra of the ions and their features relevant to the use as frequency standards.

  19. Astronomical constraints on the cosmic evolution of the fine structure constant and possible quantum dimensions.

    PubMed

    Carilli, C L; Menten, K M; Stocke, J T; Perlman, E; Vermeulen, R; Briggs, F; de Bruyn, A G; Conway, J; Moore, C P

    2000-12-25

    We present measurements of absorption by the 21 cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen toward radio sources at substantial look-back times. These data are used in combination with observations of rotational transitions of common interstellar molecules to set limits on the evolution of the fine structure constant: alpha/ alpha<3.5x10(-15) yr(-1), to a look-back time of 4.8 Gyr. In the context of string theory, the limit on the secular evolution of the scale factor of the compact dimensions, R, is &Rdot/ R<10(-15) yr(-1). Including terrestrial and other astronomical measurements places 2sigma limits on slow oscillations of R from the present to the epoch of cosmic nucleosynthesis, just seconds after the big bang, of DeltaR /R<10(-5). PMID:11136034

  20. The effective fine-structure constant of freestanding graphene measured in graphite.

    PubMed

    Reed, James P; Uchoa, Bruno; Joe, Young Il; Gan, Yu; Casa, Diego; Fradkin, Eduardo; Abbamonte, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Electrons in graphene behave like Dirac fermions, permitting phenomena from high-energy physics to be studied in a solid-state setting. A key question is whether or not these fermions are critically influenced by Coulomb correlations. We performed inelastic x-ray scattering experiments on crystals of graphite and applied reconstruction algorithms to image the dynamical screening of charge in a freestanding graphene sheet. We found that the polarizability of the Dirac fermions is amplified by excitonic effects, improving screening of interactions between quasiparticles. The strength of interactions is characterized by a scale-dependent, effective fine-structure constant, α(g)* (k,ω), the value of which approaches 0.14 ± 0.092 ~ 1/7 at low energy and large distances. This value is substantially smaller than the nominal α(g) = 2.2, suggesting that, on the whole, graphene is more weakly interacting than previously believed. PMID:21051634

  1. Constraints on a possible variation of the fine structure constant from galaxy cluster data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Landau, S. J.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Sánchez G., I. E.; Busti, V. C.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new method to probe a possible time evolution of the fine structure constant α from X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements of the gas mass fraction (fgas) in galaxy clusters. Taking into account a direct relation between variations of α and violations of the distance-duality relation, we discuss constraints on α for a class of dilaton runaway models. Although not yet competitive with bounds from high-z quasar absorption systems, our constraints, considering a sample of 29 measurements of fgas, in the redshift interval 0.14 < z < 0.89, provide an independent estimate of α variation at low and intermediate redshifts. Furthermore, current and planned surveys will provide a larger amount of data and thus allow to improve the limits on α variation obtained in the present analysis.

  2. Limit on the Temporal Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant Using Atomic Dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Cingoez, A.; Lapierre, A.; Leefer, N.; Nguyen, A.-T.; Lamoreaux, S. K.; Torgerson, J. R.; Budker, D.

    2007-01-26

    Over 8 months, we monitored transition frequencies between nearly degenerate, opposite-parity levels in two isotopes of atomic dysprosium (Dy). These frequencies are sensitive to variation of the fine-structure constant ({alpha}) due to relativistic corrections of opposite sign for the opposite-parity levels. In this unique system, in contrast to atomic-clock comparisons, the difference of the electronic energies of the opposite-parity levels can be monitored directly utilizing a rf electric-dipole transition between them. Our measurements show that the frequency variation of the 3.1-MHz transition in {sup 163}Dy and the 235-MHz transition in {sup 162}Dy are 9.0{+-}6.7 Hz/yr and -0.6{+-}6.5 Hz/yr, respectively. These results provide a rate of fractional variation of {alpha} of (-2.7{+-}2.6)x10{sup -15} yr{sup -1} (1{sigma}) without assumptions on constancy of other fundamental constants, indicating absence of significant variation at the present level of sensitivity.

  3. Searching for space-time variation of the fine structure constant using QSO spectra: overview and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; King, J. A.; Kozlov, M. G.; Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest the possibility of spatial and temporal variation of fundamental ``constants'' in the Universe. Using quasar absorption systems we can probe the value of the fine-structure constant, alpha = e2/hbar c, over the history of the universe. Previous studies of three independent samples of data, containing 143 absorption systems spread from 2 to 10 billion years after big bang, hint that alpha was smaller 7 - 11 billion years ago. However competing studies show no such alpha -variation. The studies can be improved by utilising more atomic transitions that are seen in quasar spectra, however in many cases this is hampered by a lack of accurate laboratory frequency measurements. The aim of this paper is to provide a compilation of transitions of importance to the search for alpha variation. They are E1 transitions from the ground state in several different atoms and ions, with wavelengths ranging from around 900 - 6000 Å, and require an accuracy of better than 10-4 Å. We also discuss isotope shift measurements that are needed in order to resolve systematic effects in the study. Researchers who are interested in performing these measurements should contact the authors directly.

  4. Fine-structure constant constraints on dark energy. II. Extending the parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.; Pinho, A. M. M.; Carreira, P.; Gusart, A.; López, J.; Rocha, C. I. S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical tests of the stability of fundamental couplings, such as the fine-structure constant α , are a powerful probe of new physics. Recently these measurements, combined with local atomic clock tests and Type Ia supernova and Hubble parameter data, were used to constrain the simplest class of dynamical dark energy models where the same degree of freedom is assumed to provide both the dark energy and (through a dimensionless coupling, ζ , to the electromagnetic sector) the α variation. One caveat of these analyses was that it was based on fiducial models where the dark energy equation of state was described by a single parameter (effectively its present day value, w0). Here we relax this assumption and study broader dark energy model classes, including the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder and early dark energy parametrizations. Even in these extended cases we find that the current data constrains the coupling ζ at the 1 0-6 level and w0 to a few percent (marginalizing over other parameters), thus confirming the robustness of earlier analyses. On the other hand, the additional parameters are typically not well constrained. We also highlight the implications of our results for constraints on violations of the weak equivalence principle and improvements to be expected from forthcoming measurements with high-resolution ultrastable spectrographs.

  5. New limits on variation of the fine-structure constant using atomic dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Leefer, N; Weber, C T M; Cingöz, A; Torgerson, J R; Budker, D

    2013-08-01

    We report on the spectroscopy of radio-frequency transitions between nearly degenerate, opposite-parity excited states in atomic dysprosium (Dy). Theoretical calculations predict that these states are very sensitive to variation of the fine-structure constant α owing to large relativistic corrections of opposite sign for the opposite-parity levels. The near degeneracy reduces the relative precision necessary to place constraints on variation of α, competitive with results obtained from the best atomic clocks in the world. Additionally, the existence of several abundant isotopes of Dy allows isotopic comparisons that suppress common-mode systematic errors. The frequencies of the 754-MHz transition in 164Dy and 235-MHz transition in 162Dy are measured over the span of two years. The linear variation of α is α·/α=(-5.8±6.9([1σ]))×10(-17)  yr(-1), consistent with zero. The same data are used to constrain the dimensionless parameter kα characterizing a possible coupling of α to a changing gravitational potential. We find that kα=(-5.5±5.2([1σ]))×10(-7), essentially consistent with zero and the best constraint to date. PMID:23971546

  6. Implication of Spatial and Temporal Variations of the Fine-Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Sze-Shiang; Yan, Mu-Lin

    2016-02-01

    Temporal and spatial variations of fine-structure constant α ≡ e2/hbar c in cosmology have been reported in analysis of combination Keck and VLT data. This paper studies the variations based on consideration of basic spacetime symmetry in physics. Both laboratory α 0 and distant α z are deduced from relativistic spectrum equations of atoms (e.g., hydrogen atom) defined in inertial reference systems. When Einstein's Λ≠0, the metric of local inertial reference systems in SM of cosmology is Beltrami metric instead of Minkowski, and the basic spacetime symmetry has to be de Sitter (dS) group. The corresponding special relativity (SR) is dS-SR. A model based on dS-SR is suggested. Comparing the predictions on α-varying with the data, the parameters are determined. The best-fit dipole mode in α's spatial varying is reproduced by this dS-SR model. α-varyings in whole sky are also studied. The results are generally in agreement with the estimations of observations. The main conclusion is that the phenomenon of α-varying cosmologically with dipole mode dominating is due to the de Sitter (or anti de Sitter) spacetime symmetry with a Minkowski point in an extended special relativity called de Sitter invariant special relativity (dS-SR) developed by Dirac-Inönü-Wigner-Gürsey-Lee-Lu-Zou-Guo.

  7. Spatial variations of the fine-structure constant in symmetron models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Marvin F.; Winther, Hans A.; Mota, David F.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the variation of the fine-structure constant, α, in symmetron models using N-body simulations in which the full spatial distribution of α at different redshifts has been calculated. In particular, we obtain simulated sky maps for this variation, and determine its power spectrum. We find that in high-density regions of space (such as deep inside dark matter halos) the value of α approaches the value measured on Earth. In the low-density outskirts of halos the scalar field value can approach the symmetry breaking value and leads to significantly different values of α. If the scalar-photon coupling strength βγ is of order unity we find that the variation of α inside dark matter halos can be of the same magnitude as the recent claims by Webb et al. of a dipole variation. Importantly, our results also show that with low-redshift symmetry breaking these models exhibit some dependence of α on lookback time (as opposed to a pure spatial dipole) which could in principle be detected by sufficiently accurate spectroscopic measurements, such as those of ALMA and the ELT-HIRES.

  8. A new analysis of fine-structure constant measurements and modelling errors from quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczynska, Michael R.; Webb, John K.; King, Julian A.; Murphy, Michael T.; Bainbridge, Matthew B.; Flambaum, Victor V.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of 23 absorption systems along the lines of sight towards 18 quasars in the redshift range of 0.4 ≤ zabs ≤ 2.3 observed on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). Considering both statistical and systematic error contributions we find a robust estimate of the weighted mean deviation of the fine-structure constant from its current, laboratory value of Δα/α = (0.22 ± 0.23) × 10-5, consistent with the dipole variation reported in Webb et al. and King et al. This paper also examines modelling methodologies and systematic effects. In particular, we focus on the consequences of fitting quasar absorption systems with too few absorbing components and of selectively fitting only the stronger components in an absorption complex. We show that using insufficient continuum regions around an absorption complex causes a significant increase in the scatter of a sample of Δα/α measurements, thus unnecessarily reducing the overall precision. We further show that fitting absorption systems with too few velocity components also results in a significant increase in the scatter of Δα/α measurements, and in addition causes Δα/α error estimates to be systematically underestimated. These results thus identify some of the potential pitfalls in analysis techniques and provide a guide for future analyses.

  9. The Oklo bound on the time variation of the fine-structure constant revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault; Dyson, Freeman

    1996-02-01

    It has been pointed out by Shlyakhter that data from the natural fission reactors which operated about two billion years ago at Oklo (Gabon) had the potential of providing an extremely tight bound on the variability of the fine-structure constant α. We revisit the derivation of such a bound by (i) reanalyzing a large selection of published rare-earth data from Oklo, (ii) critically taking into account the very large uncertainty of the temperature at which the reactors operated, and (iii) connecting in a new way (using isotope shift measurements) the Oklo-derived constraint on a possible shift of thermal neutron-capture resonances with a bound on the time variation of α. Our final (95% C.L.) results are: -0.9 × 10 -7 < ( αOklo - αnow)/ α < 1.2 × 10 -7 and -6.7 × 10 -17yr-1 < αdotaveraged/α < 5.0 × 10 -17yr-1.

  10. Reexamination of the effective fine structure constant of graphene as measured in graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yu; de la Peña, Gilberto A.; Kogar, Anshul; Uchoa, Bruno; Casa, Diego; Gog, Thomas; Fradkin, Eduardo; Abbamonte, Peter

    2016-05-01

    We present a refined and improved study of the influence of screening on the effective fine structure constant of graphene, α*, as measured in graphite using inelastic x-ray scattering. This followup to our previous study [J. P. Reed et al., Science 330, 805 (2010), 10.1126/science.1190920] was carried out with two times better energy resolution, five times better momentum resolution, and an improved experimental setup with lower background. We compare our results to random-phase approximation (RPA) calculations and evaluate the relative importance of interlayer hopping, excitonic corrections, and screening from high energy excitations involving the σ bands. We find that the static, limiting value of α* falls in the range 0.25-0.35, which is higher than our previous result of 0.14, but still below the value expected from RPA. We show the reduced value is not a consequence of interlayer hopping effects, which were ignored in our previous analysis, but of a combination of excitonic effects in the π →π* particle-hole continuum, and background screening from the σ -bonded electrons. We find that σ -band screening is extremely strong at distances of less than a few nanometers, and should be highly effective at screening out short-distance, Hubbard-like interactions in graphene as well as other carbon allotropes.

  11. Updated constraints on spatial variations of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, A. M. M.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2016-05-01

    Recent work by Webb et al. has provided indications of spatial variations of the fine-structure constant, α, at a level of a few parts per million. Using a dataset of 293 archival measurements, they further show that a dipole provides a statistically good fit to the data, a result subsequently confirmed by other authors. Here we show that a more recent dataset of dedicated measurements further constrains these variations: although there are only 10 such measurements, their uncertainties are considerably smaller. We find that a dipolar variation is still a good fit to the combined dataset, but the amplitude of such a dipole must be somewhat smaller: 8.1 ± 1.7 ppm for the full dataset, versus 9.4 ± 2.2 ppm for the Webb et al. data alone, both at the 68.3% confidence level. Constraints on the direction on the sky of such a dipole are also significantly improved. On the other hand the data can't yet discriminate between a pure spatial dipole and one with an additional redshift dependence.

  12. Constraint on the time variation of the fine-structure constant with the SDSS-III/BOSS DR12 quasar sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albareti, Franco D.; Comparat, Johan; Gutiérrez, Carlos M.; Prada, Francisco; Pâris, Isabelle; Schlegel, David; López-Corredoira, Martín; Schneider, Donald P.; Manchado, Arturo; García-Hernández, D. A.; Petitjean, Patrick; Ge, Jian

    2015-10-01

    From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12, which covers the full Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) footprint, we investigate the possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time-scales. We analyse the largest quasar sample considered so far in the literature, which contains 13 175 spectra (10 363 from SDSS-III/BOSS DR12 + 2812 from SDSS-II DR7) with redshift z < 1. We apply the emission-line method on the [O III] doublet (λλ 4960, 5008 Å) and obtain Δα/α = (0.9 ± 1.8) × 10-5 for the relative variation of the fine-structure constant. We also investigate the possible sources of systematics: misidentification of the lines, sky OH lines, H β and broad line contamination, Gaussian and Voigt fitting profiles, optimal wavelength range for the Gaussian fits, chosen polynomial order for the continuum spectrum, signal-to-noise ratio and good quality of the fits. The uncertainty of the measurement is dominated by the sky subtraction. The results presented in this work, being systematics limited, have sufficient statistics to constrain robustly the variation of the fine-structure constant in redshift bins (Δz ≈ 0.06) over the last 7.9 Gyr. In addition, we study the [Ne III] doublet (λλ 3869, 3968 Å) present in 462 quasar spectra and discuss the systematic effects on using these emission lines to constrain the fine-structure constant variation. Better constraints on Δα/α (< 10-6) using the emission-line method would be possible with high-resolution spectroscopy and large galaxy/qso surveys.

  13. Examining the Impact of Early AGB Nucleosynthesis on the Apparent Cosmological Variation in the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashenfelter, Timothy; Mathews, Grant; Olive, Keith

    2004-10-01

    Evidence from a large sample of quasar absorption-line spectra in damped Lyman-α systems has shown potential cosmological variation of the fine structure constant α. The most statistically significant portion of this sample involves the comparison of Mg and Fe wavelength shifts using the many-multiplet (MM) method. However, this method is sensitive to the heavy isotopes, especially in Mg. We implement recent yields of intermediate mass (IM) stars, which evolve beyond the CNO cycle, to show that the ensuing isotope distribution of Mg can account for the observed variation in α provided early star-formation was particularly rich in IM stars. During the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) phase of IM stars, heavy Mg isotopes are robustly produced via hot-bottom burning and thermal pulsing in helium burning shell. We incorporate these recently appreciated processes in the galactic chemical evolution models of these damped Lyman-α systems (early galaxies) and delve into the consequences of this chemical evolution alternative to an α variation. We find that this analysis adds to the mounting evidence that the low-metallicity Universe was strongly influenced by IM stars beyond the standard power law distribution of stellar masses. Because these AGB stars have a significant influence on other abundances, especially nitrogen, we use measurements of N, Si Fe, C, and O to constrain our models. In this way, we obtain an alternative explanation of the α variation that is consistent with observations.

  14. Chemistry as a function of the fine-structure constant and the electron-proton mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Rollin A.; Siddiqi, Ali; Allen, Wesley D.; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    2010-04-01

    In standard computations in theoretical quantum chemistry the accepted values of the fundamental physical constants are assumed. Alternatively, the tools of computational quantum chemistry can be used to investigate hypothetical chemistry that would result from different values of these constants, given the same physical laws. In this work, the dependence of a variety of basic chemical quantities on the values of the fine-structure constant and the electron-proton mass ratio is explored. In chemistry, the accepted values of both constants may be considered small, in the sense that their increase must be substantial to seriously impact bond energies. It is found that if the fine-structure constant were larger, covalent bonds between light atoms would be weaker, and the dipole moment and hydrogen-bonding ability of water would be reduced. Conversely, an increase in the value of the electron-proton mass ratio increases dissociation energies in molecules such as H2, O2, and CO2. Specifically, a sevenfold increase in the fine-structure constant decreases the strength of the O-H bond in the water molecule by 7 kcal mol-1 while reducing its dipole moment by at least 10%, whereas a 100-fold increase in the electron-proton mass ratio increases the same bond energy by 11 kcal mol-1.

  15. A New Contribution for WYP 2005: The Golden Ratio, Bohr Radius, Planck's Constant, Fine-Structure Constant and g-Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyrovska, R.; Narayan, S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, the ground state Bohr radius (aB) of hydrogen was shown to be divided into two Golden sections, aB,p = aB/ø2 and aB,e = aB/ø at the point of electrical neutrality, where ø = 1.618 is the Golden ratio (R. Heyrovska, Molecular Physics 103: 877-882, and the literature cited therein). The origin of the difference of two energy terms in the Rydberg equation was thus shown to be in the ground state energy itself, as shown below: EH = (1/2)e2/(κaB) = (1/2)(e2/κ) [(1/aB,p - (1/aB,e)] (1). This work brings some new results that 1) a unit charge in vacuum has a magnetic moment, 2) (e2/2κ) in eq. (1) is an electromagnetic condenser constant, 3) the de Broglie wavelengths of the proton and electron correspond to the Golden arcs of a circle with the Bohr radius, 4) the fine structure constant (α) is the ratio of the Planck's constants without and with the interaction of light with matter, 5) the g-factors of the electron and proton, ge/2 and gp/2 divide the Bohr radius at the magnetic center and 6) the ``mysterious'' value (137.036) of α -1 = (360/ø2) - (2/ø3), where (2/ø3) arises from the difference, (gp - ge).

  16. Precise limits on cosmological variability of the fine-structure constant with zinc and chromium quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Malec, Adrian L.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2016-09-01

    The strongest transitions of Zn and Cr II are the most sensitive to relative variations in the fine-structure constant (Δα/α) among the transitions commonly observed in quasar absorption spectra. They also lie within just 40 Å of each other (rest frame), so they are resistant to the main systematic error affecting most previous measurements of Δα/α: long-range distortions of the wavelength calibration. While Zn and Cr II absorption is normally very weak in quasar spectra, we obtained high signal-to-noise, high-resolution echelle spectra from the Keck and Very Large Telescopes of nine rare systems where it is strong enough to constrain Δα/α from these species alone. These provide 12 independent measurements (three quasars were observed with both telescopes) at redshifts 1.0-2.4, 11 of which pass stringent reliability criteria. These 11 are all consistent with Δα/α = 0 within their individual uncertainties of 3.5-13 parts per million (ppm), with a weighted mean Δα/α = 0.4 ± 1.4stat ± 0.9sys ppm (1σ statistical and systematic uncertainties), indicating no significant cosmological variations in α. This is the first statistical sample of absorbers that is resistant to long-range calibration distortions (at the <1 ppm level), with a precision comparable to previous large samples of ˜150 (distortion-affected) absorbers. Our systematic error budget is instead dominated by much shorter range distortions repeated across echelle orders of individual spectra.

  17. Atomic Transition Frequencies, Isotope Shifts, and Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine Structure Constant for Studies of Quasar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; King, J. A.; Kozlov, M. G.; Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest spatial and temporal variation of fundamental "constants" in the Universe. A change in the fine structure constant, α = {e}2/hslash c , could be detected via shifts in the frequencies of atomic transitions in quasar absorption systems. Recent studies using 140 absorption systems from the Keck telescope and 153 from the Very Large Telescope, suggest that α varies spatially (61). That is, in one direction on the sky α seems to have been smaller at the time of absorption, while in the opposite direction it seems to have been larger.

  18. Constraining possible variations of the fine structure constant in strong gravitational fields with the Kα iron line

    SciTech Connect

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2014-03-01

    In extensions of general relativity and in theories aiming at unifying gravity with the forces of the Standard Model, the value of the ''fundamental constants'' is often determined by the vacuum expectation value of new fields, which may thus change in different backgrounds. Variations of fundamental constants with respect to the values measured today in laboratories on Earth are expected to be more evident on cosmological timescales and/or in strong gravitational fields. In this paper, I show that the analysis of the Kα iron line observed in the X-ray spectrum of black holes can potentially be used to probe the fine structure constant α in gravitational potentials relative to Earth of Δφ ≈ 0.1. At present, systematic effects not fully under control prevent to get robust and stringent bounds on possible variations of the value of α with this technique, but the fact that current data can be fitted with models based on standard physics already rules out variations of the fine structure constant larger than some percent.

  19. Combination of BLOCH oscillations with a Ramsey-Bordé interferometer: new determination of the fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Cadoret, Malo; de Mirandes, Estefania; Cladé, Pierre; Guellati-Khélifa, Saïda; Schwob, Catherine; Nez, François; Julien, Lucile; Biraben, François

    2008-12-01

    We report a new experimental scheme which combines atom interferometry with Bloch oscillations to provide a new measurement of the ratio h/mRb. By using Bloch oscillations, we impart to the atoms up to 1600 recoil momenta and thus we improve the accuracy on the recoil velocity measurement. The deduced value of h/mRb leads to a new determination of the fine structure constant alpha(-1) =137.03599945 (62) with a relative uncertainty of 4.6 x 10(-9). The comparison of this result with the value deduced from the measurement of the electron anomaly provides the most stringent test of QED. PMID:19113536

  20. Optical Transitions in Highly Charged Californium Ions with High Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Ong, A.

    2012-08-01

    We study electronic transitions in highly charged Cf ions that are within the frequency range of optical lasers and have very high sensitivity to potential variations in the fine-structure constant, α. The transitions are in the optical range despite the large ionization energies because they lie on the level crossing of the 5f and 6p valence orbitals in the thallium isoelectronic sequence. Cf16+ is a particularly rich ion, having several narrow lines with properties that minimize certain systematic effects. Cf16+ has very large nuclear charge and large ionization energy, resulting in the largest α sensitivity seen in atomic systems. The lines include positive and negative shifters.

  1. The fine structure constant alpha: relevant for a model of a self-propelling photon and for particle masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Karl O.

    2015-09-01

    A model for a self propelling (i.e. massless) photon1 is based on oscillations of a pair of charges amounting to elementary charge divided by SQRT alpha, where alpha is the fine structure (Sommerfeld) constant. When one assumes a similar model for particles that do have rest mas (i.e. which are non- self propelling), alpha plays also a role in the rest masses of elementary particles. Indeed all fundamental elementary particle masses can be described by the alpha / beta rule2 --> m(particle) = alpha-n * betam* 27.2 eV /c2 where beta is the proton to electron mass ratio 183612 and n= 0….14, m= -1,0 or Thus, photons and particle masses are intimately related to the fine structure constant. If the latter would not have been strictly constant throughout all times, this would have had consequences for the nature of light and for all masses including those of elementary particles.

  2. Avoiding unrealistic priors: The case of dark energy constraints from the time variation of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, P. P.

    2016-04-01

    We critically assess recent claims suggesting that upper limits on the time variation of the fine-structure constant tightly constrain the coupling of a dark energy scalar field to the electromagnetic sector, and, indirectly, the violation of the weak equivalence principle. We show that such constraints depend crucially on the assumed priors, even if the dark energy was described by a dynamical scalar field with a constant equation-of-state parameter w linearly coupled to the electromagnetic sector through a dimensionless coupling ζ . We find that, although local atomic clock tests, as well as other terrestrial, astrophysical and cosmological data, put stringent bounds on |ζ |√{|w +1 | } , the time variation of the fine-structure constant cannot be used to set or to improve upper limits on |ζ | or |w +1 | without specifying priors, consistent with but not favored by current data, which disfavor low values of |w +1 | or |ζ |, respectively. We briefly discuss how this might change with a new generation of high-resolution ultrastable spectrographs, such as ESPRESSO and ELT-HIRES, in combination with forthcoming missions to map the geometry of the Universe, such as Euclid, or to test the equivalence principle, such as MICROSCOPE or STEP.

  3. A new limit on the variation of the fine-structure constant using absorption line multiplets in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong, Le Duc

    2015-08-01

    One of the key questions of modern physics concerns the possibility that physical constants vary over space and time during the history of the universe. The Standard Model of physics is built on these constants, but it does not provide any explanation for their values, nor requires their constancy over space and time. Here we set a new limit on possible spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant , by comparing transitions line multiplets in an ensemble of Fe II 1608, 2344, 2374, 2383, 2587 and 2600 observed in the early universe with those measured in the laboratory. Based on the optical spectra observations of QSO HE 0515-4414, we deduced a constraint of at redshift z = 1.15. This is at present the tightest limit on at early cosmological epochs compared to the published results in the literature.

  4. Attempts at a determination of the fine-structure constant from first principles: a brief historical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, U. D.; Nándori, I.

    2014-12-01

    It has been a notably elusive task to find a remotely sensical ansatz for a calculation of Sommerfeld's electrodynamic fine-structure constant αQED ≈ 1 / 137.036 based on first principles. However, this has not prevented a number of researchers to invest considerable effort into the problem, despite the formidable challenges, and a number of attempts have been recorded in the literature. Here, we review a possible approach based on the quantum electrodynamic (QED) β function, and on algebraic identities relating αQED to invariant properties of "internal" symmetry groups, as well as attempts to relate the strength of the electromagnetic interaction to the natural cutoff scale for other gauge theories. Conjectures based on both classical as well as quantum-field theoretical considerations are discussed. We point out apparent strengths and weaknesses of the most prominent attempts that were recorded in the literature. This includes possible connections to scaling properties of the Einstein-Maxwell Lagrangian which describes gravitational and electromagnetic interactions on curved space-times. Alternative approaches inspired by string theory are also discussed. A conceivable variation of the fine-structure constant with time would suggest a connection of αQED to global structures of the Universe, which in turn are largely determined by gravitational interactions.

  5. Optimizing constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cussen, Leo D.

    2016-06-01

    This article describes an analytic method to optimize constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers. It recasts the accepted mathematical description of resolution and intensity in terms of new variables and includes terms for vertical divergence, wavelength and some sample scattering effects. An undetermined multiplier method is applied to the revised equations to minimize the RMS value of resolution width at constant intensity and fixed wavelength. A new understanding of primary spectrometer transmission (presented elsewhere) can then be applied to choose beam elements to deliver an optimum instrument. Numerical methods can then be applied to choose the best wavelength.

  6. Combination of Bloch Oscillations with a Ramsey-Borde Interferometer: New Determination of the Fine Structure Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Cadoret, Malo; Mirandes, Estefania de; Clade, Pierre; Schwob, Catherine; Nez, Francois; Julien, Lucile; Biraben, Francois; Guellati-Khelifa, Saieda

    2008-12-05

    We report a new experimental scheme which combines atom interferometry with Bloch oscillations to provide a new measurement of the ratio h/m{sub Rb}. By using Bloch oscillations, we impart to the atoms up to 1600 recoil momenta and thus we improve the accuracy on the recoil velocity measurement. The deduced value of h/m{sub Rb} leads to a new determination of the fine structure constant {alpha}{sup -1}=137.035 999 45 (62) with a relative uncertainty of 4.6x10{sup -9}. The comparison of this result with the value deduced from the measurement of the electron anomaly provides the most stringent test of QED.

  7. New Limit on the Spatial and Temporal Variations of the Fine-Structure Constant Using High Redshifts of Quasar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. D.

    2015-03-01

    Highly precise measurements on the light from distant quasars can served as a powerful tool to test the possible spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant α = e 2 /c during the evolution of the Universe. Here we set a limit on the possible cosmological space-time variations of α by comparing transitions in the absorption lines of the SiIV doublet observed in the early Universe with those mesured in the laboratory. The weighted mean value of the α-variation derived from our analysis over the redshift range 2.0 ≤ cps≤ 3.7 is Δα/α (-0.53 ± 0.72) ×10-5. This result improves the constraint on Δα/α by a factor of ~ seven compared to the published results in the literature.

  8. Optical transitions in highly charged californium ions with high sensitivity to variation of the fine-structure constant.

    PubMed

    Berengut, J C; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V; Ong, A

    2012-08-17

    We study electronic transitions in highly charged Cf ions that are within the frequency range of optical lasers and have very high sensitivity to potential variations in the fine-structure constant, α. The transitions are in the optical range despite the large ionization energies because they lie on the level crossing of the 5f and 6p valence orbitals in the thallium isoelectronic sequence. Cf(16+) is a particularly rich ion, having several narrow lines with properties that minimize certain systematic effects. Cf(16+) has very large nuclear charge and large ionization energy, resulting in the largest α sensitivity seen in atomic systems. The lines include positive and negative shifters. PMID:23006353

  9. A Stringent Limit on Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant Using Absorption Line Multiplets in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. D.

    2016-06-01

    One of the key questions of modern physics concerns the possibility that physical constants have varied throughout the history of the Universe. The standard model of physics is built on these constants, but it does not provide any explanation for their values, nor does it require their constancy over space and time. Here, we set a new limit on possible spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant α = e 2/4πɛ0 ħc by comparing transitions and line multiplets in an ensemble of Fe II λ 1608, λ 2344, λ 2374, λ 2383, λ 2587, and λ 2600 observed in the early Universe with those measured in the laboratory. Based on the optical spectrum observations of QSO HE 0515-4414, we deduce a constraint of Δα/α = (-0.157± 0.300)×10-6 at redshift z = 1.15. At present, this represents the tightest limit on Δα/α in early cosmological epochs compared to the published results in the literature.

  10. Excitonic fine-structure splitting in telecom-wavelength InAs/GaAs quantum dots: Statistical distribution and height-dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, Elias Barthel, Stefan; Florian, Matthias; Jahnke, Frank; Schuh, Kolja

    2013-12-09

    The variation of the excitonic fine-structure splitting is studied for semiconductor quantum dots under the influence of a strain-reducing layer, utilized to shift the emission wavelength of the excitonic transition into the telecom-wavelength regime of 1.3–1.5 μm. By means of a sp{sup 3}s{sup *}-tight-binding model and configuration interaction, we calculate wavelength shifts and fine-structure splittings for various quantum dot geometries. We find the splittings remaining small and even decreasing with strain-reducing layer composition for quantum dots with large height. Combined with an observed increased emission efficiency, the applicability for generation of entanglement photons is persistent.

  11. Search for variation of the fine-structure constant and violation of Lorentz symmetry using atomic dysprosium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leefer, Nathan Alexander

    We report on the spectroscopy of radio-frequency transitions between nearly-degenerate, opposite-parity excited states in atomic dysprosium (Dy). Theoretical calculations predict that these states are very sensitive to variation of the fine-structure constant, alpha, owing to large relativistic corrections of opposite sign for the opposite-parity levels. The near degeneracy reduces the relative precision necessary to place constraints on variation of alpha competitive with results obtained from the best atomic clocks in the world. Additionally, the existence of several abundant isotopes of Dy allows isotopic comparisons that suppress common-mode systematic errors. The frequencies of the 754-MHz transition in 164Dy and 235-MHz transition in 162Dy were measured over the span of two years. Linear variation of alpha is found to be ȧ/alpha = (--5.8 +/- 6.9) x 10--17 yr--1 , consistent with zero. The same data are used to constrain the dimensionless parameter kalpha, characterizing a possible coupling of alpha to a changing gravitational potential. We find that kalpha = (--5.5 +/- 5.2) x 10--7, essentially consistent with zero and the best constraint to date. The same data are used to report a joint test of local Lorentzinvarianceand the Einstein Equivalence Principle for electrons. We present many-body calculations which demonstrate that the energy splitting of these states is particularly sensitive to violations of both special and general relativity. Lorentz violation for electrons is limited at the level of 10--17 , matching or improving the best laboratory and astrophysical limits by up to a factor of 10, and gravitational redshift anomalies for electrons to the level of 10--8. With some enhancements, our experiment may be sensitive to Lorentz violation at the level of 9 x 10 --20. We also report measurements of the differential polarizabilitybetween the nearly degenerate, opposite parity states. The differential scalar and tensor polarizabilities due to additional

  12. A sub-ppb measurement of the mass of cesium for a new determination of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Michael Patrick

    2000-12-01

    This thesis describes a recent measurement of the mass of atomic Cesium with a relative uncertainty of 2 × 10-10. This measurement reduces the uncertainty on the mass of Cesium by a factor of 100, and removes this uncertainty as a limitation on the accuracy of a determination of the fine-structure constant alpha via a Cesium photon recoil experiment. Removal of this limit should ultimately allow this value of alpha to have a relative accuracy ~1 ppb, which would be comparable to or even better than the most accurate measurement of alpha currently available. This value of alpha will help shed light on the current ~50 ppb discrepancies between values of alpha measured via different routes. In addition to the mass measurement of Cesium, this thesis also describes related mass measurements of atomic Rubidium and Sodium which reduce the uncertainties on these masses by factors ~100, with a view to possible future photon recoil measurements using these species. The measurements were taken using a new Penning trap mass spectrometer constructed by the author and his colleagues. This new spectrometer followed the general design principles of previous MIT ICR Lab Penning trap mass spectrometers, and incorporated a DC SQUID as an ion detector for the first time. This thesis concludes with a discussion of a passive two- coil system designed for shielding magnetic field gradients. These may prove to be the key enabling technology for a future double Penning trap mass spectrometer. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  13. Relativistic calculations of radiative properties and fine structure constant varying sensitivity coefficients in the astrophysically relevant Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D. K.; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-03-01

    We have carried out calculations of the relativistic sensitivity coefficients, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, lifetimes and magnetic dipole hyperfine structure constants for a number of low-lying states in the Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions which are abundant in the distant quasars and various stellar plasmas. These spectroscopic data will be very useful for probing temporal variation of the fine structure constant (αe) and in the diagnostic processes of some of the astrophysical plasmas. We have employed all-order perturbative methods in the relativistic coupled-cluster framework using the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian to calculate the atomic wavefunctions of the considered ions. Reference states are constructed with the VN-1 and VN+1 potentials and then the electron-electron correlation effects are taken into account by constructing all possible singly and doubly excited configurations, involving both the core and valence electrons, from the respective reference states. We have also determined one electron affinities and ionization potentials of many excited states in these Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions. Except for a few states we have attained accuracies within 1 per cent for the energies compared with their experimental values. Our calculated sensitivity coefficients are estimated to have similar accuracies as of the calculated energies. Furthermore, combining our calculated transition matrix elements with the experimental wavelengths we evaluate transition probabilities, oscillator strengths and lifetimes of some of the excited states in these ions. These results are compared with the available data in a few cases and found to be in very good agreement among themselves. Using our reported hyperfine structure constants due to the dominant magnetic dipole interaction, it is possible to determine hyperfine splittings approximately in the above considered ions.

  14. Absolute optical frequency measurements of the cesium D1 transitions and their effect on alpha, the fine-structured constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Keith Gordon

    The fine-structure constant or electromagnetic coupling constant, alpha e, is a dimensionless ratio which unites many physics subfields. Although known precisely via experiments in each subfield, there is disagreement within and between subfields. In particular, precise values obtained via electron ge - 2 experiments which depend heavily on QED calculations have not always been in agreement with those obtained via muon g mu - 2 experiments. Also, solid state measurements (quantum hall effect and AC Josephson effect) often disagree with neutronic hmn measurements. alphae is often said to vary with energy but the question remains as to whether or not its low energy value is stable now or has been stable over the history of the universe. Improved precision helps resolve these issues as they relate to physics, possibly beyond the standard model. The Optical Frequency Measurements group in the Time and Frequency Division at the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST, Boulder, CO) developed and maintains a femtosecond laser frequency comb which is calibrated with respect to the cesium fountain clock implementation of the second. A single frequency component of the femtosecond laser comb is used together with a solid state diode laser and cesium thermal beam to precisely measure the cesium D1 F ∈ {3,4} transition frequencies. The value of fD1centroid = 335 116 048 748.1(2.4) kHz obtained for the transition centroid is over fifteen times more precise than the most recent previous measurement. A precise value for the cesium D1 hyperfine splitting fHFe = 1 167 723.6(4.7) kHz is reported as well. This value is also over fifteen times more precise than the most recent previous measurement. These new neutral 133Cs 6s 2 S½ → 6p 2 P½ transition (D1) frequencies, when combined with the 2002 CODATA values of the Rydberg, proton/electron mass ratio, cesium atomic mass, and cesium recoil frequency, provide an almost QED-free value of alpha: alphae = 1/137.036 0000

  15. Relativistic effects in two valence-electron atoms and ions and the search for variation of the fine-structure constant

    SciTech Connect

    Angstmann, E.J.; Dzuba, V.A.; Flambaum, V.V.

    2004-07-01

    We perform accurate calculations of the dependence of transition frequencies in two-valence-electron atoms and ions on a variation of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}=e{sup 2}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi})c. The relativistic Hartree-Fock method is used with many-body perturbation theory and configuration interaction methods to calculate transition frequencies. The results are to be used in atomic-clock-type laboratory experiments designed to test whether {alpha} varies in time.

  16. The Doubling Theory: Dark Matter and Dark Energy Finally Explained, Speed of Light and Fine Structure Constant Calculated for the First Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet, Jean-Pierre Garnier

    2010-09-01

    Developed in previous papers [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], the ``doubling'' (of space and time) theory uses finite horizons of several virtual space-times which are embedded within the observable space-time. A specific fundamental movement creates imperceptible time instants (called ``temporal openings'') in the time flow. Considering different scale levels, it modifies the perception of the time flow and gives to each horizon instantaneous potential futures. This theory explains the cyclical planetary movement in the solar system, the entanglement between particles, the dissymmetry of matter/antimatter and the existence of the dark matter and dark energy. It can also calculate ``for the first time'' universal constants: the speed of light and the fine structure constant.

  17. Searching for space-time variation of the fine structure constant using QSO spectra: overview and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; King, J. A.; Kozlov, M. G.; Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.

    2010-11-01

    Current theories that seek to unify gravity with the other fundamental interactions suggest that spatial and temporal variation of fundamental constants is a possibility, or even a necessity, in an expanding Universe. Several studies have tried to probe the values of constants at earlier stages in the evolution of the Universe, using tools such as big-bang nucleosynthesis, the Oklo natural nuclear reactor, quasar absorption spectra, and atomic clocks (see, e.g. Flambaum & Berengut (2009)).

  18. Weighted difference of g factors of light Li-like and H-like ions for an improved determination of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V. A.; Berseneva, E.; Harman, Z.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Keitel, C. H.

    2016-08-01

    A weighted difference of the g factors of the Li- and H-like ion of the same element is studied and optimized in order to maximize the cancelation of nuclear effects. To this end, a detailed theoretical investigation is performed for the finite nuclear size correction to the one-electron g factor, the one- and two-photon exchange effects, and the QED effects. The coefficients of the Z α expansion of these corrections are determined, which allows us to set up the optimal definition of the weighted difference. It is demonstrated that, for moderately light elements, such weighted difference is nearly free from uncertainties associated with nuclear effects and can be utilized to extract the fine-structure constant from bound-electron g -factor experiments with an accuracy competitive with or better than its current literature value.

  19. New Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment and the Fine Structure Constant: A First Application of a One-Electron Quantum Cyclotron

    ScienceCinema

    Gabrielse, Gerald [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2009-09-01

    Remarkably, the famous UW measurement of the electron magnetic moment has stood since 1987. With QED theory, this measurement has determined the accepted value of the fine structure constant. This colloquium is about a new Harvard measurement of these fundamental constants. The new measurement has an uncertainty that is about six times smaller, and it shifts the values by 1.7 standard deviations. One electron suspended in a Penning trap is used for the new measurement, like in the old measurement. What is different is that the lowest quantum levels of the spin and cyclotron motion are resolved, and the cyclotron as well as spin frequencies are determined using quantum jump spectroscopy. In addition, a 0.1 mK Penning trap that is also a cylindrical microwave cavity is used to control the radiation field, to suppress spontaneous emission by more than a factor of 100, to control cavity shifts, and to eliminate the blackbody photons that otherwise stimulate excitations from the cyclotron ground state. Finally, great signal-to-noise for one-quantum transitions is obtained using electronic feedback to realize the first one-particle self-excited oscillator. The new methods may also allow a million times improved measurement of the 500 times small antiproton magnetic moment.

  20. Searching for variations in the fine-structure constant and the proton-to-electron mass ratio using quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Julian A.

    2012-02-01

    (abridged) Quasar absorption lines provide a precise test of the assumed constancy of the fundamental constants of physics. We have investigated potential changes in the fine-structure constant, alpha, and the proton-to-electron mass ratio, mu. The many-multiplet method allows one to use optical fine-structure transitions to constrain (Delta alpha)/alpha at better than the 10^(-5) level. We present a new analysis of 154 quasar absorbers with 0.2 < z <3.7 in VLT/UVES spectra. From these absorbers we find 2.2 sigma evidence for angular variations in alpha under a dipole+monopole model. Combined with previous Keck/HIRES observations, we find 4.1 sigma evidence for angular (and therefore spatial) variations in alpha, with maximal increase of alpha occurring in the direction RA=(17.3 +/- 1.0) hr, dec=(-61 +/- 10) deg. Under a model where the observed effect is proportional to the lookback-time distance the significance increases to 4.2 sigma. Dipole models fitted to the VLT and Keck samples and models fitted to z<1.6 and z>1.6 sub-samples independently yield consistent estimates of the dipole direction, which suggests that the effect is not caused by telescope systematics. We consider a number of systematic effects and show that they are unable to explain the observed dipole effect. We have used spectra of the quasars Q0405-443, Q0347-383 and Q0528-250 from VLT/UVES to investigate the absorbers at z=2.595, 3.025 and 2.811 in these spectra respectively. We find that (Delta mu)/mu=(10.1 +/- 6.6) x 10^(-6), (8.2 +/- 7.5) x 10^(-6) and (-1.4 +/- 3.9) x 10^(-6) in these absorbers respectively. A second spectrum of Q0528-250 provides an additional constraint of (Delta mu)/mu=(0.2 +/- 3.2_stat +/- 1.9_sys) x 10^(-6). The weighted mean of these values yields (Delta mu)/mu=(1.7 +/- 2.4) x 10^(-6), the most precise constraint on evolution in mu at z>1.

  1. Fine-structure Constancy Measurements in QSO Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan B.

    2013-01-01

    The ESO Large Programme 185.A-0745 has awarded 10 nights on the VLT-UVES spectrograph for the study of the possible variation in the fine structure constant. We will present the fine-structure measurements from two lines of sight and several absorption systems. We will also present updated systematic error analyses.

  2. New fine structure cooling rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  3. Wavelength dependence of Verdet constant of Tb3+:Y2O3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snetkov, I. L.; Permin, D. A.; Balabanov, S. S.; Palashov, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    Samples of the magneto-active material—Tb3+:Y2O3 ceramics with Tb3+ ion concentrations of 10%, 20%, 30%, and 100% (Tb2O3)—were prepared and studied. The wavelength dependence of Verdet constant in the 380 nm-1750 nm range was approximated for all investigated ceramic samples and was predicted for a pure Tb2O3 material. Tb2O3 ceramics demonstrates a more than three times higher Verdet constant in comparison with terbium gallium garnet crystal or ceramics. The linear dependence of the Verdet constant on Tb3+ ion concentration in the Tb3+:Y2O3 ceramics was demonstrated. The obtained data will be useful for fabricating magneto-optical elements of Faraday devices based on Tb3+:Y2O3 with arbitrary Tb3+ ion concentration operating at room temperature in the wavelength range of 380 nm-1750 nm.

  4. Vertical fine structure observations in the eastern equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.P.

    1981-11-20

    Measurements of vertical displacement and horizontal velocity finestructure near the equator at 110/sup 0/W in the eastern Pacific Ocean are reported. Profiles were scaled to a constant Bruent-Vaeisaelae frequency ocean (N/sub 0/ = 1 cph) in accordance with a WKBJ approximation. A total of 57 CTD casts between 3/sup 0/N and 3/sup 0/S taken during five cruises in 1979 were analyzed. Results show an equatorial enhancement of vertical displacement is similar variance for vertical wavelengths longer than 50 sdbar (stretched decibars). This enhancement is similar to that which has been reported at 125/sup 0/W and 179/sup 0/E. Difference between locations can be accounted for by the observed temporal variability at 110/sup 0/W. Coherence between vertical displacement profiles separated in time by dealys of 2 hours to 120 hour indicate that the high wave number structures were largely associated with time scales of 4 days and less. Meridionally, vertical structures longer than 300 sdbar were coherent within 50 km of the equator. We interpret this vertical displacement fine structure enhancement as high wave number equatorially trapped inertial-gravity waves. The velocity fine structure measurements in July 1979 also indicate equatorially enhanced horizontal kinetic energy for vertical wave lengths longer than 100 sdbar. The velocity structures persisted over the 56 hour of measurement and appeared to have longer time scales than the vertical displacements. Meridional energy measurement and appeared to have longer time scales than the vertical displacements. Meridional energy exceeded zonal energy; however, the two components were coherent. We interpret these velocity structures as inertial-gravity waves which were produced off the equator and are propagating through the equatorial region.

  5. Fine structure of plasmaspheric hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Danny; Omura, Yoshiharu; Nakamura, Satoko; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2014-11-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss has been widely regarded as a broadband, structureless, incoherent emission. In this study, by examining burst-mode vector waveform data from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science instrument on the Van Allen Probes mission, we show that plasmaspheric hiss is a coherent emission with complex fine structure. Specifically, plasmaspheric hiss appears as discrete rising tone and falling tone elements. Our study comprises the analysis of two 1 h samples within which a total of eight 1 s samples were analyzed. By means of waveform analysis on two samples, we identify typical amplitudes, phase profiles, and sweep rates of the rising and falling tone elements. The exciting new observations reported here can be expected to fuel a reexamination of the properties of plasmaspheric hiss, including a further reanalysis of the generation mechanism for hiss.

  6. Wavelength-independent constant period spin-echo modulated small angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Habicht, Klaus; Tremsin, Anton; Bouwman, Wim; Strobl, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SEMSANS) in Time-of-Flight (ToF) mode has been shown to be a promising technique for measuring (very) small angle neutron scattering (SANS) signals and performing quantitative Dark-Field Imaging (DFI), i.e., SANS with 2D spatial resolution. However, the wavelength dependence of the modulation period in the ToF spin-echo mode has so far limited the useful modulation periods to those resolvable with the limited spatial resolution of the detectors available. Here we present our results of an approach to keep the period of the induced modulation constant for the wavelengths utilised in ToF. This is achieved by ramping the magnetic fields in the coils responsible for creating the spatially modulated beam in synchronisation with the neutron pulse, thus keeping the modulation period constant for all wavelengths. Such a setup enables the decoupling of the spatial detector resolution from the resolution of the modulation period by the use of slits or gratings in analogy to the approach in grating-based neutron DFI. PMID:27370470

  7. Wavelength-independent constant period spin-echo modulated small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Habicht, Klaus; Tremsin, Anton; Bouwman, Wim; Strobl, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SEMSANS) in Time-of-Flight (ToF) mode has been shown to be a promising technique for measuring (very) small angle neutron scattering (SANS) signals and performing quantitative Dark-Field Imaging (DFI), i.e., SANS with 2D spatial resolution. However, the wavelength dependence of the modulation period in the ToF spin-echo mode has so far limited the useful modulation periods to those resolvable with the limited spatial resolution of the detectors available. Here we present our results of an approach to keep the period of the induced modulation constant for the wavelengths utilised in ToF. This is achieved by ramping the magnetic fields in the coils responsible for creating the spatially modulated beam in synchronisation with the neutron pulse, thus keeping the modulation period constant for all wavelengths. Such a setup enables the decoupling of the spatial detector resolution from the resolution of the modulation period by the use of slits or gratings in analogy to the approach in grating-based neutron DFI.

  8. Fine Structure of Plasmaspheric Hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, D.; Omura, Y.; Nakamura, S.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss plays a key role in controlling the structure and dynamics of Earth's radiation belts.The quiet time slot region between the inner and outer belts can be explained as a steady-state balance between earthward radial diffusion and pitch-angle scattering loss of energetic electrons to the atmosphere induced by plasmaspheric hiss. Plasmaspheric hiss can also induce gradual precipitation loss of MeV electrons from the outer radiation belt. Plasmaspheric hiss has been widely regarded as a broadband,structureless,incoherent emission. Here, by examining burst-mode vector waveform data from the EMFISIS instrument on the Van Allen Probes mission,we show that plasmaspheric hiss is a coherent emission with complex fine structure. Specifically, plasmaspheric hiss appears as discrete rising tone and falling tone elements. By means of waveform analysis we identify typical amplitudes,phase profiles,and sweep rates of the rising and falling tone elements. The new observations reported here can be expected to fuel a re-examination of the properties of plasmaspheric hiss, including a further re-analysis of the generation mechanism for hiss.

  9. Spectral emissivities and optical constants of electromagnetically levitated liquid metals as functions of temperature and wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, S.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a noncontact temperature measurement device utilizing rotating analyzer ellipsometry is described. The technique circumvents the necessity of spectral emissivity estimation by direct measurement concomittant with radiance brightness. Using this approach, the optical properties of electromagnetically levitated liquid metals Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pd, Pt, and Zr were measured in situ at four wavelengths and up to 600 K superheat in the liquid. The data suggest an increase in the emissivity of the liquid compared with the incandescent solid. The data also show moderate temperature dependence of the spectral emissivity. A few measurements of the optical properties of undercooled liquid metals were also conducted. The data for both solids and liquids show excellent agreement with available values in the literature for the spectral emissivities as well as the optical constants.

  10. Fine Structure of Dark Energy and New Physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Kavic, Michael; Minic, Djordje

    2007-01-01

    Following our recent work on the cosmological constant problem, in this letter we make a specific proposal regarding the fine structure (i.e., the spectrum) of dark energy. The proposal is motivated by a deep analogy between the blackbody radiation problem, which led to the development of quantum theory, and the cosmological constant problem, for which we have recently argued calls for a conceptual extension of the quantum theory. We argue that the fine structure of dark energy is governed by a Wien distribution, indicating its dual quantum and classical nature. We discuss observational consequences of such a picture of darkmore » energy and constrain the distribution function.« less

  11. Fine-structure line deficit in S 140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossenkopf, V.; Koumpia, E.; Okada, Y.; Mookerjea, B.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Simon, R.; Pütz, P.; Güsten, R.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We try to understand the gas heating and cooling in the S 140 star-forming region by spatially and spectrally resolving the distribution of the main cooling lines with GREAT/SOFIA and combining our data with existing ground-based and Herschel observations that trace the energy input and the density and temperature structure of the source. Methods: We mapped the fine-structure lines of [O i] (63 μm) and [C ii] (158 μm) and the rotational transitions of CO 13-12 and 16-15 with GREAT/SOFIA and analyzed the spatial and velocity structure to assign the emission to individual heating sources. We measure the optical depth of the [C ii] line and perform radiative transfer computations for all observed transitions. By comparing the line intensities with the far-infrared continuum we can assess the total cooling budget and measure the gas heating efficiency. Results: The main emission of fine-structure lines in S 140 stems from a 8.3'' region close to the infrared source IRS 2 that is not prominent at any other wavelength. It can be explained by a photon-dominated region (PDR) structure around the embedded cluster if we assume that the [O i] line intensity is reduced by a factor of seven owing to self-absorption. The external cloud interface forms a second PDR at an inclination of 80-85 degrees illuminated by a UV field of 60 times the standard interstellar radiation field. The main radiation source in the cloud, IRS 1, is not prominent at all in the fine-structure lines. We measure line-to-continuum cooling ratios below 10-4, i.e. values lower than in any other Galactic source, actually matching the far-IR line deficit seen in ULIRGs. In particular, the low intensity of the [C ii] line can only be modeled by an extreme excitation gradient in the gas around IRS 1. We found no explanation for why IRS 1 shows no associated fine-structure line peak, while IRS 2 does. Conclusions: The inner part of S 140 mimics the far-IR line deficit in ULIRGs thereby providing a

  12. Universal fine structure of nematic hedgehogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Samo; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2001-02-01

    We study in a Landau-de Gennes approach the biaxial structure of a nematic point defect with topological charge M = + 1. We aim to illuminate the role of the confining boundaries in determining the fine structure of the defect. We show that there are different regimes associated with different values of the ratio between the typical size R of the region in space occupied by the material and the biaxial correlation length ξb. For R/ξb>20 the core structure is already qualitatively universal, that is, independent of the confining geometry, while also for R/ξb>200 any quantitative difference is unlikely to be detected.

  13. Two-beam interferometer for optical constants measurements at near-millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. R.; Dutta, J. M.; Davé, H.

    1984-03-01

    A simple and versatile instrument for the measurement of optical constants in the near millimeter spectral region is described. Studies of quasi-optical components used in this instrument for effective beam transmission and control are reported. These studies include transmission characteristics of dielectric waveguides and performance of a variable coupler based on frustrated total internal reflection. Operation of this instrument as a two-beam interferometer for determining the index of refraction or as a device to measure transmission for determining the absorption coefficient are described. Values measured with this instrument at 245 GHz, using an optically pumped molecular laser as the source, are reported for several low-loss materials. Appropriate corrections and error estimates are discussed. The potential for improvement and increased accuracies are discussed.

  14. Fine structure of the magnetic field in active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, Lev; Beskrovnaya, Nina; Ikhsanov, Nazar

    High-resolution observations with SOHO, SDO, TRACE, HINODE suggest that the solar magnetic field in active regions has a complicated fine structure. There is a large number of thin magnetic arcs extended from the photosphere to corona with almost constant cross-section. We explore a possibility to model the complex of interacting arcs in terms of a dynamical percolating network. A transition of the system into flaring can be triggered by the flute instability of prominences and/or coronal condensations. We speculate around an assumption that the energy release in active regions is governed by the same scenario as dynamical current percolation through a random resistors network in which the saltatory conduction is controlled by a local current level.

  15. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Solar Prominence Fine Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We review recent observational and theoretical results on the fine structure and dynamics of solar prominences, beginning with an overview of prominence classifications, the proposal of possible new ``funnel prominence'' classification, and a discussion of the recent ``solar tornado'' findings. We then focus on quiescent prominences to review formation, down-flow dynamics, and the ``prominence bubble'' phenomena. We show new observations of the prominence bubble Rayleigh-Taylor instability triggered by a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear flow instability occurring along the bubble boundary. Finally we review recent studies on plasma composition of bubbles, emphasizing that differential emission measure (DEM) analysis offers a more quantitative analysis than photometric comparisons. In conclusion, we discuss the relation of prominences to coronal magnetic flux ropes, proposing that prominences can be understood as partially ionized condensations of plasma forming the return flow of a general magneto-thermal convection in the corona.

  17. Compensation of logarithmic corrections in calculating the fine structure of levels in hydrogen-like atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Boikova, N. A. Tyukhtyaev, Yu. N.; Faustov, R. N.

    2011-01-15

    Special features of the quasipotential approach to calculating logarithmic (in the fine-structure constant) contributions to the fine splitting of energy levels in hydrogen-like atoms are analyzed. The boundaries of the region of applicability of the Fell technique are indicated, and the order of corrections beyond this region is estimated.

  18. The Effect of Quantum-Mechanical Interference on Precise Measurements of the n = 2 Triplet P Fine Structure of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Marsman, A.; Horbatsch, M.; Hessels, E. A.

    2015-09-15

    For many decades, improvements in both theory and experiment of the fine structure of the n = 2 triplet P levels of helium have allowed for an increasingly precise determination of the fine-structure constant. Recently, it has been observed that quantum-mechanical interference between neighboring resonances can cause significant shifts, even if such neighboring resonances are separated by thousands of natural widths. The shifts depend in detail on the experimental method used for the measurement, as well as the specific experimental parameters employed. Here, we review how these shifts apply for the most precise measurements of the helium 2{sup 3}P fine-structure intervals.

