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Sample records for finite elements method

  1. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Timothy; Bond, Stephen D.; Littlewood, David John; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  2. Finite element methods in numerical relativity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P. J.

    The finite element method is very successful in Newtonian fluid simulations, and can be extended to relativitstic fluid flows. This paper describes the general method, and then outlines some preliminary results for spherically symmetric geometries. The mixed finite element - finite difference scheme is introduced, and used for the description of spherically symmetric collapse. Baker's (Newtonian) shock modelling method and Miller's moving finite element method are also mentioned. Collapse in double-null coordinates requires non-constant time slicing, so the full finite element method in space and time is described.

  3. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  4. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Michael A.

    Finite-difference and finite-element methods for the computational analysis of EM scattering phenomena are examined in chapters contributed by leading experts. Topics addressed include an FEM for composite scatterers, coupled finite- and boundary-element methods for EM scattering, absorbing boundary conditions for the direct solution PDEs arising in EM scattering problems, application of the control-region approximation to two-dimensional EM scattering, coupled potentials for EM fields in inhomogeneous media, the method of conforming boundary elements for transient electromagnetics, and the finite-difference time-domain method for numerical modeling of EM wave interactions with arbitrary structures. Extensive diagrams and graphs of typical results are provided.

  5. The finite element method in thermomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, T.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal stress analysis is critical in the design and operation of energy-efficient power plant components and engines as well as in nuclear and aerospace systems. The Finite Element Method in Thermomechanics attempts to embrace a wide range of topics in the nonlinear thermomechanical analysis. The book covers the basic principles of the finite element method: the formulations for the base thermomechanical analysis, including thermoelastic-plastic-creep stress analysis; the use of Fourier series for nonaxisymmetric loadings, and stress waves in solids in thermal environments; and the base finite element code called TEPSAC.

  6. A survey of mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezzi, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to and an overview of mixed finite element methods. It discusses the mixed formulation of certain basic problems in elasticity and hydrodynamics. It also discusses special techniques for solving the discrete problem.

  7. A multidimensional finite element method for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for 2- and 3-D fluid flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly using quadrilateral (2-D) and hexahedral (3-D) elements, mass lumping, and reduced integration. A Petrov-Galerkin technique is applied to the advection terms. The method requires a minimum of computational storage, executes quickly, and is scalable for execution on computer systems ranging from PCs to supercomputers.

  8. On Hybrid and mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1981-01-01

    Three versions of the assumed stress hybrid model in finite element methods and the corresponding variational principles for the formulation are presented. Examples of rank deficiency for stiffness matrices by the hybrid stress model are given and their corresponding kinematic deformation modes are identified. A discussion of the derivation of general semi-Loof elements for plates and shells by the hybrid stress method is given. It is shown that the equilibrium model by Fraeijs de Veubeke can be derived by the approach of the hybrid stress model as a special case of semi-Loof elements.

  9. Finite element methods in probabilistic mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wing Kam; Mani, A.; Belytschko, Ted

    1987-01-01

    Probabilistic methods, synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-order perturbation techniques, are formulated for linear and nonlinear problems. Random material, geometric properties and loads can be incorporated in these methods, in terms of their fundamental statistics. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not too large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. Applications showing the effects of combined random fields and cyclic loading/stress reversal are studied and compared with Monte Carlo simulation results.

  10. Mixed Finite Element Method for Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taicher, A. L.; Hesse, M. A.; Arbogast, T.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium. Therefore, a numerical method must also carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. The finite element framework provides support for additional analysis of error and convergence. Moreover, both mesh refinement and anisotropy are naturally incorporated into finite elements. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. Mixed methods also produce discretely conservative fluxes that are required for the transport problem to remains stable without violating conservation of mass. Based preliminary investigations in 1D and derived energy estimates, we present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, using novel elements of lowest order and

  11. Adaptive Finite Element Methods in Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R.; Davies, H.; Hassan, O.; Morgan, K.; Nithiarasu, P.

