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Sample records for finger thermoregulatory model

  1. Thermoregulatory control of finger blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1975-01-01

    In the present experiment, exercise was used to vary internal temperature and ambient air heat control was used to vary skin temperature. Finger temperature was fixed at about 35.7 C. Esophageal temperature was measured with a thermocouple at the level of the left atrium, and mean skin temperature was calculated from a weighted mean of thermocouple temperatures at different skin sites. Finger blood flow was measured by electrocapacitance plethysmography. An equation in these quantities is given which accounts for the data garnered.

  2. Thermoregulatory modeling for cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Tikuisis, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Modeling for cold stress has generated a rich history of innovation, has exerted a catalytic influence on cold physiology research, and continues to impact human activity in cold environments. This overview begins with a brief summation of cold thermoregulatory model development followed by key principles that will continue to guide current and future model development. Different representations of the human body are discussed relative to the level of detail and prediction accuracy required. In addition to predictions of shivering and vasomotor responses to cold exposure, algorithms are presented for thermoregulatory mechanisms. Various avenues of heat exchange between the human body and a cold environment are reviewed. Applications of cold thermoregulatory modeling range from investigative interpretation of physiological observations to forecasting skin freezing times and hypothermia survival times. While these advances have been remarkable, the future of cold stress modeling is still faced with significant challenges that are summarized at the end of this overview. PMID:24944030

  3. Transient thermoregulatory model with graphics output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grounds, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    A user's guide is presented for the transient version of the thermoregulatory model. The model is designed to simulate the transient response of the human thermoregulatory system to thermal inputs. The model consists of 41 compartments over which the terms of the heat balance are computed. The control mechanisms which are identified are sweating, vaso-constriction and vasodilation.

  4. A Self-Organising Model of Thermoregulatory Huddling

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, Jonathan; Groß, Roderich; Stone, James V.; Wilson, Stuart P.

    2015-01-01

    Endotherms such as rats and mice huddle together to keep warm. The huddle is considered to be an example of a self-organising system, because complex properties of the collective group behaviour are thought to emerge spontaneously through simple interactions between individuals. Groups of rodent pups display two such emergent properties. First, huddling undergoes a ‘phase transition’, such that pups start to aggregate rapidly as the temperature of the environment falls below a critical temperature. Second, the huddle maintains a constant ‘pup flow’, where cooler pups at the periphery continually displace warmer pups at the centre. We set out to test whether these complex group behaviours can emerge spontaneously from local interactions between individuals. We designed a model using a minimal set of assumptions about how individual pups interact, by simply turning towards heat sources, and show in computer simulations that the model reproduces the first emergent property—the phase transition. However, this minimal model tends to produce an unnatural behaviour where several smaller aggregates emerge rather than one large huddle. We found that an extension of the minimal model to include heat exchange between pups allows the group to maintain one large huddle but eradicates the phase transition, whereas inclusion of an additional homeostatic term recovers the phase transition for large huddles. As an unanticipated consequence, the extended model also naturally gave rise to the second observed emergent property—a continuous pup flow. The model therefore serves as a minimal description of huddling as a self-organising system, and as an existence proof that group-level huddling dynamics emerge spontaneously through simple interactions between individuals. We derive a specific testable prediction: Increasing the capacity of the individual to generate or conserve heat will increase the range of ambient temperatures over which adaptive thermoregulatory huddling

  5. Mechanical model of a single tendon finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical model of a single tendon three phalanxes finger is presented. By means of the model both kinematic and dynamical behavior of the finger itself can be studied. This finger is a part of a more complex mechanical system that consists in a four finger grasping device for robots or in a five finger human hand prosthesis. A first prototype has been realized in our department in order to verify the real behavior of the model. Some results of both kinematic and dynamical behavior are presented.

  6. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FINITE-DIFFERENCE THERMOREGULATORY MODEL OF A SQUIRREL MONKEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-dimensional thermoregulatory model of a squirrel monkey, whose shape is approximated by 742 rectangular blocks of varying sizes, has been developed. The inhomogeneous model has four layers: a core, a composite layer of muscle and fat, skin, and fur. The model simulates th...

  7. Testing the Fitness Consequences of the Thermoregulatory and Parental Care Models for the Origin of Endothermy

    PubMed Central

    Clavijo-Baque, Sabrina; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The origin of endothermy is a puzzling phenomenon in the evolution of vertebrates. To address this issue several explicative models have been proposed. The main models proposed for the origin of endothermy are the aerobic capacity, the thermoregulatory and the parental care models. Our main proposal is that to compare the alternative models, a critical aspect is to determine how strongly natural selection was influenced by body temperature, and basal and maximum metabolic rates during the evolution of endothermy. We evaluate these relationships in the context of three main hypotheses aimed at explaining the evolution of endothermy, namely the parental care hypothesis and two hypotheses related to the thermoregulatory model (thermogenic capacity and higher body temperature models). We used data on basal and maximum metabolic rates and body temperature from 17 rodent populations, and used intrinsic population growth rate (Rmax) as a global proxy of fitness. We found greater support for the thermogenic capacity model of the thermoregulatory model. In other words, greater thermogenic capacity is associated with increased fitness in rodent populations. To our knowledge, this is the first test of the fitness consequences of the thermoregulatory and parental care models for the origin of endothermy. PMID:22606328

  8. User's instructions for the 41-node thermoregulatory model (steady state version)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1974-01-01

    A user's guide for the steady-state thermoregulatory model is presented. The model was modified to provide conversational interaction on a remote terminal, greater flexibility for parameter estimation, increased efficiency of convergence, greater choice of output variable and more realistic equations for respiratory and skin diffusion water losses.

  9. Fingering in Stochastic Growth Models

    PubMed Central

    Aristotelous, Andreas C.; Durrett, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the widespread use of hybrid-discrete cellular automata in modeling cancer, two simple growth models are studied on the two dimensional lattice that incorporate a nutrient, assumed to be oxygen. In the first model the oxygen concentration u(x, t) is computed based on the geometry of the growing blob, while in the second one u(x, t) satisfies a reaction-diffusion equation. A threshold θ value exists such that cells give birth at rate β(u(x, t) − θ)+ and die at rate δ(θ − u(x, t)+. In the first model, a phase transition was found between growth as a solid blob and “fingering” at a threshold θc = 0.5, while in the second case fingering always occurs, i.e., θc = 0. PMID:26430353

  10. FINITE-DIFFERENCE ELECTROMAGNETIC DEPOSITION/THERMOREGULATORY MODEL: COMPARISON BETWEEN THEORY AND MEASUREMENTS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of the electromagnetic energy deposition and the resultant thermoregulatory response of a block model of a squirrel monkey exposed to plane-wave fields at 350 MHz were calculated using a finite-difference procedure. Noninvasive temperature measurements in live squirrel m...

  11. An improved thermoregulatory model for cooling garment applications with transient metabolic rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westin, Johan K.

    Current state-of-the-art thermoregulatory models do not predict body temperatures with the accuracies that are required for the development of automatic cooling control in liquid cooling garment (LCG) systems. Automatic cooling control would be beneficial in a variety of space, aviation, military, and industrial environments for optimizing cooling efficiency, for making LCGs as portable and practical as possible, for alleviating the individual from manual cooling control, and for improving thermal comfort and cognitive performance. In this study, we adopt the Fiala thermoregulatory model, which has previously demonstrated state-of-the-art predictive abilities in air environments, for use in LCG environments. We validate the numerical formulation with analytical solutions to the bioheat equation, and find our model to be accurate and stable with a variety of different grid configurations. We then compare the thermoregulatory model's tissue temperature predictions with experimental data where individuals, equipped with an LCG, exercise according to a 700 W rectangular type activity schedule. The root mean square (RMS) deviation between the model response and the mean experimental group response is 0.16°C for the rectal temperature and 0.70°C for the mean skin temperature, which is within state-of-the-art variations. However, with a mean absolute body heat storage error 3¯ BHS of 9.7 W˙h, the model fails to satisfy the +/-6.5 W˙h accuracy that is required for the automatic LCG cooling control development. In order to improve model predictions, we modify the blood flow dynamics of the thermoregulatory model. Instead of using step responses to changing requirements, we introduce exponential responses to the muscle blood flow and the vasoconstriction command. We find that such modifications have an insignificant effect on temperature predictions. However, a new vasoconstriction dependency, i.e. the rate of change of hypothalamus temperature weighted by the

  12. Coupling of three-dimensional field and human thermoregulatory models in a crowded enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, H.; Kang, Z.J.; Bong, T.Y.

    1999-11-12

    Health, comfort, and energy conservation are important factors to consider in the design of a building and its HVAC systems. Advanced tools are required to evaluate parameters regarding airflow, temperature, and humidity ratio in buildings, with the end results being better indoor air quality and thermal environment as well as increased confidence in the performance of buildings. A numerical model coupling the three-dimensional field and human thermoregulatory models is proposed and developed. A high-Re {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model is used for the field simulation. A modified 25-mode model of human thermoregulation is adopted to predict human thermal response in physiological parameters, such as body temperature and body heat loss. Distributions of air velocity, temperature, and moisture content are demonstrated in a crowded enclosure with mechanical ventilation under two ventilation rates. The results are analyzed and discussed. The coupling model is useful in assisting and verifying ventilation and air-conditioning system designs.

  13. Use of Thermoregulatory Models to Enhance Space Shuttle and Space Station operations and Review of Human Thermoregulatory Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisacane, V. L.; Kuznetz, L. H.; Logan, J. S.; Clark, J. B.; Wissler, E. H.

    2007-01-01

    Thermoregulation in the space environment is critical for survival, especially in off- nominal operations. In such cases, mathematical models of thermoregulation are frequently employed to evaluate safety-of-flight issues in various human mission scenarious. In this study, the 225-node Wissler model and the 41-Node Metabolic Man model are employed to evaluate the effects of such a scenario. Metabolic loads on astronauts wearing the advanced crew escape suit (ACES) and liquid cooled ventilation garment (LCVG) are imposed on astronauts exposed to elevated cabin temperatures resulting from a systems failure. The study indicates that the performance of the ACES/LCVG cooling system is marginal. Increases in workload and or cabin temperature above nominal will increase rectal temperature, stored heat load, heart rate, and sweating, which could lead to deficits in the performance of cognitive and motor tasks. This is of concern as the ACES/LCVG is employed during Shuttle decent when the likelihood of a safe landing may be compromised. The study indicates that the most effective mitigation strategy would be to decrease the LCVG inlet temperature.

  14. Ethnic differences in thermoregulatory responses during resting, passive and active heating: application of Werner's adaptation model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Young; Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Saat, Mohamed; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2011-12-01

    For the coherent understanding of heat acclimatization in tropical natives, we compared ethnic differences between tropical and temperate natives during resting, passive and active heating conditions. Experimental protocols included: (1) a resting condition (an air temperature of 28°C with 50% RH), (2) a passive heating condition (28°C with 50% RH; leg immersion in a hot tub at a water temperature of 42°C), and (3) an active heating condition (32°C with 70% RH; a bicycle exercise). Morphologically and physically matched tropical natives (ten Malaysian males, MY) and temperate natives (ten Japanese males, JP) participated in all three trials. The results saw that: tropical natives had a higher resting rectal temperature and lower hand and foot temperatures at rest, smaller rise of rectal temperature and greater temperature rise in bodily extremities, and a lower sensation of thirst during passive and active heating than the matched temperate natives. It is suggested that tropical natives' homeostasis during heating is effectively controlled with the improved stability in internal body temperature and the increased capability of vascular circulation in extremities, with a lower thirst sensation. The enhanced stability of internal body temperature and the extended thermoregulatory capability of vascular circulation in the extremities of tropical natives can be interpreted as an interactive change to accomplish a thermal dynamic equilibrium in hot environments. These heat adaptive traits were explained by Wilder's law of initial value and Werner's process and controller adaptation model. PMID:21437607

  15. Thermoregulatory, behavioral, and metabolic responses to heatstroke in a conscious mouse model.

    PubMed

    Leon, Lisa R; Gordon, Christopher J; Helwig, Bryan G; Rufolo, Dennis M; Blaha, Michael D

    2010-07-01

    The typical core temperature (T(c)) profile displayed during heatstroke (HS) recovery consists of initial hypothermia followed by delayed hyperthermia. Anecdotal observations led to the conclusion that these T(c) responses represent thermoregulatory dysfunction as a result of brain damage. We hypothesized that these T(c) responses are mediated by a change in the temperature setpoint. T(c) (+/- 0.1 degrees C; radiotelemetry) of male C57BL/6J mice was monitored while they were housed in a temperature gradient with ambient temperature (T(a)) range of 20-39 degrees C to monitor behaviorally selected T(a) (T(s)) or an indirect calorimeter (T(a) = 25 degrees C) to monitor metabolism (V(O(2))) and calculate respiratory exchange ratio (RER). Responses to mild and severe HS (thermal area 249.6 +/- 18.9 vs. 299.4 +/- 19.3 degrees C.min, respectively) were examined through 48 h of recovery. An initial hypothermia following mild HS was associated with warm T(s) (approximately 32 degrees C), approximately 35% V(O(2)) decrease, and RER approximately 0.71 that indicated reliance on fatty acid oxidation. After 24 h, mild HS mice developed hyperthermia associated with warm T(s) (approximately 32 degrees C), approximately 20% V(O(2)) increase, and RER approximately 0.85. Severe HS mice appeared poikilothermic-like in the temperature gradient with T(c) similar to T(s) (approximately 20 degrees C), and these mice failed to recover from hypothermia and develop delayed hyperthermia. Cellular damage (hematoxylin and eosin staining) was undetectable in the hypothalamus or other brain regions in severe HS mice. Overall, decreases and increases in T(c) were associated with behavioral and autonomic thermoeffectors that suggest HS elicits anapyrexia and fever, respectively. Taken together, T(c) responses of mild and severe HS mice suggest a need for reinterpretation of the mechanisms of thermoregulatory control during recovery. PMID:20427722

  16. Applications of real-time thermoregulatory models to occupational heat stress: validation with military and civilian field studies.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Miyo; Berglund, Larry G; Santee, William R; Buller, Mark J; Karis, Anthony J; Roberts, Warren S; Cuddy, John S; Ruby, Brent C; Hoyt, Reed W

    2012-07-01

    A real-time thermoregulatory model using noninvasive measurements as inputs was developed for predicting physiological responses of individuals working long hours. The purpose of the model is to reduce heat-related injuries and illness by predicting the physiological effects of thermal stress on individuals while working. The model was originally validated mainly by using data from controlled laboratory studies. This study expands the validation of the model with field data from 26 test volunteers, including US Marines, Australian soldiers, and US wildland fire fighters (WLFF). These data encompass a range of environmental conditions (air temperature: 19-30° C; relative humidity: 25-63%) and clothing (i.e., battle dress uniform, chemical-biological protective garment, WLFF protective gear), while performing diverse activities (e.g., marksmanship, marching, extinguishing fires, and digging). The predicted core temperatures (Tc), calculated using environmental, anthropometric, clothing, and heart rate measures collected in the field as model inputs, were compared with subjects' Tc collected with ingested telemetry temperature pills. Root mean standard deviation (RMSD) values, used for goodness of fit comparisons, indicated that overall, the model predictions were in close agreement with the measured values (grand mean of RMSD: 0.15-0.38° C). Although the field data showed more individual variability in the physiological data relative to more controlled laboratory studies, this study showed that the performance of the model was adequate. PMID:22614223

  17. Development of a finger biomechanical model and its considerations.

    PubMed

    Fok, Kim Seng; Chou, Siaw Meng

    2010-03-01

    The development of a biomechanical model for a human finger is faced with many challenges, such as extensor mechanism complexity, statistical indeterminacy and suitability of computational processes. Motivation for this work was to develop a computer model that is able to predict the internal loading patterns of tendons and joint surfaces experienced by the human finger, while mitigating these challenges. Proposed methodology was based on a non-linear optimising mathematical technique with a criterion of boundary conditions and equality equations, maximised against unknown parameters to reduce statistical indeterminacy. Initial validation was performed via the simulation of one dynamic and two static postures case studies. Past models and experiments were used, based on published literature, to verify the proposed model's methodology and results. The feasibility of the proposed methodology was deemed satisfactory as the simulated results were concordant with in-vivo results for the extrinsic flexors. PMID:19962148

  18. Thermoregulatory models of safety-for-flight issues for space operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisacane, V. L.; Kuznetz, L. H.; Logan, J. S.; Clark, J. B.; Wissler, E. H.

    2006-10-01

    This study investigates the use of a mathematical model for thermoregulation as a tool in safety-of-flight issues and proposed solutions for mission operations of the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. Specifically, this study assesses the effects of elevated cabin temperature and metabolic loads on astronauts wearing the Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) and the Liquid Cooled Ventilation Garment (LCVG). The 225-node Wissler model is validated by comparison with two ground-based human subject tests, firefighters, and surrogate astronauts under anomalous conditions that show good agreement. Subsequent simulations indicate that the performance of the ACES/LCVG is marginal. Increases in either workload or cabin temperature from the nominal will increase rectal temperature, stored heat load, heart rate, and sweating leading to possible deficits in the ability of the astronauts to perform cognitive and motor tasks that could affect the safety of the mission, especially the safe landing of the Shuttle. Specific relationships are given between cabin temperature and metabolic rate that define the threshold for decreased manual dexterity and loss of tracking skills. Model results indicate that the most effective mitigation strategy would be to decrease the LCVG inlet temperature. Methods of accomplishing this are also proposed.

  19. Finger interaction during maximal radial and ulnar deviation efforts: experimental data and linear neural network modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, Todd C.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize finger interactions during radial/ulnar deviation, including interactions with flexion movements. Subjects performed single-finger and multi-finger maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and maximal forces and various indices of interaction among the fingers were quantified. MVCs in radial/ulnar deviation were 50–80% as strong as in flexion. Along with the ‘master’ fingers (i.e., those explicitly instructed to produce force), substantial force production was also observed in ‘slave’ fingers (i.e., those not explicitly instructed to produce force), a phenomenon termed: force ‘enslaving’. In addition, a drop in MVC during multi-finger tasks as compared to single finger tasks (force ‘deficit’) was also observed. A previously unreported phenomenon that we term: ‘preferred direction enslaving’ was also apparent; both master and slave fingers produced force in the instructed direction with a non-zero perpendicular component. Due to the architectural separation of the involved muscles, preferred direction enslaving provides strong evidence that enslaving results from neural rather than biomechanical factors. A final new phenomenon: ‘negative deficit’, or force ‘facilitation’ was observed in 46.4% of the trials in 21 out of 23 subjects during multi-finger lateral efforts and was further demonstrative of extensive interconnection among neurons serving hand muscles. The data were modeled with high accuracy (~4% mean square error) using a linear neural network with motor ‘commands’ as inputs and finger forces as outputs. The proposed network, equivalent to linear regression, can be used to determine the extent to which finger forces are influenced by peripheral constraints during functional prehensile activities. PMID:17334750

  20. Structural model of ubiquitin transfer onto an artificial RING finger as an E3 ligase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide

    2014-10-01

    The artificial WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger was designed via ``α-helical region substitution'', and its structural model for the attachment of activated ubiquitin has been demonstrated. Chemical modifications of Cys residues, the circular dichroism spectra, and substrate-independent ubiquitination assays illustrated that the WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger has E3 activity, and it is ubiquitinated via Lys14. Homology modeling calculations revealed that the WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger possesses a classical RING fold for specific E2-E3 binding. The docking poses of the WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger with the UbcH5b-ubiquitin conjugate provided insight into its functional E2 interaction and development of ubiquitination at the atomic level. The structural model of the artificial WSTF PHD_EL5 RING finger proposed by the present work is useful and may help to extend the strategy of α-helical region substitution.

  1. Modeling of contact mechanics and friction limit surfaces for soft fingers in robotics, with experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Xydas, N.; Kao, I.

    1999-09-01

    A new theory in contact mechanics for modeling of soft fingers is proposed to define the relationship between the normal force and the radius of contact for soft fingers by considering general soft-finger materials, including linearly and nonlinearly elastic materials. The results show that the radius of contact is proportional to the normal force raised to the power of {gamma}, which ranges from 0 to 1/3. This new theory subsumes the Hertzian contact model for linear elastic materials, where {gamma} = 1/3. Experiments are conducted to validate the theory using artificial soft fingers made of various materials such as rubber and silicone. Results for human fingers are also compared. This theory provides a basis for numerically constructing friction limit surfaces. The numerical friction limit surface can be approximated by an ellipse, with the major and minor axes as the maximum friction force and the maximum moment with respect to the normal axis of contact, respectively. Combining the results of the contact-mechanics model with the contact-pressure distribution, the normalized friction limit surface can be derived for anthropomorphic soft fingers. The results of the contact-mechanics model and the pressure distribution for soft fingers facilitate the construction of numerical friction limit surfaces, and will enable us to analyze and simulate contact behaviors of grasping and manipulation in robotics.

  2. Mathematical model and solution for fingering phenomenon in double phase flow through homogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Piyush R; Pradhan, Vikas H; Desai, Khyati R

    2013-01-01

    The present paper analytically discusses the phenomenon of fingering in double phase flow through homogenous porous media by using variational iteration method. Fingering phenomenon is a physical phenomenon which occurs when a fluid contained in a porous medium is displaced by another of lesser viscosity which frequently occurred in problems of petroleum technology. In the current investigation a mathematical model is presented for the fingering phenomenon under certain simplified assumptions. An approximate analytical solution of the governing nonlinear partial differential equation is obtained using variational iteration method with the use of Mathematica software. PMID:24348161

  3. Evidence evaluation in fingerprint comparison and automated fingerprint identification systems--Modeling between finger variability.

    PubMed

    Egli Anthonioz, N M; Champod, C

    2014-02-01

    In the context of the investigation of the use of automated fingerprint identification systems (AFIS) for the evaluation of fingerprint evidence, the current study presents investigations into the variability of scores from an AFIS system when fingermarks from a known donor are compared to fingerprints that are not from the same source. The ultimate goal is to propose a model, based on likelihood ratios, which allows the evaluation of mark-to-print comparisons. In particular, this model, through its use of AFIS technology, benefits from the possibility of using a large amount of data, as well as from an already built-in proximity measure, the AFIS score. More precisely, the numerator of the LR is obtained from scores issued from comparisons between impressions from the same source and showing the same minutia configuration. The denominator of the LR is obtained by extracting scores from comparisons of the questioned mark with a database of non-matching sources. This paper focuses solely on the assignment of the denominator of the LR. We refer to it by the generic term of between-finger variability. The issues addressed in this paper in relation to between-finger variability are the required sample size, the influence of the finger number and general pattern, as well as that of the number of minutiae included and their configuration on a given finger. Results show that reliable estimation of between-finger variability is feasible with 10,000 scores. These scores should come from the appropriate finger number/general pattern combination as defined by the mark. Furthermore, strategies of obtaining between-finger variability when these elements cannot be conclusively seen on the mark (and its position with respect to other marks for finger number) have been presented. These results immediately allow case-by-case estimation of the between-finger variability in an operational setting. PMID:24447455

  4. Potential application of FoldX force field based protein modeling in zinc finger nucleases design.

    PubMed

    He, ZuYong; Mei, Gui; Zhao, ChunPeng; Chen, YaoSheng

    2011-05-01

    Engineered sequence-specific zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) make the highly efficient modification of eukaryotic genomes possible. However, most current strategies for developing zinc finger nucleases with customized sequence specificities require the construction of numerous tandem arrays of zinc finger proteins (ZFPs), and subsequent largescale in vitro validation of their DNA binding affinities and specificities via bacterial selection. The labor and expertise required in this complex process limits the broad adoption of ZFN technology. An effective computational assisted design strategy will lower the complexity of the production of a pair of functional ZFNs. Here we used the FoldX force field to build 3D models of 420 ZFP-DNA complexes based on zinc finger arrays developed by the Zinc Finger Consortium using OPEN (oligomerized pool engineering). Using nonlinear and linear regression analysis, we found that the calculated protein-DNA binding energy in a modeled ZFP-DNA complex strongly correlates to the failure rate of the zinc finger array to show significant ZFN activity in human cells. In our models, less than 5% of the three-finger arrays with calculated protein-DNA binding energies lower than -13.132 kcal mol(-1) fail to form active ZFNs in human cells. By contrast, for arrays with calculated protein-DNA binding energies higher than -5 kcal mol(-1), as many as 40% lacked ZFN activity in human cells. Therefore, we suggest that the FoldX force field can be useful in reducing the failure rate and increasing efficiency in the design of ZFNs. PMID:21455692

  5. A new analytical compact model for two-dimensional finger photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeve, T.; Hohenbild, M.; Seegebrecht, P.

    2008-02-01

    A new physically based circuit simulation model for finger photodiodes has been proposed. The approach is based on the solution of transport and continuity equation for generated carriers within the two-dimensional structure. As an example we present results of a diode consisting of N+-fingers located in a P-well on top of a N-type buried layer integrated in a P-type silicon substrate (N+/PW/NBL/Psub finger photodiode). The model is capable to predict the sensitivity of the diode in a wide spectral range very accurately. The structure under consideration was fabricated in an industrial 0.6 μm BiCMOS process. The good agreement of simulated sensitivity data with results of measurements and numerical simulations demonstrate the high quality of our model.

  6. Finger muscle attachments for an OpenSim upper-extremity model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Asakawa, Deanna S; Dennerlein, Jack T; Jindrich, Devin L

    2015-01-01

    We determined muscle attachment points for the index, middle, ring and little fingers in an OpenSim upper-extremity model. Attachment points were selected to match both experimentally measured locations and mechanical function (moment arms). Although experimental measurements of finger muscle attachments have been made, models differ from specimens in many respects such as bone segment ratio, joint kinematics and coordinate system. Likewise, moment arms are not available for all intrinsic finger muscles. Therefore, it was necessary to scale and translate muscle attachments from one experimental or model environment to another while preserving mechanical function. We used a two-step process. First, we estimated muscle function by calculating moment arms for all intrinsic and extrinsic muscles using the partial velocity method. Second, optimization using Simulated Annealing and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms found muscle-tendon paths that minimized root mean square (RMS) differences between experimental and modeled moment arms. The partial velocity method resulted in variance accounted for (VAF) between measured and calculated moment arms of 75.5% on average (range from 48.5% to 99.5%) for intrinsic and extrinsic index finger muscles where measured data were available. RMS error between experimental and optimized values was within one standard deviation (S.D) of measured moment arm (mean RMS error = 1.5 mm < measured S.D = 2.5 mm). Validation of both steps of the technique allowed for estimation of muscle attachment points for muscles whose moment arms have not been measured. Differences between modeled and experimentally measured muscle attachments, averaged over all finger joints, were less than 4.9 mm (within 7.1% of the average length of the muscle-tendon paths). The resulting non-proprietary musculoskeletal model of the human fingers could be useful for many applications, including better understanding of complex multi-touch and gestural movements. PMID:25853869

  7. Finger Muscle Attachments for an OpenSim Upper-Extremity Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Asakawa, Deanna S.; Dennerlein, Jack T.; Jindrich, Devin L.

    2015-01-01

    We determined muscle attachment points for the index, middle, ring and little fingers in an OpenSim upper-extremity model. Attachment points were selected to match both experimentally measured locations and mechanical function (moment arms). Although experimental measurements of finger muscle attachments have been made, models differ from specimens in many respects such as bone segment ratio, joint kinematics and coordinate system. Likewise, moment arms are not available for all intrinsic finger muscles. Therefore, it was necessary to scale and translate muscle attachments from one experimental or model environment to another while preserving mechanical function. We used a two-step process. First, we estimated muscle function by calculating moment arms for all intrinsic and extrinsic muscles using the partial velocity method. Second, optimization using Simulated Annealing and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms found muscle-tendon paths that minimized root mean square (RMS) differences between experimental and modeled moment arms. The partial velocity method resulted in variance accounted for (VAF) between measured and calculated moment arms of 75.5% on average (range from 48.5% to 99.5%) for intrinsic and extrinsic index finger muscles where measured data were available. RMS error between experimental and optimized values was within one standard deviation (S.D) of measured moment arm (mean RMS error = 1.5 mm < measured S.D = 2.5 mm). Validation of both steps of the technique allowed for estimation of muscle attachment points for muscles whose moment arms have not been measured. Differences between modeled and experimentally measured muscle attachments, averaged over all finger joints, were less than 4.9 mm (within 7.1% of the average length of the muscle-tendon paths). The resulting non-proprietary musculoskeletal model of the human fingers could be useful for many applications, including better understanding of complex multi-touch and gestural movements. PMID:25853869

  8. A Phase-field Model of Wetting in Porous Media -- Origin of Gravity Fingering During Infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, Ruben; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis

    2009-11-01

    We present a new continuum mathematical model of wetting into dry soil. The inspiration for the new model is the flow of thin films (like water down a plane), which also displays fingering instability. The key idea is very simple: the macroscopic equations must reflect the presence of a macroscopic interface---the wetting front. We then cast the model in the rigorous framework of phase-field models and nonlocal thermodynamics. The new model is appealing. It is a simple extension of the traditional model---Richards' equation---with a new term (a fourth-order derivative in space) but without any new parameters. It reproduces the two key features of unsaturated flow: a nonmonotonic saturation profile, and gravity fingering. It explains why, when, and how, fingers form. It shows excellent quantitative agreement with experiments in terms of tip saturation, tip velocity and finger width. The most attractive aspect is, however, that the new model offers a starting point for fundamentally new formulations of multiphase flow in porous media.

  9. An improved predictive recognition model for Cys2-His2 zinc finger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ankit; Christensen, Ryan G.; Bell, Heather A.; Goodwin, Mathew; Patel, Ronak Y.; Pandey, Manishi; Enuameh, Metewo Selase; Rayla, Amy L.; Zhu, Cong; Thibodeau-Beganny, Stacey; Brodsky, Michael H.; Joung, J. Keith; Wolfe, Scot A.; Stormo, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Cys2-His2 zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) are the largest family of transcription factors in higher metazoans. They also represent the most diverse family with regards to the composition of their recognition sequences. Although there are a number of ZFPs with characterized DNA-binding preferences, the specificity of the vast majority of ZFPs is unknown and cannot be directly inferred by homology due to the diversity of recognition residues present within individual fingers. Given the large number of unique zinc fingers and assemblies present across eukaryotes, a comprehensive predictive recognition model that could accurately estimate the DNA-binding specificity of any ZFP based on its amino acid sequence would have great utility. Toward this goal, we have used the DNA-binding specificities of 678 two-finger modules from both natural and artificial sources to construct a random forest-based predictive model for ZFP recognition. We find that our recognition model outperforms previously described determinant-based recognition models for ZFPs, and can successfully estimate the specificity of naturally occurring ZFPs with previously defined specificities. PMID:24523353

  10. Microwaves modify thermoregulatory behavior in squirrel monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Adams, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) trained to regulate environmental temperature (Ta) behaviorally were exposed in the far field of a horn antenna to ten-minute periods of 2,450 MHz CW microwaves. Incident power density ranged from 1 to 22 mW/cm2. The corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR), derived from temperature increments in saline-filled styrofoam models, ranged from 0.15 to 3.25 W/kg. Controls included exposure to infrared radiation equivalent incident energy and no radiation exposure. Normal thermo-regulatory behavior produces tight control over environmental and body temperatures; most monkeys select a Ta of 34-36 degrees C. Ten-minute exposures to 2,450 MHz CW microwaves at an incident power density of 6-8 mW/cm2 stimulated all animals to select a lower Ta. This threshold energy represents a whole-body SAR of 1.1 W/kg, about 20% of the resting metabolic rate of the monkey. Thermoregulatory behavior was highly efficient, and skin and rectal temperatures remained stable, even at 22 mW/cm2 where the preferred Ta was lowered by as much as 4 degrees C. No comparable reduction in selected Ta below control levels occurred during exposure to infrared radiation of equal incident power density.