  19. Cell fine structure and function - Past and present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.

    1970-01-01

    Electron microscopic studies of nerve membrane fine structure, discussing cell membrane multienzyme and macromolecular energy and information transduction, protein synthesis and nucleic acids interrelations

  20. Fine Structure and Dynamics of Sunspot Penumbra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutova, M.; Berger, T.; Title, A.

    2007-08-01

    A mature sunspot is usually surrounded by a penumbra: strong vertical magnetic field in the umbra, the dark central region of sunspot, becomes more and more horizontal toward the periphery forming an ensemble of a thin magnetic filaments of varying inclinations. Recent high resolution observations with the 1-meter Swedish Solar Telescope (SST) on La Palma revealed a fine substructure of penumbral filaments and new regularities in their dynamics.1 These findings provide both the basis and constraints for an adequate model of the penumbra whose origin still remains enigmatic. We present results of recent observations obtained with the SST. Our data, taken simultaneously in 4305 Å G-band and 4396 Å continuum bandpasses and compiled in high cadence movies, confirm previous results and reveal new features of the penumbra. We find e.g. that individual filaments are cylindrical helices with a pitch/radius ratio providing their dynamic stability. We propose a mechanism that may explain the fine structure of penumbral filaments, the observed regularities, and their togetherness with sunspot formation. The mechanism is based on the anatomy of sunspots in which not only penumbra has a filamentary structure but umbra itself is a dense conglomerate of twisted interlaced flux tubes.

  1. Internal Fine Structure of Ellerman Bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuki; Kitai, Reizaburo; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Satoru; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Ishii, Takako T.; Hagino, Masaoki; Komori, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Takuma; Otsuji, Kenichi; Nakamura, Tahei; Kawate, Tomoko; Watanabe, Hiroko; Shibata, Kazunari

    2010-08-01

    We conducted coordinated observations of Ellerman bombs (EBs) between Hinode Satellite and Hida Observatory (HOP12). CaII H broad-band filter images of NOAA 10966 on 2007 August 9 and 10 were obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode Satellite, and many bright points were observed. We identified a total of 4 bright points as EBs, and studied the temporal variation of their morphological fine structures and spectroscopic characteristics. With high-resolution CaII H images of SOT, we found that the EBs, thus far thought of as single bright features, are composed of a few of fine subcomponents. Also, by using Stokes I/V filtergrams with Hinode/SOT, and CaII H spectroheliograms with Hida/Domeless Solar Telescope (DST), our observation showed: (1) The mean duration, the mean width, the mean length, and the mean aspect ratio of the subcomponents were 390 s, 170 km, 450 km, and 2.7, respectively. (2) Subcomponents started to appear on the magnetic neutral lines, and extended their lengths from the original locations. (3) When the CaII H line of EBs showed the characteristic blue asymmetry, they are associated with the appearance or re-brightening of subcomponents. Summarizing our results, we obtained an observational view that elementary magnetic reconnections take place one by one successively and intermittently in EBs, and that their manifestation is the fine subcomponents of the EB phenomena.

  2. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harter, William G.; Mitchell, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES). Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES) used in Born–Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v), then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters. PMID:23344041

  3. Estimated Optical Constants of Calcite at visible to mid-infrared wavelengths (0.3-6 μm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    Carbonate minerals are germane to questions involving volatile and climate history on Mars [e.g., 1,2]. Spectral observations provide evidence for the presence of carbonates in the Martian environment [1, 3-7]. Carbonate minerals are identified in Asian [8] and Saharan dust [9-11]. The imaginary index of refraction in the visible to mid-infrared wavelengths (vmir) of has been determined from a few of the many studies of carbonates spanning over 100 years [12-16]. The growing evidence for carbonates on Mars, the presence of carbonates in terrestrial aerosols, and the disagreement among the optical constants for these materials in the vmir has motivated a broader effort to determine the optical constants of carbonates [17-18]. The results of the application of the techniques described in [19] to estimate the optical constants of calcite will be presented. [1] Pollack et al. 1987 Icarus, 71, 203 [2] Fanale et at. 1992 in Mars, U. Arizona Press, 1135 [3] Lellouch et al. 2000 [4] Calvin et al. 1994 JGR. 99, 14659 [5] Bandfield et al. 2003, Science 301, 1084 [6] Ehlmann et al. 2008 Science, 322, 1828 [7] Palomba et al. 2009 Icarus 203, 58 [8] Jeong 2008 JGR., 113, D02208 [9] Glaccum and Prospero 1980 Mar. Geol., 37, 295 [10] Avila et al. 1997 JGR 102, 21,977 [11] Reid et al. 2003 JGR, 108, D19 [12] Nysander, 1909 Phys. Rev. 28, 291 [13] Merrit 1895 Phys. Rev. 2, 424 [14] Hellewege et al. 1970 Z. Phys., 232, 61 [15] Marra, et al. 2006 J. Quant. Spect. & Rad. Trans. 100, 250 [16] Ivalev and Papova 1972 Sov. Phys. J. 5, 91 [17] Roush, 2009 Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf 40, abstract 1080 [18] Roush 2010 Euro. Planet. Sci. Cong. abstract 341 [19] Roush et al. 2007 JGR, 112, E10003

  4. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  5. Fine structure of the Mn acceptor in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, I. V.; Debus, J.; Averkiev, N. S.; Dimitriev, G. S.; Sapega, V. F.; Lähderanta, E.

    2016-06-01

    We reveal the electronic level structure of the Mn acceptor, which consists of a valence-band hole bound to an Mn2 + ion, in presence of applied uniaxial stress and an external magnetic field in bulk GaAs. Resonant spin-flip Raman scattering is used to measure the g factor of the AMn0 center in the ground and excited states with the total angular momenta F =1 and F =2 and characterize the optical selection rules of the spin-flip transitions between these Mn-acceptor states. We determine the random stress fields near the Mn acceptor, the constant of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between the valence-band holes and the electrons of the inner Mn2 + shell as well as the deformation potential for the exchange energy. The p -d exchange energy, in particular, decreases significantly with increasing compressive stress. By combining the experimental Raman study with the developed theoretical model on the scattering efficiency, in which also the random local and external uniaxial stresses and magnetic field are considered, the fine structure of the Mn acceptor is determined in full detail.

  6. Stochastic quintessence models: Jerk and fine-structure variability constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantas, Christine C.; Ribeiro, André L. B.

    2016-02-01

    We report on constraints to the cosmological jerk parameter (j ) and to possible variability of the fine-structure constant (Δ α /α ) based on stochastic quintessence models of dark energy, discussed by Chongchitnan and Efstathiou [Phys. Rev. D 76, 043508 (2007)]. We confirm the results by these authors in the sense that many viable solutions can be obtained, obeying current observational constraints in low redshifts. We add the observables j and Δ α /α to this conclusion. However, we find peculiarities that may produce, in the nearby universe, potential observational imprints in future cosmological data. We conclude, for redshifts z ≲3 , that (i) j (z ) fluctuates due to the stochasticity of the models, reaching an amplitude of up to 5% relatively to the Λ cold dark matter model value (jΛ CDM=1 ); and (ii) by contrasting two distinct ("extreme") types of solutions, variabilities in α (z ), linked to a linear coupling (ζ ) between the dark energy and electromagnetic sectors, are weakly dependent on redshift, for couplings of the order |ζ |˜1 0-4, even for large variations in the equation of state parameter at relatively low redshifts. Nonlinear couplings produce an earlier and steeper onset of the evolution in Δ α /α (z ), but can still accommodate the data for weak enough couplings.

  7. SEISMOLOGY OF STANDING KINK OSCILLATIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Arregui, I.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2010-10-20

    We investigate standing kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a prominence fine structure modeled as a straight and cylindrical magnetic tube only partially filled with the prominence material and with its ends fixed at two rigid walls representing the solar photosphere. The prominence plasma is partially ionized and a transverse inhomogeneous transitional layer is included between the prominence thread and the coronal medium. Thus, ion-neutral collisions and resonant absorption are the damping mechanisms considered. Approximate analytical expressions of the period, the damping time, and their ratio are derived for the fundamental mode in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. We find that the dominant damping mechanism is resonant absorption, which provides damping ratios in agreement with the observations, whereas ion-neutral collisions are irrelevant for damping. The values of the damping ratio are independent of both the prominence thread length and its position within the magnetic tube, and coincide with the values for a tube fully filled with the prominence plasma. The implications of our results in the context of the MHD seismology technique are discussed, pointing out that the reported short-period (2-10 minutes) and short-wavelength (700-8000 km) thread oscillations may not be consistent with a standing mode interpretation and could be related to propagating waves. Finally, we show that the inversion of some prominence physical parameters, e.g., Alfven speed, magnetic field strength, transverse inhomogeneity length scale, etc., is possible using observationally determined values of the period and damping time of the oscillations along with the analytical approximations of these quantities.

  8. Atomic sulfur: Frequency measurement of the J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition at 56.3 microns by laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Zink, Lyndon R.

    1994-01-01

    The J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition in atomic sulfur (S I) in its ground (3)P state has been detected in the laboratory by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance. The fine-structure interval has been measured accurately as 5,322,492.9 +/- 2.8 MHz which corresponds to a wavelength of 56.325572 +/- 0.000030 micrometers.

  9. The fine-structure intervals of (N-14)+ by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Varberg, Thomas D.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Cooksy, Andrew L.

    1994-01-01

    The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectra associated with both fine-structure transitions in (N-14)+ in its ground P-3 state have been recorded. This is the first laboratory observation of the J = 1 left arrow 0 transition and its frequency has been determined two orders of magnitude more accurately than previously. The remeasurement of the J = 2 left arrow 1 spectrum revealed a small error in the previous laboratory measurements. The fine-structure splittings (free of hyperfine interactions) determined in this work are (delta)E(sub 10) = 1461.13190 (61) GHz, (delta)E(sub 21) = 2459.38006 (37) GHz. Zero-field transition frequencies which include the effects of hyperfine structure have also been calculated. Refined values for the hyperfine constants and the g(sub J) factors have been obtained.

  10. Optical constants of e-beam-deposited zirconium dioxide measured in the 55-150 Å wavelength region using the reflectivity technique.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amol; Sinha, Mangalika; Gupta, R K; Modi, Mohammed H

    2016-04-20

    In the present study, optical constants of e-beam-deposited zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) thin film are determined in the 55-150 Å soft x-ray wavelength region using the angle-dependent reflectivity technique. Soft x-ray reflectivity measurements are carried out using the reflectivity beamline at the Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source. Derived optical constants (δ and β) are compared with the tabulated values of Henke et al. [http://henke.lbl.gov/optical_constants/asf.html]. It is found that the measured δ values are consistently lower than the tabulated bulk values in the 70-150 Å wavelength region. In this region, the delta values are lower by 19%-24% from the tabulated data. Below the Zr M4 edge (66.3 Å), a deviation in delta values is found as ∼2%-21%. These changes are attributed to growth-related defects (oxygen and voids) and variation in film stoichiometry. To the best of our knowledge, the present study gives the first reported experimental values of optical constants for ZrO2 in the 55-150 Å wavelength region. PMID:27140084

  11. Temporal Fine Structure and Applications to Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Complex broadband sounds are decomposed by the auditory filters into a series of relatively narrowband signals, each of which conveys information about the sound by time-varying features. The slow changes in the overall amplitude constitute envelope, while the more rapid events, such as zero crossings, constitute temporal fine structure (TFS).…

  12. Fine structure of 25 extragalactic radio sources. [interferometric observations of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittels, J. J.; Knight, C. A.; Shapiro, I. I.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.; Clark, T. A.; Hutton, L. K.; Marandino, G. E.; Niell, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    Interferometric observations taken at 7.8 GHz (gamma approximately = 3.8 cm) with five pairings of antennae of 25 extragalactic radio sources between April, 1972 and May, 1973 are reported. These sources exhibit a broad variety of fine structure from very simple to complex. The total flux and the correlated flux of some of the sources underwent large changes in a few weeks, while the structure and total power of others remained constant during the entire period of observation. Some aspects of the data processing and a discussion of errors are presented. Numerous figures are provided and explained. The individual radio sources are described in detail.

  13. Assigning {gamma} deformation from fine structure in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Arumugam, P.

    2011-10-28

    The nonadiabatic quasiparticle model for triaxial shapes is used to perform calculations for decay of {sup 141}Ho, the only known odd-Z even-N deformed nucleus for which fine structure in proton emission from both ground and isomeric states has been observed. All experimental data corresponding to this unique case namely, the rotational spectra of parent and daughter nuclei, decay widths and branching ratios for ground and isomeric states, could be well explained with a strong triaxial deformation {gamma}{approx}20. The recent experimental observation of fine structure decay from the isomeric state, can be explained only with an assignment of I{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup +} as the decaying state, in contradiction with the previous assignment, of I{sup {pi}} 1/2{sup +}, based on adiabatic calculations. This study reveals that proton emission measurements could be a precise tool to probe triaxial deformations and other structural properties of exotic nuclei beyond the proton dripline.

  14. Analysis of fine structure in the nuclear continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Usman, I.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.

    2008-02-15

    Fine structure has been shown to be a general phenomenon of nuclear giant resonances of different multipolarities over a wide mass range. In this article we assess various techniques that have been proposed to extract quantitative information from the fine structure in terms of characteristic scales. These include the so-called local scaling dimension, the entropy index method, Fourier analysis, and continuous and discrete wavelet transforms. As an example, results on the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in {sup 208}Pb from high-energy-resolution inelastic proton scattering and calculations with the quasiparticle-phonon model are analyzed. Wavelet analysis, both continuous and discrete, of the spectra is shown to be a powerful tool to extract the magnitude and localization of characteristic scales.

  15. Relative fine-structure intensities in two-photon excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, D. R.; Bischel, W. K.

    1984-01-01

    A discrepancy is pointed out between experimental determinations of the relative intensities for different fine-structure components of the two-photon transitions 2p3P 3p3P in oxygen and 2p3 4S0 - 2p2 3p4D0 in nitrogen, which agreed well with calculations involving a single virtual intermediate level, and a two-photon selection rule dJ not equal to one, derived in a purely theoretical and erroneous treatment of these transitions. Five other experiments are also briefly examined, with the conclusion that relative fine-structure intensities in two-photon transitions are well understood as straightforward extensions of angular momentum coupling in single-photon cases, in accordance with allowed dJ = 0, + or -1, and + or -2 transitions.

  16. Efferent Modulation of Stimulus Frequency Otoacoustic Emission Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Dewey, James B.; Boothalingam, Sriram; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2015-01-01

    Otoacoustic emissions, sounds generated in the inner ear, have become a convenient non-invasive tool to examine the efferent modulation of cochlear mechanics. Activation of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferents has been shown to alter the magnitude of these emissions. When the effects of efferent activation on the detailed spectral structures of these emissions have been examined, a shift of the spectral patterns toward higher frequencies has been reported for distortion product and spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) have been proposed as the preferred emission type in the study of efferent modulation due to the simplicity of their production leading to the possibility of clearer interpretation of results. The effects of efferent activation on the complex spectral patterns of SFOAEs have not been examined to the best of our knowledge. We have examined the effects of activating the MOC efferents using broadband noise in normal-hearing humans. The detailed spectral structure of SFOAEs, known as fine structure, was recorded with and without contralateral acoustic stimulation. Results indicate that SFOAEs are reduced in magnitude and their fine structure pushed to higher frequencies by contralateral acoustic stimulation. These changes are similar to those observed in distortion product or spontaneous otoacoustic emissions and behavioral hearing thresholds. Taken together with observations made about magnitude and phase changes in otoacoustic emissions and hearing thresholds upon contralateral acoustic stimulation, all changes in otoacoustic emission and hearing threshold fine structure appear to be driven by a common set of mechanisms. Specifically, frequency shifts in fine structure patterns appear to be linked to changes in SFOAE phase due to contralateral acoustic stimulation. PMID:26696843

  17. Fine structure of a resonantly excited p -shell exciton in a CdTe quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoleński, T.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Goryca, M.; Wojnar, P.; Kossacki, P.

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-resolved photoluminescence excitation study of the absorption spectrum of a p -shell neutral exciton in a single CdTe/ZnTe quantum dot. We find that the fine structure of the p -shell exciton is completely analogous to the fine structure of the s -shell exciton, including the selection rules and the effects of a magnetic field applied in Faraday and Voigt configurations. The energy spectrum of the p -shell exciton is found to be well described by introducing respective isotropic and anisotropic constants of the exchange interaction between a p -shell electron and a p -shell hole. The typical values of these exchange constants averaged over several randomly selected quantum dots yield δ0p p=(0.92 ±0.16 ) meV and δ1p p=(0.58 ±0.25 ) meV. Additionally, we demonstrate that the nonresonant relaxation of the p -shell exciton conserves the exciton spin to a very high degree for both bright and dark exciton configurations.

  18. Processing of temporal fine structure as a function of age

    PubMed Central

    Grose, John H.; Mamo, Sara K.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine whether the processing of temporal fine structure diminishes with age, even in the presence of relatively normal audiometric hearing. Temporal fine structure processing was assessed by measuring the discrimination of inter-aural phase differences (IPDs). The hypothesis was that IPD discrimination is more acute in middle-aged observers than in older observers but that acuity in middle-aged observers is nevertheless poorer than in young adults. Design Two experiments were undertaken. The first measured discrimination of 0-and π-radian inter-aural phases as a function of carrier frequency. The stimulus was a 5-Hz sinusoidally amplitude modulated tone where, in the signal waveform, the inter-aural phase of the carrier was inverted during alternate modulation periods. The second experiment measured IPD discrimination at fixed frequencies. The stimulus was a pair of tone pulses where, in the signal, the trailing pulse contained an IPD. A total of 39 adults with normal audiograms below 2000 Hz participated: 15 younger, 12 middle-aged, and 12 older. Results Experiment 1 showed that the highest carrier frequency at which a π-radian IPD could be discriminated from the diotic, 0-radian standard was significantly lower in middle-aged listeners than young adults, and lower still in older listeners. Experiment 2 indicated that middle-aged listeners were less sensitive to IPDs than young adults at all but the lowest frequencies tested. Older listeners, as a group, had the poorest thresholds. Conclusions These results suggest that deficits in temporal fine structure processing are evident in the pre-senescent auditory system. This adds to the accumulating evidence that deficiencies in some aspects of auditory temporal processing emerge relatively early in the aging process. It is possible that early-emerging temporal processing deficits manifest themselves in challenging speech-in-noise environments. PMID:20592614

  19. Fine Structure and Optical Depth in the Solar Transition Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plovanic, Jacob; Kankelborg, C. C.; Williamson, K.

    2011-05-01

    Unresolved fine structure in the solar transition region (TR) has long been inferred from measurements of density-sensitive line pairs showing low filling factor (< 0.01). Low filling factor models for the structure of the He II source region, however, have not been well studied. We propose a highly structured model of the lower atmosphere in which He II is formed at low filling factors, leading to high emission measure and an optically thin He II line. This transparent TR material is juxtaposed with absorbing chromospheric structures, leading to the nearly uniform center to limb behavior of the He II line as observed.

  20. Fine structure of the solar transition region - Observations and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Brueckner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of recent high spatial resolution observations of the solar transition region and temperature minimum, in the form of UV spectra and spectroheliographs from both sounding rockets and the Spacelab 2 flights of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS). Attention is given to the solar atmosphere structure implications of the HRST's observational results. The inclusion of fine structure in conjectures concerning the transition region affects the plausibility of 1D average models of the solar atmosphere, as well as the determination of temperature gradients, possible nonradiative-heating mechanisms, and the comparison of transition region structures with corresponding observations of the photosphere and corona.

  1. `Fingerprint' Fine Structure in the Solar Decametric Radio Spectrum Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, E. Y.; Zaitsev, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Dorovskyy, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    We study a unique fine structure in the dynamic spectrum of the solar radio emission discovered by the UTR-2 radio telescope (Kharkiv, Ukraine) in the frequency band of 20 - 30 MHz. The structure was observed against the background of a broadband type IV radio burst and consisted of parallel drifting narrow bands of enhanced emission and absorption on the background emission. The observed structure differs from the widely known zebra pattern at meter and decimeter wavelengths by the opposite directions of the frequency drift within a single stripe at a given time. We show that the observed properties can be understood in the framework of the radiation mechanism by virtue of the double plasma resonance effect in a nonuniform coronal magnetic trap. We propose a source model providing the observed frequency drift of the stripes.

  2. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    fundamental constant at play here, alpha. However, the observed distribution of the elements is consistent with calculations assuming that the value of alpha at that time was precisely the same as the value today. Over the 2 billion years, the change of alpha has therefore to be smaller than about 2 parts per 100 millions. If present at all, this is a rather small change indeed. But what about changes much earlier in the history of the Universe? To measure this we must find means to probe still further into the past. And this is where astronomy can help. Because, even though astronomers can't generally do experiments, the Universe itself is a huge atomic physics laboratory. By studying very remote objects, astronomers can look back over a long time span. In this way it becomes possible to test the values of the physical constants when the Universe had only 25% of is present age, that is, about 10,000 million years ago. Very far beacons To do so, astronomers rely on spectroscopy - the measurement of the properties of light emitted or absorbed by matter. When the light from a flame is observed through a prism, a rainbow is visible. When sprinkling salt on the flame, distinct yellow lines are superimposed on the usual colours of the rainbow, so-called emission lines. Putting a gas cell between the flame and the prism, one sees however dark lines onto the rainbow: these are absorption lines. The wavelength of these emission and absorption lines is directly related to the energy levels of the atoms in the salt or in the gas. Spectroscopy thus allows us to study atomic structure. The fine structure of atoms can be observed spectroscopically as the splitting of certain energy levels in those atoms. So if alpha were to change over time, the emission and absorption spectra of these atoms would change as well. One way to look for any changes in the value of alpha over the history of the Universe is therefore to measure the spectra of distant quasars, and compare the wavelengths of

  3. Numerical models of sunspot formation and fine structure.

    PubMed

    Rempel, Matthias

    2012-07-13

    Sunspots are central to our understanding of solar (and stellar) magnetism in many respects. On the large scale, they link the magnetic field observable in the photosphere to the dynamo processes operating in the solar interior. Properly interpreting the constraints that sunspots impose on the dynamo process requires a detailed understanding of the processes involved in their formation, dynamical evolution and decay. On the small scale, they give an insight into how convective energy transport interacts with the magnetic field over a wide range of field strengths and inclination angles, leading to sunspot fine structure observed in the form of umbral dots and penumbral filaments. Over the past decade, substantial progress has been made on both observational and theoretical sides. Advanced ground- and space-based observations have resolved, for the first time, the details of umbral dots and penumbral filaments and discovered similarities in their substructures. Numerical models have advanced to the degree that simulations of entire sunspots with sufficient resolution to resolve sunspot fine structure are feasible. A combination of improved helioseismic inversion techniques with seismic forward modelling provides new views on the subsurface structure of sunspots. In this review, we summarize recent progress, with particular focus on numerical modelling. PMID:22665895

  4. SOLAR RADIO BURSTS WITH SPECTRAL FINE STRUCTURES IN PREFLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Tan, Baolin; Huang, Jing; Tan, Chengming; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Simões, Paulo J.A.

    2015-01-20

    Good observations of preflare activities are important for us to understand the origin and triggering mechanism of solar flares, and to predict the occurrence of solar flares. This work presents the characteristics of microwave spectral fine structures as preflare activities of four solar flares observed by the Ondřejov radio spectrograph in the frequency range of 0.8-2.0 GHz. We found that these microwave bursts which occurred 1-4 minutes before the onset of flares have spectral fine structures with relatively weak intensities and very short timescales. They include microwave quasi-periodic pulsations with very short periods of 0.1-0.3 s and dot bursts with millisecond timescales and narrow frequency bandwidths. Accompanying these microwave bursts are filament motions, plasma ejection or loop brightening in the EUV imaging observations, and non-thermal hard X-ray emission enhancements observed by RHESSI. These facts may reveal certain independent, non-thermal energy releasing processes and particle acceleration before the onset of solar flares. They may help us to understand the nature of solar flares and to predict their occurrence.

  5. Fine-structure studies of experimental skeletal muscle trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Paddle, B. M.; Freeman, S. E.; Mawson, I.; Graham, H.

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of damage to skeletal muscle caused by a high-velocity rifle bullet. Such damage extends peripherally from the permanent wound cavity and is focal in nature. A fine-structure investigation of this region suggests that some components of the muscle are more susceptible to the wounding process than others. The sarcoplasmic reticulum appeared most sensitive and areas as far as 3 cm from the wound cavity frequently showed gross vacuolization. Mitochrondrial damage was seen, but only in areas where there was also damage to myofibrils and the microvasculature. Focal capillary leakage up to 3 cm from the wound cavity was demonstrated in an earlier study by the use of a fluorescein-labelled dextran (Paddle and Freeman, 1979). This finding was confirmed. A possible correlate at the fine structural level was swelling of te capillary endothelial cells, which occurred in the absence of other signs of microvascular damage. Damage to the endothelial junctions was not observed, even in severely damaged tissue. Intravascular colloidal carbon escaped into the extravascular space only when the microvasculature was fractured. The relationship of these findings to macroscopic damage is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7326215

  6. Towards universal wavelength-specific photodegradation rate constants for methyl mercury in humic waters, exemplified by a Boreal lake-wetland gradient.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Gómez, Cristal; Drott, Andreas; Björn, Erik; Díez, Sergi; Bayona, Josep M; Tesfalidet, Solomon; Lindfors, Anders; Skyllberg, Ulf

    2013-06-18

    We report experimentally determined first-order rate constants of MeHg photolysis in three waters along a Boreal lake-wetland gradient covering a range of pH (3.8-6.6), concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC 17.5-81 mg L(-1)), total Fe (0.8-2.1 mg L(-1)), specific UV254 nm absorption (3.3-4.2 L mg(-1) m(-1)) and TOC/TON ratios (24-67 g g(-1)). Rate constants determined as a function of incident sunlight (measured as cumulative photon flux of photosynthetically active radiation, PAR) decreased in the order dystrophic lake > dystrophic lake/wetland > riparian wetland. After correction for light attenuation by dissolved natural organic matter (DOM), wavelength-specific (PAR: 400-700 nm, UVA: 320-400 nm and UVB: 280-320 nm) first-order photodegradation rate constants (kpd) determined at the three sites were indistinguishable, with average values (± SE) of 0.0023 ± 0.0002, 0.10 ± 0.024 and 7.2 ± 1.3 m(2) E(-1) for kpdPAR, kpdUVA, and kpdUVB, respectively. The relative ratio of kpdPAR, kpdUVA, and kpdUVB was 1:43:3100. Experiments conducted at varying MeHg/TOC ratios confirm previous suggestions that complex formation with organic thiol groups enhances the rate of MeHg photodegradation, as compared to when O and N functional groups are involved in the speciation of MeHg. We suggest that if the photon fluxes of PAR, UVA, and UVB radiation are separately determined and the wavelength-specific light attenuation is corrected for, the first-order rate constants kpdPAR, kpdUVA, and kpdUVB will be universal to waters in which DOM (possibly in concert with Fe) controls the formation of ROS, and the chemical speciation of MeHg is controlled by the complexation with DOM associated thiols. PMID:23647363

  7. Fine Structure in Jupiter’s Decametric Emission using the Long Wavelength Array Station 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Charles; Clarke, T. E.; Skarda, J.; Imai, K.; Imai, M.; Reyes, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations of Jupiter’s decametric radio emissions were made with the LWA1 instrument and provide excellent spectral resolution over the bandwidth of 10 - 40 MHz. Using the full Stokes capabilities of LWA1, we show excellent detail of many well-known decametric features in Jupiter’s spectrum (nested arc structure, modulation lanes, S-bursts, and N-events). The nested arc-structures result from the geometry of the hollow emission cone(s) and the observer as Jupiter rotates. Modulation lanes seen in many Jupiter events are caused by interference as the waves propagate through the field-aligned columns of enhanced or depleted plasma density located along the longitudinal direction near Io's orbit (Imai et al., 2002). LWA1 data showing simultaneous modulation lanes in both polarizations for a Jupiter Io-C event suggest that both polarizations might be coming from the same hemisphere, contrary to the emission theory. Jupiter also emits millisecond S-bursts which are the strongest of the Jovian Io-controlled decametric emission (> 10 MJy). These bursts are concentrated in the bandwidth of 18 - 33 MHz and show very complex structures such as frequency drifting, source splitting, and combination. The S-burst frequency drift rates are similar to previous measurements and suggest that electrons are moving up the magnetic field lines away from the magnetic poles. Observations of some S-bursts show an interaction with narrow-band (N) events, by either triggering or quenching the resonance set up in the source emission zone. Further analyses are needed to understand this mechanism and other features of Jupiter’s decametric spectrum. We show many Jupiter spectra and highlight the new capabilities of the LWA1 telescope.

  8. Solution spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ X-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, M.R.; Soderholm, L.; Song, I.

    1995-06-12

    A purpose-built spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ fluorescence XAFS (X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements of bulk solution species during constant-potential electrolysis is described. The cell performance was demonstrated by the collection of europium L{sub 3}-edge XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) throughout the course of electrolysis of an aqueous solution of EuCl{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The europium L{sub 3}-edge resonances reported here for the Eu{sup III} and Eu{sup II} ions demonstrate that their 2p{sub 3/2} {yields} 5d electronic transition probabilities are not the same.

  9. Reconstruction of the fine structure of an acoustic scatterer against the distorting influence of its large-scale inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. A.; Grishina, I. M.; Lapshenkina, O. I.; Morozov, S. A.; Rumyantseva, O. D.; Sukhov, E. G.

    2003-11-01

    In the ultrasonic diagnostics of small-size neoplasms of biological tissues at the earliest stage of their development, an efficient way to eliminate the distorting influence of high-contrast or large inhomogeneities of the biological medium is to apply the iterative technique. A simple approach is proposed, which makes it possible with only two iteration steps to achieve an efficient focusing of the tomograph array. At the first step, the unknown distribution of the large-scale inhomogeneities of sound velocity and absorption over the scatterer is reconstructed, where the large-scale inhomogeneities are those whose size exceeds several wavelengths. At the second step, the fine structure of the scatterer is reconstructed against the large-scale background, which can be performed with a high accuracy owing to the evaluation of the background at the first step. The possibility of simultaneous reconstruction of the large-scale and fine structures by the noniterative Grinevich-Novikov algorithm is considered as an alternative. This algorithm reconstructs in an explicit form two-dimensional refractive-absorbing acoustic scatterers of almost arbitrary shape and strength. Taking into account the effects of multiple scattering, this algorithm provides resolution of the fine structure almost as good as that achieved in reconstructing the same structure against an undistorting homogeneous background. The results of numerical simulations of both algorithms are presented.

  10. Fine structure of track-plated Au-Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.; Staudhammer, K.P.

    1982-01-01

    The burnishing process, i.e., mechanical rubbing of the deposit during electrodeposition, produces continuous nucleation of new grains during deposition which effectively prevents large columnar grains and macroporosity. In addition, track plating produces a uniform subgrain and substructure. By the use of STEM and TEM we were able to define a number of structural features of this material. Evident from the micrographs is the non-uniform polishing of the layers resulting from the chemical variation in the plating process. Microstructural features of the Au rich regions are shown. The unit size of this structure is about 22 nm. The fine-grained structure does not have well defined boundaries but does contain a slight amount of preferred alignment. Each equivalent unit has periodic fine structure measurable to approx. 2 nm.

  11. FOURIER ANALYSIS OF EXTENDED FINE STRUCTURE WITH AUTOREGRESSIVE PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.; Shirley, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Autoregressive prediction is adapted to double the resolution of Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) Fourier transforms. Even with the optimal taper (weighting function), the commonly used taper-and-transform Fourier method has limited resolution: it assumes the signal is zero beyond the limits of the measurement. By seeking the Fourier spectrum of an infinite extent oscillation consistent with the measurements but otherwise having maximum entropy, the errors caused by finite data range can be reduced. Our procedure developed to implement this concept applies autoregressive prediction to extrapolate the signal to an extent controlled by a taper width. Difficulties encountered when processing actual ARPEFS data are discussed. A key feature of this approach is the ability to convert improved measurements (signal-to-noise or point density) into improved Fourier resolution.

  12. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure of bimetallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary Electronic and magnetic properties strongly depend on the structure of the material, especially on the crystal symmetry and chemical environment. In nanoparticles, the break of symmetry at the surface may yield different physical properties with respect to the corresponding bulk material. A useful tool to investigate the electronic structure, magnetic behaviour and local crystallographic structure is X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this review, recent developments in the field of extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements and in the analysis methods for structural investigations of bimetallic nanoparticles are highlighted. The standard analysis based on Fourier transforms is compared to the relatively new field of wavelet transforms that have the potential to outperform traditional analysis, especially in bimetallic alloys. As an example, the lattice expansion and inhomogeneous alloying found in FePt nanoparticles is presented, and this is discussed below in terms of the influence of employed density functional theory calculations on the magnetic properties. PMID:21977436

  13. The Beta Environmental Fine Structure (BEFS): The XAFS Nuclear Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Monfardini, A.; Benedek, G.; Cremonesi, O.; Nucciotti, A.; Sisti, M.; Filipponi, A.

    2007-02-02

    The Beta Environmental Fine Structure (BEFS) effect is an oscillatory modulation on the otherwise smooth spectrum of electrons emitted by beta-decaying nuclei. The existence of this effect was theoretically proposed in 1991, for condensed emitters, in analogy with XAFS. In BEFS the electron, playing the role of the XAFS photoelectron, originates directly from the nucleus and an anti-neutrino is emitted at the same time. We present evidence for BEFS oscillations observed in Silver Perrhenate (AgReO4) low-temperature (0.1K) microbolometers, together with a XAFS-like analysis that allowed for the first time a direct measurement of the anti-neutrino angular momentum. We discuss the physical analogies and differences between BEFS and XAFS and the implications for the next generation experiments aimed at measuring the neutrino mass on purely kinematic grounds. Moreover, we briefly discuss the potential and the limits of BEFS-based techniques with respect to the classical XAFS.

  14. Oscillator Strengths for Fine-Structure Transitions in S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for transitions among the fine-structure levels of the terms belonging to the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2), 3s3p(sup 3), 3s(sup 2)3p3d, 3s(sup 2)3p4s, 3s(sup 2)3p4p, and 3s(sup 2)3p4d configurations of S III are calculated using extensive configuration-interaction wave functions. The relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are incorporated by means of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. Small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices have been made so that the energy splittings are as close as possible to the experimental values. The present results are compared with other available calculations and experiments.

  15. The fine structure of capillaries and small arteries.

    PubMed

    MOORE, D H; RUSKA, H

    1957-05-25

    Details of capillary endothelia of the mammalian heart are described and compared with capillaries of other organs and tissues. Continuous invagination and pinching off of the plasma membrane to form small vesicles which move across the cytoplasm are suggested as constituting a means of active and selective transmission through capillary walls (12). This might be designated as cytopempsis (transmission by cell). The fine structure of the different layers in the walls of small heart arteries is demonstrated. Endothelial protrusions extend through windows of the elestica interna to make direct contact with smooth muscle plasma membranes. The elastica interna appears to vary greatly in both thickness and density, and probably restricts filtration, diffusion, and osmosis to such an extent that windows and the transport mechanisms described (cytopempsis) are necessary for the functional integrity of the smooth muscle layer. The contractile material consists of very fine, poorly oriented filaments. PMID:13438930

  16. Exciton Fine Structure in Single CdSe Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Thomas, N.; Herz, E.; Schöps, O.; Woggon, U.; Artemyev, M. V.

    2005-01-01

    We study the optical properties of excitons in one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures at low temperatures. In single CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanorods we observe a fine structure splitting and explain it by exchange interaction. Two peaks are observed with different degrees of linear polarization of DLP<0.85 and DLP>0.95. For small nanorod radii R≤aB/2, an increase in the photoluminescence decay time is found when the temperature increases from 10 to 80K. The observations are explained by a radius-dependent change in the symmetry of the 1D-exciton ground state which transforms from a dark state into bright states below a critical radius of Rcrit≈3.7 nm.

  17. Bounds on the fine structure constant variability from Fe ii absorption lines in QSO spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, P.; Reimers, D.; Agafonova, I. I.; Levshakov, S. A.

    2008-10-01

    The Single Ion Differential α Measurement (SIDAM)method for measuring Δα/α and its figures of merit are illustrated together withthe results produced by means of Fe ii absorption linesof QSO intervening systems. The method providesΔα/α = -0.12 ±1.79 ppm (parts-per-million) at zabs = 1.15towards HE 0515-4414 and Δα/α = 5.66±2.67 ppm at zabs = 1.84towards Q 1101-264, which are so far the most accurate measurementsfor single systems. SIDAM analysis for 3 systems from the Chand et al. [1]sample provides inconsistent results which we interpret as due tocalibration errors of the Chand et al. data at the level ≈10 ppm.In one system evidence for photo-ionization Dopplershift between Mg ii and Fe ii lines is found.This evidence has important bearings on the Many Multipletmethod where the signal for Δα/αvariabilityis carried mainly by systems involving Mg ii absorbers.Some correlations are also found in the Murphy et al. [10] sample which suggestlarger errors than previously reported.Thus, we consider unlikely that both the Chand et al.and Murphy et al. datasets could providean estimate of Δα/α with an accuracy at the level of 1 ppm.A new spectrograph like the ESPRESSO projectwill be crucial to make progress in the astronomical determination of Δα/α.

  18. Fine-structure infrared lines from the Cassiopeia A knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docenko, D.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Archival observations of infrared fine-structure lines of the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A allow us to test existing models and determine the physical parameters of various regions of the fast-moving knots, which are metal-dominated clouds of material ejected by the supernova explosion. Methods: The fluxes of far-infrared [O i] and [O iii] lines are extracted from previously unpublished archival ISO data. The archival Spitzer data are used to determine the fluxes of the O, Ne, Si, S, Ar, and Fe ion fine-structure lines originating in the fast-moving knots. The ratios of these line fluxes are used as plasma diagnostics. We also determine the infrared line flux ratios with respect to the optical [O iii] 5007 Å line in the knots with previously measured reddening. Additionally, we analyze several optical and near-infrared observations of the fast-moving knots to obtain clearer insight into the post-shock photoionized region structure. Results: We show that the infrared oxygen line flux predictions of all existing theoretical models are correct only to within a factor of a several. Comparison of the model predictions shows that to reproduce the observations it is essential to include the effects of the electron conductivity and dust. Detailed analysis of the diagnostic line flux ratios of various ions allows us to qualitatively confirm the general model of fast-moving knot emission and determine observationally for the first time the physical conditions in the photoionized region after the shock. We infer from the [O iii] line flux ratios that the pre-shock cloud densities are higher than assumed in existing theoretical models and most probably correspond to several hundred particles per cm3. We also determine the Cas A luminosity in the infrared continuum and lines. We show that accounting for the charge exchange processes in the post-shock photoionized region allows us to reproduce most of the relevant spectral line ratios even in the frame of

  19. Fine structure and optical properties of biological polarizers in crustaceans and cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Caldwell, Roy L.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Cronin, Thomas W.

    2008-04-01

    The lighting of the underwater environment is constantly changing due to attenuation by water, scattering by suspended particles, as well as the refraction and reflection caused by the surface waves. These factors pose a great challenge for marine animals which communicate through visual signals, especially those based on color. To escape this problem, certain cephalopod mollusks and stomatopod crustaceans utilize the polarization properties of light. While the mechanisms behind the polarization vision of these two animal groups are similar, several distinctive types of polarizers (i.e. the structure producing the signal) have been found in these animals. To gain a better knowledge of how these polarizers function, we studied the relationships between fine structures and optical properties of four types of polarizers found in cephalopods and stomatopods. Although all the polarizers share a somewhat similar spectral range, around 450- 550 nm, the reflectance properties of the signals and the mechanisms used to produce them have dramatic differences. In cephalopods, stack-plates polarizers produce the polarization patterns found on the arms and around their eyes. In stomatopods, we have found one type of beam-splitting polarizer based on photonic structures and two absorptive polarizer types based on dichroic molecules. These stomatopod polarizers may be found on various appendages, and on the cuticle covering dorsal or lateral sides of the animal. Since the efficiencies of all these polarizer types are somewhat sensitive to the change of illumination and viewing angle, how these animals compensate with different behaviors or fine structural features of the polarizer also varies.

  20. FINE STRUCTURE OF THE EYE OF A CHAETOGNATH.

    PubMed

    EAKIN, R M; WESTFALL, J A

    1964-04-01

    Electron microscopy reveals a star-like pigment cell at the center of the eye of the arrow-worm, Sagitta scrippsae. Between the arms of the pigment cell are clusters of photoreceptor cell processes, each process consisting of: (1) a tubular segment containing longitudinally arranged microtubules about 500 A in diameter and 20 micro in length; (2) a remarkable conical body, composed of cords and large granules, situated at the base of the tubular segment; and (3) a connecting piece which, like that of rods and cones, connects the process with the sensory cell proper and through which runs a fibrillar apparatus consisting of nine peripheral double tubules. Beneath the connecting piece lies a typical centriole with a striated rootlet. The receptor cell process is deeply recessed into the sensory cell which may possess a corona of microvilli at its inner surface. A nerve fiber arises from the outer end of the cell and passes into the optic nerve. Additional features are some supporting cells, an external layer of flattened epithelial cells, and an over-all investment of basement membrane and thick fibrous capsule. The fine structure and function of these elements of the eye are discussed in relation to earlier studies with the light microscope. The ciliary nature of the photoreceptor cell process in S. scrippsae points to a probable evolutionary relationship of chaetognaths to echinoderms and chordates. PMID:14154485

  1. Bumblebee Homing: The Fine Structure of Head Turning Movements

    PubMed Central

    Boeddeker, Norbert; Mertes, Marcel; Dittmar, Laura; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Changes in flight direction in flying insects are largely due to roll, yaw and pitch rotations of their body. Head orientation is stabilized for most of the time by counter rotation. Here, we use high-speed video to analyse head- and body-movements of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris while approaching and departing from a food source located between three landmarks in an indoor flight-arena. The flight paths consist of almost straight flight segments that are interspersed with rapid turns. These short and fast yaw turns (“saccades”) are usually accompanied by even faster head yaw turns that change gaze direction. Since a large part of image rotation is thereby reduced to brief instants of time, this behavioural pattern facilitates depth perception from visual motion parallax during the intersaccadic intervals. The detailed analysis of the fine structure of the bees’ head turning movements shows that the time course of single head saccades is very stereotypical. We find a consistent relationship between the duration, peak velocity and amplitude of saccadic head movements, which in its main characteristics resembles the so-called "saccadic main sequence" in humans. The fact that bumblebee head saccades are highly stereotyped as in humans, may hint at a common principle, where fast and precise motor control is used to reliably reduce the time during which the retinal images moves. PMID:26352836

  2. Consonant identification using temporal fine structure and recovered envelope cuesa)

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Reed, Charlotte M.; Desloge, Joseph G.; Braida, Louis D.; Delhorne, Lorraine A.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of recovered envelopes (RENVs) to the utilization of temporal-fine structure (TFS) speech cues was examined in normal-hearing listeners. Consonant identification experiments used speech stimuli processed to present TFS or RENV cues. Experiment 1 examined the effects of exposure and presentation order using 16-band TFS speech and 40-band RENV speech recovered from 16-band TFS speech. Prior exposure to TFS speech aided in the reception of RENV speech. Performance on the two conditions was similar (∼50%-correct) for experienced listeners as was the pattern of consonant confusions. Experiment 2 examined the effect of varying the number of RENV bands recovered from 16-band TFS speech. Mean identification scores decreased as the number of RENV bands decreased from 40 to 8 and were only slightly above chance levels for 16 and 8 bands. Experiment 3 examined the effect of varying the number of bands in the TFS speech from which 40-band RENV speech was constructed. Performance fell from 85%- to 31%-correct as the number of TFS bands increased from 1 to 32. Overall, these results suggest that the interpretation of previous studies that have used TFS speech may have been confounded with the presence of RENVs. PMID:25235005

  3. The importance of source positions during radio fine structure observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, Guennadi P.; Yan, Yi-Hua; Fu, Qi-Jun

    2014-07-01

    The measurement of positions and sizes of radio sources in the observations of the fine structure of solar radio bursts is a determining factor for the selection of the radio emission mechanism. The identical parameters describing the radio sources for zebra structures (ZSs) and fiber bursts confirm there is a common mechanism for both structures. It is very important to measure the size of the source in the corona to determine if it is distributed along the height or if it is point-like. In both models of ZSs (the double plasma resonance (DPR) and the whistler model) the source must be distributed along the height, but by contrast to the stationary source in the DPR model, in the whistler model the source should be moving. Moreover, the direction of the space drift of the radio source must correlate with the frequency drift of stripes in the dynamic spectrum. Some models of ZSs require a local source, for example, the models based on the Bernstein modes, or on explosive instability. The selection of the radio emission mechanism for fast broadband pulsations with millisecond duration also depends on the parameters of their radio sources.

  4. Bumblebee Homing: The Fine Structure of Head Turning Movements.

    PubMed

    Boeddeker, Norbert; Mertes, Marcel; Dittmar, Laura; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Changes in flight direction in flying insects are largely due to roll, yaw and pitch rotations of their body. Head orientation is stabilized for most of the time by counter rotation. Here, we use high-speed video to analyse head- and body-movements of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris while approaching and departing from a food source located between three landmarks in an indoor flight-arena. The flight paths consist of almost straight flight segments that are interspersed with rapid turns. These short and fast yaw turns ("saccades") are usually accompanied by even faster head yaw turns that change gaze direction. Since a large part of image rotation is thereby reduced to brief instants of time, this behavioural pattern facilitates depth perception from visual motion parallax during the intersaccadic intervals. The detailed analysis of the fine structure of the bees' head turning movements shows that the time course of single head saccades is very stereotypical. We find a consistent relationship between the duration, peak velocity and amplitude of saccadic head movements, which in its main characteristics resembles the so-called "saccadic main sequence" in humans. The fact that bumblebee head saccades are highly stereotyped as in humans, may hint at a common principle, where fast and precise motor control is used to reliably reduce the time during which the retinal images moves. PMID:26352836

  5. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  6. Energy, fine structure, hyperfine structure, and radiative transition rates of the high-lying multi-excited states for B-like neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun Mei; Chen, Chao; Sun, Yan; Gou, Bing Cong; Shao, Bin

    2015-04-01

    The Rayleigh-Ritz variational method with multiconfiguration interaction wave functions is used to obtain the energies of high-lying multi-excited quartet states 1 s 22 s2 pnl and 1 s 22 p 2 nl 4Pe,o ( n ≥ 2) in B-like neon, including the mass polarization and relativistic corrections. The fine structure and hyperfine structure of the excited quartet states for this system are investigated. Configuration structures of the high-lying multi-excited series are further identified by relativistic corrections and fine structure splittings. The transition rates and wavelengths are also calculated. Calculated wavelengths include the quantum electrodynamic effects. The results are compared with other theoretical and experimental data in the literature.

  7. Fine structure in the transition region: reaction force analyses of water-assisted proton transfers.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Diana; Murray, Jane S; Santos, Juan C; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Politzer, Peter; Jaque, Pablo

    2013-07-01

    We have analyzed the variation of the reaction force F(ξ) and the reaction force constant κ(ξ) along the intrinsic reaction coordinates ξ of the water-assisted proton transfer reactions of HX-N = Y (X,Y = O,S). The profile of the force constant of the vibration associated with the reactive mode, k ξ (ξ), was also determined. We compare our results to the corresponding intramolecular proton transfers in the absence of a water molecule. The presence of water promotes the proton transfers, decreasing the energy barriers by about 12 - 15 kcal mol(-1). This is due in part to much smaller bond angle changes being needed than when water is absent. The κ(ξ) profiles along the intrinsic reaction coordinates for the water-assisted processes show striking and intriguing differences in the transition regions. For the HS-N = S and HO-N = S systems, two κ(ξ) minima are obtained, whereas for HO-N = O only one minimum is found. The k ξ (ξ) show similar behavior in the transition regions. We propose that this fine structure reflects the degree of synchronicity of the two proton migrations in each case. PMID:22733272

  8. Analysis of Fe V and Ni V Wavelength Standards in the Vacuum Ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jacob Wolfgang; Nave, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The recent publication[1] by J.C. Berengut et al. tests for a potential variation in the fine-structure constant in the presence of high gravitational potentials through spectral analysis of white-dwarf stars.The spectrum of the white-dwarf star studied in the paper, G191-B2B, has prominent Fe V and Ni V lines, which were used to determine any variation in the fine-structure constant via observed shifts in the wavelengths of Fe V and Ni V in the vacuum ultraviolet region. The results of the paper indicate no such variation, but suggest that refined laboratory values for the observed wavelengths could greatly reduce the uncertainty associated with the paper's findings.An investigation of Fe V and Ni V spectra in the vacuum ultraviolet region has been conducted to reduce wavelength uncertainties currently limiting modern astrophysical studies of this nature. The analyzed spectra were produced by a sliding spark light source with electrodes made of invar, an iron nickel alloy, at peak currents of 750-2000 A. The use of invar ensures that systematic errors in the calibration are common to both species. The spectra were recorded with the NIST Normal Incidence Vacuum Spectrograph on phosphor image plate and photographic plate detectors. Calibration was done with a Pt II spectrum produced by a Platinum Neon Hollow Cathode lamp.[1] J. C. Berengut, V. V. Flambaum, A. Ong, et al Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 010801 (2013)

  9. Density and velocity fine structure enhancement in oceanic eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jerry L.; Evans, David L.

    1985-05-01

    Advection-diffusion models of the oceanic thermocline require a global ocean, mean vertical eddy diffusivity of about 1 cm2 s-1; however, maximum values estimated from microstructure measurements at mid-gyre locations are generally smaller and, occasionally, 1-2 orders of magnitude less, depending on the particular assumptions made by individual analysts. Mesoscale features are high kinetic energy sources, which may fuel vertical mixing mechanisms on fine structure scales, resulting in local enhancements of eddy diffusivity above the canonical value of 1 cm2 s-1. The effects of one such mechanism, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, are assessed for a Gulf Stream ring and a mid-thermocline eddy. The necessary Richardson numbers are computed from Yvette profiles obtained in these features and are accurate to within about 10% for Ri = 1, and more accurate at the critical value Ri = 0.25. A plausible extension of the Miles-Howard theorem for a nonparallel shear flow is formulated for a two-dimensional perturbation. The shear appropriate for this Richardson number calculation is well approximated by the total shear for slowly depth-varying direction, as is the case for the vast majority of the data. Upper and lower bounds on the vertical scale for the Richardson number calculation are set by the shear spectra and the Ozmidov scale. Median Richardson number was lower toward the center of the eddy because of a large decrease in Brunt-Vaisala frequency (N2) and was depressed on the fringes by high shear. Lower median Ri is also found at the center of the ring as a result of low N2. Lower bounds on vertical eddy diffusivity are estimated based on the assumptions of a simple, mixing-length model and of complete mixing of each region where Ri is less than 0.25. The spatial distribution of this quantity within the eddy and the ring mirrors that of median Ri. Values range from Az ˜ 1.1 cm2 s-1 near the center of the eddy and 0.90 cm2 s-1 near the center of the ring to zero in

  10. A History of X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumm von Bordwehr, R.

    This historical account of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy from the origin to 1975 begins with the first observations of X-ray absorption edges and the experimental setups used at the turn of the century. Then, the discovery of XAFS and Kossel's early interpretation are discussed. A close look is taken at the three outstanding papers written by Kronig to explain XAFS in solids and molecules. Petersen's development of XAFS in molecules and Smoluchowski's investigation of XAFS in crystals during the thirties are reviewed. Then, the Japanese and Soviet contributions to X-ray absorption spectroscopy up to the sixties are described. We conclude with the advent of the present understanding of XAFS developed in the early seventies. Although many experiments are presented, we emphasize the conceptual evolution of the interpretation of XAFS, including false steps and overlooked works. Cette histoire de la spectroscopie de structure fine des seuils d'absorption X (XAFS) des origines à 1975 commence par présenter les premières observations de seuils d'absorption X ainsi que les dispositifs expérimentaux utilisés au début du siècle. Puis on décrit la découverte des structures fines et l'interprétation qu'en donne Kossel. On discute en details les trois remarquables articles écrits par Kronig pour expliquer les XAFS dans les solides et les molécules. On montre comment Petersen a développé la théorie des XAFS des molécules et Smoluchowski celle des cristaux. Puis on passe en revue les contributions japonaises et soviétiques à cette spectroscopie jusqu'aux années soixante. On conclut par la description de la théorie actuelle des XAFS qui s'est développée au début des années soixante-dix. Bien que décrivant des nombreuses expériences, ce travail met l'accent sur l'évolution conceptuelle de l'interprétation des XAFS, en tenant compte des faux pas et des contributions négligées.

  11. Relative importance of temporal envelope and fine structure in lexical-tone perception (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li; Pfingst, Bryan E.

    2003-12-01

    The relative importance of temporal envelope and fine structure in speech and music perception was investigated by Smith et al. [Nature (London) 416, 87-90 (2002)] using ``auditory chimera'' in which the envelope from one sound was paired with the fine structure of another. Smith et al. found that, when 4 to 16 frequency bands were used, recognition of English speech was dominated by the envelope, whereas recognition of melody was dominated by the fine structure. In the present study, Mandarin Chinese monosyllables were divided into 4, 8, or 16 frequency bands and the fine structure and envelope of one tone pattern were exchanged with those of another tone pattern of the same monosyllable. Five normal-hearing native Mandarin Chinese speakers completed a four-alternative forced-choice tone-identification task. In the vast majority of trials, subjects based their identification of the monosyllables on the fine structure rather than the envelope. Thus, the relative importance of envelope and fine structure for lexical-tone perception resembled that for melody recognition rather than that for English speech recognition. Delivering fine-structure information in cochlear implant stimulation could be particularly beneficial for lexical-tone perception.

  12. Fine-structure enhancement — assessment of a simple method to resolve overlapping bands in spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Andreas

    2000-05-01

    A simple mathematical procedure — fine-structure enhancement — has been assessed on its ability to resolve overlapping bands in spectra. Its advantages and limitations have been explored using synthetic and experimental spectra. Fine-structure enhancement involves smoothing the original spectrum, multiplying the smoothed spectrum with a weighting factor and subtracting this spectrum from the original spectrum. As a result, the fine-structure of the original spectrum is enhanced in the processed spectrum and bands that overlap in the original spectrum appear as distinct bands in the processed spectrum. To be resolved by fine-structure enhancement, Lorentzian lines have to be separated by more than their quarter width at half maximum, Gaussian lines by more than their half width at half maximum. A comparison of fine-structure enhancement and Fourier self-deconvolution shows that Fourier self-deconvolution has in theory a higher potential to resolve overlapping bands. However, this depends crucially on the correct choice of the parameters. In practice, when parameters commonly used are chosen for Fourier self-deconvolution, fine-structure enhancement leads to similar results. This is demonstrated at the example of the infrared absorbance spectrum of the protein papain, where the amide I band components could be resolved similarly with both methods. Thus, fine-structure enhancement seems to be a simple alternative to Fourier self-deconvolution that does not require specialised software.

  13. Direct inelastic scattering of nitric oxide from clean Ag(111): Rotational and fine structure distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubiak, G. D.; Hurst, J. E., Jr.; Rennagel, H. G.; McClelland, G. M.; Zare, R. N.

    1983-11-01

    The internal state distribution of scattered NO is determined by laser fluorescence excitation spectroscopy when a pulsed, supersonically cooled beam of NO is incident upon the (111) face of a clean Ag single crystal. It is found that the mean rotational energy depends linearly on the surface temperature Es(=Ts) and the incident kinetic energy normal to the surface En according to =a(En+)+bEs. The three parameters a, b, and are constants independent of En and Es. Arguments are presented showing that is some measure of the average NO/Ag(111) well depth. For the Ω=1/2 fine structure component we estimate that =2850±450 K (245±40 meV), a=0.88±0.009, and b=0.18±0.04 while for Ω=3/2, =2080±150 K (180±13 meV), a=0.132±0.005, and b=0.11±0.02. The results are compared to the predictions of one-dimensional impulsive models of gas-surface scattering. These models are able to describe qualitatively the dependence of on En and Es but only when trapping fractions that are incompatible with experiment are predicted simultaneously.

  14. Hall effect and fine structures in magnetic reconnection with high plasma {beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, S.P.; Yang, H.A.; Wang, X.G.