    2006-12-01

    Adaptive finite element methods are presented for improving the quality of solutions to two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) convection dominated problems in geodynamics. The methods demonstrate the application of existing technology in the engineering community to problems within the `solid' Earth sciences. Two-Dimensional `Adaptive Remeshing': The `remeshing' strategy introduced in 2D adapts the mesh automatically around regions of high solution gradient, yielding enhanced resolution of the associated flow features. The approach requires the coupling of an automatic mesh generator, a finite element flow solver and an error estimator. In this study, the procedure is implemented in conjunction with the well-known geodynamical finite element code `ConMan'. An unstructured quadrilateral mesh generator is utilised, with mesh adaptation accomplished through regeneration. This regeneration employs information provided by an interpolation based local error estimator, obtained from the computed solution on an existing mesh. The technique is validated by solving thermal and thermo-chemical problems with known benchmark solutions. In a purely thermal context, results illustrate that the method is highly successful, improving solution accuracy whilst increasing computational efficiency. For thermo-chemical simulations the same conclusions can be drawn. However, results also demonstrate that the grid based methods employed for simulating the compositional field are not competitive with the other methods (tracer particle and marker chain) currently employed in this field, even at the higher spatial resolutions allowed by the adaptive grid strategies. Three-Dimensional Adaptive Multigrid: We extend the ideas from our 2D work into the 3D realm in the context of a pre-existing 3D-spherical mantle dynamics code, `TERRA'. In its original format, `TERRA' is computationally highly efficient since it employs a multigrid solver that depends upon a grid utilizing a clever

  12. Iterative methods for mixed finite element equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.; Nagtegaal, J. C.; Zienkiewicz, O. C.

    1985-01-01

    Iterative strategies for the solution of indefinite system of equations arising from the mixed finite element method are investigated in this paper with application to linear and nonlinear problems in solid and structural mechanics. The augmented Hu-Washizu form is derived, which is then utilized to construct a family of iterative algorithms using the displacement method as the preconditioner. Two types of iterative algorithms are implemented. Those are: constant metric iterations which does not involve the update of preconditioner; variable metric iterations, in which the inverse of the preconditioning matrix is updated. A series of numerical experiments is conducted to evaluate the numerical performance with application to linear and nonlinear model problems.

  13. Quantum algorithms and the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Ashley; Pallister, Sam

    2016-03-01

    The finite element method is used to approximately solve boundary value problems for differential equations. The method discretizes the parameter space and finds an approximate solution by solving a large system of linear equations. Here we investigate the extent to which the finite element method can be accelerated using an efficient quantum algorithm for solving linear equations. We consider the representative general question of approximately computing a linear functional of the solution to a boundary value problem and compare the quantum algorithm's theoretical performance with that of a standard classical algorithm—the conjugate gradient method. Prior work claimed that the quantum algorithm could be exponentially faster but did not determine the overall classical and quantum run times required to achieve a predetermined solution accuracy. Taking this into account, we find that the quantum algorithm can achieve a polynomial speedup, the extent of which grows with the dimension of the partial differential equation. In addition, we give evidence that no improvement of the quantum algorithm can lead to a superpolynomial speedup when the dimension is fixed and the solution satisfies certain smoothness properties.

  14. Mixed Finite Element Methods for Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taicher, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium so must carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. We present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, we present novel elements of lowest order and compatible with both Darcy and Stokes flow Finally, we present our 2D mixed FEM code result for solving Stokes and Darcy flow as well as the coupled Darcy-Stokes system the mid-ocean ridge or corner flow problem.

  15. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, W.

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  16. Improved finite-element methods for rotorcraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the research directed at improving finite-element methods for rotorcraft airframes is presented. The development of a modification to the finite element method which eliminates interelement discontinuities is covered. The following subject areas are discussed: geometric entities, interelement continuity, dependent rotational degrees of freedom, and adaptive numerical integration. This new methodology is being implemented as an anisotropic, curvilinear, p-version, beam, shell, and brick finite element program.

  17. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  18. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  19. Domain decomposition finite element/finite difference method for the conductivity reconstruction in a hyperbolic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilina, Larisa

    2016-08-01

    We present domain decomposition finite element/finite difference method for the solution of hyperbolic equation. The domain decomposition is performed such that finite elements and finite differences are used in different subdomains of the computational domain: finite difference method is used on the structured part of the computational domain and finite elements on the unstructured part of the domain. Explicit discretizations for both methods are constructed such that the finite element and the finite difference schemes coincide on the common structured overlapping layer between computational subdomains. Then the resulting approach can be considered as a pure finite element scheme which avoids instabilities at the interfaces. We derive an energy estimate for the underlying hyperbolic equation with absorbing boundary conditions and illustrate efficiency of the domain decomposition method on the reconstruction of the conductivity function in three dimensions.

