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Sample records for finger injuries

  1. Finger Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    You use your fingers and thumbs to do everything from grasping objects to playing musical instruments to typing. When there is something wrong ... the skin of your palm. It causes the fingers to stiffen and bend. Trigger finger - an irritation ...

  2. Traumatic Finger Injuries: What the Orthopedic Surgeon Wants to Know.

    PubMed

    Wieschhoff, Ged G; Sheehan, Scott E; Wortman, Jeremy R; Dyer, George S M; Sodickson, Aaron D; Patel, Ketan I; Khurana, Bharti

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic finger injuries account for a substantial number of emergency visits every year. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis and in directing management of these injuries. Although many injuries can be managed conservatively, some require more invasive interventions to prevent complications and loss of function. Accurate diagnosis of finger injuries can often be difficult, given the complicated soft-tissue anatomy of the hand and the diverse spectrum of injuries that can occur. To best serve the patient and the treating physician, radiologists must have a working knowledge of finger anatomy, the wide array of injury patterns that can occur, the characteristic imaging findings of different finger injuries, and the most appropriate treatment options for each type of injury. This article details the intricate anatomy of the hand as it relates to common finger injuries, illustrates the imaging findings of a range of injuries, presents optimal imaging modalities and imaging parameters for the diagnosis of different injury types, and addresses which findings have important management implications for the patient and the orthopedic surgeon. With this fund of knowledge, radiologists will be able to recommend the most appropriate imaging studies, make accurate diagnoses, convey clinically relevant imaging findings to the referring physician, and suggest appropriate follow-up examinations. In this way, the radiologist will help improve patient care and outcomes. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27399238

  3. Review of Acute Traumatic Closed Mallet Finger Injuries in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Salazar Botero, Santiago; Hidalgo Diaz, Juan Jose; Benaïda, Anissa; Collon, Sylvie; Facca, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    In adults, mallet finger is a traumatic zone I lesion of the extensor tendon with either tendon rupture or bony avulsion at the base of the distal phalanx. High-energy mechanisms of injury generally occur in young men, whereas lower energy mechanisms are observed in elderly women. The mechanism of injury is an axial load applied to a straight digit tip, which is then followed by passive extreme distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ) hyperextension or hyperflexion. Mallet finger is diagnosed clinically, but an X-ray should always be performed. Tubiana's classification takes into account the size of the bony articular fragment and DIPJ subluxation. We propose to stage subluxated fractures as stage III if the subluxation is reducible with a splint and as stage IV if not. Left untreated, mallet finger becomes chronic and leads to a swan-neck deformity and DIPJ osteoarthritis. The goal of treatment is to restore active DIPJ extension. The results of a six- to eight-week conservative course of treatment with a DIPJ splint in slight hyperextension for tendon lesions or straight for bony avulsions depends on patient compliance. Surgical treatments vary in terms of the approach, the reduction technique, and the means of fixation. The risks involved are stiffness, septic arthritis, and osteoarthritis. Given the lack of consensus regarding indications for treatment, we propose to treat all cases of mallet finger with a dorsal glued splint except for stage IV mallet finger, which we treat with extra-articular pinning. PMID:27019806

  4. Custom-Made Finger Guard to Prevent Wire-Stick Injury to the Operator's Finger while Performing Intermaxillary Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kumaresan, Ramesh; Ponnusami, Karthikeyan; Karthikeyan, Priyadarshini

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of maxillofacial fractures involves different methods from bandages and splinting to methods of open reduction and internal fixation and usually requires control of the dental occlusion with the help of intermaxillary fixation (IMF). Different wiring techniques have been used to aid in IMF including placement of custom-made arch bars, eyelet etc. However, these wiring techniques are with a constant danger of trauma to the surgeon's fingers by their sharp ends. Though there exist a variety of commercially available barrier products and customized techniques to prevent wire-stick injury, cost factor, touch sensitivity, and comfort aspect restrain their acquirement and exploit. This technical note describes the construction of a simple and economical finger guard made of soft thermoplastic material that provides an added protection to fingers from wire-stick type injuries, and its flexible nature permits a comfortable finger flexion movement and acceptable touch sensitivity. This is a simple, economical, reusable puncture, and cut-resistance figure guard by which we can avoid wire-stick type injury to the operator's fingers during wiring technique. PMID:25383158

  5. Current concepts in the evaluation and treatment of mallet finger injury.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Jacob M P; Khouri, Joseph S; Hammert, Warren C

    2013-10-01

    The mallet finger is a frequently encountered fingertip injury that leads to extensor lag of the distal phalanx. Classification systems stratify these injuries as ranging from soft-tissue disruption of the extensor mechanism alone to those that have articular involvement and volar subluxation. The management of mallet finger injuries varies based on injury pattern and surgeon preference. These treatment options include splinting regimens, closed reduction and percutaneous pinning, and open reduction and internal fixation. Although the final goal of treatment is to establish a congruent joint, the efficacy of each treatment modality has been shown to vary. PMID:24076703

  6. Nerve Transfers for the Restoration of Wrist, Finger, and Thumb Extension After High Radial Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Pet, Mitchell A; Lipira, Angelo B; Ko, Jason H

    2016-05-01

    High radial nerve injury is a common pattern of peripheral nerve injury most often associated with orthopedic trauma. Nerve transfers to the wrist and finger extensors, often from the median nerve, offer several advantages when compared to nerve repair or grafting and tendon transfer. In this article, we discuss the forearm anatomy pertinent to performing these nerve transfers and review the literature surrounding nerve transfers for wrist, finger, and thumb extension. A suggested algorithm for management of acute traumatic high radial nerve palsy is offered, and our preferred surgical technique for treatment of high radial nerve palsy is provided. PMID:27094891

  7. Small Finger Snapping due to Retinacular Ligament Injury at the Level of Proximal Interphalangeal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Keun; Lee, Jun-Mo; Lee, Malrey

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pathological snapping secondary to posttraumatic subluxation of the extensor tendon at proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ) of the finger is rare. Here, we want to describe a patient with snapping of the left small finger at PIPJ due to retinacular ligament injury. A 24-year-old man was admitted because of a 5-year history of a snapping sound in the left small finger. On examination, the radial side lateral band of the small finger was dislocated volarly at the level PIPJ with flexion of >50°, which was clearly felt over the skin. There was an obvious snapping sound at the time of dislocation. There was no specific radiographic abnormality. With the patient under regional anesthesia, exploration through a zigzag skin incision over the dorsum of the PIPJ revealed that the retinacular ligament complex was injured. We also found a partial tear in PIPJ capsule, through the incision of the injured retinacular ligament complex. We repaired the joint capsule and retinacular ligament complex with prolene 4–0. Postoperatively the small finger was immobilized in a below-elbow plaster splint with full extension of the fingers for 1 week, then dynamic splinting was advised for another 5 weeks and unrestricted full active motion was allowed at the 6th week. At the 6-month follow-up, the patient had regained full range of motion with no discomfort, and there was no sign of recurrence. We stress that when there is snapping over the dorsum of the PIPJ of the finger, the clinician should suspect rupture of the retinacular ligaments, especially in minor trauma patients. Primary repair of retinacular ligaments and dynamic splinting provided satisfactory results without recurrence in our patient. PMID:26091481

  8. Small Finger Snapping due to Retinacular Ligament Injury at the Level of Proximal Interphalangeal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Keun; Lee, Jun-Mo; Lee, Malrey

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pathological snapping secondary to posttraumatic subluxation of the extensor tendon at proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ) of the finger is rare. Here, we want to describe a patient with snapping of the left small finger at PIPJ due to retinacular ligament injury. A 24-year-old man was admitted because of a 5-year history of a snapping sound in the left small finger. On examination, the radial side lateral band of the small finger was dislocated volarly at the level PIPJ with flexion of >50°, which was clearly felt over the skin. There was an obvious snapping sound at the time of dislocation. There was no specific radiographic abnormality. With the patient under regional anesthesia, exploration through a zigzag skin incision over the dorsum of the PIPJ revealed that the retinacular ligament complex was injured. We also found a partial tear in PIPJ capsule, through the incision of the injured retinacular ligament complex. We repaired the joint capsule and retinacular ligament complex with prolene 4–0. Postoperatively the small finger was immobilized in a below-elbow plaster splint with full extension of the fingers for 1 week, then dynamic splinting was advised for another 5 weeks and unrestricted full active motion was allowed at the 6th week. At the 6-month follow-up, the patient had regained full range of motion with no discomfort, and there was no sign of recurrence. We stress that when there is snapping over the dorsum of the PIPJ of the finger, the clinician should suspect rupture of the retinacular ligaments, especially in minor trauma patients. Primary repair of retinacular ligaments and dynamic splinting provided satisfactory results without recurrence in our patient.

  9. [Self-mutilating hand and finger injuries among physicians suspected of insurance fraud].

    PubMed

    Püschel, K; Hildebrand, E; Hitzer, K; Harms, D

    1998-12-01

    27 cases of questionable self-mutilation among physicians (concerning finger and hand injuries) were analyzed retrospectively. The evaluation based on files of the insurance companies, reconstructive examinations and experimental investigations. Three typical cases are described in detail, the "victims" were suspected to have committed a special kind of fraud in order to claim financial compensation from their accident-insurance companies; the contract included special invalidity payments for finger injures (so-called "Gliedertaxe"). Many of these physicians had worked in the surgical field: apart from one 38-year-old female all of them were males, aged between 41 and 66 years. The mutilating instruments were often circular saws, sometimes chain saws and a great variety of other tools, for example hatchet, big scissors and other sharp instruments. By means of forensic-medical expertise and criminalistic investigations the insurance companies were able to demonstrate clearly that the amputation was voluntarily self-inflicted. The forensic-medical argumentation concerning intentional self-mutilation included the so-called execution position of the finger, the injury pattern, the investigations of blood stains and ergonometric aspects. PMID:9889695

  10. Mallet finger: a simulation and analysis of hyperflexion versus hyperextension injuries.

    PubMed

    Kreuder, Andrea; Pennig, Dietmar; Boese, Christoph Kolja; Eysel, Peer; Oppermann, Johannes; Dargel, Jens

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this study was to simulate the mechanisms of hyperflexion and hyperextension injuries of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint of the hand and to analyze the resulting extensor tendon injury patterns. The hypotheses were raised that hyperflexion trauma leads to a plastic deformation of the extensor tendon aponeurosis, with or without a small bony avulsion fragment but without joint surface involvement, and that hyperextension injuries can create a shear fracture of the dorsal lip of the distal phalanx, without injury to the extensor tendon aponeurosis. Loading was applied with a swinging pendulum impacting the distal phalanx in 103 human specimens in either an extended or flexion position. After loading, injury patterns were analyzed radiologically and histologically. There was evidence that hyperflexion trauma leads to a plastic deformation or rupture of the extensor tendon. Bony tendon avulsion was evident in 12.2 % of cases. With hyperextension, the extensor tendon remained intact in all cases, but there were large fracture fragments involving the articular surface in 4.1 % of cases. The results of the study show that force on the flexed joint leads to overstretching of the extensor tendon, and to an associated dorsal bony avulsion with intact joint line. Force applied to the joint in extension can lead to a bony dorsal edge fracture with articular involvement and with it, a palmar DIP joint capsule rupture. The results illuminate a direct correlation between the mechanism of injury and the pattern of injury in the clinical picture of mallet finger. PMID:26498933

  11. Finger Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about when and where they should receive healthcare. Unfortunately, most people lack the medical knowledge needed to make these decisions safely. FreeMD.com is powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of ...

  12. Successful treatment of a guitarist with a finger joint injury using instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Terry Loghmani, M; Bayliss, Amy J; Clayton, Greg; Gundeck, Evelina

    2015-12-01

    Finger injuries are common and can greatly affect a musician's quality of life. A 55-year-old man, who had injured the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left index finger 6 months prior to any intervention, was treated with a manual therapy approach incorporating instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM). Initial examination findings included self-reported pain and functional limitations and physical impairments that significantly impeded his ability to play the acoustic guitar. He was treated once a week for 6 weeks with IASTM, joint mobilization, therapeutic exercise, and ice massage. Additionally, a home exercise program and self-care instructions were provided. The patient gained positive outcomes with improvements in pain (Numerical Pain Rating Scale while playing the guitar: initial 5/10, discharge 1/10) and function (Disability Arm Shoulder Hand Sports-Performing Arts Optional Module: initial 75; discharge 6·25), each reaching a minimum clinically important difference. Importantly, he was able to play the guitar with minimal to no pain as desired. Physical measures also improved, including an immediate gain in finger range of motion with IASTM alone. Manual therapy approaches integrating IASTM may provide an effective conservative treatment strategy for patients with finger/hand conditions in the performing arts and other patient populations. PMID:26952165

  13. Treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers with combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fengshan; Wang, Guangnan; Li, Gaoshan; Ping, Juan; Mao, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Background Our aim was to summarize the treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers using combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap. Patients and methods Each degloved finger was debrided under microscopic guidance and embedded in the superficial layer of the abdominal fascia. The abdominal skin was sutured to the skin on the back and side of the hand to promote circumferential healing. After removal, the only remaining injured region was on the flexor surface, and this was repaired by multiple dorsal toe flaps, toe-web flaps, and dorsalis pedis flaps to provide blood vessels and sensory nerves. All fingers had proper flap thickness 3–6 months after surgery, and required only lateral Z-plasty modification with web deepening and widening to narrow the fingers and extend their relative length. Results We completed flap-graft and finger narrowing for 25 fingers in eight patients. Abdominal skin flaps and dorsal toe flaps were grafted, and resulted in both firmness and softness, providing finger flexibility. The dorsal toe flap provided good blood circulation and sensory nerves, and was used to cover the finger-flexor surface to regain sensation and stability when holding objects. During the 1–8 years of follow-up, sensation on the finger-flexor side recovered to the S3–4 level, and patient satisfaction based on the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire was 4–5. Flap ulcers or bone/tendon necrosis were not observed. Conclusion Treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers with combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap was effective and reliable. PMID:26229479

  14. Repair of webbed fingers - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/presentations/100096.htm Repair of webbed fingers - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Finger Injuries and Disorders A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  15. Simultaneous Volar Dislocation of Distal Interphalangeal Joint and Volar Fracture-Subluxation of Proximal Interphalangeal Joint of Little Finger: A New Mechanism of Injury.

    PubMed

    Mozaffarian, Kamran; Bayatpour, Abdollah; Vosoughi, Amir Reza

    2016-10-01

    Simultaneous volar dislocation of distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint and volar fracture-subluxation of proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint of the same finger has not been reported yet. A 19-year-old man was referred due to pain on the deformed left little finger after a ball injury. Radiographs showed volar dislocation of the DIP joint and dorsal lip fracture of the middle phalanx with volar subluxation of PIP joint of the little finger. This case was unique in terms of the mechanism of injury which was hyperflexion type in two adjacent joints of the same finger. The patient was treated by closed reduction of DIP joint dislocation and open reduction and internal fixation of the PIP joint fracture-subluxation and application of dorsal external fixator due to instability. Finally, full flexion of the PIP joint and full extension of the DIP joint were obtained but with 10 degree extension lag at the PIP joint and DIP joint flexion ranging from 0 degree to 30 degrees. Some loss of motion in small joints of the fingers after hyperflexion injuries should be expected. PMID:27595966

  16. Unintentional injuries among children in resource poor settings: where do the fingers point?

    PubMed

    Balan, Bhuvaneswari; Lingam, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Every year, over 875,000 children between 0 and 18 years of age die as a result of unintentional injuries (UIs), with a higher proportion occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs): the WHO 2008 World Report on Child Injury Prevention shows a child UI death rate 3.4 times greater in LMICs than in high income countries (HICs) (41.7 per million vs 12.2 per million, respectively). Deaths due to injuries from drowning, burns and falls are significantly higher among LMICs at 7.8, 4.3 and 2.1 per million, respectively, as compared to HICs with 1.2, 0.4 and 0.4 per million, respectively. The authors present a review of childhood UIs in LMICs undertaken to determine demographic and socioeconomic risk factors. As in industrialised settings, age, gender and social deprivation are significant factors in determining UI-related vulnerability among children. However, certain patterns are unique to LMICs, including road traffic injuries among child pedestrians, drowning and accidental paraffin poisoning. These demand contextual understanding and the implementation of appropriate injury control measures, which are currently inadequate. PMID:21949014

  17. The sigma-1 receptor-zinc finger protein 179 pathway protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury.

    PubMed

    Su, Tzu-Chieh; Lin, Shu-Hui; Lee, Pin-Tse; Yeh, Shiu-Hwa; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Chou, Szu-Yi; Su, Tsung-Ping; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Lee, Yi-Chao; Chuang, Jian-Ying

    2016-06-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have implicated the pathogenesis of several human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, stroke, and traumatic brain injury, hence protecting neurons against ROS is very important. In this study, we focused on sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), a chaperone at endoplasmic reticulum, and investigated its protective functions. Using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced ROS accumulation model, we verified that apoptosis-signaling pathways were elicited by H2O2 treatment. However, the Sig-1R agonists, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS), reduced the activation of apoptotic pathways significantly. By performing protein-protein interaction assays and shRNA knockdown of Sig-1R, we identified the brain Zinc finger protein 179 (Znf179) as a downstream target of Sig-1R regulation. The neuroprotective effect of Znf179 overexpression was similar to that of DHEAS treatment, and likely mediated by affecting the levels of antioxidant enzymes. We also quantified the levels of peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) in the hippocampi of wild-type and Znf179 knockout mice, and found both enzymes to be reduced in the knockout versus the wild-type mice. In summary, these results reveal that Znf179 plays a novel role in neuroprotection, and Sig-1R agonists may be therapeutic candidates to prevent ROS-induced damage in neurodegenerative and neurotraumatic diseases. PMID:26792191

  18. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  19. Safe Finger Tourniquet--Ideas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin-Gwei; Chen, Chieh-Feng; Hwang, Chun-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Kuan; Li, Chun-Chang; Wang, Hsian-Jenn

    2016-03-01

    Tourniquets are often needed for optimized phalangeal surgeries. However, few surgeons forget to remove them and caused ischemic injuries. We have a modified method to create a safe finger tourniquet for short duration finger surgeries, which can avoid such tragedy. It is done by donning a glove, cutting the tip of the glove over the finger of interest, and rolling the glove finger to the base. From 2010 to 2013, approximately 54 patients underwent digital surgical procedures with our safe finger tourniquet. Because the glove cannot be forgotten to be removed, the tourniquet must be released and removed. This is a simple and efficient way to apply a safe finger tourniquet by using hand rubber glove for a short-term bloodless finger surgery and can achieve an excellent surgical result. PMID:26855166

  20. Mallet finger - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Baseball finger - aftercare; Drop finger - aftercare; Avulsion fracture - mallet finger - aftercare ... Mallet finger occurs when you cannot straighten your finger: when you try to straighten it, the tip of your ...

  1. Hand Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrist, often making your fingers feel numb Injuries that result in fractures, ruptured ligaments and dislocations ... deformity Tendinitis - irritation of the tendons Disorders and injuries of your fingers and thumb

  2. Finger Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Oosterhoff, Thijs C H; Nota, Sjoerd P F T; Ring, David

    2015-06-01

    Background Finger stiffness varies substantially in patients with hand and upper extremity illness and can be notably more than expected for a given pathophysiology. In prior studies, pain intensity and magnitude of disability consistently correlate with coping strategies such as catastrophic thinking and kinesiophobia, which can be characterized as overprotectiveness. In this retrospective study we address the primary research question whether patients with finger stiffness are more often overprotective when the primary pathology is outside the hand (e.g. distal radius fracture) than when it is located within the hand. Methods In an orthopaedic hand surgery department 160 patients diagnosed with more finger stiffness than expected for a given pathophysiology or time point of recovery between December 2006 and September 2012 were analyzed to compare the proportion of patients characterized as overprotective for differences by site of pathology: (1) inside the hand, (2) outside the hand, and (3) psychiatric etiology (e.g. clenched fist). Results Among 160 subjects with more finger stiffness than expected, 132 (82 %) were characterized as overprotective including 88 of 108 (81 %) with pathology in the hand, 39 of 44 (89 %) with pathology outside the hand, and 5 of 8 (63 %) with psychiatric etiology. These differences were not significant. Conclusions Overprotectiveness is common in patients with more finger stiffness than expected regardless the site and type of primary pathology. It seems worthwhile to recognize and treat maladaptive coping strategies early during recovery to limit impairment, symptoms, and disability. PMID:26078497

  3. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect); flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect); gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions) and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect); and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists. PMID:26753604

  4. Finger Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The author has been prompted to write this article about finger multiplication for a number of reasons. Firstly there are a number of related articles in past issues of "Mathematics Teaching" ("MT") which have connections to this algorithm. Secondly, very few of his primary teaching students and professional colleagues appear to be aware of the…

  5. ZFP580, a Novel Zinc-Finger Transcription Factor, Is Involved in Cardioprotection of Intermittent High-Altitude Hypoxia against Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-cheng; Wang, Tian-hui; Mai, Xia; Liu, Hong-tao; Xu, Rui-cheng

    2014-01-01

    Background ZFP580 is a novel C2H2 type zinc-finger transcription factor recently identified by our laboratory. We previously showed that ZFP580 may be involved in cell survival and growth. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether ZFP580 is involved in the cardioprotective effects of intermittent high-altitude (IHA) hypoxia against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Methods and Results After rats were subjected to myocardial ischemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion, ZFP580 expression in the left ventricle was measured. ZFP580 protein expression was found to be up-regulated within 1 h and decreased at 2 h after reperfusion. Comparing normoxic and IHA hypoxia-adapted rats (5000 m, 6 h day−1, 6 weeks) following I/R injury (30 min ischemia and 2 h reperfusion), we found that adaptation to IHA hypoxia attenuated infarct size and plasma leakage of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase-MB. In addition, ZFP580 expression in the myocardium was up-regulated by IHA hypoxia. Consistent with this result, ZFP580 expression was found to be significantly increased in cultured H9c2 myocardial cells in the hypoxic preconditioning group compared with those in the control group following simulated I/R injury (3 h simulated ischemic hypoxia and 2 h reoxygenation). To determine the role of ZFP580 in apoptosis, lentivirus-mediated gene transfection was performed in H9c2 cells 72 h prior to simulated I/R exposure. The results showed that ZFP580 overexpression significantly inhibited I/R-induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation. H9c2 cells were pretreated with or without PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and Western blot results showed that PD98059 (10 µM) markedly suppressed I/R-induced up-regulation of ZFP580 expression. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that the cardioprotective effect of IHA hypoxia against I/R injury is mediated via ZFP580, a downstream target of ERK1/2 signaling with anti-apoptotic roles in myocardial cells. PMID:24722354

  6. Neurotization of free gracilis transfer with the brachialis branch of the musculocutaneous nerve to restore finger and thumb flexion in lower trunk brachial plexus injury: an anatomical study and case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Zou, Xue-jun; Fu, Guo; Qin, Ben-Gang; Yang, Jian-Tao; Li, Xiang-Ming; Hou, Yi; Qi, Jian; Li, Ping; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Gu, Li-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility of using free gracilis muscle transfer along with the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve to restore finger and thumb flexion in lower trunk brachial plexus injury according to an anatomical study and a case report. METHODS: Thirty formalin-fixed upper extremities from 15 adult cadavers were used in this study. The distance from the point at which the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve originates to the midpoint of the humeral condylar was measured, as well as the length, diameter, course and branch type of the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve. An 18-year-old male who sustained an injury to the left brachial plexus underwent free gracilis transfer using the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve as the donor nerve to restore finger and thumb flexion. Elbow flexion power and hand grip strength were recorded according to British Medical Research Council standards. Postoperative measures of the total active motion of the fingers were obtained monthly. RESULTS: The mean length and diameter of the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve were 52.66±6.45 and 1.39±0.09 mm, respectively, and three branching types were observed. For the patient, the first gracilis contraction occurred during the 4th month. A noticeable improvement was observed in digit flexion one year later; the muscle power was M4, and the total active motion of the fingers was 209°. CONCLUSIONS: Repairing injury to the lower trunk of the brachial plexus by transferring the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve to the anterior branch of the obturator nerve using a tension-free direct suture is technically feasible, and the clinical outcome was satisfactory in a single surgical patient. PMID:27166768

  7. A New Rerouting Technique for the Extensor Pollicis Longus in Palliative Treatment for Wrist and Finger Extension Paralysis Resulting From Radial Nerve and C5C6C7 Root Injury.

    PubMed

    Laravine, Jennifer; Cambon-Binder, Adeline; Belkheyar, Zoubir

    2016-03-01

    Wrist and finger extension paralysis is a consequence of an injury to the radial nerve or the C5C6C7 roots. Despite these 2 different levels of lesions, palliative treatment for this type of paralysis depends on the same tendon transfers. A large majority of the patients are able to compensate for a deficiency of the extension of the wrist and fingers. However, a deficiency in the opening of the first web space, which could be responsible for transfers to the abductor pollicis longus, the extensor pollicis brevis, and the extensor pollicis longus (EPL), frequently exists. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a new EPL rerouting technique outside of Lister's tubercle. Another aim was to verify whether this technique allows a better opening of the thumb-index pinch in this type of paralysis. In the first part, we performed an anatomic study comparing the EPL rerouting technique and the frequently used technique for wrist and finger extension paralyses. In the second part, we present 2 clinical cases in which this new technique will be practiced. Preliminary results during this study favor the EPL rerouting technique. This is a simple and reproducible technique that allows for good opening of the first web space in the treatment of wrist and finger extension paralysis. PMID:26709570

  8. Delayed Administration of a Bio-Engineered Zinc-Finger VEGF-A Gene Therapy Is Neuroprotective and Attenuates Allodynia Following Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Figley, Sarah A.; Liu, Yang; Karadimas, Spyridon K.; Satkunendrarajah, Kajana; Fettes, Peter; Spratt, S. Kaye; Lee, Gary; Ando, Dale; Surosky, Richard; Giedlin, Martin; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI) there are drastic changes that occur in the spinal microvasculature, including ischemia, hemorrhage, endothelial cell death and blood-spinal cord barrier disruption. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is a pleiotropic factor recognized for its pro-angiogenic properties; however, VEGF has recently been shown to provide neuroprotection. We hypothesized that delivery of AdV-ZFP-VEGF – an adenovirally delivered bio-engineered zinc-finger transcription factor that promotes endogenous VEGF-A expression – would result in angiogenesis, neuroprotection and functional recovery following SCI. This novel VEGF gene therapy induces the endogenous production of multiple VEGF-A isoforms; a critical factor for proper vascular development and repair. Briefly, female Wistar rats – under cyclosporin immunosuppression – received a 35 g clip-compression injury and were administered AdV-ZFP-VEGF or AdV-eGFP at 24 hours post-SCI. qRT-PCR and Western Blot analysis of VEGF-A mRNA and protein, showed significant increases in VEGF-A expression in AdV-ZFP-VEGF treated animals (p<0.001 and p<0.05, respectively). Analysis of NF200, TUNEL, and RECA-1 indicated that AdV-ZFP-VEGF increased axonal preservation (p<0.05), reduced cell death (p<0.01), and increased blood vessels (p<0.01), respectively. Moreover, AdV-ZFP-VEGF resulted in a 10% increase in blood vessel proliferation (p<0.001). Catwalk™ analysis showed AdV-ZFP-VEGF treatment dramatically improves hindlimb weight support (p<0.05) and increases hindlimb swing speed (p<0.02) when compared to control animals. Finally, AdV-ZFP-VEGF administration provided a significant reduction in allodynia (p<0.01). Overall, the results of this study indicate that AdV-ZFP-VEGF administration can be delivered in a clinically relevant time-window following SCI (24 hours) and provide significant molecular and functional benefits. PMID:24846143

  9. Simultaneous dislocation of both interphalangeal joints in the middle finger.

    PubMed

    Hester, Thomas; Mahmood, Shoib; Morar, Yateen; Singh, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous dorsal dislocation of both interphalangeal joints (IPJs) in one finger is an uncommon injury. This injury usually occurs on the ulnar side of the hand involving ring and little fingers. We report a case of simultaneous dislocation of both IPJs in the middle finger. Closed reduction and splinting with the IPJs in extension provided a good result with full range of motion at the patient's final follow-up. PMID:25979959

  10. Design and preliminary evaluation of the FINGER rehabilitation robot: controlling challenge and quantifying finger individuation during musical computer game play

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot), a device for assisting in finger rehabilitation after neurologic injury. We developed FINGER to assist stroke patients in moving their fingers individually in a naturalistic curling motion while playing a game similar to Guitar Hero®a. The goal was to make FINGER capable of assisting with motions where precise timing is important. Methods FINGER consists of a pair of stacked single degree-of-freedom 8-bar mechanisms, one for the index and one for the middle finger. Each 8-bar mechanism was designed to control the angle and position of the proximal phalanx and the position of the middle phalanx. Target positions for the mechanism optimization were determined from trajectory data collected from 7 healthy subjects using color-based motion capture. The resulting robotic device was built to accommodate multiple finger sizes and finger-to-finger widths. For initial evaluation, we asked individuals with a stroke (n = 16) and without impairment (n = 4) to play a game similar to Guitar Hero® while connected to FINGER. Results Precision design, low friction bearings, and separate high speed linear actuators allowed FINGER to individually actuate the fingers with a high bandwidth of control (−3 dB at approximately 8 Hz). During the tests, we were able to modulate the subject’s success rate at the game by automatically adjusting the controller gains of FINGER. We also used FINGER to measure subjects’ effort and finger individuation while playing the game. Conclusions Test results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to motivate subjects with an engaging game environment that challenges individuated control of the fingers, automatically control assistance levels, and quantify finger individuation after stroke. PMID:24495432

  11. Noncontacting Finger Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P. (Inventor); Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An annular finger seal is adapted to be interposed between a high pressure upstream region and a lower pressure downstream region to provide noncontact sealing along a rotatable member. The finger seal comprises axially juxtaposed downstream and upstream finger elements, each having integrally spaced fingers. The downstream fingers each have a lift pad, whereas the upstream fingers lack a pad. Each pad extends in a downstream direction. Each upstream finger is spaced from the rotating member a greater distance than each pad. Upon sufficient rotational speed of the rotating member, each pad is operative to lift and ride on a thin film of fluid intermediate the rotating member and the Pad.

  12. Hand and Finger Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Hand and Finger Exercises  Place your palm flat on a table. Raise and lower your fingers one ... times for ____ seconds.  Pick up objects with your hand. Start out with larger objects. Repeat ____ times for ____ ...

  13. Finger snapping during seizures.

    PubMed

    Overdijk, M J; Zijlmans, M; Gosselaar, P H; Olivier, A; Leijten, F S S; Dubeau, F

    2014-01-01

    We describe two patients who showed snapping of the right hand fingers during invasive intracranial EEG evaluation for epilepsy surgery. We correlated the EEG changes with the finger-snapping movements in both patients to determine the underlying pathophysiology of this phenomenon. At the time of finger snapping, EEG spread from the supplementary motor area towards the temporal region was seen, suggesting involvement of these sites. PMID:25667884

  14. Fingers that change color

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions can cause fingers or toes to change color: Buerger disease Chilblains. Painful inflammation of small blood vessels. Cryoglobulinemia Frostbite Necrotizing vasculitis Peripheral artery disease ...

  15. Bilateral Volleyball-Related Deformity of the Little Fingers: Mallet Finger and Clinodactyly Mimic

    PubMed Central

    Uslu, Mustafa; Solak, Kazim; Ozsahin, Mustafa; Uzun, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    A 14-year-old male high school volleyball player was seen to evaluate right- and left-hand little-finger distal interphalangeal joint deformity and pain. His symptoms began during his second season of competitive play. The distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints of the little fingers flexed 20-30°, and a 10-15° valgus deformity was seen at the same joints. Pain was relieved with rest but returned immediately after playing volleyball, so plain radiographs were obtained. The flexion and valgus deformity was obvious on plain radiographs and through a clinical examination. Thus, a bilateral little-finger distal phalanx base epiphysis injury was seen. This injury is characterized by a biplanar Salter Harris physeal injury; type 5 on anteroposterior radiographs and type 2 on lateral plain radiographs. The deformity occurred as a result of competitive volleyball play. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a bilateral biplanar physial injury of the base of distal phalanges of the little fingers. Flexion and valgus deformities of DIP joints are a result of repeated micro traumas around the physis. Key points As a result of repeated micro traumas to the physial region, flexion and valgus deformities of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints should be occurred. Sports injuries to the hand often require treatment in orthopedic departments to avoid permanent deformities. Short- or long-term functional results can be gained by simple splinting procedures and abstention from play. PMID:24149318

  16. Rolling friction robot fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A low friction, object guidance, and gripping finger device for a robotic end effector on a robotic arm is disclosed, having a pair of robotic fingers each having a finger shaft slideably located on a gripper housing attached to the end effector. Each of the robotic fingers has a roller housing attached to the finger shaft. The roller housing has a ball bearing mounted centering roller located at the center, and a pair of ball bearing mounted clamping rollers located on either side of the centering roller. The object has a recess to engage the centering roller and a number of seating ramps for engaging the clamping rollers. The centering roller acts to position and hold the object symmetrically about the centering roller with respect to the X axis and the clamping rollers act to position and hold the object with respect to the Y and Z axis.

  17. Finger and toenail onycholysis.

    PubMed

    Zaias, N; Escovar, S X; Zaiac, M N

    2015-05-01

    Onycholysis - the separation of the nail plate from the nail bed occurs in fingers and toenails. It is diagnosed by the whitish appearance of the separated nail plate from the nail bed. In fingers, the majority is caused by trauma, manicuring, occupational or self-induced behavior. The most common disease producing fingernail onycholysis is psoriasis and pustular psoriasis. Phototoxic dermatitis, due to drugs can also produce finger onycholysis. Once the separation occurs, the environmental flora sets up temporary colonization in the available space. Finger onycholysis is most common in women. Candida albicans is often recovered from the onycholytic space. Many reports, want to associate the yeast as cause and effect, but the data are lacking and the treatment of the candida does not improve finger onycholysis. A reasonable explanation for the frequent isolation of Candida and Pseudomonas in fingernail onycholysis in women, is the close proximity the fingers have to the vaginal and gastrointestinal tract. Fifty per cent of humans harbour C. albicans in the GI tract and it is frequently carried to the vagina during hygienic practices. Finger onycholysis is best treated by drying the nail 'lytic' area with a hair blower, since all colonizing biota are moisture loving and perish in a dry environment. Toenail onycholysis has a very different etiology. It is mechanical, the result of pressure on the toes from the closed shoes, while walking, because of the ubiquitous uneven flat feet producing an asymmetric gait with more pressure on the foot with the flatter sole. PMID:25512134

  18. Multiple Fingers - One Gestalt.

    PubMed

    Lezkan, Alexandra; Manuel, Steven G; Colgate, J Edward; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Drewing, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The Gestalt theory of perception offered principles by which distributed visual sensations are combined into a structured experience ("Gestalt"). We demonstrate conditions whereby haptic sensations at two fingertips are integrated in the perception of a single object. When virtual bumps were presented simultaneously to the right hand's thumb and index finger during lateral arm movements, participants reported perceiving a single bump. A discrimination task measured the bump's perceived location and perceptual reliability (assessed by differential thresholds) for four finger configurations, which varied in their adherence to the Gestalt principles of proximity (small versus large finger separation) and synchrony (virtual spring to link movements of the two fingers versus no spring). According to models of integration, reliability should increase with the degree to which multi-finger cues integrate into a unified percept. Differential thresholds were smaller in the virtual-spring condition (synchrony) than when fingers were unlinked. Additionally, in the condition with reduced synchrony, greater proximity led to lower differential thresholds. Thus, with greater adherence to Gestalt principles, thresholds approached values predicted for optimal integration. We conclude that the Gestalt principles of synchrony and proximity apply to haptic perception of surface properties and that these principles can interact to promote multi-finger integration. PMID:26863671

  19. Fingering in Confined Elastic Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggins, John; Mahadevan, L.; Wei, Z.; Saintyves, Baudouin; Bouchaud, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Fingering has recently been observed in soft highly elastic layers that are confined between and bonded to two rigid bodies. In one case an injected fluid invades the layer in finger-like protrusions at the layer's perimeter, a solid analogue of Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering. In a second case, separation of the rigid bodies (with maintained adhesion to the layer) leads air to the formation of similar fingers at the layer's perimeter. In both cases the finger formation is reversible: if the fluid is removed or the separation reduced, the fingers vanish. In this talk I will discuss a theoretical model for such elastic fingers that shows that the origin of the fingers is large-strain geometric non-linearity in the elasticity of soft solids. Our simplified elastic model unifies the two types of fingering and accurately estimates the thresholds and wavelengths of the fingers.

  20. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  1. Rotatory subluxation of the metacarpophalangeal index finger joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Teo, Ken; Berger, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of rotatory subluxation of the metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ) of the finger. A 40-year-old man sustained an open injury to his index finger following an explosive injury. Radiographs showed rotatory subluxation of the index finger MCPJ. The index finger extensor digitorium was found interposed in the MCPJ, with a complete tear of the radial collateral ligament. Treatment was by open reduction and repair of the collateral ligament and the extensor tendon. A high level of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this entity. PMID:23413862

  2. Flexible Arm Splints in the Control of a Lesch-Nyhan Victim's Finger Biting and a Profoundly Retarded Client's Finger Sucking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Thomas S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Flexible arm splints permitting the control of hand-to-mouth contacts without restricting range of motion effectively suppressed the self-injurious finger biting of a child with Lesch-Nyhan disease and a profoundly retarded adult's stereotypic finger sucking. They offered an easily applied and much less restrictive alternative to soft-tie and…

  3. Osseointegrated finger prostheses.

    PubMed

    Doppen, P; Solomons, M; Kritzinger, S

    2009-02-01

    Amputation of a digit can lead to functional and psychological problems and patients can benefit from digital prostheses. Unfortunately, standard prostheses are often unstable, particularly when fitted over short amputation stumps. Prosthesis fixation by osseointegration is widely used in oral and extraoral applications and may help avoid the problem of instability. This paper reports the results of four patients with five finger amputations who were treated with osseointegrated implants to attach finger prostheses. One implant failed to osseointegrate and the procedure was abandoned. Three patients were successfully treated to completion of three finger prostheses and are extremely satisfied with their outcomes, both cosmetically and functionally, with osseoperception reported by all three patients. PMID:19091736

  4. Multi-fingered robotic hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, Carl F. (Inventor); Salisbury, Kenneth, Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic hand is presented having a plurality of fingers, each having a plurality of joints pivotally connected one to the other. Actuators are connected at one end to an actuating and control mechanism mounted remotely from the hand and at the other end to the joints of the fingers for manipulating the fingers and passing externally of the robot manipulating arm in between the hand and the actuating and control mechanism. The fingers include pulleys to route the actuators within the fingers. Cable tension sensing structure mounted on a portion of the hand are disclosed, as is covering of the tip of each finger with a resilient and pliable friction enhancing surface.

  5. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  6. Spiral viscous fingering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Atsushi; Kato, Yoshihito; Tada, Yutaka

    2006-11-01

    When a less-viscous fluid displaces a more-viscous fluid in a radial Hele-Shaw cell, viscous fingering pattern is believed to develop in a radial direction. We performed experiments on viscous fingering in a radial Hele-Shaw cell when a polymer solution, a sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution is used as the more-viscous fluid and the trivalent iron (Fe^3+) solution is as the less-viscous fluid. The experiment was done by varying the concentration of Fe^3+, cFe3+. We have found that viscous fingering pattern develops spirally when cFe3+ is larger than a threshold value, while the pattern develops in a radial direction for small cFe3+. We confirmed from different experiments that an instantaneous chemical reaction takes place between SPA solution and Fe^3+ solution. The chemical reaction produces precipitation and significantly reduces the viscosity of the SPA solution. The quantity of the precipitation is increased with cFe3+. We will make a discussion on the relationship between the formation of spiral viscous fingering and the chemical reaction taking place between the two fluids.

  7. Exercising Your Finger After an Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can squeeze a ball (for example, a soft "stress" ball or a tennis ball). If you use a tennis ball, make a cut in the side of the ball to make it easier to squeeze. Exercise: Object Pick-up This exercise can improve fine motor skills, such as writing or tying your shoes. To ...

  8. Seal finger: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    White, Colin P; Jewer, David D

    2009-01-01

    A recent case of seal finger which was misdiagnosed and hence mistreated at the patient’s first presentation is described. The patient was eventually referred to a hand specialist and after the correct treatment with tetracycline, responded well without any long-term sequelae. Seal finger is an occupational injury that occurs to those who work directly or indirectly with seals. The disease entity has been described in both Scandinavian and Canadian literature. The causative microorganism was unknown until 1991, when Mycoplasma phocacerebrale was isolated from both the finger of a patient with seal finger and from the mouth of a seal that bit the patient. Although rare, the disease is not uncommon in marine workers, biologists and veterinarians. Prompt identification based on patient history and treatment with oral tetracycline is pendant to a favourable patient outcome. PMID:21119845

  9. Toddlers at risk for paper shredder injury in the home: easy access and severe injury.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ramona C; Foltin, George L

    2006-02-01

    A 2-year-old girl sustained severe injury to 2 fingers from a home paper shredder. This case illustrates the risk of injury from paper shredders, which are increasingly common household items. Toddlers are at risk of finger injury and amputation. The US Consumer Product Safety Commission performed an investigation of reported injuries and the characteristics of paper shredders that might have contributed to the injuries, and we summarize their findings. PMID:16452378

  10. Volleyball injuries.

    PubMed

    Eerkes, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the numbers of people playing indoor and beach volleyball since the early 1980s and, consequently, an increase in injuries. Most injuries are related to repetitive jumping and hitting the ball overhead. The ankle is the most commonly injured joint, but the knee, shoulder, low back, and fingers also are vulnerable. The shoulder in particular is subject to extreme torque when hitting and jump serving the ball. Some injuries have a predilection for those playing on sand versus those playing in an indoor court. The clinician caring for volleyball players should be aware of the types of injuries these players sustain and how to help them return to play promptly and appropriately. This article reviews the specific injuries that are most common as a result of participating in the sport of volleyball. PMID:22965348

  11. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  12. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas M. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  13. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  14. Traumatic flexor tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Lapegue, F; Andre, A; Brun, C; Bakouche, S; Chiavassa, H; Sans, N; Faruch, M

    2015-12-01

    The flexor system of the fingers consisting of flexor tendons and finger pulleys is a key anatomic structure for the grasping function. Athletes and manual workers are particularly at risk for closed injuries of the flexor system: ruptured pulleys, ruptures of the flexor digitorum profundus from its distal attachment ("jersey finger"), and less frequently, ruptures of the flexor digitorum superficialis and of the lumbrical muscles. Open injuries vary more and their imaging features are more complex since tendons may be torn in several locations, the locations may be unusual, the injuries may be associated with nerve and vascular injuries, fibrosis… Sonography is the best imaging modality to associate with the clinical exam for it allows an experienced physician to make an accurate and early diagnosis, crucial to appropriate early treatment planning. PMID:26564614

  15. Gert Finger Becomes Emeritus Physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw, T.; Lucuix, C.; Péron, M.

    2016-03-01

    Gert Finger has retired after almost 33 years service and he has been made the first Emeritus Physicist at ESO. An appreciation of some of his many achievements in the development of infrared instrumentation and detector controllers is given. A retirement party for Gert Finger was held in February 2016.

  16. Finger Tendon Travel Associated with Sequential Trigger Nail Gun Use

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Brian; Albers, James; Hudock, Stephen; Krieg, Edward

    2015-01-01

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT Background Pneumatic nail guns used in wood framing are equipped with one of two triggering mechanisms. Sequential actuation triggers have been shown to be a safer alternative to contact actuation triggers because they reduce traumatic injury risk. However, the sequential actuation trigger must be depressed for each individual nail fired as opposed to the contact actuation trigger, which allows the trigger to be held depressed as nails are fired repeatedly by bumping the safety tip against the workpiece. As such, concerns have been raised about risks for cumulative trauma injury, and reduced productivity, due to repetitive finger motion with the sequential actuation trigger. Purpose This study developed a method to predict cumulative finger flexor tendon travel associated with the sequential actuation trigger nail gun from finger joint kinematics measured in the trigger actuation and productivity standards for wood-frame construction tasks. Methods Finger motions were measured from six users wearing an instrumented electrogoniometer glove in a simulation of two common framing tasks–wall building and flat nailing of material. Flexor tendon travel was calculated from the ensemble average kinematics for an individual nail fired. Results Finger flexor tendon travel was attributable mostly to proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joint motion. Tendon travel per nail fired appeared to be slightly greater for a wall-building task than a flat nailing task. The present study data, in combination with construction industry productivity standards, suggest that a high-production workday would be associated with less than 60 m/day cumulative tendon travel per worker (based on 1700 trigger presses/day). Conclusion and Applications These results suggest that exposure to finger tendon travel from sequential actuation trigger nail gun use may be below levels that have been previously associated with high musculoskeletal disorder risk. PMID

  17. Fingering Instabilities in Dewetting Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauliac-Vaujour, E.; Stannard, A.; Martin, C. P.; Blunt, M. O.; Notingher, I.; Moriarty, P. J.; Vancea, I.; Thiele, U.

    2008-05-01

    The growth of fingering patterns in dewetting nanofluids (colloidal solutions of thiol-passivated gold nanoparticles) has been followed in real time using contrast-enhanced video microscopy. The fingering instability on which we focus here arises from evaporatively driven nucleation and growth in a nanoscopically thin precursor solvent film behind the macroscopic contact line. We find that well-developed isotropic fingering structures only form for a narrow range of experimental parameters. Numerical simulations, based on a modification of the Monte Carlo approach introduced by Rabani et al. [Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836 426, 271 (2003)10.1038/nature02087], reproduce the patterns we observe experimentally.

  18. Fingering instabilities in dewetting nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Pauliac-Vaujour, E; Stannard, A; Martin, C P; Blunt, M O; Notingher, I; Moriarty, P J; Vancea, I; Thiele, U

    2008-05-01

    The growth of fingering patterns in dewetting nanofluids (colloidal solutions of thiol-passivated gold nanoparticles) has been followed in real time using contrast-enhanced video microscopy. The fingering instability on which we focus here arises from evaporatively driven nucleation and growth in a nanoscopically thin precursor solvent film behind the macroscopic contact line. We find that well-developed isotropic fingering structures only form for a narrow range of experimental parameters. Numerical simulations, based on a modification of the Monte Carlo approach introduced by Rabani et al. [Nature (London) 426, 271 (2003)10.1038/nature02087], reproduce the patterns we observe experimentally. PMID:18518311

  19. Finger-Circumference-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Suy

    1995-01-01

    Easy-to-use device quickly measures circumference of finger (including thumb) on human hand. Includes polytetrafluoroethylene band 1/8 in. wide, bent into loop and attached to tab that slides on scale graduated in millimeters. Sliding tab preloaded with constant-force tension spring, which pulls tab toward closure of loop. Designed to facilitate measurements at various points along fingers to obtain data for studies of volumetric changes of fingers in microgravity. Also used in normal Earth gravity studies of growth and in assessment of diseases like arthritis.