    2005-04-15

    Magnetic reconnection with various plasma {beta} (the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure) is studied numerically using a 2.5 dimensional Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code developed from a multistep implicit scheme. The initial state of the Hall MHD simulation is an equilibrium Harris sheet with L{sub c}=0.5d{sub i} (where L{sub c} is the half-width of the equilibrium current layer and d{sub i} is the ion inertial length) and a zero guide field (i.e., B{sub y0}=0 at t=0). Driven by a constant boundary inflow a quasisteady fast reconnection occurs in the plasma with a low uniform resistivity. The out-of-plane magnetic field component B{sub y} is then spontaneously generated and its quadrupolar structure is shown around the X point. It is demonstrated by the comparing studies that the reconnection dynamics is controlled by the Hall effect and the effect of scalar electron pressure gradient is negligible in the generalized Ohm's law. It is also found that the openness of the magnetic separatrix angle and associated quadrupolar B{sub y} structure is enlarged as {beta} increases. When {beta}>2.0 fine structures of B{sub y} contours with reversed sign emerge. The numerical results indicate that the variations in electron velocity V{sub e} are greater than those in ion velocity V{sub i} and the decoupling of electron and ion occurs in larger scale lengths than d{sub i} as {beta} increases. Clearly, the reserve current, which is associated with the relative motion between electrons and ions, generates the fine structures of B{sub y} contours in the outflow region. Then the corresponding profile of B{sub y} component exhibits a static whistler wave signature. Enhanced wave activities observed during a Cluster crossing of the high-{beta} exterior cusp region [Y. Khotyaintsev, A. Vaivads, Y. Ogawa, B. Popielawska, M. Andre, S. Buchert, P. Decreau, B. Lavraud, and H. Reme, Ann. Geophys. 22, 2403 (2004)] might be related to the Hall effects of magnetic

  15. Anharmonicity of the Bending and Stretching Vibrations Observed in Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure of Tetrahedral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Toshihiko; Yonamoto, Yoshiki; Ohta, Toshiaki

    1996-12-01

    We have measured and analyzed the temperature dependence of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra of tetrahedral systems MBr4 ( M=C, Si, Ge). The EXAFS analysis by means of the cumulant expansion technique enables one to obtain information about force constants including the third-order anharmonicity. The second-order cumulants obtained experimentally are in excellent agreement with the values expected by the vibrational data and the third-order cumulants have been determined successfully. For the first nearest neighbor (NN) Br M shells the stretching motions are apparently dominant to describe EXAFS, while for the second NN Br Br shell the bending modes are found to contribute significantly to the cumulants especially for the third-order anharmonicity. The obtained force constants are compared to each other and the origin of observed bending anharmonicity is discussed.

  16. New fine structure cooling rate. [electron impact transitions in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  17. ISO-LWS observations of Herbig Ae/Be stars. I. Fine structure lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzetti, D.; Tommasi, E.; Giannini, T.; Nisini, B.; Benedettini, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Strafella, F.; Barlow, M.; Clegg, P. E.; Cohen, M.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Liseau, R.; Molinari, S.; Palla, F.; Saraceno, P.; Smith, H. A.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G. J.

    1999-06-01

    We present the results of the first spectrophotometric survey of a sample of eleven Herbig Ae/Be stars (HAEBE) obtained with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The [OI] 63mu m and the [CII] 158mu m lines are observed in all the investigated sources, while the [OI] 145mu m transition, due to its relative faintness, sometimes remains undetected. By comparing line intensity ratios with model predictions, photodissociation, due to the UV photons from the central star, results the dominating excitation mechanism although contributions of C-shocks to the [OI] emission cannot be ruled out. A clear example for the presence of a photodissociation region (PDR) illuminated by an HAEBE is shown by LWS spectroscopic mapping of NGC 7129. Some diagnostic probes of the radiation field and density are provided for the objects in our sample: these substantially agree with the known characteristics of both the star and its circumstellar environment, although the observed ratio [OI]63/[OI]145 tends to be smaller than predicted by PDR models. The most likely explanation for this behaviour is self-absorption at 63mu m by cold atomic oxygen. Fine structure lines of the ionised species [OIII], [NII] were detected whenever the star had a spectral type of B0 or earlier; in particular, around the star CoD-42(deg) 11721, besides a compact HII region, evidence is given for an extended low electron density ionised region. Finally, molecular line emission is associated with stars powering a CO outflow, and clumpy PDR models, better than C-shock models, predict for them relative cooling (CO vs OI and CO vs OH) similar to the observed ones. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States and with the participation of ISAS and NASA}

  18. Fundamental Constants and Tests with Simple Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    Precise measurements with simple atoms provide stringent tests of physical laws, improving the accuracy of fundamental constants--a set of which will be selected to fully define the proposed New International System of Units. This talk focuses on the atomic constants (namely, the Rydberg constant, the fine-structure constant, and the proton charge radius), discussing the impact of the proton radius obtained from the Lamb-shift measurements in muonic hydrogen. Significant discrepancies persist despite years of careful examination: the slightly smaller proton radius obtained from muonic hydrogen requires the Rydberg constant and the fine-structure constant to have values that disagree significantly with the CODATA recommendations. After giving a general overview, I will discuss our effort to produce one-electron ions in Rydberg states, to enable a different test of theory and measurement of the Rydberg constant.

  19. Optical constants of In(x)Ga(1-x)N (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.73) in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regimes.

    PubMed

    Hazari, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Aniruddha; Frost, Thomas; Zhao, Songrui; Baten, Md Zunaid; Mi, Zetian; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2015-07-15

    Complex refractive indices of In(x)Ga(1-x)N epitaxial layers have been determined from analysis of data obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The measurements were made in the wavelength range of 400-1687 nm. The samples were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on (001) silicon substrate and are of the wurtzite crystalline form. A comparison of the fundamental absorption edge derived from analysis of measured data and the measured photoluminescence peak emission energy indicates a Stokes shift present in the alloys. PMID:26176455

  20. A simulation for gravity fine structure recovery from high-low GRAVSAT SST data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.; Lancaster, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Covariance error analysis techniques were applied to investigate estimation strategies for the high-low SST mission for accurate local recovery of gravitational fine structure, considering the aliasing effects of unsolved for parameters. Surface density blocks of 5 deg x 5 deg and 2 1/2 deg x 2 1/2 deg resolution were utilized to represent the high order geopotential with the drag-free GRAVSAT configured in a nearly circular polar orbit at 250 km. altitude. GEOPAUSE and geosynchronous satellites were considered as high relay spacecraft. It is demonstrated that knowledge of gravitational fine structure can be significantly improved at 5 deg x 5 deg resolution using SST data from a high-low configuration with reasonably accurate orbits for the low GRAVSAT. The gravity fine structure recoverability of the high-low SST mission is compared with the low-low configuration and shown to be superior.

  1. The Distribution of Thermal Pressures in the Interstellar Medium from a Survey of C I Fine-Structure Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Edward B.; Tripp, Todd M.

    2001-12-01

    We used the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) with its smallest entrance aperture (0.03" wide slit) and highest resolution echelle gratings (E140H and E230H) to record the interstellar absorption features for 10 different multiplets of neutral carbon at a resolving power of λ/Δλ=200,000 in the UV spectra of 21 early-type stars. Our objective was to measure the amount of C I in each of its three fine-structure levels of the ground electronic state, so that we could determine the thermal pressures in the absorbing gas and how much they vary in different regions. Our observations are principally along directions out to several kiloparsecs in the Galactic plane near longitudes l=120deg and 300°, with the more distant stars penetrating nearby portions of the Perseus and Sagittarius-Carina arms of the Galaxy. We devised a special analysis technique to decipher the overlapping absorption features in the different multiplets, each with different arrangements of the closely spaced transitions. In order to derive internally consistent results for all multiplets, we found that we had to modify the relative transition f-values in a way that made generally weak transitions stronger than amounts indicated in the current literature. We compared our measured relative populations of the excited fine-structure levels to those expected from equilibria calculated with collisional rate constants for various densities, temperatures, and compositions. The median thermal pressure for our entire sample was p/k=2240 cm-3 K, or slightly higher if the representative temperatures of the material are much above or below a most favorable temperature of 40 K for the excitation of the first excited level at a given pressure. For gas that is moving outside the range of radial velocities permitted by differential Galactic rotation between us and the targets, about 15% of the C I indicates a thermal pressure p/k>5000 cm-3 K. For gas within the allowed velocities, this fraction is only 1

  2. A note on chromospheric fine structure at active region polarity boundaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prata, S. W.

    1971-01-01

    High resolution H-alpha filtergrams from Big Bear Solar Observatory reveal that some filamentary features in active regions have fine structure and hence magnetic field transverse to the gross structure and the zero longitudinal field line. These features are distinct from the usual active region filament, in which fine structure, magnetic field, and filament are all parallel to the zero longitudinal field line. The latter occur on boundaries between regions of weaker fields, while the former occur at boundaries between regions of stronger field.

  3. Coupled-channels study of fine structure in the {alpha} decay of platinum isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2011-09-15

    The fine structure observed in the {alpha} decay of deformed platinum isotopes is investigated using the recently developed five-channel formalism, based on the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions. The internal effect of daughter states is taken into account in dealing with the interaction matrix and the {alpha}-cluster formation. The available experimental data concerning {alpha}-decay half-lives and fine structures are reproduced. Some predictions are made especially for the {alpha} decay of neutron-rich isotopes, which could guide future experiments.

  4. Progress towards a precision measurement of the n=2 triplet P fine structure of atomic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, K.; Fitzakerley, D. W.; George, M. C.; Vutha, A. C.; Storry, C. H.; Hessels, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    We report progress on the measurement of the J = 1 to J = 2 23 P fine-structure interval of atomic helium. The measurement uses a liquid-nitrogen-cooled DC discharge source of metastable helium and the atomic beam is laser cooled in the transverse directions. The atoms are excited to 23 P by a 1083-nm diode laser, and the fine-structure transition is driven by microwaves using the frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields technique. The transition is detected by further laser excitation to a Rydberg state, followed by Stark ionization. This work is supported by NSERC, CRC.

  5. Effect of acoustic fine structure cues on the recognition of auditory-only and audiovisual speech.

    PubMed

    Meister, Hartmut; Fuersen, Katrin; Schreitmueller, Stefan; Walger, Martin

    2016-06-01

    This study addressed the hypothesis that an improvement in speech recognition due to combined envelope and fine structure cues is greater in the audiovisual than the auditory modality. Normal hearing listeners were presented with envelope vocoded speech in combination with low-pass filtered speech. The benefit of adding acoustic low-frequency fine structure to acoustic envelope cues was significantly greater for audiovisual than for auditory-only speech. It is suggested that this is due to complementary information of the different acoustic and visual cues. The results have potential implications for the assessment of bimodal cochlear implant fittings or electroacoustic stimulation. PMID:27369134

  6. Multi-wavelength spectrophotometric determination of the protolytic constants of tetracycline hydrochloride in some nonaqueous-water mixed solvents: A solvatochromism study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Jahan B.; Jalalvand, Ali R.

    2011-01-01

    Annihilation of the contribution of one chemical component from the original data matrix is a general method in rank annihilation factor analysis (RAFA). However, RAFA is not applicable for studying the protonation equilibria of multiprotic acids but in this study two-rank annihilation factor analysis (TRAFA) was used as an efficient chemometrics algorithm for determination of the protolytic constants (p Ka) of tetracycline hydrochloride (TCHC) in some nonaqueous-water mixed solvents such as acetonitrile (AN)-water and methanol (MeOH)-water from the spectral pH-absorbance data. The spectral data was obtained from spectrophotometric acid-base titrations of different solutions of TCHC at (25.0 ± 0.10) °C and an ionic strength of 0.10 M. In TRAFA algorithm the p Ka values were obtained with relationship between residual standard deviation (R.S.D.) and hypothetical p Ka values. In the case of TCHC, the spectra were divided in two consecutive subdivisions according to their pH range having two p Ka and TRAFA was run twice. The validity of the obtained p Ka values was checked with well-known chemometrics algorithms such as DATAN, EQUSPEC, SPECFIT/32 and SQUAD. The effects of changing solvent composition on the protolytic constants were explained by linear solvation energy relationships (LSER) utilizing solvatochromic parameters.

  7. Delay between the Circularly Polarized Components in Fine Structures during Solar Type IV Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, G. P.; Zlobec, P.

    1995-08-01

    We analyzed intermediately polarized (20 80%) fine structures (pulsations, sudden reductions, fiber bursts and zebras) that were recorded in type IV events. The mean polarization degree was practically the same for all the fine structures recorded in an interval lasting a few minutes and it was similar to the polarization of the continuum. A detailed analysis during the evolution of single structures reveals changes in polarization (in particular an ‘undulation’ at flux density minima) even stronger than 20%. They were caused by a delay, up to 0.1 s, between the two circularly polarized components. The weaker polarimetric component was delayed in 2 sets and the stronger one in 1 set. In the event of April 24, 1985 different types of fine structures were sporadically detected in more than one hour long time interval. Short delays of the stronger or of the weaker component were sometimes observed. The events characterized by fine structures are generally totally polarized in the ordinary mode. We assume that this holds also for the phenomena studied here. The observed intermediate polarization therefore requires a depolarization due to propagation effects. We discuss the mode coupling and the reflection of the original radio signal that could also generate the delay of the weaker and the stronger component respectively. The possibility of polarization variation due to the change of the angle between the direction of the propagation and the magnetic field in a quasi-transversal region and in a low intensity magnetic field in a current sheet is also given.

  8. Fine structural characterization of microbodies and Woronin bodies in Trichophyton mentagrophytes.

    PubMed

    Vannini, G L; Mares, D

    1975-08-15

    Microbodies and Woronin bodies, organelles surrounded by a single unit membrane, were identified in the hyphal cells of Trichophyton mentagrophytes by employing a fixative containing TAPO. The fine structure of the organelles is described and their possible significance discussed. PMID:1157867

  9. The impact of cochlear fine structure on hearing thresholds and DPOAE levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungmee; Long, Glenis; Talmadge, Carrick L.

    2001-05-01

    Although otoacoustic emissions (OAE) are used as clinical and research tools, the correlation between OAE behavioral estimates of hearing status is not large. In normal-hearing individuals, the level of OAEs can vary as much as 30 dB when the frequency is changed less than 5%. These pseudoperiodic variations of OAE level with frequency are known as fine structure. Hearing thresholds measured with high-frequency resolution reveals a similar (up to 15 dB) fine structure. We examine the impact of OAE and threshold fine structures on the prediction of auditory thresholds from OAE levels. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were measured with sweeping primary tones. Psychoacoustic detection thresholds were measured using pure tones, sweep tones, FM tones, and narrow-band noise. Sweep DPOAE and narrow-band threshold estimates provide estimates that are less influenced by cochlear fine structure and should lead to a higher correlation between OAE levels and psychoacoustic thresholds. [Research supported by PSC CUNY, NIDCD, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research in U.S. Department of Education, and The Ministry of Education in Korea.

  10. The role of adiabaticity in alkali atom-fine structure mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshel, Ben; Weeks, David E.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-02-01

    Fine-structure mixing cross-sections for the alkalis in collisions with the rare gases are reviewed. Included in the review are all the rare gases in collisions with all of the first excited state of the alkalis, the second excited state for K, Rb and Cs and the third excited state for Rb and Cs. The cross-sections are converted to probabilities for energy transfer using a quantum-defect calculated cross-section and are then presented as a function of adiabaticity. The data shows a clear decreasing trend with adiabaticity but secondary factors prevent the probabilities from decreasing as quickly as expected. Polarizability is introduced as a proxy for the secondary influences on the data as it increases with both rare gas partner and alkali excited state. The polarizability is shown to cause the probability of fine structure transition to be higher than expected. An empirical model is introduced and fit to the data. Future work will develop a model using time-independent perturbation theory in order to further develop a physical rational for the dependence of fine structure cross sections on adiabaticity and to further understand the secondary influences on the probability for fine structure transition.

  11. Accuracy of mapping the Earth's gravity field fine structure with a spaceborne gravity gradiometer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The spaceborne gravity gradiometer is a potential sensor for mapping the fine structure of the Earth's gravity field. Error analyses were performed to investigate the accuracy of the determination of the Earth's gravity field from a gravity field satellite mission. The orbital height of the spacecraft is the dominating parameter as far as gravity field resolution and accuracies are concerned.

  12. A complete sketch for fine-structure contamination by internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostiaux, L.; van Haren, H.

    2012-04-01

    Oceanic fine structure has been studied since the development of CTD and microstructure profilers allowed to resolve the vertical scales of temperature and salinity in the ocean. In the context of internal waves, it rapidly appeared that the advection of oceanic fine-structure may lead to erroneous interpretations of temperature measurements, and much theoretical work was achieved to distinguish real internal wave signal from the so-called fine-structure contamination. The pioneering work of Phillips (1971) revealed how the vertical advection of temperature steps by internal waves contaminates temperature records at fixed depths. Fine-structure contamination can be recognized in the super-buoyant part of the spectrum as a typical -2 slope, theoretically predicted for sharp stair cases in the temperature profile. However, distinguishing fine-structure contamination from other (turbulent) signals in real datasets is sometimes difficult. We will show how the use of a large number of highly accurate temperature sensors allows to completely resolve the fine-structure contamination sketch. More precisely, the coherence spectrum between vertically separated sensors shows a characteristic π-phase signature above the Brunt-Väisälä frequency N that we can reproduce using a simple kinematic model. The dataset used consists of temperature time series (1Hz during 1.5 year) obtained in the Canary Basin. Over a range of 132.5m, 54 NIOZ High Sampling Rate Thermistors (NIOZ-HST, 1mK relative accuracy) were moored around 1455m. Coherence between individual records shows a weak, but significant peak above N for all vertical separations. Instead of a dominant 0-phase difference over the range of sensors, as observed for internal waves at frequencies f < σ < N, f denoting the inertial frequency, this super-buoyancy coherence shows π-phase difference over a frequency band, that shifts to higher frequencies as the vertical separation between thermistors diminishes. In the time

  13. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  14. Fine structure in plasma waves and radiation near the plasma frequency in Earth's foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1994-01-01

    Novel observations are presented of intrunsic fine structure in the frequency spectrum of electomagnetic (EM) radiation and plasma waves near the electron plasma frequency f(sub p) during a period of unusually high interplanetary magnetic field strength. Measured using the wideband receiver on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 spacecraft, fine-structured emissions are observed both in the solar wind and the foreshock, The fine structure is shown to correspond to emissions spaced above f(sub p) near half harmonies of the electon cyclotron frequency f(sub ce), i.e., near f(sub p) + nf(sub ce)/2. These appear to be the first space physics observations of emissions spaced by f(sub ce)/2. Indirect but strong arguments are used to discriminate between EM and electrostatic (ES) signals, to identify whether ISEE 1 is in the solar wind or the foreshock, and to determine the relative frequencies of the emissions and the local f(sub p). The data are consistent with generation of the ES and EM emissions in the foreshock, with subsequent propagation of the EM emissions into the solar wind. It remains possible that some emissions currently identified as ES have significant EM character. The ES and EM emisions often merge into one another with minimal changes in frequency, arguing that their source regions and generation mechanisms are related and imposing significant constraints on theories. The f(sub ce)/2 ES and EM fine structures observed may be intrinsic to the emission mechanisms or to superposition of two series of signals with f(sub ce) spacing that differ in starting frequency by f(sub ce)/2. Present theories for nonlinear wave coupling processes, cyclotron maser emission, and other linear instability processes are all unable to explain multiple EM and/or ES components spaced by approximately f(sub ce)/2 above f(sub p) for f(sub p)/f(sub ce) much greater than 1 and typical for shock beams parameters. Suitable avenues for further theoretical research are

  15. Magnetic fields, plasma densities, and plasma beta parameters estimated from high-frequency zebra fine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Jiricka, K.

    2002-10-01

    Using the recent model of the radio zebra fine structures (Ledenev et al. 2001) the magnetic fields, plasma densities, and plasma beta parameters are estimated from high-frequency zebra fine structures. It was found that in the flare radio source of high-frequency (1-2 GHz) zebras the densities and magnetic fields vary in the intervals of (1-4)×1010 cm-3 and 40-230 G, respectively. Assuming then the flare temperature as about of 107K, the plasma beta parameters in the zebra radio sources are in the 0.05-0.81 interval. Thus the plasma pressure effects in such radio sources, especially in those with many zebra lines, are not negligible.

  16. Topological map of the Hofstadter butterfly: Fine structure of Chern numbers and Van Hove singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2016-04-01

    The Hofstadter butterfly is a quantum fractal with a highly complex nested set of gaps, where each gap represents a quantum Hall state whose quantized conductivity is characterized by topological invariants known as the Chern numbers. Here we obtain simple rules to determine the Chern numbers at all scales in the butterfly fractal and lay out a very detailed topological map of the butterfly by using a method used to describe quasicrystals: the cut and projection method. Our study reveals the existence of a set of critical points that separates orderly patterns of both positive and negative Cherns that appear as a fine structure in the butterfly. This fine structure can be understood as a small tilting of the projection subspace in the cut and projection method and by using a Chern meeting formula. Finally, we prove that the critical points are identified with the Van Hove singularities that exist at every band center in the butterfly landscape.

  17. Fine structure of alpha decay to rotational states of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Z.; Dong, J. M.; Peng, B. B.; Zhang, H. F.

    2010-06-15

    To gain a better insight into alpha-decay fine structure, we calculate the relative intensities of alpha decay to 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} rotational states in the framework of the generalized liquid drop model (GLDM) and improved Royer's formula. The calculated relative intensities of alpha decay to 2{sup +} states are in good agreement with the experimental data. For the relative intensities of alpha decay to 4{sup +} states, a good agreement with experimental data is achieved for Th and U isotopes. The formula we obtain is useful for the analysis of experimental data of alpha-decay fine structure. In addition, some predicted relative intensities which are still not measured are provided for future experiments.

  18. Relation Between Basophilia and Fine Structure of Cytoplasm in the Fungus Allomyces macrogynus Em

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Benigna; Turian, Gilbert

    1960-01-01

    In a fungus, Allomyces macrogynus Em., staining tests have revealed changes in the location of cytoplasmic basophilia following different phases of the developmental cycle. These variations in location were used to observe which fine structures correspond to basophile and non-basophile areas of the cytoplasm. Hyphae, gametangia, zygotes, and plants were fixed at various developmental stages in OsO4, pH 6.1, and embedded in vestopal. Sections were examined in the electron microscope. Comparison of basophile and non-basophile cytoplasms leads to the conclusion that cytoplasmic particles of 150 to 200 A in diameter are responsible for basophilia. The possibility of these particles being ribosomes is discussed and confirmed. The present paper also describes some observations on the fine structure of other cellular components of this fungus, such as nuclei, mitochondria, various granules, and flagella. PMID:13801597

  19. Solar Cycle Fine Structure and Surface Rotation from Ca II K-Line Time Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeff; Keil, Steve; Worden, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of three and a half decades of data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program yields evidence for four components to the variation: (a) the solar cycle, with considerable fine structure and a quasi-periodicity of 122.4 days; (b) a stochastic process, faster than (a) and largely independent of it, (c) a quasi-periodic signal due to rotational modulation, and of course (d) observational errors (shown to be quite small). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis is especially useful for extracting information about differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the connection between its behavior and fine structure of the solar cycle on approximately one-year time scales. These results further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced at NASA's Kepler observatory.

  20. Fine Structure of the R Absorption Lines of Cr3+ in Antiferromagnetic Dysprosium Aluminum Garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Kajiura, Masako; Sugano, Satoru

    1981-11-01

    The absorption spectrum of a Cr3+ ion in an antiferromagnetic disprosium aluminum garnet with the Néel temperature TN of 2.5 K, is measured in the red region between 1.7 K and 4.2 K. It is shown that the fine structure of the R1 and R2 lines at 1.7 K can be explained by using an effective Hamiltonian for the t2g3 2E excited state of Cr3+ in the surrounding of the ordered Dy3+ spins. The gross feature of the observed temperature dependence of the fine structure is shown to be reproduced by assuming appropriate exchange interactions of Cr3+ with Dy3+.

  1. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  2. Fine Structure in the Decay of Deformed Proton Emitters: Nonadiabatic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kruppa, A. T.; Barmore, B.; Nazarewicz, W.; Vertse, T. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 51, H-4001, Debrecen,

    2000-05-15

    The coupled-channel Schroedinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions is employed to study the fine structure seen in the proton decay of deformed even-N , odd-Z rare earth nuclei {sup 131}Eu and {sup 141}Ho . Experimental lifetimes and proton-decay branching ratios are reproduced. Variations with the standard adiabatic theory are discussed. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  3. The 16th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS16)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwaldt, J.-D.; Hagelstein, M.; Rothe, J.

    2016-05-01

    This preface of the proceedings volume of the 16th International Conference on X- ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS16) gives a glance on the five days of cutting-edge X-ray science which were held in Karlsruhe, Germany, August 23 - 28, 2015. In addition, several satellite meetings took place in Hamburg, Berlin and Stuttgart, a Sino-German workshop, three data analysis tutorials as well as special symposia on industrial catalysis and XFELs were held at the conference venue.

  4. HRTS observations of the fine structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere and transition zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dere, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    Arc-second UV observations of the Sun by the NRL High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS) have led to the discovery of dynamic fine structures such as 400 km/s coronal jets and chromospheric jets (spicules) and have provided new information about the structure and dynamics of the transition zone. These observations are reviewed and their relevance to the origin of the solar wind is discussed.

  5. Helium induced fine structure in the electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Pentlehner, D.; Slenczka, A.

    2015-01-07

    Electronic spectra of organic molecules doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets show characteristic features induced by the helium environment. Besides a solvent induced shift of the electronic transition frequency, in many cases, a spectral fine structure can be resolved for electronic and vibronic transitions which goes beyond the expected feature of a zero phonon line accompanied by a phonon wing as known from matrix isolation spectroscopy. The spectral shape of the zero phonon line and the helium induced phonon wing depends strongly on the dopant species. Phonon wings, for example, are reported ranging from single or multiple sharp transitions to broad (Δν > 100 cm{sup −1}) diffuse signals. Despite the large number of example spectra in the literature, a quantitative understanding of the helium induced fine structure of the zero phonon line and the phonon wing is missing. Our approach is a systematic investigation of related molecular compounds, which may help to shed light on this key feature of microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets. This paper is part of a comparative study of the helium induced fine structure observed in electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives with particular emphasis on a spectrally sharp multiplet splitting at the electronic origin. In addition to previously discussed species, 9-cyanoanthracene and 9-chloroanthracene will be presented in this study for the first time.

  6. On the dichotomy in auditory perception between temporal envelope and fine structure cues (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Nie, Kaibao; Liu, Sheng; Stickney, Ginger; del Rio, Elsa; Kong, Ying-Yee; Chen, Hongbin

    2004-09-01

    It is important to know what cues the sensory system extracts from natural stimuli and how the brain uses them to form perception. To explore this issue, Smith, Delgutte, and Oxenham [Nature (London) 416, 87-90 (2002)] mixed one sound's temporal envelope with another sound's fine temporal structure to produce auditory chimaeras and found that ``the perceptual importance of the envelope increases with the number of frequency bands, while that of the fine structure diminishes.'' This study addressed two technical issues related to natural cochlear filtering and artificial filter ringing in the chimaerizing algorithm. In addition, this study found that the dichotomy in auditory perception revealed by auditory chimaeras is an epiphenomenon of the classic dichotomy between low- and high-frequency processing. Finally, this study found that the temporal envelope determines sound location as long as the interaural level difference cue is present. The present result reinforces the original hypothesis that the temporal envelope is critical for speech perception whereas temporal fine structure is critical for pitch perception, but does not support the assertion regarding the temporal envelope and fine structure as the acoustic basis for the ``what'' and ``where'' mechanisms.

  7. Effective collision strengths for fine-structure transitions in Si VII

    SciTech Connect

    Sossah, A. M.; Tayal, S. S.

    2014-05-20

    The effective collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of fine-structure transitions in Si VII are calculated as a function of electron temperature in the range 5000-2,000,000 K. The B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method has been used to calculate collision strengths by electron impact. The target wave functions have been obtained using the multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The 92 fine-structure levels belonging to the 46 LS states of 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 4}, 2s2p {sup 5}, 2p {sup 6}, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3s, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3p, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3d, and 2s2p {sup 4}3s configurations are included in our calculations of oscillator strengths and collision strengths. There are 4186 possible fine-structure allowed and forbidden transitions among the 92 levels. The present excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and collision strengths have been compared with previous theoretical results and available experimental data. Generally, a good agreement is found with the 6 LS-state close-coupling approximation results of Butler and Zeippen and the 44 LS-state distorted wave calculation of Bhatia and Landi.

  8. Prominence fine-structure dynamics as inferred from 2D non-LTE models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunar, Stanislav; Schmieder, Brigitte; Mein, Pierre; Heinzel, Petr

    2012-07-01

    2D multi-thread prominence fine structure models are able to produce synthetic Lyman spectra in very good agreement with spectral observations by SOHO/SUMER including the spectral line asymmetries. The synthetic differential emission measure curves derived from these models are also in a good agreement with observations. Now we show that these models are also able to produce synthetic H-alpha line profiles in very good agreement with observations which allows us to analyze not only the physical parameters of the prominence fine-structure plasma but also some aspects of its dynamical behaviour. We compare the synthetic H-alpha spectra with the observed spectra of the April 26, 2007 prominence using three statistical parameters: the line integrated intensity, the line full-width at the half-maximum (FWHM), and the Doppler velocity derived from shifts of the line profiles. This statistical analysis allows us to conclude that the overall statistical distribution of the LOS velocities in the April 26, 2007 prominence at the time of the observations was below +/-15 km/s and in the prominence core was close to +/-10 km/s. In combination with the analysis of the Lyman spectra we determine several physical parameters of the observed prominence fine structures which show that the April 26, 2007 prominence was relatively less massive. We are also able to put some constrains on the prominence core temperature that might be relatively low, reaching values below 6000 K.

  9. Non-LTE modelling of prominence fine structures using hydrogen Lyman-line profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, P.; Gunár, S.; Curdt, W.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We perform a detailed statistical analysis of the spectral Lyman-line observations of the quiescent prominence observed on May 18, 2005. Methods: We used a profile-to-profile comparison of the synthetic Lyman spectra obtained by 2D single-thread prominence fine-structure model as a starting point for a full statistical analysis of the observed Lyman spectra. We employed 2D multi-thread fine-structure models with random positions and line-of-sight velocities of each thread to obtain a statistically significant set of synthetic Lyman-line profiles. We used for the first time multi-thread models composed of non-identical threads and viewed at line-of-sight angles different from perpendicular to the magnetic field. Results: We investigated the plasma properties of the prominence observed with the SoHO/SUMER spectrograph on May 18, 2005 by comparing the histograms of three statistical parameters characterizing the properties of the synthetic and observed line profiles. In this way, the integrated intensity, Lyman decrement ratio, and the ratio of intensity at the central reversal to the average intensity of peaks provided insight into the column mass and the central temperature of the prominence fine structures.

  10. Interacting Thin Film Systems Probed by Electron Induced Extended Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idzerda, Yves Ulrich

    In order to obtain information on the structure and dynamics of various systems including interacting thin films, it is necessary to be able to measure local structure information with surface sensitivity. Three techniques of Electron Induced Extended Fine Structure (EIEFS), the electron analog of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), are described, compared, and applied to thin film systems. Surface Extended Electron Loss Fine Structure (SEELFS), Extended Appearence Potential Fine Structure (EAPFS) and Auger-Monitored Extended Fine Structure (AMEFS), are all local structure probes with varying degrees of surface sensitivity, and all yield similar information. Our results show that each technique can be measured by commercially available electron optics, SEELFS and AMEFS by either a cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA) or by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) optics and EAPFS by the LEED optics. We have addressed questions concerning proper phase shifts for the analysis, short data ranges, required use of undifferentiated data, and experimental difficulties. Investigations of carbon, oxygen, sodium, potassium, cesium, and sulfur on Cu(111) and titanium on silicon demonstrate that SEELFS is applicable to single monolayer coverages of very low Z adsorbates and thin films. Many of the theoretical difficulties surrounding the analysis of SEELFS can be circumvented by the use of standards and the ratio technique analysis developed for EXAFS. We also find in our studies of silicon, titanium, and aluminum oxide that systems with plasmon losses in the region of interest cannot be analyzed, but systems with other characteristic losses which are very sharp or very broad can be. Examination of EAPFS shows that it is more surface sensitive and is applicable to single monolayer coverages (of a broader range of elements than SEELFS) and thin films. Unfortunately, EAPFS is not applicable to single crystal systems with low electron binding energies where diffraction

  11. Global investigation of the fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Burda, O.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Foertsch, S. V.; Lawrie, J. J.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Lacroix, D.

    2009-04-15

    Fine structure in the region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance (ISGQR) in {sup 58}Ni, {sup 89}Y, {sup 90}Zr, {sup 120}Sn, {sup 166}Er, and {sup 208}Pb has been observed in high-energy-resolution ({delta}E{sub 1/2}{approx_equal}35-50 keV) inelastic proton scattering measurements at E{sub 0}=200 MeV at iThemba LABS. Calculations of the corresponding quadrupole excitation strength functions performed within models based on the random-phase approximation (RPA) reveal similar fine structure when the mixing of one-particle one-hole states with two-particle two-hole states is taken into account. A detailed comparison of the experimental data is made with results from the quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM) and the extended time-dependent Hartree-Fock (ETDHF) method. For {sup 208}Pb, additional theoretical results from second RPA and the extended theory of finite Fermi systems (ETFFS) are discussed. A continuous wavelet analysis of the experimental and the calculated spectra is used to extract dominant scales characterizing the fine structure. Although the calculations agree with qualitative features of these scales, considerable differences are found between the model and experimental results and amongst different models. Within the framework of the QPM and ETDHF calculations it is possible to decompose the model spaces into subspaces approximately corresponding to different damping mechanisms. It is demonstrated that characteristic scales mainly arise from the collective coupling of the ISGQR to low-energy surface vibrations.

  12. COLLISIONAL EXCITATION OF THE [C II] FINE STRUCTURE TRANSITION IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Velusamy, T.

    2012-11-15

    We analyze the collisional excitation of the 158 {mu}m (1900.5 GHz) fine structure transition of ionized carbon in terms of line intensities produced by simple cloud models. The single C{sup +} fine structure transition is a very important coolant of the atomic interstellar medium (ISM) and of photon-dominated regions in which carbon is partially or completely in ionized form. The [C II] line is widely used as a tracer of star formation in the Milky Way and other galaxies. Excitation of the [C II] fine structure transition can be via collisions with hydrogen molecules, atoms, and electrons. Analysis of [C II] observations is complicated by the fact that it is difficult to determine the optical depth of the line. We discuss the excitation of the [C II] line, deriving analytic results for several limiting cases and carry out numerical solutions using a large velocity gradient model for a more inclusive analysis. For antenna temperatures up to 1/3 of the brightness temperature of the gas kinetic temperature, the antenna temperature is linearly proportional to the column density of C{sup +} irrespective of the optical depth of the transition. This is appropriately referred to as the effectively optically thin approximation. We review the critical densities for excitation of the [C II] line by various collision partners, briefly analyze C{sup +} absorption, and conclude with a discussion of C{sup +} cooling and how the considerations for line intensities affect the behavior of this important coolant of the ISM.

  13. 3D Whole-prominence Fine Structure Modeling. II. Prominence Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, Stanislav; Mackay, Duncan H.

    2015-10-01

    We use the new three-dimensional (3D) whole-prominence fine structure model to study the evolution of prominences and their fine structures in response to changes in the underlying photospheric magnetic flux distribution. The applied model combines a detailed 3D prominence magnetic field configuration with a realistic description of the prominence plasma distributed along multiple fine structures. In addition, we utilize an approximate Hα visualization technique to study the evolution of the visible cool prominence plasma both in emission (prominence) and absorption (filament). We show that the initial magnetic field configuration of the modeled prominence is significantly disturbed by the changing position of a single polarity of a magnetic bipole as the bipole is advected toward the main body of the filament. This leads to the creation of a barb, which becomes the dominant feature visible in the synthetic Hα images of both the prominence and filament views. The evolution of the bipole also creates conditions that lead to the disappearance and reappearance of large portions of the main body. We also show that an arch-like region containing a dark void (a bubble) can be naturally produced in the synthetic prominence Hα images. While not visible in terms of the magnetic field lines, it is due to a lack of Hα emission from low-pressure, low-density plasma located in shallow magnetic dips lying along the lines of sight intersecting the dark void. In addition, a quasi-vertical small-scale feature consisting of short and deep dips, piled one above the other, is produced.

  14. Vibronic fine structure in high-resolution x-ray absorption spectra from ion-bombarded boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Petravic, Mladen; Peter, Robert; Varasanec, Marijana; Li Luhua; Chen Ying; Cowie, Bruce C. C.

    2013-05-15

    The authors have applied high-resolution near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements around the nitrogen K-edge to study the effects of ion-bombardment on near-surface properties of boron nitride nanotubes. A notable difference has been observed between surface sensitive partial electron yield (PEY) and bulk sensitive total electron yield (TEY) fine-structure measurements. The authors assign the PEY fine structure to the coupling of excited molecular vibrational modes to electronic transitions in NO molecules trapped just below the surface. Oxidation resistance of the boron nitride nanotubes is significantly reduced by low energy ion bombardment, as broken B-N bonds are replaced by N-O bonds involving oxygen present in the surface region. In contrast to the PEY spectra, the bulk sensitive TEY measurements on as-grown samples do not exhibit any fine structure while the ion-bombarded samples show a clear vibronic signature of molecular nitrogen.

  15. Improved self-absorption correction for extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.H.; Bridges, F.

    2003-06-04

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data collected in the fluorescence mode are susceptible to an apparent amplitude reduction due to the self-absorption of the fluorescing photon by the sample before it reaches a detector. Previous treatments have made the simplifying assumption that the effect of the EXAFS on the correction term is negligible, and that the samples are in the thick limit. We present a nearly exact treatment that can be applied for any sample thickness or concentration, and retains the EXAFS oscillations in the correction term.

  16. Fine Structure in Swift Heavy Ion Tracks in Amorphous SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluth, P.; Schnohr, C. S.; Pakarinen, O. H.; Djurabekova, F.; Sprouster, D. J.; Giulian, R.; Ridgway, M. C.; Byrne, A. P.; Trautmann, C.; Cookson, D. J.; Nordlund, K.; Toulemonde, M.

    2008-10-01

    We report on the observation of a fine structure in ion tracks in amorphous SiO2 using small angle x-ray scattering measurements. Tracks were generated by high energy ion irradiation with Au and Xe between 27 MeV and 1.43 GeV. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, the tracks consist of a core characterized by a significant density deficit compared to unirradiated material, surrounded by a high density shell. The structure is consistent with a frozen-in pressure wave originating from the center of the ion track as a result of a thermal spike.

  17. Extended fine structures in the electron energy loss spectrum of InAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowengerdt, F. D.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of using electron energy loss fine structure (EELFS) for the characterization of thin pseudomorphic quantum wells of InAs and GaAs(100) is investigated. It is shown that the EELFS technique can yield reliable radial distribution functions for bulk InAs, provided beam-induced sample degradation is controlled stringently. Additional improvements in the data collection procedures, including better control of the sample condition, are required as well as more detailed work on separating contributions from multiple edges in the data analysis.

  18. Coupled-channels study of fine structure in the {alpha} decay of well deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2011-06-15

    We formulate a theoretical model for the {alpha} decay of well-deformed even-even nuclei based on the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation. The {alpha}-decay half-lives and fine structures observed in {alpha} decay are well described by the five-channel microscopic calculations. Since the branching ratios to high-spin states are hard to understand in the traditional {alpha}-decay theories, this success could be important to interpret future observations of heavier nuclei. It is also found that the {alpha} transition to high-spin states is a powerful tool to probe the energy spectrum and deformation of daughter nuclei.

  19. Balmer profiles in the geocorona and interstellar space. I - Asymmetries due to fine structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Joseph W.

    1987-01-01

    While the Doppler profiles of Balmer-alpha and -beta are in principle analyzable in order to derive orbital data concerning both escaping and satellite geocoronal particles, interpretations are in practice hampered by a lack of understanding of profile properties apart from such geocoronal features as an asymmetry, caused by the absence of escape velocity-exceeding, downward-directed particles. Attention is accordingly given to the profiles of H atoms which, while emitting radiation from a complete Maxwellian distribution, also exhibit an H-alpha fine structure-generated asymmetry which is a predictable function of the excitation mechanism.

  20. Fine structure of transient waves in a random medium: The correlation and spectral density functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Alan R.

    1994-01-01

    This is essentially a progress report on a theoretical investigation of the propagation of transient waves in a random medium. The emphasis in this study is on applications to sonic-boom propagation, particularly as regards the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the sonic-boom waveform. The analysis is general, however, and is applicable to other types of waves besides sonic-boom waves. The phenomenon of primary concern in this investigation is the fine structure of the wave. A figure is used to illustrate what is meant by finestructure.

  1. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact.

  2. Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structures Revealed in Core Ionization Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, M.; Selles, P.; Lablanquie, P.; Hikosaka, Y.; Penent, F.; Shigemasa, E.; Ito, K.; Carniato, S.

    2013-09-01

    Simultaneous core ionization and core excitation have been observed in the C2H2n (n=1, 2, 3) molecular series using synchrotron radiation and a magnetic bottle time-of-flight electron spectrometer. Rich satellite patterns corresponding to (K-2V) core excited states of the K-1 molecular ions have been identified by detecting in coincidence the photoelectron with the two Auger electrons resulting from the double core hole relaxation. A theoretical model is proposed providing absolute photoionization cross sections and revealing clear signatures of direct (monopolar) and conjugate (dipolar near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure) shakeup lines of comparable magnitude.

  3. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structures revealed in core ionization photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M; Selles, P; Lablanquie, P; Hikosaka, Y; Penent, F; Shigemasa, E; Ito, K; Carniato, S

    2013-09-20

    Simultaneous core ionization and core excitation have been observed in the C(2)H(2n) (n=1, 2, 3) molecular series using synchrotron radiation and a magnetic bottle time-of-flight electron spectrometer. Rich satellite patterns corresponding to (K(-2)V) core excited states of the K(-1) molecular ions have been identified by detecting in coincidence the photoelectron with the two Auger electrons resulting from the double core hole relaxation. A theoretical model is proposed providing absolute photoionization cross sections and revealing clear signatures of direct (monopolar) and conjugate (dipolar near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure) shakeup lines of comparable magnitude. PMID:24093255

  4. Experimental determination of the relativistic fine-structure splitting in pionic Ti and Fe atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.; Boehm, F.; Bovet, E.; Hahn, A.A.; Henrikson, H.E.; Miller, J.P.; Powers, R.J.; Vogel, P.; Vuilleumier, J.; Kunselman, A.R.

    1980-09-01

    Using a high-resolution crystal spectrometer we have measured the relativistic angular-momentum splittings of the 5g-4f and 5f-4d transitions in pionic Ti and Fe atoms. The observed fine-structure splittings of 85.3 +- 3.0 eV in ..pi../sup -/ Ti and 158.5 +- 7.8 eV in ..pi../sup -/ Fe agree with the calculated splittings of 88.5 and 167.6 eV, respectively, arising from the Klein-Gordon equation and from small corrections due to vacuum polarization, strong interaction, and electron screening.

  5. Thermal Expansion Behaviour of Silver Examined by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, M.; Chasse, A.; Haug, J.; Schneider, R.; Kruth, H.

    2007-02-02

    EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) investigations are reported concerning the thermal expansion behaviour of silver in an extended range of temperature from 10 K to about 950 K measured in transmission mode. Both the ratio method and an EXAFS fitting procedure were applied to reveal the temperature dependence of EXAFS parameters. Models based on quantum and classical thermodynamic perturbation theory have been used to interpret experimental data and compared to XRD (X-ray diffraction) results of bulk silver material. The description of thermodynamic data of thermal expansion of silver in the complete range of temperature by EXAFS Spectroscopy was successful by first calculations using third order quantum perturbation theory.

  6. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

  7. Fine-structure splittings in high-lying {sup 2}F states of rubidium via three-step laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, J. R.; Malyshev, G. S.

    2010-03-15

    Three-step laser spectroscopy has been used to measure six additional fine-structure splittings in the n {sup 2}F states of {sup 87}Rb for 11{<=}n{<=}16. When combined with our previous measurements for 4{<=}n{<=}10, they constitute a continuous sequence of 13 measurements suitable for comparison to fine-structure calculations in heavy alkali-metal atoms where relativistic effects, core polarization, configuration mixing, and electron correlation are important.

  8. Analysis of the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions by optical spectroscopy in an electron-beam ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windberger, A.; Torretti, F.; Borschevsky, A.; Ryabtsev, A.; Dobrodey, S.; Bekker, H.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U.; Ubachs, W.; Hoekstra, R.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Versolato, O. O.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally re-evaluate the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions. These ions are essential in bright extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) plasma-light sources for next-generation nanolithography, but their complex electronic structure is an open challenge for both theory and experiment. We combine optical spectroscopy of magnetic dipole M 1 transitions, in a wavelength range covering 260 to 780 nm, with charge-state selective ionization in an electron beam ion trap. Our measurements confirm the predictive power of ab initio calculations based on Fock space coupled cluster theory. We validate our line identification using semiempirical cowan calculations with adjustable wave-function parameters. Available Ritz combinations further strengthen our analysis. Comparison with previous work suggests that line identifications in the EUV need to be revisited.

  9. Time-resolved near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy on photo-induced phase transitions using a tabletop soft-x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, P.; Rajkovic, I.; Moré, R.; Norpoth, J.; Techert, S.; Jooss, C.; Mann, Klaus

    2012-05-01

    We present a table-top soft-x-ray spectrometer for the wavelength range λ = 1-5 nm based on a stable laser-driven x-ray source, making use of a gas-puff target. With this setup, optical light-pump/soft-x-ray probe near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experiments with a temporal resolution of about 230 ps are feasible. Pump-probe NEXAFS measurements were carried out in the "water-window" region (2.28 nm-4.36 nm) on the manganite Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3, investigating diminutive changes of the oxygen K edge that derive from an optically induced phase transition. The results show the practicability of the table-top soft-x-ray spectrometer on demanding investigations so far exclusively conducted at synchrotron radiation sources.

  10. Laser-spectroscopy measurement of the fine-structure splitting 2 3P1-2 3P2 of 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, G.-P.; Zheng, X.; Sun, Y. R.; Hu, S.-M.

    2015-03-01

    Laser spectroscopy has been performed on a beam of neutral 4He atoms. By using transverse laser cooling and focusing, we are able to prepare a bright beam of atoms in the metastable state 2 3S1 deflected from the original effusive atomic beam. The initial state preparation is completed with optical pumping on the 2 3P1←2 3S1 transition at the wavelength of 1083 nm, followed by laser spectroscopy on the 2 3P1 ,2←2 3S1 transitions. The 2 3P1-2 3P2 fine-structure splitting is determined to be 2 291 177.69 ±0.36 kHz . The quantum interference effect is included in data extraction. This is the most precise laser spectroscopy measurement of the interval. Our result is in agreement with both the latest QED-based calculation and the most precise measurement conducted with microwave spectroscopy.

  11. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe− using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm−1 or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe− were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm−1 accuracy. PMID:27138292

  12. On the mechanisms involved in the recovery of envelope information from temporal fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Apoux, Frédéric; Millman, Rebecca E.; Viemeister, Neal F.; Brown, Christopher A.; Bacon, Sid P.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments were designed to provide psychophysical evidence for the existence of envelope information in the temporal fine structure (TFS) of stimuli that were originally amplitude modulated (AM). The original stimuli typically consisted of the sum of a sinusoidally AM tone and two unmodulated tones so that the envelope and TFS could be determined a priori. Experiment 1 showed that normal-hearing listeners not only perceive AM when presented with the Hilbert fine structure alone but AM detection thresholds are lower than those observed when presenting the original stimuli. Based on our analysis, envelope recovery resulted from the failure of the decomposition process to remove the spectral components related to the original envelope from the TFS and the introduction of spectral components related to the original envelope, suggesting that frequency- to amplitude-modulation conversion is not necessary to recover envelope information from TFS. Experiment 2 suggested that these spectral components interact in such a way that envelope fluctuations are minimized in the broadband TFS. Experiment 3 demonstrated that the modulation depth at the original carrier frequency is only slightly reduced compared to the depth of the original modulator. It also indicated that envelope recovery is not specific to the Hilbert decomposition. PMID:21786897

  13. Perceptual weighting of individual and concurrent cues for sentence intelligibility: Frequency, envelope, and fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Fogerty, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The speech signal may be divided into frequency bands, each containing temporal properties of the envelope and fine structure. For maximal speech understanding, listeners must allocate their perceptual resources to the most informative acoustic properties. Understanding this perceptual weighting is essential for the design of assistive listening devices that need to preserve these important speech cues. This study measured the perceptual weighting of young normal-hearing listeners for the envelope and fine structure in each of three frequency bands for sentence materials. Perceptual weights were obtained under two listening contexts: (1) when each acoustic property was presented individually and (2) when multiple acoustic properties were available concurrently. The processing method was designed to vary the availability of each acoustic property independently by adding noise at different levels. Perceptual weights were determined by correlating a listener’s performance with the availability of each acoustic property on a trial-by-trial basis. Results demonstrated that weights were (1) equal when acoustic properties were presented individually and (2) biased toward envelope and mid-frequency information when multiple properties were available. Results suggest a complex interaction between the available acoustic properties and the listening context in determining how best to allocate perceptual resources when listening to speech in noise. PMID:21361454

  14. Fine structure of epithelial canal cells in petioles of Xanthium pensylvanicum

    SciTech Connect

    Maksymowych, R.; Ledbetter, M.C. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1987-01-01

    Secretory canals were examined in petioles of Xanthium pensylvanicum (Cocklebur) grown under long day illumination to maintain vegetative growth. The fine structure of the canal and its epithelium was studied by electron microscopy of thin section cut transverse to the principal axis of petioles from leaves in an early stage of development. The canal proper is delimited by walls of epithelial cells which protrude into a scallop shaped cavity. In comparison to the surrounding parenchyma, the epithelial cells are smaller, cytoplasmically more dense, and less vacuolate. The epithelium contains pleomorphic starch-free plastids with planar thylakoids frequently stacked into grana; thus, the plastids are presumed photosynthetically active. Mitochondria are abundant and often dense. The cytoplasm is rich in free polysomes, and smooth endoplasmic reticulum predominates over the rough form. Spheroidal granules averaging about 530 nm in diameter are numerous in the epithelium and appear at lower concentration in neighboring cells. Many features of fine structure of the epithelial cells suggest that a high metabolic activity in present in this tissue during this early stage of development. A possible function of the canals is defense against insect predation and animal grazing.

  15. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe(-) using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm(-1) or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe(-) were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm(-1) accuracy. PMID:27138292

  16. Coronal fine structure as seen in the Skylab white light coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, Arthur I.

    1994-01-01

    The white light coronograph (WLC) on Skylab provided an opportunity to study the corona at high spatial and temporal resolution. The spatial resolution of the instrument was approximately 25 cm with images taken approximately one per min. One set of images taken over a 10 min period was digitized, providing ten high spatial resolution images for analysis. The progress in data processing techniques available at the time was not sufficient to permit a reliable study of the fine structure in these images. Using current techniques an investigation of the sizes and lifetimes of the smallest scale features in the data was carried out. A preliminary analysis of an area between 2 and 3 Ro was completed. The results show that very narrow rays extend from at least 2 to 3 Ro. The narrowest of these rays has a thickness of approximately 75 cm. The contrast is so low that they are very close to the noise limit of the data. Most of the rays observed become unrecognizable after 10 min, although some remain visible over the entire time. Some notion seems to be detectable in the fine structure rays, but analysis of more frames will be needed to quantify these results.

  17. Fine structure of uterus and non-functioning paruterine organ in Orthoskrjabinia junlanae (Cestoda, Cyclophyllidea).

    PubMed

    Korneva, Janetta V; Kornienko, Svetlana A; Jones, Malcolm K

    2016-06-01

    Some cyclophyllidean cestodes provide protection for their eggs in the external environment by providing them with additional protective layers around the egg membranes. In attempting to examine such adaptations, the microanatomy and fine structure of the uterus of pregravid and gravid proglottids of the cyclophyllidean cestode Orthoskrjabinia junlanae, a parasite of mammals that inhabit a terrestrial but moist environment, were studied. In the initial stages of uterine development, developing embryos locate freely in the lumen of a saccate uterus that later partitions into chambers. Each chamber that forms encloses several embryos. The chambers are surrounded by muscle cells that synthesize extracellular matrix actively. The paruterine organs consist of stacks of flattened long outgrowths of muscular cells, interspersed with small lipid droplets. In the gravid proglottids, the size of paruterine organ increases and consists of flattened basal and small rounded apical parts separated by constrictions. The fine structure of the organ wall remains the same: sparse nuclei and stacks of flattened cytoplasmic outgrowths but internal invaginations or lumen in the paruterine organ are absent. Completely developed eggs remain localized in the uterus. Based on the comparative morpho-functional analysis of uterine and paruterine organs and uterine capsules in cestodes, we conclude that these non-functioning paruterine organ in O. junlanae is an example of an atavism. We postulate that the life cycle of the parasite, which infects mammals living in wet habitats, where threats of desiccation of parasite ova is reduced, has favoured a reversion to a more ancestral form of uterine development. PMID:26997340

  18. Ne II FINE-STRUCTURE LINE EMISSION FROM THE OUTFLOWS OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Hsien; Lin, Wei-Chieh; Liu, Chun-Fan J.; Glassgold, Alfred E.

    2010-05-10

    The flux and line shape of the fine-structure transitions of Ne II and Ne III at 12.8 and 15.55 {mu}m and of the forbidden transitions of O I {lambda}6300 are calculated for young stellar objects with a range of mass-loss rates and X-ray luminosities using the X-wind model of jets and the associated wide-angle winds. For moderate and high accretion rates, the calculated Ne II line luminosity is comparable to or much larger than produced in X-ray irradiated disk models. All of the line luminosities correlate well with the main parameter in the X-wind model, the mass-loss rate, and also with the assumed X-ray luminosity-and with one another. The line shapes of an approaching jet are broad and have strong blue-shifted peaks near the effective terminal velocity of the jet. They serve as a characteristic and testable aspect of jet production of the neon fine-structure lines and the O I forbidden transitions.

  19. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-05-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe‑ using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm‑1 or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe‑ were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm‑1 accuracy.

  20. Position-sensitive change in the transition metal L-edge fine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gulec, Ahmet; Phillips, Patrick J.; Klie, Robert F.

    2015-10-05

    Studying the structure and composition of solid-state materials on the atomic scale has become nearly routine in transmission electron microscopy with the development of novel electron optics and electron sources. In particular, with spatial resolutions better than 0.1 nm and energy resolution smaller than 100 meV, the stoichiometry, bonding, and coordination can now be examined on similar scales. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) have played a crucial role in identifying charge ordering, valence, and as spin state transitions in transition metal perovskite oxides. In this letter, we investigate the effects of ever-decreasing electron-probe sizes on the measured near-edge fine-structure of the transition metal core-loss edge using EELS. We find that for certain transition metal perovskites, the position of the electron probe with respect to the atomic column is crucial in determining the correct valence state. Several reasons for the observed position-sensitive EELS fine-structure are discussed.

  1. Fine structure of the red luminescence band in undoped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Reshchikov, M. A.; Usikov, A.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.

    2014-01-20

    Many point defects in GaN responsible for broad photoluminescence (PL) bands remain unidentified. Their presence in thick GaN layers grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) detrimentally affects the material quality and may hinder the use of GaN in high-power electronic devices. One of the main PL bands in HVPE-grown GaN is the red luminescence (RL) band with a maximum at 1.8 eV. We observed the fine structure of this band with a zero-phonon line (ZPL) at 2.36 eV, which may help to identify the related defect. The shift of the ZPL with excitation intensity and the temperature-related transformation of the RL band fine structure indicate that the RL band is caused by transitions from a shallow donor (at low temperature) or from the conduction band (above 50 K) to an unknown deep acceptor having an energy level 1.130 eV above the valence band.

  2. Connecting Fundamental Constants

    SciTech Connect

    Di Mario, D.

    2008-05-29

    A model for a black hole electron is built from three basic constants only: h, c and G. The result is a description of the electron with its mass and charge. The nature of this black hole seems to fit the properties of the Planck particle and new relationships among basic constants are possible. The time dilation factor in a black hole associated with a variable gravitational field would appear to us as a charge; on the other hand the Planck time is acting as a time gap drastically limiting what we are able to measure and its dimension will appear in some quantities. This is why the Planck time is numerically very close to the gravitational/electric force ratio in an electron: its difference, disregarding a {pi}{radical}(2) factor, is only 0.2%. This is not a coincidence, it is always the same particle and the small difference is between a rotating and a non-rotating particle. The determination of its rotational speed yields accurate numbers for many quantities, including the fine structure constant and the electron magnetic moment.

  3. Time-dependent radio fine structure of the quasar 3C 345

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittels, J. J.; Shapiro, I. I.; Cotton, W. D.; Counselman, C. C.; Hinteregger, H. F.; Knight, C. A.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.; Clark, T. A.; Hutton, L. K.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for VLBI observations of 3C 345 at a wavelength of 3.8 cm with left circular polarization. Sixteen sets of correlated flux densities and three sets of closure phases were obtained from observations made over a three-year period with six independent interferometers formed from up to four antennas. The mathematical models employed to represent the radio brightness distribution of the source are described, and the data are analyzed on the basis of a two-component model. The results show that the compact source in 3C 345 consists of two components whose separation increased by about 0.3 milliarcsec over the observational period, that the smaller and weaker component is to the east and south of the larger and stronger one, and that the apparent expansion velocity would be about 2.5c for a redshift of 0.6, a Hubble constant of 60 km/sec per Mpc, and a deceleration parameter of unity. It is concluded that these findings are difficult to reconcile with the 'Christmas tree' model for the apparent change of separation with time over any given series of observations.