  11. Modeling gravity-driven fingering in rough-walled fractures using modified percolation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Pore scale invasion percolation theory is modified for imbibition of.wetting fluids into fractures. The effects of gravity, local aperture field geometry, and local in-plane air/water interfacial curvatureare included in the calculation of aperture filling potential which controls wetted structure growth within the fracture. The inclusion of gravity yields fingers oriented in the direction of the gravitational gradient. These fingers widen and tend to meander and branch more as the gravitational gradient decreases. In-plane interfacial curvature also greatly affects the wetted structure in both horizontal and nonhorizontal fractures causing the formation of macroscopic wetting fronts. The modified percolation model is used to simulate imbibition into an analogue rough-walled fracture where both fingering and horizontal imbibition experiments were previously conducted. Comparison of numerical and experimental results showed reasonably good agreement. This process oriented physical and numerical modeling is-a necessary step toward including gravity-driven fingering in models of flow and transport through unsaturated, fractured rock.

  12. A model for multi-finger HBTs including current gain collapse effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlapati, Akhil; Prasad, Sheila; Vempada, Pradeep; Munshi, Kambiz

    2003-11-01

    A common-emitter equivalent circuit model which represents both the self-heating and the current collapse as feedback from the collector current to the base-emitter voltage is developed for multi-finger InGaAs/GaAs HBTs. The modified Ebers-Moll model is verified by comparing the simulated and measured results. Good agreement is also achieved for the scattering parameters and I- V characteristics confirming the validity of the model for high frequency applications.

  13. Quantum chemical modelling of reactivity and selectivity of 1,2-dithiolanes towards retroviral and cellular zinc fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topol, Igor A.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.; Burt, Stanley K.

    Interactions of 1,2-dithiolane species with zinc-containing sites, which mimic the zinc finger domains of retroviral and the cellular zinc finger proteins, have been investigated by quantum chemistry tools. According to the calculations, the immediate domains of zinc binding sites in the cellular and retroviral zinc fingers interact differently with such agents of the disulphide family. Thus, when approaching the model cellular-type domains, the molecules of 1,2-dithiolanes experience considerable potential barriers along the reaction path. However, these species react practically barrier-less with the model retroviral-type domains at the correlated DFT level. The results of the quantum chemical modelling provide firm support to the selectivity of 1,2-dithiolanes towards retroviral and cellular zinc fingers. This can be of great practical importance for the design of therapeutics that accomplish functional inactivation of the zinc fingers of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) retroviral type nucleocapsid protein NCp7.

  14. Fingering in Confined Elastic Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggins, John; Mahadevan, L.; Wei, Z.; Saintyves, Baudouin; Bouchaud, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Fingering has recently been observed in soft highly elastic layers that are confined between and bonded to two rigid bodies. In one case an injected fluid invades the layer in finger-like protrusions at the layer's perimeter, a solid analogue of Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering. In a second case, separation of the rigid bodies (with maintained adhesion to the layer) leads air to the formation of similar fingers at the layer's perimeter. In both cases the finger formation is reversible: if the fluid is removed or the separation reduced, the fingers vanish. In this talk I will discuss a theoretical model for such elastic fingers that shows that the origin of the fingers is large-strain geometric non-linearity in the elasticity of soft solids. Our simplified elastic model unifies the two types of fingering and accurately estimates the thresholds and wavelengths of the fingers.

  15. Extension of the dielectric breakdown model for simulation of viscous fingering at finite viscosity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doorwar, Shashvat; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2014-07-01

    Immiscible displacement of viscous oil by water in a petroleum reservoir is often hydrodynamically unstable. Due to similarities between the physics of dielectric breakdown and immiscible flow in porous media, we extend the existing dielectric breakdown model to simulate viscous fingering patterns for a wide range of viscosity ratios (μr). At low values of power-law index η, the system behaves like a stable Eden growth model and as the value of η is increased to unity, diffusion limited aggregation-like fractals appear. This model is compared with our two-dimensional (2D) experiments to develop a correlation between the viscosity ratio and the power index, i.e., η = 10-5μr0.8775. The 2D and three-dimensional (3D) simulation data appear scalable. The fingering pattern in 3D simulations at finite viscosity ratios appear qualitatively similar to the few experimental results published in the literature.

  16. Extension of the dielectric breakdown model for simulation of viscous fingering at finite viscosity ratios.

    PubMed

    Doorwar, Shashvat; Mohanty, Kishore K

    2014-07-01

    Immiscible displacement of viscous oil by water in a petroleum reservoir is often hydrodynamically unstable. Due to similarities between the physics of dielectric breakdown and immiscible flow in porous media, we extend the existing dielectric breakdown model to simulate viscous fingering patterns for a wide range of viscosity ratios (μ(r)). At low values of power-law index η, the system behaves like a stable Eden growth model and as the value of η is increased to unity, diffusion limited aggregation-like fractals appear. This model is compared with our two-dimensional (2D) experiments to develop a correlation between the viscosity ratio and the power index, i.e., η = 10(-5)μ(r)(0.8775). The 2D and three-dimensional (3D) simulation data appear scalable. The fingering pattern in 3D simulations at finite viscosity ratios appear qualitatively similar to the few experimental results published in the literature. PMID:25122390

  17. Modifications to the steady-state 41-node thermoregulatory model including validation of the respiratory and diffusional water loss equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    After the simplified version of the 41-Node Stolwijk Metabolic Man Model was implemented on the Sigma 3 and UNIVAC 1110 computers in batch mode, it became desirable to make certain revisions. First, the availability of time-sharing terminals makes it possible to provide the capability and flexibility of conversational interaction between user and model. Secondly, recent physiological studies show the need to revise certain parameter values contained in the model. Thirdly, it was desired to make quantitative and accurate predictions of evaporative water loss for humans in an orbiting space station. The result of the first phase of this effort are reported.

  18. Saffman-Taylor fingering: why it is not a proper upscaled model of viscous fingering in a (even two-dimensional) random porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; Toussaint, R.; Lovoll, G.; Maloy, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    P.G. Saffman & G. Taylor (1958) studied the stability of the interface between two immiscible fluids of different densities and viscosities when one displaces the other inside a Hele-Shaw (HS) cell. They showed that with a horizontal cell and if the displaced fluid is the more viscous, the interface is unstable and leads to a viscous fingering which they nearly fully modeled [1]. The HS geometry was introduced as a geometry imposing the same flow behavior as the Darcy-scale flow in a two-dimensional (2D) porous medium, and therefore allowing an analogy between the two configurations. This is however not obvious, since capillary forces act at very different scales in the two. Later, researchers performing unstable displacement experiments in HS cells containing random 2D porous media also observed viscous fingering at large viscosity ratios, but with invasion patterns very different from those of Saffman and Taylor (ST) [2-3]. It was however considered that the two processes were both Laplacian growth processes, i.e., processes in which the invasion probability density is proportional to the pressure gradient. Ten years ago, we investigated viscously-unstable drainage in 2D porous media experimentally and measured the growth activity as well as occupation probability maps for the invasion process [4-5]. We concluded that in viscous fingering in 2D porous media, the activity was rather proportional to the square of the pressure gradient magnitude (a so-called DBM model of exponent 2), so that the universality class of the growth/invasion process was different from that of ST viscous fingering. We now strengthen our claim with new results based on the comparison of (i) pressure measurements with the pressure field around a finger such as described by the ST analytical model, and (ii) branching angles in the invasion patterns with those expected for DBMs of various exponents. [1] Saffman, P. G. and Taylor, G. Proc. Soc. London 1958(Ser A 245), 312-329. [2] Lenormand, R

  19. Development of a finite element model of a finger pad for biomechanics of human tactile sensations.

    PubMed

    Vodlak, Teja; Vidrih, Zlatko; Fetih, Dusan; Peric, Djordje; Rodic, Tomaz

    2015-08-01

    The aim of ongoing research is to develop a multi-scale multi-physics computational framework for modelling of human touch in order to provide understanding of fundamental biophysical mechanisms responsible for tactile sensation. The paper presents the development of a macro-scale global finite element model of the finger pad and calibration of applied material models against experimental results using inverse method. The developed macro model serves as a basis for down-scaling to micro finite element models of mechanoreceptors and further implementations and applications as a virtual tool in scientific or industrial applications related to neuroscience, haptics, prosthetics, virtual touch and packaging. PMID:26736410

  20. Assessment of body mapping sportswear using a manikin operated in constant temperature mode and thermoregulatory model control mode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Del Ferraro, Simona; Molinaro, Vincenzo; Morrissey, Matthew; Rossi, René

    2014-09-01

    Regional sweating patterns and body surface temperature differences exist between genders. Traditional sportswear made from one material and/or one fabric structure has a limited ability to provide athletes sufficient local wear comfort. Body mapping sportswear consists of one piece of multiple knit structure fabric or of different fabric pieces that may provide athletes better wear comfort. In this study, the 'modular' body mapping sportswear was designed and subsequently assessed on a 'Newton' type sweating manikin that operated in both constant temperature mode and thermophysiological model control mode. The performance of the modular body mapping sportswear kit and commercial products were also compared. The results demonstrated that such a modular body mapping sportswear kit can meet multiple wear/thermal comfort requirements in various environmental conditions. All body mapping clothing (BMC) presented limited global thermophysiological benefits for the wearers. Nevertheless, BMC showed evident improvements in adjusting local body heat exchanges and local thermal sensations. PMID:24357489

  1. Assessment of body mapping sportswear using a manikin operated in constant temperature mode and thermoregulatory model control mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Faming; Del Ferraro, Simona; Molinaro, Vincenzo; Morrissey, Matthew; Rossi, René

    2014-09-01

    Regional sweating patterns and body surface temperature differences exist between genders. Traditional sportswear made from one material and/or one fabric structure has a limited ability to provide athletes sufficient local wear comfort. Body mapping sportswear consists of one piece of multiple knit structure fabric or of different fabric pieces that may provide athletes better wear comfort. In this study, the `modular' body mapping sportswear was designed and subsequently assessed on a `Newton' type sweating manikin that operated in both constant temperature mode and thermophysiological model control mode. The performance of the modular body mapping sportswear kit and commercial products were also compared. The results demonstrated that such a modular body mapping sportswear kit can meet multiple wear/thermal comfort requirements in various environmental conditions. All body mapping clothing (BMC) presented limited global thermophysiological benefits for the wearers. Nevertheless, BMC showed evident improvements in adjusting local body heat exchanges and local thermal sensations.

  2. Mean-field diffusion-limited aggregation: a "density" model for viscous fingering phenomena.

    PubMed

    Bogoyavlenskiy, V A

    2001-12-01

    We explore a universal "density" formalism to describe nonequilibrium growth processes, specifically, the immiscible viscous fingering in Hele-Shaw cells (usually referred to as the Saffman-Taylor problem). For that we develop an alternative approach to the viscous fingering phenomena, whose basic concepts have been recently published in a Rapid Communication [Phys. Rev. E 63, 045305(R) (2001)]. This approach uses the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) paradigm as a core: we introduce a mean-field DLA generalization in stochastic and deterministic formulations. The stochastic model, a quasicontinuum DLA, simulates Monte Carlo patterns, which demonstrate a striking resemblance to natural Hele-Shaw fingers and, for steady-state growth regimes, follow precisely the Saffman-Taylor analytical solutions in channel and sector configurations. The relevant deterministic theory, a complete set of differential equations for a time development of density fields, is derived from that stochastic model. As a principal conclusion, we prove an asymptotic equivalency of both the stochastic and deterministic mean-field DLA formulations to the classic Saffman-Taylor hydrodynamics in terms of an interface evolution. PMID:11736272

  3. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  4. Modeling and Control of Three-Dimensional Grasping by a Pair of Robot Fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Suguru; Yoshida, Morio

    This paper extends a stability theory of 2-D object grasp to cope with 3-dimensional(3-D) object grasp by a pair of multi-joint robot fingers with hemi-spheric ends. It shows that secure grasp of a 3-D object with parallel surfaces in a dynamic sense can be realized in a blind manner like human grasp an object by a pair of thumb and index finger while their eyes closed. Rolling contacts are modeled as Pfaffian constraints that can not be integrated into holonomic constraints but exert tangential constraint forces on the object surfaces. A noteworthy difference of modeling of 3-D object grasping from the 2-D case is that the instantaneous axis of rotation of the object dynamics of the overall fingers-object system are subject to non-holonomic constraints regarding a 3-D orthogonal matrix consisting of three mutually orthogonal unit-vectors fixed at the object. Lagrange's equation of motion of the overall system can be derived from the variational principle without violating the causality that governs the nonholonomic constraints. Then, a simple control signal constructed on the basis of fingers-thumb opposable forces together with an object-mass estimator is shown to accomplish stable grasp in a dynamic sense without using object information or external sensing. The closed-loop dynamics can be regarded as Lagrange's equation of motion with an artificial potential function that attains its minimum at some equilibrium state of force/torque balance. A mathematical proof of stability and asymptotic stability on a constraint manifold of the closed-loop dynamics under the nonholonomic constraints is presented.

  5. Computing with liquid crystal fingers: models of geometric and logical computation.

    PubMed

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Kitson, Stephen; Costello, Ben De Lacy; Matranga, Mario Ariosto; Younger, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    When a voltage is applied across a thin layer of cholesteric liquid crystal, fingers of cholesteric alignment can form and propagate in the layer. In computer simulation, based on experimental laboratory results, we demonstrate that these cholesteric fingers can solve selected problems of computational geometry, logic, and arithmetics. We show that branching fingers approximate a planar Voronoi diagram, and nonbranching fingers produce a convex subdivision of concave polygons. We also provide a detailed blueprint and simulation of a one-bit half-adder functioning on the principles of collision-based computing, where the implementation is via collision of liquid crystal fingers with obstacles and other fingers. PMID:22304104

  6. Evidence evaluation in fingerprint comparison and automated fingerprint identification systems--modelling within finger variability.

    PubMed

    Egli, Nicole M; Champod, Christophe; Margot, Pierre

    2007-04-11

    Recent challenges and errors in fingerprint identification have highlighted the need for assessing the information content of a papillary pattern in a systematic way. In particular, estimation of the statistical uncertainty associated with this type of evidence is more and more called upon. The approach used in the present study is based on the assessment of likelihood ratios (LRs). This evaluative tool weighs the likelihood of evidence given two mutually exclusive hypotheses. The computation of likelihood ratios on a database of marks of known sources (matching the unknown and non-matching the unknown mark) allows an estimation of the evidential contribution of fingerprint evidence. LRs are computed taking advantage of the scores obtained from an automated fingerprint identification system and hence are based exclusively on level II features (minutiae). The AFIS system attributes a score to any comparison (fingerprint to fingerprint, mark to mark and mark to fingerprint), used here as a proximity measure between the respective arrangements of minutiae. The numerator of the LR addresses the within finger variability and is obtained by comparing the same configurations of minutiae coming from the same source. Only comparisons where the same minutiae are visible both on the mark and on the print are therefore taken into account. The denominator of the LR is obtained by cross-comparison with a database of prints originating from non-matching sources. The estimation of the numerator of the LR is much more complex in terms of specific data requirements than the estimation of the denominator of the LR (that requires only a large database of prints from an non-associated population). Hence this paper addresses specific issues associated with the numerator or within finger variability. This study aims at answering the following questions: (1) how a database for modelling within finger variability should be acquired; (2) whether or not the visualisation technique or the

  7. Behavioral thermoregulatory responses of single- and group-housed mice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Becker, P; Ali, J S

    1998-11-15

    The ambient temperature (Ta) to house and study laboratory rodents is critical for nearly all biomedical studies. The ideal Ta for housing rodents and other animals should be based on their thermoregulatory requirements. However, fundamental information on the behavioral thermoregulatory responses of single- and group-housed rodents is meager. To address this issue, thermoregulatory behavior was assessed in individual and groups of CD-1 mice housed in a temperature gradient. Mice were housed in groups of five or individually while selected Ta and motor activity were monitored. Single- and group-housed mice displayed a circadian oscillation of selected Ta and motor activity with relatively warm T(a)s of approximately 29 degrees C selected during the light phase; during the dark phase selected Ta was reduced by 4 degrees C, whereas motor activity increased. Selected Ta of aged (11 months old) mice housed individually was approximately 1.0 degrees C warmer than the group-housed mice. Thermal preference of younger mice (2 months old) was similar for single- and group-housed animals. The operative Ta of mice housed in standard facilities was estimated by measuring the cooling rate of "phantom" mice modeled from aluminum cylinders. The results show that the typical housing conditions for single- and group-housed mice are cooler than their Ta for ideal thermal comfort. PMID:9855474

  8. Hidden Markov Model and Support Vector Machine based decoding of finger movements using Electrocorticography

    PubMed Central

    Wissel, Tobias; Pfeiffer, Tim; Frysch, Robert; Knight, Robert T.; Chang, Edward F.; Hinrichs, Hermann; Rieger, Jochem W.; Rose, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Objective Support Vector Machines (SVM) have developed into a gold standard for accurate classification in Brain-Computer-Interfaces (BCI). The choice of the most appropriate classifier for a particular application depends on several characteristics in addition to decoding accuracy. Here we investigate the implementation of Hidden Markov Models (HMM)for online BCIs and discuss strategies to improve their performance. Approach We compare the SVM, serving as a reference, and HMMs for classifying discrete finger movements obtained from the Electrocorticograms of four subjects doing a finger tapping experiment. The classifier decisions are based on a subset of low-frequency time domain and high gamma oscillation features. Main results We show that decoding optimization between the two approaches is due to the way features are extracted and selected and less dependent on the classifier. An additional gain in HMM performance of up to 6% was obtained by introducing model constraints. Comparable accuracies of up to 90% were achieved with both SVM and HMM with the high gamma cortical response providing the most important decoding information for both techniques. Significance We discuss technical HMM characteristics and adaptations in the context of the presented data as well as for general BCI applications. Our findings suggest that HMMs and their characteristics are promising for efficient online brain-computer interfaces. PMID:24045504

  9. Histaminergic neurons in the hypothalamic thermoregulatory pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, P.; Green, M.D.

    1981-11-01

    Based on neurochemical and neurophysiological research, especially over the past decade, considerable evidence exists for accepting histamine as a central neurotransmitter alongside the other neuroamines. The data supporting a functional role are not complete, but they do exhibit a consistent pattern in the case of the central thermoregulatory pathways. Thus, the region of the thermoregulatory centers in the rostral hypothalamus contains relatively high concentrations of histamine and the enzyme systems for its synthesis and degradation: degeneration studies indicate histaminergic pathways in the hypothalamus; thermoregulatory changes can be induced by activation of either H/sub 1/ or H/sub 2/ receptors; behavioral studies reveal different functional roles for H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ receptors; and the thermoregulatory responses to histamine are detectable across different species, even in nonhomeothermic animals. This evidence supports assigning a transmitter function to histamine in the central thermoregulatory pathways that would appear to be as well-founded as the comparable data amassed for other neuroamines.

  10. Observations and modeling of surf zone transverse finger bars at the Gold Coast, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, F.; Doeschate, A. ten; de Swart, H. E.; Ruessink, B. G.; Calvete, D.

    2014-08-01

    The occurrence and characteristics of transverse finger bars at Surfers Paradise (Gold Coast, Australia) have been quantified with 4 years of time-exposure video images. These bars are attached to the inner terrace and have an oblique orientation with respect to the coastline. They are observed during 24 % of the study period, in patches up to 15 bars, with an average lifetime of 5 days and a mean wavelength of 32 m. The bars are observed during obliquely incident waves of intermediate heights. Bar crests typically point toward the incoming wave direction, i.e., they are up-current oriented. The most frequent beach state when bars are present (43 % of the time) is a rhythmic low-tide terrace and an undulating outer bar. A morphodynamic model, which describes the feedback between waves, currents, and bed evolution, has been applied to study the mechanisms for finger bar formation. Realistic positive feedback leading to the formation of the observed bars only occurs if the sediment resuspension due to roller-induced turbulence is included. This causes the depth-averaged sediment concentration to decrease in the seaward direction, enhancing the convergence of sediment transport in the offshore-directed flow perturbations that occur over the up-current bars. The longshore current strength also plays an important role; the offshore root-mean-square wave height and angle must be larger than some critical values (0.5 m and 20∘, respectively, at 18-m depth). Model-data comparison indicates that the modeled bar shape characteristics (up-current orientation) and the wave conditions leading to the bar formation agree with data, while the modeled wavelengths and migration rates are larger than the observed ones. The discrepancies might be because in the model we neglect the influence of the large-scale beach configuration.

  11. Microwave challenges to the thermoregulatory system

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    The results of several kinds of experiments have been introduced as evidence in support of the thesis that the thermoregulatory system of endotherms functions no differently in the presence of microwaves than it does in the presence of conventional sources of thermal energy. The thermoregulatory profile, unique for each species, provides the framework for the argument. The results of our experiments have demonstrated the equivalence between T and microwave intensity as they influence individual responses of heat production and heat loss. This equivalence, in turn, allows the prediction of specific alterations in thermoregulatory responses when microwaves are present. Predictions of this kind are possible because the hierarchy of autonomic responses available to any given species is always the same. This fact should provide some comfort to those who profess concern abut the uniqueness of absorbed radiofrequency energy and its fate within the body. Additional comfort can be derived from the demonstration that changes in thermoregulatory responses in the presence of microwaves depend upon the integral of energy absorption by the whole body, not upon energy deposited in some restricted locus such as the PO/AH. It is clear that the circulatory system plays a major role in the distribution of energy deposited during such exposures, a fact already emphasized by others. This fact does not negate the presence of electrical hotspots as predicted on theoretical grounds or as demonstrated dosimetrically, but it does deemphasize their importance as potential deterrents to the efficient mobilization of thermoregulatory responses. The utility of the thermoregulatory profile in research of the kind described here cannot be overemphasized. 26 references.

  12. The Electronic Behavior of Zinc-Finger Protein Binding Sites in the Context of the DNA Extended Ladder Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oiwa, Nestor; Cordeiro, Claudette; Heermann, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Instead of ATCG letter alignments, typically used in bioinformatics, we propose a new alignment method using the probability distribution function of the bottom of the occupied molecular orbital (BOMO), highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied orbital (LUMO). We apply the technique to transcription factors with Cys2His2 zinc fingers. These transcription factors search for binding sites, probing for the electronic patterns at the minor and major DNA groves. The eukaryotic Cys2His2 zinc finger proteins bind to DNA ubiquitously at highly conserved domains. They are responsible for gene regulation and the spatial organization of DNA. To study and understand these zinc finger DNA-protein interactions, we use the extended ladder in the DNA model proposed by Zhu, Rasmussen, Balatsky & Bishop (2007) te{Zhu-2007}. Considering one single spinless electron in each nucleotide π-orbital along a double DNA chain (dDNA), we find a typical pattern for the bottom of BOMO, HOMO and LUMO along the binding sites. We specifically looked at two members of zinc finger protein family: specificity protein 1 (SP1) and early grown response 1 transcription factors (EGR1). When the valence band is filled, we find electrons in the purines along the nucleotide sequence, compatible with the electric charges of the binding amino acids in SP1 and EGR1 zinc finger.

  13. Multiple Fingers - One Gestalt.

    PubMed

    Lezkan, Alexandra; Manuel, Steven G; Colgate, J Edward; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Drewing, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The Gestalt theory of perception offered principles by which distributed visual sensations are combined into a structured experience ("Gestalt"). We demonstrate conditions whereby haptic sensations at two fingertips are integrated in the perception of a single object. When virtual bumps were presented simultaneously to the right hand's thumb and index finger during lateral arm movements, participants reported perceiving a single bump. A discrimination task measured the bump's perceived location and perceptual reliability (assessed by differential thresholds) for four finger configurations, which varied in their adherence to the Gestalt principles of proximity (small versus large finger separation) and synchrony (virtual spring to link movements of the two fingers versus no spring). According to models of integration, reliability should increase with the degree to which multi-finger cues integrate into a unified percept. Differential thresholds were smaller in the virtual-spring condition (synchrony) than when fingers were unlinked. Additionally, in the condition with reduced synchrony, greater proximity led to lower differential thresholds. Thus, with greater adherence to Gestalt principles, thresholds approached values predicted for optimal integration. We conclude that the Gestalt principles of synchrony and proximity apply to haptic perception of surface properties and that these principles can interact to promote multi-finger integration. PMID:26863671

  14. Mallet finger - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Baseball finger - aftercare; Drop finger - aftercare; Avulsion fracture - mallet finger - aftercare ... Mallet finger occurs when you cannot straighten your finger: when you try to straighten it, the tip of your ...

  15. Fingering convection induced by atomic diffusion in stars: 3D numerical computations and applications to stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Zemskova, Varvara; Garaud, Pascale; Deal, Morgan; Vauclair, Sylvie

    2014-11-10

    Iron-rich layers are known to form in the stellar subsurface through a combination of gravitational settling and radiative levitation. Their presence, nature, and detailed structure can affect the excitation process of various stellar pulsation modes and must therefore be modeled carefully in order to better interpret Kepler asteroseismic data. In this paper, we study the interplay between atomic diffusion and fingering convection in A-type stars, as well as its role in the establishment and evolution of iron accumulation layers. To do so, we use a combination of three-dimensional idealized numerical simulations of fingering convection (which neglect radiative transfer and complex opacity effects) and one-dimensional realistic stellar models. Using the three-dimensional simulations, we first validate the mixing prescription for fingering convection recently proposed by Brown et al. (within the scope of the aforementioned approximation) and identify what system parameters (total mass of iron, iron diffusivity, thermal diffusivity, etc.) play a role in the overall evolution of the layer. We then implement the Brown et al. prescription in the Toulouse-Geneva Evolution Code to study the evolution of the iron abundance profile beneath the stellar surface. We find, as first discussed by Théado et al., that when the concurrent settling of helium is ignored, this accumulation rapidly causes an inversion in the mean molecular weight profile, which then drives fingering convection. The latter mixes iron with the surrounding material very efficiently, and the resulting iron layer is very weak. However, taking helium settling into account partially stabilizes the iron profile against fingering convection, and a large iron overabundance can accumulate. The opacity also increases significantly as a result, and in some cases it ultimately triggers dynamical convection. The direct effects of radiative acceleration on the dynamics of fingering convection (especially in the

  16. Thermoregulatory responses to preoptic cooling in unrestrained rabbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, G. N., Jr.; Heath, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Rabbits at ambient temperatures within the thermal neutral zone show two different metabolic responses to preoptic cooling. One response type is defined by a preoptic thermal sensitivity that shifts with ambient temperature and a 'set point' that remains constant. The other response type is defined by a set point that shifts with ambient temperature and a preoptic thermal sensitivity that remains constant. Both response types can be modeled by a single equation. Nonmetabolic thermoregulatory responses are not significantly different between the two response types.

  17. Finger Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Oosterhoff, Thijs C H; Nota, Sjoerd P F T; Ring, David

    2015-06-01

    Background Finger stiffness varies substantially in patients with hand and upper extremity illness and can be notably more than expected for a given pathophysiology. In prior studies, pain intensity and magnitude of disability consistently correlate with coping strategies such as catastrophic thinking and kinesiophobia, which can be characterized as overprotectiveness. In this retrospective study we address the primary research question whether patients with finger stiffness are more often overprotective when the primary pathology is outside the hand (e.g. distal radius fracture) than when it is located within the hand. Methods In an orthopaedic hand surgery department 160 patients diagnosed with more finger stiffness than expected for a given pathophysiology or time point of recovery between December 2006 and September 2012 were analyzed to compare the proportion of patients characterized as overprotective for differences by site of pathology: (1) inside the hand, (2) outside the hand, and (3) psychiatric etiology (e.g. clenched fist). Results Among 160 subjects with more finger stiffness than expected, 132 (82 %) were characterized as overprotective including 88 of 108 (81 %) with pathology in the hand, 39 of 44 (89 %) with pathology outside the hand, and 5 of 8 (63 %) with psychiatric etiology. These differences were not significant. Conclusions Overprotectiveness is common in patients with more finger stiffness than expected regardless the site and type of primary pathology. It seems worthwhile to recognize and treat maladaptive coping strategies early during recovery to limit impairment, symptoms, and disability. PMID:26078497

  18. A cortically-inspired model for inverse kinematics computation of a humanoid finger with mechanically coupled joints.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Rodolphe J; Oh, Hyuk; Kregling, Alissa V; Reggia, James A

    2016-06-01

    The human hand's versatility allows for robust and flexible grasping. To obtain such efficiency, many robotic hands include human biomechanical features such as fingers having their two last joints mechanically coupled. Although such coupling enables human-like grasping, controlling the inverse kinematics of such mechanical systems is challenging. Here we propose a cortical model for fine motor control of a humanoid finger, having its two last joints coupled, that learns the inverse kinematics of the effector. This neural model functionally mimics the population vector coding as well as sensorimotor prediction processes of the brain's motor/premotor and parietal regions, respectively. After learning, this neural architecture could both overtly (actual execution) and covertly (mental execution or motor imagery) perform accurate, robust and flexible finger movements while reproducing the main human finger kinematic states. This work contributes to developing neuro-mimetic controllers for dexterous humanoid robotic/prosthetic upper-extremities, and has the potential to promote human-robot interactions. PMID:27194213

  19. Extrinsic and intrinsic index finger muscle attachments in an OpenSim upper-extremity model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Asakawa, Deanna S; Dennerlein, Jack T; Jindrich, Devin L

    2015-04-01

    Musculoskeletal models allow estimation of muscle function during complex tasks. We used objective methods to determine possible attachment locations for index finger muscles in an OpenSim upper-extremity model. Data-driven optimization algorithms, Simulated Annealing and Hook-Jeeves, estimated tendon locations crossing the metacarpophalangeal (MCP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints by minimizing the difference between model-estimated and experimentally-measured moment arms. Sensitivity analysis revealed that multiple sets of muscle attachments with similar optimized moment arms are possible, requiring additional assumptions or data to select a single set of values. The most smooth muscle paths were assumed to be biologically reasonable. Estimated tendon attachments resulted in variance accounted for (VAF) between calculated moment arms and measured values of 78% for flex/extension and 81% for ab/adduction at the MCP joint. VAF averaged 67% at the PIP joint and 54% at the DIP joint. VAF values at PIP and DIP joints partially reflected the constant moment arms reported for muscles about these joints. However, all moment arm values found through optimization were non-linear and non-constant. Relationships between moment arms and joint angles were best described with quadratic equations for tendons at the PIP and DIP joints. PMID:25281408

  20. Chalcogen bonding interactions between reducible sulfur and selenium compounds and models of zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Patricia B; Bayse, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Reducible sulfur and selenium (r-S/Se) compounds, defined as sulfur and selenium compounds not in the lowest -2 oxidation state (e.g., -1 to +6), release Zn(2+) from zinc-sulfur proteins such as zinc fingers (ZFs) and metallothionein. A series of density functional theory calculations was performed on donor-acceptor complexes between r-S/Se compounds and models of the Cys2His2, Cys3His and Cys4 ZF sites. These S⋯S/Se chalcogen bonding interactions consist of the donation of electron density from a S lone pair on the ZF model to a S/Se-X antibonding molecular orbital of the r-S/Se compound. The strength of the interaction was shown to be dependent upon the Lewis basicity of the ZF model (Cys4>Cys3His>Cys2His2) and the Lewis acidity of the r-S/Se compound as measured by the energy of the S/Se-X antibonding orbital. Interactions with the softer r-Se compounds were stronger than the r-S compounds, consistent with the greater reactivity of the former with ZF proteins. PMID:26877152

  1. Frequency weighting for vibration-induced white finger compatible with exposure-response models.

    PubMed

    Brammer, Anthony J; Pitts, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    An analysis has been performed to derive a frequency weighting for the development of vibration-induced white finger (VWF). It employs a model to compare health risks for pairs of population groups that are selected to have similar health outcomes from operating power tools or machines with markedly different acceleration spectra (rock drills, chain saws, pavement breakers and motorcycles). The model defines the Relative Risk, RR(f(trial)), which is constructed from the ratio of daily exposures and includes a trial frequency weighting that is applied to the acceleration spectra. The trial frequency weighting consists of a frequency-independent primary frequency range, and subordinate frequency ranges in which the response to vibration diminishes, with cut-off frequencies that are changed to influence the magnitude of RR(f(trial)). The frequency weighting so derived when RR(f(trial)) = 1 is similar to those obtained by other methods (W(hf), W(hT)). It consists of a frequency independent range from about 25 Hz to 500 Hz (-3 dB frequencies), with an amplitude cut-off rate of 12 dB/octave below 25 Hz and above 500 Hz. The range is compatible with studies of vasoconstriction in persons with VWF. The results provide further evidence that the ISO frequency weighting may be inappropriate for assessing the risk of developing VWF. PMID:23060253

  2. Finger Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The author has been prompted to write this article about finger multiplication for a number of reasons. Firstly there are a number of related articles in past issues of "Mathematics Teaching" ("MT") which have connections to this algorithm. Secondly, very few of his primary teaching students and professional colleagues appear to be aware of the…

  3. Changes in thermoregulatory behavior during microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.

    1981-10-01

    Voluntary behavioral action is an organism's first defense against exogenous thermal challenge. Endotherms and ectotherms alike use behavioral strategies whenever possible to counteract inhospitable alterations in the exchange of thermal energy between their bodies and the environment. Responses as diverse as the thermotropisms of unicellular organisms and the complex behavior-plus-technology of man's lunar walk share a common purpose--that of providing a hospitable microclimate so that the internal body temperature may be regulated with precision at a characteristic (neutral) level. For ectothermic species, these behaviors represent most of the thermoregulatory response available to the organism. For endothermic species, these behaviors represent most of the thermoregulatory response available to the organism. For endothermic species, these behaviors ensure minimal involvement of innate mechanisms of heat production and heat loss during thermoregulation, thus conserving the body's energy stores and water.