  20. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low-high; tempo: slow-fast, dynamics: soft-loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low-high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (F mean ) and peak force (F max ) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (F mean = 1.17 N, F max = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (F mean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (F mean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  1. Neural correlates of finger gnosis.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Elena; Tamè, Luigi; Furlan, Michele; Haggard, Patrick; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Adriani, Michela; Ferrari, Paolo; Braun, Christoph; Schwarzbach, Jens

    2014-07-01

    Neuropsychological studies have described patients with a selective impairment of finger identification in association with posterior parietal lesions. However, evidence of the role of these areas in finger gnosis from studies of the healthy human brain is still scarce. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the brain network engaged in a novel finger gnosis task, the intermanual in-between task (IIBT), in healthy participants. Several brain regions exhibited a stronger blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response in IIBT than in a control task that did not explicitly rely on finger gnosis but used identical stimuli and motor responses as the IIBT. The IIBT involved stronger signal in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL), bilateral precuneus (PCN), bilateral premotor cortex, and left inferior frontal gyrus. In all regions, stimulation of nonhomologous fingers of the two hands elicited higher BOLD signal than stimulation of homologous fingers. Only in the left anteromedial IPL (a-mIPL) and left PCN did signal strength decrease parametrically from nonhomology, through partial homology, to total homology with stimulation delivered synchronously to the two hands. With asynchronous stimulation, the signal was stronger in the left a-mIPL than in any other region, possibly indicating retention of task-relevant information. We suggest that the left PCN may contribute a supporting visuospatial representation via its functional connection to the right PCN. The a-mIPL may instead provide the core substrate of an explicit bilateral body structure representation for the fingers that when disrupted can produce the typical symptoms of finger agnosia. PMID:24990921

  2. Multi-finger interaction during involuntary and voluntary single finger force changes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J.R.; Zatsiorsky, V.M.; Latash, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Two types of finger interaction are characterized by positive co-variation (enslaving) or negative co-variation (error compensation) of finger forces. Enslaving reflects mechanical and neural connections among fingers, while error compensation results from synergic control of fingers to stabilize their net output. Involuntary and voluntary force changes by a finger were used to explore these patterns. We hypothesized that synergic mechanisms will dominate during involuntary force changes, while enslaving will dominate during voluntary finger force changes. Subjects pressed with all four fingers to match a target force that was 10% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). One of the fingers was unexpectedly raised 5.0 mm at a speed of 30.0 mm/s. During finger raising the subject was instructed “not to intervene voluntarily”. After the finger was passively lifted and a new steady-state achieved, subjects pressed down with the lifted finger, producing a pulse of force voluntarily. The data were analyzed in terms of finger forces and finger modes (hypothetical commands to fingers reflecting their intended involvement). The target finger showed an increase in force during both phases. In the involuntary phase, the target finger force changes ranged between 10.71 ± 1.89% MVC (I-finger) and 16.60 ± 2.26% MVC (L-finger). Generally, non-target fingers displayed a force decrease with a maximum amplitude of −1.49 ± 0.43% MVC (L-finger). Thus, during the involuntary phase, error compensation was observed – non-lifted fingers showed a decrease in force (as well as in mode magnitude). During the voluntary phase, enslaving was observed – non-target fingers showed an increase in force and only minor changes in mode magnitude. The average change in force of non-target fingers ranged from 21.83 ± 4.47% MVC for R-finger (M-finger task) to 0.71 ± 1.10 % MVC for L-finger (I-finger task). The average change in mode of non-target fingers was between −7.34 ± 19

  3. The TASERed finger: A new entity. Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Dunet, B; Erbland, A; Abi-Chahla, M-L; Tournier, C; Fabre, T

    2015-06-01

    The TASER(®) is a self-defense weapon whose use has now become commonplace among law enforcement agencies. Electronic control weapons were first used in the USA in the 1990s and then adopted in Europe and France. We report a case of an 18-year-old male who presented a penetrating lesion of the middle phalanx of the left index finger. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first complex finger injury due to the TASER(®). It highlights the potential major risks to finger vitality and function with use of this electrical weapon. PMID:25958324

  4. Trainability of cold induced vasodilatation in fingers and toes.

    PubMed

    Daanen, Hein A M; Koedam, Jens; Cheung, Stephen S

    2012-07-01

    Subjects that repeatedly have to expose the extremities to cold may benefit from a high peripheral temperature to maintain dexterity and tissue integrity. Therefore, we investigated if repeated immersions of a hand and a foot in cold water resulted in increased skin temperatures. Nine male and seven female subjects (mean 20.4; SD 2.2 years) immersed their right (trained) hand and foot simultaneously in 8°C water, 30 min daily for 15 days. During the pre and post-test (days 1 and 15, respectively) the left (untrained) hand and foot were immersed as well. Pain, tactile sensitivity and skin temperatures were measured every day. Mean (SD) toe temperature of the trained foot increased from 9.49°C (0.89) to 10.03°C (1.38) (p < 0.05). The trained hand, however, showed a drop in mean finger temperature from 9.28°C (0.54) to 8.91°C (0.44) (p < 0.001) and the number of cold induced vasodilation (CIVD) reactions decreased from 52% during the first test to 24% during the last test. No significant differences occurred in the untrained extremities. Pain diminished over time and tactile sensitivity decreased with skin temperature. The combination of less CIVD responses in the fingers after training, reduced finger skin temperatures in subjects that did show CIVD and the reduced pain and tactile sensitivity over time may lead to an increased risk for finger cold injuries. It is concluded that repeated cold exposure of the fingers does not lead to favorable adaptations, but may instead increase the injury risk. PMID:22081047

  5. Fluid mixing from viscous fingering.

    PubMed

    Jha, Birendra; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-05-13

    Mixing efficiency at low Reynolds numbers can be enhanced by exploiting hydrodynamic instabilities that induce heterogeneity and disorder in the flow. The unstable displacement of fluids with different viscosities, or viscous fingering, provides a powerful mechanism to increase fluid-fluid interfacial area and enhance mixing. Here we describe the dissipative structure of miscible viscous fingering, and propose a two-equation model for the scalar variance and its dissipation rate. Our analysis predicts the optimum range of viscosity contrasts that, for a given Péclet number, maximizes interfacial area and minimizes mixing time. In the spirit of turbulence modeling, the proposed two-equation model permits upscaling dissipation due to fingering at unresolved scales. PMID:21668165

  6. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  7. Modification of the Internal Suture Technique for Mallet Finger

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Peiji; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Jiaju; Dong, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article describes a treatment of tendinous mallet finger deformities using a modified internal suture technique for the stable fixation of the terminal extensor tendon and bone. Between March 2011 and July 2013, 15 patients with mallet fingers who had been treated using this modification were included in this study. The patients included 10 men and 5 women with a mean age of 33 years (range, 19–50 years). Of these patients, 9 had chronic mallet fingers, 3 were unable to comply with a splinting regimen, and 3 had a history of unsuccessful splinting therapy. The mean time between the injury and surgery was 5.5 months (range, 1–15 months). We graded the results using Crawford criteria. The mean follow-up period was 12 months (range, 9–16 months). The mean final active range of motion of the distal interphalangeal joint flexion was 73° (range, 60°–90°). Based on Crawford evaluation criteria, 8 patients were graded as excellent, 6 were graded as good, and 1 was graded as fair. Apart from 2 documented mild nail deformities, no complications were encountered. This modified technique should be considered for the management of a tendinous mallet finger deformity when the internal suture technique is planned. PMID:25674757

  8. Finger cold-induced vasodilation: a review.

    PubMed

    Daanen, H A M

    2003-06-01

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) in the finger tips generally occurs 5-10 min after the start of local cold exposure of the extremities. This phenomenon is believed to reduce the risk of local cold injuries. However, CIVD is almost absent during hypothermia, when survival of the organism takes precedence over the survival of peripheral tissue. Subjects that are often exposed to local cold (e.g. fish filleters) develop an enhanced CIVD response. Also, differences between ethnic groups are obvious, with black people having the weakest CIVD response. Many other factors affect CIVD, such as diet, alcohol consumption, altitude, age and stress. CIVD is probably caused by a sudden decrease in the release of neurotransmitters from the sympathetic nerves to the muscular coat of the arterio-venous anastomoses (AVAs) due to local cold. AVAs are specific thermoregulatory organs that regulate blood flow in the cold and heat. Their relatively large diameter enables large amounts of blood to pass and convey heat to the surrounding tissue. Unfortunately, information on the quantity of AVAs is lacking, which makes it difficult to estimate the full impact on peripheral blood flow. This review illustrates the thermospecificity of the AVAs and the close link to CIVD. CIVD is influenced by many parameters, but controlled experiments yield information on how CIVD protects the extremities against cold injuries. PMID:12712346

  9. [The mallet finger in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, B; Weinberg, A; Friedrich, H

    2008-06-01

    The "mallet finger" in childhood and adolescence differs from the "mallet finger" in adults because of an open or gradually closing epiphysial plate. Thus, our results of conservative and operative treatment were evaluated particularly in consideration of an open growth plate. We analysed retrospectively the data of all patients who suffered a lesion at the extensor tendon insertion between 1996 and 2005 and were treated at our hospital. The coding was done according to age, sex, localisation, typing by Doyle, therapy and functional outcome. The typing by Doyle was extended through dividing type IV A into A1 (=Aitken I) and A2 (=Aitken II). Depending on extension deficits, the results were evaluated as very good (0 degrees ), medium (<15 degrees) and bad (>15 degrees). 76 patients, 45 boys and 31 girls aged 1 to 17 years (average age: 11.3) were studied. In consideration of the modified typing by Doyle, following distribution arose: type I (n=16), type II (n=14), type III (n=0), type IV A1 (n=17), type IV A2 (n=6), type IV B (n=21) and type IV C (n=2). A total of 50 patients was treated conservatively. Out of 26 operatively treated patients, 4 could be classified as type I, 12 as type II, 1 as type IV A1, 2 as type IV A2, 5 as type IV B, and 2 as type IV C. In 81.5 % of all patients no functional extension deficit was seen at the end of treatment; in patients treated conservatively, the percentage rate was 94 %. 6 patients, who were treated primarily operatively, showed poor functional outcome. 2 of these developed a suture track infection, in 2 cases chondral and osseous damage in the joint existed additionally, in one patient there was a comminuted fracture and in one patient a technical operative problem. Even in adolescence, conservative treatment of types I, IV A1 and A2, as well as IV B injuries is promising. A prerequisite is a consequent splint treatment and strict regular lateral X-ray control of the fracture fragment. At the beginning of treatment, we

  10. Use of preputial skin for coverage of post-burn contractures of fingers in children

    PubMed Central

    Zaroo, Mohammed I.; Sheikh, Bashir A.; Wani, Adil H.; Darzi, Mohammad A.; Mir, Mohsin; Dar, Hameedullah; Baba Peerzada, U. F.; Zargar, Haroon R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Hand burns are common injuries. Children frequently sustain burn injuries, especially to their hands. Contractures are a common sequel of severe burns around joints. The prepuce, or foreskin, has been used as a skin graft for a number of indications. We conducted this study to evaluate the feasibility of utilising the preputial skin for the management of post-burn contractures of fingers in uncircumcised male children. Materials and Methods: Preputial skin was used for the coverage of released contractures of fingers in 12 patients aged 2-6 years. The aetiology of burns was “Kangri” burn in eight patients and scalding in four patients. Six patients had contracture in two fingers, four patients in one finger, and two patients had contractures in three fingers. Results: None of the patients had graft loss, and all the wounds healed within 2 weeks. All patients had complete release of contractures without any recurrence. Hyperpigmentation of the grafts was observed over a period of time, which was well accepted by the parents. Conclusions: Preputial skin can be used successfully for male children with mild-to-moderate contractures of 2-3 fingers for restoration of the hand function, minimal donor site morbidity. PMID:21713163

  11. Long-finger pollicization for macrodactyly of the thumb and index finger.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Kenneth W; Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-01-01

    Pollicization of the long finger is rarely performed, and previously described for treating traumatic thumb and index finger loss. Because the long finger lacks the independence of motion and muscular attachments of the index finger, pollicization of the long finger requires modifications of the technique. We present the case of a 3-year-old girl with progressive macrodactyly of the thumb and index finger associated with a lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve. The involved digits were severely enlarged, stiff, and nonfunctional. The child was treated with first and second ray resection followed by long-finger pollicization. Surgical pearls and pitfalls are discussed. PMID:24919138

  12. From viscous fingering to bulk elastic fingering in soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintyves, Baudouin; Biggins, John; Wei, Zhiyan; Mora, Serge; Dauchot, Olivier; Mahadevan, L.; Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2014-03-01

    Systematic experiments have been performed in purely elastic polyacrylamide gels in Hele-Shaw cells. We have shown that a bulk fingering instability arises in the highly deformable confined elastomers. It shares some similarities with the famous Saffman-Taylor instability, but a systematic study shows that surface tension is not relevant. This instability is sub-critical, with a clear hysteretic behavior. Our experimental observations have been compared very favorably to theoretical and finite element simulations results. In particular, the instability wavelength and the critical front advance have been shown to be proportional to the distance between the two glass plates constituting the cell. We have also shown that in Maxwell viscoelastic fluids, one crosses over continuously from a viscous to an elastic fingering instability.

  13. Mechanical model of a single tendon finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical model of a single tendon three phalanxes finger is presented. By means of the model both kinematic and dynamical behavior of the finger itself can be studied. This finger is a part of a more complex mechanical system that consists in a four finger grasping device for robots or in a five finger human hand prosthesis. A first prototype has been realized in our department in order to verify the real behavior of the model. Some results of both kinematic and dynamical behavior are presented.

  14. Impact of Finger Type in Fingerprint Authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, Davrondzhon; Bours, Patrick; Yang, Bian; Busch, Christoph

    Nowadays fingerprint verification system is the most widespread and accepted biometric technology that explores various features of the human fingers for this purpose. In general, every normal person has 10 fingers with different size. Although it is claimed that recognition performance with little fingers can be less accurate compared to other finger types, to our best knowledge, this has not been investigated yet. This paper presents our study on the topic of influence of the finger type into fingerprint recognition performance. For analysis we employ two fingerprint verification software packages (one public and one commercial). We conduct test on GUC100 multi sensor fingerprint database which contains fingerprint images of all 10 fingers from 100 subjects. Our analysis indeed confirms that performance with small fingers is less accurate than performance with the others fingers of the hand. It also appears that best performance is being obtained with thumb or index fingers. For example, performance deterioration from the best finger (i.e. index or thumb) to the worst fingers (i.e. small ones) can be in the range of 184%-1352%.

  15. Does finger sense predict addition performance?

    PubMed

    Newman, Sharlene D

    2016-05-01

    The impact of fingers on numerical and mathematical cognition has received a great deal of attention recently. However, the precise role that fingers play in numerical cognition is unknown. The current study explores the relationship between finger sense, arithmetic and general cognitive ability. Seventy-six children between the ages of 5 and 12 participated in the study. The results of stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that while general cognitive ability including language processing was a predictor of addition performance, finger sense was not. The impact of age on the relationship between finger sense, and addition was further examined. The participants were separated into two groups based on age. The results showed that finger gnosia score impacted addition performance in the older group but not the younger group. These results appear to support the hypothesis that fingers provide a scaffold for calculation and that if that scaffold is not properly built, it has continued differential consequences to mathematical cognition. PMID:26993292

  16. Surgical Repair with External Fixation of Epiphyseal Fractures of the Proximal Phalanges of Three Fingers: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Morisawa, Yasushi; Takayama, Shinichiro; Sato, Kazuki

    2015-10-01

    A 13-year-old girl sustained epiphyseal fractures of the proximal phalanges of the left index, middle, and ring fingers. Though manual reduction of the 3 fingers was possible, it was difficult to maintain the reduction due to severe instability of the middle and ring fingers, and closed reduction with external fixation was performed. At 4 years post-injury, the patient had no impairment of daily activities. The use of external fixation (1) causes no injury to the epiphyseal cartilage, (2) enables accurate reduction and maintenance of reduction, (3) is technically easier than pinning, (4) enables earlier range of motion (ROM) exercises of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints of the externally fixated and other fingers, and (5) allows repeated fine adjustments after reduction. External fixation is an option for the treatment of children with highly unstable epiphyseal fractures of the proximal phalanges. PMID:26388013

  17. Traumatic Amputation of Finger From an Alligator Snapping Turtle Bite.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert D; Nielsen, Cynthia L

    2016-06-01

    Legend states that the alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii) should be handled with extreme caution as it has jaw strength powerful enough to bite a wooden broomstick in half. Tales of bite injuries from what is the largest freshwater turtle in North America exist anecdotally, yet there are few descriptions of medical encounters for such. The risk of infection from reptilian bites to the hand in an aquatic environment warrants thorough antibiotic treatment in conjunction with hand surgery consultation. We present the first case report of a near total amputation of an index finger in an adolescent boy who had been bitten by a wild "gator snapper." PMID:27116923

  18. Re-implantation of a degloving amputation of distal index finger caused by fireworks: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Cao, X C

    2013-07-01

    Amputations associated with fireworks are customarily treated by stump revision resulting in permanent disability. In this case report, we present an eight-year old boy who suffered an amputation of his right distal index finger at the level of the epiphyseal disk with degloving injury of the amputated finger caused by fireworks. Successful re-implantation was achieved. Two-year follow-up revealed fair cosmesis and acceptable functional and aesthetic recovery though the free distal phalanx had been absorbed completely. Re-implantation of a degloving amputation finger caused by fireworks is possible and can provide good distal soft tissue coverage and recovery of sensory and motor functions. PMID:24756749

  19. On the fly finger knuckle print authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Narishige; Shinzaki, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    Finger knuckle print authentication has been researched not only as a supplemental authentication modality to fingerprint recognition but also as a method for logging into a PC or entering a building. However, in previous works, some specific devices were necessary to capture a finger knuckle print and users had to keep their fingers perfectly still to capture their finger knuckle. In this paper, we propose a new on the fly finger knuckle print authentication system using a general web camera. In our proposed authentication system, users can input their finger knuckle prints without needing their hand to remain motionless during image capture. We also evaluate the authentication accuracy of the proposed system, achieving an 7% EER under best conditions.

  20. Piezoelectric Actuators On A Cold Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Chin-Po; Garba, John A.; Glaser, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental system for active suppression of vibrations of cold finger includes three piezoelectric actuators bonded to outer surface. Actuators used to suppress longitudinal and lateral vibrations of upper end of cold finger by applying opposing vibrations. Cold finger in question is part of a cryogenic system associated with an infrared imaging detector. When fully developed, system would be feedback sensor/control/actuator system automatically adapting to changing vibrational environment and suppresses pressure-induced vibrations by imposing compensatory vibrations via actuators.

  1. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  2. Design of a Reconfigurable Robotic System for Flexoextension Fitted to Hand Fingers Size.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pereyra, J Felipe; Castillo-Castaneda, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing demand for assistance in rehabilitation therapies for hand movements, a robotic system is proposed to mobilize the hand fingers in flexion and extension exercises. The robotic system is composed by four, type slider-crank, mechanisms that have the ability to fit the user fingers length from the index to the little finger, through the adjustment of only one link for each mechanism. The trajectory developed by each mechanism corresponds to the natural flexoextension path of each finger. The amplitude of the rotations for metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) varies from 0 to 90° and the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) varies from 0 to 60°; the joint rotations are coordinated naturally. The four R-RRT mechanisms orientation allows a 15° abduction movement for index, ring, and little fingers. The kinematic analysis of this mechanism was developed in order to assure that the displacement speed and smooth acceleration into the desired range of motion and the simulation results are presented. The reconfiguration of mechanisms covers about 95% of hand sizes of a group of Mexican adult population. Maximum trajectory tracking error is less than 3% in full range of movement and it can be compensated by the additional rotation of finger joints without injury to the user. PMID:27524880

  3. Design of a Reconfigurable Robotic System for Flexoextension Fitted to Hand Fingers Size

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Castaneda, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing demand for assistance in rehabilitation therapies for hand movements, a robotic system is proposed to mobilize the hand fingers in flexion and extension exercises. The robotic system is composed by four, type slider-crank, mechanisms that have the ability to fit the user fingers length from the index to the little finger, through the adjustment of only one link for each mechanism. The trajectory developed by each mechanism corresponds to the natural flexoextension path of each finger. The amplitude of the rotations for metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) varies from 0 to 90° and the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) varies from 0 to 60°; the joint rotations are coordinated naturally. The four R-RRT mechanisms orientation allows a 15° abduction movement for index, ring, and little fingers. The kinematic analysis of this mechanism was developed in order to assure that the displacement speed and smooth acceleration into the desired range of motion and the simulation results are presented. The reconfiguration of mechanisms covers about 95% of hand sizes of a group of Mexican adult population. Maximum trajectory tracking error is less than 3% in full range of movement and it can be compensated by the additional rotation of finger joints without injury to the user. PMID:27524880

  4. Biomechanical analysis of the human finger extensor mechanism during isometric pressing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Howard, David; Ren, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the finger extensor mechanism on the bone-to-bone contact forces at the interphalangeal and metacarpal joints and also on the forces in the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles during finger pressing. This was done with finger postures ranging from very flexed to fully extended. The role of the finger extensor mechanism was investigated by using two alternative finger models, one which omitted the extensor mechanism and another which included it. A six-camera three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to capture the finger posture during maximum voluntary isometric pressing. The fingertip loads were recorded simultaneously using a force plate system. Two three-dimensional biomechanical finger models, a minimal model without extensor mechanism and a full model with extensor mechanism (tendon network), were used to calculate the joint bone-to-bone contact forces and the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle forces. If the full model is assumed to be realistic, then the results suggest some useful biomechanical advantages provided by the tendon network of the extensor mechanism. It was found that the forces in the intrinsic muscles (interosseus group and lumbrical) are significantly reduced by 22% to 61% due to the action of the extensor mechanism, with the greatest reductions in more flexed postures. The bone-to-bone contact force at the MCP joint is reduced by 10% to 41%. This suggests that the extensor mechanism may help to reduce the risk of injury at the finger joints and also to moderate the forces in intrinsic muscles. These apparent biomechanical advantages may be a result of the extensor mechanism's distinctive interconnected fibrous structure, through which the contraction of the intrinsic muscles as flexors of the MCP joint can generate extensions at the DIP and PIP joints. PMID:24732789

  5. Biomechanical Analysis of the Human Finger Extensor Mechanism during Isometric Pressing

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dan; Howard, David; Ren, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the finger extensor mechanism on the bone-to-bone contact forces at the interphalangeal and metacarpal joints and also on the forces in the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles during finger pressing. This was done with finger postures ranging from very flexed to fully extended. The role of the finger extensor mechanism was investigated by using two alternative finger models, one which omitted the extensor mechanism and another which included it. A six-camera three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to capture the finger posture during maximum voluntary isometric pressing. The fingertip loads were recorded simultaneously using a force plate system. Two three-dimensional biomechanical finger models, a minimal model without extensor mechanism and a full model with extensor mechanism (tendon network), were used to calculate the joint bone-to-bone contact forces and the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle forces. If the full model is assumed to be realistic, then the results suggest some useful biomechanical advantages provided by the tendon network of the extensor mechanism. It was found that the forces in the intrinsic muscles (interosseus group and lumbrical) are significantly reduced by 22% to 61% due to the action of the extensor mechanism, with the greatest reductions in more flexed postures. The bone-to-bone contact force at the MCP joint is reduced by 10% to 41%. This suggests that the extensor mechanism may help to reduce the risk of injury at the finger joints and also to moderate the forces in intrinsic muscles. These apparent biomechanical advantages may be a result of the extensor mechanism's distinctive interconnected fibrous structure, through which the contraction of the intrinsic muscles as flexors of the MCP joint can generate extensions at the DIP and PIP joints. PMID:24732789

  6. Error compensation during finger force production after one- and four-finger voluntarily fatiguing exercise.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Eric S; Hoopes, Josh A; Cordial, Rory J; Li, Sheng

    2007-08-01

    The effect of muscle fatigue on error compensation strategies during multi-finger ramp force production tasks was investigated. Thirteen young, healthy subjects were instructed to produce a total force with four fingers of the right hand to accurately match a visually displayed template. The template consisted of a 3-s waiting period, a 3-s ramp force production [from 0 to 30% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)], and a 3-s constant force production. A series of 12 ramp trials was performed before and after fatigue. Fatigue was induced by a 60-s maximal isometric force production with either the index-finger only or with all four fingers during two separate testing sessions. The average percent of drop was 38.2% in the MVC of the index finger after index-finger fatiguing exercise and 38.3% in the MVC of all fingers after four-finger fatiguing exercise. The ability of individual fingers to compensate for each other's errors in order for the total force to match the preset template was quantified as the error compensation index (ECI), i.e., the ratio of the sum of variances of individual finger forces and the variance of the total force. By comparing pre- and post-fatigue performance during four-finger ramp force production, we observed that the variance of the total force was not significantly changed after one- or four-finger fatiguing exercise. The ECI significantly decreased after four-finger fatiguing exercise, especially during the last second of the ramp; while the ECI remained unchanged after index finger single-finger fatiguing exercise. These results suggest that the central nervous system is able to utilize the abundant degrees of freedom to compensate for partial impairment of the motor apparatus induced by muscle fatigue to maintain the desired performance. However, this ability is significantly decreased when all elements of the motor apparatus are impaired. PMID:17443316

  7. Creating Number Semantics through Finger Movement Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badets, Arnaud; Pesenti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Communication, language and conceptual knowledge related to concrete objects may rely on the sensory-motor systems from which they emerge. How abstract concepts can emerge from these systems is however still unknown. Here we report a functional interaction between a specific meaningful finger movement, such as a finger grip closing, and a concept…

  8. Analysis and treatment of finger sucking.

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, S A; Miltenberger, R G; Stricker, J M; Garlinghouse, M A; Roberts, J; Galensky, T L; Rapp, J T

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed and treated the finger sucking of 2 developmentally typical children aged 7 and 10 years. The functional analysis revealed that the finger sucking of both children was exhibited primarily during alone conditions, suggesting that the behavior was maintained by automatic reinforcement. An extended analysis provided support for this hypothesis and demonstrated that attenuation of stimulation produced by the finger sucking resulted in behavior reductions for both children. Treatment consisted of having each child wear a glove on the relevant hand during periods when he or she was alone. Use of the glove produced zero levels of finger sucking for 1 participant, whereas only moderate reductions were obtained for the other. Subsequently, an awareness enhancement device was used that produced an immediate reduction in finger sucking. PMID:10738951

  9. Fingering in Stochastic Growth Models

    PubMed Central

    Aristotelous, Andreas C.; Durrett, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the widespread use of hybrid-discrete cellular automata in modeling cancer, two simple growth models are studied on the two dimensional lattice that incorporate a nutrient, assumed to be oxygen. In the first model the oxygen concentration u(x, t) is computed based on the geometry of the growing blob, while in the second one u(x, t) satisfies a reaction-diffusion equation. A threshold θ value exists such that cells give birth at rate β(u(x, t) − θ)+ and die at rate δ(θ − u(x, t)+. In the first model, a phase transition was found between growth as a solid blob and “fingering” at a threshold θc = 0.5, while in the second case fingering always occurs, i.e., θc = 0. PMID:26430353

  10. Differing Dynamics of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Coordination: Two-finger and Four-Finger Tapping Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Kentaro; Furuyama, Nobuhiro; Inamura, Tetsunari

    2015-01-01

    Finger-tapping experiments were conducted to examine whether the dynamics of intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems can be described equally by the Haken—Kelso—Bunz model, which describes inter-limb coordination dynamics. This article reports the results of finger-tapping experiments conducted in both systems. Two within-subject factors were investigated: the phase mode and the number of fingers. In the intrapersonal experiment (Experiment 1), the participants were asked to tap, paced by a gradually hastening auditory metronome, looking at their fingers moving, using the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. In the interpersonal experiment (Experiment 2), pairs of participants performed the task while each participant used the outside hand, tapping with the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. Some results did not agree with the HKB model predictions. First, from Experiment 1, no significant difference was observed in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase modes in the two finger condition. Second, from Experiment 2, no significant difference was found in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase mode in the four-finger condition. From these findings, different coordination dynamics were inferred between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems against prediction from the previous studies. Results were discussed according to differences between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems in the availability of perceptual information and the complexity in the interaction between limbs derived from a nested structure. PMID:26070119

  11. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, Eduardo V.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  12. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, E.V.

    1997-11-18

    A method is described for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change. 9 figs.

  13. Mutilating corn-picker injuries of the hand.

    PubMed

    Gorsche, T S; Wood, M B

    1988-05-01

    Our experience with 15 patients who had acute mutilating hand injuries from corn-picker machines is reviewed. Three injury patterns were defined. Type I involved severe injury to all digits of the hand, including the thumb; type II injuries involved amputation of all fingers, in whole or in part, but with sparing of the thumb; and type III injuries involved amputation of multiple fingers with sparing of the thumb and at least one other digit. Attempts at revascularization or at complex reconstruction of the injured digits in the period immediately after injury failed in all 15 patients. The most satisfactory results in patients with type I injuries were obtained by complex reconstructive procedures such as toe-to-hand transfer. Patients with type II injuries were best treated with construction of a mitten-type hand by various methods. Patients with type III injuries were best treated by amputation of the devascularized digits. PMID:3379282

  14. Isolated A1 Pulley Rupture of Left Fourth Finger in Kendo Players: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hyung; Joo, Seung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Annular pulley injury of fingers is usually observed in rock climbers who support their entire body weight with flexed fingers during climbing. But these lesions can also follow trivial trauma, such as lifting heavy objects with the fingertips, or during sports and recreational activities. The A2 and A4 pulleys are most usually involved and reported most frequently. However, traumatic A1 pulley rupture has not been reported yet, to the best of our knowledge. Kendo is a very vigorous martial art with frequent physical contact. Therefore, we reported two cases of repetitive microtraumatic left fourth finger A1 pulley rupture in Kendo players with results from physical examination and imaging studies, such as ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, together with related literature. PMID:26605184

  15. Isolated A1 Pulley Rupture of Left Fourth Finger in Kendo Players: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hyung; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Joo, Seung Ho

    2015-10-01

    Annular pulley injury of fingers is usually observed in rock climbers who support their entire body weight with flexed fingers during climbing. But these lesions can also follow trivial trauma, such as lifting heavy objects with the fingertips, or during sports and recreational activities. The A2 and A4 pulleys are most usually involved and reported most frequently. However, traumatic A1 pulley rupture has not been reported yet, to the best of our knowledge. Kendo is a very vigorous martial art with frequent physical contact. Therefore, we reported two cases of repetitive microtraumatic left fourth finger A1 pulley rupture in Kendo players with results from physical examination and imaging studies, such as ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, together with related literature. PMID:26605184

  16. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. PMID:22882155

  17. Fingered core structure of nematic boojums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Samo; Rosso, Riccardo; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2008-09-01

    Using the Landau-de Gennes phenomenological approach, we study the fine biaxial core structure of a boojum residing on the surface of a nematic liquid crystal phase. The core is formed by a negatively uniaxial finger, surrounded by a shell with maximal biaxiality. The characteristic finger’s length and the shell’s width are comparable to the biaxial correlation length. The finger tip is melted for topological reasons. Upon decreasing the surface anchoring strength below a critical value, the finger gradually leaves the bulk and it is expelled through the surface.

  18. Finger Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tập Thể Dục cho Bàn Tay - Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  19. Finger Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arabic (العربية) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) ... 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations French (français) Active Hand Exercises Exercices d'activité pour ...

  20. Aesthetic finger prosthesis with silicone biomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Raghu, K M; Gururaju, C R; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication of finger prosthesis is as much an art as it is science. The ideally constructed prosthesis must duplicate the missing structures so precisely that patients can appear in public without fear of attracting unwanted attraction. A 65-years-old patient reported with loss of his right index finger up to the second phalanx and wanted to get it replaced. An impression of the amputated finger and donor were made. A wax pattern of the prosthesis was fabricated using the donor impression; a trial was performed and flasked. Medical grade silicone was intrinsically stained to match the skin tone, following which it was packed, processed and finished. This clinical report describes a method of attaining retention by selective scoring of the master cast of partially amputated finger to enhance the vacuum effect at par with the proportional distribution of the positive forces on the tissues exerted by the prosthesis. PMID:23975917

  1. Finger Cooling During Cold Air Exposure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the onset of finger freezing. It is an extension of a tissue-cooling model originally developed to predict the onset of cheek freezing. The extension to the finger is presented as a more conservative warning of wind chill. Indeed, guidance on the risk of finger freezing is important not only to safeguard the finger, but also because it pertains more closely to susceptible facial features, such as the nose, than if only the risk of cheek freezing was provided. The importance of blood flow to the finger and the modeling of vaso-constriction are demonstrated through cooling predictions that agree reasonably well with several reported observations. Differences in the prediction between the present physiologic-based model and the engineering model used to develop the wind chill index are also discussed. New wind chill charts are presented that tabulate the mean cooling rates and corresponding onset times to freezing of the finger for various combinations of air temperature and wind speed. Results indicate that the surface of the finger cools to its freezing point in approximately one-eighth of the time predicted for the cheek. For combinations that result in the same wind chill temperature (WCT), the rate of finger cooling is faster at the higher wind speed. This asymmetry was previously disclosed through the application of the model to cheek cooling, and it reiterates the ambiguity associated with the reporting of WCT. It is further emphasized that the reporting of onset times to freezing, or safe exposure limits, is a more logical and meaningful alternative to the WCT.

  2. New Finger Biometric Method Using Near Infrared Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eui Chul; Jung, Hyunwoo; Kim, Daeyeoul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new finger biometric method. Infrared finger images are first captured, and then feature extraction is performed using a modified Gaussian high-pass filter through binarization, local binary pattern (LBP), and local derivative pattern (LDP) methods. Infrared finger images include the multimodal features of finger veins and finger geometries. Instead of extracting each feature using different methods, the modified Gaussian high-pass filter is fully convolved. Therefore, the extracted binary patterns of finger images include the multimodal features of veins and finger geometries. Experimental results show that the proposed method has an error rate of 0.13%. PMID:22163741

  3. Finger multibiometric cryptosystems: fusion strategy and template security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jialiang; Li, Qiong; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2014-03-01

    We address two critical issues in the design of a finger multibiometric system, i.e., fusion strategy and template security. First, three fusion strategies (feature-level, score-level, and decision-level fusions) with the corresponding template protection technique are proposed as the finger multibiometric cryptosystems to protect multiple finger biometric templates of fingerprint, finger vein, finger knuckle print, and finger shape modalities. Second, we theoretically analyze different fusion strategies for finger multibiometric cryptosystems with respect to their impact on security and recognition accuracy. Finally, the performance of finger multibiometric cryptosystems at different fusion levels is investigated on a merged finger multimodal biometric database. The comparative results suggest that the proposed finger multibiometric cryptosystem at feature-level fusion outperforms other approaches in terms of verification performance and template security.

  4. Scattering Removal for Finger-Vein Image Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy. PMID:22737028

  5. Scattering removal for finger-vein image restoration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy. PMID:22737028

  6. [Spinal epidural abscess as a complication of a finger infection].

    PubMed

    Ridderikhof, M L; van den Brink, W A; van Dalsen, A D; Kieft, H

    2008-06-21

    An 81-year-old man was treated with intravenous antibiotics for a soft tissue infection in a finger. Despite adequate antibiotic treatment, he developed signs of spinal cord injury caused by a cervical spinal epidural abscess. An emergency laminectomy was performed. The neurological impairment appeared to be irreversible, and the patient died. Spinal epidural abscess is a rare and serious complication ofa bacteraemia. It is often caused by an infection of the skin or soft tissue with Staphylococcus aureus. Given the risk of rapidly progressive and irreversible neurological damage, this complication must be treated as soon as possible. The treatment of choice is surgery. Conservative management with intravenous antibiotics is an option only under strict conditions. PMID:18624007

  7. [A Rare Case in Hand Surgery: Adder Bite in an Index Finger].

    PubMed

    Jaehn, T; Zunker, C; Mägdefrau, H; Reichert, B

    2016-08-01

    The common European adder is an endangered animal species in Europe. Despite its endangerment, snake bite injuries do occur from time to time, even in Germany. This is a poisoning emergency. Detailed numbers concerning the incidence or lethality of adder bites in Germany do not exist. Only 13% of all cases have a severe course of disease, with children and elderly people prevailing in this patient group. We report the benign course of an adder bite injury of the index finger of a 60-year-old zoologist, which healed completely under symptomatic treatment and surveillance without any operative intervention. PMID:27442002

  8. Anthropomorphic finger antagonistically actuated by SMA plates.

    PubMed

    Engeberg, Erik D; Dilibal, Savas; Vatani, Morteza; Choi, Jae-Won; Lavery, John

    2015-10-01

    Most robotic applications that contain shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators use the SMA in a linear or spring shape. In contrast, a novel robotic finger was designed in this paper using SMA plates that were thermomechanically trained to take the shape of a flexed human finger when Joule heated. This flexor actuator was placed in parallel with an extensor actuator that was designed to straighten when Joule heated. Thus, alternately heating and cooling the flexor and extensor actuators caused the finger to flex and extend. Three different NiTi based SMA plates were evaluated for their ability to apply forces to a rigid and compliant object. The best of these three SMAs was able to apply a maximum fingertip force of 9.01N on average. A 3D CAD model of a human finger was used to create a solid model for the mold of the finger covering skin. Using a 3D printer, inner and outer molds were fabricated to house the actuators and a position sensor, which were assembled using a multi-stage casting process. Next, a nonlinear antagonistic controller was developed using an outer position control loop with two inner MOSFET current control loops. Sine and square wave tracking experiments demonstrated minimal errors within the operational bounds of the finger. The ability of the finger to recover from unexpected disturbances was also shown along with the frequency response up to 7 rad s(-1). The closed loop bandwidth of the system was 6.4 rad s(-1) when operated intermittently and 1.8 rad s(-1) when operated continuously. PMID:26292164

  9. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-11-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record `three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals.

  10. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record ‘three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals. PMID:25366032

  11. Ultrafast high-resolution mass spectrometric finger pore imaging in latent finger prints.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record 'three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals. PMID:25366032

  12. Reconstruction of Extensive Volar Finger Defects with Double Cross-Finger Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Buehrer, Gregor; Arkudas, Andreas; Ludolph, Ingo; Horch, Raymund E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Cross-finger flaps still represent a viable option to reconstruct small- to medium-sized full-thickness finger defects but they are not commonly used if larger areas have to be covered. We present 2 cases showing a simple and pragmatic approach with homodigital double cross-finger flaps to reconstruct extensive volar finger soft-tissue defects. We observed very low donor-site morbidity and excellent functional and aesthetic outcomes. Furthermore, there is no need for microsurgical techniques or equipment when using this method. Although this case report only addresses volar defects, one might also think of applying this concept to dorsal defects using reversed double cross-finger flaps. PMID:27200255

  13. Perceiving fingers in single-digit arithmetic problems.

    PubMed

    Berteletti, Ilaria; Booth, James R

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate in children the neural underpinnings of finger representation and finger movement involved in single-digit arithmetic problems. Evidence suggests that finger representation and finger-based strategies play an important role in learning and understanding arithmetic. Because different operations rely on different networks, we compared activation for subtraction and multiplication problems in independently localized finger somatosensory and motor areas and tested whether activation was related to skill. Brain activations from children between 8 and 13 years of age revealed that only subtraction problems significantly activated finger motor areas, suggesting reliance on finger-based strategies. In addition, larger subtraction problems yielded greater somatosensory activation than smaller problems, suggesting a greater reliance on finger representation for larger numerical values. Interestingly, better performance in subtraction problems was associated with lower activation in the finger somatosensory area. Our results support the importance of fine-grained finger representation in arithmetical skill and are the first neurological evidence for a functional role of the somatosensory finger area in proficient arithmetical problem solving, in particular for those problems requiring quantity manipulation. From an educational perspective, these results encourage investigating whether different finger-based strategies facilitate arithmetical understanding and encourage educational practices aiming at integrating finger representation and finger-based strategies as a tool for instilling stronger numerical sense. PMID:25852582

  14. Finger millet [Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn].

    PubMed

    Ceasar, Stanislaus Antony; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2015-01-01

    Millets are the primary food source for millions of people in tropical regions of the world supplying mineral nutrition and protein. In this chapter, we describe an optimized protocol for the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of finger millet variety GPU 45. Agrobacterium strain LBA4404 harboring plasmid pCAMBIA1301 which contains hygromycin phosphotransferase (hph) as selectable marker gene and β-glucuronidase (GUS) as reporter gene has been used. This protocol utilizes the shoot apex explants for the somatic embryogenesis and regeneration of finger millet after the transformation by Agrobacterium. Desiccation of explants during cocultivation helps for the better recovery of transgenic plants. This protocol is very useful for the efficient production of transgenic plants in finger millet through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. PMID:25300836

  15. Axon reflexes in human cold exposed fingers.

    PubMed

    Daanen, H A; Ducharme, M B

    2000-02-01

    Exposure of fingers to severe cold induces cold induced vasodilatation (CIVD). The mechanism of CIVD is still debated. The original theory states that an axon reflex causes CIVD. To test this hypothesis, axon reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation of the middle fingers of hands immersed in water at either 5 degrees C or 35 degrees C. Axon reflexes were pronounced in the middle finger of the hand in warm water, but absent from the hand in cold water, even though the stimulation was rated as "rather painful" to "painful". These results showed that axon reflexes do not occur in a cold-exposed hand and thus are unlikely to explain the CIVD phenomenon. PMID:10638384

  16. Urethral Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Injuries Ureteral Injuries Urethral Injuries Injuries to the Penis and Scrotum Most urethral injuries occur in men. ... leakage of urine into the tissues of the penis, scrotum, abdominal wall, or perineum (the area between ...

  17. A reverse flow cross finger pedicle skin flap from hemidorsum of finger.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Satyanarayan; Manisundaram, S

    2010-04-01

    A reverse-flow cross-finger pedicle skin flap raised from the hemidorsum has been used, which is a modification of the distally based dorsal cross-finger flap. The flap is raised from the hemidorsum at a plane above the paratenon, the distal-most location of the base being at the level of the distal interphalangeal joint. Thirty-two flaps were used from as many fingers of as many patients. Of these, 31 (97%) flaps survived fully; there was stiffness of finger in one (3%) patient and the two-point discrimination was 4-8mm (n=14). Follow-up period was 2 months to 3 years, the median being 1 year and 3 months. The advantages of this flap are that there is less disruption of veins and less visible disfigurement of the dorsum of the finger when compared to other pedicled cross-finger skin flaps. The disadvantage of this flap is its restricted width. It is recommended as the cross-finger pedicle skin flap of choice when the defect is not wide. PMID:19386561

  18. Thermoregulatory control of finger blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1975-01-01

    In the present experiment, exercise was used to vary internal temperature and ambient air heat control was used to vary skin temperature. Finger temperature was fixed at about 35.7 C. Esophageal temperature was measured with a thermocouple at the level of the left atrium, and mean skin temperature was calculated from a weighted mean of thermocouple temperatures at different skin sites. Finger blood flow was measured by electrocapacitance plethysmography. An equation in these quantities is given which accounts for the data garnered.

  19. Interaction of finger enslaving and error compensation in multiple finger force production

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joel R.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have documented two patterns of finger interaction during multi-finger pressing tasks, enslaving and error compensation, which do not agree with each other. Enslaving is characterized by positive correlation between instructed (master) and non-instructed (slave) finger(s) while error compensation can be described as a pattern of negative correlation between master and slave fingers. We hypothesize that pattern of finger interaction, enslaving or compensation, depends on the initial force level and the magnitude of the targeted force change. Subjects were instructed to press with four fingers (I - index, M - middle, R - ring, and L - little) from a specified initial force to a target forces following a ramp target line. Force-force relations between master and each of three slave fingers were analyzed during the ramp phase of trials by calculating correlation coefficients within each master-slave pair and then 2-factor ANOVA was performed to determine effect of initial force and force increase on the correlation coefficients. It was found that, as initial force increased, the value of the correlation coefficient decreased and in some cases became negative, i.e. the enslaving transformed into error compensation. Force increase magnitude had a smaller effect on the correlation coefficients. The observations support the hypothesis that the pattern of inter-finger interaction—enslaving or compensation—depends on the initial force level and, to a smaller degree, on the targeted magnitude of the force increase. They suggest that the controller views tasks with higher steady-state forces and smaller force changes as implying a requirement to avoid large changes in the total force. PMID:18985331

  20. Fingerspell: Let Your Fingers Do the Talking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarlatos, Tony; Nesterenko, Dmitri

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss an application that translates hand gestures of the American Sign Language (ASL) alphabet and converts them to text. The FingerSpell application addresses the communication barrier of the deaf and the hearing-impaired by eliminating the need for a third party with knowledge of the American Sign Language, allowing a user…

  1. Fingers Make a Comeback in Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Andree

    1978-01-01

    Describes a new idea in finger-counting developed by 31 year old Hang Young Pai, a Korean teacher living in New York. It is called Chisanbop and it comes from a more advanced hand-calculation system used in the Orient in conjunction with the abacus. It is applicable for both elementary students and for more advanced mathematical applications, such…

  2. Finger arterial pressure measurement with Finapres.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, K H

    1996-01-01

    Finger arterial pressure measurement with Finapres has been available since a decade. Its availability has promoted at least 300 methodological and research papers over these years, outlining the usefulness and the limitations of the method and the device. Finapres is based on the volume clamp method of Peñáz and the Physiocal criteria of Wesseling. Tracking of intraarterial pressure is usually satisfactory even under conditions of strongly changing hemodynamics and high and very low blood pressures. Finapres accuracy is similar to that of other non-invasive methods. Systolic pressure levels scatter more than mean and diastolic levels. One source of error is physiologic and determined by the peripheral measurement site of the finger, causing pulse waveform distortion and a pressure gradient. The Finapres waveform can be filtered, however, to obtain a brachial pressure wave. This decreases systolic scatter under vaso-constrictive drug infusion and dynamic exercise to exhaustion, conditions where precision of systolic tracking has been criticized in the literature. Recently, level correction techniques were found which shift finger pressure up or down based on a regression equation with finger systolic and diastolic pressures. This procedure requires no additional measurements yet improves systolic, diastolic and mean level accuracy and precision remarkably. Finally, we show how to judge the quality of a Finapres recording from the behavior of Physiocal. PMID:8896298

  3. Viscous fingering with partial miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible or perfectly immiscible. In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other. Following our recent work for miscible (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a Hele-Shaw cell, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. Partial miscibility is characterized through the design of thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution.

  4. Fjord geometry observed in viscous fingering*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrasher, Matt; Ristroph, Leif; Swinney, Harry L.; Mineev-Weinstein, Mark

    2004-11-01

    Injecting a less viscous fluid (air) into a more viscous fluid (oil) produces an unstable finger of air penetrating into the oil. For sufficiently large forcing, the tip of a finger splits. The region of oil left between adjacent fingers is called a fjord. We characterize the width, widening, and bending of fjords in experiments in a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell. The channel confines air and 50 cS silicone oil between two glass plates, which are 2500 mm long and 250 mm wide with a separation of 0.5 mm. The width of the base of a fjord is found to be approximately one-half of the capillary length scale. From this base, the fjords open with a distribution of angles having a mean of about 9 ^rc, which contradicts theoretical predictions of an opening angle of 0 ^rc (parallel sides). Finally, the centerline of a fjord bends. Lajeunesse and Couder [1] account for the bending of a fjord on a single, one-half width finger. We test the validity of their idea on the tip-splitting of more complicated interfaces and on the widening of fjords. *Supported by ONR [1] E. Lajeunesse and Y. Couder, J. Fluid. Mech. 419, 125 (2000).

  5. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  6. Compact Tactile Sensors for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Toby B.; Lussy, David; Gaudiano, Frank; Hulse, Aaron; Diftler, Myron A.; Rodriguez, Dagoberto; Bielski, Paul; Butzer, Melisa

    2004-01-01

    Compact transducer arrays that measure spatial distributions of force or pressure have been demonstrated as prototypes of tactile sensors to be mounted on fingers and palms of dexterous robot hands. The pressure- or force-distribution feedback provided by these sensors is essential for the further development and implementation of robot-control capabilities for humanlike grasping and manipulation.

  7. Sticky fingers: Adhesive properties of human fingertips.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Marlene; Wiechert, Anke B; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-02-29

    Fingertip friction is a rather well studied subject. Although the phenomenon of finger stickiness is known as well, the pull-off force and the adhesive strength of human finger tips have never been previously quantified. For the first time, we provided here characterization of adhesive properties of human fingers under natural conditions. Human fingers can generate a maximum adhesive force of 15mN on a smooth surface of epoxy resin. A weak correlation of the adhesive force and the normal force was found on all test surfaces. Up to 300mN load, an increase of the normal force leads to an increase of the adhesive force. On rough surfaces, the adhesive strength is significantly reduced. Our data collected from untreated hands give also an impression of an enormous scattering of digital adhesion depending on a large set of inter-subject variability and time-dependent individual factors (skin texture, moisture level, perspiration). The wide inter- and intra-individual range of digital adhesion should be considered in developing of technical and medical products. PMID:26892897

  8. Finger force perception during ipsilateral and contralateral force matching tasks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woo-Hyung; Leonard, Charles T.; Li, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare matching performance between ipsilateral and contralateral finger force matching tasks and to examine the effect of handedness on finger force perception. Eleven subjects were instructed to produce reference forces by an instructed finger (index – I or little – L finger) and to reproduce the same amount force by the same or a different finger within the hand (i.e., ipsilateral matching task), or by a finger of the other hand (i.e., contralateral matching task). The results of the ipsilateral and contralateral tasks in the present study commonly showed that 1) the reference and matching forces were matched closely when the two forces were produced by the same or homologous finger(s) such as I/I task; 2) the weaker little finger underestimated the magnitude of reference force of the index finger (I/L task), even with the higher level of effort (relative force), but the two forces were matched when considering total finger forces; 3) the stronger index finger closely matched the reference force of the little finger with the lower level of relative force (i.e., L/I task); 4) when considering the constant errors, I/L tasks showed an underestimation and L/I tasks showed an overestimation compared to I/I tasks. There was no handedness effect during ipsilateral tasks. During the contralateral task, the dominant hand overestimated the force of the non-dominant hand, while the non-dominant hand attempted to match the absolute force of the dominant hand. The overall results support the notion that the absolute, rather than relative, finger force is perceived and reproduced during ipsilateral and contralateral finger force matching tasks, indicating the uniqueness of finger force perception. PMID:18488212

  9. Setting tool with retractable torque fingers

    SciTech Connect

    Nevels, D.L.; Baugh, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A method is described of setting a liner in a well bore using a setting tool of the type adapted to be made up in a pipe string for releasably engaging a setting sleeve in a well bore, comprising the steps of: connecting a mandrel in the pipe string which has a setting nut with external connecting threads for engaging mating connecting threads located on the interior of a setting sleeve disposed about the mandrel, the mandrel being slidably disposed within the setting nut when the setting nut is engaging the setting sleeve, the mandrel being slidable between an extended, running-in position and a weight set-down position; mounting a torque collar on the mandrel exterior, the torque collar having at least one torque finger mounted thereon which is axially slidable on an external surface of the torque collar in a plane which is parallel to the longitudinal axis of the tool, the setting sleeve having at least one end notch adapted to receive the axially slidable torque finger; initially latching the mandrel to the setting sleeve with each torque finger received within its respective end notch; setting weight down on the pipe string from the well surface to release the latch and allow relative movement between the connecting threads of the setting nut and setting sleeve; applying right hand torque to the pipe string to release the connecting threads of the setting nut from the setting sleeve; temporarily lifting the pipe string and setting tool to test the disengagement of the setting nut; again resting the setting tool on the setting sleeve; rotating the pipe string to realign the torque finger and the setting sleeve end notch and reengage the torque finger with the end notch; and continuing to rotate to the right to rotate the setting sleeve during subsequent well bore operations.