  4. AMPLITUDE FINE STRUCTURE IN THE CEPHEID P-L RELATION. I. AMPLITUDE DISTRIBUTION ACROSS THE RR LYRAE INSTABILITY STRIP MAPPED USING THE ACCESSIBILITY RESTRICTION IMPOSED BY THE HORIZONTAL BRANCH

    SciTech Connect

    Sandage, Allan

    2010-10-10

    The largest amplitude light curves for both RR Lyrae (RRL) variables and classical Cepheids with periods less than 10 days and greater than 20 days occur at the blue edge of the respective instability strips. It is shown that the equation for the decrease in amplitude with penetration into the strip from the blue edge, and hence the amplitude fine structure within the strip, is the same for RRL and the Cepheids despite their metallicity differences. However, the manifestation of this identity is different between the two classes of variables because the sampling of the RRL strip is restricted by the discrete strip positions of the horizontal branch, a restriction that is absent for the Cepheids in stellar aggregates with a variety of ages. To show the similarity of the strip amplitude fine structure for RRL and Cepheids, we make a grid of lines of constant amplitude in the H-R diagram of the strip using amplitude data for classical Cepheids in the Galaxy, LMC, and SMC. The model implicit in the grid, that also contains lines of constant period, is used to predict the correlations between period, amplitude, and color for the two Oosterhoff RRL groups in globular clusters. The good agreement of the predictions with the observations using the classical Cepheid amplitude fine structure also for the RRL shows one aspect of the unity of the pulsation processes between the two classes of variables.

  5. Studies of Mn/GaAs digital alloys using x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Y. L.; Kioseoglou, G.; Kim, S.; Chen, X.; Luo, H.; Kao, Y. H.; Sasaki, Y.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J. K.

    2002-04-01

    Local structure and effective chemical valency of Mn atoms in Mn/GaAs digital alloys have been investigated using the x-ray absorption fine structure techniques. The samples were prepared by molecular-beam epitaxy with different thickness of GaAs layers separating the nominal Mn monolayers. Lattice constants of the digital alloys are found by x-ray diffraction to increase linearly in a very narrow range (about 0.3%) with the Mn/GaAs ratio in the samples. Our data show that Mn atoms in the nominal Mn monolayers actually combine with GaAs to form (Ga, Mn)As alloys with Mn atoms substituting for the Ga sites in GaAs. This result clearly rules out the possibility of dominant MnAs formation.

  6. Pleiades luminosity function: fine structure and new Pre-MS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, A. N.; Piskunov, A. E.; Schilbach, E.

    In order to study a model-dependence of the results achieved in the previous investigations of the Pleiades luminosity function using D'Antona and Mazzitelli (1994) evolutionary tracks, we repeated the computations with the new track system by D'Antona and Mazzitelli (1997). T h e following main conclusions can be drawn: the new models agree better with observations; the helium abundance needed to fit the Hipparcos distance modulus is reduced to a more reasonable value of Y=0.31; the cluster age becomes slightly higher and the slope of the initial mass function somewhat lower. The conclusions on the fine structure of the luminosity function do not change significantly due to the application of the new models.

  7. Strain-driven growth of GaAs(111) quantum dots with low fine structure splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerino, Christopher D.; Simmonds, Paul J.; Liang, Baolai; Jung, Daehwan; Schneider, Christian; Unsleber, Sebastian; Vo, Minh; Huffaker, Diana L.; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2014-12-01

    Symmetric quantum dots (QDs) on (111)-oriented surfaces are promising candidates for generating polarization-entangled photons due to their low excitonic fine structure splitting (FSS). However, (111) QDs are difficult to grow. The conventional use of compressive strain to drive QD self-assembly fails to form 3D nanostructures on (111) surfaces. Instead, we demonstrate that (111) QDs self-assemble under tensile strain by growing GaAs QDs on an InP(111)A substrate. Tensile GaAs self-assembly produces a low density of QDs with a symmetric triangular morphology. Coherent, tensile QDs are observed without dislocations, and the QDs luminescence at room temperature. Single QD measurements reveal low FSS with a median value of 7.6 μeV, due to the high symmetry of the (111) QDs. Tensile self-assembly thus offers a simple route to symmetric (111) QDs for entangled photon emitters.

  8. Strain-driven growth of GaAs(111) quantum dots with low fine structure splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Yerino, Christopher D.; Jung, Daehwan; Lee, Minjoo Larry; Simmonds, Paul J.; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana L.; Schneider, Christian; Unsleber, Sebastian; Vo, Minh; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2014-12-22

    Symmetric quantum dots (QDs) on (111)-oriented surfaces are promising candidates for generating polarization-entangled photons due to their low excitonic fine structure splitting (FSS). However, (111) QDs are difficult to grow. The conventional use of compressive strain to drive QD self-assembly fails to form 3D nanostructures on (111) surfaces. Instead, we demonstrate that (111) QDs self-assemble under tensile strain by growing GaAs QDs on an InP(111)A substrate. Tensile GaAs self-assembly produces a low density of QDs with a symmetric triangular morphology. Coherent, tensile QDs are observed without dislocations, and the QDs luminescence at room temperature. Single QD measurements reveal low FSS with a median value of 7.6 μeV, due to the high symmetry of the (111) QDs. Tensile self-assembly thus offers a simple route to symmetric (111) QDs for entangled photon emitters.

  9. Exciton fine-structure splitting in GaN/AlN quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindel, C.; Kako, S.; Kawano, T.; Oishi, H.; Arakawa, Y.; Hönig, G.; Winkelnkemper, M.; Schliwa, A.; Hoffmann, A.; Bimberg, D.

    2010-06-01

    Exciton bright-state fine-structure splitting (FSS) in single GaN/AlN quantum dots (QDs) is reported, presenting an important step toward the realization of room temperature single-qubit emitters for quantum cryptography and communication. The FSS in nitride QDs is up to 7 meV and thus much larger than for other QD systems. We find also a surprising dependence of FSS on the QD size, inverse to that of arsenide QDs. Now we are able to explain why FSS can only be observed in small QDs of high-emission energies. Our calculations reveal a shape/strain anisotropy as origin of the large FSS allowing different approaches to control FSS in nitrides.

  10. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, I. T.; Buthelezi, Z.; Carter, J.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Förtsch, S. V.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Neveling, R.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Pysmenetska, I.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    The isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al has been investigated with high-energy-resolution proton inelastic scattering at Ep=200 MeV and at scattering angles close to the maximum of Δ L =2 angular distributions with the K600 magnetic spectrometer of iThemba LABS, South Africa. Characteristic scales are extracted from the observed fine structure with a wavelet analysis and compared for 28Si with random-phase approximation and second random phase approximation calculations with an interaction derived from the Argonne V18 potential by a unitary transformation. A recent extension of the method to deformed nuclei provides the best description of the data, suggesting the significance of Landau damping.

  11. Relation between the synthesis conditions and the fine structure of fiber carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyumentsev, V. A.; Fazlitdinova, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    The fine structure of carbon fibers synthesized under various technological conditions is studied. It is found that the material of the fibers is heterogeneous and its component composition is determined by thermomechanical treatment conditions and the presence of a boron addition and depends on the angle of coherent-domain orientation φ with respect to the fiber axis. The detected dependences of the component composition of the fibers on the heat-treatment temperature and time and the angle of coherent-domain orientation with respect to the fiber axis suggest that the transition of the carbon material of the fibers into a more equilibrium state is likely to proceed through a number of metastable states.

  12. Automated fine structure image analysis method for discrimination of diabetic retinopathy stage using conjunctival microvasculature images

    PubMed Central

    Khansari, Maziyar M; O’Neill, William; Penn, Richard; Chau, Felix; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    The conjunctiva is a densely vascularized mucus membrane covering the sclera of the eye with a unique advantage of accessibility for direct visualization and non-invasive imaging. The purpose of this study is to apply an automated quantitative method for discrimination of different stages of diabetic retinopathy (DR) using conjunctival microvasculature images. Fine structural analysis of conjunctival microvasculature images was performed by ordinary least square regression and Fisher linear discriminant analysis. Conjunctival images between groups of non-diabetic and diabetic subjects at different stages of DR were discriminated. The automated method’s discriminate rates were higher than those determined by human observers. The method allowed sensitive and rapid discrimination by assessment of conjunctival microvasculature images and can be potentially useful for DR screening and monitoring. PMID:27446692

  13. Fine structures of organic photovoltaic thin films probed by frequency-shift electrostatic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kento; Ie, Yutaka; Aso, Yoshio; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    The localized charge and electrostatic properties of organic photovoltaic thin films are predominating factors for controlling energy conversion efficiency. The surface potential and electrostatic structures of organic photovoltaic thin films were investigated by frequency shift mode Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The KFM images of a poly[2-methoxy-5-(3‧,7‧-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene]/phenyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl ester (PCBM) blend thin film reveals that the PCBM domains precipitate as the topmost layer on the thin films. We find fine structures that were not observed in the topography and KFM images. The bias dependence of the EFM images suggests that the EFM contrast reflects the field-induced polarization, indicating the presence of charge trapping sites.

  14. Fine structural changes in the lateral vestibular nucleus of aging rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E., Jr.; Miquel, J.

    1974-01-01

    The fine structure of the lateral vestibular nucleus was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats, that were sacrified at 4 weeks, 6-8 weeks, 6-8 months, and 18-20 months of age. In the neuronal perikaria, the following age-associated changes were seen with increasing frequency with advancing age: rodlike nuclear inclusions and nuclear membrane invaginations; cytoplasmic dense bodies with the characteristics of lipofuscin; and moderate disorganization of the granular endoplasmic reticulum. Dense bodies were also seen in glial cells. Rats 18 to 20 months old showed dendritic swellings, axonal degeneration, and an apparent increase in the number of axosomatic synaptic terminals containing flattened vesicles (presumed to be inhibitory in function).

  15. Support Effects on Electronic Behaviors of Gold Nanoparticles Studied by X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhongrui; Yan Wensheng; Wei Shiqiang

    2007-02-02

    The electronic properties of gold nanoparticles supported on different supports were studied with X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). It was found that the tunability of the d-electron distribution in the nano-sized Au clusters can be realized by selective supporting. The Au atoms in the clusters gain 5d electrons when supported on SiO2, and lose 5d electrons when loaded over MgO, Al2O3, and TiO2. Contractions in bond lengths of between 0.5 and 1.6% from bulk metal values were observed from EXAFS data. This work demonstrates that the important role of the different supports in the 5d-charge distribution of Au nanoparticles and usefulness of XAFS in probing the electronic behavior of noble metal nanoparticles.

  16. Semi-empirical analysis of the fine structure and oscillator strengths for atomic strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruczkowski, J.; Elantkowska, M.; Dembczyński, J.

    2016-02-01

    As the result of our studies on the atomic structure of complex atoms we produced high quality wave functions for both even and odd systems of configurations of Sr I. These wave functions were used for the parametrization of the oscillator strengths for electric-dipole transitions, where reliable data were available. The angular coefficients of the transition matrix in pure SL coupling were calculated by means of straightforward Racah algebra. The transition matrix was transformed into the actual intermediate coupling by the fine structure wave functions. The transition integrals were treated as free parameters in the least squares fit to the gf values. This procedure allowed us to obtain the values of the transition integrals and predict the values of oscillator strengths for the transitions from odd levels in a wide spectral range.

  17. Vibrational fine structure of C5 via anion slow photoelectron velocity-map imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichman, Marissa L.; Kim, Jongjin B.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2013-10-01

    High-resolution anion photoelectron spectra of cryogenically cooled C_5^ - clusters are reported using slow photoelectron velocity-map imaging spectroscopy. We resolve vibronic transitions to the ν2 stretching mode and multiply excited ν5, ν6, and ν7 bending modes of neutral C5 with significantly higher accuracy than previous experiments. Weak transitions to Franck-Condon (FC) forbidden singly excited bending modes are made possible by Herzberg-Teller coupling between electronic states of the neutral cluster. In addition, we resolve vibrational fine structure corresponding to different angular momentum states of multiply excited bending modes. The observation of this multiplet structure, some of which is FC forbidden, is attributed to Renner-Teller coupling between vibrational levels in the C_5^ - ground electronic state.

  18. Confocal imaging reveals three-dimensional fine structure difference between ventral and dorsal nerve roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuxiang; Sui, Tao; Cao, Xiaojian; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun; Sun, Peng

    2011-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injury repair is one of the most challenging problems in neurosurgery, partially due to lack of knowledge of three-dimensional (3-D) fine structure and organization of peripheral nerves. In this paper, we explored the structures of nerve fibers in ventral and dorsal nerves with a laser scanning confocal microscopy. Thick tissue staining results suggested that nerve fibers have a different 3-D structure in ventral and dorsal nerves, and reconstruction from serial sectioning images showed that in ventral nerves the nerve fibers travel in a winding form, while in dorsal nerves, the nerve fibers form in a parallel cable pattern. These structural differences could help surgeons to differentiate ventral and dorsal nerves in peripheral nerve injury repair, and also facilitate scientists to get a deeper understanding about nerve fiber organization.

  19. Xe nanocrystals in Si studied by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, Giuseppe; Pennisi, Agata R.; Zontone, Federico

    2007-07-15

    The structural configuration of Xe clusters, obtained by ion implantation in a Si matrix, has been investigated as a function of the temperature by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. In contrast with previous results, we demonstrate that an accurate analysis of the data, using high order cumulants, gives evidence of Xe fcc nanocrystals at low temperature, even in the as-implanted Si; expansion of the Xe lattice is always found as a function of the temperature, with no appreciable overpressure. We point out that a dramatic modification of these conclusions can be induced by an incorrect analysis using standard symmetrical pair distribution function G(r); for this reason, all the results were checked by x-ray diffraction measurements.

  20. Mechanical Behavior of Agave Americana L. Fibres: Correlation Between Fine Structure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msahli, S.; Chaabouni, Y.; Sakli, F.; Drean, J. Y.

    In this study, results of a mechanical behavior study of fibres extracted from the agave Americana L. plant, the most abundant variety in Tunisia, are presented. These results deal with the principal and mechanical characteristics of these fibres which are the elongation at break, the elasticity modulus and the rupture facture. These results permitted to situate these fibres, compared to the other textile fibres, as materials that can be used in technical applications such as reinforcing composites or geotextile. In order to understand the mechanical properties of these fibres, a correlation study between the properties already cited and the fine structure was done. The obtained results showed that the mechanical properties of agave Americana L. fibres are closely related to the individual fibers deformations and to the natural matrix (lignin and gums) that links these elementary fibres.

  1. Fine-structural changes in the midgut of old Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton-Erxleben, F.; Miquel, J.; Philpott, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Senescent fine-structural changes in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster are investigated. A large number of midgut mitochondria in old flies exhibit nodular cristae and a tubular system located perpendicular to the normal cristae orientation. Anterior intestinal cells show a senescent accumulation of age pigment, either with a surrounding two-unit membrane or without any membrane. The predominant localization of enlarged mitochondria and pigment in the luminal gut region may be related to the polarized metabolism of the intestinal cells. Findings concur with previous observations of dense-body accumulations and support the theory that mitochondria are involved in the aging of fixed post-mitotic cells. Demonstrated by statistical analyses is that mitochondrial size increase is related to mitochondrial variation increase.

  2. Fine structure in the cosmic ray spectrum: Further analysis and the next step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2012-01-01

    An analysis is made of the fine structure in the cosmic ray energy spectrum: new facets of present observations and their interpretation and the next step. It is argued that less than about 10% of the intensity of the helium 'peak' at the knee at ≈5 PeV is due to just a few sources (SNR) other than the single source. The apparent concavity in the rigidity spectra of protons and helium nuclei which have maximum curvature at about 200 GV is confirmed by a joint analysis of the PAMELA, CREAM and ATIC experiments. The spectra of heavier nuclei also show remarkable structure in the form of 'ankles' at several hundred GeV/nucleon. Possible mechanisms are discussed. The search for 'pulsar peaks' has not yet proved successful.

  3. Local vibrational properties of GaAs studied by extended X-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S I; Aquilanti, G; Novello, N; Olivi, L; Grisenti, R; Fornasini, P

    2013-10-28

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been measured at both the K edges of gallium and arsenic in GaAs, from 14 to 300 K, to investigate the local vibrational and thermodynamic behaviour in terms of bond expansion, parallel, and perpendicular mean square relative displacements and third cumulant. The separate analysis of the two edges allows a self-consistent check of the results and suggests that a residual influence of Ga EXAFS at the As edge cannot be excluded. The relation between bond expansion, lattice expansion, and expansion due to anharmonicity of the effective potential is quantitatively clarified. The comparison with previous EXAFS results on other crystals with the diamond or zincblende structure shows that the values of a number of parameters determined from EXAFS are clearly correlated with the fractional ionicity and with the strength and temperature interval of the lattice negative expansion. PMID:24182054

  4. Fine structure of spermatozoa in the common pandora (Pagellus erythrinus Linnaeus, 1758) (Perciformes, Sparidae).

    PubMed

    Maricchiolo, G; Genovese, L; Laurà, R; Micale, V; Muglia, U

    2004-10-01

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the fine structure of the sperm of the Sparid fish Pagellus erythrinus L. The spermatozoon of pandora has a spherical head lacking an acrosome, a cone-shaped midpiece and a long tail. The midpiece houses a single mitochondrion. The centriolar complex lies inside the nuclear fossa and is composed of a proximal and a distal centriole which are arranged at right angles to each other. The flagellum is inserted medio-laterally into the head, contains the conventional 9+2 axoneme and possesses one pair of lateral fins. On the basis of its ultrastructural organization, the pandora sperm can be regarded as an evolved form of the primitive spermatozoon found in Teleosts. According to the morphological classification proposed by Mattei (1970), the sperm of pandora belongs to a "type I" designation, like that of the other Sparid fish. PMID:15375767

  5. Automated fine structure image analysis method for discrimination of diabetic retinopathy stage using conjunctival microvasculature images.

    PubMed

    Khansari, Maziyar M; O'Neill, William; Penn, Richard; Chau, Felix; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2016-07-01

    The conjunctiva is a densely vascularized mucus membrane covering the sclera of the eye with a unique advantage of accessibility for direct visualization and non-invasive imaging. The purpose of this study is to apply an automated quantitative method for discrimination of different stages of diabetic retinopathy (DR) using conjunctival microvasculature images. Fine structural analysis of conjunctival microvasculature images was performed by ordinary least square regression and Fisher linear discriminant analysis. Conjunctival images between groups of non-diabetic and diabetic subjects at different stages of DR were discriminated. The automated method's discriminate rates were higher than those determined by human observers. The method allowed sensitive and rapid discrimination by assessment of conjunctival microvasculature images and can be potentially useful for DR screening and monitoring. PMID:27446692

  6. Fine structure in RF spectra of lightning return stroke wave forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Rinnert, K.; Krider, E. P.

    1988-01-01

    The power spectra of the wide-band (10 Hz to 100 kHz) magnetic-field signals for a number of lightning return strokes measured during a thunderstorm which occurred in Lindau in August, 1984 have been calculated. The RF magnetic field data are obtained with the engineering unit of the Galileo Jupiter Probe lightning experiment. Each return stroke data stream is passed through an adaptive filter designed to whiten its spectrum. The spectra of the magnetic field data definitely show fine structure, with two or three distinct peaks in the spectra of many of the waveforms. A peak at f of about 60-70 kHz is often seen in the power spectra of the waveform time segments preceding and following the rise-to-peak amplitude of the return stroke.

  7. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure of NaBr and Ge at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, R.; Crozier, E.D.; Whitmore, J.E.; Seary, A.J.; Tranquada, J.M.

    1980-06-01

    The x-ray absorption spectra of Ge and of Br in NaBr have been measured to pressures of 52 and 21 kbars, respectively, in a boron carbide and diamond anvil cell in which pressure was measured via the ruby-fluorescence technique. Although Bragg peaks from the diamond anvil reduced the accuracy, atomic spacings in both materials could be determined by extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) analysis. Changes in the nearest-neighbor separations in NaBr, and Ge to at least 40 kbars, agreed with literature values, indicating that the EXAFS phase shifts are quite insensitive to such pressures. In addition the near-edge peak positions in the NaBr spectra appeared to readily shift with pressure, which suggests that NaBr may be quite suitable as a pressure standard in future work of this type.

  8. Single shot near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantouvalou, I.; Witte, K.; Martyanov, W.; Jonas, A.; Grötzsch, D.; Streeck, C.; Löchel, H.; Rudolph, I.; Erko, A.; Stiel, H.; Kanngießer, B.

    2016-05-01

    With the help of adapted off-axis reflection zone plates, near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra at the C and N K-absorption edge have been recorded using a single 1.2 ns long soft X-ray pulse. The transmission experiments were performed with a laser-produced plasma source in the laboratory rendering time resolved measurements feasible independent on large scale facilities. A resolving power of E/ΔE ˜ 950 at the respective edges could be demonstrated. A comparison of single shot spectra with those collected with longer measuring time proves that all features of the used reference samples (silicon nitrate and polyimide) can be resolved in 1.2 ns. Hence, investigations of radiation sensitive biological specimen become possible due to the high efficiency of the optical elements enabling low dose experiments.

  9. Electric control of the exciton fine structure in nonparabolic quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welander, Erik; Burkard, Guido

    2012-10-01

    We show that the nonparabolic confinement potential is responsible for the nonmonotonic behavior and sign change of the exciton fine-structure splitting (FSS) in optically active self-assembled quantum dots. This insight is important for the theoretical understanding and practical control by electric fields of the quantum state of the emitted light from a biexciton cascade recombination process. We find that a hard-wall (box) confinement potential leads to a FSS that is in better agreement with experimentally measured FSS than a harmonic potential. We then show that a finite applied electric field can be used to remove the FSS entirely, thus allowing for the creation of maximally entangled photons, being vital to the growing field of quantum communication and quantum key distribution.

  10. PAP-LMPCR for improved, allele-specific footprinting and automated chromatin fine structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, R.; Gao, C.; LeBon, J.; Liu, Q.; Mayoral, R. J.; Sommer, S. S.; Hoogenkamp, M.; Riggs, A. D.; Bonifer, C.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of chromatin fine structure and transcription factor occupancy of differentially expressed genes by in vivo footprinting and ligation-mediated-PCR (LMPCR) is a powerful tool to understand the impact of chromatin on gene expression. However, as with all PCR-based techniques, the accuracy of the experiments has often been reduced by sequence similarities and the presence of GC-rich or repeat sequences, and some sequences are completely refractory to analysis. Here we describe a novel method, pyrophosphorolysis activated polymerization LMPCR or PAP-LMPCR, which is capable of generating accurate and reproducible footprints specific for individual alleles and can read through sequences previously not accessible for analysis. In addition, we have adapted this technique for automation, thus enabling the simultaneous and rapid analysis of chromatin structure at many different genes. PMID:18208840

  11. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Strong configuration mixing among the fine-structure levels of Cl+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, N. C.; Crothers, D. S. F.; Felfli, Z.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2003-01-01

    A large-scale configuration interaction (CI) calculation using Program CIV3 of Hibbert is performed for the lowest 62 fine-structure levels of the singly charged chlorine ion. Our calculated energy levels agree very well with most of the NIST results and confirm the identification of the lowest 1Po as actually 3s2 3p3 (2Do)3d 1Po rather than the generally employed 3s3p5 1Po in measurements and calculations. Discrepancies in the energy positions of some symmetries are found and discussed. Some large oscillator strengths for allowed and intercombination transitions in both length and velocity gauges are presented. Their close agreement gives credence to the accuracy of our CI wavefunctions.

  12. A simulation for gravity fine structure recovery from low-low GRAVSAT SST data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.; Lancaster, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Covariance error analysis techniques were applied to investigate estimation strategies for the low-low SST mission for accurate local recovery of gravitational fine structure, considering the aliasing effects of unsolved for parameters. A 5 degree by 5 degree surface density block representation of the high order geopotential was utilized with the drag-free low-low GRAVSAT configuration in a circular polar orbit at 250 km altitude. Recovery of local sets of density blocks from long data arcs was found not to be feasible due to strong aliasing effects. The error analysis for the recovery of local sets of density blocks using independent short data arcs demonstrated that the estimation strategy of simultaneously estimating a local set of blocks covered by data and two "buffer layers" of blocks not covered by data greatly reduced aliasing errors.

  13. [Histochemical findings of and fine structural changes in motor endplates in diseases with neuromuscular transmission abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Toshiro; Motomura, Masakatsu; Tsujihata, Mitsuhiro

    2011-07-01

    We herein review the histochemical findings and fine structural changes of motor endplates associated with diseases causing neuromuscular transmission abnormalities. In anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody-positive myasthenia gravis (MG), type 2 fiber atrophy is observed, and the motor endplates show a reduction in the nerve terminal area, simplification of the postsynaptic membrane, decreased number of acetylcholine receptors, and deposition of immune complexes. In anti-MuSK antibody-positive MG, the fine structure shows a decrease in the postsynaptic membrane length, but the secondary synaptic cleft is preserved. There is no decrease in the number of AChRs, and there are no deposits of immune complexes at the motor endplates. Patients with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome show type 2 fiber atrophy, their motor endplates show a decrease in both the mean postsynaptic area and postsynaptic membrane length in the brachial biceps muscle. Congenital myasthenic syndrome with episodic apnea is characterized only by small-sized synaptic vesicles; the postsynaptic area is preserved. In subjects with congenital myasthenic syndrome with acetylcholinesterase deficiency, quantitative electron microscopy reveals a significant decrease in the nerve terminal size and presynaptic membrane length; further, the Schwann cell processes extend into the primary synaptic cleft, and partially or completely occlude the presynaptic membrane. The postsynaptic folds are degenerated, and associated with pinocytotic vesicles and labyrinthine membranous networks. Patients with slow-channel congenital myasthenia syndrome show type 1 fiber predominance, and their junctional folds are typically degenerated with widened synaptic space and loss of AChRs. Patients with AChR deficiency syndrome caused by recessive mutations in AChR subunits also show type 1 fiber predominance, and while most junctional folds are normal, some are simplified and have smaller than normal endplates. Rapsin and Mu

  14. Comparison of Fine Structures of Electron Cyclotron Harmonic Emissions in Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labelle, J. W.; Dundek, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent discoveries of emissions at four and five times the electron cyclotron frequency in aurora occuring under daylit conditions motivated the modification of radio receivers at South Pole Station, Antarctica, to measure fine structure of such emissions during two consecutive austral summers, 2013-4 and 2014-5. The experiment recorded 347 emission events over 376 days of observation. The seasonal distribution of these events revealed that successively higher harmonics require higher solar zenith angles for occurrence, as expected if they are generated at locations where the upper hybrid frequency matches the cyclotron harmonic, which for higher harmonics requires higher electron densities which are associated with higher solar zenith angles. Detailed examination of 21 cases in which two harmonics occur simultaneously showed that only rarely, about ten percent of the time, are the frequencies of the fine structures of the emissions in exact integer ratio (e.g., 3:2, 4:3, or 5:4 depending on which combination of harmonics is observed). In the remaining approximately ninety percent of the cases, the higher harmonic occurred at a lower ratio than the appropriate integer ratio, as expected if the harmonics are generated independently at their separate matching conditions in the bottomside ionosphere, where the upper hybrid frequency increases with altitude while the gyroharmonics decrease with altitude. (The bottomside is the most likely source of the emissions, since from there the mode converted Z-modes have access to ground-level.) Taken together, these results suggest that the dominant mechanism for the higher harmonics is independent generation at locations where the upper hybrid frequency matches each harmonic, i.e., at a separate source altitude for each harmonic. Generation of higher harmonics through coalescence of lower harmonic waves explains at most a small minority of events.

  15. Comparison of fine structures of electron cyclotron harmonic emissions in aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBelle, J.; Dundek, M.

    2015-10-01

    Recent discoveries of higher harmonic cyclotron emissions in aurora occurring under daylight conditions motivated the modification of radio receivers at South Pole Station, Antarctica, to measure fine structure of such emissions during two consecutive austral summers, 2013-2014 and 2014-2015. The experiment recorded 347 emission events over 376 days of observation. The seasonal distribution of these events reveals that successively higher harmonics require higher solar zenith angles for occurrence, as expected if they are generated at the matching condition fuh = Nfce, which for higher N requires higher electron densities which are associated with higher solar zenith angles. This result implies that generation of higher harmonics from lower harmonics via wave-wave processes explains only a minority of events. Detailed examination of 21 cases in which two harmonics occur simultaneously shows that in almost all events the higher harmonic comes from higher altitudes, and only for a small fraction of events is it plausible that the frequencies of the fine structures of the emissions are correlated and in exact integer ratio. This observation puts an upper bound of 15-20% on the fraction of emissions which can be explained by wave-wave interactions involving Z mode waves at fce and, combined with consideration of source altitudes, puts an upper bound of 75% on the fraction explained by coalescence of Z mode waves at 2fce. Taken together, these results suggest that the dominant mechanism for the higher harmonics is independent generation at the matching points fuh = Nfce and that the wave-wave interaction mechanisms explain a relatively small fraction of events.

  16. Production of fine structures in type III solar radio bursts due to turbulent density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Cairns, Iver H.; Li, Bo

    2014-07-20

    Magnetic reconnection events in the corona release energetic electron beams along open field lines, and the beams generate radio emission at multiples of the electron plasma frequency f{sub p} to produce type III solar radio bursts. Type III bursts often exhibit irregularities in the form of flux modulations with frequency and/or local temporal advances and delays, and a type IIIb burst represents the extreme case where a type III burst is fragmented into a chain of narrowband features called striae. Remote and in situ spacecraft measurements have shown that density turbulence is ubiquitous in the corona and solar wind, and often exhibits a Kolmogorov power spectrum. In this work, we numerically investigate the effects of one-dimensional macroscopic density turbulence (along the beam direction) on the behavior of type III bursts, and find that this turbulence produces stria-like fine structures in the dynamic spectra of both f{sub p} and 2 f{sub p} radiation. Spectral and temporal fine structures in the predicted type III emission are produced by variations in the scattering path lengths and group speeds of radio emission, and in the locations and sizes of emitting volumes. Moderate turbulence levels yield flux enhancements with much broader half-power bandwidths in f{sub p} than 2 f{sub p} emission, possibly explaining the often observed type IIIb-III harmonic pairs as being where intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation are not resolved observationally. Larger turbulence levels producing trough-peak regions in the plasma density profile may lead to broader, resolvable intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation, which may account for the type IIIb-IIIb pairs that are sometimes observed.

  17. The importance of source positions during solar radio fine structures observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, Gennady; Tan, Baolin; Fomichev, Valery; Tan, Chengming; Yan, Yihua; Fu, Qijun

    The measurement of positions and sizes of radio sources in the observations of the fine structure of solar radio bursts is a determining factor for the selection of the radio emission mechanism. The identical parameters of the radio sources for zebra- structure and fiber bursts will testify about the united mechanism for both structures. We demonstrated several events with radio fine structures in which the positional observations could be a determining factor for the selection of the radio emission mechanism. It is very important to determine the size of source in the corona: distributed along the height or point-like. In both models of zebra- structure (on the double plasma resonance (DPR) and with the whistlers) the source must be distributed along the height, but in contrast to the stationary source in the DPR model, in the model with whistlers the source should be moving. Moreover, the direction of the space drift of radio source must correlate with the frequency drift of stripes in the dynamic spectrum. Some models of zebra- structure require the local source, for example, the models based on the Bernstein modes, or on the explosive instability. The selection of the radio emission mechanism for fast broadband pulsations of millisecond duration depends also on the parameters of their radio sources. Now, we hope on the progress of the solar radio spectral imaging observations. The Chinese spectral radioheliograph (CSRH) is a new generation solar radio telescope which will be the largest and most advanced radio imaging telescope for solar corona in the world. It can provide true imaging spectroscope with high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolutions, covering decimeter and centimeter

  18. Fine Structure of Tibetan Kefir Grains and Their Yeast Distribution, Diversity, and Shift

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Man; Wang, Xingxing; Sun, Guowei; Qin, Bing; Xiao, Jinzhou; Yan, Shuling; Pan, Yingjie; Wang, Yongjie

    2014-01-01

    Tibetan kefir grains (TKGs), a kind of natural starter for fermented milk in Tibet, China, host various microorganisms of lactic acid bacteria, yeasts, and occasionally acetic acid bacteria in a polysaccharide/protein matrix. In the present study, the fine structure of TKGs was studied to shed light on this unusual symbiosis with stereomicroscopy and thin sections. The results reveal that TKGs consist of numerous small grain units, which are characterized by a hollow globular structure with a diameter between 2.0 and 9.0 mm and a wall thickness of approximately 200 µm. A polyhedron-like net structure, formed mainly by the bacteria, was observed in the wall of the grain units, which has not been reported previously to our knowledge. Towards the inside of the grain unit, the polyhedron-like net structures became gradually larger in diameter and fewer in number. Such fine structures may play a crucial role in the stability of the grains. Subsequently, the distribution, diversity, and shift of yeasts in TKGs were investigated based on thin section, scanning electron microscopy, cloning and sequencing of D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene, real-time quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization with specific fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These show that (i) yeasts appear to localize on the outer surface of the grains and grow normally together to form colonies embedded in the bacterial community; (ii) the diversity of yeasts is relatively low on genus level with three dominant species – Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica; (iii) S. cerevisiae is the stable predominant yeast species, while the composition of Kluyveromyces and Yarrowia are subject to change over time. Our results indicate that TKGs are relatively stable in structure, and culture conditions to some extent shape the microbial community and interaction in kefir grains. These findings pave the way for further study of the specific symbiotic associations between S

  19. Experimental investigation of the hyperfine spectra of Pr I-lines: discovery of new fine structure energy levels of Pr I using LIF spectroscopy with medium angular momentum quantum number between 7/2 and 13/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Imran; Khan, Shamim; Windholz, Laurentius

    2016-03-01

    We present 39 even and 60 odd parity newly discovered fine structure levels of Pr I with angular momentum quantum numbers J = 7 / 2, 9/2, 11/2 and 13/2. Spectral lines in the wavelength range of 4200 Å to 7500 Å were investigated experimentally using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy or optogalvanic spectroscopy. Free Pr atoms were produced in a hollow cathode discharge. A high resolution Fourier transform spectrum of Pr was used to extract excitation wavelengths. From an analysis of the recorded hyperfine patterns, together with excitation and fluorescence wavelengths, we were able to find the unknown levels involved in the formation of the investigated lines. More than 500 spectral lines could be classified by the new levels. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-60485-2

  20. Detection of bright trion states using the fine structure emission of single CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Fernée, Mark J; Littleton, Bradley N; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2009-11-24

    We report direct observation of the lowest two states of the band-edge exciton fine structure in the photoluminescence from single CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals at cryogenic temperatures. The temperature dependence of this spectral fingerprint reveals exciton spin relaxation rates as low as 10 micros(-1). The fine structure is also dependent on the nanocrystal charge state facilitating the identification of a bright negatively charged trion state with a quantum yield comparable to that of neutral emission. PMID:19835398

  1. Fine Structure of the Gamow-Teller Resonance in {sup 90}Nb and Level Density of 1{sup +} States

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V.Yu.; Richter, A.; Shevchenko, A.; Wambach, J.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Berg, G.P.A.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Kamiya, J.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Fujita, H.; Smit, F.D.

    2006-01-13

    The fine structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance in a medium-heavy nucleus is observed for the first time in a high-resolution {sup 90}Zr({sup 3}He,t){sup 90}Nb experiment at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka. Using a novel wavelet analysis technique, it is possible to extract characteristic energy scales and to quantify their relative importance for the generation of the fine structure. This method combined with the selectivity of the reaction permits an extraction of the level density of 1{sup +} states in {sup 90}Nb.

  2. Manifestation of Quasilinear Diffusion on Whistlers in the Fine-Structure Radio Sources of Solar Radio Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, G.P.

    2005-04-15

    The zebra structure and fiber bursts in the dynamic spectra of the solar type IV radio burst recorded on October 25, 1994, are analyzed using observational data from ground-based stations and Earth-orbiting satellites. The fine structure is observed when new hot magnetic loops, in which high- and low-frequency plasma instabilities develop, ascend to the solar corona. The frequency range of the fine structure is determined by the dimensions of these loops. The main features of the zebra structure are analyzed in terms of the interaction of plasma waves with whistlers. The results obtained are compared to the predictions from the double plasma resonance model.

  3. Distorted Tonotopic Coding of Temporal Envelope and Fine Structure with Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sushrut

    2016-01-01

    People with cochlear hearing loss have substantial difficulty understanding speech in real-world listening environments (e.g., restaurants), even with amplification from a modern digital hearing aid. Unfortunately, a disconnect remains between human perceptual studies implicating diminished sensitivity to fast acoustic temporal fine structure (TFS) and animal studies showing minimal changes in neural coding of TFS or slower envelope (ENV) structure. Here, we used general system-identification (Wiener kernel) analyses of chinchilla auditory nerve fiber responses to Gaussian noise to reveal pronounced distortions in tonotopic coding of TFS and ENV following permanent, noise-induced hearing loss. In basal fibers with characteristic frequencies (CFs) >1.5 kHz, hearing loss introduced robust nontonotopic coding (i.e., at the wrong cochlear place) of low-frequency TFS, while ENV responses typically remained at CF. As a consequence, the highest dominant frequency of TFS coding in response to Gaussian noise was 2.4 kHz in noise-overexposed fibers compared with 4.5 kHz in control fibers. Coding of ENV also became nontonotopic in more pronounced cases of cochlear damage. In apical fibers, more classical hearing-loss effects were observed, i.e., broadened tuning without a significant shift in best frequency. Because these distortions and dissociations of TFS/ENV disrupt tonotopicity, a fundamental principle of auditory processing necessary for robust signal coding in background noise, these results have important implications for understanding communication difficulties faced by people with hearing loss. Further, hearing aids may benefit from distinct amplification strategies for apical and basal cochlear regions to address fundamentally different coding deficits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Speech-perception problems associated with noise overexposure are pervasive in today's society, even with modern digital hearing aids. Unfortunately, the underlying physiological deficits in

  4. Black hole constraints on varying fundamental constants.

    PubMed

    MacGibbon, Jane H

    2007-08-10

    We apply the generalized second law of thermodynamics and derive upper limits on the variation in the fundamental constants. The maximum variation in the electronic charge permitted for black holes accreting and emitting in the present cosmic microwave background corresponds to a variation in the fine-structure constant of Deltaalpha/alpha approximately 2 x 10(-23) per second. This value matches the variation measured by Webb et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 884 (1999); Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 091301 (2001)] using absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars and suggests the variation mechanism may be a coupling between the electron and the cosmic photon background. PMID:17930813

  5. Evidence for the distortion product frequency place as a source of distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) fine structure in humans. I. Fine structure and higher-order DPOAE as a function of the frequency ratio f2/f1.

    PubMed

    Mauermann, M; Uppenkamp, S; van Hengel, P W; Kollmeier, B

    1999-12-01

    Critical experiments were performed in order to validate the two-source hypothesis of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) generation. Measurements of the spectral fine structure of DPOAE in response to stimulation with two sinusoids have been performed with normal-hearing subjects. The dependence of fine-structure patterns on the frequency ratio f2/f1 was investigated by changing f1 or f2 only (fixed f2 or fixed f1 paradigm, respectively), and by changing both primaries at a fixed ratio and looking at different order DPOAE. When f2/f1 is varied in the fixed ratio paradigm, the patterns of 2 f1-f2 fine structure vary considerably more if plotted as a function of f2 than as a function of fDP. Different order distortion products located at the same characteristic place on the basilar membrane (BM) show similar patterns for both, the fixed-f2 and fDP paradigms. Fluctuations in DPOAE level up to 20 dB can be observed. In contrast, the results from a fixed-fDP paradigm do not show any fine structure but only an overall dependence of DP level on the frequency ratio, with a maximum for 2f1-f2 at f2/f1 close to 1.2. Similar stimulus configurations used in the experiments have also been used for computer simulations of DPOAE in a nonlinear and active model of the cochlea. Experimental results and model simulations give strong evidence for a two-source model of DPOAE generation: The first source is the initial nonlinear interaction of the primaries close to the f2 place. The second source is caused by coherent reflection from a re-emission site at the characteristic place of the distortion product frequency. The spectral fine structure of DPOAE observed in the ear canal reflects the interaction of both these sources. PMID:10615687

  6. Variation in beta-glucan fine structure, extractability, and flour slurry viscosity in oats due to genotype and environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of genotype and environment on oats on beta-glucan extractability,flour slurry viscosity, and beta-glucan polymer fine structure were tested. Certain environments had unpredictable catastrophic effects on slurry viscosity. Learning the cause of such viscosity loss should be of high priority ...

  7. Properties of the prominence magnetic field and plasma distributions as obtained from 3D whole-prominence fine structure modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Mackay, D. H.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We analyze distributions of the magnetic field strength and prominence plasma (temperature, pressure, plasma β, and mass) using the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model. Methods: The model combines a 3D magnetic field configuration of an entire prominence, obtained from non-linear force-free field simulations, with a detailed semi-empirically derived description of the prominence plasma. The plasma is located in magnetic dips in hydrostatic equilibrium and is distributed along multiple fine structures within the 3D magnetic model. Results: We show that in the modeled prominence, the variations of the magnetic field strength and its orientation are insignificant on scales comparable to the smallest dimensions of the observed prominence fine structures. We also show the ability of the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model to reveal the distribution of the prominence plasma with respect to its temperature within the prominence volume. This provides new insights into the composition of the prominence-corona transition region. We further demonstrate that the values of the plasma β are small throughout the majority of the modeled prominences when realistic photospheric magnetic flux distributions and prominence plasma parameters are assumed. While this is generally true, we also find that in the region with the deepest magnetic dips, the plasma β may increase towards unity. Finally, we show that the mass of the modeled prominence plasma is in good agreement with the mass of observed non-eruptive prominences.

  8. Log spiral of revolution highly oriented pyrolytic graphite monochromator for fluorescence x-ray absorption edge fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, D. M.; Daniel, M.; Budnick, J. I.; Rhodes, T.; Hammes, M.; Potrepka, D. M.; Sills, K.; Nelson, C.; Heald, S. M.; Brewe, D. I.

    2000-09-01

    We have constructed an x-ray monochromator based on a log spiral of revolution covered with highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Such a monochromator is used for obtaining x-ray absorption edge fine structure by the fluorescence method, and is particularly useful for measuring the fine structure of dilute element A in a concentrated matrix of element B, where B is to the left of A in the Periodic Table. Using the log spiral monochromator, we measure good Cr x-ray fine structure in an alloy of 1% Cr in a V matrix, whereas the corresponding spectrum is severely distorted by the V background if nonmonochromatized fluorescence is used. We also obtain excellent rejection of Mn fluorescence relative to Cr fluorescence in a Cr{sub 80}Mn{sub 20} alloy, and can tune the monochromator such that the entire Mn step height is significantly smaller than the Cr x-ray absorption edge fine structure oscillations for this system. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Discrimination of Speech Sounds Based upon Temporal Envelope versus Fine Structure Cues in 5- to 7-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoncini, Josiane; Serniclaes, Willy; Lorenzi, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the capacity of young children and adults with normal hearing to discriminate speech on the basis of either relatively slow (temporal envelope, E) or fast (temporal fine structure, TFS) auditory cues. Method: Vowel-consonant-vowel nonsense disyllables were processed to preserve either the E or the TFS information in 16…

  10. Fine Structure and Molecular Phylogeny of Parametopidium circumlabens (Ciliophora: Armophorea), Endocommensal of Sea Urchins.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Neto, Inácio Domingos; da Silva Paiva, Thiago; do Nascimento Borges, Bárbara; Harada, Maria Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Metopid armophoreans are ciliates commonly found in anaerobic environments worldwide; however, very little is known of their fine structure. In this study, the metopid Parametopidium circumlabens (Biggar and Wenrich 1932) Aescht, 1980, a common endocommensal of sea urchins, is investigated for the first time with emphasis on transmission electron microscopy, revealing several previously unknown elements of its morphology. Somatic dikinetids of P. circumlabens have a typical ribbon of transverse microtubules, an isolated microtubule near triplets 4 and 5 of the anterior kinetosome, plus two other microtubules between anterior and posterior kinetosomes, a short kinetodesmal striated fiber and long postciliary microtubules. In the dikinetids of the perizonal stripe, the kinetodesmal fiber is very pronounced, and there is a conspicuous microfibrillar network system associated with the kinetosomes. A new structure, shaped as a dense, roughly cylindrical mass surrounded by microtubules, is found associated with the posterior kinetosome of perizonal dikinetids. The paroral membrane is diplostichomonad and the adoral membranelles are of the "paramembranelle" type. Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood analysis of the 18S-rDNA gene unambiguously placed P. circumlabens as sister group of the cluster formed by ((Atopospira galeata, Atopospira violacea) Metopus laminarius) + Clevelandellida, corroborating its classification within the Metopida. PMID:26111546

  11. The fine structure of Langmuir waves observed upstream of the bow shock at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Strangeway, R. J.; Bolton, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    Highly structured Langmuir waves, also known as electron plasma oscillations, have been observed in the foreshock of Venus using the plasma wave experiment on the Galileo spacecraft during the gravity assist flyby on February 10, 1990. The Galileo wideband sampling system provides digital electric field waveform measurements at sampling rates up to 201,600 samples per second, much higher than any previous instrument of this type. The main Langmuir wave emission band occurs near the local electron plasma frequency, which was approximately 43 kHz. The Langmuir waves are observed to shift above and below the plasma frequency, sometimes by as much as 20 kHz. The shifts in frequency are closely correlated with the downstream distance from the tangent field line, implying that the shifts are controlled by the electron beam velocity. Considerable fine structure is also evident, with time scales as short as 0.15 milliseconds, corresponding to spatial scales of a few tens of Debye lengths. The frequency spectrum often consists of beat-type waveforms, with beat frequencies ranging from 0.2 to 7 kHz, and in a few cases, isolated wavepackets. The peak electric field strengths are approximately 1 mV/m. These field strengths are too small for strongly nonlinear processes to be important. The beat-type waveforms are suggestive of a parametric decay process.

  12. Fine Structure of the Cone of Heterodera schachtii with Emphasis on Musculature and Fenestration

    PubMed Central

    Cordero C., D. A.; Baldwin, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    Fine structure of the posterior cone of monoxenically cultured Heterodera schachtii is examined. The cone is not evident at the end of the fourth molt, but as the female matures the cone elongates, vulval lips enlarge, and cuticular patterns on the lips are modified. Body wall cuticle (BW) of the cone includes layers A and B, but C is modified or replaced by a network of fibers which correspond to the semifenestrae. Vaginal lining is continuous with the BW and terminates at the cuticular underbridge near the uterus. Vaginal musculature includes 48 dilatores vaginae (DV) as well as a sphincter vaginae (SV). The DV include a contractile and noncontractile region with abundant actin and glycogen. A distinct anal depressor muscle is present. In the cyst, only bullae, the underbridge, vagina lining, and traces of the SV muscle persist. Detailed morphology of the cone of H. schachtii provides insight into characters which, when compared with other heteroderines, will be useful in phylogenetic analysis of Heteroderinae. PMID:19283101

  13. Fine structural analysis of the neuronal inclusions of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Helen; Atherton, Joe; Cairns, Nigel J.

    2009-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) is a major component of the pathological inclusions of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy, also called FTLD with ubiquitin-positive, tau-negative inclusions (FTLD-U), and motor neuron disease (MND). TDP-43 is predominantly expressed in the nucleus and regulates gene expression and splicing. In FTLD with TDP-43 proteinopathy, neuronal inclusions present variably as cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs), dystrophic neurites (DNs), and intranuclear inclusions (NIIs), leading to a fourfold neuropathological classification correlating with genotype. There have been few fine structural studies of these inclusions. Thus, we undertook an immunoelectron microscopic study of FTLD with TDP-43 proteinopathy, including sporadic and familial cases with progranulin (GRN) mutation. TDP-43-immunoreactive inclusions comprised two components: granular and filamentous. Filament widths, expressed as mean (range) were: NCI, 9 nm (4–16 nm); DN, 10 nm (5–16 nm); NII, 18 nm (9–50 nm). Morphologically distinct inclusion components may reflect the process of TDP-43 aggregation and interaction with other proteins: determining these latter may contribute towards understanding the heterogeneous pathogenesis of FTLD with TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:18974920

  14. Plasma Resonance Surfaces in the Magnetic Field Reconnection and Radio Fine Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, Marian

    2003-02-01

    Using a 2-D MHD model, the magnetic field reconnection in the current sheet and corresponding plasma resonance lines (surfaces in 3-D), where the upper-hybrid frequency equals one of harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency, ωUH=(ωpe2+ωBe2)1/2=sωBe (ωUH, ωpe, and ωBe are the upper hybrid, electron plasma, and cyclotron frequencies, respectively, and s is the integer harmonic number) are computed. Then at selected times and positions in the magnetic reconnection the spatial and time spectra of upper hybrid frequencies along the resonance lines are calculated. These spectra are discussed from the point of view of radio fine structures as narrowband dm-spikes, zebras, and lace bursts. It is shown that not only turbulent plasma outflows, suggested in the paper by Bárta and Karlický (2001), but also perturbed zones near the reconnection slow-mode shocks can be locations of the narrowband dm-spikes (and/or continua). Sources of the lace bursts (i.e. bursts with irregular lines) can be located in the reconnection space, too. On the other hand, the zebras (bursts with regular separations of zebra lines) need to be generated out of strongly perturbed reconnection areas.

  15. Fine-structure collision strengths and line ratios for [Ne V] in infrared and optical sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, Michael; Palay, Ethan; Nahar, Sultana N.; Pradhan, Anil K.

    2013-10-01

    New collisions' strengths for the mid-infrared (mid-IR) and optical transitions in Ne V are presented. Breit-Pauli-R-Matrix calculations for electron impact excitation are carried out with fully resolved near-threshold resonances at very low energies. In particular, the fine-structure lines at 14 and 24 μm due to transitions among the ground state levels 1s22s22p3 3P0, 1, 2, and the optical/near-ultraviolet lines at 2973, 3346 and 3426 Å transitions among the 3P0, 1, 2, 1D2, 1S0 levels are described. Maxwellian-averaged collision strengths are tabulated for all forbidden transitions within the ground configuration. While some significant differences are found for both the far infrared and the optical transitions compared to previous results, computed line emissivity ratios are in good agreement, but change rapidly in the low temperature range Te < 10 000 K. An analysis of the 14/24 μm ratio in low-energy-density (LED) plasma conditions reveals considerable variation; the effective rate coefficient may be dominated by the very low energy behaviour rather than the Maxwellian-averaged collision strengths. Computed values suggest a possible solution to the anomalous mid-IR ratios found to be lower than theoretical limits observed from planetary nebulae and Seyfert galaxies. While such LED conditions may be present in infrared sources, they might be inconsistent with photoionization equilibrium models.

  16. Sensitivity of bilateral cochlear implant users to fine-structure and envelope interaural time differencesa

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Victor A.; Eddington, Donald K.

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant users have poor sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITDs) of high-rate pulse trains, which precludes use of these stimuli to convey fine-structure ITD cues. However, previous reports of single-neuron recordings in cats demonstrated good ITD sensitivity to 1000 pulses-per-second (pps) pulses when the pulses were sinusoidally amplitude modulated. The ability of modulation to restore ITD sensitivity to high-rate pulses in humans was tested by measuring ITD thresholds for three conditions: ITD encoded in the modulated carrier pulses alone, in the envelope alone, and in the whole waveform. Five of six subjects were not sensitive to ITD in the 1000-pps carrier, even with modulation. One subject's 1000-pps carrier ITD sensitivity did significantly improve due to modulation. Sensitivity to ITD encoded in the envelope was also measured as a function of modulation frequency, including at frequencies from 4 to 16 Hz where much of the speech envelope's energy and information resides. Sensitivity was best at the modulation frequency of 100 Hz and degraded rapidly outside of a narrow range. These results provide little evidence to support encoding ITD in the carrier of current bilateral processors, and suggest envelope ITD sensitivity is poor for an important segment of the speech modulation spectrum. PMID:23556598

  17. A comparative fine structural and phylogenetic analysis of resting cysts in oligotrich and hypotrich Spirotrichea (Ciliophora)

    PubMed Central

    Foissner, Wilhelm; Müller, Helga; Agatha, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    So far, neither morphology nor gene sequences have provided a reliable classification of halteriid and hypotrichid spirotrichs. Thus, we performed a comparative study on the fine structure of the resting cysts in some representative species, viz., the oligotrichs Halteria grandinella and Pelagostrombidium fallax and the oxytrichid hypotrichs Laurentiella strenua, Steinia sphagnicola, and Oxytricha granulifera. Main results include: (i) there are three different, very likely non-homologous cyst surface ornamentations, viz., spines (generated by the ectocyst), thorns (generated by the mesocyst), and lepidosomes (produced in the cytoplasm); (ii) Halteria has a perilemma; (iii) Halteria, Meseres and Pelagostrombidium have fibrous lepidosomes, while those of Oxytricha are tubular; (iv) the cyst wall structure of Pelagostrombidium and Strombidium is distinctly different from that of halteriids and oxytrichids, which are rather similar in this respect; (v) cyst ornamentation does not provide a reliable phylogenetic signal in oxytrichid hypotrichs because ectocyst spines occur in both flexible and rigid genera. The new observations and literature data were used to investigate the phylogeny of the core Spirotrichea. The Hennigian argumentation scheme and computer algorithms showed that the spirotrichs are bound together by the macronuclear reorganization band, the subepiplasmic microtubule basket, and the apokinetal stomatogenesis. The Hypotrichida and Oligotrichida are united by a very strong synapomorphy, viz., the perilemma, not found in any other member of the phylum. Halteriid and oligotrichid spirotrichs form a sister group supported by as many as 13 apomorphies. Thus, the molecular data, which classify the halteriids within the core hypotrichs, need to be reconsidered. PMID:17766095

  18. DISCOVERY OF FINELY STRUCTURED DYNAMIC SOLAR CORONA OBSERVED IN THE Hi-C TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Savage, Sabrina; Alexander, Caroline; Golub, Leon; DeLuca, Edward; Schuler, Timothy

    2014-05-20

    In the Summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew on board a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e., have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70% of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  19. Fine structure of the topological defect core: Disclination in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuang; Shiyanovskii, Sergij; Park, Heung-Shik; Kim, Young-Ki; Hearn, Tristan; Reichel, Lothar; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    Topological defects represent an important concept in many branches of modern physics ranging from cosmology and optics to hard and soft matter. One of the most difficult problems is the fine structure of the so-called core region of defects, where the deformations of the order parameter are so strong that the phenomenological description valid in the far field becomes invalid. Experimental exploration of the fine core structure is usually hindered by the small size (atomic/molecular level) of the core, where optical or even electron microscopy techniques are invalid. In this work, we take advantage of the peculiar nature of the so-called lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLC) of a nematic type that carry disclinations with a core extending over macroscopic distances (tens of micrometers), large enough to explore their spatial variation by optical and electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the director and the scalar order parameter (associated with the degree of orientational order) show a profound change in the core region. In particular, as one approaches the center of the defect, the azimuthal dependency of the director field changes dramatically and the scalar order parameter shows a strong dependence on the strength of splay and bend deformations. This work is supported by NSF Grant DMS-1434185.

  20. Fine structure of the entanglement entropy in the O(2) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Yuzhi; Zou, Haiyuan; Xie, Z. Y.; Meurice, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We compare two calculations of the particle density in the superfluid phase of the O(2) model with a chemical potential μ in 1+1 dimensions. The first relies on exact blocking formulas from the Tensor Renormalization Group (TRG) formulation of the transfer matrix. The second is a worm algorithm. We show that the particle number distributions obtained with the two methods agree well. We use the TRG method to calculate the thermal entropy and the entanglement entropy. We describe the particle density, the two entropies and the topology of the world lines as we increase μ to go across the superfluid phase between the first two Mott insulating phases. For a sufficiently large temporal size, this process reveals an interesting fine structure: the average particle number and the winding number of most of the world lines in the Euclidean time direction increase by one unit at a time. At each step, the thermal entropy develops a peak and the entanglement entropy increases until we reach half-filling and then decreases in a way that approximately mirrors the ascent. This suggests an approximate fermionic picture.