  4. Incubation temperature modulates post-hatching thermoregulatory behavior in the Madagascar ground gecko, Paroedura pictus.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Mark S; Lewis, Sean J; Sokoloff, Greta

    2002-09-01

    All vertebrates regulate body temperature within narrow limits, regardless of their physiological capabilities. When do these limits develop, and can they be modified by manipulations of the developmental thermal environment? We addressed these questions by incubating the eggs of the Madagascar ground gecko, Paroedura pictus, at three temperatures and by assessing thermoregulatory behavior in hatchlings. Thermoregulatory behavior was assessed using a two-choice shuttle paradigm, and skin temperatures were measured non-invasively using infrared thermography. The shuttling behavior of hatchlings was systematically affected by the temperature at which they were incubated, and follow-up tests suggested that this effect persisted for at least three weeks post-hatching. The body temperature data from the shuttling experiment were used to model thermoregulatory behavior in a complex thermal environment; the model predicted systematic effects of incubation temperature on thermal preference. The specificity of the alteration in thermoregulatory behavior by incubation temperature is compelling and provides evidence for powerful pre-hatching influences on a fundamental, life-sustaining behavioral process. PMID:12177143

  5. Finger Vein Segmentation from Infrared Images Based on a Modified Separable Mumford Shah Model and Local Entropy Thresholding.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Marios; Dermatas, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for finger vein pattern extraction from infrared images is presented. This method involves four steps: preprocessing which performs local normalization of the image intensity, image enhancement, image segmentation, and finally postprocessing for image cleaning. In the image enhancement step, an image which will be both smooth and similar to the original is sought. The enhanced image is obtained by minimizing the objective function of a modified separable Mumford Shah Model. Since, this minimization procedure is computationally intensive for large images, a local application of the Mumford Shah Model in small window neighborhoods is proposed. The finger veins are located in concave nonsmooth regions and, so, in order to distinct them from the other tissue parts, all the differences between the smooth neighborhoods, obtained by the local application of the model, and the corresponding windows of the original image are added. After that, veins in the enhanced image have been sufficiently emphasized. Thus, after image enhancement, an accurate segmentation can be obtained readily by a local entropy thresholding method. Finally, the resulted binary image may suffer from some misclassifications and, so, a postprocessing step is performed in order to extract a robust finger vein pattern. PMID:26120357

  6. Finger Vein Segmentation from Infrared Images Based on a Modified Separable Mumford Shah Model and Local Entropy Thresholding

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Marios; Dermatas, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for finger vein pattern extraction from infrared images is presented. This method involves four steps: preprocessing which performs local normalization of the image intensity, image enhancement, image segmentation, and finally postprocessing for image cleaning. In the image enhancement step, an image which will be both smooth and similar to the original is sought. The enhanced image is obtained by minimizing the objective function of a modified separable Mumford Shah Model. Since, this minimization procedure is computationally intensive for large images, a local application of the Mumford Shah Model in small window neighborhoods is proposed. The finger veins are located in concave nonsmooth regions and, so, in order to distinct them from the other tissue parts, all the differences between the smooth neighborhoods, obtained by the local application of the model, and the corresponding windows of the original image are added. After that, veins in the enhanced image have been sufficiently emphasized. Thus, after image enhancement, an accurate segmentation can be obtained readily by a local entropy thresholding method. Finally, the resulted binary image may suffer from some misclassifications and, so, a postprocessing step is performed in order to extract a robust finger vein pattern. PMID:26120357

  7. Thermoregulatory responses to environmental toxicants: The interaction of thermal stress and toxicant exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Lisa R.

    2008-11-15

    Thermal stress can have a profound impact on the physiological responses that are elicited following environmental toxicant exposure. The efficacy by which toxicants enter the body is directly influenced by thermoregulatory effector responses that are evoked in response to high ambient temperatures. In mammals, the thermoregulatory response to heat stress consists of an increase in skin blood flow and moistening of the skin surface to dissipate core heat to the environment. These physiological responses may exacerbate chemical toxicity due to increased permeability of the skin, which facilitates the cutaneous absorption of many environmental toxicants. The core temperature responses that are elicited in response to high ambient temperatures, toxicant exposure or both can also have a profound impact on the ability of an organism to survive the insult. In small rodents, the thermoregulatory response to thermal stress and many environmental toxicants (such as organophosphate compounds) is often biphasic in nature, consisting initially of a regulated reduction in core temperature (i.e., hypothermia) followed by fever. Hypothermia is an important thermoregulatory survival strategy that is used by small rodents to diminish the effect of severe environmental insults on tissue homeostasis. The protective effect of hypothermia is realized by its effects on chemical toxicity as molecular and cellular processes, such as lipid peroxidation and the formation of reactive oxygen species, are minimized at reduced core temperatures. The beneficial effects of fever are unknown under these conditions. Perspective is provided on the applicability of data obtained in rodent models to the human condition.

  8. Alpha adrenoceptors in the rabbit ear thermoregulatory microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Koman, L A; Smith, B P; Gordon, E S; Smith, T L

    1998-03-01

    The rabbit ear microcirculation was analyzed in a chronic unanesthetized model to evaluate alpha adrenergic microvascular control in a thermoregulatory end organ. This model allowed direct measurement of microcirculatory responses without the effects of anesthetics or inflammatory responses induced by acute surgical intervention. The ipsilateral facial artery was catheterized for drug injections into the experimental ear. Microvascular diameter changes following stimulation or blockade of adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes were observed directly through a chronic microvascular chamber implanted in the rabbit ear. Vascular alpha1- and alpha2-ARs appear to be distributed differently across the arterioles and AVAs of the rabbit ear. Both alpha1- and alpha2-ARs appear to contribute to vasoconstriction of AVAs in the conscious rabbit ear. In contrast, alpha1-AR's (vs alpha2-ARs) appear to predominate in adrenergically mediated sympathetic vasoconstriction of arterioles. PMID:9521886

  9. Computer Applications in Thermoregulatory Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMeersman, R. E.; Schneider, Frederick C.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a program which uses a series of algebraic equations calculating mean skin temperature and mean body temperature. The program, which uses the well-established physiological model by Burton, is written in Microsoft BASIC for TRS-80 microcomputers; however, it can be easily modified for other microcomputers. (JN)

  10. Analysis of the effects of surface stiffness on the contact interaction between a finger and a cylindrical handle using a three-dimensional hybrid model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, John Z.; Dong, Ren G.; Warren, Christopher M.; Welcome, Daniel E.; McDowell, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Contact interactions between the hand and handle, such as the contact surface softness and contact surface curvature, will affect both physical effort and musculoskeletal fatigue, thereby the comfort and safety of power tool operations. Previous models of hand gripping can be categorized into two groups: multi-body dynamic models and finite element (FE) models. The goal of the current study is to develop a hybrid FE hand gripping model, which combines the features of conventional FE models and multi-body dynamic models. The proposed model is applied to simulate hand-gripping on a cylindrical handle with covering materials of different softness levels. The model included three finger segments (distal, middle, and proximal phalanxes), three finger joints (the distal interphalangeal (DIP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP), and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint), and major anatomical substructures. The model was driven by joint moments, which are the net effects of all passive and active muscular forces acting about the joints. The finger model was first calibrated by using experimental data of human subject tests, and then applied to investigate the effects of surface softness on contact interactions between a finger and a cylindrical handle. Our results show that the maximal compressive stress and strain in the soft tissues of the fingers can be effectively reduced by reducing the stiffness of the covering material. PMID:24736020

  11. Finger Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    You use your fingers and thumbs to do everything from grasping objects to playing musical instruments to typing. When there is something wrong ... the skin of your palm. It causes the fingers to stiffen and bend. Trigger finger - an irritation ...

  12. Effects of motion sickness on thermoregulatory responses in a thermoneutral air environment.

    PubMed

    Nobel, Gerard; Tribukait, Arne; Mekjavic, Igor B; Eiken, Ola

    2012-05-01

    Motion sickness (MS) has been identified as a non-thermal factor that can moderate autonomic thermoregulatory responses. It has been shown that MS exaggerates core cooling during immersion in cold (15 °C) and luke-warm (28 °C) water by attenuating cold-induced vasoconstriction. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether MS affects thermal balance in a thermoneutral air environment. Eleven subjects were exposed to rotation in two conditions, control (CN) and MS. In the CN condition subjects refrained from head movements, whereas in the MS condition they performed a sequence of maximal head movements (left, right, up, down) at 15-s intervals until they were very nauseous. Sweating rate, rectal temperature (T(re)), the difference in temperature between the right forearm and tip of the second finger (T(ff)) as an index of cutaneous vasomotor tone, perceived MS, thermal comfort and temperature perception were recorded before and during rotation, and during 90-min post-rotation. During the post-rotation period, T(re) dropped and sweating rate increased in the MS but not in the CN condition. The T(ff) response suggests that MS-induced peripheral vasodilatation which, together with the sweating resulted in increased heat loss. During rotation, subjects perceived temperature to be uncomfortably high, suggesting that MS may also affect thermoregulatory behaviour. It thus appears that also in a thermoneutral air environment MS may substantially affect thermal balance. PMID:21892631

  13. Cardiovascular response to thermoregulatory challenges.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuiqing; Yavar, Zubin; Sun, Qinghua

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of extreme climate events are occurring in the setting of ongoing climate change, with an increase in both the intensity and frequency. It has been shown that ambient temperature challenges have a direct and highly varied impact on cardiovascular health. With a rapidly growing amount of literature on this issue, we aim to review the recent publications regarding the impact of cold and heat on human populations with regard to cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality/morbidity while also examining lag effects, vulnerable subgroups, and relevant mechanisms. Although the relative risk of morbidity/mortality associated with extreme temperature varied greatly across different studies, both cold and hot temperatures were associated with a positive mean excess of cardiovascular deaths or hospital admissions. Cause-specific study of CVD morbidity/mortality indicated that the sensitivity to temperature was disease-specific, with different patterns for acute and chronic ischemic heart disease. Vulnerability to temperature-related mortality was associated with some characteristics of the populations, including sex, age, location, socioeconomic condition, and comorbidities such as cardiac diseases, kidney diseases, diabetes, and hypertension. Temperature-induced damage is thought to be related to enhanced sympathetic reactivity followed by activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renin-angiotensin system, as well as dehydration and a systemic inflammatory response. Future research should focus on multidisciplinary adaptation strategies that incorporate epidemiology, climatology, indoor/building environments, energy usage, labor legislative perfection, and human thermal comfort models. Studies on the underlying mechanism by which temperature challenge induces pathophysiological response and CVD await profound and lasting investigation. PMID:26432837

  14. Thermoregulatory correlates of nausea in rats and musk shrews.

    PubMed

    Ngampramuan, Sukonthar; Cerri, Matteo; Del Vecchio, Flavia; Corrigan, Joshua J; Kamphee, Amornrat; Dragic, Alexander S; Rudd, John A; Romanovsky, Andrej A; Nalivaiko, Eugene

    2014-03-30

    Nausea is a prominent symptom and major cause of complaint for patients receiving anticancer chemo- or radiation therapy. The arsenal of anti-nausea drugs is limited, and their efficacy is questionable. Currently, the development of new compounds with anti-nausea activity is hampered by the lack of physiological correlates of nausea. Physiological correlates are needed because common laboratory rodents lack the vomiting reflex. Furthermore, nausea does not always lead to vomiting. Here, we report the results of studies conducted in four research centers to investigate whether nausea is associated with any specific thermoregulatory symptoms. Two species were studied: the laboratory rat, which has no vomiting reflex, and the house musk shrew (Suncus murinus), which does have a vomiting reflex. In rats, motion sickness was induced by rotating them in their individual cages in the horizontal plane (0.75 Hz, 40 min) and confirmed by reduced food consumption at the onset of dark (active) phase. In 100% of rats tested at three centers, post-rotational sickness was associated with marked (~1.5°C) hypothermia, which was associated with a short-lasting tail-skin vasodilation (skin temperature increased by ~4°C). Pretreatment with ondansetron, a serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, which is used to treat nausea in patients in chemo- or radiation therapy, attenuated hypothermia by ~30%. In shrews, motion sickness was induced by a cyclical back-and-forth motion (4 cm, 1 Hz, 15 min) and confirmed by the presence of retching and vomiting. In this model, sickness was also accompanied by marked hypothermia (~2°C). Like in rats, the hypothermic response was preceded by transient tail-skin vasodilation. In conclusion, motion sickness is accompanied by hypothermia that involves both autonomic and thermoeffector mechanisms: tail-skin vasodilation and possibly reduction of the interscapular brown adipose tissue activity. These thermoregulatory symptoms may serve as physiological

  15. Thermoregulatory correlates of nausea in rats and musk shrews

    PubMed Central

    Ngampramuan, Sukonthar; Cerri, Matteo; Vecchio, Flavia Del; Corrigan, Joshua J.; Kamphee, Amornrat; Dragic, Alexander S.; Rudd, John A.; Romanovsky, Andrej A.; Nalivaiko, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Nausea is a prominent symptom and major cause of complaint for patients receiving anticancer chemo- or radiation therapy. The arsenal of anti-nausea drugs is limited, and their efficacy is questionable. Currently, the development of new compounds with anti-nausea activity is hampered by the lack of physiological correlates of nausea. Physiological correlates are needed because common laboratory rodents lack the vomiting reflex. Furthermore, nausea does not always lead to vomiting. Here, we report the results of studies conducted in four research centers to investigate whether nausea is associated with any specific thermoregulatory symptoms. Two species were studied: the laboratory rat, which has no vomiting reflex, and the house musk shrew (Suncus murinus), which does have a vomiting reflex. In rats, motion sickness was induced by rotating them in their individual cages in the horizontal plane (0.75 Hz, 40 min) and confirmed by reduced food consumption at the onset of dark (active) phase. In 100% of rats tested at three centers, post-rotational sickness was associated with marked (~1.5°C) hypothermia, which was associated with a short-lasting tail-skin vasodilation (skin temperature increased by ~4°C). Pretreatment with ondansetron, a serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, which is used to treat nausea in patients in chemo- or radiation therapy, attenuated hypothermia by ~30%. In shrews, motion sickness was induced by a cyclical back-and-forth motion (4 cm, 1 Hz, 15 min) and confirmed by the presence of retching and vomiting. In this model, sickness was also accompanied by marked hypothermia (~2°C). Like in rats, the hypothermic response was preceded by transient tail-skin vasodilation. In conclusion, motion sickness is accompanied by hypothermia that involves both autonomic and thermoeffector mechanisms: tail-skin vasodilation and possibly reduction of the interscapular brown adipose tissue activity. These thermoregulatory symptoms may serve as physiological

  16. Estimating Isometric Tension of Finger Muscle Using Needle EMG Signals and the Twitch Contraction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Takafumi; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    We address an estimation method of isometric muscle tension of fingers, as fundamental research for a neural signal-based prosthesis of fingers. We utilize needle electromyogram (EMG) signals, which have approximately equivalent information to peripheral neural signals. The estimating algorithm comprised two convolution operations. The first convolution is between normal distribution and a spike array, which is detected by needle EMG signals. The convolution estimates the probability density of spike-invoking time in the muscle. In this convolution, we hypothesize that each motor unit in a muscle activates spikes independently based on a same probability density function. The second convolution is between the result of the previous convolution and isometric twitch, viz., the impulse response of the motor unit. The result of the calculation is the sum of all estimated tensions of whole muscle fibers, i.e., muscle tension. We confirmed that there is good correlation between the estimated tension of the muscle and the actual tension, with >0.9 correlation coefficients at 59%, and >0.8 at 89% of all trials.

  17. Noncontacting Finger Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P. (Inventor); Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An annular finger seal is adapted to be interposed between a high pressure upstream region and a lower pressure downstream region to provide noncontact sealing along a rotatable member. The finger seal comprises axially juxtaposed downstream and upstream finger elements, each having integrally spaced fingers. The downstream fingers each have a lift pad, whereas the upstream fingers lack a pad. Each pad extends in a downstream direction. Each upstream finger is spaced from the rotating member a greater distance than each pad. Upon sufficient rotational speed of the rotating member, each pad is operative to lift and ride on a thin film of fluid intermediate the rotating member and the Pad.

  18. Thermoregulatory vasomotor tone of the rat tail and paws in thermoneutral conditions and its impact on a behavioral model of acute pain.

    PubMed

    El Bitar, Nabil; Pollin, Bernard; Karroum, Elias; Pincedé, Ivanne; Mouraux, André; Le Bars, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The tail and paws in rodents are heat exchangers involved in the maintenance of core body temperature (T(core)). They are also the most widely used target organs to study acute or chronic "models" of pain. We describe the fluctuations of vasomotor tone in the tail and paws in conditions of thermal neutrality and the constraints of these physiological processes on the responses to thermal nociceptive stimuli, commonly used as an index of pain. Skin temperatures were recorded with a calibrated thermal camera to monitor changes of vasomotor tone in the tail and paws of awake and anesthetized rats. In thermoneutral conditions, the sympathetic tone fluctuated at a rate of two to seven cycles/h. Increased mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; ∼46 mmHg) was followed by increased heart rate (HR; ∼45 beats/min) within 30 s, vasoconstriction of extremities (3.5-7°C range) within 3-5 min, and increased T(core) (∼0.7°C) within 6 min. Decreased MAP was followed by opposite events. There was a high correlation between HR and T(core) recorded 5-6 min later. The reaction time of the animal's response to a radiant thermal stimulus-heat ramp (6°C/s, 20 mm(2) spot) generated by a CO2 laser-directed to the tail depends on these variations. Consequently, the fluctuations in tail and paw temperature thus represent a serious confound for thermal nociceptive tests, particularly when they are conducted at thermal neutrality. PMID:25008410

  19. Modeling of 3-D Object Manipulation by Multi-Joint Robot Fingers under Non-Holonomic Constraints and Stable Blind Grasping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Suguru; Yoshida, Morio; Bae, Ji-Hun

    This paper derives a mathematical model that expresses motion of a pair of multi-joint robot fingers with hemi-spherical rigid ends grasping and manipulating a 3-D rigid object with parallel flat surfaces. Rolling contacts arising between finger-ends and object surfaces are taken into consideration and modeled as Pfaffian constraints from which constraint forces emerge tangentially to the object surfaces. Another noteworthy difference of modeling of motion of a 3-D object from that of a 2-D object is that the instantaneous axis of rotation of the object is fixed in the 2-D case but that is time-varying in the 3-D case. A further difficulty that has prevented us to model 3-D physical interactions between a pair of fingers and a rigid object lies in the problem of treating spinning motion that may arise around the opposing axis from a contact point between one finger-end with one side of the object to another contact point. This paper shows that, once such spinning motion stops as the object mass center approaches just beneath the opposition axis, then this cease of spinning evokes a further nonholonomic constraint. Hence, the multi-body dynamics of the overall fingers-object system is subject to non-holonomic constraints concerning a 3-D orthogonal matrix expressing three mutually orthogonal unit vectors fixed at the object together with an extra non-holonomic constraint that the instantaneous axis of rotation of the object is always orthogonal to the opposing axis. It is shown that Lagrange's equation of motion of the overall system can be derived without violating the causality that governs the non-holonomic constraints. This immediately suggests possible construction of a numerical simulator of multi-body dynamics that can express motion of the fingers and object physically interactive to each other. By referring to the fact that human grasp an object in the form of precision prehension dynamically and stably by using opposable force between the thumb and another

  20. Elderly bioheat modeling: changes in physiology, thermoregulation, and blood flow circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rida, Mohamad; Ghaddar, Nesreen; Ghali, Kamel; Hoballah, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    A bioheat model for the elderly was developed focusing on blood flow circulatory changes that influence their thermal response in warm and cold environments to predict skin and core temperatures for different segments of the body especially the fingers. The young adult model of Karaki et al. (Int J Therm Sci 67:41-51, 2013) was modified by incorporation of the physiological thermoregulatory and vasomotor changes based on literature observations of physiological changes in the elderly compared to young adults such as lower metabolism and vasoconstriction diminished ability, skin blood flow and its minimum and maximum values, the sweating values, skin fat thickness, as well as the change in threshold parameter related to core or skin temperatures which triggers thermoregulatory action for sweating, maximum dilatation, and maximum constriction. The developed model was validated with published experimental data for elderly exposure to transient and steady hot and cold environments. Predicted finger skin temperature, mean skin temperature, and core temperature were in agreement with published experimental data at a maximum error less than 0.5 °C in the mean skin temperature. The elderly bioheat model showed an increase in finger skin temperature and a decrease in core temperature in cold exposure while it showed a decrease in finger skin temperature and an increase in core temperature in hot exposure.

  1. Phase-field modeling of two-dimensional solute precipitation/dissolution: Solid fingers and diffusion-limited precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2011-01-28

    Two-dimensional dendritic growth due to solute precipitation was simulated using a phase-field model reported earlier [Z. Xu and P. Meakin, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 014705 (2008)]. It was shown that diffusion-limited precipitation due to the chemical reaction at the solid-liquid interface posses similarities with diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). The diffusion-limited precipitation is attained by setting the chemical reaction rate much larger compared to the solute diffusion to eliminate the effect of the interface growth kinetics. The phase-field simulation results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical solutions. The fractal solid fingers can be formed in the diffusion-limited precipitation and have a fractal dimension measured , close to 1.64, the fractal dimensionality of large square lattice diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) clusters.

  2. Phase-field modeling of two-dimensional solute precipitation/dissolution: Solid fingers and diffusion-limited precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhijie Xu; Paul Meakin

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional dendritic growth due to solute precipitation was simulated using a phase-field model reported earlier [Z. Xu and P. Meakin, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 014705 (2008)]. It was shown that diffusion-limited precipitation due to the chemical reaction at the solid–liquid interface has similarities with diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). The diffusion-limited precipitation is attained by setting the chemical reaction rate much larger compared to the solute diffusion to eliminate the effect of the interface growth kinetics. The phase-field simulation results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical solutions. The fractal solid fingers can be formed in the diffusion-limited precipitation and have a fractal dimension measured df = 1.68, close to 1.64, the fractal dimensionality of large square lattice DLA clusters.

  3. Phase-field modeling of two-dimensional solute precipitation∕dissolution: solid fingers and diffusion-limited precipitation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2011-01-28

    Two-dimensional dendritic growth due to solute precipitation was simulated using a phase-field model reported earlier [Z. Xu and P. Meakin, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 014705 (2008)]. It was shown that diffusion-limited precipitation due to the chemical reaction at the solid-liquid interface has similarities with diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). The diffusion-limited precipitation is attained by setting the chemical reaction rate much larger compared to the solute diffusion to eliminate the effect of the interface growth kinetics. The phase-field simulation results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical solutions. The fractal solid fingers can be formed in the diffusion-limited precipitation and have a fractal dimension measured d(f)=1.68, close to 1.64, the fractal dimensionality of large square lattice DLA clusters. PMID:21280717

  4. Phase-field modeling of two-dimensional solute precipitation/dissolution: Solid fingers and diffusion-limited precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional dendritic growth due to solute precipitation was simulated using a phase-field model reported earlier [Z. Xu and P. Meakin, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 014705 (2008)]. It was shown that diffusion-limited precipitation due to the chemical reaction at the solid-liquid interface has similarities with diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). The diffusion-limited precipitation is attained by setting the chemical reaction rate much larger compared to the solute diffusion to eliminate the effect of the interface growth kinetics. The phase-field simulation results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical solutions. The fractal solid fingers can be formed in the diffusion-limited precipitation and have a fractal dimension measured d_f = 1.68, close to 1.64, the fractal dimensionality of large square lattice DLA clusters.

  5. Scattering Removal for Finger-Vein Image Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy. PMID:22737028

  6. Scattering removal for finger-vein image restoration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy. PMID:22737028

  7. Behavioral thermoregulatory response to maitotoxin in mice.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Yang, Y; Ramsdell, J S

    1998-10-01

    Many types of marine algal toxins induce marked hypothermic responses in mice. However, it is not known if the thermoregulatory response to these toxins results from dysfunction in the control of core temperature (Tc) or is a coordinated response to lower Tc as occurs with a variety of xenobiotic insults. Female CD-1 mice were administered purified maitotoxin (338 ng/kg; IP) and placed in a temperature gradient for 5 h that permitted the selection of ambient temperatures (Ta) ranging between 15 and 37 degrees C. Tc was monitored simultaneously by radiotelemetric probes that were surgically implanted into the abdominal cavity at least one week before maitotoxin injection. Maitotoxin led to a rapid reduction in Tc from 37 to 34 degrees C within 30 min after injection. There was a simultaneous 4 degrees C reduction in Ta selected by mice within 15 min after injection. Selected Ta recovered rapidly, increased above baseline for approximately one hour, then remained near baseline levels for the remainder of the test period in the gradient. Tc remained approximately 1 to 2 degrees C below control levels throughout the test period. In the temperature gradient, mice can select Ta's warm enough to offset the hypothermic effects of maitotoxin. That cooler Ta's are selected initially after maitotoxin injection suggest that the central neural control of body temperature is affected by the toxin. We postulate that the hypothermic response may represent an adaptive response to enhance survival following exposure to polyether toxins. PMID:9723833

  8. THE VELOCITY OF DNAPL FINGERING IN WATER-SATURATED POROUS MEDIA LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS AND A MOBILE-IMMOBILE-ZONE MODEL. (R826157)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are immiscible with water and can give rise to highly fingered fluid distributions when infiltrating through water-saturated porous media. In this paper, a conceptual mobile¯immobile¯zone (MIZ) model is pr...

  9. THE EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXERCISE CONDITIONING ON THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN FEMALE RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exercise conditioning has been shown to alter basal thermoregulatory processes (change in thermoregulatory set-point) as well as the response to infectious fever. Chlorpyrifos (CHP), an organophosphate pesticide, causes an acute period of hypothermia followed by a delaye...

  10. Influence of aging in the thermoregulatory efficiency of man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Singh, R.; Sen Gupta, J.

    1986-06-01

    Studies were carried out to evaluate the effect of aging on the thermoregulatory efficiency in man. The efficiency of thermoregulatory system was assessed on the basis of tolerance to acute cold stress, Tromp test and cold induced vasodilatation (CIVD) response. The experiments were done in 9 groups (15 each) of human volunteers in the age ranges of 20 25, 26 30, 31 35, 36 40, 41 45, 46 50, 51 55, 56 60 and 61 70 years. They were made to relax in a thermoneutral laboratory (27 ± 1‡C) for one hour; thereafter their resting heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen consumption, oral, mean skin, mean body and peripheral temperatures were measured. Then they were exposed to cold (10‡C) in a cold chamber wearing shorts and vests for two hours. The above parameters and shivering responses were recorded at 30 min intervals during cold exposures. On other occasions, their thermoregulatory efficiency test (Tromp Test) and cold induced vasodilatation response were also studied in the same thermoneutral laboratory. The results showed comparatively poor cold tolerance and thermoregulatory efficiency in elderly people. The middle aged category (above 40 years) showed a gradual reduction in the thermoregulatory efficiency, but highly significant reduction was noticed in those who exceeded sixty years of age.

  11. Thermoregulatory strategy may shape immune investment in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kutch, Ian C; Sevgili, Hasan; Wittman, Tyler; Fedorka, Kenneth M

    2014-10-15

    As temperatures change, insects alter the amount of melanin in their cuticle to improve thermoregulation. However, melanin is also central to insect immunity, suggesting that thermoregulatory strategy may indirectly impact immune defense by altering the abundance of melanin pathway components (a hypothesis we refer to as thermoregulatory-dependent immune investment). This may be the case in the cricket Allonemobius socius, where warm environments (both seasonal and geographical) produced crickets with lighter cuticles and increased pathogen susceptibility. Unfortunately, the potential for thermoregulatory strategy to influence insect immunity has not been widely explored. Here we address the relationships between temperature, thermoregulatory strategy and immunity in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. To this end, flies from two separate Canadian populations were reared in either a summer- or autumn-like environment. Shortly after adult eclosion, flies were moved to a common environment where their cuticle color and susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were measured. As with A. socius, individuals from summer-like environments exhibited lighter cuticles and increased pathogen susceptibility, suggesting that the thermoregulatory-immunity relationship is evolutionarily conserved across the hemimetabolous and holometabolous clades. If global temperatures continue to rise as expected, then thermoregulation might play an important role in host infection and mortality rates in systems that provide critical ecosystem services (e.g. pollination), or influence the prevalence of insect-vectored disease (e.g. malaria). PMID:25147243

  12. Hand and Finger Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Hand and Finger Exercises  Place your palm flat on a table. Raise and lower your fingers one ... times for ____ seconds.  Pick up objects with your hand. Start out with larger objects. Repeat ____ times for ____ ...

  13. Fluid mixing from viscous fingering.

    PubMed

    Jha, Birendra; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-05-13

    Mixing efficiency at low Reynolds numbers can be enhanced by exploiting hydrodynamic instabilities that induce heterogeneity and disorder in the flow. The unstable displacement of fluids with different viscosities, or viscous fingering, provides a powerful mechanism to increase fluid-fluid interfacial area and enhance mixing. Here we describe the dissipative structure of miscible viscous fingering, and propose a two-equation model for the scalar variance and its dissipation rate. Our analysis predicts the optimum range of viscosity contrasts that, for a given Péclet number, maximizes interfacial area and minimizes mixing time. In the spirit of turbulence modeling, the proposed two-equation model permits upscaling dissipation due to fingering at unresolved scales. PMID:21668165

  14. A thermal manikin with human thermoregulatory control: Implementation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foda, Ehab; Sirén, Kai

    2012-09-01

    Tens of different sorts of thermal manikins are employed worldwide, mainly in the evaluation of clothing thermal insulation and thermal environments. They are regulated thermally using simplified control modes. This paper reports on the implementation and validation of a new thermoregulatory control mode for thermal manikins. The new control mode is based on a multi-segmental Pierce (MSP) model. In this study, the MSP control mode was implemented, using the LabVIEW platform, onto the control system of the thermal manikin `Therminator'. The MSP mode was then used to estimate the segmental equivalent temperature ( t eq) along with constant surface temperature (CST) mode under two asymmetric thermal conditions. Furthermore, subjective tests under the same two conditions were carried out using 17 human subjects. The estimated segmental t eq from the experiments with the two modes and from the subjective assessment were compared in order to validate the use of the MSP mode for the estimation of t eq. The results showed that the t eq values estimated by the MSP mode were closer to the subjective mean votes under the two test conditions for most body segments and compared favourably with values estimated by the CST mode.