  10. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  12. A dowel exercise tool to improve finger range of motion.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Paul

    2014-01-01

    A new clinical and home dowel exercise tool to reduce joint stiffness of the fingers is introduced, along with the fabrication and the exercises that are used with it. Patients may utilize it to improve their finger joint range of motion, and facilitate tendon glide by isolating the targeted stiff joints of the fingers. PMID:24044953

  13. Robot-assisted Guitar Hero for finger rehabilitation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Hossein; Rowe, Justin B; Gardner, David; Chan, Vicky; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Wolbrecht, Eric T

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a robotic device for finger therapy after stroke: FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot). FINGER makes use of stacked single degree-of-freedom mechanisms to assist subjects in moving individual fingers in a naturalistic grasping pattern through much of their full range of motion. The device has a high bandwidth of control (-3dB at approximately 8 Hz) and is backdriveable. These characteristics make it capable of assisting in grasping tasks that require precise timing. We therefore used FINGER to assist individuals with a stroke (n= 8) and without impairment (n= 4) in playing a game similar to Guitar Hero©. The subjects attempted to move their fingers to target positions at times specified by notes that were graphically streamed to popular music. We show here that by automatically adjusting the robot gains, it is possible to use FINGER to modulate the subject's success rate at the game, across a range of impairment levels. Modulating success rates did not alter the stroke subject's effort, although the unimpaired subjects exerted more force when they were made less successful. We also present a novel measure of finger individuation that can be assessed as individuals play Guitar Hero with FINGER. The results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to provide controlled levels of assistance during an engaging computer game, and to quantify finger individuation after stroke. PMID:23366783

  14. Pressure Balanced, Low Hysteresis Finger Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Gul K.; Proctor, Margaret; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate: low cost photoetching fabrication technique; pressure balanced finger seal design; and finger seal operation. The tests and analyses includes: finger seal air leakage analysis; rotor-run out and endurance tests; and extensive analytical work and rig testing.

  15. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  17. Left hand finger force in violin playing: tempo, loudness, and finger differences.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2009-07-01

    A three-dimensional force transducer was installed in the neck of a violin under the A string at the D5 position in order to study the force with which the violinist clamps the string against the fingerboard under normal playing conditions. Violinists performed repetitive sequences of open A- and fingered D-tones using the ring finger at tempi of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 notes/s at mezzo-forte. At selected tempi, the effects of dynamic level and the use of different fingers were investigated as well. The force profiles were clearly dependent on tempo and dynamic level. At slow tempi, the force profiles were characterized by an initial pulse followed by a level force to the end of the finger contact period. At tempi higher than 2 Hz, only pulsed profiles were observed. The peak force exceeded 4.5 N at 1 and 2 Hz and decreased to 1.7 N at 16 Hz. All force and impulse values were lower at softer dynamic levels, and when using the ring or little finger compared to the index finger. PMID:19603895

  18. Injuries to children's hands caused by the engine belts of agricultural machines: classification and treatment.

    PubMed

    Terzioglu, Ahmet; Aslan, Gürcan; Ates, Levent

    2004-01-01

    Injuries to children's hands with farm machinery, particularly tractors, are common in rural areas. We present 58 cases of hand injuries in children aged from 3 to 7 (mean 4.5), caused by the engine belts of agricultural vehicles, who were referred from the cities in Central Anatolia. The injury patterns among patients were similar. The injury generally starts from the middle phalanx of the third finger, crosses the proximal phalanx of the fourth finger and ends in the hypothenar region. The patients were categorised into five groups and treatment planned accordingly. The most commonly involved digit was the third finger and the thumb the least. Surgical treatment depended on the severity of the injury and included primary closure of the lacerations, tendon repair, fixation of fractures, grafting, and local flaps. Results of these injuries are generally poor, so prevention is more important. PMID:15513603

  19. Snowblower injuries to the hand.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, D P; Gorosh, J; Burke, E F; Singer, R M

    1997-12-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the records of 62 patients who sustained serious hand injuries caused by snowblowers between 1981 and 1990. Frequency of injuries to digits tended to correlate with length (i.e., middle, index, ring, or small finger or thumb). Damage to tendons did not seem to follow any particular pattern. The majority of victims sustained multiple digital involvement. Complete versus partial amputation followed the same length distribution as did injured digits. Most of the injuries occurred to the dominant hand. When patients were further questioned regarding the circumstances and events leading to their injury, a recurring pattern was found. Most patients described a wet, heavy snow having recently fallen. The majority of the patients who were injured by placing their hands into the exit chute admitted that they were aware the machine was running, but thought that they had a greater clearance to the rotating impeller blade. PMID:9413590

  20. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  1. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Usually, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  2. Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  3. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... of head injuries include bicycle or motorcycle wrecks, sports injuries, falls from windows (especially among children who live ... to watch for? When can I start playing sports again after a head injury? How can brain damage from a head injury ...

  4. Fingering dynamics driven by a precipitation reaction: Nonlinear simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Priyanka; De Wit, A.

    2016-02-01

    A fingering instability can develop at the interface between two fluids when the more mobile fluid is injected into the less-mobile one. For example, viscous fingering appears when a less viscous (i.e., more mobile) fluid displaces a more viscous (and hence less mobile) one in a porous medium. Fingering can also be due to a local change in mobility arising when a precipitation reaction locally decreases the permeability. We numerically analyze the properties of the related precipitation fingering patterns occurring when an A +B →C chemical reaction takes place, where A and B are reactants in solution and C is a solid product. We show that, similarly to reactive viscous fingering patterns, the precipitation fingering structures differ depending on whether A invades B or vice versa. This asymmetry can be related to underlying asymmetric concentration profiles developing when diffusion coefficients or initial concentrations of the reactants differ. In contrast to reactive viscous fingering, however, precipitation fingering patterns appear at shorter time scales than viscous fingers because the solid product C has a diffusivity tending to zero which destabilizes the displacement. Moreover, contrary to reactive viscous fingering, the system is more unstable with regard to precipitation fingering when the high-concentrated solution is injected into the low-concentrated one or when the faster diffusing reactant displaces the slower diffusing one.

  5. The Shape of a Gravity Finger

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Lang; Yortsos, Yanis

    2000-09-11

    A new gravity finger model was proposed in this report in the absence of interfacial tension but in the presence of gravities. This model considered differences in density and viscosity of the two fluids. Thus, it was able to represent both stable and unstable displacements, and the finger development along either the upper or the bottom walls of a channel. This solution recovers the Saffman - Taylar solution if gravity is neglected. The results of the solution are very similar to the solutions proposed by Brener et al. for the gravity number up to 10. The solution provided in this work only has one free parameter while the solution of Brener et al. has three.

  6. Nylon-muscle-actuated robotic finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lianjun; Jung de Andrade, Monica; Rome, Richard S.; Haines, Carter; Lima, Marcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Tadesse, Yonas

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental analysis of novel artificial muscles, made of twisted and coiled nylon fibers, for powering a biomimetic robotic hand. The design is based on circulating hot and cold water to actuate the artificial muscles and obtain fast finger movements. The actuation system consists of a spring and a coiled muscle within a compliant silicone tube. The silicone tube provides a watertight, expansible compartment within which the coiled muscle contracts when heated and expands when cooled. The fabrication and characterization of the actuating system are discussed in detail. The performance of the coiled muscle fiber in embedded conditions and the related characteristics of the actuated robotic finger are described.

  7. Articular synovial chondromatosis of the finger.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kazufumi; Hashimoto, Tomohisa; Kimura, Kazumasa; Ozeki, Satoru

    2014-10-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented with a six-month history of synovial chondromatosis of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the right ring finger, which was resected through both dorsal and volar incisions. To our knowledge there have been only 17 reported cases of articular synovial chondromatosis of the digital joint so far. We present a case affecting the metacarpophalangeal joint with a review of scattered information found in other 17 reports. PMID:23596991

  8. Low-Friction Joint for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical linkage allows adjacent parts to move relative to each other with low friction and with no chatter, slipping, or backlash. Low-friction joint of two surfaces in rolling contact, held in alinement by taut flexible bands. No sliding friction or "stick-slip" motion: Only rolling-contact and bending friction within bands. Proposed linkage intended for finger joints in mechanical hands for robots and manipulators.

  9. Vibration white finger: a follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Ekenvall, L; Carlsson, A

    1987-01-01

    To study the course of vibration white finger (VWF) 55 men were re-examined three and a half to six years after the first examination. The patients were interviewed and finger systolic pressure after general body and local finger cooling was measured. The test results at the two examinations were compared. At the follow up examination some patients experienced a subjective improvement of VWF symptoms but not until more than three years had passed after they had stopped working with vibrating tools. To study the effect of diminished cold exposure on subjective symptoms, vibration exposed outdoor workers who changed to unexposed indoor work were studied separately. In this subgroup also improvement was reported only when more than three years has passed after the change of work, indicating that diminished cold exposure is not the primary explanation for the improvement. The cold provocation test, however, showed no tendency towards a diminished reaction of the vessels to cooling. Patients who continue to work with vibrating tools report a subjective increase in symptoms. This subjective impairment was reflected in an increased reaction to cold as measured in the cold provocation test. PMID:3620371

  10. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Ian M.; Smith, Irene J.; Chetverikov, Andrey; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2016-01-01

    A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a) The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging) had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b) While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints. PMID:27433323

  11. Pacifier Use, Finger Sucking, and Infant Sleep.

    PubMed

    Butler, Rachel; Moore, Melisa; Mindell, Jodi A

    2016-01-01

    Few studies to date have investigated the relationship between pacifier use or finger sucking and infant sleep. One hundred and four mothers of infants (ages 0-11 months) completed the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire (BISQ). Infants who engaged in finger sucking had fewer night wakings and longer stretches of nighttime sleep, although less daytime sleep. There were no significant differences in sleep patterns between pacifier users and infants who did not engage in nonnutritive sucking. Furthermore, no significant differences were found across groups for sleep ecology, including parental involvement at bedtime and following night wakings. Finally, infants were consistently able to retrieve their pacifiers independently by 7 months of age, although this did not appear to be associated with sleep outcomes. Results suggest that when parents are deciding whether to give their infant a pacifier, sleep may not be a critical factor. In contrast, parents of finger and thumb suckers should be reassured that this nonnutritive sucking is beneficial to sleep, at least in the first year of life. PMID:26548755

  12. Multi-finger Prehension: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the available experimental evidence on what people do when they grasp an object with several digits and then manipulate it. In addition to the Introduction, the paper includes three parts each addressing a specific aspect of multi-finger prehension. Part II discusses manipulation forces, i.e. the resultant force and moment of force exerted on the object, and the digits contribution to such force production. Part III deals with internal forces defined as forces that cancel each other and do not disturb object equilibrium. The role of the internal forces in maintaining the object stability is discussed with respect to such issues as slip prevention, tilt prevention and resistance to perturbations. Part IV is devoted to the motor control of prehension. It covers such topics as prehension synergies, chain effects, the principle of superposition, inter-finger connection matrices and reconstruction of neural commands, mechanical advantage of the fingers, and the simultaneous digit adjustment to several mutually reinforcing or conflicting demands. PMID:18782719

  13. Palm to Finger Ulnar Sensory Nerve Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Davidowich, Eduardo; Orsini, Marco; Pupe, Camila; Pessoa, Bruno; Bittar, Caroline; Pires, Karina Lebeis; Bruno, Carlos; Coutinho, Bruno Mattos; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW) is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN) in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC) of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way) and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV) ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW. PMID:26788268

  14. The creation of the artificial RING finger from the cross-brace zinc finger by {alpha}-helical region substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Togiya, Kayo

    2010-04-16

    The creation of the artificial RING finger as ubiquitin-ligating enzyme (E3) has been demonstrated. In this study, by the {alpha}-helical region substitution between the EL5 RING finger and the Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) PHD finger, the artificial E3 (WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger) was newly created. The experiments of the chemical modification of residues Cys and the circular dichroism spectra revealed that the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger binds two zinc atoms and adopts the zinc-dependent ordered-structure. In the substrate-independent ubiquitination assay, the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger functions as E3 and was poly- or mono-ubiquitinated. The present strategy is very simple and convenient, and consequently it might be widely applicable to the creation of various artificial E3 RING fingers with the specific ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2)-binding capability.

  15. Viscous fingering with partially miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Experimental and numerical studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible (e.g. water and glycerol) or perfectly immiscible (e.g. water and oil). In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other (e.g. CO2 and water). Following our recent work for miscible systems (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a porous medium, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. In our model, partial miscibility is characterized through the design of the thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We express the model in dimensionless form and elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution. Figure caption: final snapshots in simulations of viscous fingering with a two-fluid system mimicking that of CO2 and water. The colormap corresponds to the concentration of CO2. A band of less viscous gas phase rich in CO2 (red) displaces through the more viscous liquid phase that is undersaturated with CO2 (blue). At the fluid interface, an exchange of CO2 occurs as a result of local chemical potentials that drives the system towards thermodynamic equilibrium. This results in a shrinkage of gas phase as well as a local increase in

  16. Imaging of Sports-related Hand and Wrist Injuries: Sports Imaging Series.

    PubMed

    Cockenpot, Eric; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Demondion, Xavier; Chantelot, Christophe; Cotten, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Hand and wrist injuries are common occurrences in amateur and professional sports and many of them are sport-specific. These can be divided into two categories: traumatic injuries and overuse injuries. The aim of this article is to review the most common hand and wrist sports-related lesions. Acute wrist injuries are predominantly bone fractures, such as those of the scaphoid, hamate hook, and ulnar styloid. Ligament lesions are more challenging for radiologists and may lead to carpal instability if undiagnosed. Overuse wrist injuries are mainly represented by tendinous disorders, with De Quervain syndrome and extensor carpi ulnaris tendon disorders being the most common among them; however, there are other possible disorders such as impaction syndromes, stress fractures, and neurovascular lesions. Finally, finger lesions, including closed-tendon injuries (mallet and boutonniere injuries, jersey finger, and boxer's knuckle), flexor pulley injuries, and skier's thumb, should also be detected. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27183404

  17. Speed invariance of independent control of finger movements in pianists

    PubMed Central

    Soechting, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Independent control of finger movements characterizes skilled motor behaviors such as tool use and musical performance. The purpose of the present study was to identify the effect of movement frequency (tempo) on individuated finger movements in piano playing. Joint motion at the digits was recorded while 5 expert pianists were playing 30 excerpts from musical pieces with different fingering and key locations either at a predetermined normal tempo or as fast as possible. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm determined three distinct patterns of finger movement coordination for a keypress with each of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers at each of the two tempi. The finger kinematics of each coordination pattern was overall similar across the tempi. Tone sequences assigned into each cluster were also similar for both tempi. A linear regression analysis determined no apparent difference in the amount of movement covariation between the striking and nonstriking fingers at both metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-interphalangeal joints across the two tempi, which indicated no effect of tempo on independent finger movements in piano playing. In addition, the standard deviation of interkeystroke interval across strokes did not differ between the two tempi, indicating maintenance of rhythmic accuracy of keystrokes. Strong temporal constraints on finger movements during piano playing may underlie the maintained independent control of fingers over a wider range of tempi, a feature being likely to be specific to skilled pianists. PMID:22815403

  18. Investigation on a three-cold-finger pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qingjun; Chen, Houlei; Cai, Jinghui

    2015-09-01

    This paper introduces a new type of pulse tube cryocooler, three-cold-finger pulse tube cryocooler (TCFPTC), which consists of one linear compressor and three cold fingers, i.e., CFA, CFB and CFC. Those three cold fingers are driven by the linear compressor simultaneously. This paper investigates two aspects. First, it studies the mass flow distribution among the three cold fingers by varying the input electrical power. The cooling powers of the three cold fingers at constant cooling temperatures and the cooling temperatures of the three cold fingers at constant cooling powers with various input electrical powers are investigated. Secondly, the interaction among the three cold fingers is investigated by varying the heating power of any one cold finger. Generally, if the heating power applied on one cold finger increases, with its cold head temperature rising up, the cold head temperatures of the others will decrease. But, when the cooling power of CFC has been 4 W, the cold head temperature of whichever cold finger increases, the cold head temperature of CFA or CFB will seldom change if its heating power keeps constant.

  19. Does finger training increase young children's numerical performance?

    PubMed

    Gracia-Bafalluy, Maria; Noël, Marie-Pascale

    2008-04-01

    Butterworth (1999) suggested that fingers are important in representing numerosities. Furthermore, scores on a finger gnosis test are a better predictor of numerical performance up to 3 years later than intellectual measures (Marinthe et al., 2001; Noël, 2005). We hypothesised that training in finger differentiation would increase finger gnosis and might also improve numerical performance. Accordingly, 47 first-grade children were selected and divided into 3 groups: children with poor finger gnosis who followed the finger-differentiation training programme (G1), a control-intervention who were trained in story comprehension (G2), and a group with high finger gnosis scores who just continued with normal school lessons (G3). The finger training consisted of 2 weekly sessions of half an hour each, for 8 weeks. Before the training period, children in G3 performed better in finger gnosis and enumeration than children in the two other groups. After the training period this pattern remained for the children in G2 and G3, but the children in G1 were significantly better than those in G2 at finger gnosis, representation of numerosities with fingers, and quantification tasks; they also tended to be better at the processing of Arabic digits. These results indicate that improving finger gnosis in young children is possible and that it can provide a useful support to learning mathematics. Such an approach could be particularly appropriate for children with a developmental Gerstmann syndrome. Theoretically, these results are important because they suggest a functional link between finger gnosis and number skills. PMID:18387567

  20. Finger synergies during multi-finger cyclic production of moment of force

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated multi-finger synergies stabilizing the total moment of force and the total force when the subjects produced a quick cyclic change in the total moment of force. The seated subjects performed the task with the fingers of the dominant arm while paced by the metronome at 1.33 Hz. They were required to produce a rhythmic, sine-like change in the total pronation–supination moment of force computed with respect to the midpoint between the middle and ring fingers. The framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis was used to compute indices of stabilization of the total moment and of the total force across 20 cycles. Variance of the total moment showed a cyclic pattern with peaks close to the peak rate of the moment change. Variance of the total force was maximal close to peak moment into supination. Higher magnitudes of the moment directed against the required moment direction (antagonist moment) were produced by individual fingers during supination efforts as compared to pronation efforts. Indices of multi-finger synergies showed across-trials stabilization of the total moment over the whole cycle but not of the total force. These indices were smaller during supination efforts. We conclude that the central nervous system facilitates multi-finger synergies stabilizing the total rotational action across a variety of tasks. Synergies stabilizing the total force are not seen in tasks that do not explicitly require accurate force control. Pronation efforts are performed more efficiently and with better stabilization of the action. PMID:16944107

  1. The Role of Vision in the Development of Finger-Number Interactions: Finger-Counting and Finger-Montring in Blind Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crollen, Virginie; Mahe, Rachel; Collignon, Olivier; Seron, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the use of the fingers may play a functional role in the development of a mature counting system. However, the role of developmental vision in the elaboration of a finger numeral representation remains unexplored. In the current study, 14 congenitally blind children and 14 matched sighted controls undertook…

  2. Torque Control of Underactuated Tendon-driven Robotic Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Wampler, Charles W. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having a total number of degrees of freedom (DOF) equal to at least n, an underactuated tendon-driven finger driven by n tendons and n DOF, the finger having at least two joints, being characterized by an asymmetrical joint radius in one embodiment. A controller is in communication with the robot, and controls actuation of the tendon-driven finger using force control. Operating the finger with force control on the tendons, rather than position control, eliminates the unconstrained slack-space that would have otherwise existed. The controller may utilize the asymmetrical joint radii to independently command joint torques. A method of controlling the finger includes commanding either independent or parameterized joint torques to the controller to actuate the fingers via force control on the tendons.

  3. Visualization and Quantification of Fingering Flow Using Light Transmission Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Roth, K.

    2007-12-01

    With the aim of studying the physical process concerning the unstable fingering phenomena in two dimensions, experiments of vertical infiltration through layered sand were carried out in the laboratory using Hele-Shaw cells. We developed a light transmission method to measure the dynamics of water saturation within flow fingers in great detail with high spatial and temporal resolution. The method was calibrated using X-ray absorption. We improved the measured light transmission with correction for scattering effects through deconvolution with a point spread function which allows us to obtain quantitative high spatial resolution measurements. After fingers had fully developed, we added a dye tracer in order to distinguish mobile and immobile water fractions. Fully developed fingers consist of a tip, a core with mobile water, and a hull with immobile water. We analyzed the dynamics of water saturation within the finger tip, along the finger core behind the tip, and within the fringe of the fingers during radial growth. Our results confirm previous findings of saturation overshoot in the finger tips and revealed a saturation minimum behind the tip as a new feature. The finger development was characterized by a gradual increase in water content within the core of the finger behind this minimum and a gradual widening of the fingers to a quasi-stable state which evolves at time scales that are orders of magnitude longer than those of fingers' evolution. In this state, a sharp separation into a core with fast convective flow and a fringe with exceedingly slow flow was detected. All observed phenomena, with the exception of saturation overshoot, could be consistently explained based on the hysteretic behavior of the soil-water characteristic.

  4. Experimental study of fingered flow through initially dry sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Vogel, H.-J.; Roth, K.

    2006-08-01

    Water infiltration into coarse textured dry porous media becomes instable depending on flow conditions characterized through dimensionless quantities, i.e. the Bond number and the Capillary number. Instable infiltration fronts break into flow fingers which we investigate experimentally using Hele-Shaw cells. We further developed a light transmission method to measure the dynamics of water within flow fingers in great detail with high spatial and temporal resolution. The method was calibrated using x-ray absorption and the measured light transmission was corrected for scattering effects through deconvolution with a point spread function. Additionally we applied a dye tracer to visualize the velocity field within flow fingers. We analyzed the dynamics of water within the finger tips, along the finger core behind the tip, and within the fringe of the fingers during radial growth. Our results confirm previous findings of saturation overshoot in the finger tips and revealed a saturation minimum behind the tip as a new feature. The finger development was characterized by a gradual increase in water content within the core of the finger behind this minimum and a gradual widening of the fingers to a quasi-stable state which evolves on time scales that are orders of magnitudes longer than those of fingers' evolution. In this state, a sharp separation into a core with fast convective flow and a fringe with exceedingly slow flow was detected. All observed phenomena could by consistently explained based on the hysteretic behavior of the soil- water characteristic and on the positive pressure induced at the finger tip by the high flow velocity.

  5. Fingering instabilities in Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kristi E.

    Fingering has been studied in different fluid systems. Viscous fingering, which is driven by a difference in viscosity between fluids, has been studied by both experiments and numerical simulations. We used a single fluid with a temperature-dependent viscosity and studied the instability for a range of inlet pressures and viscosity ratios. The spreading and fingering of a fluid drop subjected to a centrifugal force, known as spin coating, has also been studied for a range of drop volumes and rotation speeds, both for a Newtonian and a non-Newtonian fluid. Experiments on viscous fingering with a single fluid, glycerine, show that an instability occurs at the boundary separating hot and cold fluid. The results indicate that the instability is similar to that which occurs between two miscible fluids. Fingering only occurs for high enough values of the inlet pressure and viscosity ratio. The wavelength of the fingering pattern is found to be proportional to the cell width for the two smallest cell widths used. The fingering patterns seen in the simulations are very similar to the experimental patterns, although there are some quantitative differences. In particular, the wavelength of the instability is seen to depend only weakly on the cell width. The spreading of silicone oil, a Newtonian fluid, during spin coating follows the time dependence predicted theoretically, although with a shift in the scaled time variable. Once the radius of the spreading silicone oil drop becomes large enough, fingers form around the perimeter of the drop for all experimental conditions studied. The number of fingers and the growth rate of the fingers are in agreement with theoretical predictions. Fingers are also observed to form for high enough drop volumes and rotation speeds during the spinning of a non-Newtonian fluid drop, Carbopol, which possesses a yield stress. In this case the fingering is a localized effect, occuring once the stress on the drop exceeds the yield stress, rather

  6. Nail injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... finger to keep the bone in place. Pain Management You should: Apply ice for 20 minutes every ... on the bottle or by your provider. Wound Management You should: Follow your provider's recommendations to care ...

  7. Basketball injuries in a rural area.

    PubMed

    Prebble, T B; Chyou, P H; Wittman, L; McCormick, J; Collins, K; Zoch, T

    1999-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the frequency and nature of basketball injuries occurring in a rural setting. More than 6000 patients with sports-related injuries presented to a rural emergency department between June 1, 1988 and June 1, 1994. Of these patients, 1189 (19% of the total) were injured playing basketball. A chart abstraction form was utilized to retrospectively review injuries noting demographics, types and sites of injuries, as well as referral and treatment plans. Approximately two-thirds (66.4%) of those injured were males, with most injuries (53%) occurring during school-related activities. Almost four-fifths (78%) of injuries occurred between the ages of 10 and 19. The ankle (33.1%) was the body site most commonly injured, followed in frequency by finger injuries (19.3%), sprains and strains, which accounted for the majority (55%) of injuries. The most common mechanism of injury was recorded in which no contact with other players occurred (37.4%). The vast majority (99%) of injuries were managed as outpatients. The majority of cases (72%) were expected to recover within 2 weeks. Similarities were noted regarding sites of injury and age of distribution of patients when compared to the previous studies. PMID:10638288

  8. Stick-slip instability for viscous fingering in a gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puff, N.; Debrégeas, G.; di Meglio, J.-M.; Higgins, D.; Bonn, D.; Wagner, C.

    2002-05-01

    The growth dynamics of an air finger injected in a visco-elastic gel (a PVA/borax aqueous solution) is studied in a linear Hele-Shaw cell. Besides the standard Saffman-Taylor instability, we observe—with increasing finger velocities—the existence of two new regimes: (a) a stick-slip regime for which the finger tip velocity oscillates between 2 different values, producing local pinching of the finger at regular intervals; (b) a "tadpole" regime where a fracture-type propagation is observed. A scaling argument is proposed to interpret the dependence of the stick-slip frequency with the measured rheological properties of the gel.

  9. Multiple trigger fingers in a musician: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Masoud; Hassanpour, Seyed Esmail; Mosavizadeh, Seyed Mehdi

    2010-05-01

    Trigger finger is a common disease which particularly occurs in middle-aged women. We present a rare case of a male musician with six trigger fingers (five in the left hand and one in the right hand). Mostly these fingers had been used for playing the guitar. The patient had previously been treated with local steroid injections in his fingers, however no response was seen. Therefore, we performed a surgical procedure. Four weeks after surgery, the patient could play the guitar without discomfort in his hands. PMID:20433233

  10. Vibration white finger and digital systolic pressure during cooling.

    PubMed Central

    Ekenvall, L; Lindblad, L E

    1986-01-01

    A cold provocation test (measurement of finger systolic pressure during combined body and local finger cooling) was performed on 111 male patients exposed to vibration and with a typical history of cold induced white finger. A new method of calculating the test result is described--namely, digital systolic blood pressure in the cooled test finger as a percentage of the systolic pressure in the arm (DP%). The conventional way of calculating the result, the systolic pressure in the cooled test finger as a percentage of the systolic pressure in the test finger when heated to 30 degrees C, corrected for changes in systemic pressure by the use of a reference finger (FSP%), requires the measurement of the systolic pressure in a reference finger. The two ways of calculating the test results give a similar sensitivity (74% for FSP%, 79% for DP% if all histories are regarded as true) but the new method does not require pressure measurements in a reference finger. This makes the test easier to perform and the result easier to understand. PMID:3964577

  11. Numerical Simulations and an Experimental Investigation of a Finger Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Minel; Pierson, Hazel; Li, H.; Dong, Dingeng

    2006-01-01

    Besides sealing, the other main goal of a successful finger seal design is to exhibit appropriate compliance to outside forces. The ability of the seal to ride or float along the rotor without rubbing or excessive heating is essential to the successful operation of the seal. The compliance of the finger must only occur in the radial plane; The seal needs to be as sturdy as possible in the axial direction. The compliant finger that moves radially outward with rotor growth and motion has to be able to ride the rotor back down as the rotor diameter recovers or the rotor moves "away". Thus there is an optimum stiffness for the finger.

  12. Extrinsic versus intrinsic hand muscle dominance in finger flexion.

    PubMed

    Al-Sukaini, A; Singh, H P; Dias, J J

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to identify the patterns of dominance of extrinsic or intrinsic muscles in finger flexion during initiation of finger curl and mid-finger flexion. We recorded 82 hands of healthy individuals (18-74 years) while flexing their fingers and tracked the finger joint angles of the little finger using video motion tracking. A total of 57 hands (69.5%) were classified as extrinsic dominant, where the finger flexion was initiated and maintained at proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints. A total of 25 (30.5%) were classified as intrinsic dominant, where the finger flexion was initiated and maintained at the metacarpophalangeal joint. The distribution of age, sex, dominance, handedness and body mass index was similar in the two groups. This knowledge may allow clinicians to develop more efficient rehabilitation regimes, since intrinsic dominant individuals would not initiate extrinsic muscle contraction till later in finger flexion, and might therefore be allowed limited early active motion. For extrinsic dominant individuals, by contrast, initial contraction of extrinsic muscles would place increased stress on the tendon repair site if early motion were permitted. PMID:26744509

  13. Impact of artificial "gummy" fingers on fingerprint systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Koji; Hoshino, Satoshi

    2002-04-01

    Potential threats caused by something like real fingers, which are called fake or artificial fingers, should be crucial for authentication based on fingerprint systems. Security evaluation against attacks using such artificial fingers has been rarely disclosed. Only in patent literature, measures, such as live and well detection, against fake fingers have been proposed. However, the providers of fingerprint systems usually do not mention whether or not these measures are actually implemented in emerging fingerprint systems for PCs or smart cards or portable terminals, which are expected to enhance the grade of personal authentication necessary for digital transactions. As researchers who are pursuing secure systems, we would like to discuss attacks using artificial fingers and conduct experimental research to clarify the reality. This paper reports that gummy fingers, namely artificial fingers that are easily made of cheap and readily available gelatin, were accepted by extremely high rates by 11 particular fingerprint devices with optical or capacitive sensors. We have used the molds, which we made by pressing our live fingers against them or by processing fingerprint images from prints on glass surfaces, etc. We describe how to make the molds, and then show that the gummy fingers, which are made with these molds, can fool the fingerprint devices.

  14. The design and development of a finger joint simulator.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    Artificial finger joints lack the long-term clinical success seen with hip and knee prostheses. In part, this can be explained by the challenges of rheumatoid arthritis, a progressive disease which attacks surrounding tissues as well as the joint itself. Therefore, the natural finger joints' biomechanics are adversely affected, and consequently, this imbalance due to subluxing forces further challenges any prosthesis. Many different designs of finger prosthesis have been offered over a period of greater than 50 years. Most of these designs have failed, and it is likely that many of these failures could have been identified had the prostheses been appropriately tested prior to implantation into patients. While finger joint simulators have been designed, arguably only those from a single centre have been able to reproduce clinical-type failures of the finger prostheses tested in them. This article describes the design and development of a finger simulator at Durham University, UK. It explains and justifies the engineering decisions made and thus the evolution of the finger simulator. In vitro results and their linkage to clinical-type failures are outlined to help to show the effectiveness of the simulator. Failures of finger implants in vivo continue to occur, and the need for appropriate in vitro testing of finger prostheses remains strong. PMID:26833697

  15. Finger-Vein Verification Based on Multi-Features Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Huafeng; Qin, Lan; Xue, Lian; He, Xiping; Yu, Chengbo; Liang, Xinyuan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new scheme to improve the performance of finger-vein identification systems. Firstly, a vein pattern extraction method to extract the finger-vein shape and orientation features is proposed. Secondly, to accommodate the potential local and global variations at the same time, a region-based matching scheme is investigated by employing the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) matching method. Finally, the finger-vein shape, orientation and SIFT features are combined to further enhance the performance. The experimental results on databases of 426 and 170 fingers demonstrate the consistent superiority of the proposed approach. PMID:24196433

  16. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  17. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  18. Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains and strains Herniated disks Fractured vertebrae These injuries can cause pain and limit your movement. Treatments vary but might ...

  19. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or work ...

  20. Blast Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Service Members & Veterans Family & Caregivers Medical Providers Blast Injuries U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Gustavo Olgiati How ... tertiary injury Does a blast cause different brain injuries than blunt trauma? There currently is no evidence ...

  1. Ocular Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually occur from blunt trauma, such as a sports injury or a fall with injury to the nose ... of protective goggles at all times. Even in sports like baseball, eye injuries can be prevented by using batting helmets that ...

  2. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  3. Blast injuries to the hand: Pathomechanics, patterns and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Souvik; Bandyopadhyay, Tibar; Sarkar, Tapan; Saha, Jayanta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the common patterns of injury in detail in cases of blast injuries to the hand and to outline the possible pathomechanics of these patterns of injury while describing the treatment modalities for the same as practiced in our center. Materials and Methods: A review of admitted patients in our department from september 2009 through december 2010 of blast injuries to the hand was made. Each patient had a careful characterization of their injuries as mild, moderate or severe with the help of X-rays, clinical photographs and operative notes. The treatment of these patients during hospital stay was also documented. Results: Of the 55 patients studied, 5 patients suffered mild injuries with no bony injuries or dislocations, 26 patients had moderate injuries characterized by fractures and dislocations in addition to soft tissue injuries and 24 patients had severe injuries characterized by variable degrees of amputations. The most common injury type was to the radial aspect of the hand characterized by a first web split and a dislocation of the CMC joint of the thumb associated with fracture of the central metacarpals and amputations of the index and long fingers in some cases. Injury to the ulnar aspect was rare. Injuries were treated by repair as well as replacement done mostly in a serial fashion. Conclusion: Depending on the mode of injury, blast injuries to the hand can have varying patterns of injury, which can have important implications in the treatment and rehabilitation of a patient. PMID:23492853

  4. Manufactured housing plant injuries in a rural family practice.

    PubMed

    Kellerman, R

    1990-09-01

    The manufacture of mobile homes and prefabricated houses results in the second highest occupational injury and illness rate of any industry. The types of worker injuries sustained have never previously been characterized. This series of 138 injuries from a rural family practice categorizes the injuries sustained by workers in a manufactured housing plant. Most injuries were not judged to be serious, but did result in lost work time and morbidity. Forty-nine percent of all injuries involved lacerations or puncture wounds. Seventy-six percent of puncture wounds involved staple gun use. Two thirds of lacerations were from pieces of metal, siding, and other sharp objects; one third were from knives. Fingers, hands, and wrists were the most commonly injured anatomic sites. Nine cases of overuse injury were seen; two required carpal tunnel surgical release. Twelve injuries were serious enough to require hospitalization or consultation. There were no fatalities. Several suggestions for improved worker safety are presented. PMID:2391457

  5. Sports injuries in adolescents' ball games: soccer, handball and basketball.

    PubMed

    Yde, J; Nielsen, A B

    1990-03-01

    In a prospective study of 302 adolescent players in three ball games (soccer, handball and basketball), 119 incurred injuries. The injury incidence (number of injuries per 1000 playing hours) was 5.6 in soccer, 4.1 in handball and 3.0 in basketball. Ankle sprains accounted for 25 per cent of the injuries, finger sprains 32 per cent, strains in the thigh and leg 10 per cent, and tendinitis/apophysitis 12 per cent. The most serious injuries were four fractures, one anterior cruciate ligament rupture, and two meniscus lesions. The most serious injuries, with the longest rehabilitation period, occurred in soccer. In soccer, many injuries occurred during tackling and contact with an opposing player, while the injuries in handball and basketball were often caused by ball contact and running. PMID:2350669

  6. Teleoperation of Robonaut Using Finger Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champoux, Rachel G.; Luo, Victor

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of new finger tracking systems, the idea of a more expressive and intuitive user interface is being explored and implemented. One practical application for this new kind of interface is that of teleoperating a robot. For humanoid robots, a finger tracking interface is required due to the level of complexity in a human-like hand, where a joystick isn't accurate. Moreover, for some tasks, using one's own hands allows the user to communicate their intentions more effectively than other input. The purpose of this project was to develop a natural user interface for someone to teleoperate a robot that is elsewhere. Specifically, this was designed to control Robonaut on the international space station to do tasks too dangerous and/or too trivial for human astronauts. This interface was developed by integrating and modifying 3Gear's software, which includes a library of gestures and the ability to track hands. The end result is an interface in which the user can manipulate objects in real time in the user interface. then, the information is relayed to a simulator, the stand in for Robonaut, at a slight delay.

  7. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Stapanian, Adrienne M.P.; Staley, Keith E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  8. Lipid Gymnastics: Tethers and Fingers in membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayebi, Lobat; Miller, Gregory; Parikh, Atul

    2009-03-01

    A significant body of evidence now links local mesoscopic structure (e.g., shape and composition) of the cell membrane with its function; the mechanisms by which cellular membranes adopt the specific shapes remain poorly understood. Among all the different structures adopted by cellular membranes, the tubular shape is one of the most surprising one. While their formation is typically attributed to the reorganization of membrane cytoskeleton, many exceptions exist. We report the instantaneous formation of tubular membrane mesophases following the hydration under specific thermal conditions. The shapes emerge in a bimodal way where we have two distinct diameter ranges for tubes, ˜20μm and ˜1μm, namely fat fingers and narrow tethers. We study the roughening of hydrated drops of 3 lipids in 3 different spontaneous curvatures at various temp. and ionic strength to figure out the dominant effect in selection of tethers and fingers. Dynamics of the tubes are of particular interest where we observe four distinct steps of birth, coiling, uncoiling and retraction with different lifetime on different thermal condition. These dynamics appear to reflect interplay between membrane elasticity, surface adhesion, and thermal or hydrodynamic gradient.

  9. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888.3230 Section 888.3230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification....

  10. Handedness and index finger movements performed on a small touchscreen.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Tomoko; Rivlis, Gil; Schieber, Marc H

    2016-02-01

    Many studies of right/left differences in motor performance related to handedness have employed tasks that use arm movements or combined arm and hand movements rather than movements of the fingers per se, the well-known exception being rhythmic finger tapping. We therefore explored four simple tasks performed on a small touchscreen with relatively isolated movements of the index finger. Each task revealed a different right/left performance asymmetry. In a step-tracking Target Task, left-handed subjects showed greater accuracy with the index finger of the dominant left hand than with the nondominant right hand. In a Center-Out Task, right-handed subjects produced trajectories with the nondominant left hand that had greater curvature than those produced with the dominant right hand. In a continuous Circle Tracking Task, slips of the nondominant left index finger showed higher jerk than slips of the dominant right index finger. And in a continuous Complex Tracking Task, the nondominant left index finger showed shorter time lags in tracking the relatively unpredictable target than the dominant right index finger. Our findings are broadly consistent with previous studies indicating left hemisphere specialization for dynamic control and predictable situations vs. right hemisphere specialization for impedance control and unpredictable situations, the specialized contributions of the two hemispheres being combined to different degrees in the right vs. left hands of right-handed vs. left-handed individuals. PMID:26683065

  11. Toward a Phonetic Representation of Hand Configuration: The Fingers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert E.; Liddell, Scott K.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe a componential, articulatory approach to the phonetic description of the configuration of the four fingers. Abandoning the traditional holistic, perceptual approach, we propose a system of notational devices and distinctive features for the description of the four fingers proper (index, middle, ring, and pinky).…

  12. Rediscovering Ruth Faison Shaw and Her Finger-Painting Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Veronica

    2005-01-01

    Ruth Faison Shaw was an art educator who developed a nontraditional educational perspective of teaching and a different vision about children's art. As such, she is considered by some to be the initiator of finger-painting in America (The History of Art Education Timeline 1930-1939, 2002.) Shaw developed the technique of finger-painting and a…

  13. Robust Finger Vein ROI Localization Based on Flexible Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yu; Xie, Shan Juan; Yoon, Sook; Yang, Jucheng; Park, Dong Sun

    2013-01-01

    Finger veins have been proved to be an effective biometric for personal identification in the recent years. However, finger vein images are easily affected by influences such as image translation, orientation, scale, scattering, finger structure, complicated background, uneven illumination, and collection posture. All these factors may contribute to inaccurate region of interest (ROI) definition, and so degrade the performance of finger vein identification system. To improve this problem, in this paper, we propose a finger vein ROI localization method that has high effectiveness and robustness against the above factors. The proposed method consists of a set of steps to localize ROIs accurately, namely segmentation, orientation correction, and ROI detection. Accurate finger region segmentation and correct calculated orientation can support each other to produce higher accuracy in localizing ROIs. Extensive experiments have been performed on the finger vein image database, MMCBNU_6000, to verify the robustness of the proposed method. The proposed method shows the segmentation accuracy of 100%. Furthermore, the average processing time of the proposed method is 22 ms for an acquired image, which satisfies the criterion of a real-time finger vein identification system. PMID:24284769

  14. Population Structure and Diversity in Finger Millet (Eleusine coracana) Germplasm.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genotypic analysis of 79 finger millet accessions (E. coracana subsp. coracana) from 11 African and 5 Asian countries, plus 14 wild E. coracana subsp. africana lines collected in Uganda and Kenya was conducted with 45 SSR markers distributed across the finger millet genome. Phylogenetic and popula...

  15. Finger vein extraction using gradient normalization and principal curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joon Hwan; Song, Wonseok; Kim, Taejeong; Lee, Seung-Rae; Kim, Hee Chan

    2009-02-01

    Finger vein authentication is a personal identification technology using finger vein images acquired by infrared imaging. It is one of the newest technologies in biometrics. Its main advantage over other biometrics is the low risk of forgery or theft, due to the fact that finger veins are not normally visible to others. Extracting finger vein patterns from infrared images is the most difficult part in finger vein authentication. Uneven illumination, varying tissues and bones, and changes in the physical conditions and the blood flow make the thickness and brightness of the same vein different in each acquisition. Accordingly, extracting finger veins at their accurate positions regardless of their thickness and brightness is necessary for accurate personal identification. For this purpose, we propose a new finger vein extraction method which is composed of gradient normalization, principal curvature calculation, and binarization. As local brightness variation has little effect on the curvature and as gradient normalization makes the curvature fairly uniform at vein pixels, our method effectively extracts finger vein patterns regardless of the vein thickness or brightness. In our experiment, the proposed method showed notable improvement as compared with the existing methods.

  16. Coordination of bowing and fingering in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Baader, Andreas P; Kazennikov, Oleg; Wiesendanger, Mario

    2005-05-01

    Playing string instruments implies motor skills including asymmetrical interlimb coordination. How special is musical skill as compared to other bimanually coordinated, non-musical skillful performances? We succeeded for the first time to measure quantitatively bimanual coordination in violinists playing repeatedly a simple tone sequence. A motion analysis system was used to record finger and bow trajectories for assessing the temporal structure of finger-press, finger-lift (left hand), and bow stroke reversals (right arm). The main results were: (1) fingering consisted of serial and parallel (anticipatory) mechanisms; (2) synchronization between finger and bow actions varied from -12 ms to 60 ms, but these 'errors' were not perceived. The results suggest that (1) bow-finger synchronization varied by about 50 ms from perfect simultaneity, but without impairing auditory perception; (2) the temporal structure depends on a number of combinatorial mechanisms of bowing and fingering. These basic mechanisms were observed in all players, including all amateurs. The successful biomechanical measures of fingering and bowing open a vast practical field of assessing motor skills. Thus, objective assessment of larger groups of string players with varying musical proficiency, or of professional string players developing movement disorders, may be helpful in music education. PMID:15820650

  17. [CLIMBING HIGHER--COMMON INJURIES IN ROCK CLIMBERS].

    PubMed

    Sobel, Dafna; Constantin, Naama; Or, Omer

    2016-06-01

    Rock climbing is becoming an increasingly popular sport in Israel with more and more climbing walls being built in the cities and new routes being traced on cliffs around the country. Our account describes the case of a 15 years old climber with chronic pain (without trauma) in the 3rd finger of the right hand. A stress fracture, involving the proximal interphalangeal joint (SH3) of the middle phalanx, was diagnosed. The fracture healed following two months of rest with gradual return to activity. As this sport becomes more common, there is an increasing need for knowledge about the characteristic injuries, their diagnosis and treatment. Although considered an extreme sport, most of the injuries are overuse injuries, mainly to the upper limbs. Finger flexor tendon pulley rupture being one of the most common. Diagnosis is based on history, physical examination and ultrasonography. Conservative treatment is successful for most injuries, while more complicated cases require surgical intervention. PMID:27544986

  18. Finger vein image quality evaluation using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2013-02-01

    In an automatic finger-vein recognition system, finger-vein image quality is significant for segmentation, enhancement, and matching processes. In this paper, we propose a finger-vein image quality evaluation method using support vector machines (SVMs). We extract three features including the gradient, image contrast, and information capacity from the input image. An SVM model is built on the training images with annotated quality labels (i.e., high/low) and then applied to unseen images for quality evaluation. To resolve the class-imbalance problem in the training data, we perform oversampling for the minority class with random-synthetic minority oversampling technique. Cross-validation is also employed to verify the reliability and stability of the learned model. Our experimental results show the effectiveness of our method in evaluating the quality of finger-vein images, and by discarding low-quality images detected by our method, the overall finger-vein recognition performance is considerably improved.

  19. A new algorithmic approach for fingers detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubashar Khan, Arslan; Umar, Waqas; Choudhary, Taimoor; Hussain, Fawad; Haroon Yousaf, Muhammad

    2013-03-01

    Gesture recognition is concerned with the goal of interpreting human gestures through mathematical algorithms. Gestures can originate from any bodily motion or state but commonly originate from the face or hand. Hand gesture detection in a real time environment, where the time and memory are important issues, is a critical operation. Hand gesture recognition largely depends on the accurate detection of the fingers. This paper presents a new algorithmic approach to detect and identify fingers of human hand. The proposed algorithm does not depend upon the prior knowledge of the scene. It detects the active fingers and Metacarpophalangeal (MCP) of the inactive fingers from an already detected hand. Dynamic thresholding technique and connected component labeling scheme are employed for background elimination and hand detection respectively. Algorithm proposed a new approach for finger identification in real time environment keeping the memory and time constraint as low as possible.

  20. Bulk elastic fingering in soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintyves, Baudouin; Biggins, John; Wei, Zhiyan; Bouchaud, Elisabeth; Mahadevan, L.; Harvard University Team; Ec2M/Espci Collaboration; Cambridge University Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    Systematic experiments have been performed in purely elastic polyacrylamide gels in Hele-Shaw cells. We have shown that a bulk fingering instability arises in the highly deformable confined elastomers. A systematic study shows that surface tension is not relevant. This instability is sub-critical, with a clear hysteretic behavior. Our experimental observations have been compared very favorably to theoretical and finite element simulations results. In particular, the instability wavelength and the critical front advance have been shown to be proportional to the distance between the two glass plates constituting the cell. A very important feature is that elasticity doesn't influence this lengthscale, making this instability very generic. We will also show some new results about an elastic counterpart experiment of the famous Saffman-Taylor experiment, where we push a soft gel in a stiff one.