  1. Observation of excitonic fine structure in a 2D transition-metal dichalcogenide semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jingzhi; Shen, Xiaonan; Cong, Chunxiao; Peimyoo, Namphung; Cao, Bingchen; Eginligil, Mustafa; Yu, Ting

    2015-01-27

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors, such as transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers (TMD 1Ls), have attracted increasing attention owing to the underlying fundamental physics (e.g., many body effects) and the promising optoelectronic applications such as light-emitting diodes. Though much progress has been made, intrinsic excitonic states of TMD 1Ls are still highly debated in theory, which thirsts for direct experimental determination. Here, we report unconventional emission and excitonic fine structure in 1L WS2 revealed by electrical doping and photoexcitation, which reflects the interplay of exciton, trion, and other excitonic states. Tunable excitonic emission has been realized in a controllable manner via electrical and/or optical injection of charge carriers. Remarkably enough, the superlinear (i.e., quadratic) emission is unambiguously observed which is attributed to biexciton states, indicating the strong Coulomb interactions in such a 2D material. In a nearly neutral 1L WS2, trions and biexcitons possess large binding energies of ∼ 10-15 and 45 meV, respectively. Moreover, our finding of electrically induced robust emission opens up a possibility to boost the luminous efficiency of emerging 1L TMD light emitting diodes. PMID:25560634

  2. Discovery of Finely Structured Dynamic Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e. have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70 percent of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  3. Scattering pulse of label free fine structure cells to determine the size scale of scattering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Kaixing; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Scattering pulse is sensitive to the morphology and components of each single label-free cell. The most direct detection result, label free cell's scattering pulse is studied in this paper as a novel trait to recognize large malignant cells from small normal cells. A set of intrinsic scattering pulse calculation method is figured out, which combines both hydraulic focusing theory and small particle's scattering principle. Based on the scattering detection angle ranges of widely used flow cytometry, the scattering pulses formed by cell scattering energy in forward scattering angle 2°-5° and side scattering angle 80°-110° are discussed. Combining the analysis of cell's illuminating light energy, the peak, area, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of label free cells' scattering pulses for fine structure cells with diameter 1-20 μm are studied to extract the interrelations of scattering pulse's features and cell's morphology. The theoretical and experimental results show that cell's diameter and FWHM of its scattering pulse agree with approximate linear distribution; the peak and area of scattering pulse do not always increase with cell's diameter becoming larger, but when cell's diameter is less than about 16 μm the monotone increasing relation of scattering pulse peak or area with cell's diameter can be obtained. This relationship between the features of scattering pulse and cell's size is potentially a useful but very simple criterion to distinguishing malignant and normal cells by their sizes and morphologies in label free cells clinical examinations.

  4. Sensitivity to temporal fine structure and hearing-aid outcomes in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elvira; McCormack, Abby; Edmonds, Barrie A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) on subjective measures of hearing aid outcome. Design: Prior to receiving hearing aids, participants completed a test to assess sensitivity to TFS and two self-assessment questionnaires; the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile (GHABP), and the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of hearing (SSQ-A). Follow-up appointments, comprised three self-assessment questionnaires; the GHABP, the SSQ-B, and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aid Outcomes (IOI-HA). Study sample: 75 adults were recruited from direct referral clinics. Results: Two thirds of participants were found to have good sensitivity to TFS; listeners with good sensitivity to TFS rated their hearing abilities higher at pre-fitting (SSQ-A) than those with poor sensitivity to TFS. At follow-up, participants with good sensitivity to TFS showed a smaller improvement on SSQ-B over listeners with poor sensitivity to TFS. Among the questionnaires, only the SSQ showed greater sensitivity to measure subjective differences between listeners with good and poor sensitivity to TFS. Conclusions: The clinical identification of a patient's ability to process TFS information at an early stage in the treatment pathway could prove useful in managing expectations about hearing aid outcomes. PMID:24550769

  5. Peculiarities of the fine structure of the 11-year cyclicity of solar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Voichishin, K.S.

    1981-01-01

    Substantiation is given for the concept of cyclicity, at the basis of which lie such characteristic features of heliophysical time series as stochasticity, discontinuity, and stability of the shape of the cycles. A conceptual and formal apparatus is developed for the description and analysis of cyclic oscillations. A simple model of cyclicity with disturbances of the phase structure and without them is analyzed on a heuristic level of rigor. The results of an investigation of the monthly fluctuations of Wolf numbers obtained within the framework of this model are presented. A connection between the quasideterminate amplitude component of the monthly fluctuations of Wolf numbers in the range of periods of from 2 to 15 months and the 11-year component is confirmed. It is shown that the fine structure of the 11-year averaged cycle of monthly average Wolf numbers is determined mainly by the almost-yearly quasideterminate component. The possibility of discontinuity (from cycle to cycle) in the quasi-determinate component of the above-mentioned fluctuations is pointed out.

  6. Fine Structure ENA Sources Beyond the Termination Shock: Observational Constraints and Detection Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demajistre, R.; Janzen, P. H.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N.

    2015-12-01

    High spatial resolution maps from the IBEX mission (McComas et al, Science, 2009) suggest the presence of "fine structure" in the signal from beyond the termination shock. That is, areas of enhanced ENA emission that span less than a degree in the IBEX sky map. If confirmed, this would suggest very concentrated areas of emission from sources with scales of a few AU embedded in the outer heliosphere (or proportionally larger if they are located beyond the heliopause). This, in turn, would require the presence of unanticipated structures (plasma or neutral) beyond the termination shock for which the physics is poorly defined. It is therefore crucial to confirm the presence of these structures through careful analysis, or to establish the detection limits if the data taken to date is not sufficient for such a confirmation. In this work, we use 5 years worth of IBEX data to examine the statistical significance of these enhancements. We examine correlations in time, ENA energy and coincidence type for evidence of these small-scale spatial structures. Then, using the known spatial response of the IBEX instrument, establish the conditions under which such structure, if present, would be detectable. This detection threshold analysis is fully applicable future measurements, such as those planned for IMAP.

  7. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J; Sęk, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008) suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated hearing aid was fitted individually using the CAM2A method. On each trial, a given segment of speech or music was presented twice. One segment was processed with fast compression and the other with slow compression, and the order was balanced across trials. The subject indicated which segment was preferred and by how much. On average, slow compression was preferred over fast compression, more so for music, but there were distinct individual differences, which were highly correlated for speech and music. Sensitivity to TFS was assessed using the difference limen for frequency at 2000 Hz and by two measures of sensitivity to interaural phase at low frequencies. The results for the difference limens for frequency, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, supported the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS. PMID:27604778

  8. Fine structure of the entanglement entropy in the O(2) model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Yuzhi; Zou, Haiyuan; Xie, Z Y; Meurice, Y

    2016-01-01

    We compare two calculations of the particle density in the superfluid phase of the O(2) model with a chemical potential μ in 1+1 dimensions. The first relies on exact blocking formulas from the Tensor Renormalization Group (TRG) formulation of the transfer matrix. The second is a worm algorithm. We show that the particle number distributions obtained with the two methods agree well. We use the TRG method to calculate the thermal entropy and the entanglement entropy. We describe the particle density, the two entropies and the topology of the world lines as we increase μ to go across the superfluid phase between the first two Mott insulating phases. For a sufficiently large temporal size, this process reveals an interesting fine structure: the average particle number and the winding number of most of the world lines in the Euclidean time direction increase by one unit at a time. At each step, the thermal entropy develops a peak and the entanglement entropy increases until we reach half-filling and then decreases in a way that approximately mirrors the ascent. This suggests an approximate fermionic picture. PMID:26871055

  9. Luminescence and fine structure correlation in ZnO permeated porous silicon nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Gallach, D; Muñoz-Noval, A; Torres-Costa, V; Manso-Silván, M

    2015-08-28

    Nanocomposites formed by porous silicon (PS) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have potential for applications in optoelectronic devices. However, understanding the distribution of both materials in the nanocomposite, and especially the fine structure of the synthesized ZnO crystals, is key for future device fabrication. This study focuses on the advanced characterization of a range of PS-ZnO nanocomposites by using photon- and ion-based techniques, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and elastic backscattering spectroscopy (EBS), respectively. PS substrates formed by the electrochemical etching of p(+)-type Si are used as host material for the sol-gel nucleation of ZnO nanoparticles. Different properties are induced by annealing in air at temperatures ranging from 200 °C to 800 °C. Results show that wurtzite ZnO nanoparticles form only at temperatures above 200 °C, coexisting with Si quantum dots (QDs) inside a PS matrix. Increasing the annealing temperature leads to structural and distribution changes that affect the electronic and local structure of the samples changing their luminescence. Temperatures around 800 °C activate the formation of a new zinc silicate phase and transform PS into an amorphous silicon oxide (SiOx, x≈ 2) matrix with a noticeably reduced presence of Si QDs. Thus, these changes affect dramatically the emission from these nanocomposites and their potential applications. PMID:26202423

  10. Fine structural analysis of the neuronal inclusions of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Julian R; Tang, Helen; Atherton, Joe; Cairns, Nigel J

    2008-12-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) is a major component of the pathological inclusions of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy, also called FTLD with ubiquitin-positive, tau-negative inclusions (FTLD-U), and motor neuron disease (MND). TDP-43 is predominantly expressed in the nucleus and regulates gene expression and splicing. In FTLD with TDP-43 proteinopathy, neuronal inclusions present variably as cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs), dystrophic neurites (DNs), and intranuclear inclusions (NIIs), leading to a fourfold neuropathological classification correlating with genotype. There have been few fine structural studies of these inclusions. Thus, we undertook an immunoelectron microscopic study of FTLD with TDP-43 proteinopathy, including sporadic and familial cases with progranulin (GRN) mutation. TDP-43-immunoreactive inclusions comprised two components: granular and filamentous. Filament widths, expressed as mean (range) were: NCI, 9 nm (4-16 nm); DN, 10 nm (5-16 nm); NII, 18 nm (9-50 nm). Morphologically distinct inclusion components may reflect the process of TDP-43 aggregation and interaction with other proteins: determining these latter may contribute towards understanding the heterogeneous pathogenesis of FTLD with TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:18974920

  11. Influence of dense quantum plasmas on fine-structure splitting of Lyman doublets of hydrogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    De, Madhab Ray, Debasis

    2015-05-15

    Relativistic calculations are performed to study the effects of oscillatory quantum plasma screening on the fine-structure splitting between the components of Lyman-α and β line doublets of atomic hydrogen and hydrgen-like argon ion within dense quantum plasmas, where the effective two-body (electron–nucleus) interaction is modeled by the Shukla–Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential. The numerical solutions of the radial Dirac equation for the quantum plasma-embedded atomic systems reveal that the oscillatory quantum screening effect suppresses the doublet (energy) splitting substantially and the suppression becomes more prominent at large quantum wave number k{sub q}. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, much larger amount of suppression is noticed at larger values of k{sub q}, and the corresponding results represent the screening effect of an exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction. The Z{sup 4} scaling of the Lyman doublet splitting in low-Z hydrogen isoelectronic series of ions in free space is violated in dense quantum plasma environments. The relativistic data for the doublet splitting in the zero screening (k{sub q} = 0) case are in very good agreement with the NIST reference data, with slight discrepancies (∼0.2%) arising from the neglect of the quantum electrodynamic effects.

  12. Visual Tracking via Coarse and Fine Structural Local Sparse Appearance Models.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xu; Lu, Huchuan; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2016-10-01

    Sparse representation has been successfully applied to visual tracking by finding the best candidate with a minimal reconstruction error using target templates. However, most sparse representation-based tracking methods only consider holistic rather than local appearance to discriminate between target and background regions, and hence may not perform well when target objects are heavily occluded. In this paper, we develop a simple yet robust tracking algorithm based on a coarse and fine structural local sparse appearance model. The proposed method exploits both partial and structural information of a target object based on sparse coding using the dictionary composed of patches from multiple target templates. The likelihood obtained by averaging and pooling operations exploits consistent appearance of object parts, thereby helping not only locate targets accurately but also handle partial occlusion. To update templates more accurately without introducing occluding regions, we introduce an occlusion detection scheme to account for pixels belonging to the target objects. The proposed method is evaluated on a large benchmark data set with three evaluation metrics. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed tracking algorithm performs favorably against several state-of-the-art methods. PMID:27448350

  13. Properties and Modeling of Unresolved Fine Structure Loops Observed in the Solar Transition Region by IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David H.; Reep, Jeffrey W.; Warren, Harry P.

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have discovered a new class of numerous low-lying dynamic loop structures, and it has been argued that they are the long-postulated unresolved fine structures (UFSs) that dominate the emission of the solar transition region. In this letter, we combine IRIS measurements of the properties of a sample of 108 UFSs (intensities, lengths, widths, lifetimes) with one-dimensional non-equilibrium ionization simulations, using the HYDRAD hydrodynamic model to examine whether the UFSs are now truly spatially resolved in the sense of being individual structures rather than being composed of multiple magnetic threads. We find that a simulation of an impulsively heated single strand can reproduce most of the observed properties, suggesting that the UFSs may be resolved, and the distribution of UFS widths implies that they are structured on a spatial scale of 133 km on average. Spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers appear to be typical for a range of chromospheric and coronal structures, and we conjecture that this could be an important clue for understanding the coronal heating process.

  14. Titanium local structure in tektite probed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Yoshiasa, Akira; Okube, Maki; Takeda, Takashi

    2011-11-01

    The local structure of titanium in tektites from six strewn fields was studied by Ti K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) in order to provide quantitative data on Ti-O distance and Ti coordination number. The titanium in tektites possessed different coordination environment types. XANES spectra patterns revealed resemblance to high-temperature TiO(2)-SiO(2) glass and TiO(2) anatase. All samples showed that the valence of Ti is 4+. Based on the Ti-O distances, coordination numbers and radial distribution function determined by EXAFS analyses, the tektites were classified into three types: type I, Ti occupies a four-coordinated tetrahedral site with Ti-O distances of 1.84-1.79 Å; type II, Ti occupies a five-coordinated trigonal bipyramidal or tetragonal pyramidal site with Ti-O distances of 1.92-1.89 Å; type III, Ti occupies a six-coordinated octahedral site with Ti-O distances of 2.00-1.96 Å. Although Ti occupies the TiO(6) octahedral site in most titanium minerals under ambient conditions, some tektites have four- and five-coordinated Ti. This study indicated that the local structure of Ti might change in impact events and the following stages. PMID:21997913

  15. Synthesis, fine structural characterization, and CO2 adsorption capacity of metal organic frameworks-74.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Abhijit Krishna; Lin, Kuen-Song

    2014-04-01

    Two metal organic frameworks of MOF-74 group (zinc and copper-based) were successfully synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for CO2 adsorption. The both samples such as MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) were characterized with FE-SEM for morphology and particle size, XRD patterns for phase structure, FTIR for organic functional groups, nitrogen adsorption for pore textural properties, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for fine structural parameters and oxidation states of central metal atoms. CO2 adsorption isotherms of MOF-74 samples were measured in a volumetric adsorption unit at 273 K and pressure up to 1.1 bar. The MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) adsorbents have the pore widths of 8.58 and 8.04 angstroms with the BET specific surface areas of 1,474 and 1,345 m2 g(-1), respectively. CO2 adsorption capacities of MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) were 4.10 and 3.38 mmol x g(-1), respectively measured at 273 K and 1.1 bar. The oxidation state of central atoms in MOF-74(Zn) was Zn(II) confirmed by XANES spectra while MOF-74(Cu) was composed of Cu(I) and Cu(II) central atoms. The bond distances of Zn--O and Cu--O were 1.98 and 1.94 angstroms, respectively. PMID:24734683

  16. Fine structure of low-energy H(+) in the nightside auroral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chao; Perez, J. D.; Moore, T. E.; Chappell, C. R.; Slavin, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Low-energy H(+) data with 6-s resolution from the retarding ion mass spectrometer instrument on Dynamics Explorer (DE) 1 have been analyzed to reveal the fine structure at middle altitudes of the nightside auroral region. A new method for deconvolving the energy-integrated count rate in the spin plane of the satellite has been used to derive the two-dimensional phase space density. A detailed analysis reveals an alternating conic-beam-conic pattern with the observed conics correlated with large earthward currents in the auroral region. The strong downward current (larger than 1 microamperes per sq m (equivalent value at ionosphere)) provides a free energy source for the perpendicular ion heating, that generates the ion conics with energies from several eV to tens of eV. The bowl shape distribution of the low-energy H(+) is caused by the extended perpendicular heating. The strong correlation between conics and large downward currents suggests that the current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron wave is an appropriate candidate for the transverse heating mechanism.

  17. He i Vector Magnetic Field Maps of a Sunspot and Its Superpenumbral Fine-Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.; Tritschler, A.

    2015-06-01

    Advanced inversions of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the He i triplet at 1083 nm are used to generate unique maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbral canopy. The observations were acquired by the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) on 29 January 2012. Multiple atmospheric models are employed in the inversions because superpenumbral Stokes profiles are dominated by atomic-level polarization, while sunspot profiles are Zeeman-dominated, but also exhibit signatures that might be induced by symmetry-breaking effects of the radiation field incident on the chromospheric material. We derive the equilibrium magnetic structure of a sunspot in the chromosphere and furthermore show that the superpenumbral magnetic field does not appear to be finely structured, unlike the observed intensity structure. This suggests that fibrils are not concentrations of magnetic flux, but are instead distinguished by individualized thermalization. We also directly compare our inverted values with a current-free extrapolation of the chromospheric field. With improved measurements in the future, the average shear angle between the inferred magnetic field and the potential field may offer a means to quantify the non-potentiality of the chromospheric magnetic field to study the onset of explosive solar phenomena.

  18. Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T.M.; Fabbri, J.D.; Lee, J.R.I.; Schreiner, P.R.; Fokin, A.A.; Tkachenko, B.A.; Fokina, N.A.; Dahl, J.E.P.; Carlson, R.M.K.; Vance, A.L.; Yang, W.; Terminello, L.J.; Buuren, T.van; Melosh, N.A.

    2009-05-26

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV, respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different degrees of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond nanoparticles.

  19. Fine structure and functional comments of mouthparts in Platypus cylindrus (Col., Curculionidae: Platypodinae).

    PubMed

    Belhoucine, Latifa; Bouhraoua, Rachid T; Prats, Eva; Pulade-Villar, Juli

    2013-02-01

    Oak pinhole borer, Platypus cylindrus is seen in recent years as one of the biggest enemies directly involved in the observed decline of cork oak in Mediterranean forests with all the economic implications. As an ambrosia beetle, it has developed its effective drilling mouthpart enough to make tunnels in hardwood of the tree. The fine structural aspects of the mouthpart using the field emission scanning electron microscopy are analyzed about 23 adults collected in galleries of infested cork oak trees (Quercus suber) in a littoral forest of northwest Algeria. These adults are preserved in alcohol 70%, cleaned and coated with gold. The mouthparts of this beetle consist commonly of a labrum, a pair of mandibles, a pair of maxillae and the labium but with adapted structure to excavate galleries in the hardwood. In this role is also involved the first pair of legs. The function that present the different structures related to the construction of the tunnels is discussed. Both of maxillary and labial palpi direct the food to the mouth and hold it while the mandibles chew the food. The distal ends of these palpi are flattened and have shovel-like setae. Females have larger maxillary palpi than males and this is related to the particular biology of each sex. PMID:23182681

  20. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Fabbri, J; Lee, J I; Schreiner, P; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J; Carlson, B; Vance, A L; Yang, W; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T; Melosh, N

    2007-11-27

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface-modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 eV and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different amounts of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond clusters.

  1. Dynamics of Femtosecond Laser Ablation Plume Studied With Ultrafast X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2010-10-08

    We investigated the dynamic process of an expanding femtosecond laser ablation plume of aluminum generated in an irradiation intensity range of 10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} with the ultrafast x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) imaging technique. The XAFS spectra of the aluminum L{sub II,III} edge of the plume revealed that the plume consists of doubly and singly charged ions, neutral atoms, liquid particles, and possible atomic clusters. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited ablation particles confirmed that the liquid particles corresponds to the spherical nanoparticles with a size ranging from several tens nanometers to approximately 200 nm. The spatiotemporal evolution of the XAFS image of the plume shows the sequential appearance of each ablation particle from aluminum surface according to its ejection velocity. The result suggests that the photomechanical fragmentation process, which was theoretically proposed, is dominant mechanism for the nanoparticle ejection under the irradiation intensity far from the ablation threshold of aluminum. This study clearly demonstrates the potential of our technique for measuring the ultrafast dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation process.

  2. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic study of uranium nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Poineau, Frederic; Yeamans, Charles B.; Cerefice, Gary S.; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Czerwinski, Ken R.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium mononitride (UN), sesquinitride (U2N3) and dinitride (UN2) were characterized by extended X-Ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Analysis on UN indicate the presence of three uranium shells at distances of 3.46(3), 4.89(5) and 6.01(6) A and a nitrogen shell at a distance of 2.46(2) A . For U2N3, two absorbing uranium atoms at different crystallographic positions are present in the structure. One of the uranium atoms is surrounded by nitrogen atoms at 2.28(2) A and by uranium atoms at 3.66(4) and 3.95(4) A . The second type of uranium atom is surrounded by nitrogen atoms at 2.33(2) and 2.64(3) A and by uranium atoms at 3.66(4), 3.95(4) and 5.31(5) A . Results on UN2 indicate two uranium shells at 3.71(4) and 5.32(5) A and two nitrogen shells at 2.28(2).

  3. Fine structure of the landers fault zone: Segmentation and the rupture process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Y.-G.; Vidale, J.E.; Aki, K.; Marone, C.J.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1994-01-01

    Observations and modeling of 3- to 6-hertz seismic shear waves trapped within the fault zone of the 1992 Landers earthquake series allow the fine structure and continuity of the zone to be evaluated. The fault, to a depth of at least 12 kilometers, is marked by a zone 100 to 200 meters wide where shear velocity is reduced by 30 to 50 percent. This zone forms a seismic waveguide that extends along the southern 30 kilometers of the Landers rupture surface and ends at the fault bend about 18 kilometers north of the main shock epicenter. Another fault plane waveguide, disconnected from the first, exists along the northern rupture surface. These observations, in conjunction with surface slip, detailed seismicity patterns, and the progression of rupture along the fault, suggest that several simple rupture planes were involved in the Landers earthquake and that the inferred rupture front hesitated or slowed at the location where the rupture jumped from one to the next plane. Reduction in rupture velocity can tentatively be attributed to fault plane complexity, and variations in moment release can be attributed to variations in available energy.

  4. The fine structure of electron irradiation induced EL2-like defects in n-GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunhuma, S. M.; Auret, F. D.; Legodi, M. J.; Diale, M.

    2016-04-01

    Defects induced by electron irradiation in n-GaAs have been studied using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and Laplace DLTS (L-DLTS). The E0.83 (EL2) is the only defect observed prior to irradiation. Ru/n-GaAs Schottky diodes were irradiated with high energy electrons from a Sr-90 radionuclide up to a fluence of 2.45 × 1013 cm-2. The prominent electron irradiation induced defects, E0.04, E0.14, E0.38, and E0.63, were observed together with the metastable E0.17. Using L-DLTS, we observed the fine structure of a broad base EL2-like defect peak. This was found to be made up of the E0.75, E0.83, and E0.85 defects. Our study reveals that high energy electron irradiation increases the concentration of the E0.83 defect and introduces a family of defects with electronic properties similar to those of the EL2.

  5. The Effects of Instrumental Elliptical Polarization on Stellar Point Spread Function Fine Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Joseph C.; Kern, Brian D.; Breckinridge, James B.; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    We present procedures and preliminary results from a study on the effects of instrumental polarization on the fine structure of the stellar point spread function (PSF). These effects are important to understand because the the aberration caused by instrumental polarization on an otherwise diffraction-limited will likely have have severe consequences for extreme high contrast imaging systems such as NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission and the proposed NASA Eclipse mission. The report here, describing our efforts to examine these effects, includes two parts: 1) a numerical analysis of the effect of metallic reflection, with some polarization-specific retardation, on a spherical wavefront; 2) an experimental approach for observing this effect, along with some preliminary laboratory results. While the experimental phase of this study requires more fine-tuning to produce meaningful results, the numerical analysis indicates that the inclusion of polarization-specific phase effects (retardation) results in a point spread function (PSF) aberration more severe than the amplitude (reflectivity) effects previously recorded in the literature.

  6. Fine structure and meiotic behaviour of the male multiple sex chromosomes in the genus Alouatta.

    PubMed

    Solari, A J; Rahn, M I

    2005-01-01

    The meiotic cytology and fine structure of the sex multiples in males from two species of the genus Alouatta are presented and compared with descriptions from other species of this genus. As shown in pachytene by synaptonemal complex analysis and in metaphase I by spreading, there is a quadrivalent in male meiosis in A. caraya, which is formed by an X(1)X(2)Y(1)Y(2) complex, while in A. palliata there is a trivalent formed by an X(1)X(2)Y(1) complex. Chromosome painting with human probes shows that A. caraya sex multiples share the same components as those of A. seniculus sara and A. seniculus arctoidea. However, as shown here for A. palliata and by others in A. fusca, there are differences among the multiples of some species. It is shown that in this genus there are several varieties of sex multiples that share some features, and that the origin of these multiples is most probably a primitive development in the genus Alouatta. PMID:15545739

  7. All-Optical dc Nanotesla Magnetometry Using Silicon Vacancy Fine Structure in Isotopically Purified Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simin, D.; Soltamov, V. A.; Poshakinskiy, A. V.; Anisimov, A. N.; Babunts, R. A.; Tolmachev, D. O.; Mokhov, E. N.; Trupke, M.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Sperlich, A.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; Astakhov, G. V.

    2016-07-01

    We uncover the fine structure of a silicon vacancy in isotopically purified silicon carbide (4H-28SiC) and reveal not yet considered terms in the spin Hamiltonian, originated from the trigonal pyramidal symmetry of this spin-3 /2 color center. These terms give rise to additional spin transitions, which would be otherwise forbidden, and lead to a level anticrossing in an external magnetic field. We observe a sharp variation of the photoluminescence intensity in the vicinity of this level anticrossing, which can be used for a purely all-optical sensing of the magnetic field. We achieve dc magnetic field sensitivity better than 100 nT /√{Hz } within a volume of 3 ×10-7m m3 at room temperature and demonstrate that this contactless method is robust at high temperatures up to at least 500 K. As our approach does not require application of radio-frequency fields, it is scalable to much larger volumes. For an optimized light-trapping waveguide of 3 mm3 , the projection noise limit is below 100 fT /√{Hz } .

  8. Small scale flux emergence, small flares, and the unresolved fine structure: modeling and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraldson Hansteen, Viggo H.

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of flux through the photosphere and into the outer solar atmosphere is known to produce dynamic events in the chromosphere and corona. In this talk we will describe three-dimensional (3d) magnetohydrodynamic simulations of magnetic flux emergence in a model that spans the convection zone and into the outer solar atmosphere with the Bifrost code. We will contrast this with models in which no flux emergence occurs. These are a ``realistic'' model, in the sense that the parameters and physical effects that control the atmosphere can be used to produce diagnostics that can be directly compared with observations. Thus we will also contrast the model predictions with with SST and IRIS observations of an emerging flux region. We discuss the evolution of the model and several synthetic observables. We discuss the model's possible relevance to the so called 'unresolved fine structure' observed in the solar transition region. Finally, we will report on developments to merge `deeper' models constructed from MURaM simulations with Bifrost models of the chromosphere and corona in flare relevant simulations.

  9. Detection of Acoustic Temporal Fine Structure by Cochlear Implant Listeners: Behavioral Results and Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Imennov, Nikita S.; Won, Jong Ho; Drennan, Ward R.; Jameyson, Elyse; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2013-01-01

    A test of within-channel detection of acoustic temporal fine structure (aTFS) cues is presented. Eight cochlear implant listeners (CI) were asked to discriminate between two Schroeder-phase (SP) complexes using a two-alternative, forced-choice task. Because differences between the acoustic stimuli are primarily constrained to their aTFS, successful discrimination reflects a combination of the subjects’ perception of and the strategy’s ability to deliver aTFS cues. Subjects were mapped with single-channel Continuous Interleaved Sampling (CIS) and Simultaneous Analog Stimulation (SAS) strategies. To compare within- and across- channel delivery of aTFS cues, a 16-channel clinical HiRes strategy was also fitted. Throughout testing, SAS consistently outperformed the CIS strategy (p ≤ 0.002). For SP stimuli with F0 =50 Hz, the highest discrimination scores were achieved with the HiRes encoding, followed by scores with the SAS and the CIS strategies, respectively. At 200 Hz, single-channel SAS performed better than HiRes (p = 0.022), demonstrating that under a more challenging testing condition, discrimination performance with a single-channel analog encoding can exceed that of a 16-channel pulsatile strategy. To better understand the intermediate steps of discrimination, a biophysical model was used to examine the neural discharges evoked by the SP stimuli. Discrimination estimates calculated from simulated neural responses successfully tracked the behavioral performance trends of single-channel CI listeners. PMID:23333260

  10. Fine structure of Langmuir waves observed upstream of the bow shock at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Strangeway, R. J.; Bolton, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    Highly structured Langmuir waves, also known as electron plasma oscillations, have been observed in the foreshock of Venus using the plasma wave experiment on the Galileo spacecraft during the gravity assist flyby on February 10, 1990. The Galileo wideband sampling system provides digital electric field waveform measurements at sampling rates up to 201,600 samples per second, much higher than any previous instrument of this type. The main Langmuir wave emission band occurs near the local electron plasma frequency, which was approximately 43 kHz. The Langmuir waves are observed to shift above and below the plasma frequency, sometimes by as much as 20 kHz. The shifts in frequency are closely correlated with the downstream distance from the tangent field line, implying that the shifts are controlled by the electron beam velocity. Considerable fine structure is also evident, with timescales as short as 0.15 ms, corresponding to spatial scales of a few tens of Debye lengths. The frequency spectrum often consists of beat-type waveforms, with beat frequencies ranging from 0.2 to 7 kHz, and in a few cases, isolated wave packets. The peak electric field strengths are approximately 1 mV/m. These field strengths are too small for strongly nonlinear processes to be important. The beat-type waveforms are suggestive of a parametric decay process.

  11. Planck intermediate results. XXIV. Constraints on variations in fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Uzan, J.-P.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-08-01

    Any variation in the fundamental physical constants, more particularly in the fine structure constant, α, or in the mass of the electron, me, affects the recombination history of the Universe and cause an imprint on the cosmic microwave background angular power spectra. We show that the Planck data allow one to improve the constraint on the time variation of the fine structure constant at redshift z ~ 103 by about a factor of 5 compared to WMAP data, as well as to break the degeneracy with the Hubble constant, H0. In addition to α, we can set a constraint on the variation in the mass of the electron, me, and in the simultaneous variation of the two constants. We examine in detail the degeneracies between fundamental constants and the cosmological parameters, in order to compare the limits obtained from Planck and WMAP and to determine the constraining power gained by including other cosmological probes. We conclude that independent time variations of the fine structure constant and of the mass of the electron are constrained by Planck to Δα/α = (3.6 ± 3.7) × 10-3 and Δme/me = (4 ± 11) × 10-3 at the 68% confidence level. We also investigate the possibility of a spatial variation of the fine structure constant. The relative amplitude of a dipolar spatial variation in α (corresponding to a gradient across our Hubble volume) is constrained to be δα/α = (-2.4 ± 3.7) × 10-2. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. The contribution of visual information to the perception of speech in noise with and without informative temporal fine structure.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Paula C; Kitterick, Pádraig T; Morris, Saffron D; Sumner, Christian J

    2016-06-01

    Understanding what is said in demanding listening situations is assisted greatly by looking at the face of a talker. Previous studies have observed that normal-hearing listeners can benefit from this visual information when a talker's voice is presented in background noise. These benefits have also been observed in quiet listening conditions in cochlear-implant users, whose device does not convey the informative temporal fine structure cues in speech, and when normal-hearing individuals listen to speech processed to remove these informative temporal fine structure cues. The current study (1) characterised the benefits of visual information when listening in background noise; and (2) used sine-wave vocoding to compare the size of the visual benefit when speech is presented with or without informative temporal fine structure. The accuracy with which normal-hearing individuals reported words in spoken sentences was assessed across three experiments. The availability of visual information and informative temporal fine structure cues was varied within and across the experiments. The results showed that visual benefit was observed using open- and closed-set tests of speech perception. The size of the benefit increased when informative temporal fine structure cues were removed. This finding suggests that visual information may play an important role in the ability of cochlear-implant users to understand speech in many everyday situations. Models of audio-visual integration were able to account for the additional benefit of visual information when speech was degraded and suggested that auditory and visual information was being integrated in a similar way in all conditions. The modelling results were consistent with the notion that audio-visual benefit is derived from the optimal combination of auditory and visual sensory cues. PMID:27085797

  13. How fundamental are fundamental constants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    I argue that the laws of physics should be independent of one's choice of units or measuring apparatus. This is the case if they are framed in terms of dimensionless numbers such as the fine structure constant, ?. For example, the standard model of particle physics has 19 such dimensionless parameters whose values all observers can agree on, irrespective of what clock, rulers or scales? they use to measure them. Dimensional constants, on the other hand, such as ?, c, G, e and k ?, are merely human constructs whose number and values differ from one choice of units to the next. In this sense, only dimensionless constants are 'fundamental'. Similarly, the possible time variation of dimensionless fundamental 'constants' of nature is operationally well defined and a legitimate subject of physical enquiry. By contrast, the time variation of dimensional constants such as ? or ? on which a good many (in my opinion, confusing) papers have been written, is a unit-dependent phenomenon on which different observers might disagree depending on their apparatus. All these confusions disappear if one asks only unit-independent questions. We provide a selection of opposing opinions in the literature and respond accordingly.

  14. Effects of Age and Hearing Loss on the Processing of Auditory Temporal Fine Structure.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J

    2016-01-01

    Within the cochlea, broadband sounds like speech and music are filtered into a series of narrowband signals, each of which can be considered as a relatively slowly varying envelope (ENV) imposed on a rapidly oscillating carrier (the temporal fine structure, TFS). Information about ENV and TFS is conveyed in the timing and short-term rate of nerve spikes in the auditory nerve. There is evidence that both hearing loss and increasing age adversely affect the ability to use TFS information, but in many studies the effects of hearing loss and age have been confounded. This paper summarises evidence from studies that allow some separation of the effects of hearing loss and age. The results suggest that the monaural processing of TFS information, which is important for the perception of pitch and for segregating speech from background sounds, is adversely affected by both hearing loss and increasing age, the former being more important. The monaural processing of ENV information is hardly affected by hearing loss or by increasing age. The binaural processing of TFS information, which is important for sound localisation and the binaural masking level difference, is also adversely affected by both hearing loss and increasing age, but here the latter seems more important. The deterioration of binaural TFS processing with increasing age appears to start relatively early in life. The binaural processing of ENV information also deteriorates somewhat with increasing age. The reduced binaural processing abilities found for older/hearing-impaired listeners may partially account for the difficulties that such listeners experience in situations where the target speech and interfering sounds come from different directions in space, as is common in everyday life. PMID:27080640

  15. Using networks to identify fine structural differences between functionally distinct protein states.

    PubMed

    Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2004-08-31

    The vast increase in available data from the "-omics" revolution has enabled the fields of structural proteomics and structure prediction to make great progress in assigning realistic three-dimensional structures to each protein molecule. The challenge now lies in determining the fine structural details that endow unique functions to sequences that assume a common fold. Similar problems are encountered in understanding how distinct conformations contribute to different phases of a single protein's dynamic function. However, efforts are hampered by the complexity of these large, three-dimensional molecules. To overcome this limitation, structural data have been recast as two-dimensional networks. This analysis greatly reduces visual complexity but retains information about individual residues. Such diagrams are very useful for comparing multiple structures, including (1) homologous proteins, (2) time points throughout a dynamics simulation, and (3) functionally different conformations of a given protein. Enhanced structural examination results in new functional hypotheses to test experimentally. Here, network representations were key to discerning a difference between unliganded and inducer-bound lactose repressor protein (LacI), which were previously presumed to be identical structures. Further, the interface of unliganded LacI was surprisingly similar to that of the K84L variant and various structures generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Apo-LacI appears to be poised to adopt the conformation of either the DNA- or inducer-bound structures, and the K84L mutation appears to freeze the structure partway through the conformational transition. Additional examination of the effector binding pocket results in specific hypotheses about how inducer, anti-inducer, and neutral sugars exert their effects on repressor function. PMID:15323549

  16. Penumbral Fine Structure and Driving Mechanisms of Large-scale Flows in Simulated Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, M.

    2011-03-01

    We analyze in detail the penumbral structure found in a recent radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulation. Near τ = 1, the simulation produces penumbral fine structure consistent with the observationally inferred interlocking comb structure. Fast outflows exceeding 8 km s-1 are present along almost horizontal stretches of the magnetic field; in the outer half of the penumbra, we see opposite polarity flux indicating flux returning beneath the surface. The bulk of the penumbral brightness is maintained by small-scale motions turning over on scales shorter than the length of a typical penumbral filament. The resulting vertical rms velocity at τ = 1 is about half of that found in the quiet Sun. Radial outflows in the sunspot penumbra have two components. In the uppermost few 100 km, fast outflows are driven primarily through the horizontal component of the Lorentz force, which is confined to narrow boundary layers beneath τ = 1, while the contribution from horizontal pressure gradients is reduced in comparison to granulation as a consequence of anisotropy. The resulting Evershed flow reaches its peak velocity near τ = 1 and falls off rapidly with height. Outflows present in deeper layers result primarily from a preferred ring-like alignment of convection cells surrounding the sunspot. These flows reach amplitudes of about 50% of the convective rms velocity rather independent of depth. A preference for the outflow results from a combination of Lorentz force and pressure driving. While the Evershed flow dominates by velocity amplitude, most of the mass flux is present in deeper layers and likely related to a large-scale moat flow.

  17. X-ray absorption fine structure of aged, Pu-doped glass and ceramic waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, N. J.; Weber, W. J.; Conradson, S. D.

    1998-04-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies were performed on three compositionally identical, Pu-doped, borosilicate glasses prepared 15 years ago at different α-activities by varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio. The resulting α-activities ranged from 1.9×10 7 to 4.2×10 9 Bq/g and have current, accumulated doses between 8.8×10 15 to 1.9×10 18 α-decays/g. Two ceramic, polycrystalline zircon (ZrSiO 4) samples prepared 16 years ago with 10.0 wt% Pu was also investigated. Varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio in these samples resulted in α-activities of 2.5×10 8 and 5.6×10 10 Bq/g and current, accumulated doses of 1.2×10 17 and 2.8×10 19 α-decays/g. The multicomponent composition of the waste forms permitted XAS investigations at six absorption edges for the borosilicate glass and at three absorption edges for the polycrystalline zircons. For both waste forms, analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra indicates that the local environment around the cations exhibits different degrees of disorder as a result of the accumulated α-decay dose. In general, cations with short cation-oxygen bonds show little effect from self-radiation whereas cations with long cation-oxygen bonds show a greater degree of disorder with accumulated α-decay dose.

  18. Plasma Flows Observed in Magnetic Flux Concentrations and Sunspot Fine Structure Using Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, Thomas R.

    2004-04-01

    We present diffraction-limited observations of magnetic flux concentrations and penumbral and umbral fine structure within an active region observed at disk center. We recorded G-band images, magnetograms, Dopplergrams, and narrowband filtergrams, using the Universal Birefringent Filter (UBF) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). The National Solar Observatory (NSO) adaptive optics system at the DST was used to achieve diffraction-limited long-exposure imaging with a high signal-to-noise ratio. The main results can be summarized as follows: Strong and spatially narrow downflows are observed at the edge of magnetic structures, such as small flux concentrations (sometimes also referred to as flux tubes), pores, a light bridge, and the sunspot umbrae. For the particular sunspot observed, we find strong evidence for what appear to be vigorous, small-scale convection patterns in a light bridge. We observe extremely narrow (<0.2") channels or sheets of downflowing plasma. Flux concentrations as seen in intensity expand from a height close to where the continuum is formed to the height of formation for the G band. These observations indicate that the G band forms in the mid-photosphere. We are able to identify individual penumbral fibrils in our data and find a bright (hot) upflow and a more vertical field structure at the filament footpoint near the umbral boundary. The observations are consistent with a filament geometry in which the field and flow turn to a nearly horizontal, dark structure over a distance of about 0.2". In the deep photosphere we observe strong upflows of the order of 1 km s-1 in umbral dots. We compare our results with theoretical model predictions.

  19. [Study on the fine structure of K-feldspar of Qichun granite].

    PubMed

    Du, Deng-Wen; Hong, Han-Lie; Fan, Kan; Wang, Chao-Wen; Yin, Ke

    2013-03-01

    Fine structure of K-feldspar from the Qichun granite was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods to understand the evolution of the granitic magmatism and its correlation to molybdenite mineralization. The XRD results showed that K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has higher ordering index and triclinicity and is namely microcline with triclinic symmetry. K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively lower ordering index and has widening [131] peak and is locally triclinic ordering. K-feldspar of the late cretaceous granite has lowest ordering index and sharp [131] peak and is honiogeneously monoclinic. The FTIR results showed that the IR spectra of the Qichun K-feldspar are similar to that of orthoclase reported by Farmer (1974). The 640 cm-1 absorption band increases while the 540 cm-' absorption band decreases with increase in K-feldspar ordering index, also, the 1,010 cm-1 absorption band separates into 1,010 and 1,046 cm-1 absorption bands, with a change in the band shape from widening to sharp outline. The ICP-MS results suggested that K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively higher metal elements and rare earth elements, and the granite exhibits better mineralization background, K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has markedly lower Sr and Ba, indicating that the alteration fluid originated from the granitic magmatism, and hence, potassic alteration is a good indicator for molybdenite exploration. PMID:23705418

  20. Development of a two-dimensional imaging system of X-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Misaki; Sumiwaka, Koichi; Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Ozutsumi, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Toshiaki; Inada, Yasuhiro

    2012-09-01

    A two-dimensional imaging system of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) has been developed at beamline BL-4 of the Synchrotron Radiation Center of Ritsumeikan University. The system mainly consists of an ionization chamber for I(0) measurement, a sample stage, and a two-dimensional complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor for measuring the transmitted X-ray intensity. The X-ray energy shift in the vertical direction, which originates from the vertical divergence of the X-ray beam on the monochromator surface, is corrected by considering the geometrical configuration of the monochromator. This energy correction improves the energy resolution of the XAFS spectrum because each pixel in the CMOS detector has a very small vertical acceptance of ∼0.5 µrad. A data analysis system has also been developed to automatically determine the energy of the absorption edge. This allows the chemical species to be mapped based on the XANES feature over a wide area of 4.8 mm (H) × 3.6 mm (V) with a resolution of 10 µm × 10 µm. The system has been applied to the chemical state mapping of the Mn species in a LiMn(2)O(4) cathode. The heterogeneous distribution of the Mn oxidation state is demonstrated and is considered to relate to the slow delocalization of Li(+)-defect sites in the spinel crystal structure. The two-dimensional-imaging XAFS system is expected to be a powerful tool for analyzing the spatial distributions of chemical species in many heterogeneous materials such as battery electrodes. PMID:22898951

  1. A surface extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of tellurium adsorbed onto Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, S. R.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Wilks, S. P.; Dunstan, P. R.; Dunscombe, C. J.; Williams, R. H.

    1996-09-01

    The adsorption of tellurium on Si(100) has been studied using surface extended X-ray adsorption fine structure (SEXAFS) and X-ray standing wave spectroscopy (XSW). This particular system is of interest due to its potential applicability in the surfactant aided growth of CdHgTeCdTeSi(100) based infra-red detectors. The Te/Si(100) structure was generated by depositing a thick layer (˜ 100 Å) of CdTe onto a clean Si (2 × 1) double domain surface, and annealing the sample to 350°C. This resulted is a ˜ 1 ML Te terminated surface where the (2 × 1) reconstruction was lost in favour of a (1 × 1) symmetry. X-ray absorption of the Te L 3 edge ( E = 4341 eV), with a photon energy range of 4440-4700 eV, was probed using a total yield detection scheme. The SEXAFS results indicated that the Te atoms sat in 2-fold bridge sites directly above a fourth layer Si atom. The corresponding bond length was measured to be 2.52 ± 0.05 Å. The XSW measurements of the (400) reflection gave a coherent position of 1.63 ± 0.03 Å and a coherent fraction of 0.65. This is consistent with the breaking of the SiSi dimers and thus could be an example of the phenomena of adsorbate-induced dereconstruction of the surface. These results are compared with those of Bennet et al. who examined a similar system using soft X-ray photoemission (SXPS) and the STM study of Yoshikawa et al.

  2. Extended-X-ray-absorption-fine-structure investigations of zinc in 5-aminolaevulinate dehydratase.

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, S S; Wardell, E M; Garner, C D; Schlösser, M; Beyersmann, D

    1985-01-01

    The zinc co-ordination in 5-aminolaevulinate dehydratase (5-aminolaevulinate hydro-lyase, EC 4.2.1.24) was investigated by recording and interpreting the extended X-ray-absorption fine structure (e.x.a.f.s.) associated with the zinc K-edge. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 280 000 Da and consists of eight subunits of 35 000 Da each; the samples studied contained approx. 1 g-atom of zinc/mol of subunit. Four forms of the enzyme were investigated and details of the zinc environment were elucidated, as follows. In the native enzyme, zinc is considered to be co-ordinated to three sulphur atoms at 0.228(2)nm [2.28(2)A] and a lower-Z atom at 0.192(5)nm [1.92(5)A] (if nitrogen) or 0.189(5)nm [1.89(5)A] (if oxygen). Reaction of the enzyme with the inhibitor 2-bromo-3-(imidazol-5-yl)propionic acid produced significant changes in the e.x.a.f.s., the nature of which are consistent with co-ordination by about three sulphur atoms at 0.222(2)nm [2.22(2)A], a nitrogen atom at 0.193(5)nm [1.93(5)A] and a nitrogen atom from the inhibitor at 0.214(5)nm [2.14(5)A]. Inactivation of the enzyme by air-oxidation of essential thiol groups and binding of the substrate produce slight changes in the e.x.a.f.s. consistent with slight re-arrangement of ligands with additional lighter ligands (nitrogen or oxygen). These results, when combined with previous findings, are taken to indicate that zinc has a structural rather than a direct catalytic role in 5-aminolaevulinate dehydratase. PMID:4062868

  3. MICROWAVE BURSTS WITH FINE STRUCTURES IN THE DECAY PHASE OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jing; Tan Baolin E-mail: bltan@nao.cas.cn

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents the microwave bursts with fine structures (FSs) at 1.10-1.34 GHz in the decay phase of a solar flare observed by the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer in Huairou, which show a peak-to-peak correlation with 25-50 keV hard X-ray (HXR) bursts observed by RHESSI. In the microwave spectra, we have identified stripe-like bursts such as lace bursts, fiber structures, zebra patterns (ZPs), and quasi-periodic pulsations. We also have detected short narrowband bursts such as dots, type III, and spikes. The lace bursts had rarely been reported, but in this event they are observed to occur frequently in the decay phase of the flare. The similarity between 25 and 50 keV HXR light curve and microwave time profiles at 1.10-1.34 GHz suggests that these microwave FSs are related to the properties of electron acceleration. The electron velocity inferred from the frequency drift rates in short narrowband bursts is in the range of 0.13c-0.53c and the corresponding energy is about 10-85 keV, which is close to the energy of HXR-emitting electrons. From the Alfven soliton model of fiber structures, the double plasma resonance model of ZPs, and the Bernstein model of the lace bursts, we derived a similar magnetic field strength in the range of 60-70 G. Additionally, the physical conditions of the source regions such as height, width, and velocity are estimated.

  4. Composite fermions and the first-Landau-level fine structure of the fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, W. C.; Haxton, Daniel J.

    2016-04-01

    A set of scalar operators, originally introduced in connection with an analytic first-Landau-level (FLL) construction of fractional quantum Hall (FQHE) wave functions for the sphere, are employed in a somewhat different way to generate explicit representations of both hierarchy states (e.g., the series of fillings ν =1 /3 , 2/5, 3/7,⋯) and their conjugates (ν =1 , 2/3, 3/5,⋯) as noninteracting quasielectrons filling fine-structure subshells within the FLL. This yields, for planar and spherical geometries, a quasielectron representation of the incompressible FLL state of filling p /(2 p +1 ) in a magnetic field of strength B that is algebraically identical to the IQHE state of filling ν =p in a magnetic field of strength B /(2 p +1 ) . The construction provides a precise definition of the quasielectron/composite fermion that differs in some respects from common descriptions: they are eigenstates of L ,Lz ; they and the FLL subshells they occupy carry a third index I that is associated with breaking of scalar pairs; they absorb in their internal wave functions one, not two, units of magnetic flux; and they share a common, simple structure as vector products of a spinor creating an electron and one creating magnetic flux. We argue that these properties are a consequence of the breaking of the degeneracy of noninteracting electrons within the FLL by the scale-invariant Coulomb potential. We discuss the sense in which the wave function construction supports basic ideas of both composite fermion and hierarchical descriptions of the FQHE. We describe symmetries of the quasielectrons in the ν =1 /2 limit, where a deep Fermi sea of quasielectrons forms, and the quasielectrons take on Majorana and pseudo-Dirac characters. Finally, we show that the wave functions can be viewed as fermionic excitations of the bosonic half-filled shell, producing at ν =1 /2 an operator that differs from but plays the same role as the Pfaffian.

  5. INTENSITY MAPPING OF THE [C II] FINE STRUCTURE LINE DURING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Yan; Cooray, Asantha; Silva, Marta; Santos, Mario G.; Bock, James; Bradford, C. Matt; Zemcov, Michael

    2012-01-20

    The atomic C II fine-structure line is one of the brightest lines in a typical star-forming galaxy spectrum with a luminosity {approx}0.1%-1% of the bolometric luminosity. It is potentially a reliable tracer of the dense gas distribution at high redshifts and could provide an additional probe to the era of reionization. By taking into account the spontaneous, stimulated, and collisional emission of the C II line, we calculate the spin temperature and the mean intensity as a function of the redshift. When averaged over a cosmologically large volume, we find that the C II emission from ionized carbon in individual galaxies is larger than the signal generated by carbon in the intergalactic medium. Assuming that the C II luminosity is proportional to the carbon mass in dark matter halos, we also compute the power spectrum of the C II line intensity at various redshifts. In order to avoid the contamination from CO rotational lines at low redshift when targeting a C II survey at high redshifts, we propose the cross-correlation of C II and 21 cm line emission from high redshifts. To explore the detectability of the C II signal from reionization, we also evaluate the expected errors on the C II power spectrum and C II-21 cm cross power spectrum based on the design of the future millimeter surveys. We note that the C II-21 cm cross power spectrum contains interesting features that capture physics during reionization, including the ionized bubble sizes and the mean ionization fraction, which are challenging to measure from 21 cm data alone. We propose an instrumental concept for the reionization C II experiment targeting the frequency range of {approx}200-300 GHz with 1, 3, and 10 m apertures and a bolometric spectrometer array with 64 independent spectral pixels with about 20,000 bolometers.

  6. Jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of cyclohexoxy: rotational and fine structure of molecules in nearly degenerate electronic States.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinjun; Miller, Terry A

    2014-12-26

    The rotational structure of the previously observed B̃(2)A' ← X̃(2)A″ and B̃(2)A' ← Ã(2)A' laser-induced fluorescence spectra of jet-cooled cyclohexoxy radical (c-C6H11O) [ Zu, L.; Liu, J.; Tarczay, G.; Dupré, P; Miller, T. A. Jet-cooled laser spectroscopy of the cyclohexoxy radical. J. Chem. Phys. 2004 , 120 , 10579 ] has been analyzed and simulated using a spectroscopic model that includes the coupling between the nearly degenerate X̃ and à states separated by ΔE. The rotational and fine structure of these two states is reproduced by a 2-fold model using one set of molecular constants including rotational constants, spin-rotation constants (ε's), the Coriolis constant (Aζt), the quenched spin-orbit constant (aζed), and the vibronic energy separation between the two states (ΔE0). The energy level structure of both states can also be reproduced using an isolated-state asymmetric top model with rotational constants and effective spin-rotation constants (ε's) and without involving Coriolis and spin-orbit constants. However, the spin-orbit interaction introduces transitions that have no intensity using the isolated-state model but appear in the observed spectra. The line intensities are well simulated using the 2-fold model with an out-of-plane (b-) transition dipole moment for the B̃ ← X̃ transitions and in-plane (a and c) transition dipole moment for the B̃ ← à transitions, requiring the symmetry for the X̃ (Ã) state to be A″ (A'), which is consistent with a previous determination and opposite to that of isopropoxy, the smallest secondary alkoxy radical. The experimentally determined Ã-X̃ separation and the energy level ordering of these two states with different (A' and A″) symmetries are consistent with quantum chemical calculations. The 2-fold model also enables the independent determination of the two contributions to the Ã-X̃ separation: the relativistic spin-orbit interaction (magnetic effect) and the nonrelativistic

  7. Band-Edge Exciton Fine Structure and Recombination Dynamics in InP/ZnS Colloidal Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Biadala, Louis; Siebers, Benjamin; Beyazit, Yasin; Tessier, Mickaël D; Dupont, Dorian; Hens, Zeger; Yakovlev, Dmitri R; Bayer, Manfred

    2016-03-22

    We report on a temperature-, time-, and spectrally resolved study of the photoluminescence of type-I InP/ZnS colloidal nanocrystals with varying core size. By studying the exciton recombination dynamics we assess the exciton fine structure in these systems. In addition to the typical bright-dark doublet, the photoluminescence stems from an upper bright state in spite of its large energy splitting (∼100 meV). This striking observation results from dramatically lengthened thermalization processes among the fine structure levels and points to optical-phonon bottleneck effects in InP/ZnS nanocrystals. Furthermore, our data show that the radiative recombination of the dark exciton scales linearly with the bright-dark energy splitting for CdSe and InP nanocrystals. This finding strongly suggests a universal dangling bonds-assisted recombination of the dark exciton in colloidal nanostructures. PMID:26889780

  8. Fine-structure inelastic differential cross sections and B /sup 2/. sigma. potentials for the potassium rare gas interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Dueren, R.; Hasselbrink, E.; Hillrichs, G.

    1988-09-01

    Differential scattering cross sections for fine-structure inelastic collisions of potassium in its first excited state with various rare gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) have been measured. This crossed molecular beams experiment uses cw-dye lasers for the excitation of the incident potassium beam and the detection of the fine-structure inelastic scattered potassium atoms. The collision energy has been varied between 92 and 199 meV. The differential cross sections exhibit for small collision energies Stueckelberg oscillations, which are due to interference of scattering on the attractive A /sup 2/Pi and the repulsive B /sup 2/..sigma.. potential. For higher collision energies these oscillations are missing at large angles. It is demonstrated that with the A /sup 2/Pi potential known from other sources the repulsive B /sup 2/..sigma.. potential can be determined. A shoulder in this repulsive potential is found to be responsible for the absence of the interference oscillations at higher scattering energies.

  9. Electrical control of quantum-dot fine-structure splitting for high-fidelity hole spin initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar, J. D.; Baumberg, J. J.; Xu, X. L.; Irvine, A. C.; Williams, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate electrical control of the neutral exciton fine-structure splitting in a single InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dot by significantly reducing the splitting to near zero through the application of a vertical electric field in the fast electron tunneling regime. This is verified by performing high-resolution photocurrent spectroscopy of the two fine-structure split exciton eigenstates as a function of reverse bias voltage. Using the qubit initialization scheme for a quantum-dot hole spin based on rapid electric-field ionization of a spin-polarized exciton, our results suggest a practical approach towards achieving qubit initialization with near-unity fidelity in the absence of magnetic fields.

  10. Polarized X-ray absorption fine structure of La 2CuO 4-y single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyanagi, Hiroyuki; Oka, Kunihiko; Unoki, Hiromi; Nishihara, Yoshikazu; Murata, Keizo; Matsushita, Tadashi; Tokumoto, Madoka; Kimura, Yoichi

    1989-06-01

    Polarized X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) has been measured on the Cu K-edge for undoped La2CuO4-y bulk single crystal (15 × 20 × 3 mm) grown by the top-seeded solution growth method. Strong polarization dependence observed in the near-edge and EXAFS regions demonstrates the quasi-2D character of the CuO2 plane in terms of both electron states and local structure.

  11. Synthetic differential emission measure curves of prominence fine structures. II. The SoHO/SUMER prominence of 8 June 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Parenti, S.; Anzer, U.; Heinzel, P.; Vial, J.-C.

    2011-11-01

    Aims: This study is the first attempt to combine the prominence observations in Lyman, UV, and EUV lines with the determination of the prominence differential emission measure derived using two different techniques, one based on the inversion of the observed UV and EUV lines and the other employing 2D non-LTE prominence fine-structure modeling of the Lyman spectra. Methods: We use a trial-and-error method to derive the 2D multi-thread prominence fine-structure model producing synthetic Lyman spectra in good agreement with the observations. We then employ a numerical method to perform the forward determination of the DEM from 2D multi-thread models and compare the synthetic DEM curves with those derived from observations using inversion techniques. Results: A set of available observations of the June 8, 2004 prominence allows us to determine the range of input parameters, which contains models producing synthetic Lyman spectra in good agreement with the observations. We select three models, which represent this parametric-space area well and compute the synthetic DEM curves for multi-thread realizations of these models. The synthetic DEM curves of selected models are in good agreement with the DEM curves derived from the observations. Conclusions: We show that the evaluation of the prominence fine-structure DEM complements the analysis of the prominence hydrogen Lyman spectra and that its combination with the detailed radiative-transfer modeling of prominence fine structures provides a useful tool for investigating the prominence temperature structure from the cool core to the prominence-corona transition region.