  15. A thermal manikin with human thermoregulatory control: implementation and validation.

    PubMed

    Foda, Ehab; Sirén, Kai

    2012-09-01

    Tens of different sorts of thermal manikins are employed worldwide, mainly in the evaluation of clothing thermal insulation and thermal environments. They are regulated thermally using simplified control modes. This paper reports on the implementation and validation of a new thermoregulatory control mode for thermal manikins. The new control mode is based on a multi-segmental Pierce (MSP) model. In this study, the MSP control mode was implemented, using the LabVIEW platform, onto the control system of the thermal manikin 'Therminator'. The MSP mode was then used to estimate the segmental equivalent temperature (t(eq)) along with constant surface temperature (CST) mode under two asymmetric thermal conditions. Furthermore, subjective tests under the same two conditions were carried out using 17 human subjects. The estimated segmental t(eq) from the experiments with the two modes and from the subjective assessment were compared in order to validate the use of the MSP mode for the estimation of t(eq). The results showed that the t(eq) values estimated by the MSP mode were closer to the subjective mean votes under the two test conditions for most body segments and compared favourably with values estimated by the CST mode. PMID:22083406

  16. Differing Dynamics of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Coordination: Two-finger and Four-Finger Tapping Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Kentaro; Furuyama, Nobuhiro; Inamura, Tetsunari

    2015-01-01

    Finger-tapping experiments were conducted to examine whether the dynamics of intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems can be described equally by the Haken—Kelso—Bunz model, which describes inter-limb coordination dynamics. This article reports the results of finger-tapping experiments conducted in both systems. Two within-subject factors were investigated: the phase mode and the number of fingers. In the intrapersonal experiment (Experiment 1), the participants were asked to tap, paced by a gradually hastening auditory metronome, looking at their fingers moving, using the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. In the interpersonal experiment (Experiment 2), pairs of participants performed the task while each participant used the outside hand, tapping with the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. Some results did not agree with the HKB model predictions. First, from Experiment 1, no significant difference was observed in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase modes in the two finger condition. Second, from Experiment 2, no significant difference was found in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase mode in the four-finger condition. From these findings, different coordination dynamics were inferred between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems against prediction from the previous studies. Results were discussed according to differences between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems in the availability of perceptual information and the complexity in the interaction between limbs derived from a nested structure. PMID:26070119

  17. Female anthropometric variability and their effects on predicted thermoregulatory responses to work in the heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Miyo; Berglund, Larry G.; Bathalon, Gaston P.

    2012-03-01

    The use of thermoregulatory models for assessing physiological responses of workers in thermally stressful situations has been increasing because of the risks and costs related to human studies. In a previous study (Yokota et al. Eur J Appl Physiol 104:297-302, 2008), the effects of anthropometric variability on predicted physiological responses to heat stress in U.S. Army male soldiers were evaluated. Five somatotypes were identified in U.S. Army male multivariate anthropometric distribution. The simulated heat responses, using a thermoregulatory model, were different between somatotypes. The present study further extends this line of research to female soldiers. Anthropometric somatotypes were identified using multivariate analysis [height, weight, percent body fat (%BF)] and the predicted physiological responses to simulated exercise and heat stress using a thermoregulatory model were evaluated. The simulated conditions included walking at ~3 mph (4.8 km/h) for 300 min and wearing battle dress uniform and body armor in a 30°C, 25% relative humidity (RH) environment without solar radiation. Five major somatotypes (tall-fat, tall-lean, average, short-lean, and short-fat), identified through multivariate analysis of anthropometric distributions, showed different tolerance levels to simulated heat stress: lean women were predicted to maintain their core temperatures (Tc) lower than short-fat or tall-fat women. The measured Tc of female subjects obtained from two heat studies (data1: 30°C, 32% RH, protective garments, ~225 w·m-2 walk for 90 min; data2: 32°C, 75% RH, hot weather battle dress uniform, ~378 ± 32 w·m-2 for 30 min walk/30 min rest cycles for 120 min) were utilized for validation. Validation results agreed with the findings in this study: fat subjects tended to have higher core temperatures than medium individuals (data2) and lean subjects maintained lower core temperatures than medium subjects (data1).

  18. THERMOREGULATORY EFFECTS OF METHANOL IN FISCHER AND LONG EVANS RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    While methanol neurotoxicity has been studied for decades, there are very few data available on the thermoregulatory effects of methanol exposure. his paper will present the results of three studies designed to assess the effects of methanol on body temperature and behavioral the...

  19. Thermoregulatory disorders and illness related to heat and cold stress.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, William P

    2016-04-01

    Thermoregulation is a vital function of the autonomic nervous system in response to cold and heat stress. Thermoregulatory physiology sustains health by keeping body core temperature within a degree or two of 37°C, which enables normal cellular function. Heat production and dissipation are dependent on a coordinated set of autonomic responses. The clinical detection of thermoregulatory impairment provides important diagnostic and localizing information in the evaluation of disorders that impair thermoregulatory pathways, including autonomic neuropathies and ganglionopathies. Failure of neural thermoregulatory mechanisms or exposure to extreme or sustained temperatures that overwhelm the body's thermoregulatory capacity can also result in potentially life-threatening departures from normothermia. Hypothermia, defined as a core temperature of <35.0°C, may present with shivering, respiratory depression, cardiac dysrhythmias, impaired mental function, mydriasis, hypotension, and muscle dysfunction, which can progress to cardiac arrest or coma. Management includes warming measures, hydration, and cardiovascular support. Deaths from hypothermia are twice as frequent as deaths from hyperthermia. Hyperthermia, defined as a core temperature of >40.5°C, may present with sweating, flushing, tachycardia, fatigue, lightheadedness, headache, and paresthesia, progressing to weakness, muscle cramps, oliguria, nausea, agitation, hypotension, syncope, confusion, delirium, seizures, and coma. Mental status changes and core temperature distinguish potentially fatal heat stroke from heat exhaustion. Management requires the immediate reduction of core temperature. Ice water immersion has been shown to be superior to alternative cooling measures. Avoidance of thermal risk and early recognition of cold or heat stress are the cornerstones of preventive therapy. PMID:26794588

  20. Finger snapping during seizures.

    PubMed

    Overdijk, M J; Zijlmans, M; Gosselaar, P H; Olivier, A; Leijten, F S S; Dubeau, F

    2014-01-01

    We describe two patients who showed snapping of the right hand fingers during invasive intracranial EEG evaluation for epilepsy surgery. We correlated the EEG changes with the finger-snapping movements in both patients to determine the underlying pathophysiology of this phenomenon. At the time of finger snapping, EEG spread from the supplementary motor area towards the temporal region was seen, suggesting involvement of these sites. PMID:25667884

  1. Let your fingers do the walking: A simple spectral signature model for "remote" fossil prospecting.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Glenn C; Emerson, Charles W; Anemone, Robert L; Townsend, K E Beth

    2012-07-01

    Even with the most meticulous planning, and utilizing the most experienced fossil-hunters, fossil prospecting in remote and/or extensive areas can be time-consuming, expensive, logistically challenging, and often hit or miss. While nothing can predict or guarantee with 100% assurance that fossils will be found in any particular location, any procedures or techniques that might increase the odds of success would be a major benefit to the field. Here we describe, and test, one such technique that we feel has great potential for increasing the probability of finding fossiliferous sediments - a relatively simple spectral signature model using the spatial analysis and image classification functions of ArcGIS(®)10 that creates interactive thematic land cover maps that can be used for "remote" fossil prospecting. Our test case is the extensive Eocene sediments of the Uinta Basin, Utah - a fossil prospecting area encompassing ∼1200 square kilometers. Using Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite imagery, we "trained" the spatial analysis and image classification algorithms using the spectral signatures of known fossil localities discovered in the Uinta Basin prior to 2005 and then created interactive probability models highlighting other regions in the Basin having a high probability of containing fossiliferous sediments based on their spectral signatures. A fortuitous "post-hoc" validation of our model presented itself. Our model identified several paleontological "hotspots", regions that, while not producing any fossil localities prior to 2005, had high probabilities of being fossiliferous based on the similarities of their spectral signatures to those of previously known fossil localities. Subsequent fieldwork found fossils in all the regions predicted by the model. PMID:22703969

  2. Fingers that change color

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions can cause fingers or toes to change color: Buerger disease Chilblains. Painful inflammation of small blood vessels. Cryoglobulinemia Frostbite Necrotizing vasculitis Peripheral artery disease ...

  3. Acute and delayed thermoregulatory response of mice exposed to brevetoxin.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Kimm-Brinson, K L; Padnos, B; Ramsdell, J S

    2001-09-01

    Thermal dysthesia, characterized by a painful sensation of warm and cool surfaces, is one of many ailments in humans exposed to various marine algal toxins such as brevetoxin (PbTx). There is no animal model to study thermal dysthesia and little is known of the mechanism of action. There is also little known on the acute and delayed thermoregulatory effects of PbTx. In this study, we developed a behavioral system to assess the possible development of thermal dysthesia in mice exposed to PbTx. Female mice were implanted with radiotransmitters to monitor core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA). In one experiment, mice were dosed with the control vehicle or 180 microg/kg PbTx and placed on a floor temperature gradient to measure the selected foot temperature (SFT) while air temperature was kept constant. PbTx-treated mice underwent a 10 degrees C reduction in SFT concomitant with a 3 degrees C reduction in Tc within 30 min after exposure. In another study, Tc and MA were monitored in mice maintained in their home cages after dosing with 180 microg/kg PbTx. Tc but not MA increased for 2-5 days after exposure. SFT was unaffected by PbTx when tested 1-12 days after exposure. However, PbTx-treated mice underwent an increase in Tc when placed in the temperature gradient for up to 12 days after exposure. This suggests that PbTx augments the stress-induced hyperthermia from being placed in a novel environment. Overall, acute PbTx exposure leads to a regulated reduction in Tc as characterized by a preference for cooler SFTs and a reduced Tc. Thermal dysthesia was not apparent, but the exaggerated hyperthermic response with a normal SFT in the temperature gradient may suggest an altered processing of thermal stimuli in mice treated with PbTx. PMID:11384725

  4. Behavioral, Ventilatory and Thermoregulatory Responses to Hypercapnia and Hypoxia in the Wistar Audiogenic Rat (WAR) Strain

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Humberto; Oliveira, José Antonio; Glass, Mogens Lesner; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the behavioral, respiratory, and thermoregulatory responses elicited by acute exposure to both hypercapnic and hypoxic environments in Wistar audiogenic rats (WARs). The WAR strain represents a genetic animal model of epilepsy. Methods Behavioral analyses were performed using neuroethological methods, and flowcharts were constructed to illustrate behavioral findings. The body plethysmography method was used to obtain pulmonary ventilation (VE) measurements, and body temperature (Tb) measurements were taken via temperature sensors implanted in the abdominal cavities of the animals. Results No significant difference was observed between the WAR and Wistar control group with respect to the thermoregulatory response elicited by exposure to both acute hypercapnia and acute hypoxia (p>0.05). However, we found that the VE of WARs was attenuated relative to that of Wistar control animals during exposure to both hypercapnic (WAR: 133 ± 11% vs. Wistar: 243 ± 23%, p<0.01) and hypoxic conditions (WAR: 138 ± 8% vs. Wistar: 177 ± 8%; p<0.01). In addition, we noted that this ventilatory attenuation was followed by alterations in the behavioral responses of these animals. Conclusions Our results indicate that WARs, a genetic model of epilepsy, have important alterations in their ability to compensate for changes in levels of various arterial blood gasses. WARs present an attenuated ventilatory response to an increased PaCO2 or decreased PaO2, coupled to behavioral changes, which make them a suitable model to further study respiratory risks associated to epilepsy. PMID:27149672

  5. Rolling friction robot fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A low friction, object guidance, and gripping finger device for a robotic end effector on a robotic arm is disclosed, having a pair of robotic fingers each having a finger shaft slideably located on a gripper housing attached to the end effector. Each of the robotic fingers has a roller housing attached to the finger shaft. The roller housing has a ball bearing mounted centering roller located at the center, and a pair of ball bearing mounted clamping rollers located on either side of the centering roller. The object has a recess to engage the centering roller and a number of seating ramps for engaging the clamping rollers. The centering roller acts to position and hold the object symmetrically about the centering roller with respect to the X axis and the clamping rollers act to position and hold the object with respect to the Y and Z axis.

  6. Highly Unstable Double-Diffusive Finger Convection in a Hele-Shaw Cell: Baseline Experimental Data for Evaluation of Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect

    PRINGLE,SCOTT E.; COOPER,CLAY A.; GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.

    2000-12-21

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study double-diffusive finger convection in a Hele-Shaw cell by layering a sucrose solution over a more-dense sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. The solutal Rayleigh numbers were on the order of 60,000, based upon the height of the cell (25 cm), and the buoyancy ratio was 1.2. A full-field light transmission technique was used to measure a dye tracer dissolved in the NaCl solution. They analyze the concentration fields to yield the temporal evolution of length scales associated with the vertical and horizontal finger structure as well as the mass flux. These measures show a rapid progression through two early stages to a mature stage and finally a rundown period where mass flux decays rapidly. The data are useful for the development and evaluation of numerical simulators designed to model diffusion and convection of multiple components in porous media. The results are useful for correct formulation at both the process scale (the scale of the experiment) and effective scale (where the lab-scale processes are averaged-up to produce averaged parameters). A fundamental understanding of the fine-scale dynamics of double-diffusive finger convection is necessary in order to successfully parameterize large-scale systems.

  7. Human thermoregulatory system state estimation using non-invasive physiological sensors.

    PubMed

    Buller, Mark J; Castellani, John; Roberts, Warren S; Hoyt, Reed W; Jenkins, Odest Chadwicke

    2011-01-01

    Small teams of emergency workers/military can often find themselves engaged in critical, high exertion work conducted under challenging environmental conditions. These types of conditions present thermal work strain challenges which unmitigated can lead to collapse (heat exhaustion) or even death from heat stroke. Physiological measurement of these teams provides a mechanism that could be an effective tool in preventing thermal injury. While indices of thermal work strain have been proposed they suffer from ignoring thermoregulatory context and rely on measuring internal temperature (IT). Measurement of IT in free ranging ambulatory environments is problematic. In this paper we propose a physiology based Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) model that estimates internal temperature, heat production and heat transfer from observations of heart rate, accelerometry, and skin heat flux. We learn the model's conditional probability distributions from seven volunteers engaged in a 48 hour military field training exercise. We demonstrate that sum of our minute to minute heat production estimates correlate well with total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) measured using the doubly labeled water technique (r(2) = 0.73). We also demonstrate that the DBN is able to infer IT in new datasets to within ±0.5 °C over 85% of the time. Importantly, the additional thermoregulatory context allows critical high IT temperature to be estimated better than previous approaches. We conclude that the DBN approach shows promise in enabling practical real time thermal work strain monitoring applications from physiological monitoring systems that exist today. PMID:22255042

  8. Effects of acceleration on thermoregulatory responses of unanesthetized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.; Horowitz, J. M.; Horwitz, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to examine the thermoregulatory responses of rats to step changes in ambient temperature during centrifugation. Attention is focused on the analysis of problems as to whether the ability of rats to regulate body temperature during one hour of cold exposure is altered by increasing the acceleration field to 2G, whether prior environmental conditioning can affect the temperature response to the combined stressors of acceleration and cold, and whether the orientation of the animal in the acceleration field modifies the temperature response. The finding that the decline in colonic temperature is accompanied by parallel changes in hypothalamic and spinal cord temperatures indicates that the decreasing heat production with increasing heat loss is an atypical thermoregulatory response of these animals to cooling. Mechanical forces acting on the brain may underline the temperature decrease when inverting the animal during acceleration.

  9. Viscoelastic characterization of the primate finger pad in vivo by microstep indentation and three-dimensional finite element models for tactile sensation studies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Siddarth; Liu, Gang; Schloerb, David W; Srinivasan, Mandayam A

    2015-06-01

    When we touch an object, surface loads imposed on the skin are transmitted to thousands of specialized nerve endings (mechanoreceptors) embedded within the skin. These mechanoreceptors transduce the mechanical signals imposed on them into a neural code of the incident stimuli, enabling us to feel the object. To understand the mechanisms of tactile sensation, it is critical to understand the relationship between the applied surface loads, mechanical state at the mechanoreceptor locations, and transduced neural codes. In this paper, we characterize the bulk viscoelastic properties of the primate finger pad and show its relationship to the dynamic firing rate of SA-1 mechanoreceptors. Two three-dimensional (3D) finite element viscoelastic models, a homogeneous and a multilayer model, of the primate fingertip are developed and calibrated with data from a series of force responses to micro-indentation experiments on primate finger pads. We test these models for validation by simulating indentation with a line load and comparing surface deflection with data in the literature (Srinivasan, 1989, "Surface Deflection of Primate Fingertip Under Line Load," J. Biomech., 22(4), pp. 343-349). We show that a multilayer model with an elastic epidermis and viscoelastic core predicts both the spatial and temporal biomechanical response of the primate finger pad. Finally, to show the utility of the model, ramp and hold indentation with a flat plate is simulated. The multilayer model predicts the strain energy density at a mechanoreceptor location would decay at the same rate as the average dynamic firing rate of SA-1 mechanoreceptors in response to flat plate indentation (previously observed by Srinivasan and LaMotte, 1991 "Encoding of Shape in the Responses of Cutaneous Mechanoreceptors," Information Processing in the Somatosensory System (Wenner-Gren International Symposium Series), O. Franzen and J. Westman, eds., Macmillan Press, London, UK), suggesting that the rate of

  10. Behavioral thermoregulatory response to chlorpyrifos in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J

    1997-12-31

    Chlorpyrifos (CHP) is a heavily used organophosphorous-based insecticide that elicits thermoregulatory dysfunction in the rat characterized by an initial period of hypothermia followed by a delayed hyperthermia lasting 24-72 h after exposure. The purpose of the present study was to determine (1) if the delayed hyperthermia is linked to CHP-induced hypothermia and (2) if the hypothermia and delayed hyperthermia are regulated by the CNS thermoregulatory centers. Core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA) of female Long-Evans rats were monitored via radiotelemetry. Rats housed in a temperature gradient were administered the control vehicle or CHP (25 mg/kg (p.o.)) while Tc, MA and ambient temperature (Ta) preferred by rats in the gradient (i.e. selected Ta) were recorded. There was an initial reduction in Tc concomitant with a decrease in selected Taa A gradual recovery in Tc occurred during the first night along with a preference for warmer Ta's and depressed MA. The day after CHP there was an elevation in Tc but no change in selected Ta, suggesting that the delayed rise in Tc was regulated. In another experiment, the hypothermic effects of CHP (25 mg/kg (p.o.)) were blocked by raising Ta from 22 to 31 degrees C immediately after CHP administration. Non-heated rats administered CHP underwent a marked period of hypothermia followed by an elevation in diurnal Tc for 2 days. Heated rats showed no hypothermic response but did undergo a hyperthermic response 48 h after CHP. MA was reduced during the first night after CHP in both non-heated and heated groups. Overall, the CHP-induced hyperthermia is not dependent on the development of hypothermia. Behavioral thermoregulatory observations suggest that both hypothermia and hyperthermia are regulated by CNS thermoregulatory centers. PMID:9482118

  11. Finger and toenail onycholysis.

    PubMed

    Zaias, N; Escovar, S X; Zaiac, M N

    2015-05-01

    Onycholysis - the separation of the nail plate from the nail bed occurs in fingers and toenails. It is diagnosed by the whitish appearance of the separated nail plate from the nail bed. In fingers, the majority is caused by trauma, manicuring, occupational or self-induced behavior. The most common disease producing fingernail onycholysis is psoriasis and pustular psoriasis. Phototoxic dermatitis, due to drugs can also produce finger onycholysis. Once the separation occurs, the environmental flora sets up temporary colonization in the available space. Finger onycholysis is most common in women. Candida albicans is often recovered from the onycholytic space. Many reports, want to associate the yeast as cause and effect, but the data are lacking and the treatment of the candida does not improve finger onycholysis. A reasonable explanation for the frequent isolation of Candida and Pseudomonas in fingernail onycholysis in women, is the close proximity the fingers have to the vaginal and gastrointestinal tract. Fifty per cent of humans harbour C. albicans in the GI tract and it is frequently carried to the vagina during hygienic practices. Finger onycholysis is best treated by drying the nail 'lytic' area with a hair blower, since all colonizing biota are moisture loving and perish in a dry environment. Toenail onycholysis has a very different etiology. It is mechanical, the result of pressure on the toes from the closed shoes, while walking, because of the ubiquitous uneven flat feet producing an asymmetric gait with more pressure on the foot with the flatter sole. PMID:25512134

  12. Behavioural thermoregulatory tactics in lacustrine brook charr, Salvelinus fontinalis.

    PubMed

    Bertolo, Andrea; Pépino, Marc; Adams, Julie; Magnan, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The need to vary body temperature to optimize physiological processes can lead to thermoregulatory behaviours, particularly in ectotherms. Despite some evidence of within-population phenotypic variation in thermal behaviour, the occurrence of alternative tactics of this behaviour is rarely explicitly considered when studying natural populations. The main objective of this study was to determine whether different thermal tactics exist among individuals of the same population. We studied the behavioural thermoregulation of 33 adult brook charr in a stratified lake using thermo-sensitive radio transmitters that measured hourly individual temperature over one month. The observed behavioural thermoregulatory patterns were consistent between years and suggest the existence of four tactics: two "warm" tactics with both crepuscular and finer periodicities, with or without a diel periodicity, and two "cool" tactics, with or without a diel periodicity. Telemetry data support the above findings by showing that the different tactics are associated with different patterns of diel horizontal movements. Taken together, our results show a clear spatio-temporal segregation of individuals displaying different tactics, suggesting a reduction of niche overlap. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the presence of behavioural thermoregulatory tactics in a vertebrate. PMID:21490935

  13. Finger cold-induced vasodilation: a review.

    PubMed

    Daanen, H A M

    2003-06-01

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) in the finger tips generally occurs 5-10 min after the start of local cold exposure of the extremities. This phenomenon is believed to reduce the risk of local cold injuries. However, CIVD is almost absent during hypothermia, when survival of the organism takes precedence over the survival of peripheral tissue. Subjects that are often exposed to local cold (e.g. fish filleters) develop an enhanced CIVD response. Also, differences between ethnic groups are obvious, with black people having the weakest CIVD response. Many other factors affect CIVD, such as diet, alcohol consumption, altitude, age and stress. CIVD is probably caused by a sudden decrease in the release of neurotransmitters from the sympathetic nerves to the muscular coat of the arterio-venous anastomoses (AVAs) due to local cold. AVAs are specific thermoregulatory organs that regulate blood flow in the cold and heat. Their relatively large diameter enables large amounts of blood to pass and convey heat to the surrounding tissue. Unfortunately, information on the quantity of AVAs is lacking, which makes it difficult to estimate the full impact on peripheral blood flow. This review illustrates the thermospecificity of the AVAs and the close link to CIVD. CIVD is influenced by many parameters, but controlled experiments yield information on how CIVD protects the extremities against cold injuries. PMID:12712346

  14. Thermoregulatory physiologic responses in the human body exposed to microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Way, W.I.; Kritikos, H.; Schwan, H.

    1981-01-01

    By introduction of an additional compartment in the hypothalamic region Stolwijk's thermoregulatory model has been modified to consider partial heating due to hot spots induced by microwaves. It was found that because of thermoregulatory action, the temperature of the hypothalamus will not increase drastically until the rate of energy deposition exceeds the threshold level of about 50 mW/g. The primary controlling mechanisms are blood flow and sweating. For an energy deposition rate of 10 mW/g in the hypothalamus the increase in blood flow in the skin is negligible and the temperature rise of the hypothalamus as compared with blood temperature is about 0.5/sup 0/C. It was found that exposure of the head to electromagnetic radiation, in general, causes a decrease in temperature of the trunk and skin. The results show that while the deposition of energy in the hypothalamus at the rate of 10 mW/g produced significant conductive and convective effects, the same total energy uniformly distributed over the cranial cavity produces less significant effects.

  15. Generation of SNCA Cell Models Using Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) Technology for Efficient High-Throughput Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Dansithong, Warunee; Paul, Sharan; Scoles, Daniel R.; Pulst, Stefan M.; Huynh, Duong P.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. The hallmark of PD is the appearance of neuronal protein aggregations known as Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, of which α-synuclein forms a major component. Familial PD is rare and is associated with missense mutations of the SNCA gene or increases in gene copy number resulting in SNCA overexpression. This suggests that lowering SNCA expression could be therapeutic for PD. Supporting this hypothesis, SNCA reduction was neuroprotective in cell line and rodent PD models. We developed novel cell lines expressing SNCA fused to the reporter genes luciferase (luc) or GFP with the objective to enable high-throughput compound screening (HTS) for small molecules that can lower SNCA expression. Because SNCA expression is likely regulated by far-upstream elements (including the NACP-REP1 located at 8852 bp upstream of the transcription site), we employed zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) genome editing to insert reporter genes in-frame downstream of the SNCA gene in order to retain native SNCA expression control. This ensured full retention of known and unknown up- and downstream genetic elements controlling SNCA expression. Treatment of cells with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) resulted in significantly increased SNCA-luc and SNCA-GFP expression supporting the use of our cell lines for identifying small molecules altering complex modes of expression control. Cells expressing SNCA-luc treated with a luciferase inhibitor or SNCA siRNA resulted in Z’-scores ≥ 0.75, suggesting the suitability of these cell lines for use in HTS. This study presents a novel use of genome editing for the creation of cell lines expressing α-synuclein fusion constructs entirely under native expression control. These cell lines are well suited for HTS for compounds that lower SNCA expression directly or by acting at long-range sites to the SNCA

  16. Finger Cooling During Cold Air Exposure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the onset of finger freezing. It is an extension of a tissue-cooling model originally developed to predict the onset of cheek freezing. The extension to the finger is presented as a more conservative warning of wind chill. Indeed, guidance on the risk of finger freezing is important not only to safeguard the finger, but also because it pertains more closely to susceptible facial features, such as the nose, than if only the risk of cheek freezing was provided. The importance of blood flow to the finger and the modeling of vaso-constriction are demonstrated through cooling predictions that agree reasonably well with several reported observations. Differences in the prediction between the present physiologic-based model and the engineering model used to develop the wind chill index are also discussed. New wind chill charts are presented that tabulate the mean cooling rates and corresponding onset times to freezing of the finger for various combinations of air temperature and wind speed. Results indicate that the surface of the finger cools to its freezing point in approximately one-eighth of the time predicted for the cheek. For combinations that result in the same wind chill temperature (WCT), the rate of finger cooling is faster at the higher wind speed. This asymmetry was previously disclosed through the application of the model to cheek cooling, and it reiterates the ambiguity associated with the reporting of WCT. It is further emphasized that the reporting of onset times to freezing, or safe exposure limits, is a more logical and meaningful alternative to the WCT.

  17. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  18. THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSES OF THE RABBIT TO CENTRAL NEURAL INJECTION OF SULFOLANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systemic exposure of the rabbit to sulfolane results in hypothermia; however, the mechanism of this thermoregulatory effect is unknown. his study was designed to determine the thermoregulatory effects of sulfolane on the central nervous system (CNs) of the rabbit. ale rabbits wer...

  19. Thermoregulatory consequences of salt loading in the lizard Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Scarpellini, Carolina da Silveira; Bícego, Kênia C; Tattersall, Glenn J

    2015-04-15

    Previous research has demonstrated that dehydration increases the threshold temperature for panting and decreases the thermal preference of lizards. Conversely, it is unknown whether thermoregulatory responses such as shuttling and gaping are similarly influenced. Shuttling, as an active behavioural response, is considered one of the most effective thermoregulatory behaviours, whereas gaping has been proposed to be involved in preventing brain over-heating in lizards. In this study we examined the effect of salt loading, a proxy for increased plasma osmolality, on shuttling and gaping in Pogona vitticeps. Then, we determined the upper and lower escape ambient temperatures (UETa and LETa), the percentage of time spent gaping, the metabolic rate (V̇O2 ), the evaporative water loss (EWL) during gaping and non-gaping intervals and the evaporative effectiveness (EWL/V̇O2 ) of gaping. All experiments were performed under isotonic (154 mmol l(-1)) and hypertonic saline injections (625, 1250 or 2500 mmol l(-1)). Only the highest concentration of hypertonic saline altered the UETa and LETa, but this effect appeared to be the result of diminishing the animal's propensity to move, instead of any direct reduction in thermoregulatory set-points. Nevertheless, the percentage of time spent gaping was proportionally reduced according to the saline concentration; V̇O2 was also decreased after salt loading. Thermographic images revealed lower head than body surface temperatures during gaping; however this difference was inhibited after salt loading. Our data suggest that EWL/V̇O2 is raised during gaping, possibly contributing to an increase in heat transfer away from the lizard, and playing a role in head or brain cooling. PMID:25714566

  20. A Unique Facility For Metabolic and Thermoregulatory Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Rebecca C.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    A unique exercise facility has been developed and used to perform tipper body ergometry tests for space applications. Originally designed to simulate the muscular, cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses to working in zero gravity, this facility may be used to conduct basic thermoregulatory investigations applicable to multiple sclerosis patients. An environmental chamber houses the tipper body ergometer and permits control of temperature, air now and humidify. The chamber is a closed system and recirculate-s air after conditioning if. A Cybex Lipper body ergometer has been mounted horizontally on the wall of the environmental chamber. In this configuration, the subject lies underneath the arm crank on a supine seat in order to turn the crank. The supine seat can be removed in order to introduce other equipment into the chamber such as a stool to allow upright arm cranking, or a treadmill to allow walk-run experiments. Physiological and environmental signals are fed into a Strawberry Tree data acquisition system while being monitored and logged using the Workbench software program. Physiological monitoring capabilities include 3-lead EKG using an H-P patient monitor, 5 site skin temperature and core temperature using YSI thermistors, and O2 consumption and CO2 production using AMFTFK Applied Electrochemistry analyzers and sensors. This comprehensive data acquisition set tip allows for calculation of various thermoregulatory indices including heat storage, evaporative heat loss, latent heat loss, and metabolic rate. The current system is capable of adding more data acquisition channels if needed. Some potential studies that could be carried out using the facility include: 1) An investigation into the efficiency of cooling various segments of the body to lower Tc 1-2 F. 2) A series of heat and mass balance studies comparing various LCG configurations.

  1. Thermoregulatory responses to heat and vibration in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaul, W. A.; Spear, R. C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of vibration on thermoregulatory responses was studied in heat-acclimated men exposed suddenly to simultaneous heat and whole body vibrations (WBVs) at two intensity levels, each at graded frequencies between 5 and 80 Hz. The mean rectal temperature (Tre) became elevated more quickly in the WBV exposures than in the controls (heat exposure alone). Both intensity- and frequency-dependent WBV relationships were recorded in localized blood flows and in sweat rates. Thus, vibration appears to reduce the efficiency of the cooling mechanisms during a heat exposure.

  2. Osseointegrated finger prostheses.

    PubMed

    Doppen, P; Solomons, M; Kritzinger, S

    2009-02-01

    Amputation of a digit can lead to functional and psychological problems and patients can benefit from digital prostheses. Unfortunately, standard prostheses are often unstable, particularly when fitted over short amputation stumps. Prosthesis fixation by osseointegration is widely used in oral and extraoral applications and may help avoid the problem of instability. This paper reports the results of four patients with five finger amputations who were treated with osseointegrated implants to attach finger prostheses. One implant failed to osseointegrate and the procedure was abandoned. Three patients were successfully treated to completion of three finger prostheses and are extremely satisfied with their outcomes, both cosmetically and functionally, with osseoperception reported by all three patients. PMID:19091736

  3. Multi-fingered robotic hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, Carl F. (Inventor); Salisbury, Kenneth, Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic hand is presented having a plurality of fingers, each having a plurality of joints pivotally connected one to the other. Actuators are connected at one end to an actuating and control mechanism mounted remotely from the hand and at the other end to the joints of the fingers for manipulating the fingers and passing externally of the robot manipulating arm in between the hand and the actuating and control mechanism. The fingers include pulleys to route the actuators within the fingers. Cable tension sensing structure mounted on a portion of the hand are disclosed, as is covering of the tip of each finger with a resilient and pliable friction enhancing surface.