  20. Modular Finite Element Methods Library Version: 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-06-22

    MFEM is a general, modular library for finite element methods. It provides a variety of finite element spaces and bilinear/linear forms in 2D and 3D. MFEM also includes classes for dealing with various types of meshes and their refinement.

  1. Application of the Finite Element Method to Rotary Wing Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element method for the spatial discretization of the dynamic equations of equilibrium governing rotary-wing aeroelastic problems is presented. Formulation of the finite element equations is based on weighted Galerkin residuals. This Galerkin finite element method reduces algebraic manipulative labor significantly, when compared to the application of the global Galerkin method in similar problems. The coupled flap-lag aeroelastic stability boundaries of hingeless helicopter rotor blades in hover are calculated. The linearized dynamic equations are reduced to the standard eigenvalue problem from which the aeroelastic stability boundaries are obtained. The convergence properties of the Galerkin finite element method are studied numerically by refining the discretization process. Results indicate that four or five elements suffice to capture the dynamics of the blade with the same accuracy as the global Galerkin method.

  2. Interpolation functions in the immersed boundary and finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy T.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we review the existing interpolation functions and introduce a finite element interpolation function to be used in the immersed boundary and finite element methods. This straightforward finite element interpolation function for unstructured grids enables us to obtain a sharper interface that yields more accurate interfacial solutions. The solution accuracy is compared with the existing interpolation functions such as the discretized Dirac delta function and the reproducing kernel interpolation function. The finite element shape function is easy to implement and it naturally satisfies the reproducing condition. They are interpolated through only one element layer instead of smearing to several elements. A pressure jump is clearly captured at the fluid-solid interface. Two example problems are studied and results are compared with other numerical methods. A convergence test is thoroughly conducted for the independent fluid and solid meshes in a fluid-structure interaction system. The required mesh size ratio between the fluid and solid domains is obtained.

  3. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  4. A comparative study of finite element and finite difference methods for Cauchy-Riemann type equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G. J.; Rose, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    A least squares formulation of the system divu = rho, curlu = zeta is surveyed from the viewpoint of both finite element and finite difference methods. Closely related arguments are shown to establish convergence estimates.

  5. Generalized multiscale finite element method. Symmetric interior penalty coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efendiev, Y.; Galvis, J.; Lazarov, R.; Moon, M.; Sarkis, M.

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by applications to numerical simulations of flows in highly heterogeneous porous media, we develop multiscale finite element methods for second order elliptic equations. We discuss a multiscale model reduction technique in the framework of the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. We propose two different finite element spaces on the coarse mesh. The first space is based on a local eigenvalue problem that uses an interior weighted L2-norm and a boundary weighted L2-norm for computing the “mass” matrix. The second choice is based on generation of a snapshot space and subsequent selection of a subspace of a reduced dimension. The approximation with these multiscale spaces is based on the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method framework. We investigate the stability and derive error estimates for the methods and further experimentally study their performance on a representative number of numerical examples.

  6. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  7. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Ross, Dan; Jin, J.-M.; Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Validated results are presented for the new 3D body of revolution finite element boundary integral code. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and mangnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and the exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the finite element mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that is leads to convolutional boundary operatores of low O(n) memory demand. Improvements of this code are discussed along with the proposed formulation for a full 3D implementation of the finite element boundary integral method in conjunction with a conjugate gradiant fast Fourier transformation (CGFFT) solution.

  8. Adaptive multiscale model reduction with Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric; Efendiev, Yalchin; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss a general multiscale model reduction framework based on multiscale finite element methods. We give a brief overview of related multiscale methods. Due to page limitations, the overview focuses on a few related methods and is not intended to be comprehensive. We present a general adaptive multiscale model reduction framework, the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method. Besides the method's basic outline, we discuss some important ingredients needed for the method's success. We also discuss several applications. The proposed method allows performing local model reduction in the presence of high contrast and no scale separation.