  12. Rocket experiments for spectral estimation of electron density fine structure in the auroral and equatorial ionosphere and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomei, B. A.; Smith, L. G.

    1986-01-01

    Sounding rockets equipped to monitor electron density and its fine structure were launched into the auroral and equatorial ionosphere in 1980 and 1983, respectively. The measurement electronics are based on the Langmuir probe and are described in detail. An approach to the spectral analysis of the density irregularities is addressed and a software algorithm implementing the approach is given. Preliminary results of the analysis are presented.

  13. A platform for x-ray absorption fine structure study of dynamically compressed materials above 1 Mbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Y.; Hicks, D. G.; Yaakobi, B.; Coppari, F.; Eggert, J.; Collins, G. W.

    2013-12-01

    A platform consisting of a multi-shock drive and an implosion backlighter has been developed for x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements on materials compressed to multi-Mbar pressures. The experimental setup, target design, and backlighter characteristics are presented. Extended XAFS (EXAFS) measurements for various materials have been demonstrated. A quintuple-crystal design is described to enhance the efficiency of the x-ray spectrometer, enabling observation of very weak EXAFS signals in a single shot.

  14. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16{plus_minus}2{degree} from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94{plus_minus}0.02{Angstrom}. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27{plus_minus}0.04{Angstrom}, up from 1.10{Angstrom} for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25{Angstrom} Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20{Angstrom} and 15--23{degrees}) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16{Angstrom} and 19{degrees}. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95{Angstrom} for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals` radius {approximately} 1.5 {Angstrom} for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  15. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16[plus minus]2[degree] from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94[plus minus]0.02[Angstrom]. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27[plus minus]0.04[Angstrom], up from 1.10[Angstrom] for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25[Angstrom] Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20[Angstrom] and 15--23[degrees]) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16[Angstrom] and 19[degrees]. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95[Angstrom] for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals' radius [approximately] 1.5 [Angstrom] for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS [chi](k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  16. FAR-INFRARED FINE-STRUCTURE LINE DIAGNOSTICS OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Farrah, D.; Petty, S. M.; Harris, K.; Lebouteiller, V.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Pearson, C.; Rigopoulou, D.; Smith, H. A.; González-Alfonso, E.; Clements, D. L.; Efstathiou, A.; Cormier, D.; Afonso, J.; Hurley, P.; Borys, C.; Verma, A.; Cooray, A.; Salvatelli, V.

    2013-10-10

    We present Herschel observations of 6 fine-structure lines in 25 ultraluminous infrared galaxies at z < 0.27. The lines, [O III]52 μm, [N III]57 μm, [O I]63 μm, [N II]122 μm, [O I]145 μm, and [C II]158 μm, are mostly single Gaussians with widths <600 km s{sup –1} and luminosities of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} L{sub ☉}. There are deficits in the [O I]63/L{sub IR}, [N II]/L{sub IR}, [O I]145/L{sub IR}, and [C II]/L{sub IR} ratios compared to lower luminosity systems. The majority of the line deficits are consistent with dustier H II regions, but part of the [C II] deficit may arise from an additional mechanism, plausibly charged dust grains. This is consistent with some of the [C II] originating from photodissociation regions or the interstellar medium (ISM). We derive relations between far-IR line luminosities and both the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We find that [N II] and both [O I] lines are good tracers of the IR luminosity and star formation rate. In contrast, [C II] is a poor tracer of the IR luminosity and star formation rate, and does not improve as a tracer of either quantity if the [C II] deficit is accounted for. The continuum luminosity densities also correlate with the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We derive ranges for the gas density and ultraviolet radiation intensity of 10{sup 1} < n < 10{sup 2.5} and 10{sup 2.2} < G{sub 0} < 10{sup 3.6}, respectively. These ranges depend on optical type, the importance of star formation, and merger stage. We do not find relationships between far-IR line properties and several other parameters: active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity, merger stage, mid-IR excitation, and SMBH mass. We conclude that these far-IR lines arise from gas heated by starlight, and that they are not strongly influenced by AGN activity.

  17. Fine structure analysis of biocompatible ceramic materials based hydroxyapatite and metallic biomaterials 316L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghelina, F. V.; Ungureanu, D. N.; Bratu, V.; Popescu, I. N.; Rusanescu, C. O.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to obtain and characterize (surface morphology and fine structure) two types of materials: Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 hydroxyapatite powder (HAp) as biocompatible ceramic materials and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels as metallic biomaterials, which are the components of the metal-ceramic composites used for medical implants in reconstructive surgery and prosthetic treatment. The HAp was synthesized by coprecipitation method, heat treated at 200 °C, 800 °C and 1200 °C for 4 h, analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The stainless steel 316L type was made by casting, annealing and machined with a low speed (100 mm/s) in order to obtain a smooth surface and after that has been studied from residual stresses point of view in three polishing regimes conditions: at low speed polishing (150 rpm), at high speed polishing (1500 rpm) and high speed-vibration contact polishing (1500 rpm) using wide angle X-ray diffractions (WAXD). The chemical compositions of AISI 316 steel samples were measured using a Foundry Master Spectrometer equipped with CCD detector for spectral lines and the sparking spots of AISI 316L samples were analyzed using SEM. By XRD the phases of HAp powders have been identified and also the degree of crystallinity and average size of crystallites, and with SEM, we studied the morphology of the HAp. It has been found from XRD analysis that we obtained HAp with a high degree of crystallinity at 800 °C and 1200 °C, no presence of impurity and from SEM analysis we noticed the influence of heat treatment on the ceramic particles morphology. From the study of residual stress profiles of 316L samples were observed that it differs substantially for different machining regimes and from the SEM analysis of sparking spots we revealed the rough surfaces of stainless steel rods necessary for a better adhesion of HAp on it.

  18. Recovery and fine structure variability of RGII sub-domains in wine (Vitis vinifera Merlot)

    PubMed Central

    Buffetto, F.; Ropartz, D.; Zhang, X. J.; Gilbert, H. J.; Guillon, F.; Ralet, M.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Rhamnogalacturonan II (RGII) is a structurally complex pectic sub-domain composed of more than 12 different sugars and 20 different linkages distributed in five side chains along a homogalacturonan backbone. Although RGII has long been described as highly conserved over plant evolution, recent studies have revealed variations in the structure of the polysaccharide. This study examines the fine structure variability of RGII in wine, focusing on the side chains A and B obtained after sequential mild acid hydrolysis. Specifically, this study aims to differentiate intrinsic structural variations in these RGII side chains from structural variations due to acid hydrolysis. Methods RGII from wine (Vitis vinifera Merlot) was sequentially hydrolysed with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and the hydrolysis products were separated by anion-exchange chromatography (AEC). AEC fractions or total hydrolysates were analysed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Key Results The optimal conditions to recover non-degraded side chain B, side chain A and RGII backbone were 0·1 m TFA at 40 °C for 16 h, 0·48 m TFA at 40 °C for 16 h (or 0·1 m TFA at 60 °C for 8 h) and 0·1 m TFA at 60 °C for 16 h, respectively. Side chain B was particularly prone to acid degradation. Side chain A and the RGII GalA backbone were partly degraded by 0·1 m TFA at 80 °C for 1–4 h. AEC allowed separation of side chain B, methyl-esterified side chain A and non-methyl-esterified side chain A. The structure of side chain A and the GalA backbone were highly variable. Conclusions Several modifications to the RGII structure of wine were identified. The observed dearabinosylation and deacetylation were primarily the consequence of acidic treatment, while variation in methyl-esterification, methyl-ether linkages and oxidation reflect natural diversity. The physiological significance of this variability, however, remains to be determined. PMID:24908680

  19. Close-coupling calculations of fine-structure excitation of Ne II due to H and electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Wang, Qianxia; Loch, Stuart; Pindzola, Michael; Schultz, David R.; Buenker, Robert; McLaughlin, Brendan; Ballance, Connor

    2016-06-01

    Fine-structure transitions within the ground term of ions and neutral atoms dominate the cooling in a variety of molecular regions and also provide important density and temperature diagnostics. While fine-structure rates due to electron collisions have been studied for many systems, data are generally sparse for elements larger than oxygen, at low temperatures, and for collisions due to heavy particles. We provide rate coefficients for H collisions for the first time. The calculations were performed using the quantum molecular-orbital close-coupling approach and the elastic approximation. The heavy-particle collisions use new potential energies for the lowest-lying NeH+ states computed with the MRDCI method. The focus of the electron-impact calculations is to provide fine-structure excitation rate coefficients down to 10 K. We compare with previous calculations at higher temperatures (Griffin et al. 2001), and use a range of calculations to provide an estimate of the uncertainty on our recommended rate coefficients. A brief discussion of astrophysical applications is also provided.Griffin, D.C., et al., 2001, J. Phys. B, 34, 4401This work partially supported by NASA grant No. NNX15AE47G.

  20. The Long-Range Model of High-L Rydberg Fine Structure: A Critical Comparison with Experimental Data..

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Erica L.; Wright, Laura E.; Lundeen, Stephen R.

    2006-05-01

    A simple view of the fine structure of non-penetrating Rydberg levels, suggested over 70 years ago [1], was refined to treat the fine structure of helium, lithium [2], and other atoms with S-state ion cores [3]. In this view the ion polarizabilities determine the fine structure pattern. Current experimental techniques provide access to highly excited high-L states in He [4], Li [5], Mg, SiIII [6], and Ba[7], and a test of the long-range model is possible with the availability of independent theoretical calculations. A critical comparison of the data treated with the long-range model will be made to the a-priori calculations of the ionic polarizabilities. [1] Joseph E. Mayer and Maria Goeppert Mayer, Phys. Rev. 43 605 (1933). [2] Richard J. Drachman and A. K. Bhatia, Phys. Rev. A 51 2926 (1995). [3] C. Laughlin, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 28 2787 (1995). [4] G. D. Stevens and S. R. Lundeen, Comments on At. and Mol. Phys., Comments on Mod. Phys. 1,D 207 (2000). [5] C. H. Storry, N. E. Rothery, and E. A. Hessels, Phys. Rev. A 55 128 (1997). [6] R. A. Komara et. al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 38 S87 (2005). [7] E.L. Snow, et. al. Phys. Rev. A 71, 022510 (2005)

  1. A comparison of fine structures in high-resolution x-ray-absorption spectra of various condensed organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Schoell, A; Zou, Y; Huebner, D; Urquhart, S G; Schmidt, Th; Fink, R; Umbach, E

    2005-07-22

    We report on a high-resolution C-K and O-K near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) study of large aromatic molecules in condensed thin films, namely, anhydrides 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride, 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride, benzoperylene-(1,2)-dicarboxylic acid anhydride, and 1,8-naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid anhydride and the quinoic acenaphthenequinone. Due to the high-energy resolution of the third-generation synchrotron source BESSY II we observe large differences in the NEXAFS fine structures even for very similar molecules, resulting in a wealth of new information. The rich fine structure can unambiguously be assigned to the coupling of electronic transitions to vibronic excitations. Backed by ab initio calculations we present a detailed analysis of the spectra that allows the complete interpretation of the near-edge features. It also yields information on the vibronic properties in the electronically excited state as well as on the response of the electronic system upon core excitation. The strong differences in the electron-vibron coupling for different molecules are discussed. PMID:16095371

  2. Ritz wavelengths of Fe I, Si II and Ni II for quasar absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The study of absorption lines in the spectra of galaxies along the line of sight to distant quasars can give important information about the abundances, ionization and kinematics of atoms within these galaxies. They have also been used to study the variability of the fine structure constant at high redshifts. However, the laboratory wavelengths need to be known to better than 6 parts in 108 (20 ms-1). A paper by M. Murphy and J. C. Berengut (2014, MNRAS 438,388) includes a table of spectral lines for which the laboratory wavelength uncertainties are greater than this, including 13 resonance lines of Fe I, 11 lines of Ni II, and 4 lines of Si II.Improved wavelengths for these lines were derived by re-analyzing archival spectra of iron hollow cathode lamps and a silicon carbide Penning discharge lamp. These spectra have previously been used in a comprehensive analysis of the spectrum of Fe I (Nave et al. 1994, ApJS 94, 221) and in a study of Si II, Si IV, and C IV for quasar spectroscopy (Griesmann & Kling, 2000, ApJ 536, L113). By re-optimizing the energy levels of Fe I, the absolute uncertainty of the resonance lines has been reduced by over a factor of 2 and the relative uncertainty by an order of magnitude. A similar analysis for Si II gives a improved values for the resonance lines with wavelength uncertainties of around 4 parts in 108. Analysis of new spectra of Ni II is in progress.

  3. PREFACE: The 15th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    The 15th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS15) was held on 22-28 July 2012 in Beijing, P. R. China. About 340 scientists from 34 countries attended this important international event. Main hall Figure 1. Main hall of XAFS15. The rapidly increasing application of XAFS to the study of a large variety of materials and the operation of the new SR source led to the first meeting of XAFS users in 1981 in England. Following that a further 14 International Conferences have been held. Comparing a breakdown of attendees according to their national origin, it is clear that participation is spreading to include attendees from more and more countries every year. The strategy of development in China of science and education is increasing quickly thanks to the large investment in scientific and technological research and infrastructure. There are three Synchrotron Radiation facilities in mainland China, Hefei Light Source (HLS) in the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSRL), Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) in the Institute of High Energy Physics, and Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) in the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics. More than 10000 users and over 5000 proposals run at these facilities. Among them, many teams from the USA, Japan, German, Italy, Russia, and other countries. More than 3000 manuscript were published in SCI journals, including (incomplete) Science (7), Nature (10), Nature Series (7), PNAS (3), JACS (12), Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. (15), Nano Lett. (2), etc. In XAFS15, the participants contributed 18 plenary invited talks, 16 parallel invited talks, 136 oral presentations, 12 special talks, and 219 poster presentations. Wide communication was promoted in the conference halls, the classical banquet restaurant, and the Great Wall. Parallel hallCommunicationPoster room Figure 2. Parallel hallFigure 3. CommunicationFigure 4. Poster room This volume contains 136 invited and contributed papers

  4. Correlation between the fine structure of spin-coated PEDOT:PSS and the photovoltaic performance of organic/crystalline-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funda, Shuji; Ohki, Tatsuya; Liu, Qiming; Hossain, Jaker; Ishimaru, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Keiji; Shirai, Hajime

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between the fine structure of spin-coated conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) films and the photovoltaic performance of PEDOT:PSS crystalline-Si (PEDOT:PSS/c-Si) heterojunction solar cells. Real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry revealed that there were two different time constants for the formation of the PEDOT:PSS network. Upon removal of the polar solvent, the PEDOT:PSS film became optically anisotropic, indicating a conformational change in the PEDOT and PSS chain. Polarized Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements also indicated that thermal annealing promoted an in-plane π-conjugated Cα = Cβ configuration attributed to a thiophene ring in PEDOT and an out-of-plane configuration of -SO3 groups in the PSS chain with increasing composition ratio of oxidized (benzoid) to neutral (quinoid) PEDOT, Iqui/Iben. The highest power conversion efficiency for the spin-coated PEDOT:PSS/c-Si heterojunction solar cells was 13.3% for Iqui/Iben = 9-10 without employing any light harvesting methods.

  5. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure and micro-Raman spectra of Bridgman grown Cd1-xZnxTe ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, Devki N.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Becla, P.

    2014-03-01

    We have performed low-temperature micro-Raman scattering and extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) measurements on the Bridgman-grown bulk zinc-blende Cd1-x Zn x Te (1.0 ≧̸ x ≧̸ 0.03) ternary alloys to comprehend their structural and lattice dynamical properties. The micro-Raman results are carefully appraised to authenticate the classical two-phonon mode behavior insinuated by far-infrared (FIR) reflectivity study. The composition-dependent EXAFS experiments have revealed a bimodal distribution of the nearest-neighbor bond lengths—its analysis by first-principles bond-orbital model enabled us to estimate the lattice relaxations around Zn/Cd atoms in CdTe/ZnTe to help evaluate the necessary force constant variations for constructing the impurity-perturbation matrices. The simulated results of impurity vibrational modes by average-t-matrix Green’s function (ATM-GF) theory has put our experimental findings of the gap mode ˜153 cm-1 near x ≈ 1 on a much firmer ground.

  6. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements on asymmetric bipolar pulse direct current magnetron sputtered Ta(2)O(5) thin films.

    PubMed

    Maidul Haque, S; Sagdeo, Pankaj R; Shinde, D D; Misal, J S; Jha, S N; Bhattacharyya, D; Sahoo, N K

    2015-08-01

    Tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) thin films have been deposited on fused silica substrates using a novel asymmetric bipolar DC magnetron sputtering technique under a mixed ambient of oxygen and argon. Films have been prepared at different oxygen-to-argon ratios, and the sputtering ambient and optical properties of the films have been investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry, while the structural analysis of the films has been carried out by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements. The concentration of oxygen and tantalum in the Ta2O5 films has been estimated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). The variation of the optical constants of the films with changes in deposition parameters has been explained in the light of the change in average Ta-O bond lengths and oxygen coordination around Ta sites as obtained from EXAFS measurements. The trend in variation of the oxygen-to-tantalum ratio in the films obtained from RBS measurement, as a function of oxygen partial pressure used during sputtering, is found to follow the trend in variation of the oxygen coordination number around Ta sites obtained from EXAFS measurement. PMID:26368089

  7. Fine Structure in the Secondary Electron Emission Peak for Diamond Crystal with (100) Negative Electron Affinity Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnin, V. M.; Krainsky, I. L.

    1998-01-01

    A fine structure was discovered in the low-energy peak of the secondary electron emission spectra of the diamond surface with negative electron affinity. We studied this structure for the (100) surface of the natural type-IIb diamond crystal. We have found that the low-energy peak consists of a total of four maxima. The relative energy positions of three of them could be related to the electron energy minima near the bottom of the conduction band. The fourth peak, having the lowest energy, was attributed to the breakup of the bulk exciton at the surface during the process of secondary electron emission.

  8. Fine structure in proton radioactivity: An accurate tool to ascertain the breaking of axial symmetry in {sup 145}Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, P.; Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2008-10-15

    With a proper formalism for proton emission from triaxially deformed nuclei, we perform exact calculations of decay widths for the decays to ground and first excited 2{sup +} states in the daughter nucleus. Our results for rotational spectrum, decay width and fine structure in the case of the nucleus {sup 145}Tm lead for the first time to an accurate identification of triaxial deformation using proton emission. This work also puts in evidence the advantage of proton emission over the conventional probes to study nuclear structure at the proton drip-line.

  9. 100-picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure of FeII(1,10-phenanthroline)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Tomita, Ayana; Ichikawa, Hirohiko; Chollet, Matthieu; Fujii, Hiroshi; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Koshihara, Shin-ya

    2009-02-01

    Studying photo-induced molecular dynamics in liquid with sub-nanosecond time-resolution and sub-Angstrom spatial resolution gives information for understanding fundamental chemical process in the photo-induced cooperative phenomena of molecular systems and also for developing new materials and devices. Here, we present time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure on the spin-crossover complex FeII tris-(1,10-phenanthroline) dissolved in aqueous solution. We utilized femtosecond laser at 400nm pulse for excitation and 100ps X-ray pulse for probe.

  10. InGaN Selfassembled Quantum Dots Investigated By X-Ray Diffraction-Anomalous-Fine Structure Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Piskorska, E.; Siebert, M.; Schmidt, T.; Falta, J.; Yamaguchi, T.; Hommel, D.; Renevier, H.

    2007-04-10

    Local chemical composition of InGaN quantum dots grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaN virtual substrates was investigated by x-ray diffraction anomalous fine-structure method. Using this approach, we found that the In content increases from 20% at the dot base to 40-50% at the top. From the detailed numerical analysis of the data we were able to reconstruct the local neighborhood of Ga atoms in different positions in the dots, as well as the local elastic relaxation state.

  11. Fine structure marker rescue of temperature-sensitive mutations of vaccinia virus within a central conserved region of the genome.

    PubMed Central

    Ensinger, M J; Weir, J P; Moss, B

    1985-01-01

    Fine structure marker rescue involving the use of subfragments of vaccinia virus HindIII DNA fragments L, J, and H has been used to map the mutations in eight temperature-sensitive mutants of vaccinia virus representing four complementation groups. Comparison of their map locations with the positions of the open reading frames and RNA transcripts that have been mapped within this region has allowed the identification of one or two polypeptides as the temperature-sensitive gene product of each mutant. PMID:4068140

  12. Dynamics of quiescent prominence fine structures analyzed by 2D non-LTE modelling of the Hα line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Mein, P.; Schmieder, B.; Heinzel, P.; Mein, N.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: We analyze the dynamics of the prominence fine structures of a quiescent prominence observed on April 26, 2007 during a coordinated campaign of several spaceborne and ground-based instruments. We use Lyman spectra observed by SOHO/SUMER and the Hα line spectra obtained by MSDP spectrograph working at the Meudon Solar Tower. Methods: We employ the 2D multi-thread prominence fine-structure modelling that includes randomly distributed line-of-sight (LOS) velocities of individual threads to derive models producing synthetic Lyman lines in good agreement with the SOHO/SUMER observations. We then use these models to produce synthetic Hα line spectra that we compare with the observed spectra using three statistical parameters: the line integrated intensity, the line full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), and the Doppler velocity derived from shifts of the line profiles. Results: We demonstrate that the 2D multi-thread models that produce synthetic Lyman spectra in agreement with observations also generate synthetic Hα spectra in good agreement with the observed ones. The statistical analysis of the FWHM and Doppler velocities of the synthetic Hα line profiles show that the overall LOS velocities in the April 26, 2007 prominence at the time of the observations were below 15 km s-1 and in the prominence core were close to 10 km s-1. In combination with the analysis of the Lyman spectra, we determine several physical parameters of the observed prominence fine-structures that show that the April 26, 2007 prominence had a relatively low-mass weakly magnetized structure. We are also able to impose some constraints on the prominence core temperature, which may be relatively low, with values below 6000 K. Conclusions: The combination of 2D non-LTE prominence fine-structure modelling with the statistical analysis of the observed and synthetic Lyman and Hα spectra allows us to analyze the influence of the model input parameters and the velocity fields on the synthetic H

  13. Displacive phase-transition of cuprite Ag2O revealed by extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanson, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The low-temperature phase-transition of silver oxide (Ag2O) has been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy as a function of temperature. The thermal evolution of the local structure around Ag atoms has been determined. In particular, below the phase-transition temperature at ∼35 K, a progressive splitting of the Ag-Ag next-nearest-neighbor distances is observed. This definitely supports the idea that the phase-transition of Ag2O is due to displacive disorder of the Ag atoms.

  14. PREFACE: The 15th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    The 15th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS15) was held on 22-28 July 2012 in Beijing, P. R. China. About 340 scientists from 34 countries attended this important international event. Main hall Figure 1. Main hall of XAFS15. The rapidly increasing application of XAFS to the study of a large variety of materials and the operation of the new SR source led to the first meeting of XAFS users in 1981 in England. Following that a further 14 International Conferences have been held. Comparing a breakdown of attendees according to their national origin, it is clear that participation is spreading to include attendees from more and more countries every year. The strategy of development in China of science and education is increasing quickly thanks to the large investment in scientific and technological research and infrastructure. There are three Synchrotron Radiation facilities in mainland China, Hefei Light Source (HLS) in the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSRL), Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) in the Institute of High Energy Physics, and Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) in the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics. More than 10000 users and over 5000 proposals run at these facilities. Among them, many teams from the USA, Japan, German, Italy, Russia, and other countries. More than 3000 manuscript were published in SCI journals, including (incomplete) Science (7), Nature (10), Nature Series (7), PNAS (3), JACS (12), Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. (15), Nano Lett. (2), etc. In XAFS15, the participants contributed 18 plenary invited talks, 16 parallel invited talks, 136 oral presentations, 12 special talks, and 219 poster presentations. Wide communication was promoted in the conference halls, the classical banquet restaurant, and the Great Wall. Parallel hallCommunicationPoster room Figure 2. Parallel hallFigure 3. CommunicationFigure 4. Poster room This volume contains 136 invited and contributed papers

  15. Experimental investigations of the Zeeman effect of new fine structure levels of Lanthanum and Praseodymium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbowy, S.; Güney, C.; Windholz, L.

    2016-02-01

    Landé-g J data are given for several lines of La I and Pr I in the wavelength range 641.993 nm to 685.364 nm. Spectra were recorded in the presence of magnetic fields of about 800 G for two polarizations of the exciting laser light, perpendicular and parallel with respect to the direction of the magnetic field. We have used a hollow cathode sputtering atom source and laser induced fluorescence and/or optogalvanic detection. In this way we have determined for the first time the Landé-g J factors for some new levels of neutral La and Pr atoms. Additionally, the Landé-g J factors for other known levels of La I and Pr I were reinvestigated.

  16. Stellar Spectroscopy During Exoplanet Transits: Dissecting Fine Structure Across Stellar Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, Dainis; Ludwig, Hans-Gunter; Dahlen, Erik; Pazira, Hiva

    2015-01-01

    Differential spectroscopy during exoplanet transits permits to reconstruct spectra of small stellar surface portions that successively become hidden behind the planet. The center-to-limb behavior of stellar line shapes, asymmetries and wavelength shifts will enable detailed tests of 3-dimensional hydrodynamic models of stellar atmospheres, such that are required for any precise determination of abundances or seismic properties. Such models can now be computed for widely different stars but have been feasible to test in detail only for the Sun with its resolved surface structure. Although very high quality spectra are required, already current data permit reconstructions of line profiles in the brightest transit host stars such as HD 209458 (G0 V).

  17. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics. PMID:27071459

  18. Study on the Coordination Structure of Pt Sorbed on Bacterial Cells Using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Watanabe, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption has been intensively investigated as a promising technology for the recovery of precious metals from solution. However, the detailed mechanism responsible for the biosorption of Pt on a biomass is not fully understood because of a lack of spectroscopic studies. We applied X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to elucidate the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on bacterial cells. We examined the sorption of Pt(II) and Pt(IV) species on bacterial cells of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella putrefaciens in NaCl solutions. X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of Pt-sorbed bacteria suggested that Pt(IV) was reduced to Pt(II) on the cell’s surface, even in the absence of an organic material as an exogenous electron donor. EXAFS spectra demonstrated that Pt sorbed on bacterial cells has a fourfold coordination of chlorine ions, similar to PtCl42-, which indicated that sorption on the protonated amine groups of the bacterial cells. This work clearly demonstrated the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on bacterial cells. The findings of this study will contribute to the understanding of Pt biosorption on biomass, and facilitate the development of recovery methods for rare metals using biosorbent materials. PMID:25996945

  19. X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Investigation of Copper(II) Mixed Ligand Complexes with Pyridinedicarboxylic Acid as Primary Ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, D. Ah.; Gaur, A.; Soni, B.; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.; Jha, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2015-05-01

    The X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra at the K-edge of the copper complexes Cu(PDC)(Mim)3 H2O ( 1) and Cu(PDC)2(EA)2H2O ( 2) (where PDC - Pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, Mim - 2-methylimidazole, and EA - ethyl acetate) have been investigated. The experimental extended X-ray absorption fine structure data of complex 1 have been analyzed by fitting the theoretical model generated from its own crystallographic data. The crystallographic data for complex 2 are not available. It has been found by comparing the intensity of the pre-edge peaks and X-ray absorption near edge structure features of complexes 1 and 2 that both complexes possess square pyramidal geometry around the copper centers and thus complex 2 is analogous to complex 1. Hence, the theoretical model generated for complex 1 has been fitted to the experimental EXAFS data of complex 2 to determine the structural parameters of complex 2. The coordination geometry of both complexes has been depicted. Further, the chemical shifts have been used to determine the oxidation state as well as to estimate the effective nuclear charge on the copper atom.

  20. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  1. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  2. Relation between fine structure of energy spectra for pulsating aurora electrons and frequency spectra of whistler mode chorus waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Y.; Saito, S.; Seki, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Kataoka, R.; Asamura, K.; Katoh, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Sakanoi, T.; Hirahara, M.; Oyama, S.; Kurita, S.; Santolik, O.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the origin of the fine structure of the energy spectrum of precipitating electrons for the pulsating aurora (PsA) observed by the low-altitude Reimei satellite. The Reimei satellite achieved simultaneous observations of the optical images and precipitating electrons of the PsA from satellite altitude (~620 km) with resolution of 40 ms. The main modulation of precipitation, with a few seconds, and the internal modulations, with a few hertz, that are embedded inside the main modulations are identified above ~3 keV. Moreover, stable precipitations at ~1 keV are found for the PsA. A "precipitation gap" is discovered between two energy bands. We identify the origin of the fine structure of the energy spectrum for the precipitating electrons using the computer simulation on the wave-particle interaction between electrons and chorus waves. The lower band chorus (LBC) bursts cause the main modulation of energetic electrons, and the generation and collapse of the LBC bursts determines on-off switching of the PsA. A train of rising tone elements embedded in the LBC bursts drives the internal modulations. A close set of upper band chorus (UBC) waves causes the stable precipitations at ~1 keV. We show that a wave power gap around the half gyrofrequency at the equatorial plane in the magnetosphere between LBC and UBC reduces the loss rate of electrons at the intermediate energy range, forming a gap of precipitating electrons in the ionosphere.

  3. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics. PMID:27071459

  4. Polarized light scattering with the Paschen-back effect, level-crossing of fine structure states, and partial frequency redistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sowmya, K.; Nagendra, K. N.; Sampoorna, M.; Stenflo, J. O. E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in E-mail: stenflo@astro.phys.ethz.ch

    2014-10-01

    The quantum interference between the fine structure states of an atom modifies the shapes of the emergent Stokes profiles in the second solar spectrum. This phenomenon has been studied in great detail both in the presence and absence of magnetic fields. By assuming a flat-spectrum for the incident radiation, the signatures of this effect have been explored for arbitrary field strengths. Even though the theory which takes into account the frequency dependence of the incident radiation is well developed, it is restricted to the regime in which the magnetic splitting is much smaller than the fine structure splitting. In the present paper, we carry out a generalization of our scattering matrix formalism including the effects of partial frequency redistribution for arbitrary magnetic fields. We test the formalism using available benchmarks for special cases. In particular, we apply it to the Li I 6708 Å D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} line system, for which observable effects from the Paschen-Back regime are expected in the Sun's spectrum.

  5. Improved wavelengths for Fe V and Ni V for analysis of spectra of white dwarf stellar stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jacob; Nave, Gillian

    2015-08-01

    A recent paper by J.C. Berengut et al. tests for a potential variation in the fine-structure constant, α, in the presence of a high gravitational field through spectral analysis of white-dwarf stars. The spectrum of G191-B2B has prominent Fe V and Ni V lines in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region that were used to determine any variation in α via observed shifts in their wavelengths. Although no strong evidence for a variation was found, the authors did find a difference between values obtained for Fe V and Ni V that were indicative of a problem with the laboratory wavelengths. The laboratory wavelengths dominate the uncertainty of the measured variation, so improved values would tighten the constraints on the variation of α.We have re-measured the spectra of Fe V and Ni V spectra in the VUV in order to reduce the wavelength uncertainties and put the two spectra on a consistent wavelength scale. The spectra were produced by a sliding spark light source with electrodes made of invar, an iron nickel alloy. Spectra of Fe V and Ni V were obtained using peak currents of 750-2000 A. The spectra were recorded using the NIST Normal Incidence Vacuum Spectrograph with phosphor image plates and photographic plates as detectors. Wavelengths from 1100 Å to 1800 Å were covered in a single exposure. A spectrum of a Pt/Ne hollow cathode lamp was also recorded for wavelength calibration.The spectra recorded on photographic plates are better resolved than the phosphor image plate spectra and are being measured in two ways. The first measures the positions of the spectral lines on a comparator, traditionally used to measure many archival spectra at NIST. The second uses a commercial image scanner to obtain a digital image of the plate that can be analyzed using line fitting software. Preliminary analysis of these spectra indicates that the literature values of the Fe V and Ni V wavelengths are not on the same scale and differ from our new measurements by up to 0.02 Å in some

  6. COS FUV Internal/External Wavelength Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    2009-07-01

    Observe external radial velocity standard targets in TIME-TAG {FLASH=YES} mode with all grating and central wavelength combinations. The purpose is to obtain zero-point offsets for the wavelength scale {internal wavecal lamp scale to external standard wavelength scale} and PSA dispersion relations for all central wavelengths. Following this determination, adjustments of the nominal science target spectral range for each grating and central wavelength combination will be made via SMS patchable constant for nominal OSM1 positions corresponding to each central wavelength. Subsequent to this modification of the wavelength scale {and its verification via analysis of COS30 - program 11488}, FUV science-related operations and wavelength-dependent EROs can commence.

  7. COS NUV Internal/External Wavelength Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Charles

    2009-07-01

    Observe external radial velocity standard targets {preferably, though not required, in CVZ} in TIME-TAG {FLASH=YES} mode with as many grating and central wavelength combinations as feasible. The purpose is to obtain zero-point offsets for the wavelength scale {internal wavecal lamp scale to external standard wavelength scale} for all central wavelengths. Following this determination, adjustments of the nominal science target spectral range for each grating and central wavelength combination will be made via SMS patchable constant for nominal OSM2 positions corresponding to each central wavelength. Subsequent to this modification of the wavelength scale {and its verification in COS 15 - program 11475}, NUV science-related operations and wavelength-scale dependent EROs can commence.

  8. IR Fine-Structure Line Signatures of Central Dust-Bounded Nebulae in Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, J.; Allen, R.; Dudley, C. C.; Satyapal, S.; Luhman, M.; Wolfire, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2004-01-01

    To date, the only far-infrared spectroscopic observations of ultraluminous infrared galaxies have been obtained with the European Space Agency s Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer. The spectra of these galaxies are characterized by molecular absorption lines and weak emission lines from photodissociation regions (PDRs), but no far-infrared (greater than 40 microns) lines from ionized regions have been detected. ESA s Herschel Space Observatory, slated for launch in 2007, will likely be able to detect these lines in samples of local and moderate redshift ultra luminous galaxies and to enable measurement of the ionization parameters, the slope of the ionizing continuum, and densities present in the ionized regions of these galaxies. The higher spatial resolution of proposed observatories discussed in this workshop will enable isolation of the central regions of local galaxies and detection of these lines in high-redshift galaxies for study of the evolution of galaxies. Here we discuss evidence for the e.ects of absorption by dust within ionized regions and present the spectroscopic signatures predicted by photoionization modeling of dust-bounded regions.

  9. Fine Structure of Chromospheric Brightenings above a Light Bridge and Penumbral Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Lokesh

    We present simultaneous photospheric and chromospheric observations of the trailing sunspot in NOAA 10904. At the limit of the instrumental spatial resolution Ca II H images show jet-like brightenings above a lightbridge and a penumbral filament that intrudes into the umbra. The observations were carried out with the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST) on 13 August 2006. The Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) filter was used to scan the Fe I 6302.5 ˚ line at A 6 wavelength positions. Full Stokes polarimetry was performed and the magnetic field vector was obtained by means of a Milne-Eddington inversion of the radiative transfer equation. The data reveal a more inclined field in the light bridge and penumbral filament than in the umbra with a vertical current density higher than 200 mA m-2 . Also opposite polarity patches were found in the light bridge. Such a magnetic configuration indicates low altitude reconnection. A similar mechanism causes penumbral microjets which were also observed along other penumbral filaments.

  10. The fine structure of the front side magnetopause during two successive crossings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formisano, V.; Pedersen, A.; Lindqvist, P.-A.

    1982-01-01

    The magnetopause crossings of November 10, 1977, which are considered to be representative of a class of structures, are investigated, and a procedure is developed to derive approximate surface currents near the magnetopause from ISEE 1 magnetic field data by assuming a constant speed of the magnetopause along its normal for each crossing of the magnetopause layer. Changes in the magnetic field indicate that current sheets exist on each side of the magnetopause layer, which is characterized by an irregular magnetic field and a magnetosheath-like energy distribution. No boundary layer plasma is observed on the magnetospheric field lines inside the magnetopause, and electromagnetic energy is found to be dissipated at the two edges of the magnetopause layer where the current layers are observed.

  11. Effect of cellulose fine structure on kinetics of its digestion by mixed ruminal microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, P J; Lopez-Guisa, J M; French, A D

    1990-01-01

    The digestion kinetics of a variety of pure celluloses were examined by using an in vitro assay employing mixed ruminal microflora and a modified detergent extraction procedure to recover residual cellulose. Digestion of all of the celluloses was described by a discontinuous first-order rate equation to yield digestion rate constants and discrete lag times. These kinetic parameters were compared with the relative crystallinity indices and estimated accessible surface areas of the celluloses. For type I celluloses having similar crystallinities and simple nonaggregating particle morphologies, the fermentation rate constants displayed a strong positive correlation (r2 = 0.978) with gross specific surface area; lag time exhibited a weaker, negative correlation (r2 = 0.930) with gross specific surface area. Crystallinity was shown to have a relatively minor effect on the digestion rate and lag time. Swelling of microcrystalline cellulose with 72 to 77% phosphoric acid yielded substrates which were fermented slightly more rapidly than the original material. However, treatment with higher concentrations of phosphoric acid resulted in a more slowly fermented substrate, despite a decrease in crystallinity and an increase in pore volume. This reduced fermentation rate was apparently due to the partial conversion of the cellulose from the type I to the type II allomorph, since mercerized (type II) cellulose was also fermented more slowly, and only after a much longer lag period. The results are consistent with earlier evidence for the cell-associated nature of cellulolytic enzymes of ruminal bacteria and suggest that ruminal microflora do not rapidly adapt to utilization of celluloses with altered unit cell structures. PMID:2403252

  12. Wavelength Scaling of High Harmonic Generation Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Shiner, A. D.; Trallero-Herrero, C.; Kajumba, N.; Corkum, P. B.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Bandulet, H.-C.; Comtois, D.; Legare, F.; Giguere, M.; Kieffer, J-C.

    2009-08-14

    Using longer wavelength laser drivers for high harmonic generation is desirable because the highest extreme ultraviolet frequency scales as the square of the wavelength. Recent numerical studies predict that high harmonic efficiency falls dramatically with increasing wavelength, with a very unfavorable lambda{sup -(5-6)} scaling. We performed an experimental study of the high harmonic yield over a wavelength range of 800-1850 nm. A thin gas jet was employed to minimize phase matching effects, and the laser intensity and focal spot size were kept constant as the wavelength was changed. Ion yield was simultaneously measured so that the total number of emitting atoms was known. We found that the scaling at constant laser intensity is lambda{sup -6.3+}-{sup 1.1} in Xe and lambda{sup -6.5+}-{sup 1.1} in Kr over the wavelength range of 800-1850 nm, somewhat worse than the theoretical predictions.

  13. Studying the fine structure of coherent echo spectra using data from Irkutsk incoherent scatter radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berngardt, O. I.; Potekhin, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    Studying the processes generating different-scale inhomogeneities is one of the challenging problems of ionospheric physics. Plasma instabilities are one of the physical mechanisms by which small-scale inhomogeneities are formed. The main forms of instability in the ionospheric E-layer are two-stream and gradient-drift ones. The inhomogeneities generated by them lead to an abnormally intense radio scattering of different wavelengths (known as coherent echo (CE) or radio aurora) in the E-layer. Therefore, the method of radiowave backscattering is among the widely used methods for studying such inhomogeneities. The CE phenomenon has been investigated most intensely at high and equatorial latitudes, where the conditions for the CE origination are formed rather regularly. For the last decade, CE has also been intensely studied at midlatitudes, where it is observed less frequently and its formation conditions are less known. In 1998-2006, the purposeful studies of the midlatitude CE peculiarities were performed at the Irkutsk incoherent scatter (IS) radar, with a particular emphasis on its coherent properties. It was for the first time found out that the spectra of some data sets had a fine comb-shaped structure, which generated well-known single-humped CE spectra as a result of statistical averaging. In the scope of this study, unique coherent methods for processing individual data sets of CE signals were developed, making it possible to reveal the peculiarities of unaveraged CE-signal spectra. To describe these peculiarities, we proposed a new model of the inhomogeneity spectrum, which is the superposition of the discrete set of spatial harmonics with close wave numbers. The model was shown to adequately describe the scattered signal characteristics observed experimentally.

  14. Three-dimensional temperature mapping of solar photospheric fine structure using Ca ii H filtergrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, V. M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The wings of the Ca ii H and K lines provide excellent photospheric temperature diagnostics. At the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST), the blue wing of Ca ii H is scanned with a narrowband interference filter mounted on a rotation stage. This provides up to 0farcs10 spatial resolution filtergrams at high cadence that are concurrent with other diagnostics at longer wavelengths. Aims: The aim is to develop observational techniques that provide photospheric temperature stratification at the highest spatial resolution possible and use them to compare simulations and observations at different heights. Methods: We use filtergrams in the Ca ii H blue wing that were obtained with a tiltable interference filter at the SST. Synthetic observations are produced from three-dimensional (3D) hydro and magneto-hydrodynamic numerical simulations and degraded to match the observations. The temperature structure obtained from applying the method to the synthetic data is compared with the known structure in the simulated atmospheres and with observations of an active region. Cross-correlation techniques using restored non-simultaneous continuum images are used to reduce high-altitude, small-scale seeing signal introduced from the non-simultaneity of the frames when differentiating data. Results: Temperature extraction using high-resolution filtergrams in the Ca ii H blue wing works reasonably well when tested with simulated 3D atmospheres. The cross-correlation technique successfully compensates for the problem of small-scale seeing differences and provides a measure of the spurious signal from this source in differentiated data. Synthesized data from the simulated atmospheres (including pores) match well the observations morphologically at different observed heights and in vertical temperature gradients.

  15. Results of many-year subsatellite measurements of current fine structure in northeastern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrova, Olga; Krayushkin, Evgeny; Kalashnikova, Nina

    Results of subsatellite measurements of coastal currents in the shelf zone of northeastern Black Sea are presented. The measurements have been performed every year since 2006 in June and September-October months near the Gelendzhik Bay. The main instruments used are Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) and CTD probes. Ground and ship measurements were conducted simultaneously with satellite imaging in microwave (ASAR Envisat, ERS-2, RADARSAT-2, TerraSAR-X), visible and infrared (OLI Landsat-8, ETM+ Landsat-7, TM Landsat-5, MODIS Terra/Aqua, AVHRR NOAA) ranges. The investigations performed revealed spatial, depth and temporal variability of current direction and velocity in the shelf zone. Multiple instances of counter-currents opposing to the Ring Current were registered. In our view, they are associated with a passage of small-scale anticyclonic eddies across the region of interest. The 3D structure of the eddies in the upper quasi-uniform layer was analyzed based on ADCP data. The use of high resolution (3 m) SAR data in combination with ADCP measurements at the resolution of 0.5 m allowed us to detect a number of internal wave trains. Form ADCP and thermistors records, their amplitudes were estimated to reach 5-8 m. Joint analysis of satellite SAR and subsatellite data gave an assessment of their typical wavelength at 90-100 m. Generation mechanisms of these internal waves are suggested. Another phenomenon of interest observed in the region of the measurements is surface manifestations of ring waves near localized natural and anthropogenic generation sources. Such ring waves are most frequently found in the anchor area for ships, whose oscillations can be the source of their generation. The work was in part supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (projects #14-05-00520-а, and 13-07-12017-ofi_m). SAR data from RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X were obtained under SOAR RADARSAT-2/TerraSAR-X Project #5074.

  16. Flare evolution and polarization changes in fine structures of solar radio emission in the 2013 April 11 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, Gennady; Sych, Robert; Tan, Bao-Lin; Yan, Yi-Hua; Tan, Cheng-Ming; Fu, Qi-Jun; Karlický, Marian; Fomichev, Valery

    2016-02-01

    The measurement of positions and sizes of radio sources in observations is important for understanding of the flare evolution. For the first time, solar radio spectral fine structures in an M6.5 flare that occurred on 2013 April 11 were observed simultaneously by several radio instruments at four different observatories: Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer at Huairou (SBRS/Huairou), Ondřejov Radio Spectrograph in the Czech Republic (ORSC/Ondřejov), Badary Broadband Microwave Spectropolarimeter (BMS/Irkutsk), and spectrograph/IZMIRAN (Moscow, Troitsk). The fine structures included microwave zebra patterns (ZPs), fast pulsations and fiber bursts. They were observed during the flare brightening located at the tops of a loop arcade as shown in images taken by the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) telescope onboard NASA's satellite Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The flare occurred at 06:58-07:26 UT in solar active region NOAA 11719 located close to the solar disk center. ZPs appeared near high frequency boundaries of the pulsations, and their spectra observed in Huairou and Ondřejov agreed with each other in terms of details. At the beginning of the flare's impulsive phase, a strong narrowband ZP burst occurred with a moderate left-handed circular polarization. Then a series of pulsations and ZPs were observed in almost unpolarized emission. After 07:00 UT a ZP appeared with a moderate right-handed polarization. In the flare decay phase (at about 07:25 UT), ZPs and fiber bursts become strongly right-hand polarized. BMS/Irkutsk spectral observations indicated that the background emission showed a left-handed circular polarization (similar to SBRS/Huairou spectra around 3 GHz). However, the fine structure appeared in the right-handed polarization. The dynamics of the polarization was associated with the motion of the flare exciter, which was observed in EUV images at 171 Å and 131 Å by the SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). Combining magnetograms observed by

  17. Systematic Oxidation of Polystyrene by Ultraviolet-Ozone, Characterized by Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and Contact Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Klein,R.; Fischer, D.; Lenhart, J.

    2008-01-01

    The process of implanting oxygen in polystyrene (PS) via exposure to ultraviolet-ozone (UV-O) was systematically investigated using the characterization technique of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Samples of PS exposed to UV-O for 10-300 s and washed with isopropanol were analyzed using the carbon and oxygen K-edge NEXAFS partial electron yields, using various retarding bias voltages to depth-profile the oxygen penetration into the surface. Evaluation of reference polymers provided a scale to quantify the oxygen concentration implanted by UV-O treatment. We find that ozone initially reacts with the double bonds on the phenyl rings, forming carbonyl groups, but within 1 min of exposure, the ratio of double to single oxygen bonds stabilizes at a lower value. Oxygen penetrates the film with relative ease, creating a fairly uniform distribution of oxygen within at least the first 4 nm (the effective depth probed by NEXAFS here). Before oxygen accumulates in large concentrations, however, it preferentially degrades the uppermost layer of the film by removing oxygenated low-molecular-weight oligomers. The failure to accumulate high concentrations of oxygen is seen in the nearly constant carbon edge jump, the low concentration of oxygen even at 5 min exposure (58% of that in poly(4-acetoxystyrene), the polymer with the most similarities to UV-O-treated PS), and the relatively high contact angles. At 5 min exposure the oxygen concentration contains ca. 7 atomic % oxygen. The oxygen species that are implanted consist predominantly of single O-C bonds and double OC bonds but also include a small fraction of O-H. UV-O treatment leads a plateau after 2 min exposure in the water contact angle hysteresis, at a value of 67 {+-} 2, due primarily to chemical heterogeneity. Annealing above Tg allows oxygenated species to move short distances away from the surface but not diffuse further than 1-2 nm.

  18. Effective wavelength calibration for moire fringe projection

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, Daryl; Davies, Angela; Farahi, Faramarz

    2006-12-01

    The fringe patterns seen when using moire instruments are similar to the patterns seen in traditional interferometry but differ in the spacing between consecutive fringes. In traditional interferometry, the spacing is constant and related to the wavelength of the source. In moire fringe projection, the spacing (the effective wavelength) may not be constant over the field of view and the spacing depends on the system geometry. In these cases, using a constant effective wavelength over the field of view causes inaccurate surface height measurements. We examine the calibration process of the moirefringe projection measurement, which takes this varying wavelength into account to produce a pixel-by-pixel wavelength map. The wavelength calibration procedure is to move the object in the out-of-plane direction a known distance until every pixel intensity value goes through at least one cycle. A sinusoidal function is then fit to the data to extract the effective wavelength pixel by pixel, yielding an effective wavelength map. A calibrated step height was used to validate the effective wavelength map with results within 1% of the nominal value of the step height. The error sources that contributed to the uncertainty in determining the height of the artifact are also investigated.

  19. Early universe constraints on time variation of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Susana J.; Mosquera, Mercedes E.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Vucetich, Hector

    2008-10-15

    We study the time variation of fundamental constants in the early Universe. Using data from primordial light nuclei abundances, cosmic microwave background, and the 2dFGRS power spectrum, we put constraints on the time variation of the fine structure constant {alpha} and the Higgs vacuum expectation value without assuming any theoretical framework. A variation in leads to a variation in the electron mass, among other effects. Along the same line, we study the variation of {alpha} and the electron mass m{sub e}. In a purely phenomenological fashion, we derive a relationship between both variations.

  20. Oxygen K-edge fine structures of water by x-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy under pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Hiroshi; Huotari, Simo; Andrault, Denis; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko

    2007-10-07

    Fine structure of the oxygen K edge was investigated for water at ambient pressure, 0.16, 0.21, 0.27, 0.47, and 0.60 GPa using x-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy (XRS). Similarity in near-edge structures at 0.16 and 0.60 GPa suggests little difference in the electronic state of oxygen in the low-pressure and high-pressure forms of water. Yet, we observed significant variation of preedge structure of the XRS spectra with compression. The intensity of the preedge peak at 535.7 eV has a minimal value at around 0.3 GPa, indicating that the number of hydrogen bonding increases first and then decreases as a function of pressure.

  1. Local environment of Mn dopant in ZnO by near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunisu, Masahiro; Oba, Fumiyasu; Ikeno, Hidekazu; Tanaka, Isao; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki

    2005-03-01

    High-resolution near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) at MnK edge is employed to probe the local environment of Mn dopant in ZnO. First-principles supercell calculations are systematically made to obtain theoretical NEXAFS. Mn is found to substitute for Zn up to 5at. %Mn in polycrystalline samples sintered at 1623K in air. Presence of Mn3O4 is apparent for samples with higher Mn content. The NEXAFS does not change in the range of Mn concentration from 0.01 to 5at.%, indicating the absence of Mn precipitates. The results are confirmed by examining the polarization dependence of the NEXAFS for a 5at.%-doped ZnO thin film.

  2. Effect of heat treatment on the far-infrared emission spectra and fine structures of black tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yan; Gan, Kun

    2014-05-01

    Mineral black tourmaline powders were heat-treated at different temperatures. Their crystal structure was studied by X-ray diffractometer. Their infrared absorption and emission spectra before and after the heat treatment were analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The corresponding fine structures were discussed in detail. The results showed that the powders possessed higher infrared emissivity at the band where they showed stronger infrared absorption. However, there is no certain correlation between the peak intensity of infrared absorption and emissivity values at the same frequency. Because of the crystal shrinkage of c-axis, the electronic transitions were stimulated between different energy levels, and the abilities of infrared absorption and emission were enhanced with increasing the temperature of heat treatment. PMID:24734598

  3. Fine-structural Observations on Siliceous Scale Production and Shell Assembly in the Testate Amoeba Paulinella chromatophora.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Mami; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    The fine structure of shell formation was observed in P. chromatophora. Scales were formed one by one in silica deposition vesicles (SDVs) that were supported by an array of microtubules, which are probably involved in determining the shape and size of scales. The timing of silicic acid transport into an SDV was shown to be at an early stage of scale production because silicon was detected within SDVs containing immature scales. During the shell construction process, vesicles containing two types of dense materials were observed. One type of vesicle contains lower-density material and is located at the front edge of the branched, thick pseudopodium, extending from the maternal shell to the newly formed shell. The other type of vesicle, which contains higher-density material, was also observed in the thick pseudopodium. It appears that microtubules are involved in the shell construction process. PMID:27348459

  4. Note: Construction of x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption fine structure beamline at the Pohang Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik-Jae; Yu, Chung-Jong; Yun, Young-Duck; Lee, Chae-Soon; Seo, In Deuk; Kim, Hyo-Yun; Lee, Woul-Woo; Chae, Keun Hwa

    2010-02-15

    A new hard x-ray beamline, 10B KIST-PAL beamline (BL10B), has been designed and constructed at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) in Korea. The beamline, operated by Pohang Accelerator Laboratory-Korean Institute of Science and Technology consortium, is dedicated to x-ray scattering (XRS) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) experiments. X rays with photon energies from 4.0 to 16.0 keV are delivered to the experimental station passing a collimating mirror, a fixed-exit double-crystal Si(111) monochromator, and a toroidal mirror. Basic experimental equipments for XAFS measurement, a high resolution diffractometry, an image plate detector system, and a hot stage have been prepared for the station. From our initial commissioning and performance testing of the beamline, it is observed that BL10B beamline can perform XRS and XAFS measurements successfully.

  5. Cellular fine structures and histochemical reactions in the tissue of a cypress twig preserved in Baltic amber

    PubMed Central

    Koller, Barbara; Schmitt, Jürgen M.; Tischendorf, Gilbert

    2005-01-01

    A twig of a cypress plant preserved for ca. 45Myr in Baltic amber was analysed by light and electron microscopy. Cross-sections of the whole plant showed an almost intact tissue of the entire stem and leaves, revealing, to our knowledge, the oldest and most highly preserved tissue from an amber inclusion reported so far. The preparations are based on a new technique of internal imbedding, whereby the hollow spaces within the inclusion are filled with synthetic resin which stabilizes the cellular structures during the sectioning procedure. Cytological stains applied to the sections reacted with cell walls and nuclei. A strong green auto-fluorescence of the cuticle and the resin canals in the leaves was observed. Transmission electron micrographs revealed highly preserved fine structures of cell walls, membranes and organelles. The results were compared with taxonomically related recent Glyptostrobus and Juniperus plants. PMID:15695201

  6. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  7. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, D.P.; Acremann, Y.; Scherz, A.; Burkhardt, M.; Stohr, J.; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W.F.; Beeck, T.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Pietzsch, A.; Wurth, W.; Fohlisch, A.; /Hamburg U.

    2009-12-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy on solids by means of femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL). Our experiments, carried out at the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH), used a special sample geometry, spectrographic energy dispersion, single shot position-sensitive detection and a data normalization procedure that eliminates the severe fluctuations of the incident intensity in space and photon energy. As an example we recorded the {sup 3}D{sub 1} N{sub 4,5}-edge absorption resonance of La{sup 3+}-ions in LaMnO{sub 3}. Our study opens the door for x-ray absorption measurements on future x-ray FEL facilities.

  8. Applications of extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy to studies of bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Anatoly I

    2012-12-21

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been used to study short range order in heterometallic alloys for almost four decades. In this critical review, experimental, theoretical and data analytical approaches are revisited to examine their power, and limitations, in studies of bimetallic nanocatalysts. This article covers the basics of EXAFS experiments, data analysis, and modelling of nanoscale clusters. It demonstrates that, in the best case scenario, quantitative information about the nanocatalyst's size, shape, details of core-shell architecture, as well as static and dynamic disorder in metal-metal bond lengths can be obtained. The article also emphasizes the main challenge accompanying such insights: the need to account for the statistical nature of the EXAFS technique, and discusses corrective strategies. PMID:22833100

  9. Local structure of NiAl compounds investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tian, J S; Han, G M; Wei, H; Jin, T; Dargusch, M S

    2012-07-01

    The local structures of pure NiAl and Ti-, Co-doped NiAl compounds have been obtained utilizing extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The results provide experimental evidence that Ni antisite defects exist in the Ni-rich NiAl compounds. The site preference of Ti and Co has been confirmed. Ti occupies the Al sublattice, while Co occupies the Ni sublattice. The structure parameters obtained by EXAFS were consistent with the X-ray diffraction results. Owing to the precipitation of α-Cr, the local structure of NiAl-Cr has not been obtained, making the site preference of Cr unclear. PMID:22713881

  10. Time-resolved pump and probe x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 at PETRA III.

    PubMed

    Göries, D; Dicke, B; Roedig, P; Stübe, N; Meyer, J; Galler, A; Gawelda, W; Britz, A; Geßler, P; Sotoudi Namin, H; Beckmann, A; Schlie, M; Warmer, M; Naumova, M; Bressler, C; Rübhausen, M; Weckert, E; Meents, A

    2016-05-01

    We report about the development and implementation of a new setup for time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 utilizing the outstanding source properties of the low-emittance PETRA III synchrotron storage ring in Hamburg. Using a high intensity micrometer-sized X-ray beam in combination with two positional feedback systems, measurements were performed on the transition metal complex fac-Tris[2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N]iridium(III) also referred to as fac-Ir(ppy)3. This compound is a representative of the phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, which play an important role in organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. The experiment could directly prove the anticipated photoinduced charge transfer reaction. Our results further reveal that the temporal resolution of the experiment is limited by the PETRA III X-ray bunch length of ∼103 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM). PMID:27250401

  11. Detection of O I and Si II far-infrared fine-structure emission from Alpha Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Glassgold, Alfred E.

    1993-01-01

    We have detected forbidden O I 63 micron and forbidden Si II 35 micron emission from the oxygen-rich, M2 lab supergiant, Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse). The forbidden O I line flux is 2.4 +/- 0.2 x 10 exp -18 W/sq cm, and the forbidden Si II line flux is 0.9 +/- 0.4 x 10 exp -18 W/sq cm. These fluxes are consistent with the thermal model of Rodgers and Glassgold (1991), which indicates that the emission arises in dense, warm gas in Alpha Ori's inner envelope and implies that nearly all of the available O and Si is in atomic form. This is the first reported detection of FIR, fine-structure emission from the inner or transition region of a circumstellar envelope, where molecules and dust are expected to form.