  4. The thermoregulatory theory of yawning: what we know from over 5 years of research

    PubMed Central

    Gallup, Andrew C.; Eldakar, Omar T.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 5 years numerous reports have confirmed and replicated the specific brain cooling and thermal window predictions derived from the thermoregulatory theory of yawning, and no study has found evidence contrary to these findings. Here we review the comparative research supporting this model of yawning among homeotherms, while highlighting a recent report showing how the expression of contagious yawning in humans is altered by seasonal climate variation. The fact that yawning is constrained to a thermal window of ambient temperature provides unique and compelling support in favor of this theory. Heretofore, no existing alternative hypothesis of yawning can explain these results, which have important implications for understanding the potential functional role of this behavior, both physiologically and socially, in humans and other animals. In discussion we stress the broader applications of this work in clinical settings, and counter the various criticisms of this theory. PMID:23293583

  5. Response of the thermoregulatory system to toxic insults.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    The physiological response to environmental toxicants and drugs is modulated by the thermoregulatory system. Environmental and body temperature can affect the entry of toxicants into the body through pulmonary, cutaneous, and gastrointestinal routes. Thermoregulation can ultimately influence the metabolic clearance of chemicals and their toxicity, including lethality. The thermoregulatory response following acute exposure to many toxic chemicals involves a regulated hypothermic response, characterized by activation of autonomic thermoeffectors to raise heat loss and a behavioral preference for cooler temperatures. Moderate hypothermia in rodents improves recovery and survival following toxic exposure. In relatively large mammals, including humans, the hypothermic response is minimal. Fever-like responses are often seen in humans and other large mammals exposed to many toxicants. Fever is also observed in rodents exposed to some toxicants provided that core temperature can be monitored without disturbing the animal (e.g., telemetry). Overall, the universal effects of temperature on chemical toxicity call for researchers to have a better understanding of how body and ambient temperature affect the physiological response to environmental toxicants. PMID:20036879

  6. Thermoregulatory set point decreases after hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin W; Whitehurst, Marvin E; Gordon, Christopher J; Carroll, Robert G

    2005-03-01

    Hemorrhage in rats causes a drop in body core temperature that is proportional to the hemorrhage volume. We tested the hypothesis that the hemorrhagic hypothermia is due to a downward shift in the thermoregulatory set point. If so, rats subjected to hemorrhage would prefer a cooler ambient temperature to enhance heat loss during the posthemorrhage period. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fitted with carotid arterial catheters and biotelemetry temperature probes. Two days later, rats were placed in a temperature gradient chamber that allowed the rat to move between ambient temperatures of 15 degrees C to 40 degrees C. Rat location within the gradient was recorded as the selected ambient temperature. After 48 h, a 24 mL/kg hemorrhage was induced via the carotid cannula followed by a 24-h recovery period in the gradient. Body core and selected ambient temperatures significantly decreased after hemorrhage. Within 50 min, selected ambient temperature decreased by 11 degrees C, and returned to normal 100 min after hemorrhage. Within 80 min after hemorrhage, core temperature decreased by 2.3 degrees C, and returned to normal by 8 h after hemorrhage. Expanded analysis of the first hour after hemorrhage showed that reduction in selected ambient temperature preceded the drop in body core temperature. Importantly, the decrease in selected ambient temperature persisted even during the peak decrease in body core temperature. These results indicate that a decrease in thermoregulatory set point contributes to the drop in body core temperature after hemorrhage. PMID:15718921

  7. Do female newts modify thermoregulatory behavior to manipulate egg size?

    PubMed

    Toufarová, Eliška; Gvoždík, Lumír

    2016-04-01

    Reproductive females manipulate offspring phenotypes by modifying conditions during embryogenesis. In ectotherms, the environmental control over embryogenesis is often realized by changes in maternal thermoregulation during gravidity. To determine if reproduction influences thermoregulatory behavior in species where females lay eggs shortly after fertilization (strict oviparity), we compared preferred body temperatures (Tp) between reproductive (egg-laying) and non-reproductive female newts, Ichthyosaura alpestris. Next, we exposed reproductive females to temperatures mimicking Tp ranges of reproductive and non-reproductive individuals to find out whether the maternally modified thermal regime influences ovum and jelly coat volume, and early cleavage rates at the time of oviposition. In the thermal gradient, reproductive females maintained their body temperatures within a narrower range than non-reproductive individuals. The exposure of ovipositing females to temperatures preferred during their reproductive and non-reproductive period had a negligible influence on egg size and early cleavage rates. We conclude that the modification of maternal thermoregulatory behavior provides a limited opportunity to manipulate egg traits in newts. PMID:27033041

  8. Adherence to Bergmann's rule by lizards may depend on thermoregulatory mode: support from a nocturnal gecko.

    PubMed

    Penniket, Sophie; Cree, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Bergmann's rule predicts an increase in body size with decreasing environmental temperature; however, the converse pattern has been found in the majority of lizards studied to date. For these ectotherms, small body size may provide thermal benefits (rapid heat uptake when basking), which would be highly advantageous in cold environments. Yet such an advantage may not exist in nocturnal lizards (which do not avidly bask), in which Bergmann's rule has not been closely studied. We have examined whether the body size of a primarily nocturnal gecko, Woodworthia "Otago/Southland" changed with elevation and operative temperature (determined using physical copper models). In a laboratory study, we investigated whether thermoregulatory mode (heliothermy or thigmothermy) alters the effect of body size on heating and cooling rates. This gecko followed Bergmann's rule, thereby showing the opposite of the dominant pattern in diurnal lizards. Size at maturity, maximum size of adults and size at birth were larger at higher elevations and at lower operative temperatures. Using physical models, we found that large body size can confer thermal benefits for nocturnal lizards that remain within diurnal retreats. Bergmann's rule should not be dismissed for all lizards. Our results clearly support Bergmann's rule for at least one thigmothermic species, for which large body size may provide thermal benefits. Future studies on Bergmann's rule in lizards should consider thermoregulatory mode. We advocate that this ecogeographic rule be examined in relation to operative temperature measured at field sites. Finally, we predict that climate warming may weaken the relationship between body size and elevation in this gecko. PMID:25663371

  9. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  10. Repair of webbed fingers - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/presentations/100096.htm Repair of webbed fingers - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Finger Injuries and Disorders A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  11. Spiral viscous fingering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Atsushi; Kato, Yoshihito; Tada, Yutaka

    2006-11-01

    When a less-viscous fluid displaces a more-viscous fluid in a radial Hele-Shaw cell, viscous fingering pattern is believed to develop in a radial direction. We performed experiments on viscous fingering in a radial Hele-Shaw cell when a polymer solution, a sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution is used as the more-viscous fluid and the trivalent iron (Fe^3+) solution is as the less-viscous fluid. The experiment was done by varying the concentration of Fe^3+, cFe3+. We have found that viscous fingering pattern develops spirally when cFe3+ is larger than a threshold value, while the pattern develops in a radial direction for small cFe3+. We confirmed from different experiments that an instantaneous chemical reaction takes place between SPA solution and Fe^3+ solution. The chemical reaction produces precipitation and significantly reduces the viscosity of the SPA solution. The quantity of the precipitation is increased with cFe3+. We will make a discussion on the relationship between the formation of spiral viscous fingering and the chemical reaction taking place between the two fluids.

  12. A new mathematical model to simulate AVA cold-induced vasodilation reaction to local cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rida, Mohamad; Karaki, Wafaa; Ghaddar, Nesreen; Ghali, Kamel; Hoballah, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to integrate a new mathematical model with a bioheat model, based on physiology and first principles, to predict thermoregulatory arterio-venous anastomoses (AVA) and cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) reaction to local cooling. The transient energy balance equations of body segments constrained by thermoregulatory controls were solved numerically to predict segmental core and skin temperatures, and arterial blood flow for given metabolic rate and environmental conditions. Two similar AVA-CIVD mechanisms were incorporated. The first was activated during drop in local skin temperature (<32 °C). The second mechanism was activated at a minimum finger skin temperature, T CIVD, min, where the AVA flow is dilated and constricted once the skin temperature reached a maximum value. The value of T CIVD,min was determined empirically from values reported in literature for hand immersions in cold fluid. When compared with published data, the model predicted accurately the onset time of CIVD at 25 min and T CIVD,min at 10 °C for hand exposure to still air at 0 °C. Good agreement was also obtained between predicted finger skin temperature and experimentally published values for repeated immersion in cold water at environmental conditions of 30, 25, and 20 °C. The CIVD thermal response was found related to core body temperature, finger skin temperature, and initial finger sensible heat loss rate upon exposure to cold fluid. The model captured central and local stimulations of the CIVD and accommodated observed variability reported in literature of onset time of CIVD reaction and T CIVD,min.

  13. Anthropomorphic finger antagonistically actuated by SMA plates.

    PubMed

    Engeberg, Erik D; Dilibal, Savas; Vatani, Morteza; Choi, Jae-Won; Lavery, John

    2015-10-01

    Most robotic applications that contain shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators use the SMA in a linear or spring shape. In contrast, a novel robotic finger was designed in this paper using SMA plates that were thermomechanically trained to take the shape of a flexed human finger when Joule heated. This flexor actuator was placed in parallel with an extensor actuator that was designed to straighten when Joule heated. Thus, alternately heating and cooling the flexor and extensor actuators caused the finger to flex and extend. Three different NiTi based SMA plates were evaluated for their ability to apply forces to a rigid and compliant object. The best of these three SMAs was able to apply a maximum fingertip force of 9.01N on average. A 3D CAD model of a human finger was used to create a solid model for the mold of the finger covering skin. Using a 3D printer, inner and outer molds were fabricated to house the actuators and a position sensor, which were assembled using a multi-stage casting process. Next, a nonlinear antagonistic controller was developed using an outer position control loop with two inner MOSFET current control loops. Sine and square wave tracking experiments demonstrated minimal errors within the operational bounds of the finger. The ability of the finger to recover from unexpected disturbances was also shown along with the frequency response up to 7 rad s(-1). The closed loop bandwidth of the system was 6.4 rad s(-1) when operated intermittently and 1.8 rad s(-1) when operated continuously. PMID:26292164

  14. Prediction of contact forces of underactuated finger by adaptive neuro fuzzy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, Dalibor; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Abbasi, Almas; Kiani, Kourosh; Al-Shammari, Eiman Tamah

    2015-12-01

    To obtain adaptive finger passive underactuation can be used. Underactuation principle can be used to adapt shapes of the fingers for grasping objects. The fingers with underactuation do not require control algorithm. In this study a kinetostatic model of the underactuated finger mechanism was analyzed. The underactuation is achieved by adding the compliance in every finger joint. Since the contact forces of the finger depend on contact position of the finger and object, it is suitable to make a prediction model for the contact forces in function of contact positions of the finger and grasping objects. In this study prediction of the contact forces was established by a soft computing approach. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was applied as the soft computing method to perform the prediction of the finger contact forces.

  15. Cold-seeking behavior as a thermoregulatory strategy in systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maria C; Steiner, Alexandre A; Branco, Luiz G S; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2006-06-01

    Systemic inflammation (SI) is a leading cause of hospital death. Although fever and hypothermia are listed as symptoms in every definition of SI, how SI affects thermoregulatory behavior is unclear. SI is often modeled by systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to rats. When rats are not allowed to regulate their body temperature (Tb) behaviorally, LPS causes either fever or hypothermia, and the direction of the response is determined by LPS dose and ambient temperature (Ta). However, in many studies in which rats were allowed to regulate Tb behaviorally (by selecting their preferred Ta in a thermogradient apparatus), they consistently expressed warmth-seeking behavior and developed fever. We hypothesized that SI can cause not only warmth-seeking behavior but also cold-seeking behavior; we then tested this hypothesis by studying LPS-induced thermoregulatory behavior in adult Wistar rats. A multichannel thermogradient apparatus, implantable data loggers and infrared thermography were used; multiple control experiments were conducted; and the ability of the apparatus to reliably register the changes in rats' preferred Ta induced by thermal (external cooling or heating) or chemical (TRPV1 or TRPM8 agonist) stimuli was confirmed. The rats responded to a low dose of LPS (10 microg/kg i.v.) with warmth-seeking behavior and a polyphasic fever, but to a high dose (5 mg/kg i.v.) with marked cold-seeking behavior and hypothermia followed by warmth-seeking behavior and fever. This is the first well-controlled study to report SI-associated cold-seeking behavior in rats. Cold-seeking behavior is likely to be an important defense response in severe SI. PMID:16820025

  16. Safe Finger Tourniquet--Ideas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin-Gwei; Chen, Chieh-Feng; Hwang, Chun-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Kuan; Li, Chun-Chang; Wang, Hsian-Jenn

    2016-03-01

    Tourniquets are often needed for optimized phalangeal surgeries. However, few surgeons forget to remove them and caused ischemic injuries. We have a modified method to create a safe finger tourniquet for short duration finger surgeries, which can avoid such tragedy. It is done by donning a glove, cutting the tip of the glove over the finger of interest, and rolling the glove finger to the base. From 2010 to 2013, approximately 54 patients underwent digital surgical procedures with our safe finger tourniquet. Because the glove cannot be forgotten to be removed, the tourniquet must be released and removed. This is a simple and efficient way to apply a safe finger tourniquet by using hand rubber glove for a short-term bloodless finger surgery and can achieve an excellent surgical result. PMID:26855166

  17. City-Scale Expansion of Human Thermoregulatory Costs

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Richard W.; Muhich, Timothy E.; Humphries, Murray M.

    2013-01-01

    The physiological maintenance of a stable internal temperature by mammals and birds – the phenomenon termed homeothermy – is well known to be energetically expensive. The annual energy requirements of free-living mammals and birds are estimated to be 15–30 times higher than those of similar-size ectothermic vertebrates like lizards. Contemporary humans also use energy to accomplish thermoregulation. They are unique, however, in having shifted thermoregulatory control from the body to the occupied environment, with most people living in cities in dwellings that are temperature-regulated by furnaces and air conditioners powered by exogenous energy sources. The energetic implications of this strategy remain poorly defined. Here we comparatively quantify energy costs in cities, dwellings, and individual human bodies. Thermoregulation persists as a major driver of energy expenditure across these three scales, resulting in energy-versus-ambient-temperature relationships remarkably similar in shape. Incredibly, despite the many and diversified uses of network-delivered energy in modern societies, the energy requirements of six North American cities are as temperature-dependent as the energy requirements of isolated, individual homeotherms. However, the annual per-person energy cost of exogenously powered thermoregulation in cities and dwellings is 9–28 times higher than the cost of endogenous, metabolic thermoregulation of the human body. Shifting the locus of thermoregulatory control from the body to the dwelling achieves climate-independent thermal comfort. However, in an era of amplifying climate change driven by the carbon footprint of humanity, we must acknowledge the energetic extravagance of contemporary, city-scale thermoregulation, which prioritizes heat production over heat conservation. PMID:24143181

  18. Thermoregulatory deficits following prenatal alcohol exposure: structural correlates.

    PubMed

    Zimmerberg, B

    1989-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol delays the development of thermoregulation in newborn rats. This study examined two possible physiological correlates of this effect. In the first experiment, the effect of prenatal alcohol exposure on the availability of brown adipose tissue for nonshivering thermogenesis was investigated in rat pups from birth to weanling age. Male and female pups were chosen from independent litters with one of three prenatal treatment histories: 35% ethanol-derived calories (35% EDC), pair-fed control (0% EDC), or lab-chow control (LC). Prenatal alcohol exposure resulted in decreased body weight from postnatal (PN) day 1 to 20 compared to controls. Similarly, alcohol-exposed subjects had lighter interscapular brown adipose tissue pads than controls. However, the proportion of brown adipose tissue to body weight in alcohol-exposed pups was not different from controls. It appears that thermoregulatory deficits at birth due to prenatal alcohol exposure are not due to decreased substrate availability. In the second experiment, the relative growth rate of the tail compared to the growth rate of the body was measured in male and female pups from the three prenatal treatment groups. Five-day-old rat pups exposed to alcohol prenatally had relatively slower tail growth than control pups. Since tail growth rate has been associated with ambient temperature, these results suggest that alcohol-exposed rat pups may be experiencing transient periods of cold stress in the nest because of their thermoregulatory deficiencies, which, in turn, could have important implications for neural and body growth retardation seen in Alcohol Related Birth Defects. PMID:2818842

  19. Inspiration-induced vascular responses in finger dorsum skin.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, Harvey N; Groseclose, Edye E

    2002-03-01

    A rapid and deep inspiration triggers a sympathetically mediated transient vasoconstriction of skin arterioles (inspiratory gasp vascular response, IGVR). Because the IGVR has been most often measured and studied in skin that is rich in arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs), such as the palmar aspect of the distal phalanx or plantar aspect of the toes, there is little information on its features in skin areas not dominated by thermoregulatory AVAs. Thus, the dependence of the magnitude of the IGVR on AVAs is unclear. We reasoned that if responses in a region of low AVA density, such as the finger dorsum distal phalanx, were comparable to those in AVA-rich skin, this would clarify the issue. Further, it might then be possible to use such areas to provide a useful complementary target for future study of sympathetically induced vasoconstriction. To test this, we determined the features of the finger dorsum IGVR in 28 healthy volunteers (age 19-57 years, 14 males) in whom distal phalanx skin blood perfusion (SBF) was monitored by laser-Doppler during 21 sequential IGVRs, each separated by 2 min. IGVR was quantified as the minimum SBF during each IGVR, expressed as a percentage of each immediately preceding 2-min SBF average. Results (mean +/- SD) revealed an overall IGVR of 72.2 +/- 16.7%, which is very near that reported from studies on the AVA-rich palmar finger pad. We therefore conclude that the IGVR does not depend on the presence of AVAs and that the dorsal distal phalanx is a viable alternative for the study of sympathetically related neurovascular responses. PMID:11866546

  20. Finger vein image quality evaluation using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2013-02-01

    In an automatic finger-vein recognition system, finger-vein image quality is significant for segmentation, enhancement, and matching processes. In this paper, we propose a finger-vein image quality evaluation method using support vector machines (SVMs). We extract three features including the gradient, image contrast, and information capacity from the input image. An SVM model is built on the training images with annotated quality labels (i.e., high/low) and then applied to unseen images for quality evaluation. To resolve the class-imbalance problem in the training data, we perform oversampling for the minority class with random-synthetic minority oversampling technique. Cross-validation is also employed to verify the reliability and stability of the learned model. Our experimental results show the effectiveness of our method in evaluating the quality of finger-vein images, and by discarding low-quality images detected by our method, the overall finger-vein recognition performance is considerably improved.

  1. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  2. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas M. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  3. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  4. Thermoregulatory demands of elite professional America's Cup yacht racing.

    PubMed

    Neville, V; Gant, N; Folland, J P

    2010-06-01

    America's Cup yacht racing predominantly occurs during the summer months under hot and humid conditions, with athletes exposed to the environment for prolonged periods, and yet the thermoregulatory responses to competitive sailing are largely unappreciated. This study aimed to assess the thermoregulatory responses to elite professional big-boat yacht racing, according to crew position and upwind and downwind sailing. Intestinal (T(core)) and skin temperature, fluid balance and regional sweat compositions were measured in two America's Cup crews (n=32) during 100 min of racing. The environmental conditions were as follows: 32 degrees C, 52% RH and 5 m/s wind speed. Subjective race intensity was moderate. Bowmen recorded the greatest elevation in the heart rate (184 +/- 10 beats/min) and T(core) (39.2 degrees C, P<0.01). Both heart rate and T(core) were higher during downwind sailing (P<0.001). Regional skin temperatures were significantly different according to site (P=0.05), with tibia being the lowest (33.3 +/- 1.2 degrees C). The mean sweat loss during racing was 1.34 +/- 0.58 L/h (range: 0.44-2.40 L/h), with bowmen experiencing the greatest loss of sweat (3.7 +/- 0.9% of body mass). The mean fluid intake was highly correlated to sweat loss (r=0.74, P<0.001), with 72 +/- 41% of sweat losses replaced. The mean sodium concentration of sweat was 27.2 +/- 9.2 mmol/L (range: 12.0-43.5 mmol/L) and the total NaCl loss during sailing was 3.8 +/- 2.4 g (range 0.7-10.0 g). America's Cup sailing is a demanding sport that presents considerable challenges to thermoregulation, fluid and electrolyte balance. Certain crew roles (bowmen) present an increased risk of developing exertional heat illness, and for the majority of crew downwind sailing results in greater thermal strain than upwind sailing - which may have implications for clothing selection and boat design. PMID:19558386

  5. Viscous fingering with partial miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible or perfectly immiscible. In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other. Following our recent work for miscible (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a Hele-Shaw cell, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. Partial miscibility is characterized through the design of thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution.

  6. The Effect of an Amino Acid Infusion on Central Thermoregulatory Control in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yasufumi; Takamata, Akira; Matsukawa, Takashi; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yoshifumi; Mizobe, Toshiki

    2005-01-01

    Background Administration of protein or amino acids enhances thermogenesis, presumably by stimulating oxidative metabolism. However, hyperthermia results even when thermoregulatory responses are intact, suggesting that amino acids also alter central thermoregulatory control. We thus tested the hypothesis that amino acid infusion increases the thermoregulatory setpoint. Methods Nine male volunteers each participated on four study days in randomized order: 1) intravenous amino acids infused at 4 kJ·kg−1·hr−1 for 2.5 h combined with skin-surface warming; 2) amino acid infusion combined with cutaneous cooling; 3) a saline infusion combined with skin-surface warming; and, 4) saline infusion combined with cutaneous cooling. Results Amino acid infusion increased resting core temperature by 0.3 ± 0.1°C (mean ± SD) and oxygen consumption by 18 ± 12%. Furthermore, amino acid infusion increased the calculated core temperature threshold (triggering core temperature at a designated mean-skin temperature of 34°C) for active cutaneous vasodilation by 0.3 ± 0.3°C, for sweating by 0.2 ± 0.2°C, for thermoregulatory vasoconstriction by 0.3 ± 0.3°C, and for thermogenesis by 0.4 ± 0.5°C. Amino acid infusion did not alter the incremental response intensity (i.e., gain) of thermoregulatory defenses. Conclusions Amino acid infusion increased the metabolic rate and resting core temperature. However, amino acids also produced a synchronous increase in all major autonomic thermoregulatory defense thresholds; the increase in core temperature was identical to the setpoint increase — even in a cold environment with amble potential to dissipate heat. In subjects with intact thermoregulatory defenses, amino acid-induced hyperthermia appears to result from an elevated setpoint increase rather than increased metabolic rate per se. PMID:15108979

  7. Minimal changes in hypothalamic temperature accompany microwave-induced alteration of thermoregulatory behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Adams, B.W.; Akel, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    This study probed the mechanisms underlying microwave-induced alterations of thermoregulatory behavior. Adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus), trained to regulate the temperature of their immediate environment (Ta) behaviorally, were chronically implanted with Teflon reentrant tubes in the medical preoptic/anterior hypothalamic area (PO/AH), the brainstem region considered to control normal thermoregulatory processes. A Vitek temperature probe inserted into the tube measured PO/AH temperature continuously while changes in thermoregulatory behavior were induced by either brief (10-min) or prolonged (2.5-h) unilateral exposures to planewave 2,450-MHz continuous wave (CW) microwaves (E polarization). Power densities explored ranged from 4 to 20 mW/cm2 (rate of energy absorption (SAR) . 0.05 (W/kg)/cm2)). Rectal temperature and four representative skin temperatures were also monitored, as was the Ta selected by the animal. When the power density was high enough to induce a monkey to select a cooler Ta (8 mW/cm2 and above), PO/AH temperature rose approximately 0.3 degrees C but seldom more. Lower power densities usually produced smaller increases in PO/AH temperature and no reliable change in thermoregulatory behavior. Rectal temperature remained constant while PO/AH temperature rose only 0.2-0.3 degrees C during 2.5-h exposures at 20 mW/cm2 because the Ta selected was 2-3 degrees C cooler than normally preferred. Sometimes PO/AH temperature increments greater than 0.3 degrees C were recorded, but they always accompanied inadequate thermoregulatory behavior. Thus, a PO/AH temperature rise of 0.2-0.3 degrees C, accompanying microwave exposure, appears to be necessary and sufficient to alter thermoregulatory behavior, which ensures in turn that no greater temperature excursions occur in this hypothalamic thermoregulatory center.

  8. Thermoregulatory strategies in an aquatic ectotherm from thermally-constrained habitats: An evaluation of current approaches.

    PubMed

    Piasečná, Karin; Pončová, Alena; Tejedo, Miguel; Gvoždík, Lumír

    2015-08-01

    Many ectotherms employ diverse behavioral adjustments to effectively buffer the spatio-temporal variation in environmental temperatures, whereas others remain passive to thermal heterogeneity. Thermoregulatory studies are frequently performed on species living in thermally benign habitats, which complicate understanding of the thermoregulation-thermoconformity continuum. The need for new empirical data from ectotherms exposed to thermally challenging conditions requires the evaluation of available methods for quantifying thermoregulatory strategies. We evaluated the applicability of various thermoregulatory indices using fire salamander larvae, Salamandra salamandra, in two aquatic habitats, a forest pool and well, as examples of disparate thermally-constrained environments. Water temperatures in the well were lower and less variable than in the pool. Thermal conditions prevented larvae from reaching their preferred body temperature range in both water bodies. In contrast to their thermoregulatory abilities examined in a laboratory thermal gradient, field body temperatures only matched the mean and range of operative temperatures, showing thermal passivity of larvae in both habitats. Despite apparent thermoconformity, thermoregulatory indices indicated various strategies from active thermoregulation, to thermoconformity, and even thermal evasion, which revealed their limited applicability under thermally-constrained conditions. Salamander larvae abandoned behavioral thermoregulation despite varying opportunities to increase their body temperature above average water temperatures. Thermoconformity represents a favored strategy in these ectotherms living in more thermally-constrained environments than those examined in previous thermoregulatory studies. To understand thermal ecology and its impact on population dynamics, the quantification of thermoregulatory strategies of ectotherms in thermally-constrained habitats requires the careful choice of an appropriate

  9. Gert Finger Becomes Emeritus Physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw, T.; Lucuix, C.; Péron, M.

    2016-03-01

    Gert Finger has retired after almost 33 years service and he has been made the first Emeritus Physicist at ESO. An appreciation of some of his many achievements in the development of infrared instrumentation and detector controllers is given. A retirement party for Gert Finger was held in February 2016.

  10. Effect of prism adaptation on thermoregulatory control in humans.

    PubMed

    Calzolari, Elena; Gallace, Alberto; Moseley, G Lorimer; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The physiological regulation of skin temperature can be modulated not only by autonomic brain regions, but also by a network of higher-level cortical areas involved in the maintenance of a coherent representation of the body. In this study we assessed in healthy participants if the sensorimotor changes taking place during motor adaptation to the lateral displacement of the visual scene induced by wearing prismatic lenses (prism adaptation, PA), and the aftereffects, after prisms' removal, on the ability to process spatial coordinates, were associated with skin temperature regulation changes. We found a difference in thermoregulatory control as a function of the direction of the prism-induced displacement of the visual scene, and the subsequent sensorimotor adaptation. After PA to rightward displacing lenses, with leftward aftereffects (the same directional procedure efficaciously used for ameliorating left spatial neglect in right-brain-damaged patients) the hands' temperature decreased. Conversely, after adaptation to neutral lenses, and PA to leftward displacing lenses, with rightward aftereffects, the temperature of both hands increased. These results suggest a lateral asymmetry in the effects of PA on skin temperature regulation, and a relationship between body spatial representations and homeostatic control in humans. PMID:26354443

  11. Thermoregulatory influences on common carotid blood flow in the dog.

    PubMed

    Baker, M A; Hawkins, M J; Rader, R D

    1982-05-01

    Common carotid blood flow (CCBF) and respiratory water loss (RWL) were measured in dogs resting at ambient temperatures between 25 and 50 degrees C, during hypothalamic heating, and during light and heavy exercise at ambient temperatures of 25 and 35 degrees C. In resting dogs, CCBF varied with the level of RWL. Elevations in CCBF and RWL occurred within seconds of each other during bursts of panting. Mean unilateral CCBF increased from 6.2 ml . min-1 . kg-1 at 25 degrees C to 16.8 ml . min-1 . kg-1 at 45 degrees C, in parallel with increasing RWL. Hypothalamic heating elicited simultaneous elevations in CCBF and RWL, and the level of CCBF was strongly correlated with the hypothalamic temperature. Both CCBF and RWL increased rapidly at the onset of exercise and continued to rise during a 15-min run. Highest rates of blood flow and evaporation occurred during heavy exercise at 35 degrees C. It is concluded that the rate of blood flow through the common carotid arteries in the dog is related to the thermoregulatory needs of the animal, and most of the increased flow occurring during heat stress is destined for evaporative surfaces of the nose, mouth, and tongue. PMID:7096136

  12. A Mathematical Model of Levodopa Medication Effect on Basal Ganglia in Parkinson's Disease: An Application to the Alternate Finger Tapping Task

    PubMed Central

    Baston, Chiara; Contin, Manuela; Calandra Buonaura, Giovanna; Cortelli, Pietro; Ursino, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Malfunctions in the neural circuitry of the basal ganglia (BG), induced by alterations in the dopaminergic system, are responsible for an array of motor disorders and milder cognitive issues in Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently Baston and Ursino (2015a) presented a new neuroscience mathematical model aimed at exploring the role of basal ganglia in action selection. The model is biologically inspired and reproduces the main BG structures and pathways, modeling explicitly both the dopaminergic and the cholinergic system. The present work aims at interfacing this neurocomputational model with a compartmental model of levodopa, to propose a general model of medicated Parkinson's disease. Levodopa effect on the striatum was simulated with a two-compartment model of pharmacokinetics in plasma joined with a motor effect compartment. The latter is characterized by the levodopa removal rate and by a sigmoidal relationship (Hill law) between concentration and effect. The main parameters of this relationship are saturation, steepness, and the half-maximum concentration. The effect of levodopa is then summed to a term representing the endogenous dopamine effect, and is used as an external input for the neurocomputation model; this allows both the temporal aspects of medication and the individual patient characteristics to be simulated. The frequency of alternate tapping is then used as the outcome of the whole model, to simulate effective clinical scores. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling was preliminary performed on data of six patients with Parkinson's disease (both “stable” and “wearing-off” responders) after levodopa standardized oral dosing over 4 h. Results show that the model is able to reproduce the temporal profiles of levodopa in plasma and the finger tapping frequency in all patients, discriminating between different patterns of levodopa motor response. The more influential parameters are the Hill coefficient, related with the slope of the effect

  13. A Mathematical Model of Levodopa Medication Effect on Basal Ganglia in Parkinson's Disease: An Application to the Alternate Finger Tapping Task.

    PubMed

    Baston, Chiara; Contin, Manuela; Calandra Buonaura, Giovanna; Cortelli, Pietro; Ursino, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Malfunctions in the neural circuitry of the basal ganglia (BG), induced by alterations in the dopaminergic system, are responsible for an array of motor disorders and milder cognitive issues in Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently Baston and Ursino (2015a) presented a new neuroscience mathematical model aimed at exploring the role of basal ganglia in action selection. The model is biologically inspired and reproduces the main BG structures and pathways, modeling explicitly both the dopaminergic and the cholinergic system. The present work aims at interfacing this neurocomputational model with a compartmental model of levodopa, to propose a general model of medicated Parkinson's disease. Levodopa effect on the striatum was simulated with a two-compartment model of pharmacokinetics in plasma joined with a motor effect compartment. The latter is characterized by the levodopa removal rate and by a sigmoidal relationship (Hill law) between concentration and effect. The main parameters of this relationship are saturation, steepness, and the half-maximum concentration. The effect of levodopa is then summed to a term representing the endogenous dopamine effect, and is used as an external input for the neurocomputation model; this allows both the temporal aspects of medication and the individual patient characteristics to be simulated. The frequency of alternate tapping is then used as the outcome of the whole model, to simulate effective clinical scores. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling was preliminary performed on data of six patients with Parkinson's disease (both "stable" and "wearing-off" responders) after levodopa standardized oral dosing over 4 h. Results show that the model is able to reproduce the temporal profiles of levodopa in plasma and the finger tapping frequency in all patients, discriminating between different patterns of levodopa motor response. The more influential parameters are the Hill coefficient, related with the slope of the effect sigmoidal

  14. Computer prediction of human thermoregulatory and temperature responses to a wide range of environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiala, D.; Lomas, K. J.; Stohrer, M.

    A mathematical model for predicting human thermal and regulatory responses in cold, cool, neutral, warm, and hot environments has been developed and validated. The multi-segmental passive system, which models the dynamic heat transport within the body and the heat exchange between body parts and the environment, is discussed elsewhere. This paper is concerned with the development of the active system, which simulates the regulatory responses of shivering, sweating, and peripheral vasomotion of unacclimatised subjects. Following a comprehensive literature review, 26 independent experiments were selected that were designed to provoke each of these responses in different circumstances. Regression analysis revealed that skin and head core temperature affect regulatory responses in a non-linear fashion. A further signal, i.e. the rate of change of the mean skin temperature weighted by the skin temperature error signal, was identified as governing the dynamics of thermoregulatory processes in the cold. Verification and validation work was carried out using experimental data obtained from 90 exposures covering a range of steady and transient ambient temperatures between 5°C and 50°C and exercise intensities between 46 W/m2 and 600 W/m2. Good general agreement with measured data was obtained for regulatory responses, internal temperatures, and the mean and local skin temperatures of unacclimatised humans for the whole spectrum of climatic conditions and for different activity levels.