  9. Mathematical aspects of finite element methods for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Mathematical aspects of finite element methods are surveyed for incompressible viscous flows, concentrating on the steady primitive variable formulation. The discretization of a weak formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are addressed, then the stability condition is considered, the satisfaction of which insures the stability of the approximation. Specific choices of finite element spaces for the velocity and pressure are then discussed. Finally, the connection between different weak formulations and a variety of boundary conditions is explored.

  10. Finite Element Method for Capturing Ultra-relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, G. A.; Chung, T. J.

    2003-01-01

    While finite element methods are used extensively by researchers solving computational fluid dynamics in fields other than astrophysics, their use in astrophysical fluid simulations has been predominantly overlooked. Current simulations using other methods such as finite difference and finite volume (based on finite difference) have shown remarkable results, but these methods are limited by their fundamental properties in aspects that are important for simulations with complex geometries and widely varying spatial and temporal scale differences. We have explored the use of finite element methods for astrophysical fluids in order to establish the validity of using such methods in astrophysical environments. We present our numerical technique applied to solving ultra-relativistic (Lorentz Factor Gamma >> 1) shocks which are prevalent in astrophysical studies including relativistic jets and gamma-ray burst studies. We show our finite element formulation applied to simulations where the Lorentz factor ranges up to 2236 and demonstrate its stability in solving ultra-relativistic flows. Our numerical method is based on the Flowfield Dependent Variation (FDV) Method, unique in that numerical diffusion is derived from physical parameters rather than traditional artificial viscosity methods. Numerical instabilities account for most of the difficulties when capturing shocks in this regime. Our method results in stable solutions and accurate results as compared with other methods.

  11. Radiosity algorithms using higher order finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Troutman, R.; Max, N.

    1993-08-01

    Many of the current radiosity algorithms create a piecewise constant approximation to the actual radiosity. Through interpolation and extrapolation, a continuous solution is obtained. An accurate solution is found by increasing the number of patches which describe the scene. This has the effect of increasing the computation time as well as the memory requirements. By using techniques found in the finite element method, we can incorporate an interpolation function directly into our form factor computation. We can then use less elements to achieve a more accurate solution. Two algorithms, derived from the finite element method, are described and analyzed.

  12. Finite element methods for nonlinear elastostatic problems in rubber elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Miller, T. H.; Endo, T.; Pires, E. B.

    1983-01-01

    A number of finite element methods for the analysis of nonlinear problems in rubber elasticity are outlined. Several different finite element schemes are discussed. These include the augmented Lagrangian method, continuation or incremental loading methods, and associated Riks-type methods which have the capability of incorporating limit point behavior and bifurcations. Algorithms for the analysis of limit point behavior and bifurcations are described and the results of several numerical experiments are presented. In addition, a brief survey of some recent work on modelling contact and friction in elasticity problems is given. These results pertain to the use of new nonlocal and nonlinear friction laws.

  13. A weak Galerkin generalized multiscale finite element method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu

    2016-03-31

    In this study, we propose a general framework for weak Galerkin generalized multiscale (WG-GMS) finite element method for the elliptic problems with rapidly oscillating or high contrast coefficients. This general WG-GMS method features in high order accuracy on general meshes and can work with multiscale basis derived by different numerical schemes. A special case is studied under this WG-GMS framework in which the multiscale basis functions are obtained by solving local problem with the weak Galerkin finite element method. Convergence analysis and numerical experiments are obtained for the special case.

  14. Finite element method for eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, Fred B.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element method (FEM) has been a very powerful tool to solve many complex problems in electromagnetics. The goal of the current research at the Langley Research Center is to develop a combined FEM/method of moments approach to three-dimensional scattering/radiation problem for objects with arbitrary shape and filled with complex materials. As a first step toward that goal, an exercise is taken to establish the power of FEM, through closed boundary problems. This paper demonstrates the developed of FEM tools for two- and three-dimensional eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics. In section 2, both the scalar and vector finite elements have been used for various waveguide problems to demonstrate the flexibility of FEM. In section 3, vector finite element method has been extended to three-dimensional eigenvalue problems.

  15. Robust Hybrid Finite Element Methods for Antennas and Microwave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Volakis, John L.