  1. Task specificity of finger dexterity tests.

    PubMed

    Berger, Monique A M; Krul, Arno J; Daanen, Hein A M

    2009-01-01

    Finger dexterity tests are generally used to assess performance decrease due to gloves, cold and pathology. It is generally assumed that the O'Connor and Purdue Pegboard test yield similar results. In this experiment we compared these two tests for dry conditions without gloves, and for dry and wet conditions with two types of Nytril gloves. In line with previous observations, wearing gloves caused a decrease in performance of about 12% for the O'Connor test and 9% for the Purdue test. Wetting the gloves prior to the test had no effect on the Purdue score. However, wetting the gloves increased the O'Connor performance significantly by 11%. The results show that the O'Connor and Purdue tests do not yield similar results and should be used selectively for specific tasks. PMID:18339353

  2. Bulk Elastic Fingering in Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintyves, Baudouin; Biggins, John; Wei, Zhiyan; Mora, Serge; Mahadevan, L.; Bouchaud, Elisabeth; Harvard University Team; Espci-Paristech Collaboration; Cambridge University Collaboration; Montpellier 2 University Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Systematic experiments have been performed in purely elastic polyacrylamide gels in Hele-Shaw cells. We have shown that a bulk fingering instability arises in the highly deformable confined elastomers. A systematic study shows that surface tension is not relevant. This instability is sub-critical, with a clear hysteretic behavior. Our experimental observations have been compared very favorably to theoretical and finite element simulations results. In particular, the instability wavelength and the critical front advance have been shown to be proportional to the distance between the two glass plates constituting the cell. A very important feature is that elasticity doesn't influence this lengthscale, making this instability very generic. We will also show some new results about an elastic counterpart experiment of the famous Saffman-Taylor experiment, where we push a soft gel in a stiff one.

  3. Mechanics of finger-tip electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yewang; Li, Rui; Cheng, Huanyu; Ying, Ming; Bonifas, Andrew P.; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang

    2013-10-01

    Tactile sensors and electrotactile stimulators can provide important links between humans and virtual environments, through the sensation of touch. Soft materials, such as low modulus silicones, are attractive as platforms and support matrices for arrays sensors and actuators that laminate directly onto the fingertips. Analytic models for the mechanics of three dimensional, form-fitting finger cuffs based on such designs are presented here, along with quantitative validation using the finite element method. The results indicate that the maximum strains in the silicone and the embedded devices are inversely proportional to the square root of radius of curvature of the cuff. These and other findings can be useful in formulating designs for these and related classes of body-worn, three dimensional devices.

  4. Surface Tension and Fingering of Miscible Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abib, Mohammed; Liu, Jian-Bang; Ronney, Paul D.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments on miscible, buoyantly unstable reaction-diffusion fronts and non-reacting displacement fronts in Hele-Shaw cells show a fingering-type instability whose wavelengths (lambda*) are consistent with an interfacial tension (sigma) at the front caused by the change in chemical composition, even though the solutions are miscible in all proportions. In conjunction with the Saffman-Taylor model, the relation sigma = K/tau, where tau is the interface thickness and K approximately equal 4 +/- 2 x 10(exp -6) dyne, enables prediction of our measured values of lambda* as well as results from prior experiments on miscible interfaces. These results indicate that even for miscible fluids, surface tension is generally a more significant factor than diffusion in interfacial stability and flow characteristics.

  5. Finger movements and fingers postures in pre-term infants are not a good indicator of brain damage.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Y; Prechtl, H F

    1994-02-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse, with a more detailed classification the occurrence of movements and postures of the fingers in normal and brain damaged pre-term infants. To this end the same videorecordings of normal subjects of the study described by Cioni and Prechtl and those with defined brain lesions from the investigation by Ferrari et al. have been reanalysed. In three general movements, selected randomly from each infant, we assessed the finger movement. There was no systematic trend with age and the repertoire of finger patterns per observation varied between different individuals. Only one or two finger(s) move (pattern B) and synchronized finger opening-closing (pattern D) and the complex and variable movement of three or more fingers (pattern E) are all more often or even only seen during arm movements. Fisting without arm movement (pattern A-) was only seen less frequently in the control cases, in the infants with flares and one-sided lesions. On the other hand, the two latter groups had more often pattern C+ (opening of all fingers with arm movement) while B+ (only one or two fingers move with arm movement) and E+ (three or more fingers move variably with arm movement) was less frequent in the severely damaged infants. Albeit significant differences, the plotted data immediately show the large overlap of the findings between the groups. There was no difference in the fisting between low-risk and neurologically abnormal pre-term infants. These findings corroborate the conclusions that abnormal movements and postures are not useful in the diagnosis of pre-term infants with confirmed brain lesions because of the wide overlap between the values for normal and brain damaged infants. PMID:8200324

  6. Injuries caused by firewood splitting machines.

    PubMed

    Hellstrand, P H

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the types of injury caused by firewood splitting machines and also to elucidate the accident mechanism. The study is based on 15 cases. The machine has a rotating spiral cone, and usually the victims' gloved fingertips were caught by the point of the cone. This led to either amputations, usually of radial fingers and/or penetrating wounds through the middle of the hand. In most cases the accidents could not be blamed on bad working techniques. The study of the mechanisms of injury points to insufficient protective devices in a machine construction which has a potentially dangerous working principle. PMID:2740847

  7. Lisfranc injuries.

    PubMed

    Welck, M J; Zinchenko, R; Rudge, B

    2015-04-01

    Lisfranc injuries are commonly asked about in FRCS Orthopaedic trauma vivas. The term "Lisfranc injury" strictly refers to an injury where one or more of the metatarsals are displaced from the tarsus. The term is more commonly used to describe an injury to the midfoot centred on the 2nd tarsometatarsal joint. The injury is named after Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin (1790-1847), a French surgeon and gynaecologist who first described the injury in 1815. 'Lisfranc injury' encompasses a broad spectrum of injuries, which can be purely ligamentous or involve the osseous and articular structures. They are often difficult to diagnose and treat, but if not detected and appropriately managed they can cause long-term disability. This review outlines the anatomy, epidemiology, classification, investigation and current evidence on management of this injury. PMID:25543185

  8. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality. PMID:20016434

  9. Fluctuations in Saffman-Taylor fingers with quenched disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torralba, M.; Ortín, J.; Hernández-Machado, A.; Corvera Poiré, E.

    2006-04-01

    We make an experimental characterization of the effect that static disorder has on the shape of a normal Saffman-Taylor finger. We find that static noise induces a small amplitude and long wavelength instability on the sides of the finger. Fluctuations on the finger sides have a dominant wavelength, indicating that the system acts as a selective amplifier of static noise. The dominant wavelength does not seem to be very sensitive to the intensity of static noise present in the system. On the other hand, at a given flow rate, rms fluctuations of the finger width, decrease with decreasing intensity of static noise. This might explain why the sides of the fingers are flat for typical Saffman-Taylor experiments. Comparison with previous numerical studies of the effect that temporal noise has on the Saffman-Taylor finger, leads to conclude that the effect of temporal noise and static noise are similar. The behavior of fluctuations of the finger width found in our experiments, is qualitatively similar to one recently reported, in the sense that, the magnitude of the width fluctuations decays as a power law of the capillary number, at low flow rates, and increases with capillary number for larger flow rates.

  10. Response to reflected-force feedback to fingers in teleoperations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, P. H.; Iatridis, J. C.; Thakor, N. V.

    1989-01-01

    Reflected-force feedback is an important aspect of teleoperations. The objective is to determine the ability of the human operator to respond to that force. Telerobotics operation is simulated by computer control of a motor-driven device with capabilities for programmable force feedback and force measurement. A computer-controlled motor drive is developed that provides forces against the fingers as well as (angular) position control. A load cell moves in a circular arc as it is pushed by a finger and measures reaction forces on the finger. The force exerted by the finger on the load cell and the angular position are digitized and recorded as a function of time by the computer. Flexure forces of the index, long and ring fingers of the human hand in opposition to the motor driven load cell are investigated. Results of the following experiments are presented: (1) Exertion of maximum finger force as a function of angle; (2) Exertion of target finger force against a computer controlled force; and (3) Test of the ability to move to a target force against a force that is a function of position. Averaged over ten individuals, the maximum force that could be exerted by the index or long finger is about 50 Newtons, while that of the ring finger is about 40 Newtons. From the tests of the ability of a subject to exert a target force, it was concluded that reflected-force feedback can be achieved with the direct kinesthetic perception of force without the use of tactile or visual clues.

  11. Basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Newman, Joel S; Newberg, Arthur H

    2010-11-01

    Basketball injuries are most prevalent in the lower extremity, especially at the ankle and knee. Most basketball injuries are orthopedic in nature and commonly include ligament sprains, musculotendinous strains, and overuse injuries including stress fractures. By virtue of its excellent contrast resolution and depiction of the soft tissues and trabecular bone, magnetic resonance imaging has become the principal modality for evaluating many basketball injuries. In this article, commonly encountered basketball injuries and their imaging appearances are described. The epidemiology of basketball injuries across various age groups and levels of competition and between genders are reviewed. PMID:21094400

  12. Dendrites, viscous fingers, and the theory of pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of pattern formation in dendritic crystal growth and viscous fingering in fluids are reviewed. Consideration is given to the discovery that weak capillary forces act as singular perturbations which lead to selection mechanisms in dendritic crystal growth and fingering patterns. Other topics include the conventional thermodynamic model of the solidification of a pure substance from its melt, fingering instability, pattern selection, the solvability theory, dendritic growth rates, the bubble effect discovered by Couder et al. (1986), the dynamics of pattern-forming systems, and snowflake formation.

  13. Narrow fingers in the Saffman-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couder, Y.; Gerard, N.; Rabaud, M.

    1986-12-01

    Saffman-Taylor fingers with a relative width much smaller than the classical limit lambda = 0.5 are found when a small isolated bubble is located at their tip. These solutions are members of a family found by Saffman and Taylor (1958) neglecting superficial tension. Recent theories have shown that when capillary forces are taken into account an unphysical cusplike singularity would appear at the tip of all the fingers with lambda less than 0.5. Conversely, here the replacement of the tip by a small bubble makes these solutions possible. At large velocity these fingers show dendritic instability.

  14. Plasmonic "nano-fingers on nanowires" as SERS substrates.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Yashna; Dhawan, Anuj

    2016-05-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on plasmonics-active metallic nano-finger arrays grown on arrays of triangular-shaped metal-coated silicon nanowire arrays is proposed. Finite-difference time-domain modeling is employed to numerically calculate the effect of the inter-finger gap and the growth angle of the nano-fingers on the magnitude of SERS enhancement and the plasmon resonance wavelength. Additionally, the polarization dependence of the SERS signals from these novel substrates has been studied. A protocol for the fabrication of the proposed SERS substrate is also discussed. PMID:27128080

  15. Finger rafting: a generic instability of floating elastic sheets.

    PubMed

    Vella, Dominic; Wettlaufer, J S

    2007-02-23

    Colliding ice floes are often observed to form a series of interlocking fingers. We show that this striking phenomenon is not a result of some peculiar property of ice but rather a general and robust mechanical phenomenon reproducible in the laboratory with other floating materials. We determine the theoretical relationship between the width of the resulting fingers and the material's mechanical properties and present experimental results along with field observations to support the theory. The generality of this "finger rafting" suggests that analogous processes may be responsible for creating the large-scale structures observed at the boundaries between Earth's convergent tectonic plates. PMID:17359135

  16. A hierarchical classification method for finger knuckle print recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Tao; Yang, Gongping; Yang, Lu

    2014-12-01

    Finger knuckle print has recently been seen as an effective biometric technique. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical classification method for finger knuckle print recognition, which is rooted in traditional score-level fusion methods. In the proposed method, we firstly take Gabor feature as the basic feature for finger knuckle print recognition and then a new decision rule is defined based on the predefined threshold. Finally, the minor feature speeded-up robust feature is conducted for these users, who cannot be recognized by the basic feature. Extensive experiments are performed to evaluate the proposed method, and experimental results show that it can achieve a promising performance.

  17. Patterns in Blast Injuries to the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Buntic, Rudolf F.; Brooks, Darrell

    2008-01-01

    Blast injuries to the hand are not just a wartime phenomenon but also quite common in rural communities throughout northern California. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with blast injuries in the community and review the most common patterns in an attempt to identify the pathomechanics of the hand injury and the reconstructive procedures that are required. This is a retrospective study of blast injuries to the hand treated between 1978 and 2006. Medical records, X-rays, and photos were reviewed to compile standard patient demographics and characterize the injury pattern. Explosives were classified based on their rate of decomposition. Reconstructive solutions were reviewed and characterized based on whether damaged tissues were repaired or replaced. Sixty-two patients were identified with blast injuries to their hand. Patients were predominantly male (92%) with an average age of 27 years. Firecrackers were the most commonly encountered explosives. Thirty-seven patients were identified as holding a low explosive in their dominant hand and were used for characterization of the injury pattern. The apparent pattern of injury was hyperextension and hyperabduction of the hand and digits. Common injuries were metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joint hyperextension with associated soft tissue avulsion, hyperabduction at the web spaces with associated palmar soft tissue tears, and finger disarticulation amputations worse at radial digits. Given the mechanisms of injury with tissue loss, surgical intervention generally involved tissue replacement rather than tissue repair. Blast injuries to the hand represent a broad spectrum of injuries that are associated with the magnitude of explosion and probably, the proximity to the hand. We were able to identify a repetitive pattern of injury and demonstrate the predominant use for delayed tissue replacement rather than microsurgical repair at the acute setting. PMID:18780004

  18. An epidemiological analysis of the injury pattern in indoor and in beach volleyball.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, H; Scavenius, M; Jørgensen, U

    1997-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the injuries in indoor and in beach volleyball, and to compare the injury pattern in the two different types of volleyball. Injuries in 295 volleyball players were recorded during the beach volleyball season 1993 and during the following indoor volleyball season 1993 to 1994. The method of enquiry was two identical questionnaires. Equal numbers of men and women, elite and recreational players were represented. In beach volleyball 24 injuries were reported and 286 in indoor volleyball, representing an incidence of 4.9 injuries per 1000 volleyball hours in beach volleyball and 4.2 in indoor volleyball. The most frequent injuries were acute injuries located in the ankle and finger and overuse injuries in the knee and shoulder. The injury pattern was different in indoor and in beach volleyball. In beach volleyball most injuries occurred in field defence and in spiking, with overuse injuries in the shoulder as the major site. In indoor volleyball most injuries occurred during blocking and spiking, resulting most frequently in acute finger and ankle injuries, respectively. PMID:9187978

  19. High Performance EVA Glove Collaboration: Glove Injury Data Mining Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, C. R.; Benson, E.; England, S.; Charvat, J.; Norcross, J. R.; McFarland, S. M.; Rajulu, S.

    2015-01-01

    injured during 11,704 ground EVA training events. Of the 196 glove related injury incidents, 106 related to EVA and 90 to EVA training. Over these 196 incidents, 277 total injuries (126 flight; 151 training) were reported and were then grouped into 23 types of injuries. Of EVA flight injuries, 65% were commonly reported to the hand (in general), metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint, and finger (not including thumb) with fatigue, abrasion, and paresthesia being the most common injury types (44% of total flight injuries). Training injuries totaled to more than 70% being distributed to the fingernail, MCP joint, and finger crotch with 88% of the specific injuries listed as pain, erythema, and onycholysis. Of these training injuries, when reporting pain or erythema, the most common location was the index finger, but when reporting onycholysis, it was the middle finger. Predictor variables specific to increased risk of onycholysis included: female sex (OR=2.622), older age (OR=1.065), increased duration in hours of the flight or training event (OR=1.570), middle finger length differences in inches between the finger and the EVA glove (OR=7.709), and use of the Phase VI glove (OR=8.535). Differentiation between training and flight and injury reporting during 2002-2004 were significant control variables. For likelihood of time to first onycholysis injury, there was a 24% reduction in rate of reporting for each year increase in age. Also, more experienced crewmembers, based on number of EVA flight or training events completed, were less likely to report an onycholysis injury (3% less for every event). Longer duration events also found reporting rates to occur 2.37 times faster for every hour of length. Crewmembers with larger hand size reported onycholysis 23% faster than those with smaller hand size. Finally, for every 1/10th of an inch increase in difference between the middle finger length and the glove, the rate of reporting increased by 60%. DISCUSSION: One key finding was that

  20. Examiner's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, Naohiro; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2014-06-01

    The best way to assess fetal condition is to observe the oxygen status of the fetus (as well as to assess the condition of infants, children, and adults). Previously, several fetal oximeters have been developed; however, no instrument has been utilized in clinical practice because of the low-capturing rate of the fetal oxygen saturation. To overcome the problem, we developed a doctor's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximeter, whose sensor volume is one hundredth of the conventional one. Additionally, we prepared transparent gloves. The calculation algorithm of the hemoglobin concentration was derived from the light propagation analysis based on the transport theory. We measured neonatal and fetal oxygen saturation (StO2) with the new tissue oximeter. Neonatal StO was measured at any position of the head regardless of amount of hair. Neonatal StO was found to be around 77%. Fetal StO was detected in every position of the fetal head during labor regardless of the presence of labor pain. Fetal StO without labor pain was around 70% in the first stage of labor and around 60% in the second stage of labor. We concluded that our new concept of fetal tissue oximetry would be useful for detecting fetal StO in any condition of the fetus.

  1. Finger Length Ratios in Serbian Transsexuals

    PubMed Central

    Vujović, Svetlana; Popović, Srdjan; Mrvošević Marojević, Ljiljana; Ivović, Miomira; Tančić-Gajić, Milina; Stojanović, Miloš; Marina, Ljiljana V.; Barać, Marija; Barać, Branko; Kovačević, Milena; Duišin, Dragana; Barišić, Jasmina; Djordjević, Miroslav L.; Micić, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Atypical prenatal hormone exposure could be a factor in the development of transsexualism. There is evidence that the 2nd and 4th digit ratio (2D : 4D) associates negatively with prenatal testosterone and positively with estrogens. The aim was to assess the difference in 2D : 4D between female to male transsexuals (FMT) and male to female transsexuals (MFT) and controls. We examined 42 MFT, 38 FMT, and 45 control males and 48 control females. Precise measurements were made by X-rays at the ventral surface of both hands from the basal crease of the digit to the tip using vernier calliper. Control male and female patients had larger 2D : 4D of the right hand when compared to the left hand. Control male's left hand ratio was lower than in control female's left hand. There was no difference in 2D : 4D between MFT and control males. MFT showed similar 2D : 4D of the right hand with control women indicating possible influencing factor in embryogenesis and consequently finger length changes. FMT showed the lowest 2D : 4D of the left hand when compared to the control males and females. Results of our study go in favour of the biological aetiology of transsexualism. PMID:24982993

  2. Ubiquitin interactions of NZF zinc fingers

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Steven L; Sun, Ji; Payne, Marielle; Welch, Brett D; Blake, B Kelly; Davis, Darrell R; Meyer, Hemmo H; Emr, Scott D; Sundquist, Wesley I

    2004-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) functions in many different biological pathways, where it typically interacts with proteins that contain modular Ub recognition domains. One such recognition domain is the Npl4 zinc finger (NZF), a compact zinc-binding module found in many proteins that function in Ub-dependent processes. We now report the solution structure of the NZF domain from Npl4 in complex with Ub. The structure reveals that three key NZF residues (13TF14/M25) surrounding the zinc coordination site bind the hydrophobic ‘Ile44' surface of Ub. Mutations in the 13TF14/M25 motif inhibit Ub binding, and naturally occurring NZF domains that lack the motif do not bind Ub. However, substitution of the 13TF14/M25 motif into the nonbinding NZF domain from RanBP2 creates Ub-binding activity, demonstrating the versatility of the NZF scaffold. Finally, NZF mutations that inhibit Ub binding by the NZF domain of Vps36/ESCRT-II also inhibit sorting of ubiquitylated proteins into the yeast vacuole. Thus, the NZF is a versatile protein recognition domain that is used to bind ubiquitylated proteins during vacuolar protein sorting, and probably many other biological processes. PMID:15029239

  3. From frictional fingers to stick slip bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandnes, Bjørnar; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Flekkøy, Eirik; Eriksen, Jon

    2014-05-01

    Gas intrusion into wet porous/deformable/granular media occurs in a wide range of natural and engineered settings. Examples include hydrocarbon recovery, carbon dioxide geo-sequestration, gas venting in sediments and volcanic eruptions. In the case where the intruding gas is able to displace particles and grains, local changes in granular packing fraction govern the evolution of flow paths, resulting in complex pattern formation of the displacement flow. Here we investigate flow patterning as a compressed gas displaces a granular mixture confined in the narrow gap of a Hele-Shaw cell. We find a surprising variety of different pattern formation dynamics, and present a unified phase diagram of the flow morphologies we observe. This talk will focus on one particular transition the system undergoes: from frictional fingers to stick slip bubbles. We show that the frictional fluid flow patterns depend on granular mass loading and system elasticity, analogous to the behaviour of the well-known spring-block sliding friction problem.

  4. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  5. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sand or dust Ultraviolet injuries: Caused by sunlight, sun lamps, snow or water reflections, or arc- ... a corneal injury if you: Are exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light for long periods of ...

  6. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  7. Development of Functional Recovery Training Device for Hemiplegic Fingers with Finger-expansion Facilitation Exercise by Stretch Reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong; Iwashita, Hisashi; Kawahira, Kazumi; Hayashi, Ryota

    This paper develops a functional recovery training device to perform repetition facilitating exercise for hemiplegic finger rehabilitation. On the facilitation exercise, automatic finger expansion can be realized and facilitated by stretch reflex, where a stimulation forces is applied instantaneously on flexion finger for making strech reflex and resistance forces are applied for maintaining the strech reflex. In this paper, novel parallel mechanisms, force sensing system with high sensitivity and resistance accompanying cooperation control method are proposed for sensing, controlling and realizing the stimulation force, resistance forces, strech reflex and repetition facilitating exercise. The effectivities and performances of the device are shown by some experiments.

  8. Cycling injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    Bicycle-related injuries have increased as cycling has become more popular. Most injuries to recreational riders are associated with overuse or improper fit of the bicycle. Injuries to racers often result from high speeds, which predispose riders to muscle strains, collisions, and falls. Cyclists contact bicycles at the pedals, seat, and handlebars. Each is associated with particular cycling injuries. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8471908

  9. The generation of zinc finger proteins by modular assembly

    PubMed Central

    Bhakta, Mital; Segal, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The modular assembly (MA) method of generating engineered zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) was the first practical method for creating custom DNA-binding proteins. As such, MA has enabled a vast exploration of sequence-specific methods and reagents, ushering in the modern era of zinc finger-based applications that are described in this volume. The first zinc finger nuclease to cleave an endogenous site was created using MA, as was the first artificial transcription factor to enter phase II clinical trials. In recent years, other excellent methods have been developed that improved the affinity and specificity of the engineered ZFPs. However, MA is still used widely for many applications. This chapter will describe methods and give guidance for the creation of ZFPs using MA. Such ZFPs might be useful as starting materials to perform other methods described in this volume. Here, we also describe a single-strand annealing recombination assay for the initial testing of zinc finger nucleases. PMID:20680825

  10. L'index significant (The Pointed Index Finger).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calbris, G.

    1979-01-01

    In the framework of a study of nonverbal communication, the various meanings attached to the pointed index finger are analyzed. The question is raised as to what extent the findings hold for cultures other than French. (AMH)

  11. Finger vein recognition based on local directional code.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianjing; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2012-01-01

    Finger vein patterns are considered as one of the most promising biometric authentication methods for its security and convenience. Most of the current available finger vein recognition methods utilize features from a segmented blood vessel network. As an improperly segmented network may degrade the recognition accuracy, binary pattern based methods are proposed, such as Local Binary Pattern (LBP), Local Derivative Pattern (LDP) and Local Line Binary Pattern (LLBP). However, the rich directional information hidden in the finger vein pattern has not been fully exploited by the existing local patterns. Inspired by the Webber Local Descriptor (WLD), this paper represents a new direction based local descriptor called Local Directional Code (LDC) and applies it to finger vein recognition. In LDC, the local gradient orientation information is coded as an octonary decimal number. Experimental results show that the proposed method using LDC achieves better performance than methods using LLBP. PMID:23202194

  12. Finger Vein Recognition Based on Local Directional Code

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianjing; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2012-01-01

    Finger vein patterns are considered as one of the most promising biometric authentication methods for its security and convenience. Most of the current available finger vein recognition methods utilize features from a segmented blood vessel network. As an improperly segmented network may degrade the recognition accuracy, binary pattern based methods are proposed, such as Local Binary Pattern (LBP), Local Derivative Pattern (LDP) and Local Line Binary Pattern (LLBP). However, the rich directional information hidden in the finger vein pattern has not been fully exploited by the existing local patterns. Inspired by the Webber Local Descriptor (WLD), this paper represents a new direction based local descriptor called Local Directional Code (LDC) and applies it to finger vein recognition. In LDC, the local gradient orientation information is coded as an octonary decimal number. Experimental results show that the proposed method using LDC achieves better performance than methods using LLBP. PMID:23202194

  13. Finger Growth in Surfactant Solution in Hele-Shaw Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Yamashita, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yousuke; Hashimoto, Takamasa; Mori, Noriyasu

    2006-05-01

    Viscous fingering in surfactant solutions was experimentally studied. Aqueous solutions of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with sodium salicylate (NaSal) as a counter ion were used as test fluids. Excess of counter ion was added into a surfactant solution of CTAB to configure network structures of wormlike micelles. The experiments were mainly carried out using a square Hele-Shaw cell. The structure of fingering pattern was dimensionally analyzed to classify the patterns into three types. In addition, growth phenomena distinguishing for the viscous finger in the CTAB/NaSal solutions were observed: surface instabilities with dendrites, and a sudden protrusion from a cuspidate shaped finger tip. The dependence of the sudden protrusion on the shear rate was confirmed by the experiment using a rectangular cell.

  14. Tension Distribution in a Tendon-Driven Robotic Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method is provided for distributing tension among tendons of a tendon-driven finger in a robotic system, wherein the finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons. The method includes determining a maximum functional tension and a minimum functional tension of each tendon of the finger, and then using a controller to distribute tension among the tendons, such that each tendon is assigned a tension value less than the maximum functional tension and greater than or equal to the minimum functional tension. The method satisfies the minimum functional tension while minimizing the internal tension in the robotic system, and satisfies the maximum functional tension without introducing a coupled disturbance to the joint torques. A robotic system includes a robot having at least one tendon-driven finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons, and a controller having an algorithm for controlling the tendons as set forth above.

  15. Suppression of viscous fingering in nonflat Hele-Shaw cells.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Rodolfo; Fontana, João V; Miranda, José A

    2014-11-01

    Viscous fingering formation in flat Hele-Shaw cells is a classical and widely studied fluid mechanical problem. Recently, instead of focusing on the development of the fingering instability, researchers have devised different strategies aiming to suppress its appearance. In this work, we study a protocol that intends to inhibit the occurrence of fingering instabilities in nonflat (spherical and conical) Hele-Shaw cell geometries. By using a mode-coupling theory to describe interfacial evolution, plus a variational controlling technique, we show that viscous fingering phenomena can be minimized in such a confined, curved environment by properly manipulating a time-dependent injection flow rate Q(t). Explicit expressions for Q(t) are derived for the specific cases of spherical and conical cells. The suitability of the controlling method is verified for linear and weakly nonlinear stages of the flow. PMID:25493877

  16. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration

    PubMed Central

    Welcome, Daniel E.; Dong, Ren G.; Xu, Xueyan S.; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed. Relevance to industry Prolonged, intensive exposure to hand-transmitted vibration can cause hand-arm vibration syndrome. Vibration-reducing gloves have been used as an alternative approach to reduce the vibration exposure. However, their effectiveness for reducing finger-transmitted vibrations remains unclear. This study enhanced the understanding of the glove effects on finger vibration and provided useful information on the effectiveness of typical VR gloves at reducing the vibration transmitted to the fingers. The new

  17. Fingered bola body, bola with same, and methods of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzenitis, John M. (Inventor); Billica, Linda W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention discloses bola bodies, bolas, and a snaring method which makes use such devices. A bola body, according to the present invention, is nonspherical or irregular in shape rather than a smooth sphere or ovoid body. One or more fingers extends from the bola body. These fingers may be relatively straight or they may have crooked or bent portions to enhance entanglement with a bola line or lines or with each other. Two or more of such fingers may be used and may be regularly or irregularly spaced apart on a bola body. A bola with such bodies includes lines which are connected to the other bodies. In one particular embodiment of a bola body, according to the present invention, the body has an irregular shape with a bottom rectangular portion and a top pyramid portion forming a nose. A plurality of fingers is extended from the pyramidal top portion with one finger extended up and away from each of four corners of the top portion. Such a bola body tends to be initially oriented with its nose and fingers against an object being snared since the body is pulled nose first when a bola line is secured at the tip of the pyramidal portion of the bola body. With such a bola, an unwrapping bola body can slip around a target member so that two of the rod-shaped fingers catch a bola line and guide it into an area or crook between the fingers and a side of the top pyramidal portion of the bola body. Tension on the bola line maintains the line in the crook and tends to press the fingers against the unwrapped target member to stabilize the wrapping of the line about the target member. With such a bola, it is difficult for two or more lines unwrapping in different directions to move past one another without being forced together by line tension. Also, the fingers of such bola bodies may hook and hold each other. The fingers may also hook or entangle some object on or portion of the target member. A probable known target member has known dimensions and shapes so that

  18. Orienteering injuries

    PubMed Central

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering. Imagesp236-ap237-ap237-bp238-ap239-ap240-a PMID:7159815

  19. Fracture dislocation of carpometacarpal joints: a missed injury.

    PubMed

    Gaheer, Rajinder Singh; Ferdinand, Rupert D

    2011-05-01

    Fracture dislocation of the carpometacarpal joints on the ulnar side of the hand is an uncommon injury. These are high-energy injuries seen in motorcyclists and boxers. The mechanism of injury involves violent, forceful dorsiflexion of the wrist combined with longitudinal impact on the closed hand. This article reports a case of fracture of the base of the middle finger with dislocation of the ring and little finger carpometacarpal joints. On first examination, a diagnosis of isolated, minimally-displaced, middle-metacarpal base fracture was made and deemed suitable for nonoperative management. The hand was splinted in a plaster-of-Paris slab. Later, a true lateral radiograph showed the exact nature of the injury. The fracture was successfully treated with closed reduction under general anesthesia and transfixation using Kirschner wires. Functional results were excellent with return to work at 10 weeks and excellent grip strength at 14 weeks. This injury may be missed in an acute setting in a busy accident and emergency unit. Swelling around the wrist with shortening of the knuckle should alert the clinician towards the possibility of such an injury. On routine anteroposterior view, overlap of joint surfaces, loss of parallelism, and asymmetry at the carpometacarpal joints should raise suspicion of the possibility of a subtle carpometacarpal injury. This article highlights the importance of a high index of suspicion, a true lateral radiograph, and careful evaluation of radiographs in diagnosing these injuries. Intensive postoperative physiotherapy is vital to achieving a satisfactory outcome. PMID:21598884

  20. Finger blood content, light transmission, and pulse oximetry errors.

    PubMed

    Craft, T M; Lawson, R A; Young, J D

    1992-01-01

    The changes in light emitting diode current necessary to maintain a constant level of light incident upon a photodetector were measured in 20 volunteers at the two wavelengths employed by pulse oximeters. Three states of finger blood content were assessed; exsanguinated, hyperaemic, and normal. The changes in light emitting diode current with changes in finger blood content were small and are not thought to represent a significant source of error in saturation as measured by pulse oximetry. PMID:1536406

  1. Detecting overblown flute fingerings from the residual noise spectrum.

    PubMed

    Verfaille, Vincent; Depalle, Philippe; Wanderley, Marcelo M

    2010-01-01

    Producing a tone by increasing the blowing pressure to excite a higher frequency impedance minimum, or overblowing, is widely used in standard flute technique. In this paper, the effect of overblowing a fingering is explored with spectral analysis, and a fingering detector is designed based on acoustical knowledge and pattern classification techniques. The detector performs signal analysis of the strong broadband signal, that is, spectrally shaped by the pipe impedance, and measures the spectral energy during the attack around multiples of the fundamental frequency sub-multiples over the first octave and a half. It is trained and evaluated on sounds recorded with four expert performers. They played six series of tones from overblown and regular fingerings, with frequencies that are octave- and non-octave-related to the playing frequency. The best of the four proposed sound descriptors allows for a detection error below 1.3% for notes with two and three fingerings (C(5), D(5), C(6), and Cmusical sharp(6)) and below 14% for four (E(6)) or five fingerings (G(6)). The error is shown to dramatically increase when two fingerings' impedance become too similar (E(6) and A(4) and G(6) and C(5)). PMID:20058998

  2. Biomechanical Analysis of Force Distribution in Human Finger Extensor Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dan; Ren, Lei; Howard, David; Zong, Changfu

    2014-01-01

    The complexities of the function and structure of human fingers have long been recognised. The in vivo forces in the human finger tendon network during different activities are critical information for clinical diagnosis, surgical treatment, prosthetic finger design, and biomimetic hand development. In this study, we propose a novel method for in vivo force estimation for the finger tendon network by combining a three-dimensional motion analysis technique and a novel biomechanical tendon network model. The extensor mechanism of a human index finger is represented by an interconnected tendinous network moving around the phalanx's dorsum. A novel analytical approach based on the “Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy” is used to calculate the forces and deformations throughout the tendon network of the extensor mechanism when subjected to an external load and with the finger posture defined by measurement data. The predicted deformations and forces in the tendon network are in broad agreement with the results obtained by previous experimental in vitro studies. The proposed methodology provides a promising tool for investigating the biomechanical function of complex interconnected tendon networks in vivo. PMID:25126576

  3. Fluidic Channels Produced by Electro Hydrodynamic Viscous Fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behler, Kristopher; Wetzel, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Viscous fingering is a term describing fingerlike extensions of liquid from a column of low viscosity liquid that has been injected into a more viscous liquid. The modification of viscous fingering, known as electro hydrodynamic viscous fingering (EHVF), utilizes large electrical potentials of 10-60 kV. The fingers see a reduction in size and increase in branching behavior due to the potential applied to the system. The resulting finely structured patterns are analogous to biological systems such as blood vessels and the lymphatic system. In this study silicone oils and water were studied in thin channel Hele-Shaw cells. The interfacial tension was optimized by altering the surfactant concentration in the silicone oils. EHVF of liquid filled packed beds consisting of beads and silicone oils showed retardation of the relaxation of the fingers after the voltage was turned off. Decreased relaxation provides a means to solidify patterns into a curable material, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). After the water is evacuated from the fingers, the cured materials then possess hollow channels that can be refilled and emptied, thus creating an artificial circulatory system.

  4. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events.

    PubMed

    MacRitchie, Jennifer; McPherson, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterization of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction. PMID:26082732

  5. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events

    PubMed Central

    MacRitchie, Jennifer; McPherson, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterization of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction. PMID:26082732

  6. Biomechanical analysis of force distribution in human finger extensor mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Ren, Lei; Howard, David; Zong, Changfu

    2014-01-01

    The complexities of the function and structure of human fingers have long been recognised. The in vivo forces in the human finger tendon network during different activities are critical information for clinical diagnosis, surgical treatment, prosthetic finger design, and biomimetic hand development. In this study, we propose a novel method for in vivo force estimation for the finger tendon network by combining a three-dimensional motion analysis technique and a novel biomechanical tendon network model. The extensor mechanism of a human index finger is represented by an interconnected tendinous network moving around the phalanx's dorsum. A novel analytical approach based on the "Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy" is used to calculate the forces and deformations throughout the tendon network of the extensor mechanism when subjected to an external load and with the finger posture defined by measurement data. The predicted deformations and forces in the tendon network are in broad agreement with the results obtained by previous experimental in vitro studies. The proposed methodology provides a promising tool for investigating the biomechanical function of complex interconnected tendon networks in vivo. PMID:25126576

  7. Viscous Fingering Induced Flow Instability in Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, Kirsty; Shalliker, R. Andrew; Catchpoole, Heather J.; Sweeney, Alan P.; Wong, Victor; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-07-01

    Viscous fingering is a flow instability phenomenon that results in the destabilisation of the interface between two fluids of differing viscosities. The destabilised interface results in a complex mixing of the two fluids in a pattern that resembles fingers. The conditions that enhance this type of flow instability can be found in coupled chromatographic separation systems, even when the solvents used in each of the separation stages have seemingly similar chemical and physical properties (other than viscosity). For example, the viscosities of acetonitrile and methanol are sufficiently different that instability at the interface between these two solvents can be established and viscous fingering results. In coupled chromatographic systems, the volume of solvent transported from one separation dimension to the second often exceeds the injection volume by two or more orders of magnitude. As a consequence, viscous fingering may occur, when otherwise following the injection of normal analytical size injection plugs viscous fingering would not occur. The findings in this study illustrate the onset of viscous fingering in emulated coupled chromatographic systems and show the importance of correct solvent selection for optimum separation performance.

  8. Enhancement of finger motion range with compliant anthropomorphic joint design.

    PubMed

    Çulha, Utku; Iida, Fumiya

    2016-04-01

    Robotic researchers have been greatly inspired by the human hand in the search to design and build adaptive robotic hands. Especially, joints have received a lot of attention upon their role in maintaining the passive compliance that gives the fingers flexibility and extendible motion ranges. Passive compliance, which is the tendency to be employed in motion under the influence of an external force, is the result of the stiffness and the geometrical constraints of the joints that define the direction of the motion. Based on its building elements, human finger joints have multi-directional passive compliance which means that they can move in multiple axis of motion under external force. However, due to their complex anatomy, only simplified biomechanical designs based on physiological analysis are preferred in present day robotics. To imitate the human joints, these designs either use fixed degree of freedom mechanisms which substantially limit the motion axes of compliance, or soft materials that can deform in many directions but hinder the fingers' force exertion capacities. In order to find a solution that lies between these two design approaches, we are using anatomically correct finger bones, elastic ligaments and antagonistic tendons to build anthropomorphic joints with multi-directional passive compliance and strong force exertion capabilities. We use interactions between an index finger and a thumb to show that our joints allow the extension of the range of motion of the fingers up to 245% and gripping size to 63% which can be beneficial for mechanical adaptation in gripping larger objects. PMID:26891473

  9. Rapid functional plasticity of the somatosensory cortex after finger amputation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, T; Miltner, W H; Huonker, R; Friedel, R; Schmidt, I; Taub, E

    2000-09-01

    Recent research indicates that areas of the primary somatosensory (SI) and primary motor cortex show massive cortical reorganization after amputation of the upper arm, forearm or fingers. Most of these studies were carried out months or several years after amputation. In the present study, we describe cortical reorganization of areas in the SI of a patient who underwent amputation of the traumatized middle and ring fingers of his right hand 10 days before cortical magnetic source imaging data were obtained. Somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields (SEF) to mechanical stimuli to the finger tips were recorded and single moving dipoles were calculated using a realistic volume conductor model. Results reveal that the dipoles representing the second and fifth fingers of the affected hand were closer together than the comparable dipoles of the unaffected hand. Our findings demonstrate that neural cell assemblies in SI which formerly represented the right middle and ring fingers of this amputee became reorganized and invaded by neighbouring cell assemblies of the index and little finger of the same hand. These results indicate that functional plasticity occurs within a period of 10 days after amputation. PMID:11037286

  10. Dorsal root ganglion myeloid zinc finger protein 1 contributes to neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve trauma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lingli; Cao, Jing; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Zhang, Wei; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury-induced changes in gene transcription and translation in primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) are considered to contribute to neuropathic pain genesis. Transcription factors control gene expression. Peripheral nerve injury increases the expression of myeloid zinc finger protein 1 (MZF1), a transcription factor, and promotes its binding to the voltage-gated potassium 1.2 (Kv1.2) antisense RNA gene in the injured DRG. However, whether DRG MZF1 participates in neuropathic pain is still unknown. Here, we report that blocking the nerve injury-induced increase of DRG MZF1 through microinjection of MZF1 siRNA into the injured DRG attenuated the initiation and maintenance of mechanical, cold, and thermal pain hypersensitivities in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, without affecting locomotor functions and basal responses to acute mechanical, heat, and cold stimuli. Mimicking the nerve injury-induced increase of DRG MZF1 through microinjection of recombinant adeno-associated virus 5 expressing full-length MZF1 into the DRG produced significant mechanical, cold, and thermal pain hypersensitivities in naïve rats. Mechanistically, MZF1 participated in CCI-induced reductions in Kv1.2 mRNA and protein and total Kv current and the CCI-induced increase in neuronal excitability through MZF1-triggered Kv1.2 antisense RNA expression in the injured DRG neurons. MZF1 is likely an endogenous trigger of neuropathic pain and might serve as a potential target for preventing and treating this disorder. PMID:25630025

  11. Needle puncture resistance of surgical gloves, finger guards, and glove liners.

    PubMed

    Leslie, L F; Woods, J A; Thacker, J G; Morgan, R F; McGregor, W; Edlich, R F

    1996-01-01

    New puncture resistant materials are being developed for health professional use as protection against disease and needle stick injuries. The needle puncture resistance of protective gloves and glove liners from DePuy DuPont Orthopaedics and of finger guards from Zimmer was evaluated using a computerized needle penetration system to determine maximal penetration forces and the penetration work required for taper point and for cutting edge needles to penetrate these membranes. The Medak portion of the Life Liner glove liner and the Spectra portion of the FingGuard finger guard offered remarkable resistance against needle penetration as compared to the other glove liners and gloves tested. The cutting edge needles required considerably less penetration force and work to penetrate the FingGuard and Life Liner than that required with comparable size taper point needles. Because these unique protective materials had a limited distribution over the hand, the surgeon's hand remained susceptible to inadvertent needle puncture. While this protection against needle penetration in the Life Liner and the FingGuard represents an exciting advance in surgery, it is important to emphasize that this development is only one consideration in the selection of surgical gloves. PMID:8734073

  12. Extra-articular fractures of the digital metacarpals and phalanges of the long fingers.

    PubMed

    Le Nen, D

    2014-02-01

    Metacarpal and phalangeal fractures of the long fingers are the result of trauma occurring under extremely varied circumstances. As a consequence, the clinical presentation varies greatly, with every bone and joint potentially being involved. Each step of their treatment is crucial, although the benign appearance of these injuries can lead to steps being missed: diagnostic phase with clinical examination and radiographs; therapeutic phase where the most suitable treatment is chosen, which combines mobilization of the digital chains as soon as possible and in every patient; follow-up phase with regular monitoring to detect any complications, especially secondary displacement, and verify that good progress is being made during rehabilitation. The goal of any fracture treatment is to preserve or restore the anatomy, with the emphasis here being on the stability and mobility of the digital chains. The potential progression towards serious functional sequelae (pain, instability or stiffness in hand) and the resulting significant socio-economic repercussions must be at the forefront of a surgeon's mind early on during the initial care of any finger or hand trauma. PMID:24486016

  13. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  14. Unintentional Injuries In Children: Are Our Homes Safe?

    PubMed

    Faruque, Ahmad Vaqas; Mateen Khan, Muhammad Arif

    2016-05-01

    Unintentional injuries are a leading cause of death in childhood globally. Injuries lead to emotional trauma and financial burden for children, parents, and society. Here are the frequencies of unintentional injuries in children presented to the emergency and paediatric surgery clinics of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from January to December 2012. Aretrospective chart review of children aged 0 day to 14 years presented with falls, burns, foreign body ingestion or inhalation, poisoning, fingers caught in doors, electrocution injuries and drowning, was conducted. Atotal of 165 children were included. Domestic injuries were frequently occurring injuries in our set-up which could be prevented by doing small adjustments to make the home safe for children. PMID:27225158

  15. Preliminary Assessment of Ergonomic Injury Risk Factors in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Spacesuit Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amick, Ryan Z.; Reid, Christopher R.; Vu, Linh Q.; Nguyen, Dan; Sweet, Robert; McFarland, Shane; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the hands and fingers are commonly reported among astronauts who perform and train for Extravehicular Activities in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Spacesuit. In an effort to better understand the physical and environmental ergonomic injury risk factors associated with spacesuit glove use, a custom built carrier glove with multiple integrated sensors was developed to be worn within the spacesuit glove with the purpose of measuring the physical and environmental variables acting on the fingers and hand, and the physiological response, within two pressurized glove conditions in a 1G laboratory setting. One male subject performed multiple dynamic and functional tasks in a pressurized EMU. Results indicate that the sensor glove is capable of measuring multiple physical and environmental variables associated with the development of finger and hand injuries observed in astronauts.

  16. Enucleation of Eye Using Finger Following Cannabis Consumption: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sabahi, Abdol Reza; Amini-Ranjbar, Zahra; Sharifi, Ali; Kheradmand, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background Enucleation is a topic discussed in psychiatry which is a self-injury matter. Enucleation is observed as psychotic disorder due to substance abuse. In people with mental disorders who also have substance use leading to hallucinations and delusions, unusual eye evacuation were reported. In most cases, enucleation was done using sharp tools. Case Report This report describes a man suffering from psychosis after consuming hashish and has attempted to evacuate his eyes with his finger. Discussion Given the increasing prevalence of hashish use by young people, and false beliefs about the use of hashish in order to withdraw other substances, preventive methods and education for young and vulnerable people are suggested. PMID:25140221

  17. [Osteoarthritis of the thumb and fingers].

    PubMed

    Waris, Eero; Waris, Ville; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2012-01-01

    Most commonly affected joints of the hand in osteoarthritis include the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb (CMC 1) and the distal (DIP) and proximal (PIP) interphalangeal joints. Ageing, female gender, genotype, heavy work causing pressure on the hands, and injuries predispose to osteoarthritis in the hand. The pain is likely to be due to secondary synovitis caused by molecules released from the joint cartilage. Initial treatment of osteoarthritis is always conservative: analgesic medication, splint and physiotherapy. Surgery is considered for severe symptoms. The most common procedures include arthrodeses and arthroplasties with autogenous grafts or implants. PMID:22448556

  18. Pediatric hand treadmill injuries.

    PubMed

    Banever, Gregory T; Moriarty, Kevin P; Sachs, Barry F; Courtney, Richard A; Konefal, Stanley H; Barbeau, Lori

    2003-07-01

    The great popularity of physical fitness in modern society has brought many pieces of exercise equipment into our homes for convenience and privacy. This trend has come with an increasing rate of injuries to children who curiously touch moving parts, including treadmill belts. Experience with a recent series of treadmill contact burns to children's hands is described in this article. A retrospective chart review at a tertiary referral center from June 1998 until June 2001 found six children sustaining hand burns from treadmills. The patients' ages at presentation ranged from 15 to 45 months (average of 31 months, three boys and three girls). All injuries occurred in the home while a parent was using the treadmill. Burns involved the palmar aspect of the hand, mostly confined to the fingers, and the severity ranged from partialto full-thickness burns. All patients were initially managed with collagenase and bacitracin zinc/polymyxin B powder dressings to second- and third-degree burns, along with splinting and range-of-motion exercises. Two patients required skin grafting at 2 weeks and 2 months for full-thickness tissue loss and tight joint contracture, respectively. At an average follow-up of 12 months, all patients had full range of motion and no physical limitation. The rate of children injured by exercise equipment is expected to increase. Friction burns to the hands remain a concern, although early recognition and appropriate management are associated with excellent functional outcomes. Protective modification of exercise machines seems to be the best approach to eliminating these injuries. PMID:12867861

  19. A systematic review of outcomes after revision amputation for treatment of traumatic finger amputation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Frank; McGlinn, Evan P.; Giladi, Aviram M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Revision amputations are often the treatment for traumatic finger amputation injuries. However, patient outcomes are inadequately reported, and their impact poorly understood. We performed a systematic review to evaluate outcomes of revision amputations and amputation wound coverage techniques. Methods We searched all available English literature in PubMed and EMBASE for articles reporting outcomes of non-replantation treatments for traumatic finger amputation injuries, including revision amputation, local digital flaps, skin grafting, and conservative treatment. Data extracted were study characteristics, patient demographic data, sensory and functional outcomes, patient-reported outcomes (PROs), and complications. Results 1659 articles were screened, yielding 43 studies for review. Mean static 2-point discrimination (2-PD) was 5.0 ± 1.5 mm (n=23 studies) overall. Mean static 2-PD was 6.1 ± 2.4 mm after local flap procedures and 3.8 ± 0.4 mm after revision amputation. Mean total active motion (TAM) was 93 ± 8% of normal (n=6 studies) overall. Mean TAM was 90 ± 9% of normal after local flap procedures and 95% of normal after revision amputation. 77% of patients report cold intolerance after revision amputation. 91% of patients (217/238) report “satisfactory” or “good/excellent” ratings regardless of treatment. Conclusion Revision amputation and conservative treatments result in better static 2-PD outcomes compared to local flaps. All techniques preserve TAM, although arc of motion is slightly better with revision amputation. Revision amputation procedures are frequently associated with cold intolerance. Patients report “satisfactory,” “good,” or “excellent” ratings in appearance and quality of life with all non-replantation techniques. Level of Evidence III PMID:26111316

  20. Making fingers and words count in a cognitive robot

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Vivian M.; Di Nuovo, Alessandro; Di Nuovo, Santo; Cangelosi, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Evidence from developmental as well as neuroscientific studies suggest that finger counting activity plays an important role in the acquisition of numerical skills in children. It has been claimed that this skill helps in building motor-based representations of number that continue to influence number processing well into adulthood, facilitating the emergence of number concepts from sensorimotor experience through a bottom-up process. The act of counting also involves the acquisition and use of a verbal number system of which number words are the basic building blocks. Using a Cognitive Developmental Robotics paradigm we present results of a modeling experiment on whether finger counting and the association of number words (or tags) to fingers, could serve to bootstrap the representation of number in a cognitive robot, enabling it to perform basic numerical operations such as addition. The cognitive architecture of the robot is based on artificial neural networks, which enable the robot to learn both sensorimotor skills (finger counting) and linguistic skills (using number words). The results obtained in our experiments show that learning the number words in sequence along with finger configurations helps the fast building of the initial representation of number in the robot. Number knowledge, is instead, not as efficiently developed when number words are learned out of sequence without finger counting. Furthermore, the internal representations of the finger configurations themselves, developed by the robot as a result of the experiments, sustain the execution of basic arithmetic operations, something consistent with evidence coming from developmental research with children. The model and experiments demonstrate the importance of sensorimotor skill learning in robots for the acquisition of abstract knowledge such as numbers. PMID:24550795

  1. [High-pressure injection injury of the hand. Underestimation of injury severity].