  15. Computer prediction of human thermoregulatory and temperature responses to a wide range of environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Fiala, D; Lomas, K J; Stohrer, M

    2001-09-01

    A mathematical model for predicting human thermal and regulatory responses in cold, cool, neutral, warm, and hot environments has been developed and validated. The multi-segmental passive system, which models the dynamic heat transport within the body and the heat exchange between body parts and the environment, is discussed elsewhere. This paper is concerned with the development of the active system, which simulates the regulatory responses of shivering, sweating, and peripheral vasomotion of unacclimatised subjects. Following a comprehensive literature review, 26 independent experiments were selected that were designed to provoke each of these responses in different circumstances. Regression analysis revealed that skin and head core temperature affect regulatory responses in a nonlinear fashion. A further signal, i.e. the rate of change of the mean skin temperature weighted by the skin temperature error signal, was identified as governing the dynamics of thermoregulatory processes in the cold. Verification and validation work was carried out using experimental data obtained from 90 exposures covering a range of steady and transient ambient temperatures between 5 degrees C and 50 degrees C and exercise intensities between 46 W/m2 and 600 W/m2. Good general agreement with measured data was obtained for regulatory responses, internal temperatures, and the mean and local skin temperatures of unacclimatised humans for the whole spectrum of climatic conditions and for different activity levels. PMID:11594634

  16. COMPARISON OF RATS OF THE FISCHER 344 AND LONG-EVANS STRAINS IN THEIR AUTONOMIC THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSE TO TRIMETHYLTIN ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of genetic strain on the acute and long-term thermoregulatory response to the neurotoxicant, trimethyltin (TNT) in rats of the Long-Evans (LE) and Fischer 344 (FCH) strains. n one study basic thermoregulatory responses including ...

  17. Tree-hugging koalas demonstrate a novel thermoregulatory mechanism for arboreal mammals.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Natalie J; Handasyde, Kathrine A; Griffiths, Stephen R; Porter, Warren P; Krockenberger, Andrew; Kearney, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    How climate impacts organisms depends not only on their physiology, but also whether they can buffer themselves against climate variability via their behaviour. One of the way species can withstand hot temperatures is by seeking out cool microclimates, but only if their habitat provides such refugia. Here, we describe a novel thermoregulatory strategy in an arboreal mammal, the koala Phascolarctos cinereus. During hot weather, koalas enhanced conductive heat loss by seeking out and resting against tree trunks that were substantially cooler than ambient air temperature. Using a biophysical model of heat exchange, we show that this behaviour greatly reduces the amount of heat that must be lost via evaporative cooling, potentially increasing koala survival during extreme heat events. While it has long been known that internal temperatures of trees differ from ambient air temperatures, the relevance of this for arboreal and semi-arboreal mammals has not previously been explored. Our results highlight the important role of tree trunks as aboveground 'heat sinks', providing cool local microenvironments not only for koalas, but also for all tree-dwelling species. PMID:24899683

  18. Plasmonic "nano-fingers on nanowires" as SERS substrates.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Yashna; Dhawan, Anuj

    2016-05-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on plasmonics-active metallic nano-finger arrays grown on arrays of triangular-shaped metal-coated silicon nanowire arrays is proposed. Finite-difference time-domain modeling is employed to numerically calculate the effect of the inter-finger gap and the growth angle of the nano-fingers on the magnitude of SERS enhancement and the plasmon resonance wavelength. Additionally, the polarization dependence of the SERS signals from these novel substrates has been studied. A protocol for the fabrication of the proposed SERS substrate is also discussed. PMID:27128080

  19. Dendrites, viscous fingers, and the theory of pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of pattern formation in dendritic crystal growth and viscous fingering in fluids are reviewed. Consideration is given to the discovery that weak capillary forces act as singular perturbations which lead to selection mechanisms in dendritic crystal growth and fingering patterns. Other topics include the conventional thermodynamic model of the solidification of a pure substance from its melt, fingering instability, pattern selection, the solvability theory, dendritic growth rates, the bubble effect discovered by Couder et al. (1986), the dynamics of pattern-forming systems, and snowflake formation.

  20. Finger-Circumference-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Suy

    1995-01-01

    Easy-to-use device quickly measures circumference of finger (including thumb) on human hand. Includes polytetrafluoroethylene band 1/8 in. wide, bent into loop and attached to tab that slides on scale graduated in millimeters. Sliding tab preloaded with constant-force tension spring, which pulls tab toward closure of loop. Designed to facilitate measurements at various points along fingers to obtain data for studies of volumetric changes of fingers in microgravity. Also used in normal Earth gravity studies of growth and in assessment of diseases like arthritis.

  1. Fingering Instabilities in Dewetting Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauliac-Vaujour, E.; Stannard, A.; Martin, C. P.; Blunt, M. O.; Notingher, I.; Moriarty, P. J.; Vancea, I.; Thiele, U.

    2008-05-01

    The growth of fingering patterns in dewetting nanofluids (colloidal solutions of thiol-passivated gold nanoparticles) has been followed in real time using contrast-enhanced video microscopy. The fingering instability on which we focus here arises from evaporatively driven nucleation and growth in a nanoscopically thin precursor solvent film behind the macroscopic contact line. We find that well-developed isotropic fingering structures only form for a narrow range of experimental parameters. Numerical simulations, based on a modification of the Monte Carlo approach introduced by Rabani et al. [Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836 426, 271 (2003)10.1038/nature02087], reproduce the patterns we observe experimentally.

  2. Fingering instabilities in dewetting nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Pauliac-Vaujour, E; Stannard, A; Martin, C P; Blunt, M O; Notingher, I; Moriarty, P J; Vancea, I; Thiele, U

    2008-05-01

    The growth of fingering patterns in dewetting nanofluids (colloidal solutions of thiol-passivated gold nanoparticles) has been followed in real time using contrast-enhanced video microscopy. The fingering instability on which we focus here arises from evaporatively driven nucleation and growth in a nanoscopically thin precursor solvent film behind the macroscopic contact line. We find that well-developed isotropic fingering structures only form for a narrow range of experimental parameters. Numerical simulations, based on a modification of the Monte Carlo approach introduced by Rabani et al. [Nature (London) 426, 271 (2003)10.1038/nature02087], reproduce the patterns we observe experimentally. PMID:18518311

  3. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low-high; tempo: slow-fast, dynamics: soft-loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low-high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (F mean ) and peak force (F max ) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (F mean = 1.17 N, F max = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (F mean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (F mean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  4. Modelling of the mechanical behavior of a polyurethane finger interphalangeal joint endoprosthesis after surface modification by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beliaev, A.; Svistkov, A.; Iziumov, R.; Osorgina, I.; Kondyurin, A.; Bilek, M.; McKenzie, D.

    2016-04-01

    Production of biocompatible implants made of polyurethane treated with plasma is very perspective. During plasma treatment the surface of polyurethane acquires unique physic-chemical properties. However such treatment may change the mechanical properties of polyurethane which may adversely affect the deformation behaviour of the real implant. Therefore careful study of the mechanical properties of the plasma-modified polyurethane is needed. In this paper, experimental observations of the elastic characteristics of plasma treated polyurethane and modelling of the deformation behaviour of polyurethane bio-implants are reported.

  5. Postexercise thermoregulatory behavior and recovery from exercise in desert iguanas.

    PubMed

    Wagner, E L; Gleeson, T T

    1997-02-01

    Desert iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) undergo respiratory recovery more rapidly and incur lower energetic costs when they recover from 40 degrees C burst activity at 20 degrees C than when they recover at 40 degrees C. However, a body temperature of 20 degrees C falls well outside the preferred activity temperature range of this species, and imposes several physiological and behavioral liabilities. To determine if exhausted animals would favor a thermal regimen that allows for rapid and inexpensive respiratory recovery, we exercised lizards to exhaustion and allowed them to recover in a laboratory thermal gradient for 180 min. Recovering animals allowed their body temperatures to cool significantly to a mean temperature of 33.5 degrees C during the first 60 min of recovery, and subsequently rewarmed themselves to an average temperature of 38 degrees C for the remainder of their recovery period. Control animals maintained a constant body temperature of 37.7 degrees C throughout the 180-min recovery period. We then exercised animals to exhaustion at 40 degrees C and allowed them to recover for 180 min under a thermal regimen that mimicked that selected by exhausted animals in the previous experiment. Animals recovering under this thermal regimen returned to rates of O2 consumption, removed exercise-generated blood lactate, and incurred energetic costs that were more similar to data previously collected for animals recovering from exercise at a constant 40 degrees C than to data from animals recovering at 20 degrees C. These results suggested that the energetic benefits associated with recovery at 20 degrees C are not of sufficient biological importance to cause a major shift in thermoregulatory behavior. PMID:9035245

  6. Physical Effort Affects Heatstroke Thermoregulatory Response and Mortality in Rats.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yan; Peng, Na; Liu, Ya-Nan; Li, Xing-Gui; Li, Bing-Lin; Peng, Li-Qiong; Ma, Qiang; Su, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Animals suffering from heatstroke (HS) after physical effort may have different heat-related core temperature (Tc) responses compared with passive HS. In the present study, conscious and unrestrained rats were exposed to ambient temperature (Ta) of 39.5°C ± 0.2°C with or without running (run-heated or rest-heated, respectively) until HS onset, which was defined as the systolic blood pressure starting to drop. In comparison with rest-heated rats, run-heated rats had a significantly shorter latency of HS onset. Physical effort did not have significant influence on hyperthermia severity (43.3°C ± 0.2°C at rest-heated, and 43.4°C ± 0.2°C at run-heated), but it could significantly decrease the thermal load to develop HS (315.1°C ± 37.3°C·min for rest-heated, and 133.5 ± 21.4 °C·min for run-heated). Working component during heat exposure may contribute to a decreased survival rate of HS (46.9% at rest-heated and 31.3% at run-heated). Impaired heat dissipation during recovery may be responsible for relative poor survival of run-heated rats. In both groups, survival was affected by Tc at HS onset and thermal area. Hypothermia (Tc <35°C) developed after HS onset, with no significant difference in Tc,min between the rest-heated and run-heated groups. These thermoregulatory responses to HS after physical effort may provide insight into HS pathophysiology. PMID:26009815

  7. Diagnostic model of saliva peptide finger print analysis of oral squamous cell carcinoma patients using weak cation exchange magnetic beads

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei-Peng; Wang, Zhen; Xu, Li-Xin; Peng, Xin; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Saliva diagnostics utilizing nanotechnology and molecular technologies to detect oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has become an attractive field of study. However, no specific methods have been established. To refine the diagnostic power of saliva peptide fingerprints for the early detection of OSCC, we screened the expression spectrum of salivary peptides in 40 T1 stage OSCC patients (and healthy controls) using MALDI-TOF-MS combined with magnetic beads. Fifty proteins showed significantly different expression levels in the OSCC samples (P<0.05). Potential biomarkers were also predicted. The novel diagnostic proteomic model with m/z peaks of 1285.6 Da and 1432.2 Da are of certain value for early diagnosis of OSCC. PMID:26182373

  8. The Shape of a Gravity Finger

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Lang; Yortsos, Yanis

    2000-09-11

    A new gravity finger model was proposed in this report in the absence of interfacial tension but in the presence of gravities. This model considered differences in density and viscosity of the two fluids. Thus, it was able to represent both stable and unstable displacements, and the finger development along either the upper or the bottom walls of a channel. This solution recovers the Saffman - Taylar solution if gravity is neglected. The results of the solution are very similar to the solutions proposed by Brener et al. for the gravity number up to 10. The solution provided in this work only has one free parameter while the solution of Brener et al. has three.

  9. Neural correlates of finger gnosis.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Elena; Tamè, Luigi; Furlan, Michele; Haggard, Patrick; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Adriani, Michela; Ferrari, Paolo; Braun, Christoph; Schwarzbach, Jens

    2014-07-01

    Neuropsychological studies have described patients with a selective impairment of finger identification in association with posterior parietal lesions. However, evidence of the role of these areas in finger gnosis from studies of the healthy human brain is still scarce. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the brain network engaged in a novel finger gnosis task, the intermanual in-between task (IIBT), in healthy participants. Several brain regions exhibited a stronger blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response in IIBT than in a control task that did not explicitly rely on finger gnosis but used identical stimuli and motor responses as the IIBT. The IIBT involved stronger signal in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL), bilateral precuneus (PCN), bilateral premotor cortex, and left inferior frontal gyrus. In all regions, stimulation of nonhomologous fingers of the two hands elicited higher BOLD signal than stimulation of homologous fingers. Only in the left anteromedial IPL (a-mIPL) and left PCN did signal strength decrease parametrically from nonhomology, through partial homology, to total homology with stimulation delivered synchronously to the two hands. With asynchronous stimulation, the signal was stronger in the left a-mIPL than in any other region, possibly indicating retention of task-relevant information. We suggest that the left PCN may contribute a supporting visuospatial representation via its functional connection to the right PCN. The a-mIPL may instead provide the core substrate of an explicit bilateral body structure representation for the fingers that when disrupted can produce the typical symptoms of finger agnosia. PMID:24990921

  10. Acutely Decreased Thermoregulatory Energy Expenditure or Decreased Activity Energy Expenditure Both Acutely Reduce Food Intake in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaiyala, Karl J.; Morton, Gregory J.; Thaler, Joshua P.; Meek, Thomas H.; Tylee, Tracy; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Wisse, Brent E.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the suggestion that reduced energy expenditure may be a key contributor to the obesity pandemic, few studies have tested whether acutely reduced energy expenditure is associated with a compensatory reduction in food intake. The homeostatic mechanisms that control food intake and energy expenditure remain controversial and are thought to act over days to weeks. We evaluated food intake in mice using two models of acutely decreased energy expenditure: 1) increasing ambient temperature to thermoneutrality in mice acclimated to standard laboratory temperature or 2) exercise cessation in mice accustomed to wheel running. Increasing ambient temperature (from 21°C to 28°C) rapidly decreased energy expenditure, demonstrating that thermoregulatory energy expenditure contributes to both light cycle (40±1%) and dark cycle energy expenditure (15±3%) at normal ambient temperature (21°C). Reducing thermoregulatory energy expenditure acutely decreased food intake primarily during the light cycle (65±7%), thus conflicting with the delayed compensation model, but did not alter spontaneous activity. Acute exercise cessation decreased energy expenditure only during the dark cycle (14±2% at 21°C; 21±4% at 28°C), while food intake was reduced during the dark cycle (0.9±0.1 g) in mice housed at 28°C, but during the light cycle (0.3±0.1 g) in mice housed at 21°C. Cumulatively, there was a strong correlation between the change in daily energy expenditure and the change in daily food intake (R2 = 0.51, p<0.01). We conclude that acutely decreased energy expenditure decreases food intake suggesting that energy intake is regulated by metabolic signals that respond rapidly and accurately to reduced energy expenditure. PMID:22936977

  11. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Ian M.; Smith, Irene J.; Chetverikov, Andrey; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2016-01-01

    A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a) The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging) had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b) While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints. PMID:27433323

  12. Multi-finger interaction during involuntary and voluntary single finger force changes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J.R.; Zatsiorsky, V.M.; Latash, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Two types of finger interaction are characterized by positive co-variation (enslaving) or negative co-variation (error compensation) of finger forces. Enslaving reflects mechanical and neural connections among fingers, while error compensation results from synergic control of fingers to stabilize their net output. Involuntary and voluntary force changes by a finger were used to explore these patterns. We hypothesized that synergic mechanisms will dominate during involuntary force changes, while enslaving will dominate during voluntary finger force changes. Subjects pressed with all four fingers to match a target force that was 10% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). One of the fingers was unexpectedly raised 5.0 mm at a speed of 30.0 mm/s. During finger raising the subject was instructed “not to intervene voluntarily”. After the finger was passively lifted and a new steady-state achieved, subjects pressed down with the lifted finger, producing a pulse of force voluntarily. The data were analyzed in terms of finger forces and finger modes (hypothetical commands to fingers reflecting their intended involvement). The target finger showed an increase in force during both phases. In the involuntary phase, the target finger force changes ranged between 10.71 ± 1.89% MVC (I-finger) and 16.60 ± 2.26% MVC (L-finger). Generally, non-target fingers displayed a force decrease with a maximum amplitude of −1.49 ± 0.43% MVC (L-finger). Thus, during the involuntary phase, error compensation was observed – non-lifted fingers showed a decrease in force (as well as in mode magnitude). During the voluntary phase, enslaving was observed – non-target fingers showed an increase in force and only minor changes in mode magnitude. The average change in force of non-target fingers ranged from 21.83 ± 4.47% MVC for R-finger (M-finger task) to 0.71 ± 1.10 % MVC for L-finger (I-finger task). The average change in mode of non-target fingers was between −7.34 ± 19

  13. A new approach for comparing thermoregulatory responses of subjects with different body sizes

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Ollie; Cramer, Matthew N

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent assessment of human thermoregulatory responses during exercise, such as changes in core temperature and sweating, are commonplace in research laboratories worldwide. Moreover, researchers wishing to identify potential impairments in these responses due to factors such as obesity, age, disease and injury, must typically adopt a between-group experimental design.

  14. Thermoregulatory responses in exercising rats: methodological aspects and relevance to human physiology

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Samuel Penna; Prímola-Gomes, Thales Nicolau; Pires, Washington; Guimarães, Juliana Bohnen; Hudson, Alexandre Sérvulo Ribeiro; Kunstetter, Ana Cançado; Fonseca, Cletiana Gonçalves; Drummond, Lucas Rios; Damasceno, William Coutinho; Teixeira-Coelho, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Rats are used worldwide in experiments that aim to investigate the physiological responses induced by a physical exercise session. Changes in body temperature regulation, which may affect both the performance and the health of exercising rats, are evident among these physiological responses. Despite the universal use of rats in biomedical research involving exercise, investigators often overlook important methodological issues that hamper the accurate measurement of clear thermoregulatory responses. Moreover, much debate exists regarding whether the outcome of rat experiments can be extrapolated to human physiology, including thermal physiology. Herein, we described the impact of different exercise intensities, durations and protocols and environmental conditions on running-induced thermoregulatory changes. We focused on treadmill running because this type of exercise allows for precise control of the exercise intensity and the measurement of autonomic thermoeffectors associated with heat production and loss. Some methodological issues regarding rat experiments, such as the sites for body temperature measurements and the time of day at which experiments are performed, were also discussed. In addition, we analyzed the influence of a high body surface area-to-mass ratio and limited evaporative cooling on the exercise-induced thermoregulatory responses of running rats and then compared these responses in rats to those observed in humans. Collectively, the data presented in this review represent a reference source for investigators interested in studying exercise thermoregulation in rats. In addition, the present data indicate that the thermoregulatory responses of exercising rats can be extrapolated, with some important limitations, to human thermal physiology. PMID:27227066

  15. THERMOREGULATORY CONSEQUENCES OF LONG-TERM MICROWAVE EXPOSURE AT CONTROLLED AMBIENT TEMPERATURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was designed to identify and measure changes in thermoregulatory response systems, both behavioral and physiological, that may occur when squirrel monkeys are exposed to 2450-MHz CW microwaves 40 hours/week for 15 weeks. Microwave power densities explored were 1 and 5 m...

  16. THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSES OF THE RABBIT TO SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTION TO SULFOLANE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was designed to determine the thermoregulatory effects of sulfolane on the central nervous system (CNS) of the rabbit. POAH temperature (T sub POAH), ear temperature (T sub e), and metabolic rate (MR) were recorded at an ambient temperature (T sub a) of 15 C. No changes...

  17. Thermoregulatory responses in exercising rats: methodological aspects and relevance to human physiology.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Samuel Penna; Prímola-Gomes, Thales Nicolau; Pires, Washington; Guimarães, Juliana Bohnen; Hudson, Alexandre Sérvulo Ribeiro; Kunstetter, Ana Cançado; Fonseca, Cletiana Gonçalves; Drummond, Lucas Rios; Damasceno, William Coutinho; Teixeira-Coelho, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Rats are used worldwide in experiments that aim to investigate the physiological responses induced by a physical exercise session. Changes in body temperature regulation, which may affect both the performance and the health of exercising rats, are evident among these physiological responses. Despite the universal use of rats in biomedical research involving exercise, investigators often overlook important methodological issues that hamper the accurate measurement of clear thermoregulatory responses. Moreover, much debate exists regarding whether the outcome of rat experiments can be extrapolated to human physiology, including thermal physiology. Herein, we described the impact of different exercise intensities, durations and protocols and environmental conditions on running-induced thermoregulatory changes. We focused on treadmill running because this type of exercise allows for precise control of the exercise intensity and the measurement of autonomic thermoeffectors associated with heat production and loss. Some methodological issues regarding rat experiments, such as the sites for body temperature measurements and the time of day at which experiments are performed, were also discussed. In addition, we analyzed the influence of a high body surface area-to-mass ratio and limited evaporative cooling on the exercise-induced thermoregulatory responses of running rats and then compared these responses in rats to those observed in humans. Collectively, the data presented in this review represent a reference source for investigators interested in studying exercise thermoregulation in rats. In addition, the present data indicate that the thermoregulatory responses of exercising rats can be extrapolated, with some important limitations, to human thermal physiology. PMID:27227066

  18. Viscous fingering with partially miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Experimental and numerical studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible (e.g. water and glycerol) or perfectly immiscible (e.g. water and oil). In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other (e.g. CO2 and water). Following our recent work for miscible systems (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a porous medium, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. In our model, partial miscibility is characterized through the design of the thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We express the model in dimensionless form and elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution. Figure caption: final snapshots in simulations of viscous fingering with a two-fluid system mimicking that of CO2 and water. The colormap corresponds to the concentration of CO2. A band of less viscous gas phase rich in CO2 (red) displaces through the more viscous liquid phase that is undersaturated with CO2 (blue). At the fluid interface, an exchange of CO2 occurs as a result of local chemical potentials that drives the system towards thermodynamic equilibrium. This results in a shrinkage of gas phase as well as a local increase in

  19. Biomechanical Analysis of Force Distribution in Human Finger Extensor Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dan; Ren, Lei; Howard, David; Zong, Changfu

    2014-01-01

    The complexities of the function and structure of human fingers have long been recognised. The in vivo forces in the human finger tendon network during different activities are critical information for clinical diagnosis, surgical treatment, prosthetic finger design, and biomimetic hand development. In this study, we propose a novel method for in vivo force estimation for the finger tendon network by combining a three-dimensional motion analysis technique and a novel biomechanical tendon network model. The extensor mechanism of a human index finger is represented by an interconnected tendinous network moving around the phalanx's dorsum. A novel analytical approach based on the “Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy” is used to calculate the forces and deformations throughout the tendon network of the extensor mechanism when subjected to an external load and with the finger posture defined by measurement data. The predicted deformations and forces in the tendon network are in broad agreement with the results obtained by previous experimental in vitro studies. The proposed methodology provides a promising tool for investigating the biomechanical function of complex interconnected tendon networks in vivo. PMID:25126576

  20. Rapid functional plasticity of the somatosensory cortex after finger amputation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, T; Miltner, W H; Huonker, R; Friedel, R; Schmidt, I; Taub, E

    2000-09-01

    Recent research indicates that areas of the primary somatosensory (SI) and primary motor cortex show massive cortical reorganization after amputation of the upper arm, forearm or fingers. Most of these studies were carried out months or several years after amputation. In the present study, we describe cortical reorganization of areas in the SI of a patient who underwent amputation of the traumatized middle and ring fingers of his right hand 10 days before cortical magnetic source imaging data were obtained. Somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields (SEF) to mechanical stimuli to the finger tips were recorded and single moving dipoles were calculated using a realistic volume conductor model. Results reveal that the dipoles representing the second and fifth fingers of the affected hand were closer together than the comparable dipoles of the unaffected hand. Our findings demonstrate that neural cell assemblies in SI which formerly represented the right middle and ring fingers of this amputee became reorganized and invaded by neighbouring cell assemblies of the index and little finger of the same hand. These results indicate that functional plasticity occurs within a period of 10 days after amputation. PMID:11037286

  1. Biomechanical analysis of force distribution in human finger extensor mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Ren, Lei; Howard, David; Zong, Changfu

    2014-01-01

    The complexities of the function and structure of human fingers have long been recognised. The in vivo forces in the human finger tendon network during different activities are critical information for clinical diagnosis, surgical treatment, prosthetic finger design, and biomimetic hand development. In this study, we propose a novel method for in vivo force estimation for the finger tendon network by combining a three-dimensional motion analysis technique and a novel biomechanical tendon network model. The extensor mechanism of a human index finger is represented by an interconnected tendinous network moving around the phalanx's dorsum. A novel analytical approach based on the "Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy" is used to calculate the forces and deformations throughout the tendon network of the extensor mechanism when subjected to an external load and with the finger posture defined by measurement data. The predicted deformations and forces in the tendon network are in broad agreement with the results obtained by previous experimental in vitro studies. The proposed methodology provides a promising tool for investigating the biomechanical function of complex interconnected tendon networks in vivo. PMID:25126576

  2. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  3. Analyses of thermoregulatory responses of feeder cattle exposed to simulated heat waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown-Brandl, T. M.; Eigenberg, R. A.; Hahn, G. L.; Nienaber, J. A.; Mader, T. L.; Spiers, D. E.; Parkhurst, A. M.

    2005-05-01

    Heat stress in feedlot cattle causes reduced performance, and in the most severe cases, death of the animals, thus causing the loss of millions of dollars in revenue to the cattle industry. A study was designed to evaluate dynamics of thermoregulation and feeding activities when feeder cattle were exposed to simulated heat waves, in comparison with repeated sinusoidal hot and thermoneutral environments. Nine beef steers were randomly assigned to an individual pen in one of three environmental chambers. Each chamber was subjected to each of three temperature regimes (Heatwave simulation from Rockport, Mo., 1995, Heatwave simulation from Columbia, Mo., 1999, and Controlled heat stress treatment of 32±7°C) for a period of 18 days, according to a Latin square treatment design, with a 10-day thermoneutral period (18±7°C) separating treatment periods. Respiration rate, core body temperature, heat production, feed intake, and feeding behavior were measured on each animal for the duration of the experiment. Differences were found in all treatments for all parameters except feeding behavior. It was shown that the two simulated heat waves elicited very different thermoregulatory responses. Based on these results the heat wave centered at Rockport, Mo. in 1995 was devastating because the animals were not acclimated to hot conditions, thus causing an acute response to heat stress. The responses of cattle to conditions at Columbia, Mo. showed some acclimation to heat prior to the peak stress days, and therefore a dampened response was seen. It appears the extreme conditions at Columbia, Mo., 1999 were made severe by environmental conditions not simulated during this study (low wind speed and intensive solar radiation). Overall, it was determined while a cyclic heat stress treatment is a representative model to test heat stress in cattle, further heat stress experiments should be conducted in an actual feedlot.

  4. OB-RL silencing inhibits the thermoregulatory ability of Great Roundleaf Bats (Hipposideros armiger).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tengteng; Yuan, Lihong; Jones, Gareth; Hua, Panyu; He, Guimei; Chen, Jinping; Zhang, Shuyi

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that the hormone Leptin has an important role in mammalian heterothermy by regulating metabolism and food intake via lipolysis, as well as adaptive evolution of Leptin in heterothermic bats driven by selected pressure. However, the mechanism of Leptin in heterothermic regulation in mammals is unknown. By combining previous results, we speculated that the Leptin signaling pathway mediated by OB-RL (Leptin receptor long form) in the hypothalamus is important. OB-RL is one of the products of db gene and mainly distributed in the hypothalamus. In this study, we used OB-RL as a molecular marker, combining with the RNA interference technology and physiological/molecular analyses with Hipposideros armiger (a hibernating bat species) as an animal model, to explore the mechanism of Leptin in heterothermic regulation. Our data showed that all of four anti-OB-RL shRNA lentivirus significantly inhibited OB-RL expression (>90%), and the interference efficiency of PSC1742 lentivirus reached the highest value. In situ hybridization proved that PSC1742 lentivirus significantly decreased the OB-RL expression in the hypothalamus, especially in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VHM, 86.6%). Physiological analysis demonstrated that the thermoregulatory ability of bats (e.g., reducing core body temperature and heart rate) was significantly depressed after OB-RL silencing in the hypothalamus, and animals could not enter torpor state. Our study for the first time proved that the knock-down of OB-RL expression in hypothalamus inhibits heterothermic regulation of bats, and also provided the clues for further analyzing the mechanism of Leptin in the heterothermic regulation of mammals. PMID:24815886

  5. Extreme plasticity in thermoregulatory behaviors of free-ranging black-tailed prairie dogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehmer, E.M.; Savage, L.T.; Antolin, M.F.; Biggins, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    In the natural environment, hibernating sciurids generally remain dormant during winter and enter numerous deep torpor bouts from the time of first immergence in fall until emergence in spring. In contrast, black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) remain active throughout winter but periodically enter short and shallow bouts of torpor. While investigating body temperature (Tb) patterns of black-tailed prairie dogs from six separate colonies in northern Colorado, we observed one population that displayed torpor patterns resembling those commonly seen in hibernators. Five individuals in this population experienced multiple torpor bouts in immediate succession that increased in length and depth as winter progressed, whereas 16 prairie dogs in five neighboring colonies remained euthermic for the majority of winter and entered shallow bouts of torpor infrequently. Our results suggest that these differences in torpor patterns did not result from differences in the physiological indicators that we measured because the prairie dogs monitored had similar body masses and concentrations of stored lipids across seasons. Likewise, our results did not support the idea that differences in overwinter Tb patterns between prairie dogs in colonies with differing torpor patterns resulted from genetic differences between populations; genetic analyses of prairie dog colonies revealed high genetic similarity between the populations and implied that individuals regularly disperse between colonies. Local environmental conditions probably played a role in the unusual T b patterns experienced by prairie dogs in the colony where hibernation-like patterns were observed; this population received significantly less rainfall than neighboring colonies during the summer growing seasons before, during, and after the year of the winter in which they hibernated. Our study provides a rare example of extreme plasticity in thermoregulatory behaviors of free-ranging prairie dogs and provides

  6. Prior Knowledge Improves Decoding of Finger Flexion from Electrocorticographic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Ji, Q.; Miller, K. J.; Schalk, Gerwin

    2011-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) use brain signals to convey a user’s intent. Some BCI approaches begin by decoding kinematic parameters of movements from brain signals, and then proceed to using these signals, in absence of movements, to allow a user to control an output. Recent results have shown that electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings from the surface of the brain in humans can give information about kinematic parameters (e.g., hand velocity or finger flexion). The decoding approaches in these studies usually employed classical classification/regression algorithms that derive a linear mapping between brain signals and outputs. However, they typically only incorporate little prior information about the target movement parameter. In this paper, we incorporate prior knowledge using a Bayesian decoding method, and use it to decode finger flexion from ECoG signals. Specifically, we exploit the constraints that govern finger flexion and incorporate these constraints in the construction, structure, and the probabilistic functions of the prior model of a switched non-parametric dynamic system (SNDS). Given a measurement model resulting from a traditional linear regression method, we decoded finger flexion using posterior estimation that combined the prior and measurement models. Our results show that the application of the Bayesian decoding model, which incorporates prior knowledge, improves decoding performance compared to the application of a linear regression model, which does not incorporate prior knowledge. Thus, the results presented in this paper may ultimately lead to neurally controlled hand prostheses with full fine-grained finger articulation. PMID:22144944

  7. Width of a ferrofluid finger: hysteresis and a double energy minimum.

    PubMed

    Hillier, Narelle J; Jackson, David P

    2007-03-01

    We study a ferrofluid in a horizontal Hele-Shaw geometry subjected to a vertical magnetic field. Specifically, we calculate the energy of a single ferrofluid finger using an idealized model for the finger. By minimizing this energy, we find the preferred finger width as a function of the applied field. Our model predicts a first order transition as the fluid abruptly transforms from a circular drop to a finite finger. This behavior arises because of a double energy minimum that yields two different stable configurations for the system. Interestingly, this system exhibits hysteresis as the circle-to-finger (increasing field) transition occurs at a different applied field than the finger-to-circle (decreasing field) transition. We carry out a simple experiment and observe good overall agreement with the theoretical predictions. PMID:17500798

  8. Making fingers and words count in a cognitive robot

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Vivian M.; Di Nuovo, Alessandro; Di Nuovo, Santo; Cangelosi, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Evidence from developmental as well as neuroscientific studies suggest that finger counting activity plays an important role in the acquisition of numerical skills in children. It has been claimed that this skill helps in building motor-based representations of number that continue to influence number processing well into adulthood, facilitating the emergence of number concepts from sensorimotor experience through a bottom-up process. The act of counting also involves the acquisition and use of a verbal number system of which number words are the basic building blocks. Using a Cognitive Developmental Robotics paradigm we present results of a modeling experiment on whether finger counting and the association of number words (or tags) to fingers, could serve to bootstrap the representation of number in a cognitive robot, enabling it to perform basic numerical operations such as addition. The cognitive architecture of the robot is based on artificial neural networks, which enable the robot to learn both sensorimotor skills (finger counting) and linguistic skills (using number words). The results obtained in our experiments show that learning the number words in sequence along with finger configurations helps the fast building of the initial representation of number in the robot. Number knowledge, is instead, not as efficiently developed when number words are learned out of sequence without finger counting. Furthermore, the internal representations of the finger configurations themselves, developed by the robot as a result of the experiments, sustain the execution of basic arithmetic operations, something consistent with evidence coming from developmental research with children. The model and experiments demonstrate the importance of sensorimotor skill learning in robots for the acquisition of abstract knowledge such as numbers. PMID:24550795

  9. Long-finger pollicization for macrodactyly of the thumb and index finger.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Kenneth W; Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-01-01

    Pollicization of the long finger is rarely performed, and previously described for treating traumatic thumb and index finger loss. Because the long finger lacks the independence of motion and muscular attachments of the index finger, pollicization of the long finger requires modifications of the technique. We present the case of a 3-year-old girl with progressive macrodactyly of the thumb and index finger associated with a lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve. The involved digits were severely enlarged, stiff, and nonfunctional. The child was treated with first and second ray resection followed by long-finger pollicization. Surgical pearls and pitfalls are discussed. PMID:24919138

  10. Interaction of three-finger proteins from snake venoms and from mammalian brain with the cys-loop receptors and their models.