    1996-01-01

    One of the primary goals in this dissertation is concerned with the development of robust hybrid finite element-boundary integral (FE-BI) techniques for modeling and design of conformal antennas of arbitrary shape. Both the finite element and integral equation methods will be first overviewed in this chapter with an emphasis on recently developed hybrid FE-BI methodologies for antennas, microwave and millimeter wave applications. The structure of the dissertation is then outlined. We conclude the chapter with discussions of certain fundamental concepts and methods in electromagnetics, which are important to this study.

  16. Adaptive finite-element method for diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Gang; Chen, Zhiming; Wu, Haijun

    2005-06-01

    A second-order finite-element adaptive strategy with error control for one-dimensional grating problems is developed. The unbounded computational domain is truncated to a bounded one by a perfectly-matched-layer (PML) technique. The PML parameters, such as the thickness of the layer and the medium properties, are determined through sharp a posteriori error estimates. The adaptive finite-element method is expected to increase significantly the accuracy and efficiency of the discretization as well as reduce the computation cost. Numerical experiments are included to illustrate the competitiveness of the proposed adaptive method.

  17. Electrical and Joule heating relationship investigation using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraju, S. K.; Munisamy, K. M.

    2015-09-01

    The finite element method is vastly used in material strength analysis. The nature of the finite element solver, which solves the Fourier equation of stress and strain analysis, made it possible to apply for conduction heat transfer Fourier Equation. Similarly the Current and voltage equation is also liner Fourier equation. The nature of the governing equation makes it possible to numerical investigate the electrical joule heating phenomena in electronic component. This paper highlights the Finite Element Method (FEM) application onto semiconductor interconnects to determine the specific contact resistance (SCR). Metal and semiconductor interconnects is used as model. The result confirms the possibility and validity of FEM utilization to investigate the Joule heating due electrical resistance.

  18. Spectral finite-element methods for parametric constrained optimization problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to approximate the solution mapping of parametric constrained optimization problems. The approximation, which is of the spectral finite element type, is represented as a linear combination of orthogonal polynomials. Its coefficients are determined by solving an appropriate finite-dimensional constrained optimization problem. We show that, under certain conditions, the latter problem is solvable because it is feasible for a sufficiently large degree of the polynomial approximation and has an objective function with bounded level sets. In addition, the solutions of the finite-dimensional problems converge for an increasing degree of the polynomials considered, provided that the solutions exhibit a sufficiently large and uniform degree of smoothness. Our approach solves, in the case of optimization problems with uncertain parameters, the most computationally intensive part of stochastic finite-element approaches. We demonstrate that our framework is applicable to parametric eigenvalue problems.

  19. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  20. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for gradient plasticity.

    SciTech Connect

    Garikipati, Krishna.; Ostien, Jakob T.

    2010-10-01

    In this report we apply discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods to the equations of an incompatibility based formulation of gradient plasticity. The presentation is motivated with a brief overview of the description of dislocations within a crystal lattice. A tensor representing a measure of the incompatibility with the lattice is used in the formulation of a gradient plasticity model. This model is cast in a variational formulation, and discontinuous Galerkin machinery is employed to implement the formulation into a finite element code. Finally numerical examples of the model are shown.

  1. Spanwise variation of potential form drag. [finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clever, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The finite element method is used to calculate the spanwise variation of potential form drag of a wing at subsonic and supersonic speeds using linearly varying panels. The wing may be of arbitrary planform and nonplanar provided the wing panels are parallel to the aircraft axis.

  2. An Efficient Vector Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; White, D A; Rodrigue, G H

    2006-06-27

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with a nonlinear polarization term. The method allows for discretization of complicated geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields. In this paper we will describe the method and a series of optimizations that significantly reduce the computational cost. Additionally, a series of test simulations will be presented to validate the method. Finally, a nonlinear waveguide mode mixing example is presented and discussed.