  12. Single Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals at Low Temperature: Fast Single-Photon Emission, Reduced Blinking, and Exciton Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Metal-halide semiconductors with perovskite crystal structure are attractive due to their facile solution processability, and have recently been harnessed very successfully for high-efficiency photovoltaics and bright light sources. Here, we show that at low temperature single colloidal cesium lead halide (CsPbX3, where X = Cl/Br) nanocrystals exhibit stable, narrow-band emission with suppressed blinking and small spectral diffusion. Photon antibunching demonstrates unambiguously nonclassical single-photon emission with radiative decay on the order of 250 ps, representing a significant acceleration compared to other common quantum emitters. High-resolution spectroscopy provides insight into the complex nature of the emission process such as the fine structure and charged exciton dynamics. PMID:26771336

  13. Measurement of the p to s Wave Branching Ratio of {sup 187}Re {beta} Decay from Beta Environmental Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.; Capelli, S.; Capozzi, F.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M.; Benedek, G.; Filipponi, A.; Giuliani, A.; Pedretti, M.; Monfardini, A.

    2006-02-03

    The mixed occurrence of s-wave and p-wave contributions in a first forbidden unique Gamow-Teller {beta} decay has been investigated for the first time by measuring the beta environmental fine structure (BEFS) in a {sup 187}Re crystalline compound. The experiment has been carried out with an array of eight AgReO{sub 4} thermal detectors operating at a temperature of {approx}100 mK. A fit of the observed BEFS spectrum indicates the p-wave electron emission as the dominant channel. The complete understanding of the BEFS distortion of the {sup 187}Re {beta} decay spectrum is crucial for future experiments aiming at the precise calorimetric measurement of the antineutrino mass.

  14. Fine structure in α decay of even-even nuclei using a finite-range nucleon-nucleon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, A.; Alharbi, T.

    2015-07-01

    A systematic study on α -decay fine structure is presented for even-even nuclei in the range 78 ≤Z ≤102 . The penetration probability is obtained from the WKB approximation in combination with the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition. The potential barrier is numerically constructed in the well-established double-folding model for both Coulomb and nuclear potentials. A realistic M3Y interaction, based on the G -matrix elements of the Paris N N potential, has been used in the folding calculation. The local approximation for the nondiagonal one-body density matrix in the calculation of the exchange potential was included by using the harmonic oscillator representation of the nondiagonal density matrix of the α particle. The computed partial half-lives and branching ratios are compared with the recent experimental data and they are in good agreement.

  15. Precision Test of Many-Body QED in the Be+ 2 p Fine Structure Doublet Using Short-Lived Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Geppert, Christopher; Krieger, Andreas; Pachucki, Krzysztof; Puchalski, Mariusz; Blaum, Klaus; Bissell, Mark L.; Frömmgen, Nadja; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Krämer, Jörg; Kreim, Kim; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Sánchez, Rodolfo; Yordanov, Deyan T.

    2015-07-01

    Absolute transition frequencies of the 2 s 1/2S2 →2 p 1/2,3/2P2 transitions in Be+ were measured for the isotopes 7,9,-12Be. The fine structure splitting of the 2 p state and its isotope dependence are extracted and compared to results of ab initio calculations using explicitly correlated basis functions, including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics effects at the order of m α6 and m α7 ⁢ln α ⁡ . Accuracy has been improved in both the theory and experiment by 2 orders of magnitude, and good agreement is observed. This represents one of the most accurate tests of quantum electrodynamics for many-electron systems, being insensitive to nuclear uncertainties.

  16. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Samusev, Kirill B.; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters. PMID:27491952

  17. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure.

    PubMed

    Rybin, Mikhail V; Samusev, Kirill B; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu; Kivshar, Yuri S; Limonov, Mikhail F

    2016-01-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters. PMID:27491952

  18. Fine Structure of Bacteroids in Root Nodules of Vigna sinensis, Acacia longifolia, Viminaria juncea, and Lupinus angustifolius

    PubMed Central

    Dart, P. J.; Mercer, F. V.

    1966-01-01

    Dart, P. J. (University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia), and F. V. Mercer. Fine structure of bacteroids in root nodules of Vigna sinensis, Acacia longifolia, Viminaria juncea, and Lupinus angustifolius. J. Bacteriol. 91:1314–1319.—In nodules of Vigna sinensis, Acacia longifolia, and Viminaria juncea, membrane envelopes enclose groups of bacteroids. The bacteroids often contain inclusion granules and electron-dense bodies, expand little during development, and retain their rod form with a compact, central nucleoid area. The membrane envelope may persist around bacteroids after host cytoplasm breakdown. In nodules of Lupinus angustifolius, the membrane envelopes enclose only one or two bacteroids, which expand noticeably during development and change from their initial rod structure. Images PMID:5929757

  19. Determining fine-structure parameters for tungsten powder and filings by harmonic analysis of x-ray diffraction lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchik, A.E.; Moshkina, T.I.; Osmakov, A.S.

    1986-12-01

    Evidence has been accumulating on determining fine-structure parameters by line shape harmonic analysis (LSHA) although many aspects remain unresolved. In this paper, the authors discuss the interpretations afresh, on-going improvements in x-ray techniques, in recording methods, and in processing the data, as well as in programs for determining the parameters by LSHA. The authors selected tungsten because of its bcc lattice, whose diffraction peaks are widely separated, which almost completely rules out their overlapping even if there is considerable broadening, such as is produced by large plastic strain. The material was produced in two ways: by firing a tungsten single crystal and by grinding VChDK tungsten powder in a laboratory vibration mill for 10, 20, 30, 50, and 100 h.

  20. Tuning exciton energy and fine-structure splitting in single InAs quantum dots by applying uniaxial stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Dan; Dou, Xiuming; Wu, Xuefei; Liao, Yongping; Zhou, Pengyu; Ding, Kun; Ni, Haiqiao; Niu, Zhichuan; Zhu, Haijun; Jiang, Desheng; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-04-01

    Exciton and biexciton emission energies as well as excitonic fine-structure splitting (FSS) in single InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) have been continuously tuned in situ in an optical cryostat using a developed uniaxial stress device. With increasing tensile stress, the red shift of excitonic emission is up to 5 nm; FSS decreases firstly and then increases monotonically, reaching a minimum value of approximately 10 μeV; biexciton binding energy decreases from 460 to 106 μeV. This technique provides a simple and convenient means to tune QD structural symmetry, exciton energy and biexciton binding energy and can be used for generating entangled and indistinguishable photons.

  1. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Samusev, Kirill B.; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2016-08-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters.

  2. Sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) of thiol and thioether compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Beyhan, Shirin; Urquhart, Stephen G.; Hu Yongfeng

    2011-06-28

    The speciation and quantification of sulfur species based on sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy is of wide interest, particularly for biological and petroleum science. These tasks require a firm understanding of the sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of relevant species. To this end, we have examined the gas phase sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of a group of simple thiol and thioether compounds. These high-resolution gas phase spectra are free of solid-state broadening, charging, and saturation effects common in the NEXAFS spectra of solids. These experimental data have been further analyzed with the aid of improved virtual orbital Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations. The experimental sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra show fine features predicted by calculation, and the combination of experiment and calculation has been used to improve assignment of spectroscopic features relevant for the speciation and quantification of the sulfur compounds.

  3. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in Co{sub 0.013}NbSe{sub 2}.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Castellan, J.-P.; Rosenkranz, S.; Osborn, R.; Rosenmann, D.; Iavarone, M.; Materials Science Division

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the local environment of the Co atom in single crystalline Co{sub x}NbSe{sub 2}, x = 0.013, via Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Co K-edge (7.7 keV) at various temperatures. Co intercalation quickly suppresses superconductivity and the charge-density wave (CDW) present in pure NbSe{sub 2}. In order to study the effect of impurities on superconducting and CDW states one has to verify the random distribution of the intercalated atoms in contrast to possible clustering which could lead to additional, e.g. magnetic, interactions in the case of Co intercalation. Our measurements show that the Co atoms are indeed randomly distributed in Co{sub 0.013}NbSe{sub 2}.

  4. Zinc cysteine active sites of metalloproteins: A density functional theory and x-ray absorption fine structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Farooqi, Mohammed Junaid; Garza, Emily Sofia; Bunker, Grant

    2008-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are complementary tools for the biophysical study of active sites in metalloproteins. DFT is used to compute XAFS multiple scattering Debye Waller factors, which are then employed in genetic algorithm-based fitting process to obtain a global fit to the XAFS in the space of fitting parameters. Zn-Cys sites, which serve important functions as transcriptional switches in Zn finger proteins and matrix metalloproteinases, previously have proven intractable by this method; here these limitations are removed. In this work we evaluate optimal DFT nonlocal functionals and basis sets for determining optimal geometries and vibrational densities of states of mixed ligation Zn(His)4-n(Cys)n sites. Theoretical results are compared to experimental XAFS measurements and Raman spectra from the literature and tabulated for use.

  5. Precision Test of Many-Body QED in the Be+ 2p Fine Structure Doublet Using Short-Lived Isotopes.

    PubMed

    Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Geppert, Christopher; Krieger, Andreas; Pachucki, Krzysztof; Puchalski, Mariusz; Blaum, Klaus; Bissell, Mark L; Frömmgen, Nadja; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Krämer, Jörg; Kreim, Kim; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Sánchez, Rodolfo; Yordanov, Deyan T

    2015-07-17

    Absolute transition frequencies of the 2s 2S{1/2}→2p2P{1/2,3/2} transitions in Be^{+} were measured for the isotopes ^{7,9-12}Be. The fine structure splitting of the 2p state and its isotope dependence are extracted and compared to results of ab initio calculations using explicitly correlated basis functions, including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics effects at the order of mα(6) and mα(7) ⁢ln α. Accuracy has been improved in both the theory and experiment by 2 orders of magnitude, and good agreement is observed. This represents one of the most accurate tests of quantum electrodynamics for many-electron systems, being insensitive to nuclear uncertainties. PMID:26230786

  6. Suppression of fine-structure splitting and oscillator strength of sodium D-line in a Debye plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Joyee Ray, Debasis

    2014-01-15

    We investigate theoretically the influence of static plasma screening on relativistic spin-orbit interaction-induced fine-structure splitting of the D-line doublet arising from the transitions 3p{sub 1/2}–3s{sub 1/2} and 3p{sub 3/2}–3s{sub 1/2} of the valence electron of a sodium atom embedded in a model plasma environment. The many-electron atomic problem is formulated first as an effective one-electron problem in which the interaction between the optically active valence electron and the atomic ion core is represented by an accurate parametric model potential including core-polarization correction, and then the plasma effect on the atomic system is simulated by the Debye-screening model for the valence-core interaction. It is observed that the magnitude of spin-orbit energy shift reduces for both the upper component 3p{sub 3/2} and the lower component 3p{sub 1/2} with increasing plasma screening strength, thereby reducing the spin-orbit energy separation between these two components as the screening becomes stronger. As a consequence, the magnitude of fine-structure splitting between the D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} line energies of sodium drops significantly with stronger plasma screening. The optical (absorption) oscillator strength for 3s → 3p transition is seen to reduce with stronger screening and this leads to a screening-induced gradual suppression of the 3p → 3s spontaneous decay rate.

  7. Fine Structure of Antennal Sensilla of Paysandisia archon and Electrophysiological Responses to Volatile Compounds Associated with Host Palms

    PubMed Central

    Ruschioni, Sara; Riolo, Paola; Verdolini, Elisa; Peri, Ezio; Guarino, Salvatore; Colazza, Stefano; Romani, Roberto; Isidoro, Nunzio

    2015-01-01

    Paysandisia archon (Lepidoptera: Castniidae) is a serious pest of palm trees. A comprehensive knowledge of the insect olfactory system is essential for the development of efficient semiochemical-based control methods. The olfactory sensilla are located particularly on the antennae, and these can detect plant volatiles that provide important cues for the insects in the search for their host plants. To date, the fine structure of P. archon antennal sensilla studies and their role in host-plant perception have not been investigated in great detail. Using light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy, the antennae of both sexes of P. archon are described here in detail, according to the different types, quantities and distributions of the sensilla. Six types of sensilla were identified. The most widespread are sensilla trichoidea, sensilla basiconica and sensilla auricilica, which are associated with olfactory function. These have cuticular shafts characterised by numerous pores, and they are innervated by two or three sensory neurons. Sensilla coeloconica, sensilla chaetica and sensilla ampullacea are associated with olfactory or olfactory-thermoreception, mechano-gustatory, and thermo-hygroreception functions, respectively. Moreover, the role of P. archon antennae in locating of the host palms was evaluated using electroantennograms, to monitor responses to ester and terpene compounds previously identified as volatiles of damaged/fermenting palm tissues. P. archon showed responses to all of the synthetic chemicals tested, with greater responses in the females, providing a significant sex*dose effect. Among the compounds tested, ethyl isobutyrate elicited the strongest antenna responses. The fine structure of the cuticular and cellular components of the P. archon antenna sensory equipment is described for the first time. The results of this study form an important starting point and complement physiological and behavioural studies, to provide

  8. Influence of 8-Oxoguanosine on the Fine Structure of DNA Studied with Biasing-Potential Replica Exchange Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Mahmut; Zacharias, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modification or radiation can cause DNA damage, which plays a crucial role for mutagenesis of DNA, carcinogenesis, and aging. DNA damage can also alter the fine structure of DNA that may serve as a recognition signal for DNA repair enzymes. A new, advanced sampling replica-exchange method has been developed to specifically enhance the sampling of conformational substates in duplex DNA during molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach employs specific biasing potentials acting on pairs of pseudodihedral angles of the nucleic acid backbone that are added in the replica simulations to promote transitions of the most common substates of the DNA backbone. The sampled states can exchange with a reference simulation under the control of the original force field. The application to 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine, one of the most common oxidative damage in DNA indicated better convergence of sampled states during 10 ns simulations compared to 20 times longer standard MD simulations. It is well suited to study systematically the fine structure and dynamics of large nucleic acids under realistic conditions, including explicit solvent and ions. The biasing potential-replica exchange MD simulations indicated significant differences in the population of nucleic acid backbone substates in the case of 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine compared to a regular guanosine in the same sequence context. This concerns both the ratio of the B-DNA substates BI and BII associated with the backbone dihedral angles ε and ζ but also coupled changes in the backbone dihedral angles α and γ. Such differences may play a crucial role in the initial recognition of damaged DNA by repair enzymes. PMID:23473492

  9. Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for sulfur-like iron, Fe XI

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Allam, S.H.

    2014-05-15

    Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the 14 LS states belonging to configurations of sulfur-like iron, Fe XI, have been calculated. These states are represented by configuration interaction wavefunctions and have configurations 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 4}, 3s3p{sup 5}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}3d, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4s, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4p, and 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4d, which give rise to 123 fine-structure energy levels. Extensive configuration interaction calculations using the CIV3 code have been performed. To assess the importance of relativistic effects, the intermediate coupling scheme by means of the Breit–Pauli Hamiltonian terms, such as the one-body mass correction and Darwin term, and spin–orbit, spin–other-orbit, and spin–spin corrections, are incorporated within the code. These incorporations adjusted the energy levels, therefore the calculated values are close to the available experimental data. Comparisons between the present calculated energy levels as well as oscillator strengths and both experimental and theoretical data have been performed. Our results show good agreement with earlier works, and they might be useful in thermonuclear fusion research and astrophysical applications. -- Highlights: •Accurate atomic data of iron ions are needed for identification of solar corona. •Extensive configuration interaction wavefunctions including 123 fine-structure levels have been calculated. •The relativistic effects by means of the Breit–Pauli Hamiltonian terms are incorporated. •This incorporation adjusts the energy levels, therefore the calculated values are close to experimental values.

  10. Fine structural and immunohistochemical detection of collar enamel in the teeth of Polypterus senegalus, an actinopterygian fish.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, I; Yokosuka, H; Ishiyama, M; Mikami, M; Shimokawa, H; Uchida, T

    2012-02-01

    This is the first detailed report about the collar enamel of the teeth of Polypterus senegalus. We have examined the fine structure of the collar enamel and enamel organ of Polypterus during amelogenesis by light and transmission electron microscopy. An immunohistochemical analysis with an antibody against bovine amelogenin, an antiserum against porcine amelogenin and region-specific antibodies or antiserum against the C-terminus, middle region and N-terminus of porcine amelogenin has also been performed to examine the collar enamel matrix present in these teeth. Their ameloblasts contain fully developed Golgi apparatus, rough endoplasmic reticulum and secretory granules. During collar enamel formation, an amorphous fine enamel matrix containing no collagen fibrils is found between the dentin and ameloblast layers. In non-demineralized sections, the collar enamel (500 nm to 1 μm thick) is distinguishable from dentin, because of its higher density and differences in the arrangement of its crystals. The fine structural features of collar enamel in Polypterus are similar to those of tooth enamel in Lepisosteus (gars), coelacanths, lungfish and amphibians. The enamel matrix shows intense immunoreactivity to the antibody and antiserum against mammalian amelogenins and to the middleregion- and C-terminal-specific anti-amelogenin antibodies. These findings suggest that the proteins in the enamel of Polypterus contain domains that closely resemble those of bovine and porcine amelogenins. The enamel matrix, which exhibits positive immunoreactivity to mammalian amelogenins, extends to the cap enameloid surface, implying that amelogenin-like proteins are secreted by ameloblasts as a thin matrix layer that covers the cap enameloid after enameloid maturation. PMID:22287040

  11. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes having analogous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Abhijeet; Shrivastava, B. D.; Srivastava, Krishna; Prasad, J.

    2013-02-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectra have been studied at the Cu K-edge in five mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes, viz., [Cu(L-glu)(bipy)] 1, [Cu(L-glu)(phen) (H2O)].3H2O 2, [Cu(L-tyro)(bipy)(ClO4)].2H2O 3, [Cu(L-phen)(bipy)(H2O)] (ClO4) 4, and [Cu(L-tyro)(phen)(H2O)] (ClO4).1.5H2O 5 (where L-glu = L-glutamate dianion, L-tyro = L-tyrosinate anion, bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine, and phen =1,10-phenanthroline), having essentially the same structure. The crystallographic data are available for all the complexes using which five theoretical models have been generated. Firstly, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data of each complex has been analyzed using its own theoretical model and the results obtained are found to be comparable with the crystallographic results. Then, the EXAFS data of each complex has been analyzed using the theoretical models of the remaining four of these complexes. For each complex, the structural parameters obtained by fitting EXAFS data with theoretical models of the four remaining complexes have been found to be comparable with those obtained by fitting its own theoretical model. Thus, it has been found that if the crystal structure is not available for a complex, then the crystal structure of similar or analogous complex can be used satisfactorily for generating the theoretical model for the EXAFS data analysis of that complex, even if different ligands are attached to the central metal atom. On the basis of EXAFS data analysis, the coordination geometries around the central metal ions in these complexes have been depicted.

  12. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S; Conradson, Steven D; Clark, David L

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

  13. Influence of 8-Oxoguanosine on the Fine Structure of DNA Studied with Biasing-Potential Replica Exchange Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kara, Mahmut; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2013-03-05

    Chemical modification or radiation can cause DNA damage, which plays a crucial role for mutagenesis of DNA, carcinogenesis, and aging. DNA damage can also alter the fine structure of DNA that may serve as a recognition signal for DNA repair enzymes. A new, advanced sampling replica-exchange method has been developed to specifically enhance the sampling of conformational substates in duplex DNA during molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach employs specific biasing potentials acting on pairs of pseudodihedral angles of the nucleic acid backbone that are added in the replica simulations to promote transitions of the most common substates of the DNA backbone. The sampled states can exchange with a reference simulation under the control of the original force field. The application to 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine, one of the most common oxidative damage in DNA indicated better convergence of sampled states during 10 ns simulations compared to 20 times longer standard MD simulations. It is well suited to study systematically the fine structure and dynamics of large nucleic acids under realistic conditions, including explicit solvent and ions. The biasing potential-replica exchange MD simulations indicated significant differences in the population of nucleic acid backbone substates in the case of 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine compared to a regular guanosine in the same sequence context. This concerns both the ratio of the B-DNA substates BI and BII associated with the backbone dihedral angles ε and z but also coupled changes in the backbone dihedral angles a and g. Such differences may play a crucial role in the initial recognition of damaged DNA by repair enzymes.

  14. Method of Controlling Lasing Wavelength(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Hutcheson, Ralph L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided to control the lasing wavelength of a laser material without changing or adjusting the mechanical components of a laser device, The rate at which the laser material is pumped with the pumping energy is controlled so that lasing occurs at one or more lasing wavelengths based on the rate. The lasing wavelengths are determined by transition lifetimes and/or energy transfer rates.

  15. X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray excited optical luminescence studies of II-VI semiconducting nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael Wayne

    2010-06-01

    Various II-VI semiconducting nanomaterials such as ZnO-ZnS nanoribbons (NRs), CdSxSe1-x nanostructures, ZnS:Mn NRs, ZnS:Mn,Eu nanoprsims (NPs), ZnO:Mn nanopowders, and ZnO:Co nanopowders were synthesized for study. These materials were characterized by techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, element dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The electronic and optical properties of these nanomaterials were studied by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) techniques, using tuneable soft X-rays from a synchrotron light source. The complementary nature ofthe XAFS and XEOL techniques give site, element and chemical specific measurements which allow a better understanding of the interplay and role of each element in the system. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of ZnS powder in a limited oxygen environment resulted in side-by-side biaxial ZnO-ZnS NR heterostructures. The resulting NRs contained distinct wurtzite ZnS and wurtzite ZnO components with widths of 10--100 nm and 20 --500 nm, respectively and a uniform interface region of 5-15 nm. XAFS and XEOL measurements revealed the luminescence of ZnO-ZnS NRs is from the ZnO component. The luminescence of CdSxSe1-x nanostructures is shown to be dependent on the S to Se ratio, with the band-gap emission being tunable between that of pure CdS and CdSe. Excitation of the CdSxSe 1-x nanostructures by X-ray in XEOL has revealed new de-excitation channels which show a defect emission band not seen by laser excitation. CVD of Mn2+ doped ZnS results in nanostructures with luminescence dominated by the yellow Mn2+ emission due to energy transfer from the ZnS host to the Mn dopant sites. The addition of EuCl3 to the reactants in the CVD process results in a change in morphology from NR to NP. Zn1-xMnxO and Zn1-xCOxO nanopowders were prepared by sol-gel methods at dopant concentrations

  16. Ex-vivo Imaging of Thyroid Gland Using Ultrahigh-Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography at Wavelength from 800 to 1700 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Shutaro; Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2012-03-01

    Wavelength dependence of ex-vivo ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) imaging of thyroid gland using supercontinuum at wavelength from 800 to 1700 nm was demonstrated. The wavelength dependence of the thickness of follicular epithelium and fine structures such as round or oval follicles were observed from the UHR-OCT cross sectional images. The reconstructed en-face OCT images at all wavelength regions were obtained and the images of follicles with several different signal intensities were observed in 1060 and 1700 nm UHR-OCT images. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of wavelength dependence of OCT images of thyroid gland structure.

  17. Understanding Physical Conditions in High-redshift Galaxies Through C I Fine Structure Lines: Data and Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, Regina A.; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2010-10-01

    We probe the physical conditions in high-redshift galaxies, specifically, the damped Lyα systems (DLAs) using neutral carbon (C I) fine structure lines and molecular hydrogen (H2). We report five new detections of C I and analyze the C I in an additional two DLAs with previously published data. We also present one new detection of H2 in a DLA. We present a new method of analysis that simultaneously constrains both the volume density and the temperature of the gas, as opposed to previous studies that a priori assumed a gas temperature. We use only the column density of C I measured in the fine structure states and the assumption of ionization equilibrium in order to constrain the physical conditions in the gas. We present a sample of 11 C I velocity components in six DLAs and compare their properties to those derived by the global C II* technique. The resulting median values for this sample are langn(H I)rang = 69 cm-3, langTrang = 50 K, and langlog(P/k)rang = 3.86 cm-3 K, with standard deviations, σ_{n(H I)} = 134 cm-3, σ T = 52 K, and σlog(P/k) = 3.68 cm-3 K. This can be compared with the integrated median values for the same DLAs: langn(H I)rang = 2.8 cm-3, langTrang = 139 K, and langlog(P/k)rang = 2.57 cm-3 K, with standard deviations σ_{n(H I)} = 3.0 cm-3, σ T = 43 K, and σlog(P/k) = 0.22 cm-3 K. Interestingly, the pressures measured in these high-redshift C I clouds are similar to those found in the Milky Way. We conclude that the C I gas is tracing a higher-density, higher-pressure region, possibly indicative of post-shock gas or a photodissociation region on the edge of a molecular cloud. We speculate that these clouds may be direct probes of the precursor sites of star formation in normal galaxies at high redshift. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space

  18. UNDERSTANDING PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES THROUGH C I FINE STRUCTURE LINES: DATA AND METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, Regina A.; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2010-10-10

    We probe the physical conditions in high-redshift galaxies, specifically, the damped Ly{alpha} systems (DLAs) using neutral carbon (C I) fine structure lines and molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}). We report five new detections of C I and analyze the C I in an additional two DLAs with previously published data. We also present one new detection of H{sub 2} in a DLA. We present a new method of analysis that simultaneously constrains both the volume density and the temperature of the gas, as opposed to previous studies that a priori assumed a gas temperature. We use only the column density of C I measured in the fine structure states and the assumption of ionization equilibrium in order to constrain the physical conditions in the gas. We present a sample of 11 C I velocity components in six DLAs and compare their properties to those derived by the global C II* technique. The resulting median values for this sample are (n(H I)) = 69 cm{sup -3}, (T) = 50 K, and (log(P/k)) = 3.86 cm{sup -3} K, with standard deviations, {sigma}{sub n(H{sub i})} = 134 cm{sup -3}, {sigma}{sub T} = 52 K, and {sigma}{sub log(P/k)} = 3.68 cm{sup -3} K. This can be compared with the integrated median values for the same DLAs: (n(H I)) = 2.8 cm{sup -3}, (T) = 139 K, and (log(P/k)) = 2.57 cm{sup -3} K, with standard deviations {sigma}{sub n(H{sub i})} = 3.0 cm{sup -3}, {sigma}{sub T} = 43 K, and {sigma}{sub log(P/k)} = 0.22 cm{sup -3} K. Interestingly, the pressures measured in these high-redshift C I clouds are similar to those found in the Milky Way. We conclude that the C I gas is tracing a higher-density, higher-pressure region, possibly indicative of post-shock gas or a photodissociation region on the edge of a molecular cloud. We speculate that these clouds may be direct probes of the precursor sites of star formation in normal galaxies at high redshift.

  19. Extended electron energy loss fine structure simulation of the local boron environment in sodium aluminoborosilicate glasses containing gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Morris; Li, Hong; Li, Liyu ); Strachan, Denis M. )

    2003-10-15

    Gadolinium can be dissolved in sodium-alumino-borosilicate glasses up to 47 wt% in a baseline borosilicate glass (mol%) 20 B2O3, 5 Al2O3, 60 SiO2,and 20 Na2O. Understanding of Gd dissolution in borosilicate melts is important in glass formulation optimization. Electron energy loss fine structure (ELFS) spectroscopy is chosen, which provides well resolved local atomic structure information for both amorphous and crystalline materials with high sensitivity to low Z elements such as Al, B, Na, O, and Si where the x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique faces experimental difficulty. In this study, we report our results of boron K-edge ELFS study. Two borosilicate glass samples with 30 and 47 mass% Gd2O3, B20Gd30 and B20Gd47were chosen for B K-edge ELFS study. EEL spectra were acquired on a Philips 430 TEM equipped with Gatan PEELS system 666 and EL/P 2.1 software with Custom function AcqLong. The ELFS data analysis was performed using UWELFS, UWXAFS and FEFF software. From our Gd solubility study, the local structure of Gd in the borate environment possibly resembles double chain structure found in crystalline Gd(BO2)3 as proposed by Chakraborty et al. The B/Gd ratio's in both glasses are smaller then 3, which means the excess Gd atoms in the Si-sites would be 17 and 60 mol% of the total Gd atoms, respectively according to the model, yet the local environment of borate sites saturated with Gd should be remained. To verity above hypothesis, the double chain structure model was applied to fit boron K-edge. The model was shown to well fit experimental boron K-edge EELS spectra for both glasses with some degree of distance distortion which is understandable in amorphous structure. Therefore, it is very likely that Gd stabilized in borate sites has a local structure resembling the double chain Gd(BO2)3 structure as proposed by our solubility study and literature.

  20. The Role of Temporal Envelope and Fine Structure in Mandarin Lexical Tone Perception in Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Dong, Ruijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Luo; Xu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Temporal information in a signal can be partitioned into temporal envelope (E) and fine structure (FS). Fine structure is important for lexical tone perception for normal-hearing (NH) listeners, and listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) have an impaired ability to use FS in lexical tone perception due to the reduced frequency resolution. The present study was aimed to assess which of the acoustic aspects (E or FS) played a more important role in lexical tone perception in subjects with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) and to determine whether it was the deficit in temporal resolution or frequency resolution that might lead to more detrimental effects on FS processing in pitch perception. Fifty-eight native Mandarin Chinese-speaking subjects (27 with ANSD, 16 with SNHL, and 15 with NH) were assessed for (1) their ability to recognize lexical tones using acoustic E or FS cues with the “auditory chimera” technique, (2) temporal resolution as measured with temporal gap detection (TGD) threshold, and (3) frequency resolution as measured with the Q10dB values of the psychophysical tuning curves. Overall, 26.5%, 60.2%, and 92.1% of lexical tone responses were consistent with FS cues for tone perception for listeners with ANSD, SNHL, and NH, respectively. The mean TGD threshold was significantly higher for listeners with ANSD (11.9 ms) than for SNHL (4.0 ms; p < 0.001) and NH (3.9 ms; p < 0.001) listeners, with no significant difference between SNHL and NH listeners. In contrast, the mean Q10dB for listeners with SNHL (1.8±0.4) was significantly lower than that for ANSD (3.5±1.0; p < 0.001) and NH (3.4±0.9; p < 0.001) listeners, with no significant difference between ANSD and NH listeners. These results suggest that reduced temporal resolution, as opposed to reduced frequency selectivity, in ANSD subjects leads to greater degradation of FS processing for pitch perception. PMID:26052707

  1. Fine Structure of Metric Type IV Radio Bursts Observed with the ARTEMIS-IV Radio-Spectrograph: Association with Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouratzis, C.; Hillaris, A.; Alissandrakis, C. E.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Moussas, X.; Caroubalos, C.; Tsitsipis, P.; Kontogeorgos, A.

    2015-01-01

    Fine structures embedded in type IV burst continua may be used as diagnostics of the magnetic-field restructuring and the corresponding energy release associated with the low-corona development of flare or coronal mass ejection (CME) events. A catalog of 36 type IV bursts observed with the SAO receiver of the ARTEMIS-IV solar radio-spectrograph in the 450 - 270 MHz range at high cadence (0.01 sec) was compiled; the fine structures were classified into five basic classes with two or more subclasses each. The time of fine-structure emission was compared with the injection of energetic electrons as recorded by hard X-ray and microwave emission, the soft X-ray (SXR) light curves and the CME onset time. Our results indicate a very tight temporal association between energy release episodes and pulsations, spikes, narrow-band bursts of the type III family, and zebra bursts. Of the remaining categories, the featureless broadband continuum starts near the time of the first energy release, between the CME onset and the SXR peak, but extends for several tens of minutes after that, covering almost the full extent of the flare-CME event. The intermediate drift bursts, fibers in their majority, mostly follow the first energy release, but have a wider distribution than other fine structures.

  2. Probing the spontaneous reduction mechanism of platinum ions confined in the nanospace by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fangling; Li, Cheng; Fu, Haiying; Guo, Xiaojing; Wu, Guozhong; Chen, Shimou

    2016-07-28

    The reduction mechanism of Pt(4+) ions confined in the channel of multi-walled carbon nanotubes was mainly investigated using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, with the aid of TEM, Raman, XRD and ICP-AES studies. The XAFS spectra revealed the spontaneous formation of Pt nanoparticles when H2PtCl6 was confined in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The Pt L3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) coupled with the C K-edge NEXAFS results indicated that the reduction of Pt(4+) from tetravalent to zerovalent was attributed to the electron transfer from MWCNTs. The Fourier transform R-space of the Pt L3-edge XAFS data displayed that the nanoconfinement effect of MWCNTs promoted the formation of Pt nanoparticles. Moreover, the Pt-Pt bond length in confined Pt nanoparticles became shorter than that of Pt in the bulk state. Furthermore, by varying the inner diameter of MWCNTs from 15 nm to 10 nm and 5 nm, the Pt-Pt bond length of nanoconfined Pt nanoparticles decreased gradually. The results clearly revealed that MWCNTs acting as enriched electron donors can continuously reduce the confined Pt ions to Pt nanoparticles, thereby showing a great potential for the design of a new type of confined nanocatalysts. PMID:27373466

  3. Determination of hexavalent chromium in plastic certified reference materials by X-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohata, Masaki; Matsubayashi, Nobuyuki

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis with transmission mode was used to determine the percentages of hexavalent chromium {Cr(VI)} in total Cr in plastic certified reference materials (CRMs). Cr-K edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were observed and the normalized pre-edge peaks of the spectrum where absorption data was summed was acquired for the determination of Cr(VI). Examination of different number of data point and range of photon energy for summed absorption of the pre-edge peak resulted in reproducible absorption data, though the measurements were carried out at different beam time and beam line. The concentrations of Cr(VI) in the plastic CRMs were also estimated from both the certified value of total Cr and the determined percentage of Cr(VI). The analytical procedure and the estimated concentrations can be useful for the determination of Cr(VI) in plastics with respect to RoHS (restriction of the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronics equipment) directive.

  4. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy of naphthalene diimide-thiophene co-polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, Eliot; McNeill, Christopher R.; Szumilo, Monika; Sirringhaus, Henning; Sommer, Michael; Maniam, Subashani; Langford, Steven J.; Thomsen, Lars

    2014-04-28

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is an important tool for probing the structure of conjugated polymer films used in organic electronic devices. High-performance conjugated polymers are often donor-acceptor co-polymers which feature a repeat unit with multiple functional groups. To facilitate better application of NEXAFS spectroscopy to the study of such materials, improved understanding of the observed NEXAFS spectral features is required. In order to examine how the NEXAFS spectrum of a donor-acceptor co-polymer relates to the properties of the sub-units, a series of naphthalene diimide-thiophene-based co-polymers have been studied where the nature and length of the donor co-monomer has been systematically varied. The spectra of these materials are compared with that of a thiophene homopolymer and naphthalene diimide monomer enabling peak assignment and the influence of inter-unit electronic coupling to be assessed. We find that while it is possible to attribute peaks within the π* manifold as arising primarily due to the naphthalene diimide or thiophene sub-units, very similar dichroism of these peaks is observed indicating that it may not be possible to separately probe the molecular orientation of the separate sub-units with carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectroscopy.

  5. Mercury Speciation by X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy and Sequential Chemical Extractions: A Comparison of Speciation Methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.S.; Bloom, N.S.; Rytuba, J.J.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Determining the chemical speciation of mercury in contaminated mining and industrial environments is essential for predicting its solubility, transport behavior, and potential bioavailability as well as for designing effective remediation strategies. In this study, two techniques for determining Hg speciation-X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and sequential chemical extractions (SCE)-are independently applied to a set of samples with Hg concentrations ranging from 132 to 7539 mg/kg to determine if the two techniques provide comparable Hg speciation results. Generally, the proportions of insoluble HgS (cinnabar, metacinnabar) and HgSe identified by XAFS correlate well with the proportion of Hg removed in the aqua regia extraction demonstrated to remove HgS and HgSe. Statistically significant (> 10%) differences are observed however in samples containing more soluble Hg-containing phases (HgCl2, HgO, Hg3S2O 4). Such differences may be related to matrix, particle size, or crystallinity effects, which could affect the apparent solubility of Hg phases present. In more highly concentrated samples, microscopy techniques can help characterize the Hg-bearing species in complex multiphase natural samples.

  6. X-ray absorption fine structure study of amorphous metal oxide thin films prepared by photochemical metalorganic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudel, Simon; Daryl Crozier, E.; Gordon, Robert A.; Budnik, Peter S.; Hill, Ross H.

    2011-05-01

    The oxidation state and local geometry of the metal centers in amorphous thin films of Fe 2O 3 (Fe 3+ oxidation state), CoFe 2O 4 (Co 2+/Fe 3+ oxidation states), and Cr 2O 3 (Cr 3+ oxidation state) are determined using K edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The metal oxide thin films were prepared by the solid-state photochemical decomposition of the relevant metal 2-ethylhexanoates, spin cast as thin films. No peaks are observed in the X-ray diffraction patterns, indicating the metal oxides are X-ray amorphous. The oxidation state of the metals is determined from the edge position of the K absorption edges, and in the case of iron-containing samples, an analysis of the pre-edge peaks. In all cases, the EXAFS analysis indicates the first coordination shell consists of oxygen atoms in an octahedral geometry, with a second shell consisting of metals. No higher shells are observed beyond 3.5 Å for all samples, indicating the metal oxides are truly amorphous, consistent with X-ray diffraction results.

  7. Structural Analysis of Freshwater-Cultured Pearls with Different Lusters Using the Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monarumit, N.; Noirawee, N.; Phlayrahan, A.; Promdee, K.; Won-in, K.; Satitkune, S.

    2016-05-01

    The quality of freshwater-cultured pearls (Chamberlainia hainesiana) is determined by their luster, which is related to the content of the two CaCO3 mineral phases: aragonite and vaterite. The atomic structures of pearl samples were analyzed by the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique using synchrotron radiation to compare the atomic environment and atomic bonding around Ca atoms of high- and low-luster pearls. The Ca K-edge EXAFS spectra of the pearl samples were determined and interpreted in terms of the photoelectron wave number and the distance between Ca atoms and neighboring atoms. From the results, the wave oscillation of high-luster pearls is less than that of low-luster pearls. This indicates the presence of the aragonite phase in high-luster pearls and a combination of aragonite and vaterite phases in low-luster pearls, especially in the fi rst and second shells of Ca atoms. It can be concluded that the different lusters of freshwater-cultured pearls are related to the different CaCO3 phases in their structures.

  8. Reexamining X-mode suppression and fine structure in artificial E region field-aligned plasma density irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, R. J.; Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; McCarrick, M.; Huba, J. D.

    2013-09-01

    Artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs) were generated in the E region of the ionosphere above the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program facility during campaigns in May and August of 2012 and observed using a 30 MHz coherent scatter radar imager in Homer, Alaska. The purpose of this ionospheric modification experiment was to measure the threshold pump power required to excite thermal parametric instabilities by O-mode heating and to investigate the suppression of the FAIs by simultaneous X-mode heating. We find that the threshold pump power for irregularity excitation was consistent with theoretical predictions and increased by approximately a factor of 2 when X-mode heating was present. A modified version of the Another Model of the Ionosphere (SAMI2) ionospheric model was used to simulate the threshold experiments and suggested that the increase was entirely due to enhanced D region absorption associated with X-mode heating. Additionally, a remarkable degree of fine structure possibly caused by natural gradient drift instability in the heater-modified volume was observed in experiments performed during geomagnetically active conditions.

  9. Dense clumps of ionized gas near Pi Scorpii, as revealed by the fine-structure excitation of N II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoldi, Frank; Jenkins, Edward B.

    1992-01-01

    The column density and the emission of the ionized gas along the line of sight toward the B1 V + B2 V binary star Pi Sco are measured on the basis of the fine-structure absorption lines of the ground state N II. It is found that the bulk of this ionized gas must be clumped on a length scale of 0.025 pc, which is far smaller than the observed size of the diffuse H II region surrounding Pi Sco of about 6 pc. The observed column density of S III toward Pi Sco yields an upper limit on the distance of the absorbing, clumped gas from the star of less than about 0.02 pc, assuming that both the N II and S III absorption arise from the same gas. The possibility that the ionized gas originates from a photoevaporating circumstellar disk directly surrounding Pi Sco is excluded, since such a disk would have an unusual size of order 0.025 pc and would have had to survive for the estimated age of Pi Sco of 5-8 Myr. The derived mean density of the clumped gas is of order 40/cu cm, so that the gas is at a pressure that far exceeds the mean pressure in the H II region. It is concluded that the ionized gas could originate from evaporation flows off a cluster of compact neutral objects that evaporate due to the ionizing radiation of Pi Sco.

  10. Accurate modeling of spectral fine-structure in Earth radiance spectra measured with the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment.

    PubMed

    van Deelen, Rutger; Hasekamp, Otto P; Landgraf, Jochen

    2007-01-10

    We present what we believe to be a novel approach to simulating the spectral fine structure (<1 nm) in measurements of spectrometers such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME). GOME measures the Earth's radiance spectra and daily solar irradiance spectra from which a reflectivity spectrum is commonly extracted. The high-frequency structures contained in such a spectrum are, apart from atmospheric absorption, caused by Raman scattering and by a shift between the solar irradiance and the Earth's radiance spectrum. Normally, an a priori high-resolution solar spectrum is used to simulate these structures. We present an alternative method in which all the required information on the solar spectrum is retrieved from the GOME measurements. We investigate two approaches for the spectral range of 390-400 nm. First, a solar spectrum is reconstructed on a fine spectral grid from the GOME solar measurement. This approach leads to undersampling errors of up to 0.5% in the modeling of the Earth's radiance spectra. Second, a combination of the solar measurement and one of the Earth's radiance measurement is used to retrieve a solar spectrum. This approach effectively removes the undersampling error and results in residuals close to the GOME measurement noise of 0.1%. PMID:17268571

  11. Fine Structural Aspects of Lymphoedema in Various Tissues and the Effects of Treatment with Coumarin and Troxerutin

    PubMed Central

    Casley-Smith, J. R.; Földi-Börcsök, E.; Földi, M.

    1974-01-01

    The fine structural changes produced by lymphoedema, and by its treatment by coumarin and rutin were studied in the facial skin, parotid glands, ciliary bodies and cerebral cortices of rats, after the ligation of their cervical lymphatics. Both the true initial lymphatics (in the first two sites) and the prelymphatics (in the other two) behaved similarly, as did the tissue around them. There was much protein and oedema fluid during lymphoedema, which were markedly reduced by the drugs, separately and in combination. The very dilated lymphatics in the facial skin had many open endothelial intercellular junctions: the better supported ones in the parotid did not dilate so much and had no open junctions, although they normally possess some. It is suggested that the raised intralymphatic pressures, plus the smaller amount of dilatation permitted in this site, caused the junctions to be sealed closed. Fenestrae seemed to have little effect on the amount of lymphoedema, nor did it appear to affect their numbers. ImagesFigs. 10-11Fig. 1Figs. 5-7Figs. 2-3Fig. 4Figs. 8-9 PMID:4835800

  12. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies of Mn Coordination in Doped Perovskite SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, I.; Krayzman, V; Woicik, J; Tkach, A; Vilarinho, P

    2010-01-01

    The coordination of Mn in doped SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics having nominal compositions SrTi{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} and Sr{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}TiO{sub 3} was analyzed using x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. As expected, Mn{sup 4+} substitution for Ti{sup 4+} leads to Mn occupancy of the octahedral B-sites of ABO{sub 3} perovskite lattice with a Mn-O bond distance of 1.902 {angstrom} (compared to 1.953 {angstrom} for Ti-O) and no significant local distortions around the Mn atoms. In contrast, for the composition Sr{sub 0.98}Mn{sup 0.02}TiO{sub 3}, Mn segregates to both the A-sites (as Mn{sup 2+}) and the B-sites (predominantly as Mn{sup 4+}). Extended XAFS confirms strong ({approx} 0.77 {angstrom}) displacements of Mn{sup 2+} cations off the ideal A-site positions along <001> directions with a significant distortion of several coordination shells around the dopant atoms.

  13. Fine structures and ion images on fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections by transmission electron and scanning ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaya, K.; Okabe, M.; Sawataishi, M.; Takashima, H.; Yoshida, T.

    2003-01-01

    Ion microscopy (IM) of air-dried or freeze-dried cryostat and semi-thin cryosections has provided ion images of elements and organic substances in wide areas of the tissue. For reproducible ion images by a shorter time of exposure to the primary ion beam, fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections were prepared by freezing the tissue in propane chilled with liquid nitrogen, cryocut at 60 nm, mounted on grids and silicon wafer pieces, and freeze-dried. Rat Cowper gland and sciatic nerve, bone marrow of the rat administered of lithium carbonate, tree frog and African toad spleen and buffy coat of atopic dermatitis patients were examined. Fine structures and ion images of the corresponding areas in the same or neighboring sections were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) followed by sector type and time-of-flight type IM. Cells in the buffy coat contained larger amounts of potassium and magnesium while plasma had larger amounts of sodium and calcium. However, in the tissues, lithium, sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium were distributed in the cell and calcium showed a granular appearance. A granular cell of the tree frog spleen contained sodium and potassium over the cell and magnesium and calcium were confined to granules.

  14. Fine-structural characterization and phylogeny of Peridinium polonicum, type species of the recently described genus Naiadinium (Dinophyceae).

    PubMed

    Craveiro, Sandra C; Daugbjerg, Niels; Moestrup, Øjvind; Calado, António J

    2015-08-01

    Peridinium polonicum is a freshwater peridinioid with an unusual tabulation that includes one or two anterior intercalary plates in the mid-dorsal axis, and in such a low position that it seems inset in precingular Plate 4. Although the species has been classified in both Peridinium and Peridiniopsis, evidence from nucleotide sequences consistently shows that its closest relatives are within the Scrippsiella group. The genus Naiadinium Carty has been recently described with P. polonicum as its type species. However, Naiadinium was separated from other peridinioids only on the basis of shape and plate arrangements and these characters do not allow reliable determination of its closest phylogenetic relatives. Serial section fine-structural analysis revealed the presence of a small peduncle supported by a conspicuous microtubular basket that extended far into the cell; a complex pusular system that included a collecting chamber from which about 70 pusular tubes radiated; a flagellar apparatus with general peridinioid characters but with an unusually large distance of nearly 700 nm between basal bodies. An ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA-based phylogenetic analysis grouped, with high statistical support, Naiadinium polonicum with three species currently placed in Scrippsiella, viz. S. irregularis, S. precaria and S. ramonii. PMID:26094011

  15. The forms of trace metals in an Illinois basin coal by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Bruinius, J.A.; Lytle, J.M.; Ruch, R.R.; Huggins, Frank E.; Huffman, G.P.; Ho, K.K.

    1997-01-01

    Utilities burning Illinois coals currently do not consider trace elements in their flue gas emissions. After the US EPA completes an investigation on trace elements, however, this may change and flue gas emission standards may be established. The mode of occurrence of a trace element may determine its cleanability and Hue gas emission potential. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) is a spectroscopic technique that can differentiate the mode of occurrence of an element, even at the low concentrations that trace elements are found in coal. This is principally accomplished by comparing the XAFS spectra of a coal to a database of reference sample spectra. This study evaluated the technique as a potential tool to examine six trace elements in an Illinois #6 coal. For the elements As and Zn, the present database provides a definitive interpretation on their mode of occurrence. For the elements Ti, V, Cr, and Mn the database of XAFS spectra of trace elements in coal was still too limited to allow a definitive interpretation. The data obtained on these elements, however, was sufficient to rule out several of the mineralogical possibilities that have been suggested previously. The results indicate that XAFS is a promising technique for the study of trace elements in coal.

  16. Studies of vibrational properties in Ga stabilized delta-Pu by extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.G.; Henderson, A.L.; Sylwester, E.R.; Turchi, P.E.A.; Shen, T.H.; Gallegos, G.F.; Booth, C.H.

    2002-02-14

    Temperature dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra were measured for a 3.3 at. % Ga stabilized Pu alloy over the range T= 20 - 300 K. EXAFS data were acquired at both the Ga K-edge and the Pu L{sub III} edge. Curve-fits were performed to the first shell interactions to obtain pair-distance distribution widths, {sigma}, as a function of temperature. The temperature dependence of {sigma}(T) was accurately modeled using a correlated-Debye model for the lattice vibrational properties, suggesting Debye-like behavior in this material. Using this formalism, we obtain pair-specific correlated-Debye temperatures, {Theta}{sub cD}, of 110.7 {+-} 1.7 K and 202.6 {+-} 3.7 K, for the Pu-Pu and Ga-Pu pairs, respectively. The result for the Pu-{Theta}{sub cD} value compares well with previous vibrational studies on {delta}-Pu. In addition, our results represent the first unambiguous determination of Ga-specific vibrational properties in Pu-Ga alloys, i.e, {Theta}{sub cD} for the Ga-Pu pair. Because the Debye temperature can be related to a measure of the lattice stiffness, these results indicate the Ga-Pu bonds are significantly stronger than the Pu-Pu bonds. This effect has important implications for lattice stabilization mechanisms in these alloys.

  17. The electronic structure of Fe2+ in reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. II. Extended x-ray fine structure studies.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberger, P; Okamura, M Y; Feher, G

    1982-01-01

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies were performed on reaction centers (RC) of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. RC containing two, one, and no quinones (2Q, 1Q, 0Q) samples were studied. The average ligand distance of the first coordination shell was determined to be 2.10 +/- 0.02 A with a more distant shell at 4.14 +/- 0.05 A. The Fe2+ site in RC was found to have a very large structural disorder parameter, from which a spread in ligand distance per iron site of approximately +/- 0.1 A was deduced. The most likely coordination number of the first shell is six, with a mixture of oxygens and nitrogens as ligands. The edge absorption results are consistent with the Fe2+ being in distorted octahedral environment. The EXAFS spectra of the 2Q and 1Q samples with and without O-phenanthroline were found to be the same. This indicates that either the secondary quinone and o-phenanthroline do not bind to Fe2+ or that they replace an equivalent ligand. The 0Q sample showed a 12% decrease in the EXAFS amplitude, which was restored upon addition of o-phenanthroline. These results can be explained by either a loss of a ligand or a severe conformational change when the primary quinone was removed. PMID:6977381

  18. A fine structure genomic map of the region of 12q13 containing SAS and CDK4

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, C.Y.; Elkahloun, A.G.; Su, Y.A.

    1994-09-01

    We have recently adapted a method, originally described by Rackwitz, to the rapid restriction mapping of multiple cosmid DNA samples. Linearization of the cosmids at the lambda cohesive site using lambda terminase is followed by partial digestion with selected restriction enzymes and hybridization to oligonucleotides specific for the right or left hand termini. Partial digestions are performed in a microtiter plate thus allowing up to 12 cosmid clones to be digested with one restriction enzyme. We have applied this rapid restriction mapping method to cosmids derived from a region of chromosome 12q13 that has recently been shown to be amplified in a variety of cancers including malignant fibrous histiocytoma, fibrosarcoma, liposarcoma, osteosarcoma and brain tumors. A small segment of this amplification unit containing three genes, SAS (a membrane protein), CDK4 (a cyclin dependent kinase) and OS-9 (a recently described cDNA) has been analyzed with the system described above. This fine structure genomic map will be useful for completing the expression map of this region as well as characterizing its pattern of amplification in tumor specimens.

  19. Fine structure and cytochemical analysis of the intestinal wall along the body of adult female of Litomosoides chagasfilhoi (Nematoda: Filarioidea).

    PubMed

    de Moraes Neto, A H A; Cunha, G S P; Ferreira, T F; de Carvalho, S N; Guimarães, E V; de Souza, W

    2006-05-01

    Litomosoides chagasfilhoi is a filariid nematode parasite of the abdominal cavity of the wild rodent Akodon cursor (Winge, 1887), that has been described and used in Brazil as a new model for human filariasis. The fine structure of the intestine of this nematode was analyzed based on observations made by light and transmission electron microscopies of serial sections along the body. Cytochemical analysis was carried out to investigate the composition of the intestinal wall. This structure consisted of a basal lamina and an epithelium of variable thickness, composed of cells that have an irregular shape. The cytoplasm of intestinal cells contains few organelles: vacuoles, lysosomal bodies, spheroid bodies, endoplasmic reticulum, and many large lipid droplets. In the anterior portion of the intestine, the lysosomal bodies, spheroid bodies, and vacuoles presented positive reaction for acid phosphatase, and carbohydrates were detected in lysosomal bodies. The midbody and posterior regions presented less organelles and lipid droplets, and nuclei were more abundant. Residues of L-fucose were detected by Ulex europaeus lectin binding in the midbody sections. Basic proteins were associated to lipid droplets, in the posterior region. In the whole extension of the intestine, carbohydrates were detected on tight junctions. These results indicate that the metabolized material in the epithelium can contribute to the microfilariae development and also probably can be involved with the excretory/secretory mechanism of these nematodes. PMID:16416290

  20. Curium analysis in plutonium uranium mixed oxide by x-ray fluorescence and absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Degueldre, C; Borca, C; Cozzo, C

    2013-10-15

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are being used in commercial nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regards to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the local occurrence, speciation and next-neighbour environment of curium (Cm) in the (Pu,U)O2 lattice within an irradiated (60 MW d kg(-1) average burn-up) MOX sample was performed employing micro-x-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-x-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Cm (≈ 0.7 wt% in the rim and ≈ 0.03 wt% in the centre) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its centre and peripheral (rim) zones of the fuel. Curium occurrence is also reduced from the centre (hot) to the periphery (colder) because of the condensation of these volatile oxides. In the irradiated sample Cm builds up as Cm(3+) species (>90%) within a [CmO8](13-) or [CmO7](11-) coordination environment and no (<10%) Cm(IV) can be detected in the rim zone. Curium dioxide is reduced because of the redox buffering activity of the uranium dioxide matrix and of its thermodynamic instability. PMID:24054692

  1. Determining Orientational Structure of Diamondoid Thiols Attached to Silver Using Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Lee, J I; Fabbri, J D; Wang, D; Nielsen, M; Randel, J C; Schreiner, P R; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J P; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Melosh, N A; van Buuren, T

    2008-10-07

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) is a powerful tool for determination of molecular orientation in self-assembled monolayers and other surface-attached molecules. A general framework for using NEXAFS to simultaneously determine molecular tilt and twist of rigid molecules attached to surfaces is presented. This framework is applied to self-assembled monolayers of higher diamondoid, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures. Diamondoid monolayers chemisorbed on metal substrates are known to exhibit interesting electronic and surface properties. This work compares molecular orientation in monolayers prepared on silver substrates using two different thiol positional isomers of [121]tetramantane, and thiols derived from two different pentamantane structural isomers, [1212]pentamantane and [1(2,3)4]pentamantane. The observed differences in monolayer structure demonstrate the utility and limitations of NEXAFS spectroscopy and the framework. The results also demonstrate the ability to control diamondoid assembly, in particular the molecular orientational structure, providing a flexible platform for the modification of surface properties with this exciting new class of nanodiamond materials.

  2. Mechanism of Pb Adsorption to Fatty Acid Langmuir Monolayers Studied by X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanov, M.I.; Kmetko, J.; Shibata, T.; Datta, A.; Dutta, P.; Bunker, B.A.

    2010-09-30

    The local atomic environment of lead (Pb) adsorbed to a CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 19}COOH Langmuir monolayer was investigated in situ using grazing-incidence X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-XAFS) spectroscopy at the Pb L{sub III} edge. Measurements were performed at pH 6.5 of the 10{sup -5} M PbCl{sub 2} solution subphase, a condition under which grazing incidence diffraction (GID) revealed a large-area commensurate superstructure underneath the close-packed organic monolayer. The XAFS results indicate covalent binding of the Pb cations to the carboxyl headgroups, and the observed Pb-Pb coordination suggests that the metal is adsorbed as a hydrolysis polymer, rather than as individual Pb{sup 2+} ions. The data are consistent with a bidentate chelating mechanism and a one Pb atom to one carboxyl headgroup binding stoichiometry. We discuss how this adsorption model can explain the peculiarities observed with Pb in previous metal-Langmuir monolayer studies. A systematic study of lead perchlorate and lead acetate aqueous solutions is presented and used in the analysis. XAFS multiple scattering effects from alignment of the Pb-C-C atoms in the lead acetate solutions are reported.