    PubMed

    Beirer, M; Deiler, S; Neu, J

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old man sustained a high-pressure injection injury of the left index finger with hot hydraulic oil in an occupational accident. On presentation to the occupational physician 4 h later the wound was irrigated and cleaned. At this time X-ray diagnostics, wound revision, administration of antibiotics and immobilization were not performed. The following day the patient presented to a hospital with painful swelling and reddening of the left index finger where an emergency surgical wound revision, administration of antibiotics and immobilization of the finger were performed due to a phlegmon of the flexor tendon. Despite subsequent revision operations, necrosis of the flexor tendon sheath occurred with a skin subcutis defect necessitating a full thickness skin transplantation and ultimately operative fusion of the distal interphalangeal joint of the index finger. After a total period of treatment of 9 months the patient still presented with local soft tissue swelling and paresthesia as well as a limited range of motion of the proximal interphalangeal joint. The patient filed a complaint for wrong treatment of the high-pressure injection injury in terms of an inaccurate examination and lack of administration of antibiotics at the first presentation. The expert opinion of the arbitration board ascertained medical malpractice at the first presentation. An emergency surgical wound revision had already been indicated at the first presentation and the revision procedures would have been less extensive and it was highly probability that surgical fusion of the distal interphalangeal joint could have been avoided. The arbitration furthermore concluded that iatrogenic maltreatment led to a phlegmon of the flexor tendon with the need for subsequent revision operations including surgical fusion of the distal interphalangeal joint which resulted in an affected grip control. The delay in surgical treatment must be considered as the reason for the much worse initial situation

  2. The Use of an MEG/fMRI-Compatible Finger Motion Sensor in Detecting Different Finger Actions

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Xinyi; Li, Yasong; Menon, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the use of a novel device in detecting different finger actions among healthy individuals and individuals with stroke. The device is magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) compatible. It was prototyped to have four air-filled chambers that are made of silicone elastomer, which contains low magnetizing materials. When an individual compresses the device with his/her fingers, each chamber experiences a change in pressure, which is detected by a pressure sensor. In a previous recent work, our device was shown to be MEG/fMRI compatible. In this study, our research effort focuses on using the device to detect different finger actions (e.g., grasping and pinching) in non-shielded rooms. This is achieved by applying a support vector machine to the sensor data collected from the device when participants are resting and executing the different finger actions. The total number of possible finger actions that can be executed using the device is 31. The healthy participants could perform all the 31 different finger actions and the average classification accuracy achieved is 95.53 ± 2.63%. The stroke participants could perform all the 31 different finger actions with their healthy hand and the average classification accuracy achieved is 83.13 ± 6.69%. Unfortunately, the functions of their affected hands are compromised due to stroke. Thus, the number of finger actions they could perform ranges from 2 to 24, depending on the level of impairments. The average classification accuracy for the affected hand is 83.99 ± 16.38%. The ability to identify different finger actions using the device can provide a mean to researchers to label the data automatically in MEG/fMRI studies. In addition, the sensor data acquired from the device provide sensorimotor-­related information, such as speed and force, when the device is compressed. Thus, brain activations can be correlated with this information during different

  3. Pediatric hand injuries due to home exercycles.

    PubMed

    Benson, L S; Waters, P M; Meier, S W; Visotsky, J L; Williams, C S

    2000-01-01

    The clinical presentation and management of 19 children who sustained injuries by stationary exercise bicycles were reviewed retrospectively. These injuries represented 32 traumatized digits with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. The index and long fingers were most commonly involved. Wheel-spoke injuries typically produced repairable nerve and tendon lacerations, and full functional recovery in these cases was common. The chain/sprocket injury involved a crushing mechanism and frequently produced severe injury including amputations that were not salvageable. Stationary exercise bicycles represented a predictable source of severe hand injury in children between the ages of 18 months and 5 years. Adult supervision was not reliable in preventing contact between an operating exercycle and a child's hand. We recommend that children not be allowed access to any stationary exercycle machinery, whether it is in use or not. Safety design considerations should focus on not only shielding the wheel spokes, but also (and perhaps even more important) on enclosing the entire chain axis and gear interface. In addition to these design considerations, public education will be critical in reducing the incidence of injury. PMID:10641685

  4. Extrinsic Finger and Thumb Muscles Command a Virtual Hand to Allow Individual Finger and Grasp Control

    PubMed Central

    Hargrove, Levi J.; Weir, Richard F. ff.; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Fine-wire intramuscular electrodes were used to obtain EMG signals from six extrinsic hand muscles associated with the thumb, index, and middle fingers. Subjects’ EMG activity was used to control a virtual three-DOF hand as they conformed the hand to a sequence of hand postures testing two controllers: direct EMG control and pattern recognition control. Subjects tested two conditions using each controller: starting the hand from a pre-defined neutral posture before each new posture and starting the hand from the previous posture in the sequence. Subjects demonstrated their ability to simultaneously, yet individually, move all three DOFs during the direct EMG control trials, however results showed subjects did not often utilize this feature. Performance metrics such as failure rate and completion time showed no significant difference between the two controllers. PMID:25099395

  5. Magic Ring: A Finger-Worn Device for Multiple Appliances Control Using Static Finger Gestures

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lei; Zhou, Yinghui; Cheng, Zixue; Huang, Tongjun

    2012-01-01

    An ultimate goal for Ubiquitous Computing is to enable people to interact with the surrounding electrical devices using their habitual body gestures as they communicate with each other. The feasibility of such an idea is demonstrated through a wearable gestural device named Magic Ring (MR), which is an original compact wireless sensing mote in a ring shape that can recognize various finger gestures. A scenario of wireless multiple appliances control is selected as a case study to evaluate the usability of such a gestural interface. Experiments comparing the MR and a Remote Controller (RC) were performed to evaluate the usability. From the results, only with 10 minutes practice, the proposed paradigm of gestural-based control can achieve a performance of completing about six tasks per minute, which is in the same level of the RC-based method. PMID:22778612

  6. A study of white finger in the gas industry.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D D; Jones, B; Ogston, S; Tasker, E G; Robinson, A J

    1985-01-01

    Men engaged in breaking or reinstating road surfaces are exposed to vibration from mechanical tools. In view of the lack of epidemiological information on vibration white finger in such a population, a survey was carried out to identify the prevalence of symptoms of white finger in a sample of men using these tools in the gas industry and to compare the prevalence with that found in a control group not occupationally exposed to vibration. Altogether 905 men (97%) in the gas industry and 552 men (92%) in the control group were interviewed, using a questionnaire from which the presence or absence of white finger symptoms from all causes was noted. The prevalence of white finger was 9.6% in the group exposed to vibration at work compared with 9.5% in the control group. The prevalence in the former group when adjusted for age differences between the survey and control populations was 12.2%, but this difference did not reach statistical significance. In case the approach of comparing prevalences of white finger from all causes might have obscured any contributory effect of vibration, the prevalence of white finger was examined in relation to the number of years vibrating tools had been used, this being the only measure of exposure to vibration available. No direct association was found between the prevalence of symptoms and number of years vibrating tools had been used. In view of this and the absence of a significant excess of white finger symptoms in the group using vibratory tools, the authors conclude that vibration white finger is not a special problem in the gas industry. Nevertheless, experimental tests carried out on the different types of roadbreakers used in the industry and on different road surfaces indicate that the vibration levels exceed the standards advocated in the draft international standard DIS 5349 (1979) at the lower end of the frequency spectrum. That no particular problem has been found may be due to the relatively short exposures to vibration

  7. Skiing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    In the broad spectrum of orthopedic skiing injuries, ‘second aid’ on the mountain and at the base by the physician is very important. All skiing physicians should carry minimal medical supplies, including narcotic medication. Diagnosis and treatment of injuries at the hospital are outlined. Most ski fractures of the tibia can be treated by conservative methods. A more aggressive approach to diagnosis and treatment of ligamentous injuries of the knee is recommended. PMID:20469236

  8. Gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Hinkle, J; Betz, S

    1995-05-01

    If current trends for this nation continue, by the year 2003 the number of people killed by firearms will exceed the number of people killed in motor vehicle accidents. Critical care practitioners must understand the mechanism of injury associated with firearm injuries to provide optimal care. This article reviews internal, exterior, and terminal ballistics, bullet design, wound classification, and initial assessment and treatment of firearm injuries. PMID:7743422

  9. High-Speed, High-Temperature Finger Seal Test Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2003-01-01

    A finger seal, designed and fabricated by Honeywell Engines, Systems and Services, was tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center at surface speeds up to 1200 ft/s, air temperatures up to 1200 F, and pressures across the seal of 75 psid. These are the first test results obtained with NASA s new High-Temperature, High-Speed Turbine Seal Test Rig (see the photograph). The finger seal is an innovative design recently patented by AlliedSignal Engines, which has demonstrated considerably lower leakage than commonly used labyrinth seals and is considerably cheaper than brush seals. The cost to produce finger seals is estimated to be about half of the cost to produce brush seals. Replacing labyrinth seals with fingers seals at locations that have high-pressure drops in gas turbine engines, typically main engine and thrust seals, can reduce air leakage at each location by 50 percent or more. This directly results in a 0.7- to 1.4-percent reduction in specific fuel consumption and a 0.35- to 0.7-percent reduction in direct operating costs . Because the finger seal is a contacting seal, this testing was conducted to address concerns about its heat generation and life capability at the higher speeds and temperatures required for advanced engines. The test results showed that the seal leakage and wear performance are acceptable for advanced engines.

  10. Fluid-driven fingering instability of a confined elastic meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggins, John S.; Wei, Z.; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-05-01

    When a fluid is pumped into a cavity in a confined elastic layer, at a critical pressure, destabilizing fingers of fluid invade the elastic solid along its meniscus (Saintyves B. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 111 (2013) 047801). These fingers occur without fracture or loss of adhesion and are reversible, disappearing when the pressure is decreased. We develop an asymptotic theory of pressurized highly elastic layers trapped between rigid bodies in both rectilinear and circular geometries, with predictions for the critical fluid pressure for fingering, and the finger wavelength. Our results are in good agreement with recent experimental observations of this elastic interfacial instability in a radial geometry. Our theory also shows that, perhaps surprisingly, this lateral-pressure-driven instability is analogous to a transverse-displacement-driven instability of the elastic layer. We verify these predictions by using non-linear finite-element simulations on the two systems which show that in both cases the fingering transition is first order (sudden) and hence has a region of bistability.

  11. RNA binding by the Wilms tumor suppressor zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Caricasole, A; Duarte, A; Larsson, S H; Hastie, N D; Little, M; Holmes, G; Todorov, I; Ward, A

    1996-01-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor gene WT1 is implicated in the ontogeny of genito-urinary abnormalities, including Denys-Drash syndrome and Wilms tumor of the kidney. WT1 encodes Kruppel-type zinc finger proteins that can regulate the expression of several growth-related genes, apparently by binding to specific DNA sites located within 5' untranslated leader regions as well as 5' promoter sequences. Both WT1 and a closely related early growth response factor, EGR1, can bind the same DNA sequences from the mouse gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf-2). We report that WT1, but not EGR1, can bind specific Igf-2 exonic RNA sequences, and that the zinc fingers are required for this interaction. WT1 zinc finger 1, which is not represented in EGR1, plays a more significant role in RNA binding than zinc finger 4, which does have a counterpart in EGR1. Furthermore, the normal subnuclear localization of WT1 proteins is shown to be RNase, but not DNase, sensitive. Therefore, WT1 might, like the Kruppel-type zinc finger protein TFIIIA, regulate gene expression by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8755514

  12. Finger Vein Recognition Based on Personalized Weight Maps

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gongping; Xiao, Rongyang; Yin, Yilong; Yang, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Finger vein recognition is a promising biometric recognition technology, which verifies identities via the vein patterns in the fingers. Binary pattern based methods were thoroughly studied in order to cope with the difficulties of extracting the blood vessel network. However, current binary pattern based finger vein matching methods treat every bit of feature codes derived from different image of various individuals as equally important and assign the same weight value to them. In this paper, we propose a finger vein recognition method based on personalized weight maps (PWMs). The different bits have different weight values according to their stabilities in a certain number of training samples from an individual. Firstly we present the concept of PWM, and then propose the finger vein recognition framework, which mainly consists of preprocessing, feature extraction, and matching. Finally, we design extensive experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of our proposal. Experimental results show that PWM achieves not only better performance, but also high robustness and reliability. In addition, PWM can be used as a general framework for binary pattern based recognition. PMID:24025556

  13. The biometric recognition on contactless multi-spectrum finger images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wenxiong; Chen, Xiaopeng; Wu, Qiuxia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel multimodal biometric system based on contactless multi-spectrum finger images, which aims to deal with the limitations of unimodal biometrics. The chief merits of the system are the richness of the permissible texture and the ease of data access. We constructed a multi-spectrum instrument to simultaneously acquire three different types of biometrics from a finger: contactless fingerprint, finger vein, and knuckleprint. On the basis of the samples with these characteristics, a moderate database was built for the evaluation of our system. Considering the real-time requirements and the respective characteristics of the three biometrics, the block local binary patterns algorithm was used to extract features and match for the fingerprints and finger veins, while the Oriented FAST and Rotated BRIEF algorithm was applied for knuckleprints. Finally, score-level fusion was performed on the matching results from the aforementioned three types of biometrics. The experiments showed that our proposed multimodal biometric recognition system achieves an equal error rate of 0.109%, which is 88.9%, 94.6%, and 89.7% lower than the individual fingerprint, knuckleprint, and finger vein recognitions, respectively. Nevertheless, our proposed system also satisfies the real-time requirements of the applications.

  14. Prior Knowledge Improves Decoding of Finger Flexion from Electrocorticographic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Ji, Q.; Miller, K. J.; Schalk, Gerwin

    2011-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) use brain signals to convey a user’s intent. Some BCI approaches begin by decoding kinematic parameters of movements from brain signals, and then proceed to using these signals, in absence of movements, to allow a user to control an output. Recent results have shown that electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings from the surface of the brain in humans can give information about kinematic parameters (e.g., hand velocity or finger flexion). The decoding approaches in these studies usually employed classical classification/regression algorithms that derive a linear mapping between brain signals and outputs. However, they typically only incorporate little prior information about the target movement parameter. In this paper, we incorporate prior knowledge using a Bayesian decoding method, and use it to decode finger flexion from ECoG signals. Specifically, we exploit the constraints that govern finger flexion and incorporate these constraints in the construction, structure, and the probabilistic functions of the prior model of a switched non-parametric dynamic system (SNDS). Given a measurement model resulting from a traditional linear regression method, we decoded finger flexion using posterior estimation that combined the prior and measurement models. Our results show that the application of the Bayesian decoding model, which incorporates prior knowledge, improves decoding performance compared to the application of a linear regression model, which does not incorporate prior knowledge. Thus, the results presented in this paper may ultimately lead to neurally controlled hand prostheses with full fine-grained finger articulation. PMID:22144944

  15. Prediction of contact forces of underactuated finger by adaptive neuro fuzzy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, Dalibor; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Abbasi, Almas; Kiani, Kourosh; Al-Shammari, Eiman Tamah

    2015-12-01

    To obtain adaptive finger passive underactuation can be used. Underactuation principle can be used to adapt shapes of the fingers for grasping objects. The fingers with underactuation do not require control algorithm. In this study a kinetostatic model of the underactuated finger mechanism was analyzed. The underactuation is achieved by adding the compliance in every finger joint. Since the contact forces of the finger depend on contact position of the finger and object, it is suitable to make a prediction model for the contact forces in function of contact positions of the finger and grasping objects. In this study prediction of the contact forces was established by a soft computing approach. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was applied as the soft computing method to perform the prediction of the finger contact forces.

  16. Development of cylindrical-type finger force measuring system using force sensors and its characteristics evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeon-Min; Yoon, Joungwon; Shin, Hee-Suk; Kim, Gab-Soon

    2012-02-01

    Some patients cannot use their hands because of the paralysis of their fingers. Their fingers can recover with rehabilitative training, and the extent of rehabilitation can be judged by grasping a cylindrical-object with their fingers. At present, the cylindrical-object used in hospitals is only a plastic cylinder, which cannot measure grasping force of the fingers. Therefore, doctors must judge the extent of rehabilitation by watching patients' fingers as they grasp the plastic cylinder. In this paper, the development of two cylindrical-type finger force measuring systems with four force sensors for left hand and right hand were developed. The developed finger force measuring system can measure the grasping force of patients' each finger (forefinger, middle finger, ring finger and little finger), and the measured results could be used to judge the rehabilitation extent of a finger patient. The grasping force tests of men and women were performed using the developed cylindrical-type finger force measuring systems. The tests confirm that the average finger forces of right hand and left hand for men were about 194 N and 179 N, and for women, 108 N and 95 N.

  17. Index and ring finger ratio--a morphologic sex determinant in South-Indian children.

    PubMed

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Pradeep Kumar, G

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the sexual dimorphism of index and ring finger ratio in South Indian children. The index finger length (IFL) and the ring finger length (RFL) were measured in 350 subjects aged between 2 and 12 years using a steel measuring tape. The index and ring finger ratio was computed by dividing index finger length by ring finger length. The data obtained were analyzed statistically using SPSS, version 11.0. Mean RFL was greater than mean IFL in both males and females. The mean ring finger length was longer in males than females and mean index finger length longer in females than males. However, these sex differences observed for index and ring finger length were not significant in both hands. Statistically significant sex differences were observed from the derived index and ring finger ratio. The mean index and ring finger ratio was found to be higher in females than males. Significant correlation was found between age and index and ring finger lengths. Index and ring finger ratio however, did not show any significant correlation with age. This study suggests that among South-Indian children, the index and ring finger ratio of 0.97 and less is indicative of male, and a ratio of more than 0.97 is indicative of female sex. The ratio can be a useful sex indicator irrespective of the age of the individual. PMID:20369311

  18. Incidence of acute volleyball injuries: a prospective cohort study of injury mechanisms and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bahr, R; Bahr, I A

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the incidence and mechanisms of acute volleyball injuries, with particular reference to possible risk factors for ankle injuries. Coaches and players in the top two divisions of the Norwegian Volleyball Federation were asked to keep records of exposure time and all acute volleyball injuries causing a player to miss at least one playing day during one season. We found 89 injuries among 272 players during 51588 player hours, 45837 h of training and 5751 h of match play. The total injury incidence was 1.7 +/- 0.2 per 1000 h of play, 1.5 +/- 0.2 during training and 3.5 +/- 0.8 during match play. The ankle (54%) was the most commonly injured region, followed by the lower back (11%), knee (8%), shoulder (8%) and fingers (7%). Of the ankle injuries, 79% were recurrences, and the relative risk of injury was 3.8 (P < 0.0001) for previously injured ankles (38 of 232) vs. non-injured ankles (10 of the 234). Moreover, a reinjury was observed in 21 of the 50 ankles that had suffered an ankle sprain within the last 6 months (42.0 +/- 7.0%; risk ratio: 9.8 vs. uninjured ankles; P < 0.000001). The data indicate that external supports should be worn for 6-12 months after an ankle sprain and that specific injury prevention programs may be developed for ankle sprains in volleyball. PMID:9200321

  19. Rowing injuries.

    PubMed

    Rumball, Jane S; Lebrun, Constance M; Di Ciacca, Stephen R; Orlando, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Participation in the sport of rowing has been steadily increasing in recent decades, yet few studies address the specific injuries incurred. This article reviews the most common injuries described in the literature, including musculoskeletal problems in the lower back, ribs, shoulder, wrist and knee. A review of basic rowing physiology and equipment is included, along with a description of the mechanics of the rowing stroke. This information is necessary in order to make an accurate diagnosis and treatment protocol for these injuries, which are mainly chronic in nature. The most frequently injured region is the low back, mainly due to excessive hyperflexion and twisting, and can include specific injuries such as spondylolysis, sacroiliac joint dysfunction and disc herniation. Rib stress fractures account for the most time lost from on-water training and competition. Although theories abound for the mechanism of injury, the exact aetiology of rib stress fractures remains unknown. Other injuries discussed within, which are specific to ribs, include costochondritis, costovertebral joint subluxation and intercostal muscle strains. Shoulder pain is quite common in rowers and can be the result of overuse, poor technique, or tension in the upper body. Injuries concerning the forearm and wrist are also common, and can include exertional compartment syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, deQuervain's and intersection syndrome, and tenosynovitis of the wrist extensors. In the lower body, the major injuries reported include generalised patellofemoral pain due to abnormal patellar tracking, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Lastly, dermatological issues, such as blisters and abrasions, and miscellaneous issues, such as environmental concerns and the female athlete triad, are also included in this article.Pathophysiology, mechanism of injury, assessment and management strategies are outlined in the text for each injury, with special attention given to ways to correct

  20. Targeted Mutagenesis in Zebrafish Using Customized Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Jonathan E.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Pearlberg, Joseph; Joung, J. Keith; Peterson, Randall T.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey J.

    2009-01-01

    Zebrafish mutants have traditionally been obtained using random mutagenesis or retroviral insertions, methods that cannot be targeted to a specific gene and require laborious gene mapping and sequencing. Recently, we and others have shown that customized zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can introduce targeted frame-shift mutations with high efficiency, thereby enabling directed creation of zebrafish gene mutations. Here we describe a detailed protocol for constructing ZFN expression vectors, for generating and introducing ZFN-encoding RNAs into zebrafish embryos, and for identifying ZFN-generated mutations in targeted genomic sites. All of our vectors and methods are compatible with previously described Zinc Finger Consortium reagents for constructing engineered zinc finger arrays. Using these methods, zebrafish founders carrying targeted mutations can be identified within four months. PMID:20010934

  1. Initial results of finger imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, Peter; Biswas, Samir K.; Moens, Hein J. Bernelot; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2014-06-01

    We present a photoacoustic computed tomography investigation on a healthy human finger, to image blood vessels with a focus on vascularity across the interphalangeal joints. The cross-sectional images were acquired using an imager specifically developed for this purpose. The images show rich detail of the digital blood vessels with diameters between 100 μm and 1.5 mm in various orientations and at various depths. Different vascular layers in the skin including the subpapillary plexus could also be visualized. Acoustic reflections on the finger bone of photoacoustic signals from skin were visible in sequential slice images along the finger except at the location of the joint gaps. Not unexpectedly, the healthy synovial membrane at the joint gaps was not detected due to its small size and normal vascularization. Future research will concentrate on studying digits afflicted with rheumatoid arthritis to detect the inflamed synovium with its heightened vascularization, whose characteristics are potential markers for disease activity.

  2. Prognostic factors on survival rate of fingers replantation

    PubMed Central

    Lima, José Queiroz; Carli, Alberto De; Nakamoto, Hugo Alberto; Bersani, Gustavo; Crepaldi, Bruno Eiras; de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the factors that influence the survival rate of replantation and revascularization of the thumb and/or fingers. Methods: We included fifty cases treated in our department from May 2012 to October 2013 with total or partial finger amputations, which had blood perfusion deficit and underwent vascular anastomosis. The parameters evaluated were: age, gender, comorbidities, trauma, time and type of ischemia, mechanism, the injured area, number of anastomosed vessels and use of vein grafts. The results were statistically analyzed and type I error value was set at p <0.05 . Results: Fifty four percent of the 50 performed replantation survived. Of 15 revascularizations performed, the survival rate was 93.3%. The only factor that affected the survival of the amputated limb was the necessity of venous anastomosis. Conclusion: We could not establish contraindications or absolute indications for the replantation and revascularization of finger amputations in this study. Level of Evidence III, Retropective Study. PMID:26327788

  3. Arthropathy, ankylosing spondylitis, and clubbing of fingers in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, K. N.; Prescott, R. J.; Walker, R. J.; Sircus, W.; McManus, J. P. A.; Card, W. I.

    1970-01-01

    In a retrospective study of 399 patients with ulcerative colitis, 27 patients had colitic arthritis, 17 had ankylosing spondylitis, and 20 had clubbing of the fingers. Colitic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis were not related to severity, extent of involvement, or duration of colitis. A significant association between colitic arthropathy and other complications of ulcerative colitis, such as pseudopolyposis, perianal disease, eye lesions, skin eruptions, aphthous ulceration, and liver disease has been demonstrated. The outcome of the first referred attack of colitis in the presence of colitic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis remained uninfluenced. Clubbing of fingers was related to severity, extent of involvement, and length of the history of colitis. A significant association between clubbing of the fingers and carcinoma of the colon, pseudopolyposis, toxic dilatation, and arthropathy has been shown. The frequency of surgical intervention in patients with clubbing was higher but the overall mortality was not significantly different from the patients without clubbing. PMID:5473606

  4. High-Speed, High-Temperature Finger Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Kumar, Arun; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2002-01-01

    Finger seals have significantly lower leakage rates than conventional labyrinth seals used in gas turbine engines and are expected to decrease specific fuel consumption by over 1 percent and to decrease direct operating cost by over 0.5 percent. Their compliant design accommodates shaft growth and motion due to thermal and dynamic loads with minimal wear. The cost to fabricate these finger seals is estimated to be about half the cost to fabricate brush seals. A finger seal has been tested in NASA's High Temperature, High Speed Turbine Seal Test Rig at operating conditions up to 1200 F, 1200 ft/s, and 75 psid. Static, performance and endurance test results are presented. While seal leakage and wear performance are acceptable, further design improvements are needed to reduce the seal power loss.

  5. Regulation of cancer stem cells by RING finger ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Like normal stem cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs) are capable of self-renewal, either by symmetric or asymmetric cell division. They have the exclusive ability to reproduce malignant tumors indefinitely, and to confer resistance in response to radiation or chemotherapy. The ubiquitin modification system plays various roles in physiology and pathology. The key component for the specificity of this system is ubiquitin ligases (E3s). Of these E3s, the majority are RING finger proteins. Many RING finger E3s, such as the Cullin1-Skp1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s, CBL, BRCA1, MDM2 and von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor (VHL), are crucial in the regulation of cell-cycle progression and cell differentiation. As a result, many RING finger E3s are implicated in the positive and negative regulation of CSC maintenance. This review summarizes current knowledge in this research field. PMID:27358852

  6. Finger Pricking and Pain: A Never Ending Story

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Without finger pricking, no self-measurement of blood glucose (SMBG) is possible. However, the number of scientific studies dealing with this topic, which is highly relevant for patients, is surprisingly small. This is in sharp contrast to the number of papers about blood glucose meters and SMBG in general. This article highlights a number of aspects that are relevant when it comes to finger pricking and pain. There is a clear improvement in the technology employed in the many different lancing devices that are on the market nowadays; however, no good head-to-head comparison study has been performed to date. The invention of novel devices for finger pricking will most likely bring more attention to this topic. PMID:19885279

  7. Finger sudorometry and assessment of the sudomotor drive.

    PubMed

    Satchell, P; Ware, S; Barron, J; Tuck, R

    1994-08-01

    Sudorometry of the finger was carried out using the ventilated capsule method, the aim being to use the level of relative humidity within the sudorometer as an indirect measure of the sudomotor drive. Subjects inserted a finger through a diaphragm of a finger-shaped, temperature-controlled chamber which also contained the humidity sensor. Manoeuvres known to alter the sudomotor drive produced changes in chamber humidity. The relative humidity within the sudorometer became constant after local anaesthesia of the digital nerves and after upper limb sympathectomy, suggesting that fluctuations in the sudorometer output were dependent upon an intact autonomic nervous system. In an environment in which temperature was controlled and arousal effects from the process of measurement were minimised, chamber humidity always increased during a Stroop test, providing a rapid means of indirectly assessing sudomotor drive mechanisms. PMID:7823624

  8. Effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation on force of finger pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagaki, Masato; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Hiwaki, Osamu

    2009-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used to explore many aspects of brain function, and to treat neurological disorders. Cortical motor neuronal activation by TMS over the primary motor cortex (M1) produces efferent signals that pass through the corticospinal tracts. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) are observed in muscles innervated by the stimulated motor cortex. TMS can cause a silent period (SP) following MEP in voluntary electromyography (EMG). The present study examined the effects of TMS eliciting MEP and SP on the force of pinching using two fingers. Subjects pinched a wooden block with the thumb and index finger. TMS was applied to M1 during the pinch task. EMG of first dorsal interosseous muscles and pinch forces were measured. Force output increased after the TMS, and then oscillated. The results indicated that the motor control system to keep isotonic forces of the muscles participated in the finger pinch was disrupted by the TMS.

  9. Finger Vein Recognition Based on a Personalized Best Bit Map

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gongping; Xi, Xiaoming; Yin, Yilong

    2012-01-01

    Finger vein patterns have recently been recognized as an effective biometric identifier. In this paper, we propose a finger vein recognition method based on a personalized best bit map (PBBM). Our method is rooted in a local binary pattern based method and then inclined to use the best bits only for matching. We first present the concept of PBBM and the generating algorithm. Then we propose the finger vein recognition framework, which consists of preprocessing, feature extraction, and matching. Finally, we design extensive experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of our proposal. Experimental results show that PBBM achieves not only better performance, but also high robustness and reliability. In addition, PBBM can be used as a general framework for binary pattern based recognition. PMID:22438735

  10. Interfacial instabilities and fingering formation in Hele-Shaw flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1996-10-01

    The interfacial instability of Hele-Shaw flow has been a crucial issue for the understanding of the pattern formation of viscous fingers in a Hele-Shaw cell. By using a unified asymptotic approach, we derive two different types of instability mechanisms for slightly' time-dependent finger solutions; namely, (i) the global-trapped-wave (GTW) instability; and (ii) the zero-frequency (null-f) instability. On the basis of these instability mechanisms, the selection of viscous finger formation is clarified; the apparent contradiction between the previous linearstability analysis by Tanveer (1987, Phys. Fluid 30, 1589) and others and the numerical simulations by DeGregoria & Schwartz (1986, J. Fluid Mech. 164, 383)and the experimental evidence is reconciled.

  11. Computing with liquid crystal fingers: models of geometric and logical computation.

    PubMed

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Kitson, Stephen; Costello, Ben De Lacy; Matranga, Mario Ariosto; Younger, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    When a voltage is applied across a thin layer of cholesteric liquid crystal, fingers of cholesteric alignment can form and propagate in the layer. In computer simulation, based on experimental laboratory results, we demonstrate that these cholesteric fingers can solve selected problems of computational geometry, logic, and arithmetics. We show that branching fingers approximate a planar Voronoi diagram, and nonbranching fingers produce a convex subdivision of concave polygons. We also provide a detailed blueprint and simulation of a one-bit half-adder functioning on the principles of collision-based computing, where the implementation is via collision of liquid crystal fingers with obstacles and other fingers. PMID:22304104

  12. Continuous non-invasive finger blood pressure monitoring in children.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Thulesius, O; Yamaguchi, H; Mino, M; Konishi, K

    1994-06-01

    We evaluated the performance of continuous non-invasive finger arterial pressure measurement using the volume-clamp technique (Finapres). This study was designed to compare finger arterial pressure with brachial blood pressure estimated by the auscultatory method in 217 children (90 boys and 127 girls) aged 4-16 years and in 38 adults (aged 18-45 years). Finger and brachial artery pressure readings were obtained consecutively from the ipsilateral side in the supine position. Finger arterial pressure waveforms were recorded in all children except 4 with small and thin fingers. There was good agreement for systolic pressure with only a slight underestimation of 1.9 mmHg and 5.1 mmHg lower for diastolic pressure. This difference most probably reflects inaccuracy of the auscultatory cuff method rather than an error in the Finapres. There was large inter-individual variability in Finapres recordings which might be due to differences in vasomotor tone, as demonstrated by systolic amplification in 5 patients with anorexia. However, Finapres showed a small within-subject variability (3.8 mmHg for systolic and 4.1 mmHg for diastolic pressure) determined in 5 patients during phenylephrine infusion, and as good reproducibility as the auscultatory method. These results suggest that finger arterial pressure measurement in children older than 6 years of age has similar accuracy as that in adults, and that this method is useful for clinical applications in children, especially for the non-invasive evaluation of autonomic control and cardiovascular reflexes involving transient and rapid blood pressure changes. PMID:7919764

  13. Motor equivalence during multi-finger accurate force production

    PubMed Central

    Mattos, Daniela; Schöner, Gregor; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    We explored stability of multi-finger cyclical accurate force production action by analysis of responses to small perturbations applied to one of the fingers and inter-cycle analysis of variance. Healthy subjects performed two versions of the cyclical task, with and without an explicit target. The “inverse piano” apparatus was used to lift/lower a finger by 1 cm over 0.5 s; the subjects were always instructed to perform the task as accurate as they could at all times. Deviations in the spaces of finger forces and modes (hypothetical commands to individual fingers) were quantified in directions that did not change total force (motor equivalent) and in directions that changed the total force (non-motor equivalent). Motor equivalent deviations started immediately with the perturbation and increased progressively with time. After a sequence of lifting-lowering perturbations leading to the initial conditions, motor equivalent deviations were dominating. These phenomena were less pronounced for analysis performed with respect to the total moment of force with respect to an axis parallel to the forearm/hand. Analysis of inter-cycle variance showed consistently higher variance in a subspace that did not change the total force as compared to the variance that affected total force. We interpret the results as reflections of task-specific stability of the redundant multi-finger system. Large motor equivalent deviations suggest that reactions of the neuromotor system to a perturbation involve large changes of neural commands that do not affect salient performance variables, even during actions with the purpose to correct those salient variables. Consistency of the analyses of motor equivalence and variance analysis provides additional support for the idea of task-specific stability ensured at a neural level. PMID:25344311

  14. Occupational injuries to fisheries workers in Norway reported to insurance companies from 1991 to 1996.

    PubMed

    Bull, N; Riise, T; Moen, B E

    2001-08-01

    Fisheries work is one of the occupations at highest risk for occupational accidents in many countries. It is necessary to understand the injuries in order to prevent them. This study of occupational injury claims by fisheries workers in Norway made to insurance companies from 1991 to 1996 analysed the workers' age, time of injury, injury type, part of the body involved, injury event and cost. The highest injury incidence rates were among the younger fisheries workers and during the winter months. Bruises and fractures were the most frequent injury types, and fingers and hands were most often affected, whereas falls and accidents related to machines were the most common causes. Safety measures should be taken on board to prevent falls and machine-related injuries, and young fisheries workers should have better on-the-job training. PMID:11473135

  15. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper gear can cause them. Some people get hurt because they are not in shape. Not warming up or stretching enough can also ... injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  16. [Seal finger in Denmark diagnosed by PCR-technique].

    PubMed

    Jansen, Louise Charlotte; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Roos, Signe Moeslund; Dargis, Rimtas; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Kemp, Michael

    2012-02-13

    Seal finger is an unusual infection in Denmark but is seen quite often in Greenland. A 69 year-old Danish man developed severe infection after cutting his finger on a sea urchin while handling a fishing net. Treatment with beta-lactam antibiotics had no effect. Standard culture from the lesion was negative. A Mycoplasma species was detected by PCR and DNA sequencing and subsequently cultured on special media. Specifically asked about exposure to sea mammals the patient could inform that a dead seal had also been trapped in the fishing net. PMID:22331047

  17. Fjords in viscous fingering: selection of width and opening scale

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev-weinstein, Mark; Ristroph, Leif; Thrasher, Matthew; Swinney, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Our experiments on viscous fingering of air into oil contained between closely spaced plates reveal two selection rules for the fjords of oil that separate fingers of air. (Fjords are the building blocks of solutions of the zero-surface-tension Laplacian growth equation.) Experiments in rectangular and circular geometries yield fjords with base widths {lambda}{sub c}/2, where {lambda}{sub c} is the most unstable wavelength from a linear stability analysis. Further, fjords open at an angle of 8.0{sup o}{+-}1.0{sup o}. These selection rules hold for a wide range of pumping rates and fjord lengths, widths, and directions.

  18. GCT of proximal phalanx of ring finger: a case report.

    PubMed

    Khare, Pratima; Kishore, Bimal; Gupta, Rashmi Jain; Vanita; Dhal, Anil

    2012-08-01

    Giant-cell tumor (GCT) of bone arising from phalanx of a finger is extremely rare. Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute in their study on 900 treated cases of GCT from 1947-1997 reported only 0.9% incidence of GCT in bones of the hand. There was no case of GCT of the phalanges in that series. We report here a case of GCT of bone arising from phalanx of finger because of its very unusual location. The tumor was diagnosed on the basis of fine-needle aspiration cytology and confirmed by histopathology. PMID:21656700

  19. Controlling and minimizing fingering instabilities in non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, João V.; Dias, Eduardo O.; Miranda, José A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of the viscous fingering instability in Hele-Shaw cells has great practical and scientific importance. Recently, researchers have proposed different strategies to control the number of interfacial fingering structures, or to minimize as much as possible the amplitude of interfacial disturbances. Most existing studies address the situation in which an inviscid fluid displaces a viscous Newtonian fluid. In this work, we report on controlling and minimizing protocols considering the situation in which the displaced fluid is a non-Newtonian, power-law fluid. The necessary changes on the controlling schemes due to the shear-thinning and shear thickening nature of the displaced fluid are calculated analytically and discussed.

  20. Finger Vein Recognition Using Local Line Binary Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Rosdi, Bakhtiar Affendi; Shing, Chai Wuh; Suandi, Shahrel Azmin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a personal verification method using finger vein is presented. Finger vein can be considered more secured compared to other hands based biometric traits such as fingerprint and palm print because the features are inside the human body. In the proposed method, a new texture descriptor called local line binary pattern (LLBP) is utilized as feature extraction technique. The neighbourhood shape in LLBP is a straight line, unlike in local binary pattern (LBP) which is a square shape. Experimental results show that the proposed method using LLBP has better performance than the previous methods using LBP and local derivative pattern (LDP). PMID:22247670

  1. Simultaneous closed dislocation of both interphalangeal joints in one finger.

    PubMed

    Ron, D; Alkalay, D; Torok, G

    1983-01-01

    A rare case of simultaneous dislocation of both interphalangeal joints in one finger in a table-tennis player is presented. The second dislocation took place when the first dislocated joint became the fixed part of the finger as it hit a wall. Treatment was, first, hyperextension to unlock the base of the phalanx, then traction along the phalanx: its base was then pushed into contact with the head of the proximal phalanx. Splinting was applied with the joint in slight flexion. PMID:6823005

  2. Rowing Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hosea, Timothy M.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Rowing is one of the original modern Olympic sports and was one of the most popular spectator sports in the United States. Its popularity has been increasing since the enactment of Title IX. The injury patterns in this sport are unique because of the stress applied during the rowing stroke. Evidence Acquisition: This review summarizes the existing literature describing the biomechanics of the rowing stroke and rowing-related injury patterns. Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December, 2011) as well as from textbook chapters and rowing coaching manuals. Results: Rowing injuries are primarily overuse related. The knee, lumbar spine, and ribs are most commonly affected. The injury incidence is directly related to the volume of training and technique. Conclusion: Familiarity of the injury patterns and the biomechanical forces affecting the rowing athlete will aid in prompt diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:23016093

  3. Load-induced changes in older individual's hand-finger tremor are ameliorated with targeting.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Justin J; Cross, Troy J; Newell, Karl M; Morrison, Steven

    2014-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate hand-finger tremor dynamics when a load was applied to the finger in a group of healthy older adults. Moreover, we sought to determine if projecting a representation of the subject's finger tremor on a target was capable of overcoming the effects of loading so that hand-finger interactions returned to a state that was similar to normal tremor. Eight healthy older males (67 ± 1 year) performed a postural pointing task, where tremor was assessed using lightweight accelerometers attached to the hand and finger. Tremor was then assessed when a laser pointer was attached to the finger and switched off (the load), and then with the laser pointer attached and switched on pointing at targets of 40 mm and 20mm in diameter. The main findings of this study were that 1) loading the finger resulted in a reduction in finger tremor amplitude and increased finger tremor regularity, but no change in hand tremor, 2) loading caused increased hand-finger 8-12 Hz cross wavelet coherence and phase synchrony, and 3) pointing at different targets while the finger was loaded resulted in an increase in finger tremor amplitude, and changes in inter-segmental coupling to the extent that hand-finger dynamics reflected normal unloaded conditions. Overall, these results illustrate that the damping effects of limb loading can be offset, in part, by altering the accuracy demands of the task to make the pointing action more challenging. PMID:24503237

  4. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is shaken, is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. Scalp wounds. Skull fractures. Head injuries may cause ... of people who suffer head injuries are children. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) accounts for over 1 in 6 injury- ...

  5. Intensity Variation Normalization for Finger Vein Recognition Using Guided Filter Based Singe Scale Retinex

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shan Juan; Lu, Yu; Yoon, Sook; Yang, Jucheng; Park, Dong Sun

    2015-01-01

    Finger vein recognition has been considered one of the most promising biometrics for personal authentication. However, the capacities and percentages of finger tissues (e.g., bone, muscle, ligament, water, fat, etc.) vary person by person. This usually causes poor quality of finger vein images, therefore degrading the performance of finger vein recognition systems (FVRSs). In this paper, the intrinsic factors of finger tissue causing poor quality of finger vein images are analyzed, and an intensity variation (IV) normalization method using guided filter based single scale retinex (GFSSR) is proposed for finger vein image enhancement. The experimental results on two public datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in enhancing the image quality and finger vein recognition accuracy. PMID:26184226

  6. An Annotated Bibliography of the Chisanbop Method of Finger Calculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Mary K.

    The term Chisanbop is the trademark for the finger calculation method originally developed by a Korean, Sung Jin Pai. It was refined and simplified by his son, Hang Young Pai, who introduced the technique to the United States in 1976. This annotated bibliography has been organized in five categories. Readings in the first category, Historical…

  7. 21 CFR 890.5410 - Powered finger exerciser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered finger exerciser. 890.5410 Section 890.5410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5410 Powered...

  8. 21 CFR 890.5410 - Powered finger exerciser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered finger exerciser. 890.5410 Section 890.5410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5410 Powered...

  9. 21 CFR 890.5410 - Powered finger exerciser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered finger exerciser. 890.5410 Section 890.5410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5410 Powered...

  10. 21 CFR 890.5410 - Powered finger exerciser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered finger exerciser. 890.5410 Section 890.5410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5410 Powered...

  11. Singing Greeting Card Beeper as a Finger Pulse Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belusic, Gregor; Zupancic, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    We constructed a robust and low-priced finger pulse sensor from a singing greeting card beeper. The beeper outputs the plethysmographic signal, which is indistinguishable from that of commercial grade sensors. The sensor can be used in school for a number of experiments in human cardiovascular physiology.

  12. Movement Kinematics of the Braille-Reading Finger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Barry

    2011-01-01

    A new means of measuring the movement properties of the braille-reading finger is described and exemplified in an experiment in which experienced readers of braille encountered sentences comprised of keywords in which word and orthographic frequencies were manipulated. These new data are considered in theoretical and practical terms. (Contains 2…

  13. Some Numerical Simulations and an Experimental Investigation of Finger Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Minel J.; Smith, Ian; Marie, Hazel

    2007-01-01

    All seal types have been shown to lift effectively, and experience only minor wear during startup. .. The double pad design outperforms previous seals, providing lower operating temperatures, and less leakage at higher pressures. .. Future experimentation at higher pressures, temperatures, and operating speeds will show the full potential of finger sealing technology.

  14. 21 CFR 890.5410 - Powered finger exerciser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered finger exerciser. 890.5410 Section 890.5410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5410 Powered...

  15. Finger stiffness or edema as presenting symptoms of eosinophilic fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shingo; Noda, Kazutaka; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Shikino, Kiyoshi; Ikusaka, Masatomi

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the clinical features and finger symptoms of eosinophilic fasciitis (EF), we reviewed five patients with EF. The chief complaint was pain, edema and/or stiffness of the extremities. The distal extremities were affected in all patients, and there was also proximal involvement in one patient. One patient had asymmetrical symptoms. All four patients with upper limb involvement had limited range of motion of the wrist joints, and three of them complained of finger symptoms. Two of these three patients showed slight non-pitting edema of the hands, and the other one had subcutaneous induration of the forearm. All four patients with lower limb symptoms had limited range of motion of the ankle joints, and two showed edema or induration of the legs. Inflammatory changes in the joints were not detected in any of the patients. Two patients displayed neither objective induration nor edema, and two patients had muscle tenderness. In conclusion, finger symptoms of patients with EF might be caused by fasciitis of the forearms, which leads to dysfunction of the long finger flexors and extensors as well as slight edema of hands. Limited range of motion of wrist and/or ankle joints indicates sensitively distal muscle dysfunction caused by fasciitis. PMID:26248532

  16. The Three-Fingers Technique: Does It Reduce Test Anxiety?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maycock, George

    The utility of brief exposure to a mental focusing aid, the Three-Fingers Technique (TFT), in reducing test anxiety was studied for 15 college students. One week before their final examination, the students were given a 15-minute classroom introduction to the TFT, part of the Silva Mental Training Method (1983). After the introduction to this…

  17. Viscous and gravitational fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Viscous and gravitational fingering refer to flow instabilities in porous media that are triggered by adverse mobility or density ratios, respectively. These instabilities have been studied extensively in the past for (1) single-phase flow (e.g., contaminant transport in groundwater, first-contact-miscible displacement of oil by gas in hydrocarbon production), and (2) multi-phase immiscible and incompressible flow (e.g., water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection in oil reservoirs). Fingering in multiphase compositional and compressible flow has received much less attention, perhaps due to its high computational complexity. However, many important subsurface processes involve multiple phases that exchange species. Examples are carbon sequestration in saline aquifers and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by gas or WAG injection below the minimum miscibility pressure. In multiphase flow, relative permeabilities affect the mobility contrast for a given viscosity ratio. Phase behavior can also change local fluid properties, which can either enhance or mitigate viscous and gravitational instabilities. This work presents a detailed study of fingering behavior in compositional multiphase flow in two and three dimensions and considers the effects of (1) Fickian diffusion, (2) mechanical dispersion, (3) flow rates, (4) domain size and geometry, (5) formation heterogeneities, (6) gravity, and (7) relative permeabilities. Results show that fingering in compositional multiphase flow is profoundly different from miscible conditions and upscaling techniques used for the latter case are unlikely to be generalizable to the former.