  3. PWSCC Assessment by Using Extended Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Jun; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Chang, Yoon-Suk

    2015-12-01

    The head penetration nozzle of control rod driving mechanism (CRDM) is known to be susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) due to the welding-induced residual stress. Especially, the J-groove dissimilar metal weld regions have received many attentions in the previous studies. However, even though several advanced techniques such as weight function and finite element alternating methods have been introduced to predict the occurrence of PWSCC, there are still difficulties in respect of applicability and efficiency. In this study, the extended finite element method (XFEM), which allows convenient crack element modeling by enriching degree of freedom (DOF) with special displacement function, was employed to evaluate structural integrity of the CRDM head penetration nozzle. The resulting stress intensity factors of surface cracks were verified for the reliability of proposed method through the comparison with those suggested in the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) code. The detailed results from the FE analyses are fully discussed in the manuscript.

  4. Implicit extrapolation methods for multilevel finite element computations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Ruede, U.

    1994-12-31

    The finite element package FEMGP has been developed to solve elliptic and parabolic problems arising in the computation of magnetic and thermomechanical fields. FEMGP implements various methods for the construction of hierarchical finite element meshes, a variety of efficient multilevel solvers, including multigrid and preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations, as well as pre- and post-processing software. Within FEMGP, multigrid {tau}-extrapolation can be employed to improve the finite element solution iteratively to higher order. This algorithm is based on an implicit extrapolation, so that the algorithm differs from a regular multigrid algorithm only by a slightly modified computation of the residuals on the finest mesh. Another advantage of this technique is, that in contrast to explicit extrapolation methods, it does not rely on the existence of global error expansions, and therefore neither requires uniform meshes nor global regularity assumptions. In the paper the authors will analyse the {tau}-extrapolation algorithm and present experimental results in the context of the FEMGP package. Furthermore, the {tau}-extrapolation results will be compared to higher order finite element solutions.

  5. Parallel, adaptive finite element methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Devine, Karen D.; Flaherty, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    We construct parallel finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. A posteriori estimates of spatial errors are obtained by a p-refinement technique using superconvergence at Radau points. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We compare results using different limiting schemes and demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on an NCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive h- and p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method.

  6. The finite element method: Is weighted volume integration essential?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    In developing finite element equations for steady state and transient diffusion-type processes, weighted volume integration is generally assumed to be an intrinsic requirement. It is shown that such finite element equations can be developed directly and with ease on the basis of the elementary notion of a surface integral. Although weighted volume integration is mathematically correct, the algebraic equations stemming from it are no more informative than those derived directly on the basis of a surface integral. An interesting upshot is that the derivation based on surface integration does not require knowledge of a partial differential equation but yet is logically rigorous. It is commonly stated that weighted volume integration of the differential equation helps one carry out analyses of errors, convergence and existence, and therefore, weighted volume integration is preferable. It is suggested that because the direct derivation is logically consistent, numerical solutions emanating from it must be testable for accuracy and internal consistency in ways that the style of which may differ from the classical procedures of error- and convergence-analysis. In addition to simplifying the teaching of the finite element method, the thoughts presented in this paper may lead to establishing the finite element method independently in its own right, rather than it being a surrogate of the differential equation. The purpose of this paper is not to espouse any one particular way of formulating the finite element equations. Rather, it is one of introspection. The desire is to critically examine our traditional way of doing things and inquire whether alternate approaches may reveal to us new and interesting insights.

  7. Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Parabolic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Hideaki; Bey, Kim S.; Hou, Gene J. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a time and its corresponding spatial discretization scheme, based upon the assumption of a certain weak singularity of parallel ut(t) parallel Lz(omega) = parallel ut parallel2, for the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for one-dimensional parabolic problems. Optimal convergence rates in both time and spatial variables are obtained. A discussion of automatic time-step control method is also included.

  8. [Whiplash injury analysis of cervical vertebra by finite element method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Li, Zheng-Dong; Shao, Yu; Chen, Yi-Jiu

    2015-02-01

    Finite element method (FEM) is an effective mathematical method for stress analysis, and has been gradually applied in the study of biomechanics of human body structures. This paper reviews the construction, development, materials assignment and verification of FEM model of cervical vertebra, and it also states the research results of injury mechanism of whiplash injury and biomechanical response analysis of the cervical vertebra using FEM by researchers at home and abroad. PMID:26058135

  9. The finite element method for calculating the marine structural design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, A.; Ticu, I.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimally design and dimension marine structures in order for them to fulfil both functional and safety requirements. A master level of structural mechanics is vital in order to check tests and analysis and to develop new structures. This study can improve the calculation and estimation of the effects of hydrodynamics and of other loads; movements, strains and internal forces in fixed and floating platforms and ships. The finite element method (FEM) ensures basic understanding of the finite element model as applied on static cases including beam and plate elements, experience with static analysis of marine structures like platforms and ships, along with the basic understanding of dynamic response of systems with one degree of freedom and simple continuous beams, and also how analysis models can be established for real structures by the use of generalized coordinates and superposition.