    PubMed

    Faure, G; Shelukhina, I V; Porowinska, D; Shulepko, M A; Lyukmanova, E N; Dolgikh, D A; Spirova, E N; Kasheverov, I E; Utkin, Yu N; Corringer, J-P; Tsetlin, V I

    2016-05-01

    With the use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) it was shown that ws-Lynx1, a water-soluble analog of the three-finger membrane-bound protein Lynx1, that modulates the activity of brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), interacts with the acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) with high affinity, K D = 62 nM. This result agrees with the earlier demonstrated competition of ws-Lynx1 with radioiodinated α-bungarotoxin for binding to AChBP. For the first time it was shown that ws-Lynx1 binds to GLIC, prokaryotic Cys-loop receptor (K D = 1.3 μM). On the contrary, SPR revealed that α-cobratoxin, a three-finger protein from cobra venom, does not bind to GLIC. Obtained results indicate that SPR is a promising method for analysis of topography of ws-Lynx1 binding sites using its mutants and those of AChBP and GLIC. PMID:27417718

  11. Peripheral mechanisms of thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow in aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, W. Larry

    2010-01-01

    Human skin blood flow is controlled via dual innervation from the sympathetic nervous system. Reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction and vasodilation are both impaired with primary aging, rendering the aged more vulnerable to hypothermia and cardiovascular complications from heat-related illness. Age-related alterations in the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow occur at multiple points along the efferent arm of the reflex, including 1) diminished sympathetic outflow, 2) altered presynaptic neurotransmitter synthesis, 3) reduced vascular responsiveness, and 4) impairments in downstream (endothelial and vascular smooth muscle) second-messenger signaling. This mechanistic review highlights some of the recent findings in the area of aging and the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow. PMID:20413421

  12. From viscous fingering to bulk elastic fingering in soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintyves, Baudouin; Biggins, John; Wei, Zhiyan; Mora, Serge; Dauchot, Olivier; Mahadevan, L.; Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2014-03-01

    Systematic experiments have been performed in purely elastic polyacrylamide gels in Hele-Shaw cells. We have shown that a bulk fingering instability arises in the highly deformable confined elastomers. It shares some similarities with the famous Saffman-Taylor instability, but a systematic study shows that surface tension is not relevant. This instability is sub-critical, with a clear hysteretic behavior. Our experimental observations have been compared very favorably to theoretical and finite element simulations results. In particular, the instability wavelength and the critical front advance have been shown to be proportional to the distance between the two glass plates constituting the cell. We have also shown that in Maxwell viscoelastic fluids, one crosses over continuously from a viscous to an elastic fingering instability.

  13. To each its own: Thermoregulatory strategy varies among neonatal polar phocids.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Linnea E; Liwanag, Heather E M; Hammill, Mike O; Burns, Jennifer M

    2014-12-01

    Cold environmental conditions and small body size promote heat loss and may create thermoregulatory challenges for marine mammals born in polar regions. However, among polar-born phocid seal species there are variations in physical attributes and environmental conditions at birth, allowing for an interesting contrast in thermoregulatory strategy. We compared thermoregulatory strategies through morphometrics, sculp attributes (conductivity and resistance), nonshivering thermogenesis (NST via uncoupling protein 1; UCP1), and muscle thermogenesis (via enzyme activity) in neonatal harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus), hooded (Cystophora cristata), and Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii). Harp seals are the smallest at birth (9.8±0.7 kg), rely on lanugo (82.49±3.70% of thermal resistance), and are capable of NST through expression of UCP1 in brown adipose tissue (BAT). In contrast, hooded seal neonates (26.8±1.3 kg) have 2.06±0.23 cm of blubber, accounting for 38.19±6.07% of their thermal resistance. They are not capable of NST, as UCP1 is not expressed. The large Weddell seal neonates (31.5±4.9 kg) rely on lanugo (89.85±1.25% of thermal resistance) like harp seals, but no evidence of BAT was found. Muscle enzyme activity was highest in Weddell seal neonates, suggesting that they rely primarily on muscle thermogenesis. Similar total thermal resistance, combined with marked differences in thermogenic capacity of NST and ST among species, strongly supports that thermoregulatory strategy in neonatal phocids is more closely tied to pups' surface area to volume ratio (SA:V) and potential for early water immersion rather than mass and ambient environmental conditions. PMID:25151642

  14. Relationship of osmotic inhibition in thermoregulatory responses and sweat sodium concentration in humans.

    PubMed

    Takamata, A; Yoshida, T; Nishida, N; Morimoto, T

    2001-03-01

    Heat acclimatization improves thermoregulatory responses to heat stress and decreases sweat sodium concentration ([Na(+)](sweat)). The reduced [Na(+)](sweat) results in a larger increase in plasma osmolality (P(osmol)) at a given amount of sweat output. The increase in P(osmol) inhibits thermoregulatory responses to increased body core temperature. Therefore, we hypothesized that the inhibitory effect of plasma hyperosmolality on the thermoregulatory responses to heat stress should be attenuated with the reduction of [Na(+)](sweat) due to heat acclimatization. Eleven subjects (9 male and 2 female) were passively heated by immersing their lower legs into water at 42 degrees C (room temperature 28 degrees C and relative humidity 30%) for 50 min following isotonic or hypertonic saline infusion. We determined the increase in the esophageal temperature (T(es)) required to elicit sweating and cutaneous vasodilation (CVD) (DeltaT(es) thresholds for sweating and CVD, respectively) in each condition and calculated the elevation of the T(es) thresholds per unit increase in P(osmol) as the osmotic inhibition of sweating and CVD. The osmotic shift in the DeltaT(es) thresholds for both sweating and CVD correlated linearly with [Na(+)](sweat) (r = 0.858 and r = 0.628, respectively). Thus subjects with a lower [Na(+)](sweat) showed a smaller osmotic elevation of the DeltaT(es) thresholds for sweating and CVD. These results suggest the possibility that heat acclimatization attenuates osmotic inhibition of thermoregulatory responses as well as reducing [Na(+)](sweat). PMID:11171638

  15. Clay for Little Fingers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Joan Bouza

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the renewed interest in clay as a modeling compound in early childhood programs; describes the nature of clay and presents a working vocabulary. Suggests methods of working with clay, including introducing clay to children, discovering its uses, clean up, firing clay, and finishing baked clay. Includes activity suggestions and…

  16. Altered thermoregulatory responses after 15 days of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Johnson, John M.; Convertino, Victor A.; Raven, Peter B.; Engelke, Keith A.

    1994-01-01

    To determine whether extended exposure to a simulation of microgravity alters thermoregulatory reflex control of skin blood flow, six adult males were exposed to 15 days of 6 deg head-down tilt (HDT). On an ambulatory control day before HDT exposure and on HDT day 15 the core temperature of each subject was increased by 0.5 - 1.0 C by whole body heating with a water-perfused suit. Mean skin temperature, oral temperature (T (sub or)), mean arterial pressure, and forearm blood flow were measured throughout the protocol. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was calculated from the ratio of forearm blood flow to mean arterial pressure. After HDT exposure, the T(sub or) threshold at which reflex thermally induced increases in FVC began was elevated, whereas the slope of the T(sub or)-FVC relationship after this threshold was reduced. Moreover, normothermic FVC and FVC at the highest common T(sub or) between pre- and post-HDT trials were reduced after HDT. These data suggest that HDT exposure reduces thermoregulatory responses to heat stress. The mechanisms resulting in such an impaired thermoregulatory response are unknown but are likely related to the relative dehydration that accompanies this exposure.

  17. Quantification of correlational selection on thermal physiology, thermoregulatory behavior, and energy metabolism in lizards

    PubMed Central

    Artacho, Paulina; Saravia, Julia; Ferrandière, Beatriz Decencière; Perret, Samuel; Le Galliard, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic selection is widely accepted as the primary cause of adaptive evolution in natural populations, but selection on complex functional properties linking physiology, behavior, and morphology has been rarely quantified. In ectotherms, correlational selection on thermal physiology, thermoregulatory behavior, and energy metabolism is of special interest because of their potential coadaptation. We quantified phenotypic selection on thermal sensitivity of locomotor performance (sprint speed), thermal preferences, and resting metabolic rate in captive populations of an ectothermic vertebrate, the common lizard, Zootoca vivipara. No correlational selection between thermal sensitivity of performance, thermoregulatory behavior, and energy metabolism was found. A combination of high body mass and resting metabolic rate was positively correlated with survival and negatively correlated with fecundity. Thus, different mechanisms underlie selection on metabolism in lizards with small body mass than in lizards with high body mass. In addition, lizards that selected the near average preferred body temperature grew faster that their congeners. This is one of the few studies that quantifies significant correlational selection on a proxy of energy expenditure and stabilizing selection on thermoregulatory behavior. PMID:26380689

  18. Can Newts Cope with the Heat? Disparate Thermoregulatory Strategies of Two Sympatric Species in Water

    PubMed Central

    Balogová, Monika; Gvoždík, Lumír

    2015-01-01

    Many ectotherms effectively reduce their exposure to low or high environmental temperatures using behavioral thermoregulation. In terrestrial ectotherms, thermoregulatory strategies range from accurate thermoregulation to thermoconformity according to the costs and limits of thermoregulation, while in aquatic taxa the quantification of behavioral thermoregulation have received limited attention. We examined thermoregulation in two sympatric newt species, Ichthyosaura alpestris and Lissotriton vulgaris, exposed to elevated water temperatures under semi-natural conditions. According to a recent theory, we predicted that species for which elevated water temperatures pose a lower thermal quality habitat, would thermoregulate more effectively than species in thermally benign conditions. In the laboratory thermal gradient, L. vulgaris maintained higher body temperatures than I. alpestris. Semi-natural thermal conditions provided better thermal quality of habitat for L. vulgaris than for I. alpestris. Thermoregulatory indices indicated that I. alpestris actively thermoregulated its body temperature, whereas L. vulgaris remained passive to the thermal heterogeneity of aquatic environment. In the face of elevated water temperatures, sympatric newt species employed disparate thermoregulatory strategies according to the species-specific quality of the thermal habitat. Both strategies reduced newt exposure to suboptimal water temperatures with the same accuracy but with or without the costs of thermoregulation. The quantification of behavioral thermoregulation proves to be an important conceptual and methodological tool for thermal ecology studies not only in terrestrial but also in aquatic ectotherms. PMID:25993482

  19. Neural substrates for sexual and thermoregulatory behavior in the male leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Nora; Kriegsfeld, Lance; Crews, David

    2004-12-10

    The preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus (POAH) continuum is critical for the integration of environmental, physiological, and behavioral cues associated with reproduction in vertebrates. In the present study, radiofrequency lesions in the POAH abolished sexual behavior in the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius). Furthermore, results suggest a differential effect of POAH lesions on those behaviors regarded as appetitive (tail vibration and grip) and those regarded as consummatory (mounting and copulation), with consummatory behaviors being affected to a greater extent. E. macularius is an ectothermic vertebrate that modulates body temperature behaviorally relative to ambient temperature. In vertebrates, the POAH is also an important integrator of thermoregulation. Thus, the present study investigated whether lesions that disrupt reproductive behavior also disrupt body temperature regulation. While virtually all males displayed diurnal rhythms in thermoregulatory behavior prior to surgery, this pattern was abolished in a small proportion of animals bearing POAH lesions. Lesions that abolished thermoregulatory rhythms involved the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), whereas lesions confined to the POAH, while dramatically influencing sexual behavior, did not affect thermoregulatory rhythms or temperature set point. Together, these findings identify the POAH as an important neural locus regulating sexual behavior but not thermoregulation and suggest that the SCN acts as a pacemaker controlling daily behavioral temperature regulation in this species. PMID:15533318

  20. Thermoregulatory effect of alarin, a new member of the galanin peptide family

    PubMed Central

    Mikó, Alexandra; Balla, Péter; Tenk, Judit; Balaskó, Márta; Soós, Szilvia; Székely, Miklós; Brunner, Susanne; Kofler, Barbara; Pétervári, Erika

    2014-01-01

    In the background of obesity, among other factors, regulatory alterations in energy balance affecting peptide systems may also be assumed. Regulation of energy balance does not only involve maintenance of body weight but also that of metabolic rate and core temperature. The contribution of alarin, a new member of the potentially orexigenic galanin peptide family, to the regulation of energy metabolism has been recently suggested. Our aim was to analyze the thermoregulatory effects of alarin in rats.   Adult male Wistar rats received full-length alarin (alarin 1–25), its truncated form (alarin 6–25Cys) or scrambled alarin in various doses intracerebroventricularly at different ambient temperatures. Oxygen consumption, heat loss (assessed by tail skin temperature) and core temperature of rats were recorded in an indirect calorimeter system. Upon alarin injection at 25 °C, an increase in oxygen consumption and continuous tail skin vasoconstriction induced a slow rise in core temperature that reached 0.5 °C by 120 and 1.0 °C by 180 min. At cooler or slightly warmer temperatures similar responses were seen. Neither the truncated nor the scrambled alarin elicited any significant thermoregulatory response, however, the truncated form antagonized the hyperthermic actions of the full-length peptide. Alarin appears to elicit a slow hypermetabolic, hyperthermic response in rats. Such a thermoregulatory response would characterize a catabolic (anorexic and hypermetabolic) mediator. Further investigations are needed to clarify the complex role of alarin in energy homeostasis.

  1. Can newts cope with the heat? Disparate thermoregulatory strategies of two sympatric species in water.

    PubMed

    Balogová, Monika; Gvoždík, Lumír

    2015-01-01

    Many ectotherms effectively reduce their exposure to low or high environmental temperatures using behavioral thermoregulation. In terrestrial ectotherms, thermoregulatory strategies range from accurate thermoregulation to thermoconformity according to the costs and limits of thermoregulation, while in aquatic taxa the quantification of behavioral thermoregulation have received limited attention. We examined thermoregulation in two sympatric newt species, Ichthyosaura alpestris and Lissotriton vulgaris, exposed to elevated water temperatures under semi-natural conditions. According to a recent theory, we predicted that species for which elevated water temperatures pose a lower thermal quality habitat, would thermoregulate more effectively than species in thermally benign conditions. In the laboratory thermal gradient, L. vulgaris maintained higher body temperatures than I. alpestris. Semi-natural thermal conditions provided better thermal quality of habitat for L. vulgaris than for I. alpestris. Thermoregulatory indices indicated that I. alpestris actively thermoregulated its body temperature, whereas L. vulgaris remained passive to the thermal heterogeneity of aquatic environment. In the face of elevated water temperatures, sympatric newt species employed disparate thermoregulatory strategies according to the species-specific quality of the thermal habitat. Both strategies reduced newt exposure to suboptimal water temperatures with the same accuracy but with or without the costs of thermoregulation. The quantification of behavioral thermoregulation proves to be an important conceptual and methodological tool for thermal ecology studies not only in terrestrial but also in aquatic ectotherms. PMID:25993482

  2. Impact of Finger Type in Fingerprint Authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, Davrondzhon; Bours, Patrick; Yang, Bian; Busch, Christoph

    Nowadays fingerprint verification system is the most widespread and accepted biometric technology that explores various features of the human fingers for this purpose. In general, every normal person has 10 fingers with different size. Although it is claimed that recognition performance with little fingers can be less accurate compared to other finger types, to our best knowledge, this has not been investigated yet. This paper presents our study on the topic of influence of the finger type into fingerprint recognition performance. For analysis we employ two fingerprint verification software packages (one public and one commercial). We conduct test on GUC100 multi sensor fingerprint database which contains fingerprint images of all 10 fingers from 100 subjects. Our analysis indeed confirms that performance with small fingers is less accurate than performance with the others fingers of the hand. It also appears that best performance is being obtained with thumb or index fingers. For example, performance deterioration from the best finger (i.e. index or thumb) to the worst fingers (i.e. small ones) can be in the range of 184%-1352%.

  3. Does finger sense predict addition performance?

    PubMed

    Newman, Sharlene D

    2016-05-01

    The impact of fingers on numerical and mathematical cognition has received a great deal of attention recently. However, the precise role that fingers play in numerical cognition is unknown. The current study explores the relationship between finger sense, arithmetic and general cognitive ability. Seventy-six children between the ages of 5 and 12 participated in the study. The results of stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that while general cognitive ability including language processing was a predictor of addition performance, finger sense was not. The impact of age on the relationship between finger sense, and addition was further examined. The participants were separated into two groups based on age. The results showed that finger gnosia score impacted addition performance in the older group but not the younger group. These results appear to support the hypothesis that fingers provide a scaffold for calculation and that if that scaffold is not properly built, it has continued differential consequences to mathematical cognition. PMID:26993292

  4. The Eagle Nebula's fingers - pointers to the earliest stages of star formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, G. J.; Nelson, R. P.; Holland, W. S.; Robson, E. I.; Greaves, J. S.; McCaughrean, M. J.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Balser, D. S.; Oka, T.; Sakamoto, S.; Hasegawa, T.; McCutcheon, W. H.; Matthews, H. E.; Fridlund, C. V. M.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Huldtgren, M.; Deane, J. R.

    1999-02-01

    Molecular line, millimetre/submillimetre continuum, and mid-IR observations are reported of the opaque fingers which cross the Eagle Nebula. The fingers are surprisingly warm when viewed in the CO J= 3-2 lines, with kinetic temperatures approaching 60 K, although the lines are relatively narrow. Most of the mass in the fingers is concentrated in cores which lie at the tips of the fingers, and contain from ~ 10 to 60 Msun, representing 55-80% of the mass of the individual fingers. The integrated mass contained in the three fingers and the nearby extended material is ~ 200 Msun. The velocity fields of the gas are complex and the material is very clumpy. The best evidence for coherent velocity structure is seen running along the central finger, which has a velocity gradient ~ 1.7 km s(-1) pc(-1) . The fingers contain several embedded submm continuum cores, with the most intense located at the tips of the fingers. The continuum spectra of these cores shows that they are much cooler, Tdust ~ 20 K, than Tgas ~ 60 K of their respective fingers. A simple thermal and chemical model of a finger was developed to study the physical environment, which takes into account the external UV illumination ( ~ 1700 G_0), and the chemical and thermal structure of a finger. The model predictions are consistent with all of the available observations. The fingers appear to have been formed after primordial dense clumps in the original cloud were irradiated by the light of its OB stars. These clumps then shielded material lying behind from the photoevaporative dispersal of the cloud, and facilitated the formation of the finger structures. The cores in the tips of the fingers appear to be at a very early stage of pre-protostellar development: there are no embedded infrared sources or molecular outflows present. The pressure inside the cores is just less than that of the surrounding gas, allowing them to be compressed by the external pressure. The cores are probably just starting the final

  5. Comparison of heat and cold stress to assess thermoregulatory dysfunction in hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Becker, P; Padnos, B

    2000-12-01

    How borderline impairment of thyroid function can affect thermoregulation is an important issue because of the antithyroidal properties of a many environmental toxicants. This study compared the efficacy of heat and cold stress to identify thermoregulatory deficits in rats subjected to borderline and overt hypothyroidism via subchronic exposure to propylthiouracil (PTU). After 3 wk of exposure to PTU in the drinking water (0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 25 mg/l), rats were subjected to a heat stress challenge (34 degrees C for 2.5 h). After one more week of PTU treatment, the same rats were subjected to a cold stress challenge (7 degrees C for 2.5 h). Core temperature (T(c)) was monitored by radiotelemetry. Baseline T(c) during the light phase was reduced by treatment with 25 mg/l PTU. The rate of rise and overall increase in T(c) during heat stress was attenuated by PTU doses of 10 and 25 mg/l. Cold stress resulted in a 1.0 degrees C increase in T(c) regardless of PTU treatment. The rate of rise in T(c) during the cold stress challenge was similar in all PTU treatment groups. There was a dose-related decrease in serum thyroxine (T(4)) at PTU doses >/=5 mg/l. Serum triiodothyronine (T(3)) was reduced at PTU doses of 5 and 25 mg/l. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was marginally elevated by PTU treatment. Overall, heat stress was more effective than cold stress for detecting a thermoregulatory deficit in borderline (i.e., 10 mg/l PTU) and overtly hypothyroid rats (i.e., 25 mg/l PTU). A significant thermoregulatory deficit is manifested with a 78% decrease in serum T(4). A thermoregulatory deficit is more correlated with a reduction in serum T(4) compared with T(3). Serum levels of TSH are unrelated to thermoregulatory response to heat and cold stress. PMID:11080070

  6. Moving Fingers under a Stick: A Laboratory Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massalha, Taha; Lanir, Yuval; Gluck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We consider a demonstration in which pupils alternately slide and stop their fingers under a long horizontal rod which they support. The changeover is described in terms of the relevant kinetic and static friction. We present a model calculation, performed on a spreadsheet, which clarifies the process and describes graphically the stepwise…

  7. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect); flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect); gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions) and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect); and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists. PMID:26753604

  8. On the fly finger knuckle print authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Narishige; Shinzaki, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    Finger knuckle print authentication has been researched not only as a supplemental authentication modality to fingerprint recognition but also as a method for logging into a PC or entering a building. However, in previous works, some specific devices were necessary to capture a finger knuckle print and users had to keep their fingers perfectly still to capture their finger knuckle. In this paper, we propose a new on the fly finger knuckle print authentication system using a general web camera. In our proposed authentication system, users can input their finger knuckle prints without needing their hand to remain motionless during image capture. We also evaluate the authentication accuracy of the proposed system, achieving an 7% EER under best conditions.

  9. The interaction of DNA with multi-Cys2His2 zinc finger proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2015-02-01

    The multi-Cys2His2 (mC2H2) zinc finger protein, like CTCF, plays a central role in the three-dimensional organization of chromatin and gene regulation. The interaction between DNA and mC2H2 zinc finger proteins becomes crucial to better understand how CTCF dynamically shapes the chromatin structure. Here, we study a coarse-grained model of the mC2H2 zinc finger proteins in complexes with DNA, and in particular, we study how a mC2H2 zinc finger protein binds to and searches for its target DNA loci. On the basis of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we present several interesting kinetic conformational properties of the proteins, such as the rotation-coupled sliding, the asymmetrical roles of different zinc fingers and the partial binding partial dangling mode. In addition, two kinds of studied mC2H2 zinc finger proteins, of CG-rich and AT-rich binding motif each, were able to recognize their target sites and slide away from their non-target sites, which shows a proper sequence specificity in our model and the derived force field for mC2H2-DNA interaction. A further application to CTCF shows that the protein binds to a specific DNA duplex only with its central zinc fingers. The zinc finger domains of CTCF asymmetrically bend the DNA, but do not form a DNA loop alone in our simulations.

  10. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  11. Piezoelectric Actuators On A Cold Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Chin-Po; Garba, John A.; Glaser, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental system for active suppression of vibrations of cold finger includes three piezoelectric actuators bonded to outer surface. Actuators used to suppress longitudinal and lateral vibrations of upper end of cold finger by applying opposing vibrations. Cold finger in question is part of a cryogenic system associated with an infrared imaging detector. When fully developed, system would be feedback sensor/control/actuator system automatically adapting to changing vibrational environment and suppresses pressure-induced vibrations by imposing compensatory vibrations via actuators.

  12. Control of dissected leaf morphology by a Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger transcription factor in the model legume Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianbin; Ge, Liangfa; Wang, Hongliang; Berbel, Ana; Liu, Yu; Chen, Yuhui; Li, Guangming; Tadege, Million; Wen, Jiangqi; Cosson, Viviane; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Ratet, Pascal; Madueño, Francisco; Bai, Guihua; Chen, Rujin

    2010-01-01

    Plant leaves are diverse in their morphology, reflecting to a large degree the plant diversity in the natural environment. How different leaf morphology is determined is not yet understood. The leguminous plant Medicago truncatula exhibits dissected leaves with three leaflets at the tip. We show that development of the trifoliate leaves is determined by the Cys(2)His(2) zinc finger transcription factor PALM1. Loss-of-function mutants of PALM1 develop dissected leaves with five leaflets clustered at the tip. We demonstrate that PALM1 binds a specific promoter sequence and down-regulates the expression of the M. truncatula LEAFY/UNIFOLIATA orthologue SINGLE LEAFLET1 (SGL1), encoding an indeterminacy factor necessary for leaflet initiation. Our data indicate that SGL1 is required for leaflet proliferation in the palm1 mutant. Interestingly, ectopic expression of PALM1 effectively suppresses the lobed leaf phenotype from overexpression of a class 1 KNOTTED1-like homeobox protein in Arabidopsis plants. Taken together, our results show that PALM1 acts as a determinacy factor, regulates the spatial-temporal expression of SGL1 during leaf morphogenesis and together with the LEAFY/UNIFOLIATA orthologue plays an important role in orchestrating the compound leaf morphology in M. truncatula. PMID:20498057

  13. Heat storage in Asian elephants during submaximal exercise: behavioral regulation of thermoregulatory constraints on activity in endothermic gigantotherms.

    PubMed

    Rowe, M F; Bakken, G S; Ratliff, J J; Langman, V A

    2013-05-15

    Gigantic size presents both opportunities and challenges in thermoregulation. Allometric scaling relationships suggest that gigantic animals have difficulty dissipating metabolic heat. Large body size permits the maintenance of fairly constant core body temperatures in ectothermic animals by means of gigantothermy. Conversely, gigantothermy combined with endothermic metabolic rate and activity likely results in heat production rates that exceed heat loss rates. In tropical environments, it has been suggested that a substantial rate of heat storage might result in a potentially lethal rise in core body temperature in both elephants and endothermic dinosaurs. However, the behavioral choice of nocturnal activity might reduce heat storage. We sought to test the hypothesis that there is a functionally significant relationship between heat storage and locomotion in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), and model the thermoregulatory constraints on activity in elephants and a similarly sized migratory dinosaur, Edmontosaurus. Pre- and post-exercise (N=37 trials) measurements of core body temperature and skin temperature, using thermography were made in two adult female Asian elephants at the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, LA, USA. Over ambient air temperatures ranging from 8 to 34.5°C, when elephants exercised in full sun, ~56 to 100% of active metabolic heat production was stored in core body tissues. We estimate that during nocturnal activity, in the absence of solar radiation, between 5 and 64% of metabolic heat production would be stored in core tissues. Potentially lethal rates of heat storage in active elephants and Edmontosaurus could be behaviorally regulated by nocturnal activity. PMID:23785105

  14. Control of thermal balance by a liquid circulating garment based on a mathematical representation of the human thermoregulatory system. Ph.D. Thesis - California Univ., Berkeley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetz, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    Test data and a mathematical model of the human thermoregulatory system were used to investigate control of thermal balance by means of a liquid circulating garment (LCG). The test data were derived from five series of experiments in which environmental and metabolic conditions were varied parametrically as a function of several independent variables, including LCG flowrate, LCG inlet temperature, net environmental heat exchange, surrounding gas ventilation rate, ambient pressure, metabolic rate, and subjective/obligatory cooling control. The resultant data were used to relate skin temperature to LCG water temperature and flowrate, to assess a thermal comfort band, to demonstrate the relationship between metabolic rate and LCG heat dissipation, and so forth. The usefulness of the mathematical model as a tool for data interpretation and for generation of trends and relationships among the various physiological parameters was also investigated and verified.