  18. Moving Fingers under a Stick: A Laboratory Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massalha, Taha; Lanir, Yuval; Gluck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We consider a demonstration in which pupils alternately slide and stop their fingers under a long horizontal rod which they support. The changeover is described in terms of the relevant kinetic and static friction. We present a model calculation, performed on a spreadsheet, which clarifies the process and describes graphically the stepwise…

  19. Science Fair Report: Flight of the Split-Fingered Fastball.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    Reports on the results of an eighth grade student's experiments, conducted with a moving car, concerning the aerodynamics of a baseball in flight. Describes the peculiar diving ability of the split-fingered fastball, as well as the dancing and weaving effect of the knuckleball. (JJK)

  20. Dorsal finger joint soft tissue loss: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Bervar, M

    2003-01-01

    This article brings our experience, standpoints and management guidelines for early reconstruction of traumatic soft tissue loss on the dorsal aspect of the finger joints, with the aim of preserving acceptable late functional ability of the hand. Two interesting and unusual cases of reconstruction are presented. PMID:14989334

  1. Finger Seal: A Novel Approach to Air to Air Sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Gul; Steinetz, Bruce; Proctor, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    The gas turbine industry used a variety of sealing mechanisms to contain and direct secondary flows into and around components for cooling, and to limit leakage into and from bearing and disk cavities. The function of these seals is very important to the component efficiencies and attendant engine performance. Most of these seals are labyrinth seals, which are high-leakage seals that are costly to manufacture. In recent years, brush seals have been introduced which have demonstrated significantly reduced leakage, although they are still expensive and have exhibited wear and hysteresis difficulties. A new innovative concept called finger seal, patented by AlliedSignal, has demonstrated leakage similar to brush seals and is cheaper. The finger seal is comprised of a stack of precision photo-etched sheet metal elements, which allows intricate features to be made at very low cost and with the potential to resist wear and provide the compliance necessary to accomodate rotor excursions. Initial testing in the high-speed/high-temperature seal test facility, at the NASA Lewis Research Center, has corroborated the finger seal performance. The testing also revealed hysteresis problems with the current design. A NASA funded research project is in progress to correct the functional deficiencies of the finger seal and to refine its features to provide sufficient seal life for commercial transport engines and other long-life applications. This research will benefit the aeronautical gas turbine industry as a whole in terms of fuel consumption, operational characteristics, and cost. The first phase of this research to reduce finger seal hysteresis has been in progress for the last one year. This paper presents the results of this research to date. In future the research program will address seal performance, manufacturing, cost and life issues. The research program is expected to be completed by December 1998.

  2. Improving Finger Coordination in Young and Elderly Persons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yen-Hsun; Pazin, Nemanja; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effects of a single practice session of a variable task with subject specific adjustments of task difficulty (instability) on indices of multi-finger coordination in young and elderly persons. The main hypothesis was that practicing such a task would lead to contrasting changes in the amounts of two components of variance estimated across repetitive trials within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis: VUCM that had no effect on total force and VORT that affected total force. In addition, we also expected to see strong transfer effects to a different task. A variable task with graded instability was designed to encourage use of variable solutions during the accurate production of total force with two fingers. The subjects practiced with the index and middle fingers pressing on individual force sensors. Overall, the older subjects showed lower indices of performance and higher indices of both VUCM and VORT. After about one hour of practice, both groups showed an increase in the index of involuntary force production by non-task fingers (enslaving). Both groups improved the indices of performance. The two variance indices showed opposite effects of practice: VORT dropped with practice while VUCM increased leading to an increase in the total amount of variance in the space of commands to fingers and in the index of force-stabilizing synergy. Performance in a simpler, non-practiced task improved, but there was no transfer of the changes in the structure of variance. Specifically, both variance components, VORT and VUCM, dropped in the non-practiced task. The results show that the neural system responsible for synergies stabilizing important features of performance is highly adaptable to practice of tasks designed to encourage use of variable solutions. We view the results as highly promising for future use in populations with impaired coordination characterized by low synergy indices. PMID:23411675

  3. Multi-finger prehension: control of a redundant mechanical system.

    PubMed

    Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2009-01-01

    The human hand has been a fascinating object of study for researchers in both biomechanics and motor control. Studies of human prehension have contributed significantly to the progress in addressing the famous problem of motor redundancy. After a brief review of the hand mechanics, we present results of recent studies that support a general view that the apparently redundant design of the hand is not a source of computational problems but a rich apparatus that allows performing a variety of tasks in a reliable and flexible way (the principle of abundance). Multi-digit synergies have been analyzed at two levels of a hypothetical hierarchy involved in the control of prehensile actions. At the upper level, forces and moments produced by the thumb and virtual finger (an imagined finger with a mechanical action equal to the combined mechanical action of all four fingers of the hand) co-vary to stabilize the gripping action and the orientation of the hand-held object. These results support the principle of superposition suggested earlier in robotics with respect to the control of artificial grippers. At the lower level of the hierarchy, forces and moments produced by individual fingers co-vary to stabilize the magnitude and direction of the force vector and the moment of force produced by the virtual finger. Adjustments to changes in task constraints (such as, for example, friction under individual digits) may be local and synergic. The latter reflect multi-digit prehension synergies and may be analyzed with the so-called chain effects: Sequences of relatively straightforward cause-effect links directly related to mechanical constraints leading to non-trivial strong co-variation between pairs of elemental variables. Analysis of grip force adjustments during motion of hand-held objects suggests that the central nervous system adjusts to gravitational and inertial loads differently. The human hand is a gold mine for researchers interested in the control of natural human

  4. Ret finger protein mediates Pax7-induced ubiquitination of MyoD in skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Joung, Hosouk; Eom, Gwang Hyeon; Choe, Nakwon; Lee, Hye Mi; Ko, Jeong-Hyeon; Kwon, Duk-Hwa; Nam, Yoon Seok; Min, Hyunki; Shin, Sera; Kook, Jeewon; Cho, Young Kuk; Kim, Jeong Chul; Seo, Sang Beom; Baik, Yung Hong; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kook, Hyun

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy results from the net loss of muscular proteins and organelles and is caused by pathologic conditions such as nerve injury, immobilization, cancer, and other metabolic diseases. Recently, ubiquitination-mediated degradation of skeletal-muscle-specific transcription factors was shown to be involved in muscle atrophy, although the mechanisms have yet to be defined. Here we report that ret finger protein (RFP), also known as TRIM27, works as an E3 ligase in Pax7-induced degradation of MyoD. Muscle injury induced by sciatic nerve transection up-regulated RFP and RFP physically interacted with both Pax7 and MyoD. RFP and Pax7 synergistically reduced the protein amounts of MyoD but not the mRNA. RFP-induced reduction of MyoD protein was blocked by proteasome inhibitors. The Pax7-induced reduction MyoD was attenuated by RFP siRNA and by MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. RFPΔR, an RFP construct that lacks the RING domain, failed to reduce MyoD amounts. RFP ubiquitinated MyoD, but RFPΔR failed to do so. Forced expression of RFP, but not RFPΔR, enhanced Pax7-induced ubiquitination of MyoD, whereas RFP siRNA blocked the ubiquitination. Sciatic nerve injury-induced muscle atrophy as well the reduction in MyoD was attenuated in RFP knockout mice. Taken together, our results show that RFP works as a novel E3 ligase in the Pax7-mediated degradation of MyoD in response to skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:25025573

  5. Electrical injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage, especially to the heart, muscles, or brain. Electric current can cause injury in three ways: Cardiac arrest ... How long you were in contact with the electricity How the electricity moved through your body Your ...

  6. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart, to help decrease swelling. The Body’s Healing Process From the moment a bone breaks or a ... what happens at each stage of the healing process: At the moment of injury: Chemicals are released ...

  7. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... at all times when using hand or power tools or chemicals, during high impact sports, or during other activities where you may get an eye injury. Wear sunglasses that screen ultraviolet light when you are ...

  8. Preliminary Test Results of a Non-Contacting Finger Seal on a Herringbone-Grooved Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2009-01-01

    The baseline non-contacting finger seal is a NASA patented design. The primary difference between it and Gul Aroras design patented by AlliedSignal is that there are no lift pads on the high pressure fingers. The baseline non-contacting finger seal is comprised of a back plate, aft spacer, aft (or low pressure) finger element, forward (or high pressure) finger element, forward spacer, and front plate. The components are held together with 20 flat head screws. A typical seal would have a back plate of approximately the same thickness as the front plate and would be riveted together. The thicker back plate allows use of threaded fasteners so that different finger elements can be tested without having to replace all the individual seal components. The finger elements are essentially washers made of thin sheet stock with multiple curved slots machined around the inner diameter to form the fingers. They are clocked so that the fingers of one cover the slots of the other. The aft finger element fingers have axial extensions or "lift pads" at the seal id that are concentric to the rotor. The fingers act as cantilever beams and flex in response to rotor dynamic motion and radial growth of the rotor due to centrifugal or thermal forces.

  9. 21 CFR 888.3200 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3200 Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3220 Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3220 Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint...

  12. 40 CFR 81.128 - Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.128 Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial...

  13. 40 CFR 81.128 - Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.128 Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3200 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3200 Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3200 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3200 Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3210 Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3220 Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint...

  18. An Experimental Study on Preventing First Graders from Finger Counting in Basic Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albayrak, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: When counting is taught to students at primary stage of schooling, they are generally allowed to use their fingers as a counting tool. Therefore, some students continue using their fingers to count, while others stop this habit later. The students who have the habit of using their fingers to count have difficulty when their fingers…

  19. 40 CFR 81.128 - Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.128 Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial...

  20. 76 FR 77769 - North Finger Grazing Authorization Project, Malheur National Forest, Grant County, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... Forest Service North Finger Grazing Authorization Project, Malheur National Forest, Grant County, OR... North Finger Landscape. These allotments are within the Upper Deer Creek, Basin Creek, Upper Long Creek, Lower Fox Creek, Upper Fox Creek, and Upper Cottonwood Creek subwatersheds. The North Finger...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3210 Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal...

  2. 40 CFR 81.128 - Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.128 Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3210 Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal...

  4. 40 CFR 81.128 - Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.128 Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Genesee-Finger Lakes Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial...

  5. 78 FR 35098 - Proposed Information Collection (Hand and Finger Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Hand and Finger Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Hand or Finger Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any.... Title: Hand and Finger Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-7. OMB Control Number:...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented... metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/polymer..., 1996 for any finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented... metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/polymer..., 1996 for any finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  8. Shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers: review and development of a FIFA 11+ shoulder injury prevention program

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Benno; Barbosa, Gisele; Andreoli, Carlos V; de Castro Pochini, A; Lobo, Thiago; Zogaib, Rodrigo; Cohen, Moises; Bizzini, Mario; Dvorak, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, shoulder injuries have represented an increasing health problem in soccer players. The goalkeepers are more exposed to shoulder disorders than other field players. Injury prevention exercises for upper limbs were cited in few studies involving throwing athletes, but we know that goalkeepers need a specific program. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of an adapted Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) 11+ program, namely the FIFA 11+ shoulder, which targets the prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers. The FIFA 11+ shoulder program is structured into three parts: general warming-up exercises, exercises to improve strength and balance of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger muscles, and advanced exercises for core stability and muscle control. The exercises were selected based on recommendations from studies demonstrating high electromyographic activity. PMID:27563262

  9. Shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers: review and development of a FIFA 11+ shoulder injury prevention program.

    PubMed

    Ejnisman, Benno; Barbosa, Gisele; Andreoli, Carlos V; de Castro Pochini, A; Lobo, Thiago; Zogaib, Rodrigo; Cohen, Moises; Bizzini, Mario; Dvorak, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, shoulder injuries have represented an increasing health problem in soccer players. The goalkeepers are more exposed to shoulder disorders than other field players. Injury prevention exercises for upper limbs were cited in few studies involving throwing athletes, but we know that goalkeepers need a specific program. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of an adapted Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) 11+ program, namely the FIFA 11+ shoulder, which targets the prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers. The FIFA 11+ shoulder program is structured into three parts: general warming-up exercises, exercises to improve strength and balance of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger muscles, and advanced exercises for core stability and muscle control. The exercises were selected based on recommendations from studies demonstrating high electromyographic activity. PMID:27563262

  10. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries. PMID:10645833

  11. Zinc finger protein 667 expression is upregulated by cerebral ischemic preconditioning and protects cells from oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, DUN; HUANG, JUN; YUAN, XIANRUI; ZHAO, JIE; JIANG, WEIXI

    2013-01-01

    Brain ischemic injury is associated with clinical emergencies such as acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, head trauma, prolonged severe hypotension and cardiac arrest. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is the most powerful endogenous mechanism against ischemic injury. However, the majority of IPC treatments are invasive and thus impractical in the clinical setting. Identifying the endogenous neuroprotective mechanism induced by IPC is important for developing new strategies to reduce stroke severity. Zinc finger protein 667 (ZNF667) is a novel zinc finger protein that is upregulated by myocardial IPC. However, its functional role in neuronal ischemia has not been elucidated. In this study, the changes of ZNF667 expression on cerebral IPC and its potential neuroprotective function were investigated. The cerebral ischemia model was established by ameliorated four-vessel occlusion in rats. The northern blot results demonstrated that ZNF667 expression was increased in the hippocampus and cortex at 12 and 24 h after cerebral ischemic pretreatment. To investigate the neuroprotective function of ZNF667, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-ZNF667 fusion protein was expressed in C2C12 and brain astrocytoma cells and its subcellular localization was detected by confocal microscopy. EGFP-ZNF667 fusion proteins were localized in the nucleus of C2C12 and brain astrocytoma cells, indicating that ZNF667 may act as a transcription factor in neural cells. To mimic oxidative stress associated with ischemia/reperfusion injury, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was used to treat cells. Cell viability was measured by the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and WST-1 assays. A decrease in viability was detected in C2C12 and astrocytoma cells following H2O2 treatment, whereas ZNF667 gene overexpression significantly improved cell viability following H2O2 treatment. These results suggested that ZNF667 plays a neuroprotective role by acting as a transcription factor in cerebral IPC. PMID:24648981

  12. Feasibility Assessment of an EVA Glove Sensing Platform to Evaluate Potential Hand Injury Risk Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Christopher R.; McFarland, Shane M.

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the hands are common among astronauts who train for extravehicular activity (EVA). When the gloves are pressurized, they restrict movement and create pressure points during tasks, sometimes resulting in pain, muscle fatigue, abrasions, and occasionally more severe injuries such as onycholysis. A brief review of the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health's injury database reveals that 58% of total astronaut hand and arm injuries from NBL training between 1993 and 2010 occurred either to the fingernail, MCP, or fingertip. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of using small sensors to measure force acting on the fingers and hand within pressurized gloves and other variables such as blood perfusion, skin temperature, humidity, fingernail strain, skin moisture, among others. Tasks were performed gloved and ungloved in a pressurizable glove box. The test demonstrated that fingernails saw greater transverse strain levels for tension or compression than for longitudinal strain, even during axial fingertip loading. Blood perfusion peaked and dropped as the finger deformed during finger presses, indicating an initial dispersion and decrease of blood perfusion levels. Force sensitive resistors to force plate comparisons showed similar force curve patterns as fingers were depressed, indicating suitable functionality for future testing. Strategies for proper placement and protection of these sensors for ideal data collection and longevity through the test session were developed and will be implemented going forward for future testing.

  13. Pattern of hand injuries in children and adolescents in a teaching hospital in Abha, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Mirdad, T

    2001-03-01

    Over a seven-year period, 136 children and adolescents with hand injuries were prospectively studied at the Accident and Emergency Department of Asir Central Hospital, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, to determine the pattern of hand injury. The male:female ratio was 1.7:1.0, both left and right hands were relatively equally injured. The age group ranged from two months to 16 years (average 5.3 years). The finger most commonly injured was the middle finger (24.6%) followed by the index finger (18.7%). The most common type of hand injury was crush injuries caused by doors at home (52.2%), heavy objects (6.6%) and injuries caused by grinding machines (6.6%). Since youngsters are often unaware of the dangers in their environment it is necessary to redesign the doors of our homes with safety devices to prevent injuries. Application of hydraulic automatic door closures is a simple but useful way of ensuring smooth and safe closing of doors in homes. PMID:11329697

  14. Transfer of tactile perceptual learning to untrained neighboring fingers reflects natural use relationships

    PubMed Central

    Harrar, Vanessa; Oliver, Jonathan; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Spence, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Tactile learning transfers from trained to untrained fingers in a pattern that reflects overlap between the representations of fingers in the somatosensory system (e.g., neurons with multifinger receptive fields). While physical proximity on the body is known to determine the topography of somatosensory representations, tactile coactivation is also an established organizing principle of somatosensory topography. In this study we investigated whether tactile coactivation, induced by habitual inter-finger cooperative use (use pattern), shapes inter-finger overlap. To this end, we used psychophysics to compare the transfer of tactile learning from the middle finger to its adjacent fingers. This allowed us to compare transfer to two fingers that are both physically and cortically adjacent to the middle finger but have differing use patterns. Specifically, the middle finger is used more frequently with the ring than with the index finger. We predicted this should lead to greater representational overlap between the former than the latter pair. Furthermore, this difference in overlap should be reflected in differential learning transfer from the middle to index vs. ring fingers. Subsequently, we predicted temporary learning-related changes in the middle finger's representation (e.g., cortical magnification) would cause transient interference in perceptual thresholds of the ring, but not the index, finger. Supporting this, longitudinal analysis revealed a divergence where learning transfer was fast to the index finger but relatively delayed to the ring finger. Our results support the theory that tactile coactivation patterns between digits affect their topographic relationships. Our findings emphasize how action shapes perception and somatosensory organization. PMID:26631145

  15. Transfer of tactile perceptual learning to untrained neighboring fingers reflects natural use relationships.

    PubMed

    Dempsey-Jones, Harriet; Harrar, Vanessa; Oliver, Jonathan; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Spence, Charles; Makin, Tamar R

    2016-03-01

    Tactile learning transfers from trained to untrained fingers in a pattern that reflects overlap between the representations of fingers in the somatosensory system (e.g., neurons with multifinger receptive fields). While physical proximity on the body is known to determine the topography of somatosensory representations, tactile coactivation is also an established organizing principle of somatosensory topography. In this study we investigated whether tactile coactivation, induced by habitual inter-finger cooperative use (use pattern), shapes inter-finger overlap. To this end, we used psychophysics to compare the transfer of tactile learning from the middle finger to its adjacent fingers. This allowed us to compare transfer to two fingers that are both physically and cortically adjacent to the middle finger but have differing use patterns. Specifically, the middle finger is used more frequently with the ring than with the index finger. We predicted this should lead to greater representational overlap between the former than the latter pair. Furthermore, this difference in overlap should be reflected in differential learning transfer from the middle to index vs. ring fingers. Subsequently, we predicted temporary learning-related changes in the middle finger's representation (e.g., cortical magnification) would cause transient interference in perceptual thresholds of the ring, but not the index, finger. Supporting this, longitudinal analysis revealed a divergence where learning transfer was fast to the index finger but relatively delayed to the ring finger. Our results support the theory that tactile coactivation patterns between digits affect their topographic relationships. Our findings emphasize how action shapes perception and somatosensory organization. PMID:26631145

  16. Analysis and optimal design of an underactuated finger mechanism for LARM hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuangji; Ceccarelli, Marco; Carbone, Giuseppe; Zhan, Qiang; Lu, Zhen

    2011-09-01

    This paper aims to present general design considerations and optimality criteria for underactuated mechanisms in finger designs. Design issues related to grasping task of robotic fingers are discussed. Performance characteristics are outlined as referring to several aspects of finger mechanisms. Optimality criteria of the finger performances are formulated after careful analysis. A general design algorithm is summarized and formulated as a suitable multi-objective optimization problem. A numerical case of an underactuated robot finger design for Laboratory of Robotics and Mechatronics (LARM) hand is illustrated with the aim to show the practical feasibility of the proposed concepts and computations.

  17. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  18. A prospective study of rock climbing injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, J P; McNaughton, G W; Grant, P T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the rate, causes, and nature of rock climbing injuries presenting to an accident and emergency (A&E) department. METHODS: Patients presenting with rock climbing injuries to an urban A&E department were studied prospectively for one year. RESULTS: 19 rock climbers presented during the year, at a rate of one per 2774 A&E attendances. Fourteen climbers were injured on outdoor cliffs and five on the local indoor climbing wall, where the safety mats were noted to be in poor condition. Eighteen climbers had been injured during falls, 17 hitting the ground. Twelve of these climbers sustained fractures, four of which were missed on initial attendance. The remaining climber sustained the characteristic A2 pulley finger injury, which was treated conservatively with a good result. CONCLUSIONS: The risks of rock climbing in Britain would be reduced if lead climbers arranged protection at earlier stages of climbs. Sports centres with climbing walls should regularly inspect and repair their safety equipment. It is important for staff in A&E departments to appreciate the large forces involved in any climbing fall, in order that significant injuries are not missed. Those treating injured climbers should also be aware of the specific injuries to which elite climbers are predisposed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8799601

  19. Finger-vein and fingerprint recognition based on a feature-level fusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinfeng; Hong, Bofeng

    2013-07-01

    Multimodal biometrics based on the finger identification is a hot topic in recent years. In this paper, a novel fingerprint-vein based biometric method is proposed to improve the reliability and accuracy of the finger recognition system. First, the second order steerable filters are used here to enhance and extract the minutiae features of the fingerprint (FP) and finger-vein (FV). Second, the texture features of fingerprint and finger-vein are extracted by a bank of Gabor filter. Third, a new triangle-region fusion method is proposed to integrate all the fingerprint and finger-vein features in feature-level. Thus, the fusion features contain both the finger texture-information and the minutiae triangular geometry structure. Finally, experimental results performed on the self-constructed finger-vein and fingerprint databases are shown that the proposed method is reliable and precise in personal identification.

  20. [Hand injuries in the users of hydraulic wood-cutters].

    PubMed

    Holm, R

    1998-12-01

    This study has been carried out in order to suggest possible prophylactic recommendations. We investigated the type of injuries, the type of logsplitter used, the injury circumstances and the safety measures. Fifty-two patients were included. There were a total of 21 crushing injuries with amputations of fingers, hand, on forearm. Nine replantations, two revascularisations and seven amputations were carried out. Eighty-eight percent of the patients had their hand in the splitting area. Sixty-seven percent had not received any instructions on how to operate the machinery. In 58% of the cases two or more persons were operating the logsplitter and 40% of the machines had no emergency stop button. The hazards mentioned above influenced the injury frequence and severity. We therefore recommend improved prophylactic measures and precautions to be considered. For the old machines a campaign will be necessary, and for new logsplitters we recommend implementation of new standards. PMID:9859724

  1. Development of a finger biomechanical model and its considerations.

    PubMed

    Fok, Kim Seng; Chou, Siaw Meng

    2010-03-01

    The development of a biomechanical model for a human finger is faced with many challenges, such as extensor mechanism complexity, statistical indeterminacy and suitability of computational processes. Motivation for this work was to develop a computer model that is able to predict the internal loading patterns of tendons and joint surfaces experienced by the human finger, while mitigating these challenges. Proposed methodology was based on a non-linear optimising mathematical technique with a criterion of boundary conditions and equality equations, maximised against unknown parameters to reduce statistical indeterminacy. Initial validation was performed via the simulation of one dynamic and two static postures case studies. Past models and experiments were used, based on published literature, to verify the proposed model's methodology and results. The feasibility of the proposed methodology was deemed satisfactory as the simulated results were concordant with in-vivo results for the extrinsic flexors. PMID:19962148

  2. Light-Inducible Gene Regulation with Engineered Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of light-inducible protein-protein interactions with gene regulation systems has enabled the control of gene expression with light. In particular, heterodimer protein pairs from plants can be used to engineer a gene regulation system in mammalian cells that is reversible, repeatable, tunable, controllable in a spatiotemporal manner, and targetable to any DNA sequence. This system, Light-Inducible Transcription using Engineered Zinc finger proteins (LITEZ), is based on the blue light-induced interaction of GIGANTEA and the LOV domain of FKF1 that drives the localization of a transcriptional activator to the DNA-binding site of a highly customizable engineered zinc finger protein. This chapter provides methods for modifying LITEZ to target new DNA sequences, engineering a programmable LED array to illuminate cell cultures, and using the modified LITEZ system to achieve spatiotemporal control of transgene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24718797

  3. Automatic finger joint synovitis localization in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurzynska, Karolina; Smolka, Bogdan

    2016-04-01

    A long-lasting inflammation of joints results between others in many arthritis diseases. When not cured, it may influence other organs and general patients' health. Therefore, early detection and running proper medical treatment are of big value. The patients' organs are scanned with high frequency acoustic waves, which enable visualization of interior body structures through an ultrasound sonography (USG) image. However, the procedure is standardized, different projections result in a variety of possible data, which should be analyzed in short period of time by a physician, who is using medical atlases as a guidance. This work introduces an efficient framework based on statistical approach to the finger joint USG image, which enables automatic localization of skin and bone regions, which are then used for localization of the finger joint synovitis area. The processing pipeline realizes the task in real-time and proves high accuracy when compared to annotation prepared by the expert.

  4. Hamiltonian formulation towards minimization of viscous fluid fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Carlos; Dias, Eduardo O.; Miranda, José A.

    2016-07-01

    A variational approach has been recently employed to determine the ideal time-dependent injection rate Q (t ) that minimizes fingering formation when a fluid is injected in a Hele-Shaw cell filled with another fluid of much greater viscosity. However, such a calculation is approximate in nature, since it has been performed by assuming a high capillary number regime. In this work, we go one step further, and utilize a Hamiltonian formulation to obtain an analytical exact solution for Q (t ) , now valid for arbitrary values of the capillary number. Moreover, this Hamiltonian scheme is applied to calculate the corresponding injection rate that minimizes fingering formation in a uniform three-dimensional porous media. An analysis of the improvement offered by these exact injection rate expressions in comparison with previous approximate results is also provided.

  5. Hamiltonian formulation towards minimization of viscous fluid fingering.

    PubMed

    Batista, Carlos; Dias, Eduardo O; Miranda, José A

    2016-07-01

    A variational approach has been recently employed to determine the ideal time-dependent injection rate Q(t) that minimizes fingering formation when a fluid is injected in a Hele-Shaw cell filled with another fluid of much greater viscosity. However, such a calculation is approximate in nature, since it has been performed by assuming a high capillary number regime. In this work, we go one step further, and utilize a Hamiltonian formulation to obtain an analytical exact solution for Q(t), now valid for arbitrary values of the capillary number. Moreover, this Hamiltonian scheme is applied to calculate the corresponding injection rate that minimizes fingering formation in a uniform three-dimensional porous media. An analysis of the improvement offered by these exact injection rate expressions in comparison with previous approximate results is also provided. PMID:27575219

  6. Novel titanium-aluminum joints for cryogenic cold finger structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, H. M.; Sweet, R. C.

    For optimum performance, the sensors employed in airborne detection and surveillance systems must be maintained at low temperatures. The containing wall of the expansion volume of a Stirling cycle cooler may provide the low temperature surface for mounting the sensors. IR detectors are commonly mounted on copper heat exchanger surfaces. A stainless steel member is employed to thermally isolate and structurally stabilize such surfaces. It is pointed out that the use of an aluminum-titanium cold finger results in a considerable weight reduction. The present investigation is concerned with an attempt to obtain such structures with the aid of a technique involving the casting of molten aluminum onto an appropriately dimensioned and positioned titanium member, taking into account the fact that aluminum readily wets and bonds to clean titanium surfaces. The casting is then machined to provide the form and structure desired. It is concluded that aluminum-titanium cast structures offer good potential for use as cryogenic cold finger assemblies.

  7. Emerging roles of zinc finger proteins in regulating adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shengjuan; Zhang, Lifan; Zhou, Xiang; Du, Min; Jiang, Zhihua; Hausman, Gary J.; Bergen, Werner G.; Zan, Linsen; Dodson, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins containing the zinc finger domain(s) are named zinc finger proteins (ZFPs), which are one of the largest classes of transcription factors in eukaryotic genomes. A large number of ZFPs have been studied and many of them were found to be involved regulating normal growth and development of cells and tissues through diverse signal transduction pathways. Recent studies revealed that a small but increasing number of ZFPs could function as key transcriptional regulators involved in adipogenesis. As the prevalence of obesity and metabolic disorders, the investigation of molecular regulatory mechanisms of adipocyte development must be more completely understood to develop novel and long term impact strategies for ameliorating obesity. In this review, we discuss recent work which has documented that ZFPs are important functional contributors to the regulation of adipogenesis. Taken altogether these data lead to the conclusion that ZFPs may become promising targets to combat human obesity. PMID:23760207

  8. Controlling and minimizing fingering instabilities in non-Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Fontana, João V; Dias, Eduardo O; Miranda, José A

    2014-01-01

    The development of the viscous fingering instability in Hele-Shaw cells has great practical and scientific importance. Recently, researchers have proposed different strategies to control the number of interfacial fingering structures, or to minimize as much as possible the amplitude of interfacial disturbances. Most existing studies address the situation in which an inviscid fluid displaces a viscous Newtonian fluid. In this work, we report on controlling and minimizing protocols considering the situation in which the displaced fluid is a non-Newtonian, power-law fluid. The necessary changes on the controlling schemes due to the shear-thinning and shear thickening nature of the displaced fluid are calculated analytically and discussed. PMID:24580329

  9. New Optical Methods for Liveness Detection on Fingers

    PubMed Central

    Dolezel, Michal; Vana, Jan; Brezinova, Eva; Yim, Jaegeol; Shim, Kyubark

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to new optical methods, which are supposed to be used for liveness detection on fingers. First we describe the basics about fake finger use in fingerprint recognition process and the possibilities of liveness detection. Then we continue with introducing three new liveness detection methods, which we developed and tested in the scope of our research activities—the first one is based on measurement of the pulse, the second one on variations of optical characteristics caused by pressure change, and the last one is based on reaction of skin to illumination with different wavelengths. The last part deals with the influence of skin diseases on fingerprint recognition, especially on liveness detection. PMID:24151584

  10. Finger tips detection for two handed gesture recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, M. K.; Kar, Mithun Kumar; Neog, Debanga Raj

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, a novel algorithm is proposed for fingertips detection in view of two-handed static hand pose recognition. In our method, finger tips of both hands are detected after detecting hand regions by skin color-based segmentation. At first, the face is removed in the image by using Haar classifier and subsequently, the regions corresponding to the gesturing hands are isolated by a region labeling technique. Next, the key geometric features characterizing gesturing hands are extracted for two hands. Finally, for all possible/allowable finger movements, a probabilistic model is developed for pose recognition. Proposed method can be employed in a variety of applications like sign language recognition and human-robot-interactions etc.

  11. [Congenital Fibrosarcoma of the Left Index Finger - An Unusual Case].

    PubMed

    Mailänder, L; Piza-Katzer, H

    2016-02-01

    Congenital fibrosarcoma is a rare mesenchymal soft tissue tumour, which most commonly develops in the peripheral extremities during infancy. Diagnostic work-up is a challenge for clinicians and pathologists alike, because in many cases the lesion initially resembles a haemangioma on macroscopic inspection. A 4-month-old boy presented with a strongly vascularised tumour of the left index finger, which had been diagnosed as a capillary haemangioma by means of a biopsy performed in another facility. The lesion had been treated with systemic and intralesional cortisone injections. Due to ulceration and the risk of infection, the tumour mass was resected with the index finger being preserved. The histological appearance was inconclusive. PCR revealed a congenital fibrosarcoma. 2 years after surgery, the boy is free from recurrence. PMID:26895521

  12. When pliers become fingers in the monkey motor system

    PubMed Central

    Umiltà, M. A.; Escola, L.; Intskirveli, I.; Grammont, F.; Rochat, M.; Caruana, F.; Jezzini, A.; Gallese, V.; Rizzolatti, G.

    2008-01-01

    The capacity to use tools is a fundamental evolutionary achievement. Its essence stands in the capacity to transfer a proximal goal (grasp a tool) to a distal goal (e.g., grasp food). Where and how does this goal transfer occur? Here, we show that, in monkeys trained to use tools, cortical motor neurons, active during hand grasping, also become active during grasping with pliers, as if the pliers were now the hand fingers. This motor embodiment occurs both for normal pliers and for “reverse pliers,” an implement that requires finger opening, instead of their closing, to grasp an object. We conclude that the capacity to use tools is based on an inherently goal-centered functional organization of primate cortical motor areas. PMID:18238904

  13. Computer-based automatic finger- and speech-tracking system.

    PubMed

    Breidegard, Björn

    2007-11-01

    This article presents the first technology ever for online registration and interactive and automatic analysis of finger movements during tactile reading (Braille and tactile pictures). Interactive software has been developed for registration (with two cameras and a microphone), MPEG-2 video compression and storage on disk or DVD as well as an interactive analysis program to aid human analysis. An automatic finger-tracking system has been implemented which also semiautomatically tracks the reading aloud speech on the syllable level. This set of tools opens the way for large scale studies of blind people reading Braille or tactile images. It has been tested in a pilot project involving congenitally blind subjects reading texts and pictures. PMID:18183897

  14. Secondary repair of flexor tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Battiston, B; Triolo, P F; Bernardi, A; Artiaco, S; Tos, P

    2013-03-01

    Tendon adhesions or even secondary ruptures causing severe hand functional impairment still represent a frequent complication after repair of flexor tendon injuries. Secondary treatment of these problems includes tenolysis, one or two stages flexor tendons reconstruction by grafts or even the use of tendon prosthesis. The mechanism and severity of injury, the status of the surrounding tissues and injured finger, the presence of associated lesions, the age of the patient, post-operative management, patient motivation and the surgeon's skill, may all have implications in the final outcome of the tendon reconstruction. A correct evaluation of the problem by means of classifications such as the one described by Boyes, may help the surgeon in choosing the appropriate technique. PMID:23347767

  15. Connective tissue adaptations in the fingers of performance sport climbers.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Tonja; Allenspach, Philippe; Seifert, Burkhardt; Schweizer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the changes of the connective tissue in the fingers of performance sport climbers resulting after a minimum of 15 years of climbing. Evaluation was performed by ultrasonography on the palmar side of the fingers (Dig) II-V to measure the thickness of the A2 and A4 annular pulleys, the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and profundus (FDP) tendons and the palmar plates (PP's) of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) as well as distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint in sagittal and axial direction. Totally, 31 experienced male sport climbers (mean age 37y, 30-48y grade French scale median 8b, range 7b+ to 9a+) participated in the study. The control-group consisted of 20 male non-climbers (age 37y, 30-51y). The A2 and A4 pulleys in climbers were all significantly thicker (A2 Dig III 62%, Dig IV 69%; A4 Dig III 69%, Dig IV 76%) as compared to non-climbers pulleys. All PP's of the DIP joints were also significantly thicker, particularly at Dig III and IV (76 and 67%), whereas the PP's at PIP joints were only scarce significant for three joints. Differences of the diameter of the flexor tendons were less distinct (1-21%) being significant only over the middle phalanx. High load to the fingers of rock climbers after a minimum of 15 years of climbing years induced considerable connective tissue adaptions in the fingers, most distinct at the flexor tendon pulleys and joint capsule (PP) of the DIP joints and well detectable by ultrasound. PMID:26267120

  16. Mechanism of Hot Finger Formation in Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, M. Y.; Tamura, Y.; Sakaguchi, H.

    2013-12-01

    Processes of mantle melting and volcanic eruptions along subduction zones are often illustrated by the use of two-dimensional cross-section models of convergent margins. However, Quaternary volcanoes in the NE Japan arc could be grouped into ten volcano clusters striking transverse to the arc; these have an average width of ~ 50 km, and are separated by parallel gaps 30-75 km wide (Tamura et al., 2002). Moreover, the structure of the mantle wedge and arc crust beneath the NE Japan arc and the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc, respectively, suggest that the third dimension, lying along the strike of the arc, is necessary to understand the actual production of magmas in subduction zones (e.g., Nakajima et al., 2001; Hasegawa & Nakajima, 2004; Kodaira et al., 2007; Kodaira et al., 2008). Common periodic structural variations, having wavelengths of 80-100 km, can be observed in both areas. This grouping of volcanoes and the structural variations may be related to locally developed hot regions within the mantle wedge that have the form of inclined, 50 km-wide fingers (hot fingers). The 'hot fingers' models (Tamura et al., 2002) may play an important role in linking the 3D structures within the mantle wedge and overlying arc crust to volcanic eruptions at the surface. To explore a physical and mathematical mechanism to produce a hot finger pattern, we develop a hydrodynamic model of mantle convection in mantle wedge. A hypothesis incorporated in our model is a double diffusive mechanism of mantle materials; diffusion of composition of mantle materials is much weaker than temperature diffusion. We show that our model shows a spatiotemporal pattern in a mantle material composition, temperature, and velocity that are similar to the spatiotemporal patterns observed in the NE Japan arc.

  17. The EpiPen and the ischaemic finger.

    PubMed

    Singh, Talvinder; Randhawa, Susheelwant; Khanna, Rakesh

    2007-08-01

    We present a case of a 24-year-old with a history of accidental injection of adrenaline from an EpiPen into the proximal aspect of her left index finger. Various methods were advocated to treat digital ischaemia but were of no benefit. Topical infiltration of phentolamine in 1 ml of lignocaine 2% was given at the puncture site with immediate results of resolution of digital ischaemia. PMID:17620915

  18. Fingering in a driven hele-shaw cell

    PubMed

    Rauseo

    2000-12-01

    A modified Hele-Shaw cell in which the plate gap can be modulated in time was constructed. Highly nonlinear fingers on the interface between air and water in the cell were observed as the plate gap was driven at a variety of frequencies, but typically near 60 Hz. Modified equations to describe the flow in a periodically driven cell were derived and the linear stability analysis of waves on a circular fluid-fluid interface was performed. PMID:11138089

  19. Numerical simulation of immiscible viscous fingering using adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Salinas, P.; Percival, J. R.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C.; Muggeridge, A. H.; Jackson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Displacement of one fluid by another in porous media occurs in various settings including hydrocarbon recovery, CO2 storage and water purification. When the invading fluid is of lower viscosity than the resident fluid, the displacement front is subject to a Saffman-Taylor instability and is unstable to transverse perturbations. These instabilities can grow, leading to fingering of the invading fluid. Numerical simulation of viscous fingering is challenging. The physics is controlled by a complex interplay of viscous and diffusive forces and it is necessary to ensure physical diffusion dominates numerical diffusion to obtain converged solutions. This typically requires the use of high mesh resolution and high order numerical methods. This is computationally expensive. We demonstrate here the use of a novel control volume - finite element (CVFE) method along with dynamic unstructured mesh adaptivity to simulate viscous fingering with higher accuracy and lower computational cost than conventional methods. Our CVFE method employs a discontinuous representation for both pressure and velocity, allowing the use of smaller control volumes (CVs). This yields higher resolution of the saturation field which is represented CV-wise. Moreover, dynamic mesh adaptivity allows high mesh resolution to be employed where it is required to resolve the fingers and lower resolution elsewhere. We use our results to re-examine the existing criteria that have been proposed to govern the onset of instability.Mesh adaptivity requires the mapping of data from one mesh to another. Conventional methods such as consistent interpolation do not readily generalise to discontinuous fields and are non-conservative. We further contribute a general framework for interpolation of CV fields by Galerkin projection. The method is conservative, higher order and yields improved results, particularly with higher order or discontinuous elements where existing approaches are often excessively diffusive.

  20. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael J.; Johnson, Simon A.; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick–slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function. PMID:23256185

  1. Blast injury.

    PubMed

    de Candole, C A

    1967-01-28

    The shock wave generated by an explosion ("blast wave") may cause injury in any or all of the following: (1) direct impact on the tissues of variations in environmental pressure; (2) flying glass and other debris set in motion by it; (3) propulsion of the body. Injuries in the first category affect gas-containing organs (ears, lungs and intestines), and acute death is attributed to air forced into the coronary vessels via damaged pulmonary alveoli. It is estimated that overpressure sufficient to cause lung injury may occur up to five miles from a 20-megaton nuclear explosion. The greatest single hazard from blast is, however, flying glass, and serious wounding from this cause is possible up to 12 miles from an explosion of this magnitude. PMID:6015742

  2. Blast Injury

    PubMed Central

    de Candole, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    The shock wave generated by an explosion (“blast wave”) may cause injury in any or all of the following: (1) direct impact on the tissues of variations in environmental pressure; (2) flying glass and other debris set in motion by it; (3) propulsion of the body. Injuries in the first category affect gas-containing organs (ears, lungs and intestines), and acute death is attributed to air forced into the coronary vessels via damaged pulmonary alveoli. It is estimated that overpressure sufficient to cause lung injury may occur up to five miles from a 20-megaton nuclear explosion. The greatest single hazard from blast is, however, flying glass, and serious wounding from this cause is possible up to 12 miles from an explosion of this magnitude. PMID:6015742

  3. Which Fingers Should We Perform Two-Finger Chest Compression Technique with When Performing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on an Infant in Cardiac Arrest?

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Sinn; Oh, Je Hyeok; Kim, Chan Woong; Kim, Sung Eun; Lee, Dong Hoon; Hong, Jun Young

    2016-06-01

    This study compared the effectiveness two-finger chest compression technique (TFCC) performed using the right vs. left hand and the index-middle vs. middle-ring fingers. Four different finger/hand combinations were tested randomly in 30 healthcare providers performing TFCC (Test 1: the right index-middle fingers; Test 2: the left index-middle fingers; Test 3: the right middle-ring fingers; Test 4: the left middle-ring fingers) using two cross-over trials. The "patient" was a 3-month-old-infant-sized manikin. Each experiment consisted of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) consisting of 2 minutes of 30:2 compression: ventilation performed by one rescuer on a manikin lying on the floor as if in cardiac arrest. Ventilations were performed using the mouth-to-mouth method. Compression and ventilation data were collected during the tests. The mean compression depth (MCD) was significantly greater in TFCC performed with the index-middle fingers than with the middle-ring fingers regardless of the hand (95% confidence intervals; right hand: 37.8-40.2 vs. 35.2-38.6 mm, P = 0.002; left hand: 36.9-39.2 vs. 35.5-38.1 mm, P = 0.003). A deeper MCD was achieved with the index-middle fingers of the right versus the left hand (P = 0.004). The ratio of sufficiently deep compressions showed the same patterns. There were no significant differences in the other data. The best performance of TFCC in simulated 30:2 compression: ventilation CPR performed by one rescuer on an infant in cardiac arrest lying on the floor was obtained using the index-middle fingers of the right hand. Clinical Trial Registry at the Clinical Research Information Service (KCT0001515). PMID:27247512

  4. Which Fingers Should We Perform Two-Finger Chest Compression Technique with When Performing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on an Infant in Cardiac Arrest?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness two-finger chest compression technique (TFCC) performed using the right vs. left hand and the index-middle vs. middle-ring fingers. Four different finger/hand combinations were tested randomly in 30 healthcare providers performing TFCC (Test 1: the right index-middle fingers; Test 2: the left index-middle fingers; Test 3: the right middle-ring fingers; Test 4: the left middle-ring fingers) using two cross-over trials. The “patient” was a 3-month-old-infant-sized manikin. Each experiment consisted of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) consisting of 2 minutes of 30:2 compression: ventilation performed by one rescuer on a manikin lying on the floor as if in cardiac arrest. Ventilations were performed using the mouth-to-mouth method. Compression and ventilation data were collected during the tests. The mean compression depth (MCD) was significantly greater in TFCC performed with the index-middle fingers than with the middle-ring fingers regardless of the hand (95% confidence intervals; right hand: 37.8–40.2 vs. 35.2–38.6 mm, P = 0.002; left hand: 36.9–39.2 vs. 35.5–38.1 mm, P = 0.003). A deeper MCD was achieved with the index-middle fingers of the right versus the left hand (P = 0.004). The ratio of sufficiently deep compressions showed the same patterns. There were no significant differences in the other data. The best performance of TFCC in simulated 30:2 compression: ventilation CPR performed by one rescuer on an infant in cardiac arrest lying on the floor was obtained using the index-middle fingers of the right hand. Clinical Trial Registry at the Clinical Research Information Service (KCT0001515). PMID:27247512

  5. Mallet finger injuries-A new method to maintain distal interphalangeal joint extension.

    PubMed

    Mak, Lonita; Aitkens, Lorna D; Novak, Christine B

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring that distal interphalangeal joint extension is maintained is an important but challenging part of the treatment process. These authors describe a simple approach to ensuring distal interphalangeal joint extension for these patients. - VictoriaPriganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:27496991

  6. Finger vein recognition based on the hyperinformation feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Xiaoming; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Yang, Lu

    2014-01-01

    The finger vein is a promising biometric pattern for personal identification due to its advantages over other existing biometrics. In finger vein recognition, feature extraction is a critical step, and many feature extraction methods have been proposed to extract the gray, texture, or shape of the finger vein. We treat them as low-level features and present a high-level feature extraction framework. Under this framework, base attribute is first defined to represent the characteristics of a certain subcategory of a subject. Then, for an image, the correlation coefficient is used for constructing the high-level feature, which reflects the correlation between this image and all base attributes. Since the high-level feature can reveal characteristics of more subcategories and contain more discriminative information, we call it hyperinformation feature (HIF). Compared with low-level features, which only represent the characteristics of one subcategory, HIF is more powerful and robust. In order to demonstrate the potential of the proposed framework, we provide a case study to extract HIF. We conduct comprehensive experiments to show the generality of the proposed framework and the efficiency of HIF on our databases, respectively. Experimental results show that HIF significantly outperforms the low-level features.

  7. Two-Finger EKG Method of Detecting Evasive Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldham, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    A system based on acquisition and processing of electrocardiographic (EKG) signals from two fingers has been proposed as a means of determining whether a person is answering questions evasively. The system -- in effect, a "lie detector" of sorts, would be used to gauge prospective passengers responses to questions at airport security checkpoints. The person to be interrogated would be required to put one finger from each hand onto two metal strips on a counter and would be instructed to relax and wait for the system to indicate that it is ready. Then a security person would ask the passenger a set of standard security questions. EKG signals acquired through contact with the fingers would be processed by an algorithm that would extract a single-value measure of the level of stress in the interrogated person. This measure would be used to determine whether the system should display a green or a red light to signify that the person is or is not, respectively, telling the truth. It has also been conjectured that the system may be useful for communicating with a person who is in a coma and, hence, unable to speak.

  8. Numerical simulation of double-diffusive finger convection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Vacher, H.L.

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid finite element, integrated finite difference numerical model is developed for the simulation of double-diffusive and multicomponent flow in two and three dimensions. The model is based on a multidimensional, density-dependent, saturated-unsaturated transport model (SUTRA), which uses one governing equation for fluid flow and another for solute transport. The solute-transport equation is applied sequentially to each simulated species. Density coupling of the flow and solute-transport equations is accounted for and handled using a sequential implicit Picard iterative scheme. High-resolution data from a double-diffusive Hele-Shaw experiment, initially in a density-stable configuration, is used to verify the numerical model. The temporal and spatial evolution of simulated double-diffusive convection is in good agreement with experimental results. Numerical results are very sensitive to discretization and correspond closest to experimental results when element sizes adequately define the spatial resolution of observed fingering. Numerical results also indicate that differences in the molecular diffusivity of sodium chloride and the dye used to visualize experimental sodium chloride concentrations are significant and cause inaccurate mapping of sodium chloride concentrations by the dye, especially at late times. As a result of reduced diffusion, simulated dye fingers are better defined than simulated sodium chloride fingers and exhibit more vertical mass transfer. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. The Impact of Miscible Viscous Fingering on Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, J.; De Anna, P.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Viscous fingering is a hydrodynamic instability that occurs when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous one. Instead of progressing as a uniform front, the less viscous fluid forms fingers that vary in size and shape to create complex patterns. The interface created from these patterns affects mixing between the two fluids, and therefore is of critical importance in applications such as enhanced oil recovery and microfluidics. This work focuses on how the evolution of the fingering interface affects mixing between two miscible fluids, specifically in a radial configuration. We measure the local concentration field temporally and spatially with the use of a fluorescent tracer in the injected fluid, and with this high resolution information are able to calculate various measures of mixing, such as mixing efficiency, scalar dissipation rate, and the areal mixing zone for different fluid injection rates and various viscosity ratios. We propose a scaling theory based on experimental observations for the growth of the mixing zone and the overall rate of mixing. This is a snapshot of the concentration field. In this experiment, water with a fluorescent tracer at a concentration of 250mg/L is displacing fluid ten times more viscous from a point injection. The inset shows an enlarged section of the concentration field.

  10. The Impact of Miscible Viscous Fingering on Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, Jane; de Anna, Pietro; Juanes, Ruben

    2013-11-01

    Viscous fingering is a hydrodynamic instability that occurs when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous one. Instead of progressing as a uniform front, the less viscous fluid forms fingers that vary in size and shape to create complex patterns. The interface created from these patterns affects mixing between the two fluids, and therefore is of critical importance in applications such as enhanced oil recovery and microfluidics. This work focuses on how the evolution of the fingering interface affects mixing between two miscible fluids, specifically in a radial configuration. We measure the local concentration field temporally and spatially with the use of a fluorescent tracer in the injected fluid, and with this high resolution information are able to calculate various measures of mixing, such as mixing efficiency, scalar dissipation rate, and the areal mixing zone for different fluid injection rates and various viscosity ratios. We propose a scaling theory based on experimental observations for the growth of the mixing zone and the overall rate of mixing.