  10. Phased array antenna analysis using hybrid finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Daniel T.

    1993-06-01

    This research in computational electromagnetics developed a new method for predicting the near-field mutual coupling effects in phased array antennas, using the finite element method (FEM) in combination with integral equations. Accurate feed modeling is accomplished by enforcing continuity between the FEM solution and an arbitrary number of wave guide models across a ground plane aperture. A periodic integral equation is imposed above the antenna's physical structure in order to enforce the radiation condition and to confine the analysis to an array unit cell. The electric field is expanded in terms of vector finite elements, and Galerkin's method is used to write the problem as a matrix equation. A general-purpose computer code was developed and validated by comparing its results to published data for several array types. Its versatility was demonstrated with predictions of the scanning properties of arrays of printed dipoles and printed flared notches.

  11. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  12. Least-squares finite element method for fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of new developments of the least squares finite element method (LSFEM) in fluid dynamics. Special emphasis is placed on the universality of LSFEM; the symmetry and positiveness of the algebraic systems obtained from LSFEM; the accommodation of LSFEM to equal order interpolations for incompressible viscous flows; and the natural numerical dissipation of LSFEM for convective transport problems and high speed compressible flows. The performance of LSFEM is illustrated by numerical examples.

  13. Material nonlinear analysis via mixed-iterative finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is examined through a set of convergence studies. Membrane and bending behaviors are tested using 4-node quadrilateral finite elements. The membrane result is excellent, which indicates the implementation of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is appropriate. On the other hand, further research to improve bending performance of the method seems to be warranted.

  14. Application of Finite Element Method to Analyze Inflatable Waveguide Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine propagation characteristics of deformed inflatable rectangular waveguide. Various deformations that might be present in an inflatable waveguide are analyzed using the FEM. The FEM procedure and the code developed here are so general that they can be used for any other deformations that are not considered in this report. The code is validated by applying the present code to rectangular waveguide without any deformations and comparing the numerical results with earlier published results.

  15. Hybrid finite element-finite difference method for thermal analysis of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C H; Gutierrez, G; White, J A; Roemer, R B

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid finite-difference/finite-element technique for the thermal analysis of blood vessels embedded in perfused tissue has been developed and evaluated. This method provides efficient and accurate solutions to the conjugated heat transfer problem of convection by blood coupled to conduction in the tissue. The technique uses a previously developed 3D automatic meshing method for creating a finite element mesh in the tissue surrounding the vessels, coupled iteratively with a 1-D marching finite difference method for the interior of the vessels. This hybrid technique retains the flexibility and ease of automated finite-element meshing techniques for modelling the complex geometry of blood vessels and irregularly shaped tissues, and speeds the solution time by using a simple finite-difference method to calculate the bulk mean temperatures within all blood vessels. The use of the 1D finite-difference technique in the blood vessels also eliminates the large computer memory requirements needed to accurately solve large vessel network problems when fine FE meshes are used in the interior of vessels. The accuracy of the hybrid technique has been verified against previously verified numerical solutions. In summary, the hybrid technique combines the accuracy and flexibility found in automated finite-element techniques, with the speed and reduction of computational memory requirements associated with the 1D finite-difference technique, something which has not been done before. This method, thus, has the potential to provide accurate, flexible and relatively fast solutions for the thermal analysis of coupled perfusion/blood vessel problems, and large vessel network problems. PMID:10949130

  16. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  17. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  18. Weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  19. Crystal level simulations using Eulerian finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Barton, N R; Benson, D J

    2004-02-06

    Over the last several years, significant progress has been made in the use of crystal level material models in simulations of forming operations. However, in Lagrangian finite element approaches simulation capabilities are limited in many cases by mesh distortion associated with deformation heterogeneity. Contexts in which such large distortions arise include: bulk deformation to strains approaching or exceeding unity, especially in highly anisotropic or multiphase materials; shear band formation and intersection of shear bands; and indentation with sharp indenters. Investigators have in the past used Eulerian finite element methods with material response determined from crystal aggregates to study steady state forming processes. However, Eulerian and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element methods have not been widely utilized for simulation of transient deformation processes at the crystal level. The advection schemes used in Eulerian and ALE codes control mesh distortion and allow for simulation of much larger total deformations. We will discuss material state representation issues related to advection and will present results from ALE simulations.