  3. Dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation studied with time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2009-04-01

    We studied the dynamics of the femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum in an energy range well above the ablation threshold with the ultrafast time-resolved x-ray-absorption fine structure imaging technique. Analyzing the spectral structures near the L absorption edge that appeared in one-dimensional images of soft-x-ray absorbance, we successfully identified doubly and singly charged ions, neutral atoms, liquid nanoparticles, and possible atomic clusters in the expanding ablation plume. We also clarified that the ejected particles depend strongly on the laser irradiation intensity. The spatiotemporal evolution of the ablation particles allows us to estimate the spatial distribution of atomic density and the ejection velocity of each type of particle. In particular, we discuss the temporal sequence of the particle ejection in the early stages of plume expansion. Our experimental results strongly support the idea that photomechanical fragmentation and vaporization are dominant mechanisms for the production of liquid nanoparticles and neutral atoms, respectively, in femtosecond laser ablation induced in an irradiation intensity range of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for sulfur-like iron, Fe XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Allam, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the 14 LS states belonging to configurations of sulfur-like iron, Fe XI, have been calculated. These states are represented by configuration interaction wavefunctions and have configurations 3s23p4, 3s3p5, 3s23p33d, 3s23p34s, 3s23p34p, and 3s23p34d, which give rise to 123 fine-structure energy levels. Extensive configuration interaction calculations using the CIV3 code have been performed. To assess the importance of relativistic effects, the intermediate coupling scheme by means of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian terms, such as the one-body mass correction and Darwin term, and spin-orbit, spin-other-orbit, and spin-spin corrections, are incorporated within the code. These incorporations adjusted the energy levels, therefore the calculated values are close to the available experimental data. Comparisons between the present calculated energy levels as well as oscillator strengths and both experimental and theoretical data have been performed. Our results show good agreement with earlier works, and they might be useful in thermonuclear fusion research and astrophysical applications.

  5. Space and time variations in the fine structure of the upper atmosphere according to acoustic sounding data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulichkov, S. N.; Chunchuzov, I. P.; Bush, G. A.; Mishenin, A. A.; Golikova, E. V.

    2016-03-01

    The results of studying variations in the fine layered structure of the upper atmosphere (heights of 20-140 km) according to data obtained from acoustic sounding within the range of infrasonic waves are given. The sources of infrasounds were surface explosions equivalent to 10 kg to 70 t of TNT. These explosions were set off in different seasons in different regions of Russia. Experimental data obtained in 1981-2011 have been analyzed. It has been found that the fine structure in the form of vertically distributed layered formations occurs in the upper atmosphere in all seasons. Moreover, the vertical distribution of both air-temperature and wind-velocity inhomogeneities in the upper atmosphere may be invariable over a time interval of no less than several hours. It has also been found that, throughout the entire atmospheric thickness from the stratopause to the lower thermosphere heights (up to 140 km), the instantaneous height distribution of layered air-temperature and wind-velocity inhomogeneities may remain almost unchanged during a time interval of no less than 20 min.

  6. Optimal Combination of Neural Temporal Envelope and Fine Structure Cues to Explain Speech Identification in Background Noise

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Il Joon; Won, Jong Ho; Ives, D. Timothy; Nie, Kaibao; Heinz, Michael G.; Lorenzi, Christian; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2014-01-01

    The dichotomy between acoustic temporal envelope (ENV) and fine structure (TFS) cues has stimulated numerous studies over the past decade to understand the relative role of acoustic ENV and TFS in human speech perception. Such acoustic temporal speech cues produce distinct neural discharge patterns at the level of the auditory nerve, yet little is known about the central neural mechanisms underlying the dichotomy in speech perception between neural ENV and TFS cues. We explored the question of how the peripheral auditory system encodes neural ENV and TFS cues in steady or fluctuating background noise, and how the central auditory system combines these forms of neural information for speech identification. We sought to address this question by (1) measuring sentence identification in background noise for human subjects as a function of the degree of available acoustic TFS information and (2) examining the optimal combination of neural ENV and TFS cues to explain human speech perception performance using computational models of the peripheral auditory system and central neural observers. Speech-identification performance by human subjects decreased as the acoustic TFS information was degraded in the speech signals. The model predictions best matched human performance when a greater emphasis was placed on neural ENV coding rather than neural TFS. However, neural TFS cues were necessary to account for the full effect of background-noise modulations on human speech-identification performance. PMID:25186758

  7. Relationship of magnetic field strength and brightness of fine-structure elements in the solar temperature minimum region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Ewing, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative relationship was determined between magnetic field strength (or magnetic flux) from photospheric magnetograph observations and the brightness temperature of solar fine-structure elements observed at 1600 A, where the predominant flux source is continuum emission from the solar temperature minimum region. A Kitt Peak magnetogram and spectroheliograph observations at 1600 A taken during a sounding rocket flight of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph from December 11, 1987 were used. The statistical distributions of brightness temperature in the quiet sun at 1600 A, and absolute value of magnetic field strength in the same area were determined from these observations. Using a technique which obtains the best-fit relationship of a given functional form between these two histogram distributions, a quantitative relationship was determined between absolute value of magnetic field strength B and brightness temperature which is essentially linear from 10 to 150 G. An interpretation is suggested, in which a basal heating occurs generally, while brighter elements are produced in magnetic regions with temperature enhancements proportional to B.

  8. Clarifying the chemical state of additives in membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells by X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Toshihiro; Itoh, Takanori

    2016-02-01

    Cerium and manganese compounds are used in the membrane for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) as radical scavengers to mitigate chemical degradation of the membrane. The chemical states of cerium and manganese in the membrane were investigated using a fluorescence X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to open circuit voltage (OCV) condition, under which hydroxyl radicals attack the membrane; a shift in absorption energy in X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra was compared between Ce- and Mn-containing membranes before and after OCV testing. In the case of the Ce-containing MEA, there was no significant difference in XANES spectra before and after OCV testing, whereas in the case of the Mn-containing MEA, there was an obvious shift in XANES absorption energy after OCV testing, indicating that Mn atoms with higher valence state than 2+ exist in the membrane after OCV testing. This can be attributed to the difference in the rate of reduction; the reaction of Ce4+ with ·OOH is much faster than that of Mn3+ with ·OOH, leaving some of the Mn atoms with higher valence state. It was confirmed that cerium and manganese redox couples reduced the attack from radicals, mitigating membrane degradation.

  9. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  10. [Electron-microscopic studies on fine structure and enzyme activity in the axenic and conventional strains of Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed

    Yong, Tai Soon; Chung, Pyung Rim; Lee, Keun Tae

    1985-12-01

    The metabolism of Entamoeba histolytica would be affected by various environmental factors, and alteration of the environment was known to affect the fine structure of E. histolytica. The present study was designed electronmicroscopically to investigate the ultrastructure and enzyme activities in the axenic and conventional strains of E. histolytica. The trophozoites of axenically cultivated HK-9 strain and conventional YS-27 and YS-49 strains of E. histolytica were collected and fixed with 4 percent paraformaldehyde/0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4). After washing them by centrifugation, 1 percent warm agar was added in the sediment. Solidified agar with the trophozoites was cut into 1 mm(3) cubes, and incubated in the various substrates to observe enzyme activities. Then, the specimen was post-fixed with 3 percent glutaraldehyde/0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4) and 1 percent osmium tetroxide/0.1 M cacodylate buffer (pH 7.4), dehydrated in ascending ethanol series and embedded in epoxy resin. These were sectioned on an ultramicrotome and observed with a transmission electron microscope. The procedures for the observation of the fine structure were same as the above, except for the incubation in the substrate. The sections were stained with uranyl scetate and lead citrate. For the observation of the surface of the amoebae, scanning electron microscopy was carried out. The results obtained in the present study are summarized as follows: 1. The fuzzy coat around double-layered plasma membrane of E. histolytica was more irregularly and densely distributed in the conventional strains (YS-27, YS-49 strains) than in the axenic strain (HK-9 strain). 2. The endosomes, button bodies and chromatin material were surrounded by a double-layered nuclear membrane having scattered nuclear pores. The paranuclear body, mono- or double-layered vacuoles, vacuolar membrane whorls, rosette-like cylindrical bodies, aggregation of cylindrical bodies and helical bodies were found in the

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of the Carbon Hybridization State by Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mangolini, Filippo; McClimon, J Brandon; Carpick, Robert W

    2016-03-01

    The characterization of the local bonding configuration of carbon in carbon-based materials is of paramount importance since the properties of such materials strongly depend on the distribution of carbon hybridization states, the local ordering, and the degree of hydrogenation. Carbon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful techniques for gaining insights into the bonding configuration of near-surface carbon atoms. The common methodology for quantitatively evaluating the carbon hybridization state using C 1s NEXAFS measurements, which is based on the analysis of the sample of interest and of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) reference sample, was reviewed and critically assessed, noting that inconsistencies are found in the literature in applying this method. A theoretical rationale for the specific experimental conditions to be used for the acquisition of HOPG reference spectra is presented together with the potential sources of uncertainty and errors in the correctly computed fraction of sp(2)-bonded carbon. This provides a specific method for analyzing the distribution of carbon hybridization state using NEXAFS spectroscopy. As an illustrative example, a hydrogenated amorphous carbon film was analyzed using this method and showed good agreement with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (which is surface sensitive). Furthermore, the results were consistent with analysis from Raman spectroscopy (which is not surface sensitive), indicating the absence of a structurally different near-surface region in this particular thin film material. The present work can assist surface scientists in the analysis of NEXAFS spectra for the accurate characterization of the structure of carbon-based materials. PMID:26814796

  12. KINEMATICS AND FINE STRUCTURE OF AN UNWINDING POLAR JET OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMIC OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu; Ibrahim, Ahmed

    2011-07-10

    We present an observational study of the kinematics and fine structure of an unwinding polar jet, with high temporal and spatial observations taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory and the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope. During the rising period, the shape of the jet resembled a cylinder with helical structures on the surface, while the mass of the jet was mainly distributed on the cylinder's shell. In the radial direction, the jet expanded successively at its western side and underwent three distinct phases: the gradually expanding phase, the fast expanding phase, and the steady phase. Each phase lasted for about 12 minutes. The angular speed of the unwinding motion of the jet and the twist transferred into the outer corona during the eruption are estimated to be 11.1 x 10{sup -3} rad s{sup -1} (period = 564 s) and 1.17-2.55 turns (or 2.34-5.1{pi}), respectively. On the other hand, by calculating the azimuthal component of the magnetic field in the jet and comparing the free energy stored in the non-potential magnetic field with the jet's total energy, we find that the non-potential magnetic field in the jet is enough to supply the energy for the ejection. These new observational results strongly support the scenario that the jets are driven by the magnetic twist, which is stored in the twisted closed field of a small bipole, and released through magnetic reconnection between the bipole and its ambient open field.

  13. Probing the Limits of Conventional Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Analysis Using Thiolated Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chill, Samuel T; Anderson, Rachel M; Yancey, David F; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Crooks, Richard M; Henkelman, Graeme

    2015-04-28

    We present a method for quantifying the accuracy of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) fitting models. As a test system, we consider the structure of bare Au147 nanoparticles as well as particles bound with thiol ligands, which are used to systematically vary disorder in the atomic structure of the nanoparticles. The accuracy of the fitting model is determined by comparing two distributions of bond lengths: (1) a direct average over a molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory using forces and energies from density functional theory (DFT) and (2) a fit to the theoretical EXAFS spectra generated from that same trajectory. Both harmonic and quasi-harmonic EXAFS fitting models are used to characterize the first-shell Au-Au bond length distribution. The harmonic model is found to significantly underestimate the coordination number, disorder, and bond length. The quasi-harmonic model, which includes the third cumulant of the first-shell bond length distribution, yields accurate bond lengths, but incorrectly predicts a decrease in particle size and little change in the disorder with increasing thiol ligands. A direct analysis of the MD data shows that the particle surfaces become much more disordered with ligand binding, and the high disorder is incorrectly interpreted by the EXAFS fitting models. Our DFT calculations compare well with experimental EXAFS measurements of Au nanoparticles, synthesized using a dendrimer encapsulation technique, showing that systematic errors in EXAFS fitting models apply to nanoparticles 1-2 nm in size. Finally we show that a combination of experimental EXAFS analysis with candidate models from DFT is a promising strategy for a more accurate determination of nanoparticle structures. PMID:25853740

  14. Differentiation of biological hydroxyapatite compounds by infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassot, E.; Oudadesse, H.; Irigaray, J.; Curis, E.; Bénazeth, S.; Nicolis, I.

    2001-12-01

    Pure hydroxyapatite (HAP) and HAP doped with 800 ppm of zinc were implanted in cortical bone of femur diaphysis of ovines [J. L. Irigaray et al., Mater. Clin. Appl. 28, 399 (1999)]. We observed that the doped HAP was better resorbed than pure HAP. The first hypothesis is that zinc acts as a stimulator on macrophage cells and improves quantity and quality of osteoblast cells. The second hypothesis is that zinc yields HAP structure that is better resorbed in biological field. For our experiment we used HAP doped with 3000 ppm of zinc in order to have a good sensitivity. In the present work, chemical studies by inductively coupled plasma absorption emission spectrometry, x ray diffraction, and infrared were carried out to determine the composition of major and trace elements in the doped hydroxyapatite, and the crystallographic structure. These studies can indicate possible modifications induced by the insertion of zinc. We used the extended x-ray absorption fine structure experimental station of LURE (Orsay, France) to try to clarify the atomic surroundings of zinc in doped HAP structure and transformations induced in initial lattice. Despite the low zinc concentration, we got good quality fluorescence mode spectra. These spectra showed medium range order of the material that is consistent with its crystalline form. To perform the analysis, we compared the result obtained with another models like β tricalcium phosphate and we created theoretical models of zinc in substitution of calcium in order to reproduce as well as possible the experimental spectrum. After this study, only two models are coherent with experimental spectrum, zinc in substitution of calcium in site I and zinc in the interstice between the two hydroxydes.

  15. 3-cm Fine Structure Masers: A Unique Signature of Supermassive Black Hole Formation via Direct Collapse in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Mark; Sethi, Shiv; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    The direct collapse black hole (DCBH) scenario describes the isothermal collapse of a pristine gas cloud directly into a massive, {M}{BH} = 104-106{M}⊙ black hole. In this paper we show that large H i column densities of primordial gas at T˜ {10}4 K with low molecular abundance—which represent key aspects of the DCBH scenario—provide optimal conditions for the pumping of the 2p-level of atomic hydrogen by trapped Lyα photons. This Lyα pumping mechanism gives rise to an inverted level population of the 2{s}1/2-2{p}3/2 transition, and therefore also gives rise to stimulated fine structure emission at λ =3.04 {cm} (rest-frame). We show that simplified models of the DCBH scenario amplify the CMB by up to a factor of ˜ {10}5, above which the maser saturates. Hyperfine splitting of the 3 cm transition gives rise to a characteristic broad (FWHM ˜ tens of MHz in the observers frame) asymmetric line profile. This signal subtends an angular scale of ˜1-10 mas, which translates to a flux of ˜0.3-3 μJy, which is detectable with ultra-deep surveys being planned with SKA1-MID. While challenging, as the signal is visible for a fraction of the collapse time of the cloud, the matching required physical conditions imply that a detection of the redshifted 3-cm emission line could provide direct evidence for the DCBH scenario.

  16. Temporal Fine-Structure Coding and Lateralized Speech Perception in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    PubMed

    Lőcsei, Gusztáv; Pedersen, Julie H; Laugesen, Søren; Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; MacDonald, Ewen N

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between speech perception performance in spatially complex, lateralized listening scenarios and temporal fine-structure (TFS) coding at low frequencies. Young normal-hearing (NH) and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with mild or moderate hearing loss above 1.5 kHz participated in the study. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were estimated in the presence of either speech-shaped noise, two-, four-, or eight-talker babble played reversed, or a nonreversed two-talker masker. Target audibility was ensured by applying individualized linear gains to the stimuli, which were presented over headphones. The target and masker streams were lateralized to the same or to opposite sides of the head by introducing 0.7-ms interaural time differences between the ears. TFS coding was assessed by measuring frequency discrimination thresholds and interaural phase difference thresholds at 250 Hz. NH listeners had clearly better SRTs than the HI listeners. However, when maskers were spatially separated from the target, the amount of SRT benefit due to binaural unmasking differed only slightly between the groups. Neither the frequency discrimination threshold nor the interaural phase difference threshold tasks showed a correlation with the SRTs or with the amount of masking release due to binaural unmasking, respectively. The results suggest that, although HI listeners with normal hearing thresholds below 1.5 kHz experienced difficulties with speech understanding in spatially complex environments, these limitations were unrelated to TFS coding abilities and were only weakly associated with a reduction in binaural-unmasking benefit for spatially separated competing sources. PMID:27601071

  17. Spectroscopic Constants of the Known Electronic States of Lead Monofluoride

    SciTech Connect

    McRaven, C.P.; Sivakumar, P.; Shafer-Ray, N.E.; Hall, G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2010-08-01

    Based on measurements made by mass-resolved 1 + 1{prime} + 1{double_prime} resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy, we have determined new molecular constants describing the rotational and fine structure levels of the B, D, E, and F states of the most abundant isotopic variant {sup 208}Pb{sup 19}F, and we summarize the spectroscopic constants for all the know electronic states of the radical. Many spectroscopic constants for the isotopologues {sup 206}Pb{sup 19}F and {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F have also been determined. The symmetry of the D-state is found to be {sup 2}{pi}{sub 1/2}, and the F-state is found to be an {Omega} = 3/2 state.

  18. Applications of x ray absorption fine structure to the in situ study of the effect of cobalt in nickel hydrous oxide electrodes for fuel cells and rechargeable batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sunghyun; Tryk, Donald A.; Scherson, Daniel A.; Antonio, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Electronic and structural aspects of composite nickel-cobalt hydrous oxides have been examined in alkaline solutions using in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results obtained have indicated that cobalt in this material is present as cobaltic ions regardless of the oxidation state of nickel in the lattice. Furthermore, careful analysis of the Co K-edge Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data reveals that the co-electrodeposition procedure generates a single phase, mixed metal hydrous oxide, in which cobaltic ions occupy nickel sites in the NiO2 sheet-like layers and not two intermixed phases each consisting of a single metal hydrous oxide.

  19. Fine structure and ionization energy of the 1s2s2p 4P state of the helium negative ion He-.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liming; Li, Chun; Yan, Zong-Chao; Drake, G W F

    2014-12-31

    The fine structure and ionization energy of the 1s2s2p (4)P state of the helium negative ion He(-) are calculated in Hylleraas coordinates, including relativistic and QED corrections up to O(α(4)mc(2)), O((μ/M)α(4)mc(2)), O(α(5)mc(2)), and O((μ/M)α(5)mc(2)). Higher order corrections are estimated for the ionization energy. A comparison is made with other calculations and experiments. We find that the present results for the fine structure splittings agree with experiment very well. However, the calculated ionization energy deviates from the experimental result by about 1 standard deviation. The estimated theoretical uncertainty in the ionization energy is much less than the experimental accuracy. PMID:25615325

  20. Adsorption of dopamine on rutile TiO2 (110): a photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure study.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Mark J; Syres, Karen L; Cant, David J H; Hardman, Samantha J O; Thomas, Andrew G

    2014-07-29

    Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) techniques have been used to study the adsorption of dopamine on a rutile TiO2 (110) single crystal. Photoemission results suggest that dopamine bonds through the oxygen molecules in a bidentate fashion. From the data, it is ambiguous whether the oxygens bond to the same 5-fold coordinated surface titanium atom or bridges across two, although based on the bonding of pyrocatechol on rutile TiO2 (110), it is likely that the dopamine bridges two titanium atoms. Using the searchlight effect, the carbon K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure NEXAFS spectra recorded for dopamine on rutile TiO2 (110) show the phenyl ring to be oriented at 78° ± 5° from the surface and twisted 11 ± 10° relative to the (001) direction. PMID:25003716

  1. Search for shape coexistence in {sup 188,190}Pb via fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192,194}Po

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Davids, C.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1995-08-01

    The interaction between coexisting shapes in nuclei near closed shells was of great interest in the past decade. Excited 0{sup +} states at low energy can often be identified as the bandheads of structures with differing shapes built on those states, These structures were identified in {sup 190-198}Pb via beta decay and alpha decay {open_quotes}fine structure{close_quotes} studies. Coexistence of different shapes in Pb nuclei was predicted by Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations, in which both the oblate and prolate minima were predicted to have excitation energies near 1 MeV. It was our intention to continue the systematic study of the Pb nuclides by searching for excited O{sup +} states in {sup 188}Pb by observing the fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192}Po.

  2. Accurate electron affinity of Co and fine-structure splittings of C o- via slow-electron velocity-map imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolin; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-05-01

    The high-resolution photoelectron spectra of C o- were obtained via the slow-electron velocity-map imaging method. The electron affinity of cobalt element was determined to be 5341.45 (37 ) c m-1 or 662.256(46) meV. The fine structure of C o- was well resolved. The fine-structure intervals C o-(F34) -C o-(F33) and C o-(F34) -C o-(F32) were found to be 920.9 (6 ) c m-1 and 1550.3 (9 ) c m-1 , respectively. The accuracy was improved by a factor of more than ten with respect to the previous laser photodetachment threshold measurement.

  3. Dynamical Study of Femtosecond-Laser-Ablated Liquid-Aluminum Nanoparticles Using Spatiotemporally Resolved X-Ray-Absorption Fine-Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2007-10-19

    We study the temperature evolution of aluminum nanoparticles generated by femtosecond laser ablation with spatiotemporally resolved x-ray-absorption fine-structure spectroscopy. We successfully identify the nanoparticles based on the L-edge absorption fine structure of the ablation plume in combination with the dependence of the edge structure on the irradiation intensity and the expansion velocity of the plume. In particular, we show that the lattice temperature of the nanoparticles is estimated from the L-edge slope, and that its spatial dependence reflects the cooling of the nanoparticles during plume expansion. The results reveal that the emitted nanoparticles travel in a vacuum as a condensed liquid phase with a lattice temperature of about 2500 to 4200 K in the early stage of plume expansion.

  4. Magnetic field control of the neutral and charged exciton fine structure in single quantum dashes emitting at 1.55 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Mrowiński, P.; Musiał, A.; Maryński, A.; Syperek, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Sęk, G.; Somers, A.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Höfling, S.

    2015-02-02

    We investigated the neutral and charged exciton fine structure in single InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dashes emitting at 1.55 μm using polarization-resolved microphotoluminescence in a magnetic field. Inverted spin configuration of horizontally [1–10] and vertically [110] polarized transitions has been observed. An in-plane magnetic field of up to 5 Tesla has been applied to tailor the fine structure, and eventually to reduce the splitting of the bright exciton states down to zero. This inverted structure has been observed for all the investigated excitons, making it a characteristic feature for this class of nanostructures with the largest splitting reduction of 170 μeV.

  5. Surface structure of CdSe Nanorods revealed by combined X-rayabsorption fine structure measurements and ab-initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Aruguete, Deborah A.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Li, Liang-shi; Williamson, Andrew; Fakra, Sirine; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-01-27

    We report orientation-specific, surface-sensitive structural characterization of colloidal CdSe nanorods with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and ab-initio density functional theory calculations. Our measurements of crystallographically-aligned CdSe nanorods show that they have reconstructed Cd-rich surfaces. They exhibit orientation-dependent changes in interatomic distances which are qualitatively reproduced by our calculations. These calculations reveal that the measured interatomic distance anisotropy originates from the nanorod surface.

  6. Counting individual sulfur atoms in a protein by ultrahighresolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry: Experimental resolution of isotopic fine structure in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Stone D.-H.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.

    1998-01-01

    A typical molecular ion mass spectrum consists of a sum of signals from species of various possible isotopic compositions. Only the monoisotopic peak (e.g., all carbons are 12C; all nitrogens are 14N, etc.) has a unique elemental composition. Every other isotope peak at approximately integer multiples of ∼1 Da higher in nominal mass represents a sum of contributions from isotope combinations differing by a few mDa (e.g., two 13C vs. two 15N vs. one 13C and one 15N vs. 34S, vs. 18O, etc., at ∼2 Da higher in mass than the monoisotopic mass). At sufficiently high mass resolving power, each of these nominal-mass peaks resolves into its isotopic fine structure. Here, we report resolution of the isotopic fine structure of proteins up to 15.8 kDa (isotopic 13C,15N doubly depleted tumor suppressor protein, p16), made possible by electrospray ionization followed by ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass analysis at 9.4 tesla. Further, a resolving power of m/Δm50% ≈8,000,000 has been achieved on bovine ubiquitin (8.6 kDa). These results represent a 10-fold increase in the highest mass at which isotopic fine structure previously had been observed. Finally, because isotopic fine structure reveals elemental composition directly, it can be used to confirm or determine molecular formula. For p16, for example, we were able to determine (5.1 ± 0.3) the correct number (five) of sulfur atoms solely from the abundance ratio of the resolved 34S peak to the monoisotopic peak. PMID:9751700

  7. The Herschel Comprehensive (U)LIRG Emission Survey (HERCULES): CO Ladders, Fine Structure Lines, and Neutral Gas Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; van der Werf, P. P.; Aalto, S.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Evans, A. S.; Fischer, J.; Gao, Y.; González-Alfonso, E.; Greve, T. R.; Harris, A. I.; Henkel, C.; Israel, F. P.; Isaak, K. G.; Kramer, C.; Meijerink, R.; Naylor, D. A.; Sanders, D. B.; Smith, H. A.; Spaans, M.; Spinoglio, L.; Stacey, G. J.; Veenendaal, I.; Veilleux, S.; Walter, F.; Weiß, A.; Wiedner, M. C.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Xilouris, E. M.

    2015-03-01

    (Ultra) luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) are objects characterized by their extreme infrared (8-1000 μm) luminosities (L LIRG > 1011 L ⊙ and L ULIRG > 1012 L ⊙). The Herschel Comprehensive ULIRG Emission Survey (PI: van der Werf) presents a representative flux-limited sample of 29 (U)LIRGs that spans the full luminosity range of these objects (1011 L ⊙ <= L IR <= 1013 L ⊙). With the Herschel Space Observatory, we observe [C II] 157 μm, [O I] 63 μm, and [O I] 145 μm line emission with Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer, CO J = 4-3 through J = 13-12, [C I] 370 μm, and [C I] 609 μm with SPIRE, and low-J CO transitions with ground-based telescopes. The CO ladders of the sample are separated into three classes based on their excitation level. In 13 of the galaxies, the [O I] 63 μm emission line is self absorbed. Comparing the CO excitation to the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite 60/100 μm ratio and to far infrared luminosity, we find that the CO excitation is more correlated to the far infrared colors. We present cooling budgets for the galaxies and find fine-structure line flux deficits in the [C II], [Si II], [O I], and [C I] lines in the objects with the highest far IR fluxes, but do not observe this for CO 4 <= J upp <= 13. In order to study the heating of the molecular gas, we present a combination of three diagnostic quantities to help determine the dominant heating source. Using the CO excitation, the CO J = 1-0 linewidth, and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution, we conclude that galaxies with large CO linewidths always have high-excitation CO ladders, and often low AGN contributions, suggesting that mechanical heating is important. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  8. Structural features and the reaction mechanism of cytochrome oxidase: iron and copper X-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed Central

    Powers, L; Chance, B; Ching, Y; Angiolillo, P

    1981-01-01

    X-ray edge absorption of copper and extended fine structure studies of both copper and iron centers have been made of cytochrome oxidase from beef heart, Paracoccus dentrificans, and HB-8 thermophilic bacteria (1-2.5 mM in heme). The desired redox state (fully oxidized, reduced CO, mixed valence formate and CO) in the x-ray beam was controlled by low temperature (-140 degrees C) and was continuously monitored by simultaneous optical spectroscopy and by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) monitoring every 30 min of x-ray exposure. The structure of the active site, a cytochrome a3-copper pair in fully oxidized and in mixed valence formate states where they are spin coupled, contains a sulphur bridge with three ligands 2.60 +/- 0.03 A from Fea3 and 2.18 +/- 0.03 A from Cua3. The distance between Fea3 and Cua3 is 3.75 +/- 0.05 A, making the sulphur bond angle 103 degrees reasonable for sp3 sulphur bonding. The Fea3 first shell has four typical heme nitrogens (2.01 +/- 0.03 A) with a proximal nitrogen at 2.14 +/- 0.03 A. The sixth ligand is the bridging sulphur. The Cua3 first shell is identical to oxidized stellacyanin containing two nitrogens and a bridging sulphur. Upon reduction with CO, the active site is identical to reduced stellacyanin for the Cua3 first shell and contains the sulphur that forms the bridge in fully oxidized and mixed valence formate states. The Fea3 first shell is identical to oxyhemoglobin but has CO instead of O2. The other redox centers, Fea and the other "EPR detectable" Cu are not observed in higher shells of Fea3. Fea has six equidistant nitrogens and Cua has one (or two) nitrogens and three (or two) sulphurs with typical distances; these ligands change only slight on reduction. These structures afford the basis for an oxygen reduction mechanism involving oxy- and peroxy intermediates. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:6264990

  9. (1,3;1,4)-β-Glucan Biosynthesis by the CSLF6 Enzyme: Position and Flexibility of Catalytic Residues Influence Product Fine Structure.

    PubMed

    Dimitroff, George; Little, Alan; Lahnstein, Jelle; Schwerdt, Julian G; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Bulone, Vincent; Burton, Rachel A; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2016-04-01

    Cellulose synthase-like F6 (CslF6) genes encode polysaccharide synthases responsible for (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan biosynthesis in cereal grains. However, it is not clear how both (1,3)- and (1,4)-linkages are incorporated into a single polysaccharide chain and how the frequency and arrangement of the two linkage types that define the fine structure of the polysaccharide are controlled. Through transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, two CSLF6 orthologs from different cereal species were shown to mediate the synthesis of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucans with very different fine structures. Chimeric cDNA constructs with interchanged sections of the barley and sorghum CslF6 genes were developed to identify regions of the synthase enzyme responsible for these differences. A single amino acid residue upstream of the TED motif in the catalytic region was shown to dramatically change the fine structure of the polysaccharide produced. The structural basis of this effect can be rationalized by reference to a homology model of the enzyme and appears to be related to the position and flexibility of the TED motif in the active site of the enzyme. The region and amino acid residue identified provide opportunities to manipulate the solubility of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan in grains and vegetative tissues of the grasses and, in particular, to enhance the solubility of dietary fibers that are beneficial to human health. PMID:26967377

  10. Wavelength independent interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B. (Inventor); Page, Norman A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polychromatic interferometer utilizing a plurality of parabolic reflective surfaces to properly preserve the fidelity of light wavefronts irrespective of their wavelengths as they pass through the instrument is disclosed. A preferred embodiment of the invention utilizes an optical train which comprises three off-axis parabolas arranged in conjunction with a beam-splitter and a reference mirror to form a Twyman-Green interferometer. An illumination subsystem is provided and comprises a pair of lasers at different preselected wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The output light of the two lasers is coaxially combined by means of a plurality of reflectors and a grating beam combiner to form a single light source at the focal point of the first parabolic reflection surface which acts as a beam collimator for the rest of the optical train. By using visible light having two distinct wavelengths, the present invention provides a long equivalent wavelength interferogram which operates at visible light wherein the effective wavelength is equal to the product of the wavelengths of the two laser sources divided by their difference in wavelength. As a result, the invention provides the advantages of what amounts to long wavelength interferometry but without incurring the disadvantage of the negligible reflection coefficient of the human eye to long wavelength frequencies which would otherwise defeat any attempt to form an interferogram at that low frequency using only one light source.

  11. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented of the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micron region. K is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Using the previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorentz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for condensed CH4.

  12. Wavelength Swept Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Seok Hyun; Bouma, Brett E.

    In optical interferometric metrology, the wavelength of light serves as a reference for length. At a given optical wavelength, an interference signal varies as a sinusoidal function of distance with a period equal to the wavelength. Although this approach offers unrivaled precision, the periodic signal results in a 2π ambiguity for measurement of lengths greater than one wavelength. In optical coherence tomography (OCT), one wishes to determine light scattering distances and distribution within a sample, but without the ambiguity. To accomplish this, OCT is based on interferometry using many optical wavelengths, each serving as a "ruler" with different periodicities. OCT traditionally has used broadband light sources providing a wide range of wavelengths, all simultaneously. Alternatively, a tunable light source emitting one wavelength at a time, rapidly swept over a broad spectral range, can also be used to achieve the absolute ranging capability in OCT. In this chapter, we describe a technical overview of these new emerging sources. We begin with a discussion general specifications of these light sources, the review basic fundamentals of laser and wavelength tuning. Finally, we discuss the principles of various techniques developed to date for high-speed and wide tuning range.

  13. Antimony(III) complexing with O-bearing organic ligands in aqueous solution: An X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and solubility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tella, Marie; Pokrovski, Gleb S.

    2009-01-01

    The stability and structure of aqueous complexes formed by trivalent antimony (Sb III) with carboxylic acids (acetic, adipic, malonic, lactic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric acid), phenols (catechol), and amino acids (glycine) having O- and N-functional groups (carboxyl, alcoholic hydroxyl, phenolic hydroxyl and amine) typical of natural organic matter, were determined at 20 and 60 °C from solubility and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy measurements. In organic-free aqueous solutions and in the presence of acetic, adipic, malonic acids and glycine, both spectroscopic and solubility data are consistent with the dominant formation of Sb III hydroxide species, Sb(OH)3-nn+,Sb(OH)30andSb(OH)4-, at strongly acid, acid-to-neutral and basic pH, respectively, demonstrating negligible complexing with mono-functional organic ligands (acetic) or those having non adjacent carboxylic groups (adipic, malonic). In contrast, in the presence of poly-functional carboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic acids and catechol, Sb III forms stable 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with the studied organic ligands over a wide pH range typical of natural waters (3 < pH < 9). XAFS spectroscopy measurements show that in these species the central Sb III atom has a distorted pseudo-trigonal pyramidal geometry composed of the lone pair of 5s 2 electrons of Sb and four oxygen atoms from two adjacent functional groups of the ligand (O dbnd C-OH and/or C sbnd OH), forming a five-membered bidendate chelate cycle. Stability constants for these species, generated from Sb 2O 3 (rhomb.) solubility experiments, were used to model Sb complexing with natural humic acids possessing the same functional groups as those investigated in this study. Our predictions show that in an aqueous solution of pH between 2 and 10, containing 1 μg/L of Sb and 5 mg/L of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), up to 35% of total dissolved Sb binds to aqueous organic matter via carboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic groups. This amount of

  14. [CuCln](2-n) Ion-Pair Species in 1-Ethyl-3-Methylimidazolium Chloride Ionic Liquid-Water Mixtures: Ultraviolet-Visible, X-ray Absorbtion Fine Structure, and Density Functional Theory Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Camaioni, Donald M.; Amonette, James E.; Zhang, Z. Conrad; Johnson, Timothy J.; Fulton, John L.

    2010-10-07

    We report details of the coordination environment about Cu(II) in a pure ionic liquid, 1- ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([EMIM]Cl) and in mixtures containing varying amounts of water from 0-100% of the [EMIM]Cl. There are many stages in the ion pairing of the divalent cation, Cu(II) including the contact ion pairing of Cu2+ with multiple Cl- to form various CuCln (2-n) polyanions. Thereis also the subsequent solvation and ion pairing of the polychlorometallate anion with the EMIM+ cation. Using a combination of x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), UV-Vis spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations (TDDFT) we are able to follow the detailed structural changes about Cu(II). Ion pair formation is strongly promoted in [EMIM]Cl by the low dielectric constant and by the extensive breakdown of the water hydrogen bond network in [EMIM]Cl/water mixtures. In the [EMIM]Cl solvent the CuCl4 2- species dominates and it’s geometry is quite similar to gas-phase structure. These results are important in understanding catalysis and separation processes involving transition metals in ionic liquid systems.

  15. Structural Study of Cu-Deficient Cu2(1-x)ZnSnSe4 Solar Cell Materials by X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Yamazoe, Seiji; Maeda, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Takahiro

    2012-10-01

    Cu-poor Cu2(1-x)ZnSnSe4 powders were prepared from elemental powders. The crystal structure of Cu-poor Cu2(1-x)ZnSnSe4 was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analyses. Kesterite-type Cu2(1-x)ZnSnSe4 could be prepared in the range of 0≤x ≤0.0750. The lattice parameters were refined by the Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffraction data. The lattice constants a and c decreased with a decrease in the Cu/(Zn+Sn) ratio. However, there was little change in c/a value. On the other hand, the position of the Se atom (u parameters) changed considerably. The XAFS study showed that the local structure of Sn in Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) changed with a decrease in Cu/(Zn+Sn) ratio and the local structural changes in Cu, Zn, or Se could not be clearly observed. These local structural changes around Sn are due to the disordering of Cu, Zn, and Sn atoms. The diffuse reflectance spectra showed that the band gap of Cu2ZnSnSe4 is 0.98 eV and that the band gaps do not depend on Cu/(Zn+Sn) ratio in the range of 0≤x ≤0.0750.

  16. Spatial structure determination of ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees}CO on Cu(111) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors report a study of the spatial structure of ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} (low coverage) and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} (intermediate coverage) CO adsorbed on Cu(111), using the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) technique at beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The CO molecule adsorbs on an atop site for both adsorption phases. Full multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) calculations were used to extract the C-Cu. bond length and the first Cu-Cu layer spacing for each adsorption phase. The authors find that the C-Cu bond length remains unchanged with increasing coverage, but the 1st Cu-Cu layer spacing contracts at the intermediate coverage. They calculate the bending mode force constant in the (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} phase to be K{sub {delta}} = 2.2 (1) x 10{sup {minus}12} dyne-cm/rad from their experimentally determined bond lengths combined with previously published infra-red absorption frequencies.

  17. Fundamental Constants as Monitors of Particle Physics and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger

    2016-03-01

    This contribution considers the constraints on particle physics and dark energy parameter space imposed by the astronomical observational constraints on the variation of the proton to electron mass ratio μ and the fine structure constant α. These constraints impose limits on the temporal variation of these parameters on a time scale greater than half the age of the universe, a time scale inaccessible by laboratory facilities such as the Large Hadron Collider. The limits on the variance of μ and α constrain combinations of the QCD Scale, the Higgs VEV and the Yukawa coupling on the particle physics side and a combination of the temporal variation of rolling scalar field and its coupling to the constants on the dark energy side.

  18. Short wavelength FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented on the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micrometer region. Deposition onto a substrate at 10 K produces glassy (semi-amorphous) material. Annealing this material at approximately 33 K for approximately 1 hour results in a crystalline material as seen by sharper, more structured bands and negligible background extinction due to scattering. The constant k is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Typical values (at absorption maxima) are in the .001 to .0001 range. Below lambda = 1.1 micrometers the bands are too weak to be detected by transmission through the films less than or equal to 215 micrometers in thickness, employed in the studies to date. Using previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K, n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorenz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for

  20. Al K-edge extended fine structures in X-ray emission spectra of aluminum metal and aluminum oxide measured by an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, S.; Nishio, M.

    1998-03-01

    The radiative Auger satellite peaks of Al Kα for aluminum metal and aluminum oxide were measured over a small area using an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The oscillation was found to be similar to the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) in the EPMA spectra, oscillation which was recently discovered by Hayashi et al. (1997) in the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. The measured EXAFS spectra with EPMA are in good agreement with those by Hayashi et al., but here the oscillation structure could be obtained in a few minutes over a small area by using EPMA.

  1. NONLINEAR OPTICAL PHENOMENA Frequency shift of Rayleigh line fine structure components in a water solution of 4-methylpyridine as a function of temperature, concentration, and light scattering angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkin, Nikolai F.; Gorelik, Vladimir S.; Sabirov, L. M.; Semenov, D. I.; Khaidarov, Kh S.

    2010-11-01

    The frequency shift Δv of the fine structure components of Rayleigh light scattering in 4-methylpyridine water solutions is studied in the ranges of 1 — 0.1 mole fraction concentrations and temperature 10 — 80 °C. The laws of Δv variation at different light scattering angles are discussed from the viewpoint of solution structural reorganisation under the varying temperature and concentration of nonelectrolyte in water. Existence of a continuous hydrogen-bond net in the solutions is experimentally proved in a certain range of temperatures and concentrations.

  2. Mechanism of the CO oxidation reaction on O-precovered Pt(111) surfaces studied with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, I.; Kondoh, H.; Amemiya, K.; Nagasaka, M.; Shimada, T.; Yokota, R.; Nambu, A.; Ohta, T.

    2005-04-01

    The mechanism of CO oxidation reaction on oxygen-precovered Pt(111) surfaces has been studied by using time-resolved near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The whole reaction process is composed of two distinct paths: (1) a reaction of isolated oxygen atoms with adsorbed CO, and (2) a reaction of island-periphery oxygen atoms after the CO saturation. CO coadsorption plays a role to induce the dynamic change in spatial distribution of O atoms, which switches over the two reaction paths. These mechanisms were confirmed by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The effect of coadsorbed water in the reaction mechanism was also examined.

  3. C 1s Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) of substituted benzoic acids: a theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Baldea,I.; Schimmelpfennig, B.; Plaschke, M.; Rothe, J.; Schirmer, J.; Trofimov, A.; Fanghaenel, T.

    2007-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to explain the discrete transitions in experimental C 1s-NEXAFS (near edge X-ray absorption fine structure) spectra of various benzoic acid derivates. Transition energies and oscillator strengths of the contributing C 1s-{pi}* excitations are computed using the ADC(2) (second-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction) method. This method is demonstrated to be well suited for the finite electronic systems represented by these simple organic acids. There is good agreement between experiment and theory reproducing all the relevant spectral features. Some transitions can only be assigned based on a theoretical foundation. Remaining discrepancies between experimental and computed spectra are discussed.

  4. Structural properties of rutile TiO2 nanoparticles accumulated in a model of gastrointestinal epithelium elucidated by micro-beam x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronesi, G.; Brun, E.; Fayard, B.; Cotte, M.; Carrière, M.

    2012-05-01

    Micro-beam x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used to investigate rutile TiO2 nanoparticles internalized into gastrointestinal cells during their crossing of a gut model barrier. Nanoparticles diluted in culture medium tend to accumulate in cells after 48 h exposure; however, no spectral differences arise between particles in cellular and in acellular environments, as corroborated by quantitative analysis. This finding establishes that no modification of the lattice properties of the nanoparticles occurs upon interaction with the barrier. These measurements demonstrate the possibility of interrogating nanoparticles in situ within cells, suggesting a way to investigate their fate when incorporated in biological hosts.

  5. Accurate determination of the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground states of C-13 and C-12 by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooksy, A. L.; Saykally, R. J.; Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate values are presented for the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground state of neutral atomic C-12 and C-13 as obtained from laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The rigorous analysis of C-13 hyperfine structure, the measurement of resonant fields for C-12 transitions at several additional far-infrared laser frequencies, and the increased precision of the C-12 measurements, permit significant improvement in the evaluation of these energies relative to earlier work. These results will expedite the direct and precise measurement of these transitions in interstellar sources and should assist in the determination of the interstellar C-12/C-13 abundance ratio.

  6. Diameter dependence of the fine structure of the Raman G-band of single wall carbon nanotubes revealed by a Kohonen self-organizing map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukovecz, A.; Smolik, M.; Bokova, S. N.; Kataura, H.; Achiba, Y.; Kuzmany, H.

    2003-11-01

    The Raman G-band of six single wall carbon nanotube samples with known diameters between 1.05 and 1.56 nm was measured with 14 different lasers in the 457-676 nm range. Spectra were reduced in size by discrete cosine transformation and introduced as input vectors into a Kohonen self-organizing map (SOM). Even though no diameter data was supplied to the network, the SOM was able to identify spectra belonging to the same sample. The results correlated well with those obtained by conventional cluster analysis. This suggests that artificial neural networks are capable of extracting diameter information from the G-band fine structure.

  7. Systematics of Rydberg structure in the spectra of the rare gas dimers between the atomic ²P⁰3/2 and ²P⁰1/2 fine-structure thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Patricia M.; Pratt, Stephen T.

    1981-01-01

    The relative photoionization cross sections for the rare gas dimers Ar2, Kr2, and Xe2 were measured in the energy region between the respective atomic ²P3/2⁰ and ²P1/2fine-structure thresholds at wavelength resolutions of 0.15 Â for Ar2, 0.28 Â for Kr2, and 0.45 Â for Xe2. Discrete autoionization structure was observed for all three systems and has been partially analyzed in terms of Rydberg series converging to the C ²Π1/2u state of the molecular ions. Vertical binding energies for the individual Rydberg states were estimated based on the assumption that the Rydberg states dissociate to a rare gas atom in an ns'[1/2]1⁰ or nd'[3/2]1⁰ excited state plus a rare gas atom in the ¹S0 ground state. The binding energies thus obtained are in excellent agreement with the corresponding values for the C ²Π1/2u ionic states obtained from previously reported photoelectron spectra. Some of the molecular structure exhibits Beutler--Fano profiles similar to those observed in the nd'[3/2]1⁰ atomic series. This is in contrast to the energy region near the first ionization threshold, where it is extremely difficult to find a simple correlation between the atomic and molecular Rydberg structure.

  8. On the ground-state splitting, fine structure of multiplets and EPR spectrum of Ni2+ doped in MgF2 crystal with orthorhombic site symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wang; Xiang, Xun; Chen, Heng-Jie; Zheng, Wen-Chen; Tang, Hai-Yan

    2014-04-01

    The 45×45 complete energy matrix for 3d8 ion at D2h site symmetry is used to calculate and assign the ground-state splitting and the fine structure of the multiplets of Ni2+(3d8) doped in MgF2 crystal with rutile type structure by the complete diagonalizaton method (CDM) in the frame of semi-empirical molecular orbital (MO) scheme in the strong crystal field (CF) approximation. In the calculation, all the configuration interactions though the cubic CF part, low-symmetry component (tetragonal and orthorhombic parts), Coulomb interaction and the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) interaction (both of the central ion and the liangds) are taken into account completely. The calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the ground-state splitting is also calculated by the high-order perturbation method (PTM), together with the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters D, E and g-factors (gx, gy and gz). The results of the spin-orbit splitting of the ground state calculated by CDM and PTM are not only close to each other, but also in good agreement with the observed data. The relationship between crystalline parameters and the fine structure of multiplets and EPR spectrum is established and the local defect structure is determined.

  9. Excitonic fine structure splitting in ZnTe/ZnX (X = S and Se) core/shell nanocrystals: Atomistic tight-binding theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukkabot, Worasak

    2016-03-01

    Implementing the atomistic tight-binding theory in the conjunction with a configuration interaction method of coulomb and exchange description, the excitonic fine structure splitting (FSS) in core/shell semiconductor nanocrystals is usually caused by the intrinsic electron-hole exchange interaction. I demonstrate the control of the excitonic fine structure splitting by suitably engineering the type of the band alignments and the thickness of the growth shell. ZnTe/ZnS and ZnTe/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystals exhibiting the type-I and type-II band profile are used to be the simulated candidates with various growth shell thicknesses. The detailed calculations, consisting of single-particle spectra, optical band gaps, ground-state wave function overlaps, ground-state oscillation strengths, ground-state coulomb energies, ground-state exchange energies and excitonic splitting energies, are all sensitive with the type and dimension of the coated shells. The simulations highlight that ZnTe/ZnSe type-II core/shell nanocrystals with the thick growth shell can offer an intensely reduced excitonic splitting as defined by an associated reduction of electron-hole exchange interaction. This insight is important for the theoretical understanding and practical control by the type of the band alignments and sizes in the growth shell for the quantum state of the emitted light from a biexciton cascade recombination process which will be implemented to the entangled photon source in the novel application of quantum information processing.

  10. Low-temperature adsorption of H2S on Ni(001) studied by near-edge- and surface-extended-x-ray-absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, R.; MacDowell, A. A.; Hashizume, T.; Sette, F.; Citrin, P. H.

    1989-11-01

    The adsorption of H2S on Ni(001) has been studied with surface-extended x-ray-absorption fine structure and near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) using the AT&T Bell Laboratories X15B beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source. At 95 K and full saturation coverage, ~0.45 monolayer (ML) of S atoms in fourfold-hollow sites are produced, characteristic of room-temperature adsorption, accompanied by ~0.05 ML of oriented molecular H2S. Both these atomic and molecular chemisorbed species are buried under ~0.9 ML of disordered physisorbed H2S. No evidence for HS is found. Above 190 K the two molecular H2S phases desorb, leaving only dissociated S. These findings differ from previously reported interpretations of data obtained with high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. They also exemplify the utility of NEXAFS for identifying and quantifying atomic and molecular surface species even when their difference involves only H and the two species coexist.

  11. Lymphatic Specific Disruption in the Fine Structure of Heparan Sulfate Inhibits Dendritic Cell Traffic and Functional T Cell Responses in the Lymph Node

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C.; Kim, Daniel; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Salanga, Catherina L.; Handel, Tracy M.; Macal, Mónica; Zúñiga, Elina I.; Fuster, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen-presenting cells essential for initiating adaptive immunity. Following pathogen exposure, trafficking of DC to lymph nodes (LN) through afferent lymphatic vessels constitutes a crucial step in the execution of their functions. The mechanisms regulating this process, however, are poorly understood, although the involvement of certain chemokines in this process has recently been reported. Herein, we demonstrate that genetically altering the fine structure (N-sulfation) of heparan sulfate specifically in mouse lymphatic endothelium significantly reduces DC trafficking to regional lymph nodes in vivo. Moreover, this alteration had the unique functional consequence of reducing CD8+ T cell proliferative responses in draining lymph nodes in an ovalbumin immunization model. Mechanistic studies suggested that lymphatic endothelial heparan sulfate regulates multiple steps during DC trafficking, including optimal presentation of chemokines on the surface of DC, thus acting as a co-receptor that may function “in trans” to mediate chemokine-receptor binding. This study not only identifies novel glycan-mediated mechanisms that regulate lymphatic DC trafficking, but also validates the fine structure of lymphatic-vascular specific heparan sulfate as a novel molecular target for strategies aiming to modulate DC behavior and/or alter pathologic T cell responses in lymph nodes. PMID:24493818

  12. Imaging of fine structures of cellular organelles in hydrated biological cells by a soft x-ray microscope combined with a fluorescence microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Kishimoto, Maki; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Aoyama, Masato; Shinohara, Kunio

    2013-09-01

    We have proposed and developed a new hybrid microscopy system using a soft x-ray microscope and a fluorescence microscope imaging the same biological cells at the nearly same time. Combining the powerful advantages such as high spatial resolution of the soft x-ray microscope and the accurate organelle identification of the fluorescence microscope, we can observe fine structures of the cellular organelles in live hydrated biological cells in situ. Staining the cells with several fluorescent dyes such as Mito-tracker, Phalloidin, and DAPI, the soft x-ray images of the cells have been directly compared with the fluorescent images and the cellular organelles such as mitochondria, actin filaments, and chromosomes in the soft x-ray images have been clearly identified. Since the soft x-ray microscope has higher spatial resolution than that of the fluorescence microscope, not only shape of the cellular organelles but also the fine structures of the cellular organelles of the live biological cells have been clearly observed for the first time.

  13. L-edge x-ray absorption fine structure study of growth and morphology of ultrathin nickel films deposited on copper

    SciTech Connect

    Nietubyc, Robert; Foehlisch, Alexander; Glaser, Leif; Lau, Julian Tobias; Martins, Michael; Reif, Matthias; Wurth, Wilfried

    2004-12-15

    We have studied the Ni L edge x-ray absorption fine structure for thin Ni films evaporated on a Cu(001) substrate. The measurements have been carried out for films having coverages ranging from 0.07 monolayers (ML) up to 3.1 ML. The coverage has been calibrated using the ratio of the Ni L{sub 3} to Cu L{sub 3} edge jump heights and independently verified with titration experiments. We have found a clear evolution of the x-ray absorption fine structure at the Ni L{sub 3} edge with coverage. To interpret the measured spectra first-principles calculations have been performed modeling a two-dimensional growth. The calculations reproduced all features observed experimentally. From the comparison between experiment and theory we can conclude that submonolayer films contain a large number of small islands. Deposition of an amount of nickel corresponding to a single layer results in the formation of an almost perfect flat layer. Our studies show that L edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy can provide useful information on thin-film growth and morphology.

  14. Fine Structure in Type IV Solar Radio Bursts during three major Solar Events of October-November 2003 observed by Artemis IV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitsipis, P.; Kontogeorgos, A.; Caroubalos, C.; Moussas, X.; Hillaris, A.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Alissandrakis, C.; Dumas, G.; Polygiannakis, J.

    The fine structure in three solar type IV radio bursts was studied using the French-Greek ARTEMIS-IV multichannel radio spectrograph. The bursts were recorded during three major solar events, on the 26 and 28 October.and 3 Nov. 2003; these we associated with intense flares and CMEs. The observed fine structure includes intermediate drift bursts (fibers) and pulsations. The complexity and overlapping of the various spectral characteristics necessitated the utilization of certain, 2D-FFT based, filtering processes, aiming firstly at structure detection in the frequency-time plane (ie the dynamic spectrum) and secondly in the separation of fibers and pulsations and the suppression of the type IV continuum. This methodology results also to the fibers frequency drift rate distributions and their evolution in time. These fiber frequency drift distributions may be interpreted as the exciter velocity distributions, using a Newkirk coronal density model; the latter may be used as diagnostics of the magnetic field restructuring and energy release during a solar energetic event (flare and/or CME). Artemis IV will provide complementary data to the STEREO/WAVES experiment.

  15. Core-hole effects on theoretical electron-energy-loss near-edge structure and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure of MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Tanaka, Isao; Yoshiya, Masato; Oba, Fumiyasu; Ogasawara, Kazuyoshi; Adachi, Hirohiko

    2000-01-01

    First-principles molecular orbital calculations using model clusters are made in order to reproduce and interpret experimental electron-energy-loss near-edge structure and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure of MgO at Mg K, L2,3 and O K edges. Ground-state calculations using a model cluster composed of 125 atoms and by a band-structure method are in good agreement, but they do not reproduce the experimental spectra satisfactory. They are well reproduced only by the cluster calculations for the Slater transition state, where a half-electron is removed from a core orbital and placed into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. The core-hole effect is therefore essential for theoretical reproduction of the spectral shapes. A large supercell is required to reproduce the experimental spectra when one uses a band-structure method. The origin of peaks appearing in the experimental spectra is interpreted in terms of orbital interactions using overlap-population diagrams. Some features of the spectra at different edges are pointed out to have common origins. Experimental spectra are aligned accordingly. The transition energies and qualitative features of experimental spectra are found to be reproduced even using a smaller cluster composed of 27 atoms, although some of fine structure is missing.

  16. Optical constants of solid methane

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, B.N.; Thompson, W.R.; Sagan, C. . Lab. for Planetary Studies); Arakawa, E.T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J.P. ); Khanna, R.K. . Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry); Pollack, J.B. . Ames Research Center)

    1989-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH{sub 4} for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. We present preliminary results of the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 {mu}m to 2.6 {mu}m region. We report k for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Using our previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110{degree}K (Bull. Am. Phys. Soc.31, 700 (1986)) we compute n for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorentz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for condensed CH{sub 4}. 33 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Simultaneous fine structure observation of wind and temperature profiles by the Arecibo 430-MHz radar and in situ measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, D.; Bertin, F.; Petitdidier, M.; Teitelbaum, H.; Woodman, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    A simultaneous campaign of balloon and radar measurements took place on March 14 to 16, 1984, above the Arecibo 430-MHz radar. This radar was operating with a vertical resolution of 150 m following two antenna beam directions: 15 deg. from the zenith, respectively, in the N-S and E-W directions. The main results concerning the comparison between the flight and simultaneous radar measurements obtained on March 15, 1984 are analyzed. The radar return power profile (S/N ratio in dB) exhibits maxima which are generally well correlated with step-like structures in the potential temperature profile. These structures are generally considered as the consequence of the mixing processes induced by the turbulence. A good correlation appears in the altitude range 12.5 to 19 km between wind shears induced by a wave structure observed in the meridional wind and the radar echo power maxima. This wave structure is characterized by a vertical wavelength of about 2.5 km, and a period in the range 30 to 40 hours. These characteristics are deduced from the twice daily rawinsonde data launched from the San Juan Airport by the National Weather Service. These results pointed out an example of the interaction between wave and turbulence in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Turbulent layers are observed at locations where wind shears related to an internal inertia-gravity wave are maxima.

  18. Hyperfine rather than spin splittings dominate the fine structure of the B 4Σ--X 4Σ- bands of AlC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clouthier, Dennis J.; Kalume, Aimable

    2016-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence and wavelength resolved emission spectra of the B 4Σ--X 4Σ- band system of the gas phase cold aluminum carbide free radical have been obtained using the pulsed discharge jet technique. The radical was produced by electron bombardment of a precursor mixture of trimethylaluminum in high pressure argon. High resolution spectra show that each rotational line of the 0-0 and 1-1 bands of AlC is split into at least three components, with very similar splittings and intensities in both the P- and R-branches. The observed structure was reproduced by assuming bβS magnetic hyperfine coupling in the excited state, due to a substantial Fermi contact interaction of the unpaired electron in the aluminum 3s orbital. Rotational analysis has yielded ground and excited state equilibrium bond lengths in good agreement with the literature and our own ab initio values. Small discrepancies in the calculated intensities of the hyperfine lines suggest that the upper state spin-spin constant λ' is of the order of ≈0.025-0.030 cm-1.

  19. Long wavelength infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Long wavelength infrared detection is achieved by a detector made with layers of quantum well material bounded on each side by barrier material to form paired quantum wells, each quantum well having a single energy level. The width and depth of the paired quantum wells, and the spacing therebetween, are selected to split the single energy level with an upper energy level near the top of the energy wells. The spacing is selected for splitting the single energy level into two energy levels with a difference between levels sufficiently small for detection of infrared radiation of a desired wavelength.

  20. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.