  11. Coordination between breathing and mental grouping of pianistic finger movements.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Dietrich; Hefter, Harald; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2002-10-01

    6 pianists (age 22 to 43 years) performed a simple finger exercise at a spontaneously chosen most comfortable tempo on a Yamaha-Disklavier piano. Five versions of the exercise, notated in quarter notes, were presented with different types of meters: (1) 3/4, (2) 4/4, (3) 5/4, (4) 6/4, and (5) 7/4. The onsets of finger strokes were measured while respiration was recorded in parallel by means of a thermistor placed at the front of the dominant nostril. The chosen tempo (finger-beat-rate) was about 3 Hz on all trials but not exactly constant. Correspondingly, the meter-rate chosen was faster for 3/4 and 4/4 meter (around 1 Hz), slower for 5/4, 6/4, and 7/4 meter (around 0.5 Hz). Mean breathing rate while playing the piano (0.38 Hz) was significantly higher than while resting (0.22 Hz, p<.05). Pooling the data of all subjects, the ratios of instantaneous meter and breathing rates clustered around different integer values, depending on the type of meter. Also the individual data indicated integer ratios between instantaneous meter and breathing rates. Even periods of constant phase relations between onsets of the meter and of inspiration could be observed. Thus, the mental process of grouping the same piece of music by various musical meters interacts with unconscious breathing rhythm. PMID:12434824

  12. Bonding of silicon scanning mirror having vertical comb fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Ho; Ko, Young-Chul; Choi, Byoung-So; Kim, Jong-Min; Jeon, Duk Young

    2002-09-01

    A 1500 μm × 1200 μm silicon scanning mirror has been fabricated by using anodic bonding and flip chip bonding. This scanning mirror is mainly composed of two structures having vertical comb fingers. By anodic bonding between the silicon wafer and the Pyrex glass substrate, and following deep inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching (ICPRIE), isolated comb electrodes were fabricated at the lower structure. However, gold signal lines for electrical connection to the electrodes, which were inserted between silicon and Pyrex glass, were damaged during anodic bonding. This problem was solved by using the proposed processes and signal lines were successfully fabricated with the contact resistance below several tens of ohms. By flip chip bonding, the upper and lower structures having vertical comb fingers were assembled. Vertical comb fingers of two structures were aligned with a microscope and the frames of two structures were bonded at 300 °C for 20 s using the eutectic bonding material - electroplated AuSn. Finally, the scanning mirror was successfully fabricated and could be used for laser display as a galvanometric vertical scanner.

  13. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  14. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD ...

  15. Injury risk is low among world-class volleyball players: 4-year data from the FIVB Injury Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Bere, Tone; Kruczynski, Jacek; Veintimilla, Nadège; Hamu, Yuichiro; Bahr, Roald

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the rate and pattern of injuries in international volleyball competition. Objective To describe the risk and pattern of injuries among world-class players based on data from the The International Volleyball Federation (FIVB) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) (junior and senior, male and female). Methods The FIVB ISS is based on prospective registration of injuries by team medical staff during all major FIVB tournaments (World Championships, World Cup, World Grand Prix, World League, Olympic Games). This paper is based on 4-year data (September 2010 to November 2014) obtained through the FIVB ISS during 32 major FIVB events (23 senior and 9 junior). Results The incidence of time-loss injuries during match play was 3.8/1000 player hours (95% CI 3.0 to 4.5); this was greater for senior players than for junior players (relative risk: 2.04, 1.29 to 3.21), while there was no difference between males and females (1.04, 0.70 to 1.55). Across all age and sex groups, the ankle was the most commonly injured body part (25.9%), followed by the knee (15.2%), fingers/thumb (10.7%) and lower back (8.9%). Injury incidence was greater for centre players and lower for liberos than for other player functions; injury patterns also differed between player functions. Conclusions Volleyball is a very safe sport, even at the highest levels of play. Preventive measures should focus on acute ankle and finger sprains, and overuse injuries in the knee, lower back and shoulder. PMID:26194501

  16. Numerical Simulation of Flow, Pressure and Motion of Front Back Fingers in a Two Rows Finger Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. Jack; Kudriavtsev, V. V.; Choy, Fred K.; Proctor, Margaret P.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2002-01-01

    This proposal fits within the programmatic long-term development direction for turbine engine seals of the Seal Team of the Mechanical Component Branch. The intended work concerns the further development of the Finger Seal concept which is a compliant passive-adaptive seal meant to mitigate (and eventually replace) the shortcomings of the entire class of rigid seals used today (labyrinth, honeycomb, mechanical face seals) in the gas turbines and compressors,

  17. Numerical Simulation of Flow, Pressure and Motion of Front Back Fingers in a Two Rows Finger Seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. Jack; Kudriavtsev, V. V.; Choy, Fred K.; Proctor, Margaret P.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2002-10-01

    This proposal fits within the programmatic long-term development direction for turbine engine seals of the Seal Team of the Mechanical Component Branch. The intended work concerns the further development of the Finger Seal concept which is a compliant passive-adaptive seal meant to mitigate (and eventually replace) the shortcomings of the entire class of rigid seals used today (labyrinth, honeycomb, mechanical face seals) in the gas turbines and compressors,

  18. Electrical Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your injuries are depends on how strong the electric current was, what type of current it was, how it moved through your body, and how long you were exposed. Other factors include how ... you should see a doctor. You may have internal damage and not realize it.

  19. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase mortality 30% to 40% when patients with cutaneous burns and inhalation injury are compared with patients ... nasal hairs • Facial burns • Burns around the mouth • Mineral spirits – 104º F – paint thinner, brush cleaner. • Redness, ...

  20. Finger Counting and (2D:4D) Digit Ratio in Spatial-Numerical Association.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Marco; Natale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    It is reported that a canonical and cultural finger counting habit influences the spatial-numerical association. The digit ratio (the ratio between the lengths of the index and ring fingers as a putative indicator of prenatal androgen exposure) also plays an effect on space-number representation, reflecting a stronger left-to-right number representation in people with a short index finger and longer ring finger (i.e., 2D:4D ratio). It is unknown whether the finger counting habit and digit ratio have an effect on spatial-numerical association independently from each other or whether they interact with each other. In Study 1, the digit ratio and finger counting mapping were recorded in right handers. The participants performed number-to-position, digit string bisection, and physical line bisection tasks. In the number-to-position task, a finger counting effect was found, as well as a significant interaction between factors. A digit ratio effect was observed in the digit string bisection task. In Study 2, digit ratio and finger counting mapping were recorded in right and left handers. The results showed that the finger counting habit influenced the spatial biases in both numerical tasks. A significant interaction between finger counting and digit ratio was found in both numerical tasks when only the left hand was considered. The results are discussed considering the embodied nature of the spatial-numerical association. PMID:26562848

  1. Transcriptional cofactors of the FOG family interact with GATA proteins by means of multiple zinc fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A H; Liew, C; Holmes, M; Kowalski, K; Mackay, J; Crossley, M

    1999-01-01

    Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1) is a zinc finger protein that has been shown to interact physically with the erythroid DNA-binding protein GATA-1 and modulate its transcriptional activity. Recently, two new members of the FOG family have been identified: a mammalian protein, FOG-2, that also associates with GATA-1 and other mammalian GATA factors; and U-shaped, a Drosophila protein that interacts with the Drosophila GATA protein Pannier. FOG proteins contain multiple zinc fingers and it has been shown previously that the sixth finger of FOG-1 interacts specifically with the N-finger but not the C-finger of GATA-1. Here we show that fingers 1, 5 and 9 of FOG-1 also interact with the N-finger of GATA-1 and that FOG-2 and U-shaped also contain multiple GATA-interacting fingers. We define the key contact residues and show that these residues are highly conserved in GATA-interacting fingers. We examine the effect of selectively mutating the four interacting fingers of FOG-1 and show that each contributes to FOG-1's ability to modulate GATA-1 activity. Finally, we show that FOG-1 can repress GATA-1-mediated activation and present evidence that this ability involves the recently described CtBP co-repressor proteins that recognize all known FOG proteins. PMID:10329627

  2. The effect of conservative management in extensor plus finger after partial amputation to the ulnar digits--a case report.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Gangatharam; Le blanc, Monique

    2012-03-01

    The extensor plus finger after partial amputation of ulnar digits can affect the functions of the hand. The therapist intricate knowledge of intrinsic and extrinsic mechanism of fingers and creative approach in therapy would solve the puzzle when managing complex problem (extensor plus finger). Here we study a case of extensor plus finger after partial amputation of ulnar digits, its mechanism, and our experience with conservative management in managing extensor plus finger. PMID:22411113

  3. Mount Everest and Makalu cold injury amputation: 40 years on.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Shawnda A; Gorjanc, Jurij; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2014-04-01

    Freezing cold injuries (frostbite) of the extremities are a common injury among alpinists participating in high altitude expeditions, particularly during inclement weather conditions. Anecdotally, a digit that has suffered frostbite may be at greater risk to future cold injuries. In this case study, we profile a 62-year-old elite alpinist who suffered multiple digit amputations on both his hands and foot after historic summit attempts on Makalu (8481 m) and Mt. Everest (8848 m) in 1974-1979. We describe the clinical treatment he received at that time, and follow up his case 40 years after the first incidence of frostbite utilizing a noninvasive evaluation of hand and foot function to a cold stress test, including rates of re-warming to both injured and non-injured digits. Finger rates of recovery to the cold stress test were not different (0.8 vs. 1.0°C·min(-1)) except one (injured, left middle finger, distal phalanx; 0.4°C·min(-1)). Toe recovery rates after cold-water immersion were identical between previously injured and non-injured toes (0.2°C·min(-1)). Thermocouple data indicate that this alpinist's previous frostbite injuries may not have significantly altered his digit rates of re-warming during passive recovery compared to his non-injured digits. PMID:24559468

  4. Neurosensory sequelae assessed by thermal and vibrotactile perception thresholds after local cold injury

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Daniel; Burström, Lage; Lilliesköld, Victoria Heldestad; Nilsson, Tohr; Nordh, Erik; Wahlström, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background Local freezing cold injuries are common in the north and sequelae to cold injury can persist many years. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) can be used to assess neurosensory symptoms but has previously not been used on cold injury patients. Objective To evaluate neurosensory sequelae after local freezing cold injury by thermal and vibrotactile perception thresholds and by symptom descriptions. Design Fifteen patients with a local freezing cold injury in the hands or feet, acquired during military training, were studied with QST by assessment of vibrotactile (VPT), warmth (WPT) and cold (CPT) perception thresholds 4 months post-injury. In addition, a follow-up questionnaire, focusing on neurovascular symptoms, was completed 4 months and 4 years post-injury. Results QST demonstrated abnormal findings in one or both affected hands for VPT in 6 patients, for WPT in 4 patients and for CPT in 1 patient. In the feet, QST was abnormal for VPT in one or both affected feet in 8 patients, for WPT in 6 patients and for CPT in 4 patients. Freezing cold injury related symptoms, e.g. pain/discomfort when exposed to cold, cold sensation and white fingers were common at 4 months and persisted 4 years after the initial injury. Conclusions Neurosensory sequelae after local freezing cold injury, in terms of abnormal thermal and/or vibration perception thresholds, may last at least 4 months after the initial injury. Symptoms such as pain/discomfort at cold exposure, cold sensations and white fingers may persist at least 4 years after the initial injury. PMID:24624368

  5. Width of a ferrofluid finger: hysteresis and a double energy minimum.

    PubMed

    Hillier, Narelle J; Jackson, David P

    2007-03-01

    We study a ferrofluid in a horizontal Hele-Shaw geometry subjected to a vertical magnetic field. Specifically, we calculate the energy of a single ferrofluid finger using an idealized model for the finger. By minimizing this energy, we find the preferred finger width as a function of the applied field. Our model predicts a first order transition as the fluid abruptly transforms from a circular drop to a finite finger. This behavior arises because of a double energy minimum that yields two different stable configurations for the system. Interestingly, this system exhibits hysteresis as the circle-to-finger (increasing field) transition occurs at a different applied field than the finger-to-circle (decreasing field) transition. We carry out a simple experiment and observe good overall agreement with the theoretical predictions. PMID:17500798

  6. Tide-induced fingering flow during submarine groundwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greskowiak, Janek

    2013-04-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is a relevant component of the hydrological cycle (Moore, 2010). The discharge of fresh groundwater that originated from precipitation on the land typically occurs at the near shore scale (~ 10m-100m) and the embayment scale (~ 100m - 10km) (Bratton, 2010). In the recent years a number of studies revealed that tidal forcing has an important effect on the fresh SGD pattern in the beach zone, i.e., it leads to the formation of an upper saline recirculation cell and a lower "freshwater discharge tube" (Boufadel, 2000, Robinson et al., 2007; Kuan et al., 2012). Thereby the discharge of the fresh groundwater occurs near the low-tide mark. The shape and extent of the upper saline recirculation cell is mainly defined by the tidal amplitude, beach slope, fresh groundwater discharge rate and hydraulic conductivity (Robinson et al., 2007). In spite of fact that in this case sea water overlies less denser freshwater, all previous modeling studies suggested that the saline recirculation cell and the freshwater tube are rather stable. However, new numerical investigations indicate that there maybe realistic cases where the upper saline recirculation cell becomes unstable as a result of the density contrast to the underlying freshwater tube. In these cases salt water fingers develop and move downward, thereby penetrating the freshwater tube. To the author's knowledge, the present study is the first that illustrate the possibility of density induced fingering flow during near shore SGD. A total of 240 high resolution simulations with the density dependent groundwater modelling software SEAWAT-2000 (Langevin et al., 2007) has been carried out to identify the conditions under which salt water fingering starts to occur. The simulations are based on the field-scale model setup employed in Robinson et al. (2007). The simulation results indicate that a very flat beach slope of less than 1:35, a hydraulic conductivity of 10 m/d and already a tidal

  7. Somatosensory evoked potentials following proprioceptive stimulation of finger in man.

    PubMed

    Mima, T; Terada, K; Maekawa, M; Nagamine, T; Ikeda, A; Shibasaki, H

    1996-09-01

    Brisk passive flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the middle finger, produced by using a newly devised instrument, elicited evoked potentials on the scalp. The present study carefully excluded the possible contribution of sensory modalities other than proprioception. The initial part of cortical response was a positive deflexion at the contralateral central area (P1 at 34.6 ms after the stimulus). This was followed by a midfrontal negative wave (N1 at 44.8 ms) and a clear positivity at the contralateral centroparietal area (P2 at 48.0 ms). The evoked responses persisted in spite of the abolition of cutaneous and joint afferents of the finger caused by ischemic anesthesia, but they were lost by ischemic anesthesia of the forearm. Thus, the cortical evoked responses obtained in this study most probably reflect muscle afferent inputs. The scalp distribution of P1 suggested that its cortical generator source was different from that of the N20-P20 components of evoked potentials to electrical median nerve stimulation. Brodmann areas 2 and 3a of human brain, which are known to receive deep receptor inputs, are the most plausible generator sites for the early components of the proprioception-related evoked responses. The amplitude of P2 was related to the velocity but not to the magnitude of movement. In conclusion, the present study established a method for recording the evoked responses to the brisk passive movement of the finger joint, which mainly reflect the dynamic aspects of proprioception mediated through muscle afferent. PMID:8891653

  8. Optical Myography: Detecting Finger Movements by Looking at the Forearm.

    PubMed

    Nissler, Christian; Mouriki, Nikoleta; Castellini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    One of the crucial problems found in the scientific community of assistive/rehabilitation robotics nowadays is that of automatically detecting what a disabled subject (for instance, a hand amputee) wants to do, exactly when she wants to do it, and strictly for the time she wants to do it. This problem, commonly called "intent detection," has traditionally been tackled using surface electromyography, a technique which suffers from a number of drawbacks, including the changes in the signal induced by sweat and muscle fatigue. With the advent of realistic, physically plausible augmented- and virtual-reality environments for rehabilitation, this approach does not suffice anymore. In this paper, we explore a novel method to solve the problem, which we call Optical Myography (OMG). The idea is to visually inspect the human forearm (or stump) to reconstruct what fingers are moving and to what extent. In a psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects, we used visual fiducial markers (AprilTags) and a standard web camera to visualize the deformations of the surface of the forearm, which then were mapped to the intended finger motions. As ground truth, a visual stimulus was used, avoiding the need for finger sensors (force/position sensors, datagloves, etc.). Two machine-learning approaches, a linear and a non-linear one, were comparatively tested in settings of increasing realism. The results indicate an average error in the range of 0.05-0.22 (root mean square error normalized over the signal range), in line with similar results obtained with more mature techniques such as electromyography. If further successfully tested in the large, this approach could lead to vision-based intent detection of amputees, with the main application of letting such disabled persons dexterously and reliably interact in an augmented-/virtual-reality setup. PMID:27148039

  9. Finger coordination during moment production on a mechanically fixed object

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae Kun; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The moment production by several fingers on a mechanically fixed vertically oriented handle was studied under the systematic variations of task parameters such as (a) moment magnitude (1.0 Nm and 2.0 Nm) and (b) direction of moment production (into pronation and supination), as well as (c) vertical position of the handle from the moment axis, P (0, 2.0, 4.0, and 6.0 cm in both directions). The purpose of this study was twofold: to investigate the dependences between the task parameters and the performance variables and to test the mechanical advantage hypothesis. The performance variables changed symmetrically with P. In particular, magnitudes of the net horizontal and vertical forces both showed an S-shape change. The position of the point of zero free moment (PZFM) was determined. In the intermediate grasp locations (when 0

    fingers, the ratio of finger force to its moment arm was not constant. The mechanical advantage hypothesis was successful in explaining some of the data but could not cope with other findings. We assume, therefore, that this hypothesis is limited in its applicability and may be task and effector specific. PMID:15024540

  10. Inspiration-induced vascular responses in finger dorsum skin.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, Harvey N; Groseclose, Edye E

    2002-03-01

    A rapid and deep inspiration triggers a sympathetically mediated transient vasoconstriction of skin arterioles (inspiratory gasp vascular response, IGVR). Because the IGVR has been most often measured and studied in skin that is rich in arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs), such as the palmar aspect of the distal phalanx or plantar aspect of the toes, there is little information on its features in skin areas not dominated by thermoregulatory AVAs. Thus, the dependence of the magnitude of the IGVR on AVAs is unclear. We reasoned that if responses in a region of low AVA density, such as the finger dorsum distal phalanx, were comparable to those in AVA-rich skin, this would clarify the issue. Further, it might then be possible to use such areas to provide a useful complementary target for future study of sympathetically induced vasoconstriction. To test this, we determined the features of the finger dorsum IGVR in 28 healthy volunteers (age 19-57 years, 14 males) in whom distal phalanx skin blood perfusion (SBF) was monitored by laser-Doppler during 21 sequential IGVRs, each separated by 2 min. IGVR was quantified as the minimum SBF during each IGVR, expressed as a percentage of each immediately preceding 2-min SBF average. Results (mean +/- SD) revealed an overall IGVR of 72.2 +/- 16.7%, which is very near that reported from studies on the AVA-rich palmar finger pad. We therefore conclude that the IGVR does not depend on the presence of AVAs and that the dorsal distal phalanx is a viable alternative for the study of sympathetically related neurovascular responses. PMID:11866546

  11. Optical Myography: Detecting Finger Movements by Looking at the Forearm

    PubMed Central

    Nissler, Christian; Mouriki, Nikoleta; Castellini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    One of the crucial problems found in the scientific community of assistive/rehabilitation robotics nowadays is that of automatically detecting what a disabled subject (for instance, a hand amputee) wants to do, exactly when she wants to do it, and strictly for the time she wants to do it. This problem, commonly called “intent detection,” has traditionally been tackled using surface electromyography, a technique which suffers from a number of drawbacks, including the changes in the signal induced by sweat and muscle fatigue. With the advent of realistic, physically plausible augmented- and virtual-reality environments for rehabilitation, this approach does not suffice anymore. In this paper, we explore a novel method to solve the problem, which we call Optical Myography (OMG). The idea is to visually inspect the human forearm (or stump) to reconstruct what fingers are moving and to what extent. In a psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects, we used visual fiducial markers (AprilTags) and a standard web camera to visualize the deformations of the surface of the forearm, which then were mapped to the intended finger motions. As ground truth, a visual stimulus was used, avoiding the need for finger sensors (force/position sensors, datagloves, etc.). Two machine-learning approaches, a linear and a non-linear one, were comparatively tested in settings of increasing realism. The results indicate an average error in the range of 0.05–0.22 (root mean square error normalized over the signal range), in line with similar results obtained with more mature techniques such as electromyography. If further successfully tested in the large, this approach could lead to vision-based intent detection of amputees, with the main application of letting such disabled persons dexterously and reliably interact in an augmented-/virtual-reality setup. PMID:27148039

  12. Finger interaction during maximal radial and ulnar deviation efforts: experimental data and linear neural network modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, Todd C.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize finger interactions during radial/ulnar deviation, including interactions with flexion movements. Subjects performed single-finger and multi-finger maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and maximal forces and various indices of interaction among the fingers were quantified. MVCs in radial/ulnar deviation were 50–80% as strong as in flexion. Along with the ‘master’ fingers (i.e., those explicitly instructed to produce force), substantial force production was also observed in ‘slave’ fingers (i.e., those not explicitly instructed to produce force), a phenomenon termed: force ‘enslaving’. In addition, a drop in MVC during multi-finger tasks as compared to single finger tasks (force ‘deficit’) was also observed. A previously unreported phenomenon that we term: ‘preferred direction enslaving’ was also apparent; both master and slave fingers produced force in the instructed direction with a non-zero perpendicular component. Due to the architectural separation of the involved muscles, preferred direction enslaving provides strong evidence that enslaving results from neural rather than biomechanical factors. A final new phenomenon: ‘negative deficit’, or force ‘facilitation’ was observed in 46.4% of the trials in 21 out of 23 subjects during multi-finger lateral efforts and was further demonstrative of extensive interconnection among neurons serving hand muscles. The data were modeled with high accuracy (~4% mean square error) using a linear neural network with motor ‘commands’ as inputs and finger forces as outputs. The proposed network, equivalent to linear regression, can be used to determine the extent to which finger forces are influenced by peripheral constraints during functional prehensile activities. PMID:17334750

  13. Compliant finger sensor for sensorimotor studies in MEG and MR environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Yong, X.; Cheung, T. P. L.; Menon, C.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are widely used for functional brain imaging. The correlations between the sensorimotor functions of the hand and brain activities have been investigated in MEG/fMRI studies. Currently, limited information can be drawn from these studies due to the limitations of existing motion sensors that are used to detect hand movements. One major challenge in designing these motion sensors is to limit the signal interference between the motion sensors and the MEG/fMRI. In this work, a novel finger motion sensor, which contains low-ferromagnetic and non-conductive materials, is introduced. The finger sensor consists of four air-filled chambers. When compressed by finger(s), the pressure change in the chambers can be detected by the electronics of the finger sensor. Our study has validated that the interference between the finger sensor and an MEG is negligible. Also, by applying a support vector machine algorithm to the data obtained from the finger sensor, at least 11 finger patterns can be discriminated. Comparing to the use of traditional electromyography (EMG) in detecting finger motion, our proposed finger motion sensor is not only MEG/fMRI compatible, it is also easy to use. As the signals acquired from the sensor have a higher SNR than that of the EMG, no complex algorithms are required to detect different finger movement patterns. Future studies can utilize this motion sensor to investigate brain activations during different finger motions and correlate the activations with the sensory and motor functions respectively.

  14. Density fingering in spatially modulated Hele-Shaw cells

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Tamara; Horvath, Dezso; Toth, Agota

    2007-12-21

    Density fingering of the chlorite-tetrathionate reaction has been studied experimentally in a periodically heterogeneous Hele-Shaw cell where the heterogeneity is introduced in the form of spatial modulation of gap width along the front. Depending on the spatial wavelength, gap width, and chemical composition, three types of cellular structures have been observed. The initial evolution is characterized by dispersion curves, while the long time behavior is described by the change in the autocorrelation function of the front profile and in the mixing length of the patterns.

  15. Invariantly propagating dissolution fingers in finite-width systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutka, Filip; Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution fingers are formed in porous medium due to positive feedback between transport of reactant and chemical reactions [1-4]. We investigate two-dimensional semi-infinite systems, with constant width W in one direction. In numerical simulations we solve the Darcy flow problem combined with advection-dispersion-reaction equation for the solute transport to track the evolving shapes of the fingers and concentration of reactant in the system. We find the stationary, invariantly propagating finger shapes for different widths of the system, flow and reaction rates. Shape of the reaction front, turns out to be controlled by two dimensionless numbers - the (width-based) Péclet number PeW = vW/Dφ0 and Damköhler number DaW = ksW/v, where k is the reaction rate, s - specific reactive surface area, v - characteristic flow rate, D - diffusion coefficient of the solute, and φ0 - initial porosity of the rock matrix. Depending on PeW and DaW stationary shapes can be divided into seperate classes, e.g. parabolic-like and needle-like structures, which can be inferred from theoretical predictions. In addition we determine velocity of propagating fingers in time and concentration of reagent in the system. Our simulations are compared with natural forms (solution pipes). P. Ortoleva, J. Chadam, E. Merino, and A. Sen, Geochemical self-organization II: the reactive-infiltration instability, Am. J. Sci, 287, 1008-1040 (1987). M. L. Hoefner, and H. S. Fogler. Pore evolution and channel formation during flow and reaction in porous media, AIChE Journal 34, 45-54 (1988). C. E. Cohen, D. Ding, M. Quintard, and B. Bazin, From pore scale to wellbore scale: impact of geometry on wormhole growth in carbonate acidization, Chemical Engineering Science 63, 3088-3099 (2008). P. Szymczak and A. J. C. Ladd, Reactive-infiltration nstabilities in rocks. Part II: Dissolution of a porous matrix, J. Fluid Mech. 738, 591-630 (2014).

  16. Asymptomatic Papulo-nodules Localized to One Finger

    PubMed Central

    Rambhia, Kinjal D; Khopkar, Uday S

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous or deep granuloma annulare is a benign asymptomatic condition characterized by firm asymptomatic nodules in deep subcutaneous tissues that may be associated with intradermal lesions. A 53-year-old female presented with asymptomatic skin-colored, firm nodules over the right ring finger. Histopathology revealed a palisading granuloma with central degenerated collagen and mucin deposition in the dermis suggestive of granuloma annulare. Isolated and unilateral involvement of a single digit with clusters of nodules of subcutaneous granuloma annulare (GA) in an adult is rare and differentiation from its simulator rheumatoid nodule is essential. PMID:26538728

  17. Zinc finger proteins and the 3D organization of chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Feinauer, Christoph J; Hofmann, Andreas; Goldt, Sebastian; Liu, Lei; Máté, Gabriell; Heermann, Dieter W

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger domains are one of the most common structural motifs in eukaryotic cells, which employ the motif in some of their most important proteins (including TFIIIA, CTCF, and ZiF268). These DNA binding proteins contain up to 37 zinc finger domains connected by flexible linker regions. They have been shown to be important organizers of the 3D structure of chromosomes and as such are called the master weaver of the genome. Using NMR and numerical simulations, much progress has been made during the past few decades in understanding their various functions and their ways of binding to the DNA, but a large knowledge gap remains to be filled. One problem of the hitherto existing theoretical models of zinc finger protein DNA binding in this context is that they are aimed at describing specific binding. Furthermore, they exclusively focus on the microscopic details or approach the problem without considering such details at all. We present the Flexible Linker Model, which aims explicitly at describing nonspecific binding. It takes into account the most important effects of flexible linkers and allows a qualitative investigation of the effects of these linkers on the nonspecific binding affinity of zinc finger proteins to DNA. Our results indicate that the binding affinity is increased by the flexible linkers by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, they show that the binding map for proteins with more than one domain presents interesting structures, which have been neither observed nor described before, and can be interpreted to fit very well with existing theories of facilitated target location. The effect of the increased binding affinity is also in agreement with recent experiments that until now have lacked an explanation. We further explore the class of proteins with flexible linkers, which are unstructured until they bind. We have developed a methodology to characterize these flexible proteins. Employing the concept of barcodes, we propose a measure to compare

  18. Continuous Access to Competing Stimulation as Intervention for Self-Injurious Skin Picking in a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, Mara V.; Luiselli, James K.; Baker, Lorianne

    2009-01-01

    Children with autism frequently display self-injurious behavior (SIB), but skin picking--a less severe topography of SIB--has not been the focus of much clinical research. The present study evaluated a home-based intervention that was implemented with a 9-year-old girl who had autism and picked her fingers with resulting tissue damage. The…

  19. Analysis of 344 Hand Injuries in a Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Byung-Joon; Lee, Jung-Il; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Dong Chul; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify comprehensive hand injury patterns in different pediatric age groups and to assess their risk factors. Methods This retrospective study was conducted among patients younger than 16-year-old who presented to the emergency room of a general hospital located in Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea, and were treated for an injury of the finger or hand from January 2010 to December 2014. The authors analyzed the medical records of 344 patients. Age was categorized according to five groups. Results A total of 391 injury sites of 344 patients were evaluated for this study. Overall and in each group, male patients were in the majority. With regard to dominant or non-dominant hand involvement, there were no significant differences. Door-related injuries were the most common cause in the age groups of 0 to 3, 4 to 6, and 7 to 9 years. Sport/recreational activities or physical conflict injuries were the most common cause in those aged 10 to 12 and 13 to 15. Amputation and crushing injury was the most common type in those aged 0 to 3 and 4 to 6 years. However, in those aged 10 to 12 and 13 to 15, deep laceration and closed fracture was the most common type. With increasing age, closed injuries tended to increase more sharply than open injuries, extensor tendon rupture more than flexor injuries, and the level of injury moved proximally. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive overview of the epidemiology of hand injuries in the pediatric population. PMID:26848449

  20. Common substrate for mental arithmetic and finger representation in the parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Andres, Michael; Michaux, Nicolas; Pesenti, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    The history of mathematics provides several examples of the use of fingers to count or calculate. These observations converge with developmental data showing that fingers play a critical role in the acquisition of arithmetic knowledge. Further studies evidenced specific interference of finger movements with arithmetic problem solving in adults, raising the question of whether or not finger and number manipulations rely on common brain areas. In the present study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the possible overlap between the brain areas involved in mental arithmetic and those involved in finger discrimination. Solving subtraction and multiplication problems was found to increase cerebral activation bilaterally in the horizontal part of the intraparietal sulcus (hIPS) and in the posterior part of the superior parietal lobule (PSPL). Finger discrimination was associated with increased activity in a bilateral occipito-parieto-precentral network extending from the extrastriate body area to the primary somatosensory and motor cortices. A conjunction analysis showed common areas for mental arithmetic and finger representation in the hIPS and PSPL bilaterally. Voxelwise correlations further showed that finger discrimination and mental arithmetic induced a similar pattern of activity within the parietal areas only. Pattern similarity was more important for the left than for the right hIPS and for subtraction than for multiplication. These findings provide the first evidence that the brain circuits involved in finger representation also underlie arithmetic operations in adults. PMID:22634854

  1. Evaluation of finger millet incorporated noodles for nutritive value and glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Kamini; Srivastava, Sarita

    2014-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to develop finger millet incorporated noodles for diabetic patients. Finger millet variety VL-149 was taken. The finger millet flour and refined wheat flour (RWF) were evaluated for nutrient composition. The finger millet flour (FMF) was blended in various proportions (30 to 50%) in refined wheat flour and used for the preparation of noodles. Control consisted of RWF noodles. Sensory quality and nutrient composition of finger millet noodles was evaluated. The 30% finger millet incorporated noodles were selected best on the basis of sensory evaluation. Noodles in that proportion along with control were evaluated for glycemic response. Nutrient composition of noodles showed that 50% finger millet incorporated noodles contained highest amount of crude fat (1.15%), total ash (1.40%), crude fiber (1.28%), carbohydrate (78.54%), physiological energy (351.36 kcal), insoluble dietary fiber (5.45%), soluble dietary fiber (3.71%), iron (5.58%) and calcium (88.39%), respectively. However, control RWF noodles contained highest amount of starch (63.02%), amylose (8.72%) and amylopectin (54.29%). The glycemic index (GI) of 30% finger millet incorporated noodles (best selected by sensory evaluation) was observed significantly lower (45.13) than control noodles (62.59). It was found that finger millet flour incorporated noodles were found nutritious and showed hypoglycemic effect. PMID:24587528

  2. Evaluation of nutraceutical and antinutritional properties in barnyard and finger millet varieties grown in Himalayan region.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Priyankar; Dubey, Ashutosh; Verma, A K

    2016-06-01

    Five elite varieties of barnyard (Echinochloa frumentacea) and finger (Eleusine coracana) growing at northwestern Himalaya were investigated for nutraceutical and antinutritional properties. Barnyard millet contained higher amount of crude fiber, total dietary fiber, tryptophan content, total carotenoids, α-tocopherol compared to the finger millet whereas the finger millet contains higher amount of methionine and ascorbic acid as compared to the barnyard millet. The secondary metabolites of biological functions were analyzed and found that barnyard millet contained the higher amount of polyphenols, tannins and ortho-dihydroxy phenol content compared to finger millet. Among antinutitional compounds barnyard millet contained lower phytic acid content compare to finger millet whereas no significant difference in trypsin inhibition activity of barnyard millet and finger millet varieties were found. Barnyard millet contained higher acid phosphatase, α-galactosidase and α-amylase inhibitor activity compared to finger millet. Finger millet seeds contained about 10-13 folds higher calcium content and double amount of manganese content in comparison to barnyard millet seeds. Present study suggests that barnyard millet varieties studied under present investigation were found nutritionally superior compared to finger millet varieties. PMID:27478234

  3. Correlation Among Lip Print Pattern, Finger Print Pattern and Abo Blood Group

    PubMed Central

    N, Srilekha; A, Anuradha; Srinivas G, Vijay; Devi R, Sabitha

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To study correlation between lip print pattern, finger print pattern and ABO blood group. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 27 males and 27 females who were aged between 20–40 years. Lip prints, finger prints and ABO and Rh blood groups of each individual were recorded. Lip prints were classified, based on Suzuki’s and Tsuchihashi’s classification and finger prints were classified, based on Michael’s and Kucken’s classification. The results were statistically analyzed by using Chi–square test. Results: Complete vertical lip print, loop finger print pattern, O+ blood group were predominant among individual groups. O+ blood group-type I lip print combination, loop finger print pattern-type IV lip print pattern combination, O+ blood group-loop finger print pattern combination and both B+ blood group-loop finger print pattern- type IV lip print pattern combination and O+ blood group-loop finger print pattern-type I lip print pattern were predominant. Conclusion: Though lip prints, finger prints and blood groups had their own specificities, correlation of the three parameters did not show any significance. PMID:24783079

  4. A force commanded impedance control for a robot finger with uncertain kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Doulgeri, Z.; Arimoto, Suguru

    1999-10-01

    The authors consider the problem of impedance control for the physical interaction between the soft tip of a robot finger, where the nonlinear characteristics of the reproducing force and the finger dynamic parameters are unknown, and a rigid object or environment under kinematic uncertainties arising from both uncertain contact point location and uncertain rigid object geometry. An adaptive controller is proposed, and the asymptotic stability of the force regulation problem is shown for the planar case even when finger kinematics and rigid surface orientation are uncertain. Confirmation of the theoretical findings is done through simulation of a 3-degree-of-freedom planar robotic finger.

  5. Radiation safety education reduces the incidence of adult fingers on neonatal chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Sahota, N; Burbridge, B E; Duncan, M D

    2014-06-01

    A previous audit revealed a high frequency of adult fingers visualised on neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) chest radiographs-representing an example of inappropriate occupational radiation exposure. Radiation safety education was provided to staff and we hypothesised that the education would reduce the frequency of adult fingers visualised on NICU chest radiographs. Two cross-sectional samples taken before and after the administration of the education were compared. We examined fingers visualised directly in the beam, fingers in the direct beam but eliminated by technologists editing the image, and fingers under the cones of the portable x-ray machine. There was a 46.2% reduction in fingers directly in the beam, 50.0% reduction in fingers directly in the beam but cropped out, and 68.4% reduction in fingers in the coned area. There was a 57.1% overall reduction in adult fingers visualised, which was statistically significant (Z value - 7.48, P < 0.0001). This study supports radiation safety education in minimising inappropriate occupational radiation exposure. PMID:24705198

  6. Sensory Feedback Training for Improvement of Finger Perception in Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Pinto, Ana; Aschmann, Simon; Lützow, Ines; Lampe, Renée

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To develop and to test a feedback training system for improvement of tactile perception and coordination of fingers in children and youth with cerebral palsy. Methods. The fingers of 7 probands with cerebral palsy of different types and severity were stimulated using small vibration motors integrated in the fingers of a hand glove. The vibration motors were connected through a microcontroller to a computer and to a response 5-button keyboard. By pressing an appropriate keyboard button, the proband must indicate in which finger the vibration was felt. The number of incorrect responses and the reaction time were measured for every finger. The perception and coordination of fingers were estimated before and after two-week training using both clinical tests and the measurements. Results. Proper functioning of the developed system in persons with cerebral palsy was confirmed. The tactile sensation of fingers was improved in five of seven subjects after two weeks of training. There was no clear tendency towards improvement of selective use of fingers. Conclusion. The designed feedback system could be used to train tactile perception of fingers in children and youth with cerebral palsy. An extensive study is required to confirm these findings. PMID:26124965

  7. The Eagle Nebula's fingers - pointers to the earliest stages of star formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, G. J.; Nelson, R. P.; Holland, W. S.; Robson, E. I.; Greaves, J. S.; McCaughrean, M. J.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Balser, D. S.; Oka, T.; Sakamoto, S.; Hasegawa, T.; McCutcheon, W. H.; Matthews, H. E.; Fridlund, C. V. M.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Huldtgren, M.; Deane, J. R.

    1999-02-01

    Molecular line, millimetre/submillimetre continuum, and mid-IR observations are reported of the opaque fingers which cross the Eagle Nebula. The fingers are surprisingly warm when viewed in the CO J= 3-2 lines, with kinetic temperatures approaching 60 K, although the lines are relatively narrow. Most of the mass in the fingers is concentrated in cores which lie at the tips of the fingers, and contain from ~ 10 to 60 Msun, representing 55-80% of the mass of the individual fingers. The integrated mass contained in the three fingers and the nearby extended material is ~ 200 Msun. The velocity fields of the gas are complex and the material is very clumpy. The best evidence for coherent velocity structure is seen running along the central finger, which has a velocity gradient ~ 1.7 km s(-1) pc(-1) . The fingers contain several embedded submm continuum cores, with the most intense located at the tips of the fingers. The continuum spectra of these cores shows that they are much cooler, Tdust ~ 20 K, than Tgas ~ 60 K of their respective fingers. A simple thermal and chemical model of a finger was developed to study the physical environment, which takes into account the external UV illumination ( ~ 1700 G_0), and the chemical and thermal structure of a finger. The model predictions are consistent with all of the available observations. The fingers appear to have been formed after primordial dense clumps in the original cloud were irradiated by the light of its OB stars. These clumps then shielded material lying behind from the photoevaporative dispersal of the cloud, and facilitated the formation of the finger structures. The cores in the tips of the fingers appear to be at a very early stage of pre-protostellar development: there are no embedded infrared sources or molecular outflows present. The pressure inside the cores is just less than that of the surrounding gas, allowing them to be compressed by the external pressure. The cores are probably just starting the final

  8. Dendritic growth of single viscous finger under the influence of linear anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Mitsugu; Yamada, Hideaki

    1990-01-01

    As a hydrodynamic analog of dendritic crystal growth, we have performed viscous fingering experiments under the influence of linear anisotropy through a straight groove. A single finger on the groove always tends to grow faster, accompanied by side branches. It is found that (1) the finger tip profile is approximated by a parabola, (2) the finger tip speed v and the radius ρ satisfies the relation vρ 2 = constant for a wide range of v, and (3) the side branch spacing λ is approximately proportional to ρ. The crossover behavior to the constant ρ is also found for larger values of v in the v-ρ relation.

  9. Traumatic hand injuries: the emergency clinician's evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Aaron; Hern, H Gene

    2011-06-01

    At the start of your Saturday afternoon shift, you are not surprised to see that several patients are waiting to be seen for physical injuries. The first patient is a 34-year-old woman who sustained injury to her hand while skiing, 2 hours prior to her arrival. She reports falling with her hand still tethered to the pole's grip, landing on her outstretched right hand. She felt a painful snap in her right thumb, which still hurts, but otherwise she did not sustain any other trauma. Her only complaint currently is pain at the base of the right thumb. The patient is otherwise completely healthy, has no past medical or surgical history, and takes no medications. Upon examination, the affected hand appears to be surprisingly normal except for mild tenderness and swelling over the ulnar aspect of her first metacarpophalangeal joint and mildly decreased strength in her pincher grasp. X-ray reveals no fracture. You wonder if there is additional testing that should be done to evaluate this injury. You move on to a second patient, a 24-year-old man who cut his ring finger knuckle when he punched a wall 2 days ago. Physical examination reveals a small puncture wound over the IV metacarpophalangeal joint with mild swelling, erythema, warmth, and decreased range of motion secondary to pain. X-ray reveals no fracture, but there's something suspicious about this case. A third patient is a 37-year-old industrial worker whose finger contacted the stream of a high-powered grease injector. Physical examination reveals a small puncture wound over the volar proximal interphalangeal joint of his left long finger, mild tenderness to palpation over the area, and slight decreased range of motion secondary to pain. You wonder if the injury is as benign as it looks. PMID:22164514

  10. Stabilization of the total force in multi-finger pressing tasks studied with the 'inverse piano' technique.

    PubMed

    Martin, J R; Budgeon, M K; Zatsiorsky, V M; Latash, M L

    2011-06-01

    When one finger changes its force, other fingers of the hand can show unintended force changes in the same direction (enslaving) and in the opposite direction (error compensation). We tested a hypothesis that externally imposed changes in finger force predominantly lead to error compensation effects in other fingers thus stabilizing the total force. A novel device, the "inverse piano", was used to impose controlled displacements to one of the fingers over different magnitudes and at different rates. Subjects (n=10) pressed with four fingers at a constant force level and then one of the fingers was unexpectedly raised. The subjects were instructed not to interfere with possible changes in the finger forces. Raising a finger caused an increase in its force and a drop in the force of the other three fingers. Overall, total force showed a small increase. Larger force drops were seen in neighbors of the raised finger (proximity effect). The results showed that multi-finger force stabilizing synergies dominate during involuntary reactions to externally imposed finger force changes. Within the referent configuration hypothesis, the data suggest that the instruction "not to interfere" leads to adjustments of the referent coordinates of all the individual fingers. PMID:21450360

  11. Stabilization of the total force in multi-finger pressing tasks studied with the ‘inverse piano’ technique

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J.R.; Budgeon, M.K.; Zatsiorsky, V.M.; Latash, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    When one finger changes its force, other fingers of the hand can show unintended force changes in the same direction (enslaving) and in the opposite direction (error compensation). We tested a hypothesis that externally imposed changes in finger force predominantly lead to error compensation effects in other fingers thus stabilizing the total force. A novel device, the “inverse piano”, was used to impose controlled displacements to one of the fingers over different magnitudes and at different rates. Subjects (n =10) pressed with four fingers at a constant force level and then one of the fingers was unexpectedly raised. The subjects were instructed not to interfere with possible changes in the finger forces. Raising a finger caused an increase in its force and a drop in the force of the other three fingers. Overall, total force showed a small increase. Larger force drops were seen in neighbors of the raised finger (proximity effect). The results show that multi-finger force stabilizing synergies dominate during involuntary reactions to externally imposed finger force changes. Within the referent configuration hypothesis, the data suggest that the instruction “not to interfere” leads to adjustments of the referent coordinates of all the individual fingers. PMID:21450360

  12. Suppression of Viscous Fingers in Miscible Hele-Shaw Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Radha; Burton, Justin; Nagel, Sidney

    2011-03-01

    The flow of two immiscible fluids between closely-spaced parallel plates can be highly unstable and produce a series of complex fingering patterns when the less viscous injected fluid invades the more viscous one. Air displacing granular material in such a Hele-Shaw geometry shows similar patterns with sharp features consistent with the granular/air surface tension being virtually zero. Here we investigate the flow of two miscible fluids in a radial Hele-Shaw cell, with an inner liquid displacing an outer one of higher viscosity. We use two glycerol- water mixtures so that the viscosity can be tuned by varying the glycerol concentration. We vary the plate spacing and flow rate as well as the fluid viscosites. The non-equilibrium interfacial tension between these two miscible fluids is expected to be nearly zero. However, extrapolating to zero surface tension in the linear theory for Hele-Shaw flow does not describe our results. Specifically, flow becomes stable even when the inner liquid has a much lower viscosity than the outer one. At higher velocity, it is possible to see small amplitude fingering patterns develop.

  13. Evaluation of hydrodynamic scaling in porous media using finger dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selker, John S.; Schroth, Martin H.

    1998-08-01

    The use of dimensionless scaling is ubiquitous to hydrodynamic analysis, providing a powerful method of extending limited experimetnal results and generalizing theories. Miller and Miller [1956] contributed a scaling framework for immiscible fluid flow through porous media that relied on consistency of the contact angle between systems to be compared. It is common to assume that the effective contact angle will be zero in clean sand material where water is the wetting liquid. The well-documented unstable wetting process of fingered flow is used here as a diagnostic tool for the scaling relationships for infiltration into sandy media. Through comparison of finger cross sections produced using three liquids as well as various concentrations of anionic surfactant, it is shown that the zero contact angle assumption is very poor even for laboratory cleaned silica sand: Experimental results demonstrate effective contact angles approaching 60°. Scaling was effective for a given liquid between sands of differing particle size. These results suggest that caution should be exercised when applying scaling theory to initial wetting of porous media by liquids of differing gas-liquid interfacial tensions.

  14. Unveiling the Biometric Potential of Finger-Based ECG Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, André; Silva, Hugo; Fred, Ana

    2011-01-01

    The ECG signal has been shown to contain relevant information for human identification. Even though results validate the potential of these signals, data acquisition methods and apparatus explored so far compromise user acceptability, requiring the acquisition of ECG at the chest. In this paper, we propose a finger-based ECG biometric system, that uses signals collected at the fingers, through a minimally intrusive 1-lead ECG setup recurring to Ag/AgCl electrodes without gel as interface with the skin. The collected signal is significantly more noisy than the ECG acquired at the chest, motivating the application of feature extraction and signal processing techniques to the problem. Time domain ECG signal processing is performed, which comprises the usual steps of filtering, peak detection, heartbeat waveform segmentation, and amplitude normalization, plus an additional step of time normalization. Through a simple minimum distance criterion between the test patterns and the enrollment database, results have revealed this to be a promising technique for biometric applications. PMID:21837235

  15. Saffman-Taylor streamers: mutual finger interaction in spark formation.

    PubMed

    Luque, Alejandro; Brau, Fabian; Ebert, Ute

    2008-07-01

    Bunches of streamers form the early stages of sparks and lightning but theory presently concentrates on single streamers or on coarse approximations of whole breakdown trees. Here a periodic array of interacting streamer discharges in a strong homogeneous electric field is studied in density or fluid approximation in two dimensions. If the period of the streamer array is small enough, the streamers do not branch, but approach uniform translation. When the streamers are close to the branching regime, the enhanced field at the tip of the streamer is close to 2Einfinity, where Einfinity is the homogeneous field applied between the electrodes. We discuss a moving boundary approximation to the density model. This moving boundary model turns out to be essentially the same as the one for two-fluid Hele-Shaw flows. In two dimensions, this model possesses a known analytical solution. The shape of the two-dimensional interacting streamers in uniform motion obtained from the PDE simulations is actually well fitted by the analytically known "selected Saffman-Taylor finger." This finding helps to understand streamer interactions and raises new questions on the general theory of finger selection in moving boundary problems. PMID:18764034

  16. Decoding flexion of individual fingers using electrocorticographic signals in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubánek, J.; Miller, K. J.; Ojemann, J. G.; Wolpaw, J. R.; Schalk, G.

    2009-12-01

    Brain signals can provide the basis for a non-muscular communication and control system, a brain-computer interface (BCI), for people with motor disabilities. A common approach to creating BCI devices is to decode kinematic parameters of movements using signals recorded by intracortical microelectrodes. Recent studies have shown that kinematic parameters of hand movements can also be accurately decoded from signals recorded by electrodes placed on the surface of the brain (electrocorticography (ECoG)). In the present study, we extend these results by demonstrating that it is also possible to decode the time course of the flexion of individual fingers using ECoG signals in humans, and by showing that these flexion time courses are highly specific to the moving finger. These results provide additional support for the hypothesis that ECoG could be the basis for powerful clinically practical BCI systems, and also indicate that ECoG is useful for studying cortical dynamics related to motor function.