  15. Effects of exercise conditioning on thermoregulatory response to anticholinesterase insecticide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rowsey, P J; Metzger, B L; Gordon, C J

    2001-04-01

    Chronic exercise conditioning has been shown to alter basal thermoregulatory processes (change in thermoregulatory set point) as well as the response to infectious fever Chlorpyrifos (CHP), an organophosphate insecticide, also affects thermoregulation, causing an acute period of hypothermia followed by a delayed fever. This study examined whether chronic exercise training in the rat alters the thermoregulatory response to CHP. Core temperature and motor activity were monitored by radiotelemetry in female Sprague-Dawley rats housed individually at an ambient temperature of 22 degrees C. The rats were either given continuous access to running wheels or housed in standard cages without wheels. The exercise group ran predominately at night. After 8 weeks, the rats were gavaged with corn oil or 15 mg/kg CHP. CHP induced a transient hypothermic response followed by a delayed fever, beginning 1 day after exposure. Relative to controls, T7 decreases were not significantly different between the exercise (1.6 degrees C) group and the sedentary (0.5 degrees C) group given CHP. The sedentary and exercise group administered CHP developed a fever the day after CHP treatment. The fever response was greater in the sedentary group and persisted for approximately 3 days post-injection. Fever of the exercise group persisted for just one-half of 1 day after CHP. It is well known that chronic exercise training improves aerobic capacity; however, trained rats were not protected from the hypothermic effects of CHP. Training did ameliorate the febrile effects of CHP. Thus, exercise training may afford protection to the toxic effects of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:11876466

  16. Role of alpha-1 adrenoceptor subtypes mediating constriction of the rabbit ear thermoregulatory microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Silver, W P; Koman, L A; Strandhoy, J W; Rosencrance, E; Gordon, S; Smith, T L

    2000-01-01

    An acute in vivo preparation of the microvasculature of the rabbit ear was used to evaluate the functional role of alpha1 (alpha1)-adrenoceptor subtypes in thermoregulatory microcirculation. The effect of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtype blockade on phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction was assessed with the alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D-adrenoceptor-selective antagonists 5-methyl-urapidil (10(-8) M), chloroethylclonidine (10(-5) M), and 8-[2-[4(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-8-azaspirol[4.5]deca ne-7,9-dione dihydrochloride (BMY7378) (10(-6) M), respectively. The results demonstrated that pretreatment of the ear microvasculature with 5-methyl-urapidil or BMY7378 shifted the phenylephrine concentration-response curve rightward and significantly changed the log of the phenylephrine concentration, causing half-maximum stimulation (EC50) in arterioles (p < 0.05). BMY7378 shifted the phenylephrine concentration-response curve of the arteriovenous anastomoses about 100-fold rightward (p < 0.05). All three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists eliminated the vasoconstrictive effects of phenylephrine on venules. The results indicate that the ear microvasculature has a heterogenous distribution of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. The alpha1A and alpha1D-adrenoceptor subtypes appear to have a greater influence on constrictive function in arterioles, whereas the alpha1D-adrenoceptor is the dominant constrictor of arteriovenous anastomoses. In general, the alpha1-adrenoceptor does not play a major vasoconstrictor role in venules. Chloroethylclonidine, an irreversible alpha1B-adrenoceptor antagonist, induced contractile responses in the ear microvasculature, probably due to its alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist effects. This study extended our understanding of the adrenergic receptor control mechanisms of a cutaneous thermoregulatory end organ characterized by two parallel perfusion circuits providing nutritional and thermoregulatory functions. PMID:10716292

  17. The effect of ageing and fitness on thermoregulatory response to high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Best, S; Caillaud, C; Thompson, M

    2012-08-01

    There are conflicting reports as to whether ageing causes a decreased thermoregulatory response, or if observed differences in previous studies are related to maximal aerobic capacity or training status. This study hypothesized that thermoregulatory response to severe exercise-heat stress is maintained with ageing when both young and older subjects are well trained. Seven older highly trained (OHT = 51-63 years) cyclists were matched with two groups of young cyclists (19-35 years); one group matched for training status [young highly trained (YHT) participants, n = 7] and another for V ˙ O 2 max [young moderately trained (YMT), n = 7]. Each participant exercised at 70% V ˙ O 2 max in hot (35°C, 40% relative humidity) and thermoneutral (20°C, 40% relative humidity) conditions for 60 min. Final rectal temperature in the thermoneutral and heat (YHT = 39.13 ± 0.33°C, YMT = 39.11 ± 0.38°C, OHT = 39.11 ± 0.51°C) tests were similar between all three groups. %HR(max) (heat test: YHT = 92.5 ± 6.0%, YMT = 91.6 ± 4.4%, OHT = 88.6 ± 5.1%), skin temperature, and cutaneous vascular conductance during cycling in both environments were similar between groups. Lower sweat loss and evaporative heat loss in the heat test in the OHT and YMT groups when compared with the YHT group reflected lower metabolic heat production. The findings of the present study suggest that thermoregulatory response is maintained with age among highly trained subjects. PMID:22092378

  18. Interindividual differences in the thermoregulatory response to cool exposure in sleeping neonates.

    PubMed

    Bach, V; Telliez, F; Zoccoli, G; Lenzi, P; Leke, A; Libert, J P

    2000-04-01

    The responses of the thermoregulatory effectors vary greatly among neonates. Therefore, we assume that a small decrease in air temperature from thermoneutrality induces various thermoregulatory responses within neonates that represent an energy cost due to the cold defence processes. To determine the importance of this variability in nursing, 26 neonates were explored at thermoneutrality and in a cool environment (-1.5 degrees C from thermoneutrality) similar to that which occurs currently in clinical procedure. Oxygen consumption (VO2), oesophageal and skin temperatures, as well as sleep parameters were recorded continuously in both conditions. Analysis of all of the data from all of the neonates revealed that the cool exposure induced thermal and sleep disturbances, but VO2 did not increase and was not negatively correlated to body temperature (as might be expected). Analyses of individual data showed large variability in body temperature regulation: the neonates could be assigned to one of three groups according to the direction of the individual slopes of VO2 versus oesophageal or skin temperature. The groups also differed according to the sleep changes recorded in the cool condition. The results show that the definition of thermoneutrality should be revised by incorporating non only changes in the body temperature, but also the sleep disturbances (increased wakefulness and active sleep, decreased quiet sleep), which are criteria that are more sensitive to mild cool exposure. Thermoneutrality should be defined for each individual, since the results stress that the variability does not help to predict a general pattern of thermoregulatory responses in cool-exposed neonates. PMID:10774868

  19. Mild evaporative cooling applied to the torso provides thermoregulatory benefits during running in the heat.

    PubMed

    Filingeri, D; Fournet, D; Hodder, S; Havenith, G

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the effects of mild evaporative cooling applied to the torso, before or during running in the heat. Nine male participants performed three trials: control-no cooling (CTR), pre-exercise cooling (PRE-COOL), and during-exercise cooling (COOL). Trials consisted of 10-min neutral exposure and 50-min heat exposure (30 °C; 44% humidity), during which a 30-min running protocol (70% VO2max ) was performed. An evaporative cooling t-shirt was worn before the heat exposure (PRE-COOL) or 15 min after the exercise was started (COOL). PRE-COOL significantly lowered local skin temperature (Tsk ) (up to -5.3 ± 0.3 °C) (P < 0.001), mean Tsk (up to -2 ± 0.1 °C) (P < 0.001), sweat losses (-143 ± 40 g) (P = 0.002), and improved thermal comfort (P = 0.001). COOL suddenly lowered local Tsk (up to -3.8 ± 0.2 °C) (P < 0.001), mean Tsk (up to -1 ± 0.1 °C) (P < 0.001), heart rate (up to -11 ± 2 bpm) (P = 0.03), perceived exertion (P = 0.001), and improved thermal comfort (P = 0.001). We conclude that the mild evaporative cooling provided significant thermoregulatory benefits during exercise in the heat. However, the timing of application was critical in inducing different thermoregulatory responses. These findings provide novel insights on the thermoregulatory role of Tsk during exercise in the heat. PMID:25943671

  20. Age-dependent differences in the thermoregulatory response of the immature rat to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Spiers, D E; Fusco, L E

    1991-02-01

    Major improvement in the homeothermic ability of the rat occurs during the first 2 weeks of postnatal development. Changes in thermoregulatory responsiveness to a single injection of ethanol (EtOH) may occur during this period. Immature rats (2-3, 8-9, and 14-15 days of age) were administered either saline or EtOH (2 or 4 g/kg BW; ip) at thermoneutral ambient temperatures (Ta). In one experiment, metabolic rate (MR) and body temperatures (colonic and skin) were recorded for 1-3 hr postinjection. A second experiment determined blood EtOH concentration in rats from the 3 age groups over an 8-hr period following injection of EtOH. 4 g EtOH/kg produced few significant reductions in thermoregulatory function of 2-3 day-old rats, but decreased MR by 16% and colonic temperature by 0.5-0.7 degrees C in 8-15 day-old animals. 2 g EtOH/kg had no effect on 8-9 day-old rats, but reduced MR and colonic temperature in rats aged 14-15 days. In every case, the hypothermic response to EtOH was correlated with a reduction in MR. Back and abdominal skin temperatures decreased with colonic temperature, and tail skin temperature indicated EtOH-induced vasoconstriction in older rats. Blood EtOH concentrations were similar in the three age groups during the first 2 hr postinjection and did not explain differences in metabolic response. The magnitude and duration of thermoregulatory responsiveness to EtOH increases with age in the immature rat. PMID:2024730

  1. Thermoregulatory uncoupling in heart muscle mitochondria: involvement of the ATP/ADP antiporter and uncoupling protein.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, R A; Skulachev, V P

    1998-09-25

    Possible involvement of the ATP/ADP antiporter and uncoupling protein (UCP) in thermoregulatory uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation in heart muscle has been studied. To this end, effects of carboxyatractylate (cAtr) and GDP, specific inhibitors of the antiporter and UCP, on the membrane potential of the oligomycin-treated mitochondria from cold-exposed (6 degrees C, 48 h) and control rats have been measured. It is found that cAtr increases the membrane potential level in both cold-exposed and non-exposed groups, the effect being strongly enhanced by cooling. As for GDP, it is effective only in mitochondria from the cold-exposed rats. In these mitochondria, the coupling effect of GDP is smaller than that of cAtr. CDP, which does not interact with UCP, is without any influence on membrane potential. The cold exposure is found to increase the uncoupling efficiency of added natural (palmitate) or artificial (SF6847) uncouplers, the increase being cAtr- and GDP-sensitive in the case of palmitate. The fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin enhances delta psi in both cold-exposed and control groups, the effect being much larger in the former case. It is concluded that in heart muscle mitochondria the ATP/ADP antiporter is responsible for the 'mild uncoupling' under normal conditions and for major portion of the thermoregulatory uncoupling in the cold whereas the rest of thermoregulatory uncoupling is served by UCP (presumably by UCP2 since the UCP2 mRNA level is shown to strongly increase in rat heart muscle under the cold exposure conditions used). PMID:9771898

  2. Simulation of light transport in arthritic- and non-arthritic human fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanic, Matija; Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2014-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that frequently leads to joint destruction. It has high incidence rates worldwide, and the disease significantly reduces patient's quality of life due to pain, swelling and stiffness of the affected joints. Early diagnosis is necessary to improve course of the disease, therefore sensitive and accurate diagnostic tools are required. Optical imaging techniques have capability for early diagnosis and monitoring of arthritis. As compared to conventional diagnostic techniques optical technique is a noninvasive, noncontact and fast way of collecting diagnostic information. However, a realistic model of light transport in human joints is needed for understanding and developing of such optical diagnostic tools. The aim of this study is to develop a 3D numerical model of light transport in a human finger. The model will guide development of a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) diagnostic modality for arthritis in human fingers. The implemented human finger geometry is based on anatomical data. Optical data of finger tissues are adjusted to represent either an arthritic or an unaffected finger. The geometry and optical data serve as input into a 3D Monte Carlo method, which calculate diffuse reflectance, transmittance and absorbed energy distributions. The parameters of the model are optimized based on HIS-measurements of human fingers. The presented model serves as an important tool for understanding and development of HSI as an arthritis diagnostic modality. Yet, it can be applied to other optical techniques and finger diseases.

  3. Neural network committees for finger joint angle estimation from surface EMG signals

    PubMed Central

    Shrirao, Nikhil A; Reddy, Narender P; Kosuri, Durga R

    2009-01-01

    Background In virtual reality (VR) systems, the user's finger and hand positions are sensed and used to control the virtual environments. Direct biocontrol of VR environments using surface electromyography (SEMG) signals may be more synergistic and unconstraining to the user. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop a technique to predict the finger joint angle from the surface EMG measurements of the extensor muscle using neural network models. Methodology SEMG together with the actual joint angle measurements were obtained while the subject was performing flexion-extension rotation of the index finger at three speeds. Several neural networks were trained to predict the joint angle from the parameters extracted from the SEMG signals. The best networks were selected to form six committees. The neural network committees were evaluated using data from new subjects. Results There was hysteresis in the measured SMEG signals during the flexion-extension cycle. However, neural network committees were able to predict the joint angle with reasonable accuracy. RMS errors ranged from 0.085 ± 0.036 for fast speed finger-extension to 0.147 ± 0.026 for slow speed finger extension, and from 0.098 ± 0.023 for the fast speed finger flexion to 0.163 ± 0.054 for slow speed finger flexion. Conclusion Although hysteresis was observed in the measured SEMG signals, the committees of neural networks were able to predict the finger joint angle from SEMG signals. PMID:19154615

  4. Evaluation of thermoregulatory response to microwave power deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Stolwijk, J.A.J.

    1981-10-01

    The deposition of electromagnetic energy as heat in all of the human body, or in specific parts of it is one of the specific conditions which lend themselves uniquely to a preliminary evaluation through simulation modeling. In general the use of one of the widely accepted models of thermoregulation to evaluate the thermal effects of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation should be seen as a useful tool which should be interpreted with reasonable caution.

  5. Mechanics of finger-tip electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yewang; Li, Rui; Cheng, Huanyu; Ying, Ming; Bonifas, Andrew P.; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang

    2013-10-01

    Tactile sensors and electrotactile stimulators can provide important links between humans and virtual environments, through the sensation of touch. Soft materials, such as low modulus silicones, are attractive as platforms and support matrices for arrays sensors and actuators that laminate directly onto the fingertips. Analytic models for the mechanics of three dimensional, form-fitting finger cuffs based on such designs are presented here, along with quantitative validation using the finite element method. The results indicate that the maximum strains in the silicone and the embedded devices are inversely proportional to the square root of radius of curvature of the cuff. These and other findings can be useful in formulating designs for these and related classes of body-worn, three dimensional devices.

  6. Surface Tension and Fingering of Miscible Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abib, Mohammed; Liu, Jian-Bang; Ronney, Paul D.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments on miscible, buoyantly unstable reaction-diffusion fronts and non-reacting displacement fronts in Hele-Shaw cells show a fingering-type instability whose wavelengths (lambda*) are consistent with an interfacial tension (sigma) at the front caused by the change in chemical composition, even though the solutions are miscible in all proportions. In conjunction with the Saffman-Taylor model, the relation sigma = K/tau, where tau is the interface thickness and K approximately equal 4 +/- 2 x 10(exp -6) dyne, enables prediction of our measured values of lambda* as well as results from prior experiments on miscible interfaces. These results indicate that even for miscible fluids, surface tension is generally a more significant factor than diffusion in interfacial stability and flow characteristics.

  7. Error compensation during finger force production after one- and four-finger voluntarily fatiguing exercise.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Eric S; Hoopes, Josh A; Cordial, Rory J; Li, Sheng

    2007-08-01

    The effect of muscle fatigue on error compensation strategies during multi-finger ramp force production tasks was investigated. Thirteen young, healthy subjects were instructed to produce a total force with four fingers of the right hand to accurately match a visually displayed template. The template consisted of a 3-s waiting period, a 3-s ramp force production [from 0 to 30% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)], and a 3-s constant force production. A series of 12 ramp trials was performed before and after fatigue. Fatigue was induced by a 60-s maximal isometric force production with either the index-finger only or with all four fingers during two separate testing sessions. The average percent of drop was 38.2% in the MVC of the index finger after index-finger fatiguing exercise and 38.3% in the MVC of all fingers after four-finger fatiguing exercise. The ability of individual fingers to compensate for each other's errors in order for the total force to match the preset template was quantified as the error compensation index (ECI), i.e., the ratio of the sum of variances of individual finger forces and the variance of the total force. By comparing pre- and post-fatigue performance during four-finger ramp force production, we observed that the variance of the total force was not significantly changed after one- or four-finger fatiguing exercise. The ECI significantly decreased after four-finger fatiguing exercise, especially during the last second of the ramp; while the ECI remained unchanged after index finger single-finger fatiguing exercise. These results suggest that the central nervous system is able to utilize the abundant degrees of freedom to compensate for partial impairment of the motor apparatus induced by muscle fatigue to maintain the desired performance. However, this ability is significantly decreased when all elements of the motor apparatus are impaired. PMID:17443316

  8. 50 years of computer simulation of the human thermoregulatory system.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Daniel W; Mark, Andrew E; Abella, Jayvee R; Netscher, George M; Wissler, Eugene H; Diller, Kenneth R

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents an updated and augmented version of the Wissler human thermoregulation model that has been developed continuously over the past 50 years. The existing Fortran code is translated into C with extensive embedded commentary. A graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed in Python to facilitate convenient user designation of input and output variables and formatting of data presentation. Use of the code with the GUI is described and demonstrated. New physiological elements were added to the model to represent the hands and feet, including the unique vascular structures adapted for heat transfer associated with glabrous skin. The heat transfer function and efficacy of glabrous skin is unique within the entire body based on the capacity for a very high rate of blood perfusion and the novel capability for dynamic regulation of blood flow. The model was applied to quantify the absolute and relative contributions of glabrous skin flow to thermoregulation for varying levels of blood perfusion. The model also was used to demonstrate how the unique features of glabrous skin blood flow may be recruited to implement thermal therapeutic procedures. We have developed proprietary methods to manipulate the control of glabrous skin blood flow in conjunction with therapeutic devices and simulated the effect of these methods with the model. PMID:23445051

  9. Creating Number Semantics through Finger Movement Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badets, Arnaud; Pesenti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Communication, language and conceptual knowledge related to concrete objects may rely on the sensory-motor systems from which they emerge. How abstract concepts can emerge from these systems is however still unknown. Here we report a functional interaction between a specific meaningful finger movement, such as a finger grip closing, and a concept…

  10. Analysis and treatment of finger sucking.

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, S A; Miltenberger, R G; Stricker, J M; Garlinghouse, M A; Roberts, J; Galensky, T L; Rapp, J T

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed and treated the finger sucking of 2 developmentally typical children aged 7 and 10 years. The functional analysis revealed that the finger sucking of both children was exhibited primarily during alone conditions, suggesting that the behavior was maintained by automatic reinforcement. An extended analysis provided support for this hypothesis and demonstrated that attenuation of stimulation produced by the finger sucking resulted in behavior reductions for both children. Treatment consisted of having each child wear a glove on the relevant hand during periods when he or she was alone. Use of the glove produced zero levels of finger sucking for 1 participant, whereas only moderate reductions were obtained for the other. Subsequently, an awareness enhancement device was used that produced an immediate reduction in finger sucking. PMID:10738951

  11. Local and global thermoregulatory responses to MRI electromagnetic fields: Biological effects and safety aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    During magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures, a subject is exposed to three novel environmental stimuli which have drawn attention over the past decade as potential health hazards: (1) a relatively intense static magnetic field; (2) a time-varying magnetic field, and (3) a radiofrequency (RF) field. Thermoregulation is one of many physiological systems that can be affected by MRI, specifically by the RF radiation absorbed by the subject during MRI. While there is some sparse, albeit controversial data on the possible effects of static magnetic fields on thermoregulation, the major concern regarding potential health hazards of the MRI-induced thermal effects centers on the RF radiation absorbed by a subject during a scan. The purpose of the paper is to review the studies that have impacted on understanding the thermoregulatory effects of MRI with special emphasis on the problems of selecting appropriate animal models for assessing the potential risk of RF radiation exposure during MRI.

  12. Attenuated thermoregulatory responses with increased plasma osmolality in obese subjects during two seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanikowska, Dominika; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Inukai, Yoko; Iwase, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    Obese subjects may be more vulnerable to injury from heat stress, and appear to be less efficient at thermoregulation. Sweat rate, tympanic temperature and osmolality in obese subjects were investigated in Japan during two seasons. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between obesity, thermoregulatory response and season. Five obese (BMI, 32.0 ± 4.9 kg/m2) and five non-obese (BMI, 23.2 ± 2.9 kg/m2) men participated in this experiment at latitude 35°10' N and longitude 136°57.9'E. The average atmospheric temperature was 29.1 ± 1.0 °C in summer and 3.3 ± 1.4 °C in winter. Tympanic temperature and sweat rate were measured during leg water immersion at 42 °C for 30 min. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma osmolality. The relationship between tympanic temperature and sweat rate decreased significantly in obese compared to in non-obese subjects in both seasons, there being a lowered sweat rate for any core temperature in obese subjects. Plasma osmolality was significantly higher in obese than in non-obese subjects in both seasons. Thermal sensation increased significantly in non-obese than in obese in winter but not in summer. Our data show that thermoregulatory responses are attenuated in obese subjects compared with controls, suggesting that obese people are at increased risk of heat-related illnesses.

  13. The relative influences of exercise and coat-type on the thermoregulatory responses of cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajrabukka, C.; Thwaites, C. J.

    1984-03-01

    Field and climatic chamber studies revealed that walking at 4.5 km/h elicited greater thermoregulatory responses in Hereford cattle than did the possession of a wooly hair coat. Under mild field conditions, walking caused sweating rate to increase to 150 200 g/m2/h within one hour (P<0.001); no significant differences were recorded between wooly-coated and clipped cattle. Walking at 4.5 km/h on a treadmill in a climate chamber at 38°C and 34 mm Hg water vapour pressure elevated rectal (P<0.001) and skin (P<0.05) temperatures to levels considerably above those in stationary controls. There were no differential effects on sweating or respiratory rates, though the latter were generally higher in the exercising group. Differences in skin temperature, sweating and respiratory rates between coat-types and exercise groups in the climate chamber were similar, but exercise resulted in a much greater rectal temperature response. Overall, exercise represented a more potent thermoregulatory stimulus than a wooly hair coat.

  14. Thermoregulatory effects of caffeine ingestion during rest and exercise in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Nancy; Greenleaf, John E.; Cisar, Craig J.

    1994-01-01

    Body temperatures and thermoregulatory responses were measured at rest and during submaximal exercise under normal ambient conditions in 11 aerobically-conditioned men (age = 29.2 +/- 6.2 yr, VO2(max) = 3.73 +/- 0.46 min(sup -1), relative body fat = 12.3 +/- 3.7 percent, mean +/- SD) with (CT) and without (NCT) the ingestion of 10 mg of caffeine per kg of body weight. Oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), and rectal (T(sub re)) and mean skin (T-bar(sub sk)) temperatures were recorded for 100 minutes starting one minute after ingestion of caffeine or a placebo. Data were collected throughout 30 minutes of rest (sitting) and the following 70 minutes of sitting leg ergometer exercise using the same constant load (1,088 +/- 153 kgm/min) in both NCT and CT. The load resulted in a mean relative exercise intensity equal to approximately 68 percent of VO2(sub max). Skin heat conductance (H(sub sk)) and sweat rate were calculated. Two-way analysis of covariance revealed no significant (P greater than 0.05) differences between NCT and CT in VO2, HR, T(sub re), T-bar(sub sk), or H(sub sk). A dependent t-test indicated no significant difference between NCT and CT in sweat rate. Thus, a high level of caffeine ingestion has no detrimental effects on body temperatures and thermoregulatory responses during moderately heavy exercise in normal ambient conditions.

  15. Characterization of the thermoregulatory response to pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide in rodents.

    PubMed

    Banki, Eszter; Pakai, Eszter; Gaszner, Balazs; Zsiboras, Csaba; Czett, Andras; Bhuddi, Paras Rahul Parkash; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Toth, Gabor; Tamas, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Garami, Andras

    2014-11-01

    Administration of the long form (38 amino acids) of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38) into the central nervous system causes hyperthermia, suggesting that PACAP38 plays a role in the regulation of deep body temperature (T b). In this study, we investigated the thermoregulatory role of PACAP38 in details. First, we infused PACAP38 intracerebroventricularly to rats and measured their T b and autonomic thermoeffector responses. We found that central PACAP38 infusion caused dose-dependent hyperthermia, which was brought about by increased thermogenesis and tail skin vasoconstriction. Compared to intracerebroventricular administration, systemic (intravenous) infusion of the same dose of PACAP38 caused significantly smaller hyperthermia, indicating a central site of action. We then investigated the thermoregulatory phenotype of mice lacking the Pacap gene (Pacap (-/-)). Freely moving Pacap (-/-) mice had higher locomotor activity throughout the day and elevated deep T b during the light phase. When the Pacap (-/-) mice were loosely restrained, their metabolic rate and T b were lower compared to their wild-type littermates. We conclude that PACAP38 causes hyperthermia via activation of the autonomic cold-defense thermoeffectors through central targets. Pacap (-/-) mice express hyperkinesis, which is presumably a compensatory mechanism, because under restrained conditions, these mice are hypometabolic and hypothermic compared to controls. PMID:24994541

  16. Thermoregulatory consequences of resonant microwave exposure. Final report, August 1987-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.

    1990-06-01

    Four experiments were conducted in which it was shown that behavioral and autonomic thermo-regulatory responses are mobilized in an orderly fashion when squirrel monkeys undergo whole-body exposure at the resonant frequency, 450 MHz. The threshold for alteration of thermo-regulatory behavior is about 3 mW/sq cm, equivalent to an SAR of nearly 2 W/kg. Behavioral responses serve to regulate the skin temperature at the normally preferred level. Because of the deep penetration of the radiation at resonance, this regulation results in a stable hyperthermic offset or bias in the deep body temperature. This situation is identical to that which occurs during exercise. Although not yet studied, we presume that the magnitude of this offset will be a direct function of the energy deposited in the body or SAR. Autonomic response of peripheral vasodilation and sweating, manifested on the skin surface. are stimulated at SARs similar to the behavioral threshold, indicating the possibility that such responses could serve as auxiliary sensory cues to behavior.

  17. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, Eduardo V.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  18. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, E.V.

    1997-11-18

    A method is described for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change. 9 figs.

  19. Acute Physiological and Thermoregulatory Responses to Extended Interval Training in Endurance Runners: Influence of Athletic Performance and Age

    PubMed Central

    García-Pinillos, Felipe; Soto-Hermoso, Víctor Manuel; Latorre-Román, Pedro Ángel

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the acute impact of extended interval training (EIT) on physiological and thermoregulatory levels, as well as to determine the influence of athletic performance and age effect on the aforementioned response in endurance runners. Thirty-one experienced recreational male endurance runners voluntarily participated in this study. Subjects performed EIT on an outdoor running track, which consisted of 12 runs of 400 m. The rate of perceived exertion, physiological response through the peak and recovery heart rate, blood lactate, and thermoregulatory response through tympanic temperature, were controlled. A repeated measures analysis revealed significant differences throughout EIT in examined variables. Cluster analysis grouped according to the average performance in 400 m runs led to distinguish between athletes with a higher and lower sports level. Cluster analysis was also performed according to age, obtaining an older group and a younger group. The one-way analysis of variance between groups revealed no significant differences (p≥0.05) in the response to EIT. The results provide a detailed description of physiological and thermoregulatory responses to EIT in experienced endurance runners. This allows a better understanding of the impact of a common training stimulus on the physiological level inducing greater accuracy in the training prescription. Moreover, despite the differences in athletic performance or age, the acute physiological and thermoregulatory responses in endurance runners were similar, as long as EIT was performed at similar relative intensity. PMID:26839621

  20. METABOLIC AND THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSES OF THE RAT MAINTAINED IN ACRYLIC OR WIRE-SCREEN CAGES: IMPLICATIONS FOR PHARMACOLOGICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory rodents are usually housed and studied in cages with walls and floor made of ventilated metal or solid plastic materials. It should be recognized that a rodent's thermoregulatory requirements will vary in metal and plastic cages; and it is likely that its metabolic res...

  1. EFFECTS OF ACUTE EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATES ON CARDIOPULMONARY, THERMOREGULATORY, AND BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN OLD SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory


    EFFECTS OF ACUTE EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATES ON CARDIOPULMONARY, THERMOREGULATORY, AND BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN OLD SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS. JP Nolan1, LB Wichers2, DW Winsett1, UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, DL Costa1, and WP Watkinson1. 1US E...

  2. Susceptibility of the aging Brown Norway rat to carbaryl, an anti-cholinesterase-based insecticide: Thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proportion of aged in the United States is projected to expand markedly for the next several decades. Hence, the U.S.EPA is assessing if the aged are more susceptible to environmental toxicants. The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses of young adult, mature adult, a...

  3. EFFECTS OF INSTILLATION OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH ON INDICES OF CARDIAC, PULMONARY, AND THERMOREGULATORY FUNCTION IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory


    EFFECTS OF INSTILLED RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) ON INDICES OF CARDIAC, PULMONARY, AND THERMOREGULATORY FUNCTION IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE (SH) RATS. LB Wichers1, JP Nolan2, UP Kodavanti2, MCJ Schladweiler2, R Hauser3, DW Winsett2, DL Costa2, and WP Watkinson2. 1UNC Sch...

  4. EFFECTS OF INSTILLATION OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) ON CARDIAC, PULMONARY, AND THERMOREGULATORY PARAMETERS IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE (SH) RATS

    EPA Science Inventory


    EFFECTS OF INSTILLATION OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) ON CARDIAC, PULMONARY, AND THERMOREGULATORY PARAMETERS IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE (SH) RATS. LB Wichers1, JP Nolan2, DW Winsett2, AD Ledbetter2, UP Kodavanti2, MCJ Schladweiler2, R Hauser3, DC Christiani3, DL Costa2, ...

  5. EFFECTS OF INHALATION OF SOLUBLE METALLIC CONSTITUENTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER ON CARDIOPULMONARY, THERMOREGULATORY, AND BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN GUINEA PIGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF INHALATION OF SOLUBLE METALLIC CONSTITUENTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER ON CARDIOPULMONARY, THERMOREGULATORY, AND BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN GUINEA PIGS. JP Nolan1, LB Wichers2, J Stanek3, UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, PA Evansky1, ER Lappi1, DL Costa1, and WP Watkinson1...

  6. EFFECTS OF INDUCED RESPIRATORY CHANGES ON CARDIAC, VENTILATORY, AND THERMOREGULATORY PARAMETERS IN HEALTHY SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory


    EFFECTS OF INDUCED RESPIRATORY CHANGES ON CARDIAC, VENTILATORY, AND THERMOREGULATORY PARAMETERS IN HEALTHY SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS. LB Wichers1, WH Rowan2, DL Costa2, MJ Campen3 and WP Watkinson2 1UNC SPH, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2USEPA, ORD/NHEERL/ETD/PTB, RTP, NC, USA; 3LRRI, A...

  7. Acute Physiological and Thermoregulatory Responses to Extended Interval Training in Endurance Runners: Influence of Athletic Performance and Age.

    PubMed

    García-Pinillos, Felipe; Soto-Hermoso, Víctor Manuel; Latorre-Román, Pedro Ángel

    2015-12-22

    This study aimed to describe the acute impact of extended interval training (EIT) on physiological and thermoregulatory levels, as well as to determine the influence of athletic performance and age effect on the aforementioned response in endurance runners. Thirty-one experienced recreational male endurance runners voluntarily participated in this study. Subjects performed EIT on an outdoor running track, which consisted of 12 runs of 400 m. The rate of perceived exertion, physiological response through the peak and recovery heart rate, blood lactate, and thermoregulatory response through tympanic temperature, were controlled. A repeated measures analysis revealed significant differences throughout EIT in examined variables. Cluster analysis grouped according to the average performance in 400 m runs led to distinguish between athletes with a higher and lower sports level. Cluster analysis was also performed according to age, obtaining an older group and a younger group. The one-way analysis of variance between groups revealed no significant differences (p≥0.05) in the response to EIT. The results provide a detailed description of physiological and thermoregulatory responses to EIT in experienced endurance runners. This allows a better understanding of the impact of a common training stimulus on the physiological level inducing greater accuracy in the training prescription. Moreover, despite the differences in athletic performance or age, the acute physiological and thermoregulatory responses in endurance runners were similar, as long as EIT was performed at similar relative intensity. PMID:26839621

  8. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. PMID:22882155

  9. Fingered core structure of nematic boojums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Samo; Rosso, Riccardo; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2008-09-01

    Using the Landau-de Gennes phenomenological approach, we study the fine biaxial core structure of a boojum residing on the surface of a nematic liquid crystal phase. The core is formed by a negatively uniaxial finger, surrounded by a shell with maximal biaxiality. The characteristic finger’s length and the shell’s width are comparable to the biaxial correlation length. The finger tip is melted for topological reasons. Upon decreasing the surface anchoring strength below a critical value, the finger gradually leaves the bulk and it is expelled through the surface.

  10. Repeated nitrous oxide exposure in rats causes a thermoregulatory sign-reversal with concurrent activation of opposing thermoregulatory effectors

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Douglas S.; Woods, Stephen C.; Kaiyala, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    Initial administration of 60% nitrous oxide (N2O) to rats at an ambient temperature of 21°C decreases core temperature (Tc), primarily via increased heat loss (HL). Over repeated N2O administrations, rats first develop tolerance to this hypothermia and subsequently exhibit hyperthermia (a sign-reversal) due primarily to progressive increases in heat production (HP). When rats initially receive 60% N2O in a thermal gradient, they become hypothermic while selecting cooler ambient temperatures that facilitate HL. This study investigated whether rats repeatedly administered 60% N2O in a thermal gradient would use the gradient to behaviorally facilitate, or oppose, the development of chronic tolerance and a hyperthermic sign-reversal. Male Long-Evans rats (N=16) received twelve 3-h administrations of 60% N2O in a gas-tight, live-in thermal gradient. Hypothermia (Sessions 1-3), complete chronic tolerance (Sessions 4-6), and a subsequent transient hyperthermic sign-reversal (Sessions 7-12) sequentially developed. Despite the progressive recovery and eventual hyperthermic sign-reversal of Tc, rats consistently selected cooler ambient temperatures during all N2O administrations. A final 60% N2O administration in a total calorimeter indicated that the hyperthermic sign-reversal resulted primarily from increased HP. Thus, rats did not facilitate chronic tolerance development by moving to warmer locations in the gradient, and instead selected cooler ambient temperatures while simultaneously increasing autonomic HP. The inefficient concurrent activation of opposing effectors and the development of a sign-reversal are incompatible with homeostatic models of drug-adaptation and may be better interpreted using a model of drug-induced allostasis. PMID:25938127