  17. Determining the bias and variance of a deterministic finger-tracking algorithm.

    PubMed

    Morash, Valerie S; van der Velden, Bas H M

    2016-06-01

    Finger tracking has the potential to expand haptic research and applications, as eye tracking has done in vision research. In research applications, it is desirable to know the bias and variance associated with a finger-tracking method. However, assessing the bias and variance of a deterministic method is not straightforward. Multiple measurements of the same finger position data will not produce different results, implying zero variance. Here, we present a method of assessing deterministic finger-tracking variance and bias through comparison to a non-deterministic measure. A proof-of-concept is presented using a video-based finger-tracking algorithm developed for the specific purpose of tracking participant fingers during a psychological research study. The algorithm uses ridge detection on videos of the participant's hand, and estimates the location of the right index fingertip. The algorithm was evaluated using data from four participants, who explored tactile maps using only their right index finger and all right-hand fingers. The algorithm identified the index fingertip in 99.78 % of one-finger video frames and 97.55 % of five-finger video frames. Although the algorithm produced slightly biased and more dispersed estimates relative to a human coder, these differences (x=0.08 cm, y=0.04 cm) and standard deviations (σ x =0.16 cm, σ y =0.21 cm) were small compared to the size of a fingertip (1.5-2.0 cm). Some example finger-tracking results are provided where corrections are made using the bias and variance estimates. PMID:26174712

  18. A new ocular trauma score in pediatric penetrating eye injuries

    PubMed Central

    Acar, U; Tok, O Y; Acar, D E; Burcu, A; Ornek, F

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To assess the prognostic value of a new ocular trauma score (OTS) in pediatric penetrating injuries. Methods Children ≤15 years of age that presented to the emergency room with penetrating eye injuries between April 2007 and August 2008 were evaluated prospectively. All patients were reviewed on the basis of age, gender, time of injury and how it happened, time of admission, time of surgery, type of penetrating injury, initial and final visual acuity (VA), and concomitant eye pathology. Injuries were classified based on a new OTS, and we assessed the relationship with final VA and the new OTS. Results In total, 30 eyes in 29 patients (41.38% female, 58.62% male) with a mean age of 6.83±4.00 years (range: 1–15 years) were included in the study. Initial VA, which was evaluated in 22 patients, was as follows: no light perception (NLP) in 2 (9.09%) patients, light perception (LP) to hand motion (HM) in 8 (36.36%) patients, counting fingers in 6 (27.27%) patients, 0.1–0.5 in 4 (18.18%) patients, and ≥0.6 in 2 (9.09%) patients. Final VA, which was evaluated in 27 patients, was as follows: NLP in 3 (11.11%) patients, LP to HM in 3 (11.11%) patients, counting fingers in 2 (7.41%) patients, 0.1–0.5 in 11 (40.74%) patients, and ≥0.6 in 8 (29.63%) patients. The relationship between initial VA and final VA was statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusions The new OTS calculated at initial examination may be of prognostic value in children with penetrating eye injuries. PMID:21252953

  19. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center PTACs Workspaces Log-in Search for: Traumatic Brain Injury A legacy resource from NICHCY Disability Fact ... in her. Back to top What is Traumatic Brain Injury? A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an ...

  1. Eye Injuries at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 20,000 workplace eye injuries happen each year. Injuries on the job often ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports that workplace eye injuries cost an estimated $300 million a year in ...

  2. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  4. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  5. Wounds and Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    An injury is damage to your body. It is a general term that refers to harm caused by accidents, ... millions of people injure themselves every year. These injuries range from minor to life-threatening. Injuries can ...

  6. Neuron selection based on deflection coefficient maximization for the neural decoding of dexterous finger movements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hee; Thakor, Nitish V; Schieber, Marc H; Kim, Hyoung-Nam

    2015-05-01

    Future generations of brain-machine interface (BMI) will require more dexterous motion control such as hand and finger movements. Since a population of neurons in the primary motor cortex (M1) area is correlated with finger movements, neural activities recorded in M1 area are used to reconstruct an intended finger movement. In a BMI system, decoding discrete finger movements from a large number of input neurons does not guarantee a higher decoding accuracy in spite of the increase in computational burden. Hence, we hypothesize that selecting neurons important for coding dexterous flexion/extension of finger movements would improve the BMI performance. In this paper, two metrics are presented to quantitatively measure the importance of each neuron based on Bayes risk minimization and deflection coefficient maximization in a statistical decision problem. Since motor cortical neurons are active with movements of several different fingers, the proposed method is more suitable for a discrete decoding of flexion-extension finger movements than the previous methods for decoding reaching movements. In particular, the proposed metrics yielded high decoding accuracies across all subjects and also in the case of including six combined two-finger movements. While our data acquisition and analysis was done off-line and post processing, our results point to the significance of highly coding neurons in improving BMI performance. PMID:25347884

  7. Losing dexterity: patterns of impaired coordination of finger movements in musician’s dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Shinichi; Tominaga, Kenta; Miyazaki, Fumio; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Extensive training can bring about highly-skilled action, but may also impair motor dexterity by producing involuntary movements and muscular cramping, as seen in focal dystonia (FD) and tremor. To elucidate the underlying neuroplastic mechanisms of FD, the present study addressed the organization of finger movements during piano performance in pianists suffering from the condition. Principal component (PC) analysis identified three patterns of fundamental joint coordination constituting finger movements in both patients and controls. The first two coordination patterns described less individuated movements between the “dystonic” finger and key-striking fingers for patients compared to controls. The third coordination pattern, representing the individuation of movements between the middle and ring fingers, was evident during a sequence of strikes with these fingers in controls, which was absent in the patients. Consequently, rhythmic variability of keystrokes was more pronounced during this sequence of strikes for the patients. A stepwise multiple-regression analysis further identified greater variability of keystrokes for individuals displaying less individuated movements between the affected and striking fingers. The findings suggest that FD alters dexterous joint coordination so as to lower independent control of finger movements, and thereby degrades fine motor control. PMID:26289433

  8. Place and Summation Coding for Canonical and Non-Canonical Finger Numeral Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Luca, Samuel; Lefevre, Nathalie; Pesenti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Fingers can be used to express numerical magnitudes, and cultural habits about the fixed order in which fingers are raised determine which configurations become canonical and which non-canonical. Although both types of configuration carry magnitude information, it has been shown that the canonical ones are recognized faster and directly linked to…

  9. 76 FR 62498 - Finger Lakes Railway Corp.-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-CSX Transportation, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Finger Lakes Railway Corp.--Acquisition and Operation Exemption-- CSX Transportation, Inc. Finger Lakes Railway Corp. (FGLK), a Class III carrier, has filed a verified notice...

  10. Nature and Culture of Finger Counting: Diversity and Representational Effects of an Embodied Cognitive Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Andrea; Beller, Sieghard

    2012-01-01

    Studies like the one conducted by Domahs et al. (2010, in Cognition) corroborate that finger counting habits affect how numbers are processed, and legitimize the assumption that this effect is culturally modulated. The degree of cultural diversity in finger counting, however, has been grossly underestimated in the field at large, which, in turn,…

  11. Age-related changes in the control of finger force vectors.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Shweta; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2010-12-01

    We explored changes in finger interaction in the process of healthy aging as a window into neural control strategies of natural movements. In particular, we quantified the amount of force produced by noninstructed fingers in different directions, the amount of force produced by the instructed finger orthogonally to the task direction, and the strength of multifinger synergies stabilizing the total force magnitude and direction during accurate force production. Healthy elderly participants performed accurate isometric force production tasks in five directions by individual fingers and by all four fingers acting together. Their data were compared with a dataset obtained in a similar earlier study of young subjects. Finger force vectors were measured using six-component force/torque sensors. Multifinger synergies were quantified using the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis. The elderly participants produced lower force magnitudes by noninstructed fingers and higher force magnitudes by instructed fingers in nontask directions. They showed strong synergies stabilizing the magnitude and direction of the total force vector. However, the synergy indexes were significantly lower than those observed in the earlier study of young subjects. The results are consistent with an earlier hypothesis of preferential weakening of intrinsic hand muscles with age. We interpret the findings as a shift in motor control from synergic to element-based, which may be causally linked to the documented progressive neuronal death at different levels of the neural axis. PMID:20829494

  12. Neuron Selection Based on Deflection Coefficient Maximization for the Neural Decoding of Dexterous Finger Movements

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Hee; Thakor, Nitish V.; Schieber, Marc H.; Kim, Hyoung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Future generations of brain-machine interface (BMI) will require more dexterous motion control such as hand and finger movements. Since a population of neurons in the primary motor cortex (M1) area is correlated with finger movements, neural activities recorded in M1 area are used to reconstruct an intended finger movement. In a BMI system, decoding discrete finger movements from a large number of input neurons does not guarantee a higher decoding accuracy in spite of the increase in computational burden. Hence, we hypothesize that selecting neurons important for coding dexterous flexion/extension of finger movements would improve the BMI performance. In this paper, two metrics are presented to quantitatively measure the importance of each neuron based on Bayes risk minimization and deflection coefficient maximization in a statistical decision problem. Since motor cortical neurons are active with movements of several different fingers, the proposed method is more suitable for a discrete decoding of flexion-extension finger movements than the previous methods for decoding reaching movements. In particular, the proposed metrics yielded high decoding accuracies across all subjects and also in the case of including six combined two-finger movements. While our data acquisition and analysis was done off-line and post processing, our results point to the significance of highly coding neurons in improving BMI performance. PMID:25347884

  13. 78 FR 68907 - Agency Information Collection (Hand and Finger Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Hand and Finger Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under..._submission@omb.eop.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900- NEW (Hand and Finger Conditions Disability... 20420, (202) 632-7492 or email crystal.rennie@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW...

  14. Optimized comb-drive finger shape for shock-resistant actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, Johan B. C.; Abelmann, Leon; Elwenspoek, Miko C.

    2010-10-01

    This work presents the analytical solution, finite-element analysis, realization and measurement of comb drives with finger shapes optimized for shock-resistant actuation. The available force for actuating an external load determines how large shock forces can be compensated for. The optimized finger shape provides much more available force than the standard straight finger shape, especially at large displacements. A graphical method is presented to determine whether stable voltage control is possible for a given available force curve. An analytical expression is presented for the finger shape that provides a constant large available force over the actuation range. The new finger shape is asymmetric, and the unit-cell width is equal to the unit-cell width of standard straight fingers that are commonly used, and can be used in all applications where a large force is required. Because the unit-cell width is not increased, straight fingers can be replaced by the new finger shape without changing the rest of the design. It is especially suited for shock-resistant positioning and for applications where a constant force is desired.

  15. The interaction of DNA with multi-Cys2His2 zinc finger proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2015-02-01

    The multi-Cys2His2 (mC2H2) zinc finger protein, like CTCF, plays a central role in the three-dimensional organization of chromatin and gene regulation. The interaction between DNA and mC2H2 zinc finger proteins becomes crucial to better understand how CTCF dynamically shapes the chromatin structure. Here, we study a coarse-grained model of the mC2H2 zinc finger proteins in complexes with DNA, and in particular, we study how a mC2H2 zinc finger protein binds to and searches for its target DNA loci. On the basis of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we present several interesting kinetic conformational properties of the proteins, such as the rotation-coupled sliding, the asymmetrical roles of different zinc fingers and the partial binding partial dangling mode. In addition, two kinds of studied mC2H2 zinc finger proteins, of CG-rich and AT-rich binding motif each, were able to recognize their target sites and slide away from their non-target sites, which shows a proper sequence specificity in our model and the derived force field for mC2H2-DNA interaction. A further application to CTCF shows that the protein binds to a specific DNA duplex only with its central zinc fingers. The zinc finger domains of CTCF asymmetrically bend the DNA, but do not form a DNA loop alone in our simulations.

  16. Impaired Finger Dexterity in Parkinson's Disease Is Associated with Praxis Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanbellingen, T.; Kersten, B.; Bellion, M.; Temperli, P.; Baronti, F.; Muri, R.; Bohlhalter, S.

    2011-01-01

    A controversial concept suggests that impaired finger dexterity in Parkinson's disease may be related to limb kinetic apraxia that is not explained by elemental motor deficits such as bradykinesia. To explore the nature of dexterous difficulties, the aim of the present study was to assess the relationship of finger dexterity with ideomotor praxis…

  17. Viscous fingering with chemical reaction: effect of in-situ production of surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Juan; Homsy, G. M.

    2003-04-01

    Viscous fingering experiments are performed in a radial Hele-Shaw cell for a liquid liquid system in the presence of a well-characterized interfacial reaction capable of changing the surface tension on the time scale of the experiments. The reaction is a neutralization of a fatty acid by an alkaline material to form a surfactant, which exhibits first-order kinetics for the surface tension as a function of time. The experiments are carried out for capillary numbers, Ca, high enough for the fingering to always be in the fractal regime, and for a wide range of Damköhler numbers, Da. The fingers are typically wider in the presence of the chemical reaction than the non-reactive case. We observe two different-behaviours of the reactive fingering patterns. For intermediate values of Da, 0.5 < Da < 4, the fractal dimension d_{f} is higher than the classical value measured for the non-reactive fingering patterns and reaches a maximum of about 1.9. For both small (Da < 0.5) and high Da (Da > 4), the reactive fingering patterns are similar to the fingers with no reaction: the fractal dimension is found to be the same for both systems. These effects are consistent with the hypothesis that Marangoni stresses are present and produce wider fingers.

  18. Finger flexion does not contribute to ball speed in overarm throws.

    PubMed

    Hore, J; Watts, S; Martin, J

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether, in overarm throws made by recreational ball players, the fingers undergo flexion movement before ball release and thereby contribute to the generation of ball speed. To obtain the high resolution needed to answer this question, the magnetic-field search-coil technique was used and the data were sampled at 1000 Hz. The subjects, who were either seated or were standing, threw tennis balls at different speeds at a target 3 m away. Angular positions in three dimensions were simultaneously recorded of the distal phalanx of the middle finger and hand and, in additional experiments to determine the mechanism of ball release in more detail, three middle finger phalanges and the hand. Different phases of ball release were determined by pressure-sensitive microswitches on the proximal and distal phalanges of the middle finger. Irrespective of whether the subjects were seated or were standing, for all throws at all speeds, finger flexion did not occur before ball release. That is, up until final release of the ball, the fingers only underwent extension associated with hand opening. For fast throws, at the instant of final ball release the fingers began to flex, presumably as a result of reactive forces associated with release of the ball. Thus, in overarm throws made by recreational ball players, finger flexion movement does not appear to contribute to the generation of ball speed. PMID:8887213

  19. Neural network committees for finger joint angle estimation from surface EMG signals

    PubMed Central

    Shrirao, Nikhil A; Reddy, Narender P; Kosuri, Durga R

    2009-01-01

    Background In virtual reality (VR) systems, the user's finger and hand positions are sensed and used to control the virtual environments. Direct biocontrol of VR environments using surface electromyography (SEMG) signals may be more synergistic and unconstraining to the user. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop a technique to predict the finger joint angle from the surface EMG measurements of the extensor muscle using neural network models. Methodology SEMG together with the actual joint angle measurements were obtained while the subject was performing flexion-extension rotation of the index finger at three speeds. Several neural networks were trained to predict the joint angle from the parameters extracted from the SEMG signals. The best networks were selected to form six committees. The neural network committees were evaluated using data from new subjects. Results There was hysteresis in the measured SMEG signals during the flexion-extension cycle. However, neural network committees were able to predict the joint angle with reasonable accuracy. RMS errors ranged from 0.085 ± 0.036 for fast speed finger-extension to 0.147 ± 0.026 for slow speed finger extension, and from 0.098 ± 0.023 for the fast speed finger flexion to 0.163 ± 0.054 for slow speed finger flexion. Conclusion Although hysteresis was observed in the measured SEMG signals, the committees of neural networks were able to predict the finger joint angle from SEMG signals. PMID:19154615

  20. Birth Outcomes across Three Rural-Urban Typologies in the Finger Lakes Region of New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strutz, Kelly L.; Dozier, Ann M.; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Glantz, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The study is a descriptive, population-based analysis of birth outcomes in the New York State Finger Lakes region designed to determine whether perinatal outcomes differed across 3 rural typologies. Methods: Hospital birth data for the Finger Lakes region from 2006 to 2007 were used to identify births classified as low birthweight (LBW),…

  1. Basketball Injuries: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple Jr., David F.

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses reasons for the increase in basketball-related injuries, describes common injuries, outlines steps for diagnosis and treatment, and offers recovery and prevention strategies. (IAH)

  2. Perioperative lung injury.

    PubMed

    Slinger, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Patients are at risk for several types of lung injury in the perioperative period. These injuries include atelectasis, pneumonia, pneumothorax, bronchopleural fistula, acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Anesthetic management can cause, exacerbate or ameliorate most of these injuries. Clinical research trends show that traditional protocols for perioperative mechanical ventilation, using large tidal volumes without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can cause a sub-clinical lung injury and this injury becomes clinically important when any additional lung injury is added. Lung-protective ventilation strategies using more physiologic tidal volumes and appropriate levels of PEEP can decrease the extent of this injury. PMID:18494396

  3. Evaluation of Novel Design Strategies for Developing Zinc Finger Nucleases Tools for Treating Human Diseases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bach, Christian; Sherman, William; Pallis, Jani; Patra, Prabir; Bajwa, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are associated with cell death and apoptosis by binding at countless undesired locations. This cytotoxicity is associated with the binding ability of engineered zinc finger domains to bind dissimilar DNA sequences with high affinity. In general, binding preferences of transcription factors are associated with significant degenerated diversity and complexity which convolutes the design and engineering of precise DNA binding domains. Evolutionary success of natural zinc finger proteins, however, evinces that nature created specific evolutionary traits and strategies, such as modularity and rank-specific recognition to cope with binding complexity that are critical for creating clinical viable toolsmore » to precisely modify the human genome. Our findings indicate preservation of general modularity and significant alteration of the rank-specific binding preferences of the three-finger binding domain of transcription factor SP1 when exchanging amino acids in the 2nd finger.« less

  4. Salt-Finger Convection in a Stratified Fluid Layer Induced by Thermal and Solutal Capillary Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuan F.; Chan, Cho Lik

    1996-01-01

    Salt-finger convection in a double-diffusive system is a motion driven by the release of gravitational potential due to different diffusion rates. Normally, when the gravitational field is reduced, salt-finger convection together with other convective motions driven by buoyancy forces will be rapidly suppressed. However, because the destabilizing effect of the concentration gradient is amplified by the Lewis number, with values varying from 10(exp 2) for aqueous salt solutions to 10 (exp 4) for liquid metals, salt-finger convection may be generated at much reduced gravity levels. In the microgravity environment, the surface tension gradient assumes a dominant role in causing fluid motion. In this paper, we report on some experimental results showing the generation of salt-finger convection due to capillary motio on the surface of a stratified fluid layer. A numerical simulation is presented to show the cause of salt-finger convection.

  5. Sequence Discrimination by Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of a DNA Binding Zinc Finger Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogos, Joseph A.; Hsu, Tien; Bolton, Jesse; Kafatos, Fotis C.

    1992-09-01

    Two major developmentally regulated isoforms of the Drosophila chorion transcription factor CF2 differ by an extra zinc finger within the DNA binding domain. The preferred DNA binding sites were determined and are distinguished by an internal duplication of TAT in the site recognized by the isoform with the extra finger. The results are consistent with modular interactions between zinc fingers and trinucleotides and also suggest rules for recognition of AT-rich DNA sites by zinc finger proteins. The results show how modular finger interactions with trinucleotides can be used, in conjunction with alternative splicing, to alter the binding specificity and increase the spectrum of sites recognized by a DNA binding domain. Thus, CF2 may potentially regulate distinct sets of target genes during development.

  6. Analysis of suitable geometrical parameters for designing a tendon-driven under-actuated mechanical finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penta, Francesco; Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to optimize the geometrical parameters of an under-actuated mechanical finger by conducting a theoretical analysis of these parameters. The finger is actuated by a flexion tendon and an extension tendon. The considered parameters are the tendon guide positions with respect to the hinges. By applying such an optimization, the correct kinematical and dynamical behavior of the closing cycle of the finger can be obtained. The results of this study are useful for avoiding the snapthrough and the single joint hyperflexion, which are the two breakdowns most frequently observed during experimentation on prototypes. Diagrams are established to identify the optimum values for the tendon guides position of a finger with specified dimensions. The findings of this study can serve as guide for future finger design.

  7. Role of zinc finger structure in nuclear localization of transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tatsuo; Azumano, Makiko; Uwatoko, Chisana; Itoh, Kohji Kuwahara, Jun

    2009-02-27

    Transcription factor Sp1 is localized in the nucleus and regulates gene expression. Our previous study demonstrated that the carboxyl terminal region of Sp1 containing 3-zinc finger region as DNA binding domain can also serve as nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, the nuclear transport mechanism of Sp1 has not been well understood. In this study, we performed a gene expression study on mutant Sp1 genes causing a set of amino acid substitutions in zinc finger domains to elucidate nuclear import activity. Nuclear localization of the GFP-fused mutant Sp1 proteins bearing concomitant substitutions in the first and third zinc fingers was highly inhibited. These mutant Sp1 proteins had also lost the binding ability as to the GC box sequence. The results suggest that the overall tertiary structure formed by the three zinc fingers is essential for nuclear localization of Sp1 as well as dispersed basic amino acids within the zinc fingers region.

  8. The PHD fingers of MLL block MLL fusion protein–mediated transformation

    PubMed Central

    Muntean, Andrew G.; Giannola, Diane; Udager, Aaron M.

    2008-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene are associated with aggressive acute lymphoid and myeloid leukemias. These translocations are restricted to an 8.3-kb breakpoint region resulting in fusion of amino terminal MLL sequences in frame to 1 of more than 60 different translocation partners. The translocations consistently delete the plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers and more carboxyl terminal MLL sequences. The function of the PHD fingers is obscure and their specific role in transformation has not been explored. Here we show that inclusion of the PHD fingers in the MLL fusion protein MLL-AF9 blocked immortalization of hematopoietic progenitors. Inclusion of 2 or more PHD fingers reduced association with the Hoxa9 locus and suppressed Hoxa9 up-regulation in hematopoietic progenitors. These data provide an explanation for why MLL translocation breakpoints exclude the PHD fingers and suggest a possible role for these domains in regulating the function of wild-type MLL. PMID:18796627

  9. Transfer of piano practice in fast performance of skilled finger movements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transfer of learning facilitates the efficient mastery of various skills without practicing all possible sensory-motor repertoires. The present study assessed whether motor practice at a submaximal speed, which is typical in sports and music performance, results in an increase in a maximum speed of finger movements of trained and untrained skills. Results Piano practice of sequential finger movements at a submaximal speed over days progressively increased the maximum speed of trained movements. This increased maximum speed of finger movements was maintained two months after the practice. The learning transferred within the hand to some extent, but not across the hands. Conclusions The present study confirmed facilitation of fast finger movements following a piano practice at a submaximal speed. In addition, the findings indicated the intra-manual transfer effects of piano practice on the maximum speed of skilled finger movements. PMID:24175946

  10. Evaluation of Novel Design Strategies for Developing Zinc Finger Nucleases Tools for Treating Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Christian; Sherman, William; Pallis, Jani; Bajwa, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are associated with cell death and apoptosis by binding at countless undesired locations. This cytotoxicity is associated with the binding ability of engineered zinc finger domains to bind dissimilar DNA sequences with high affinity. In general, binding preferences of transcription factors are associated with significant degenerated diversity and complexity which convolutes the design and engineering of precise DNA binding domains. Evolutionary success of natural zinc finger proteins, however, evinces that nature created specific evolutionary traits and strategies, such as modularity and rank-specific recognition to cope with binding complexity that are critical for creating clinical viable tools to precisely modify the human genome. Our findings indicate preservation of general modularity and significant alteration of the rank-specific binding preferences of the three-finger binding domain of transcription factor SP1 when exchanging amino acids in the 2nd finger. PMID:24808958

  11. Dermatoglyphic analysis of La Liébana (Cantabria, Spain). 2. Finger ridge counts.

    PubMed

    Martín, J; Gómez, P

    1993-06-01

    The results of univariate and multivariate analyses of the quantitative finger dermatoglyphic traits (i.e. ridge counts) of a sample of 109 males and 88 females from La Liébana (Cantabria, Spain) are reported. Univariate results follow the trends usually found in previous studies, e.g., ranking of finger ridge counts, bilateral asymmetry or shape of the distributions of the frequencies. However, sexual dimorphism is nearly inexistent concerning finger ridge counts. This lack of dimorphism could be related to certain characteristics of the distribution of finger dermatoglyphic patterns previously reported by the same authors. The multivariate description has been carried out by means of principal component analysis (with varimax rotation to obtain the final solution) of the correlation matrices computed from the 10 maximal finger ridge counts. Although the results do not necessarily prove the concept of developmental fields ("field theory" and later modifications), some precepts of the theory are present: field polarization and field overlapping. PMID:8333735

  12. Single Degree-of-Freedom Exoskeleton Mechanism Design for Finger Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Wolbrecht, Eric T.; Reinkensmeyer, David J.; Perez-Gracia, Alba

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the kinematic design of a single degree-of-freedom exoskeleton mechanism: a planar eight-bar mechanism for finger curling. The mechanism is part of a finger-thumb robotic device for hand therapy that will allow users to practice key pinch grip and finger-thumb opposition, allowing discrete control inputs for playing notes on a musical gaming interface. This approach uses the mechanism to generate the desired grasping trajectory rather than actuating the joints of the fingers and thumb independently. In addition, the mechanism is confined to the back of the hand, so as to allow sensory input into the palm of the hand, minimal size and apparent inertia, and the possibility of placing multiple mechanisms side-by-side to allow control of individual fingers. PMID:22275628

  13. Structural model of ubiquitin transfer onto an artificial RING finger as an E3 ligase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide

    2014-10-01

    The artificial WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger was designed via ``α-helical region substitution'', and its structural model for the attachment of activated ubiquitin has been demonstrated. Chemical modifications of Cys residues, the circular dichroism spectra, and substrate-independent ubiquitination assays illustrated that the WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger has E3 activity, and it is ubiquitinated via Lys14. Homology modeling calculations revealed that the WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger possesses a classical RING fold for specific E2-E3 binding. The docking poses of the WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger with the UbcH5b-ubiquitin conjugate provided insight into its functional E2 interaction and development of ubiquitination at the atomic level. The structural model of the artificial WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger proposed by the present work is useful and may help to extend the strategy of α-helical region substitution.

  14. Correlation between functional and binding activities of designer zinc-finger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jong Seok

    2006-01-01

    Rapid progress in the ability to develop and utilize zinc-finger proteins with customized sequence specificity have led to their increasing use as tools for modulation of target gene transcription in the post-genomic era. In the present paper, a series of in vitro binding assays and in vivo reporter analyses were used to demonstrate that a zinc-finger protein can effectively specify a base at each position of the target site in vivo and that functional activity of the zinc-finger protein as either a transcriptional repressor or activator is positively correlated with its binding affinity. In addition, this correlation can be extended to artificial engineered zinc-finger proteins. These data suggest that the binding affinity of designer zinc-finger proteins with novel specificity might be a determinant for their ability to regulate transcription of a gene of interest. PMID:17176251

  15. Severe onychophagia and finger mutilation associated with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Nino, Gustavo; Singareddy, Ravi

    2013-04-15

    Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can lead to important neurobehavioral consequences including cognitive deficits, hyperactivity/inattention, daytime sleepiness, and mood disturbances. Interestingly, the potential role of OSA in the pathogenesis of impulse-control disorders such as nail biting (onychophagia) is currently unknown. We present a case of a man with severe onychophagia and biting-induced finger mutilation that was completely resolved after diagnosis and treatment of severe OSA. Accordingly, this report represents an important clinical observation that suggests a connection between sleep physiology and the neurobiological circuits implicated in the regulation of impulse-control behaviors. Further research in this area may improve our current understanding of the neurobehavioral consequences of untreated OSA. PMID:23585754

  16. FingerSight: Fingertip Haptic Sensing of the Visual Environment

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Samantha; Galeotti, John; Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta; Siegel, Mel

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel device mounted on the fingertip for acquiring and transmitting visual information through haptic channels. In contrast to previous systems in which the user interrogates an intermediate representation of visual information, such as a tactile display representing a camera generated image, our device uses a fingertip-mounted camera and haptic stimulator to allow the user to feel visual features directly from the environment. Visual features ranging from simple intensity or oriented edges to more complex information identified automatically about objects in the environment may be translated in this manner into haptic stimulation of the finger. Experiments using an initial prototype to trace a continuous straight edge have quantified the user's ability to discriminate the angle of the edge, a potentially useful feature for higher levels analysis of the visual scene. PMID:27170882

  17. Acute idiopathic blue fingers: a young man with Achenbach's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hidemi; Uchida, Haruhito Adam; Okuyama, Yuka; Wada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 20-year-old man presenting with acute painful blue fingers. All physical findings, including an Allen test, were normal, and systematic symptoms frequently seen in collagen diseases were absent. Although we performed a wide variety of investigations including medical imaging, no specific abnormal findings were observed. Skin biopsy pathology was an important reference. The patient's symptoms gradually improved and were completely resolved without specific treatment. Based on the clinical presentation and course, we gave a diagnosis of Achenbach's syndrome, developed in a young male. Achenbach's syndrome is rare, but still may be encountered in clinical practice. The symptoms can be startling to the patient, eliciting fear of something terrible when, in fact, the syndrome is relatively benign and has a good prognosis. Recognising this disease quickly after presentation helps to eliminate the anxiety of the patient, as well as reducing excessively invasive investigations. We present a case report to enlighten Achenbach's syndrome. PMID:27090544

  18. Inhibition of virus DNA replication by artificial zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed

    Sera, Takashi

    2005-02-01

    Prevention of virus infections is a major objective in agriculture and human health. One attractive approach to the prevention is inhibition of virus replication. To demonstrate this concept in vivo, an artificial zinc finger protein (AZP) targeting the replication origin of the Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV), a model DNA virus, was created. In vitro DNA binding assays indicated that the AZP efficiently blocked binding of the viral replication protein (Rep), which initiates virus replication, to the replication origin. All of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the AZP showed phenotypes strongly resistant to virus infection, and 84% of the transgenic plants showed no symptom. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that BSCTV replication was completely suppressed in the transgenic plants. Since the mechanism of viral DNA replication is well conserved among plants and mammals, this approach could be applied not only to agricultural crop protection but also to the prevention of virus infections in humans. PMID:15681461

  19. Stabilization of posture by precision contact of the index finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, M.; Ventura, J.; Lackner, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Postural sway during quiet stance increases if sight of the surroundings is denied. We studied how sensory-motor information about body displacement provided by contact of the index finger with a stationary bar can be used to stabilize balance in the absence of vision. Stabilization equivalent to the contribution conferred by vision was achieved at contact force levels less than 1 N. This value is much below that necessary to provide significant physical stabilization of the body. We interpret our findings in relation to tactile thresholds for motion detection, "precision grip," and proprioceptive and sensory-motor information about the configuration of the arm to the torso. In conditions allowing higher force levels at the fingertip (5-8 N), subjects assumed a passively stable state to stabilize their stance.

  20. Keep your fingers crossed!: how superstition improves performance.

    PubMed

    Damisch, Lysann; Stoberock, Barbara; Mussweiler, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Superstitions are typically seen as inconsequential creations of irrational minds. Nevertheless, many people rely on superstitious thoughts and practices in their daily routines in order to gain good luck. To date, little is known about the consequences and potential benefits of such superstitions. The present research closes this gap by demonstrating performance benefits of superstitions and identifying their underlying psychological mechanisms. Specifically, Experiments 1 through 4 show that activating good-luck-related superstitions via a common saying or action (e.g., "break a leg," keeping one's fingers crossed) or a lucky charm improves subsequent performance in golfing, motor dexterity, memory, and anagram games. Furthermore, Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrate that these performance benefits are produced by changes in perceived self-efficacy. Activating a superstition boosts participants' confidence in mastering upcoming tasks, which in turn improves performance. Finally, Experiment 4 shows that increased task persistence constitutes one means by which self-efficacy, enhanced by superstition, improves performance. PMID:20511389

  1. Surgical treatment of degenerative osteoarthritis of the fingers.

    PubMed

    Rongières, M

    2013-09-01

    Degenerative osteoarthritis of the long fingers is rare and surgical management is often necessary if there is joint pain, however this indication should not only be based on radiographic imaging. The specific anatomical problems of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints are described. The surgical approach for each joint is described as well as functional management, in particular that of the extensor apparatus. Mobility should always be preserved for the MCP, arthroplasties are recommended for the PIP except for the index, and arthrodesis for the DIP. The different and most frequently used implants are described as well as the indications and expected results. The indications are discussed in relation to the limited results in the literature as well as the preferences of a panel of French hand surgeons. PMID:23684245

  2. Stationary patterns in centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Gabriel D; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A

    2014-12-01

    A vortex sheet formalism is used to search for equilibrium shapes in the centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering problem. We study the development of interfacial instabilities when a viscous fluid surrounded by another of smaller density flows in the confined environment of a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. The peculiarity of the situation is associated to the fact that, due to a chemical reaction, the two-fluid boundary becomes an elastic layer. The interplay between centrifugal and elastic forces leads to the formation of a rich variety of stationary shapes. Visually striking equilibrium morphologies are obtained from the numerical solution of a nonlinear differential equation for the interface curvature (the shape equation), determined by a zero vorticity condition. Classification of the various families of shapes is made via two dimensionless parameters: an effective bending rigidity (ratio of elastic to centrifugal effects) and a geometrical radius of gyration. PMID:25615189

  3. Stationary patterns in centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Gabriel D.; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A.

    2014-12-01

    A vortex sheet formalism is used to search for equilibrium shapes in the centrifugally driven interfacial elastic fingering problem. We study the development of interfacial instabilities when a viscous fluid surrounded by another of smaller density flows in the confined environment of a rotating Hele-Shaw cell. The peculiarity of the situation is associated to the fact that, due to a chemical reaction, the two-fluid boundary becomes an elastic layer. The interplay between centrifugal and elastic forces leads to the formation of a rich variety of stationary shapes. Visually striking equilibrium morphologies are obtained from the numerical solution of a nonlinear differential equation for the interface curvature (the shape equation), determined by a zero vorticity condition. Classification of the various families of shapes is made via two dimensionless parameters: an effective bending rigidity (ratio of elastic to centrifugal effects) and a geometrical radius of gyration.

  4. Modular synthetic inverters from zinc finger proteins and small RNAs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hsia, Justin; Holtz, William J.; Maharbiz, Michel M.; Arcak, Murat; Keasling, Jay D.; Rao, Christopher V.

    2016-02-17

    Synthetic zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) can be created to target promoter DNA sequences, repressing transcription. The binding of small RNA (sRNA) to ZFP mRNA creates an ultrasensitive response to generate higher effective Hill coefficients. Here we combined three “off the shelf” ZFPs and three sRNAs to create new modular inverters in E. coli and quantify their behavior using induction fold. We found a general ordering of the effects of the ZFPs and sRNAs on induction fold that mostly held true when combining these parts. We then attempted to construct a ring oscillator using our new inverters. In conclusion, our chosenmore » parts performed insufficiently to create oscillations, but we include future directions for improvement upon our work presented here.« less

  5. Modular Synthetic Inverters from Zinc Finger Proteins and Small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Justin; Holtz, William J.; Maharbiz, Michel M.; Arcak, Murat; Keasling, Jay D.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) can be created to target promoter DNA sequences, repressing transcription. The binding of small RNA (sRNA) to ZFP mRNA creates an ultrasensitive response to generate higher effective Hill coefficients. Here we combined three “off the shelf” ZFPs and three sRNAs to create new modular inverters in E. coli and quantify their behavior using induction fold. We found a general ordering of the effects of the ZFPs and sRNAs on induction fold that mostly held true when combining these parts. We then attempted to construct a ring oscillator using our new inverters. Our chosen parts performed insufficiently to create oscillations, but we include future directions for improvement upon our work presented here. PMID:26886888

  6. Distinct neural processes of bodily awareness in crossed fingers illusion.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Takayasu; Mogi, Ken

    2009-03-25

    The tactile reassignment process supports the flexible and dynamic changes of body schema in various situations such as those involving tool use. Here, we show that there exist two distinct neural processes in the dynamical reassignment process. One process is involved in identifying the body part where the tactile stimuli are applied, whereas the other is involved in the assignment of the tactile stimuli in the external space including one's body. These processes, combined together, would facilitate the quick and appropriate acquisition of information from the environment, resulting in the speedy spatial perception and execution of motor activities. In addition, we show that the body posture affects the accuracy of tactile localization in the crossed fingers illusion. PMID:19190522

  7. Miscible viscous fingering involving production of gel by chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hoshino, Kenichi

    2015-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated miscible viscous fingering with chemical reactions producing gel. Here, two systems were employed. In one system, sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution and aluminum ion (Al3 +) solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In another system, SPA solution and ferric ion (Fe3 +) solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In the case of Al3 +, displacement efficiency was smaller than that in the non-reactive case, whereas in the case of Fe3 +, the displacement efficiency was larger. We consider that the difference in change of the patterns in the two systems will be caused by the difference in the properties of the gels. Therefore, we have measured the rheological properties of the gels by means of a rheometer. We discuss relationship between the VF patterns and the rheological measurement.

  8. Nasopharyngeal foreign body triggered by a blind finger sweep.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takaaki; Inoue, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 1-year-old boy suddenly began choking and coughing after ingesting a coin. The child's mother attempted to extract the coin by inserting her fingers in his mouth and sweeping the oral cavity. The mother felt the object momentarily with her fingertips but was unable to retrieve it, and brought her son to a local hospital for assistance. The patient was referred to our emergency department (ED) for possible oesophageal obstruction by a foreign body based on the X-ray findings. On arrival at our ED, the child exhibited mild gagging but presented no respiratory symptoms and normal pulmonary examination. The chest X-ray revealed a nasopharyngeal foreign body. The patient was placed under procedural sedation and emergency removal was successfully completed by an otolaryngologist. Subsequently, the patient was discharged without complications. PMID:27605001

  9. Single trial discrimination of individual finger movements on one hand: a combined MEG and EEG study.

    PubMed

    Quandt, F; Reichert, C; Hinrichs, H; Heinze, H J; Knight, R T; Rieger, J W

    2012-02-15

    It is crucial to understand what brain signals can be decoded from single trials with different recording techniques for the development of Brain-Machine Interfaces. A specific challenge for non-invasive recording methods are activations confined to small spatial areas on the cortex such as the finger representation of one hand. Here we study the information content of single trial brain activity in non-invasive MEG and EEG recordings elicited by finger movements of one hand. We investigate the feasibility of decoding which of four fingers of one hand performed a slight button press. With MEG we demonstrate reliable discrimination of single button presses performed with the thumb, the index, the middle or the little finger (average over all subjects and fingers 57%, best subject 70%, empirical guessing level: 25.1%). EEG decoding performance was less robust (average over all subjects and fingers 43%, best subject 54%, empirical guessing level 25.1%). Spatiotemporal patterns of amplitude variations in the time series provided best information for discriminating finger movements. Non-phase-locked changes of mu and beta oscillations were less predictive. Movement related high gamma oscillations were observed in average induced oscillation amplitudes in the MEG but did not provide sufficient information about the finger's identity in single trials. Importantly, pre-movement neuronal activity provided information about the preparation of the movement of a specific finger. Our study demonstrates the potential of non-invasive MEG to provide informative features for individual finger control in a Brain-Machine Interface neuroprosthesis. PMID:22155040

  10. Finger temperature controller for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Ting, Choon Meng; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2010-11-01

    Blood glucose level is an important parameter for doctors to diagnose and treat diabetes. The Near-Infra-Red (NIR) spectroscopy method is the most promising approach and this involves measurement on the body skin. However it is noted that the skin temperature does fluctuate with the environmental and physiological conditions and we found that temperature has important influences on the glucose measurement. In-vitro and in-vivo investigations on the temperature influence on blood glucose measurement have been carried out. The in-vitro results show that water temperature has significant influence on water absorption. Since 90% of blood components are water, skin temperature of measurement site has significant influence on blood glucose measurement. Also the skin temperature is related to the blood volume, blood volume inside capillary vessels changes with skin temperature. In this paper the relationship of skin temperature and signal from the skin and inside tissue was studied at different finger temperatures. Our OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) trials results show the laser signals follow the skin temperature trend and the correlation of signal and skin temperature is much stronger than the correlation of signal and glucose concentration. A finger heater device is designed to heat and maintain the skin temperature of measurement site. The heater is controlled by an electronic circuit according to the skin temperature sensed by a thermocouple that is put close to the measurement site. In vivo trials were carried out and the results show that the skin temperature significantly influences the signal fluctuations caused by pulsate blood and the average signal value.

  11. Fractal patterns formed by growth of radial viscous fingers*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praud, Olivier

    2004-03-01

    We examine fractal patterns formed by the injection of air into oil in a thin (0.13 mm) layer contained between two cylindrical glass plates of 288 mm diameter (a Hele-Shaw cell) [1]. The resultant radially grown patterns are similar to those formed in Diffusion Limited Aggregation (DLA), but the relation between the continuum limit of DLA and continuum (Laplacian) growth remains an open question. Our viscous fingering patterns in the limit of very high pressure difference reach an asymptotic state in which they exhibit a fractal dimension of 1.70± 0.02, in good agreement with a calculation of the fractal dimension of a DLA cluster, 1.713± 0.003 [2]. The generalized dimensions are also computed and show that the observed pattern is self-similar with Dq = 1.70 for all q. Further, the probability density function of shielding angles suggests the existence of a critical angle close to 75 degrees. This result is in accord with numerical and analytical evidence of a critical angle in DLA [3]. Thus fractal viscous fingering patterns and Diffusion Limited Aggregation clusters have a similar geometrical structure. *Work conducted in collaboration with H.L. Swinney, M.G. Moore and Eran Sharon [1] E. Sharon, M. G. Moore, W. D. McCormick, and H. L. Swinney, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 205504 (2003). [2] B.Davidovitch et A. Levermann and I. Procaccia, Phys. Rev. E 62, 5919 (2000). [3] D. A. Kessler et al., Phys. Rev. E 57, 6913 (1998).

  12. Work related diseases and injuries on an oil rig.

    PubMed

    Valentić, Damir; Stojanović, Drazen; Mićović, Vladimir; Vukelić, Mihovil

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of diseases and injuries in the workers on an American oil rig, operating in the Mediterranean Sea, was done in the period of one year, from 1 May 1996 to 1 May 1997. In total, 518 medical examinations of sick and injuried workers were conducted. At the first place in morbidity, there were injuries and poisonings (26.7% of all registered cases). Then followed musculo-skeletal (17.5%), respiratory (14.2%), gastrointestinal diseases (12.1%), mental disorders (10.3%), nervous system (9.2%), skin (6.5%), urogenital (2.9%) and circulatory system diseases (0.6%). Out of all cases, the hand and finger injuries (48.3%) were most frequent, followed by injuries of the leg (13.4%), eye (11.3%), head and neck (10.1%), arm (7.9%), foot (6.7%) and trunk (2.3%). To reduce the incidence of diseases and injuries, special attention should be paid to the workers' basic medical education, to protective measures and providing first aid at the work site. PMID:16532585

  13. Simple and easy reconstruction of nail matrix lesion using lateral finger flap after excision of digital mucous cyst

    PubMed Central

    Okochi, Masayuki; Saito, Masami; Ueda, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We treated nine patients with skin defect produced by digital mucous cyst (DMC) excision on the finger and toe using lateral finger flap (LFF). The postoperative scars were esthetically acceptable and no recurrence of mucous cysts was observed. Our LFF is a simple method to repair minor distal dorsal finger defects. PMID:27583263

  14. Simple and easy reconstruction of nail matrix lesion using lateral finger flap after excision of digital mucous cyst.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Masayuki; Saito, Masami; Ueda, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    We treated nine patients with skin defect produced by digital mucous cyst (DMC) excision on the finger and toe using lateral finger flap (LFF). The postoperative scars were esthetically acceptable and no recurrence of mucous cysts was observed. Our LFF is a simple method to repair minor distal dorsal finger defects. PMID:27583263

  15. A non-invasive miniaturized-wireless laser-Doppler fiber optic sensor for understanding distal fingertip injuries in astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Pollonini, Luca; Rodriguez, Mikael; Opperman, Roedolph; Hochstein, Jason

    2009-02-01

    During extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) or space walks astronauts over use their fingertips under pressure inside the confined spaces of gloves/space-suite. The repetitive hand motion is a probable cause for discomfort and injuries to the finger-tips. We describe a new wireless fiber-optic probe that can be integrated inside the astronaut glove for non-invasive blood perfusion measurements in distal finger tips. In this preliminary study, we present blood perfusion measurements while performing hand-grip exercises simulating the use of space tools.

  16. Head Injuries in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  17. Simulation of light transport in arthritic- and non-arthritic human fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanic, Matija; Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2014-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that frequently leads to joint destruction. It has high incidence rates worldwide, and the disease significantly reduces patient's quality of life due to pain, swelling and stiffness of the affected joints. Early diagnosis is necessary to improve course of the disease, therefore sensitive and accurate diagnostic tools are required. Optical imaging techniques have capability for early diagnosis and monitoring of arthritis. As compared to conventional diagnostic techniques optical technique is a noninvasive, noncontact and fast way of collecting diagnostic information. However, a realistic model of light transport in human joints is needed for understanding and developing of such optical diagnostic tools. The aim of this study is to develop a 3D numerical model of light transport in a human finger. The model will guide development of a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) diagnostic modality for arthritis in human fingers. The implemented human finger geometry is based on anatomical data. Optical data of finger tissues are adjusted to represent either an arthritic or an unaffected finger. The geometry and optical data serve as input into a 3D Monte Carlo method, which calculate diffuse reflectance, transmittance and absorbed energy distributions. The parameters of the model are optimized based on HIS-measurements of human fingers. The presented model serves as an important tool for understanding and development of HSI as an arthritis diagnostic modality. Yet, it can be applied to other optical techniques and finger diseases.

  18. Optimize design dexterity of tooth-arrangement three-fingered hands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai-ying; Zhang, Li-yong; Zhang, Yong-de

    2005-12-01

    "Tooth-arrangement Three-fingered Hands" is a brand-new oral cavity repairing robot. It has the functions of fine grasping and arranging artificial tooth, manufacturing complete denture, etc. A new optimization design method is proposed in this paper that solves the problems in optimization structure parameter confirming and optimal dexterous design. The bionic theorem behind duplicating the dexterity of the human finger is incorporated into the structure parameter optimization algorithm. Through analyzing the dexterity of the single finger, adopting the design criteria of dexterous degree with optimum index and combining the characteristic of grasping the smallest object, this design method can confirm the best dexterity area for single finger, relations between every rod length and rotation range of every joint. Using MATLAB optimization toolbox to optimize above-mentioned structure parameter, it gains the optimal dimension that meets characteristic of human fingers and can finish grasping. A quantitative method is also proposed in this paper to calculate the relative position between fingers. It is applied to the real design of Tooth-Arrangement Three-fingered Hands and obtained optimal flexible performance.

  19. One- Vs Two Stage Surgery Technique for Implant Placement in Finger Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Amornvit, Pokpong; Rokaya, Dinesh; Keawcharoen, Konrawee; Raucharernporn, Somchart; Thongpulsawasdi, Nimit

    2013-01-01

    Background: The loss of the finger can lead to psychological problems. Although several reconstructive techniques may exist, the use of osseous-integrated implants to anchor digital prosthesis presents a suitable alternative for the amputation of finger. The surgery for implant placement has initially been described as a two-stage technique. However, no study in the literature has attempted to compare this technique with one-stage technique and stated a clear superiority technique in the implant retained finger prosthesis. Methods: This article describes two cases of digital amputation as a result of accident; a 45-year-old female whose second finger of right hand was lost and a 25-year-old male patient with amputation of the first finger of right hand. Result and Conclusion: One-stage implant placement technique for implant retained finger prosthesis is a reliable, safe and efficient option that allows a good result in a significantly lower operating time and hospital visits compared to the two-stage technique. It could therefore, be considered as good option for implant retained finger prosthesis. PMID:24179908

  20. Finger gnosis predicts a unique but small part of variance in initial arithmetic performance.

    PubMed

    Wasner, Mirjam; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Martignon, Laura; Roesch, Stephanie; Moeller, Korbinian

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies indicated that finger gnosis (i.e., the ability to perceive and differentiate one's own fingers) is associated reliably with basic numerical competencies. In this study, we aimed at examining whether finger gnosis is also a unique predictor for initial arithmetic competencies at the beginning of first grade-and thus before formal math instruction starts. Therefore, we controlled for influences of domain-specific numerical precursor competencies, domain-general cognitive ability, and natural variables such as gender and age. Results from 321 German first-graders revealed that finger gnosis indeed predicted a unique and relevant but nevertheless only small part of the variance in initial arithmetic performance (∼1%-2%) as compared with influences of general cognitive ability and numerical precursor competencies. Taken together, these results substantiated the notion of a unique association between finger gnosis and arithmetic and further corroborate the theoretical idea of finger-based representations contributing to numerical cognition. However, the only small part of variance explained by finger gnosis seems to limit its relevance for diagnostic purposes. PMID:26895483