  20. The Mimetic Finite Element Method and the Virtual Element Method for elliptic problems with arbitrary regularity.

    SciTech Connect

    Manzini, Gianmarco

    2012-07-13

    We develop and analyze a new family of virtual element methods on unstructured polygonal meshes for the diffusion problem in primal form, that use arbitrarily regular discrete spaces V{sub h} {contained_in} C{sup {alpha}} {element_of} N. The degrees of freedom are (a) solution and derivative values of various degree at suitable nodes and (b) solution moments inside polygons. The convergence of the method is proven theoretically and an optimal error estimate is derived. The connection with the Mimetic Finite Difference method is also discussed. Numerical experiments confirm the convergence rate that is expected from the theory.

  1. Efficient finite element method for grating profile reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruming; Sun, Jiguang

    2015-12-01

    This paper concerns the reconstruction of grating profiles from scattering data. The inverse problem is formulated as an optimization problem with a regularization term. We devise an efficient finite element method (FEM) and employ a quasi-Newton method to solve it. For the direct problems, the FEM stiff and mass matrices are assembled once at the beginning of the numerical procedure. Then only minor changes are made to the mass matrix at each iteration, which significantly saves the computation cost. Numerical examples show that the method is effective and robust.

  2. Analysis of Waveguide Junction Discontinuities Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.

    1997-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine reflection and transmission coefficients of rectangular waveguide junction discontinuities. An H-plane discontinuity, an E-plane ridge discontinuity, and a step discontinuity in a concentric rectangular waveguide junction are analyzed using the FEM procedure. Also, reflection and transmission coefficients due to presence of a gap between two sections of a rectangular waveguide are determined using the FEM. The numerical results obtained by the present method are in excellent agreement with the earlier published results. The numerical results obtained by the FEM are compared with the numerical results obtained using the Mode Matching Method (MMM) and also with the measured data.

  3. Dual Formulations of Mixed Finite Element Methods with Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, Andrew; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2011-01-01

    Mixed finite element methods solve a PDE using two or more variables. The theory of Discrete Exterior Calculus explains why the degrees of freedom associated to the different variables should be stored on both primal and dual domain meshes with a discrete Hodge star used to transfer information between the meshes. We show through analysis and examples that the choice of discrete Hodge star is essential to the numerical stability of the method. Additionally, we define interpolation functions and discrete Hodge stars on dual meshes which can be used to create previously unconsidered mixed methods. Examples from magnetostatics and Darcy flow are examined in detail. PMID:21984841

  4. Least-squares finite element methods for quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelsen, Christian; Brannick, J; Manteuffel, T; Mccormick, S

    2008-01-01

    A significant amount of the computational time in large Monte Carlo simulations of lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is spent inverting the discrete Dirac operator. Unfortunately, traditional covariant finite difference discretizations of the Dirac operator present serious challenges for standard iterative methods. For interesting physical parameters, the discretized operator is large and ill-conditioned, and has random coefficients. More recently, adaptive algebraic multigrid (AMG) methods have been shown to be effective preconditioners for Wilson's discretization of the Dirac equation. This paper presents an alternate discretization of the Dirac operator based on least-squares finite elements. The discretization is systematically developed and physical properties of the resulting matrix system are discussed. Finally, numerical experiments are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of adaptive smoothed aggregation ({alpha}SA ) multigrid as a preconditioner for the discrete field equations resulting from applying the proposed least-squares FE formulation to a simplified test problem, the 2d Schwinger model of quantum electrodynamics.

  5. Turbomachinery flow calculation on unstructured grids using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koschel, W.; Vornberger, A.

    An explicit finite-element scheme based on a two-step Taylor-Galerkin algorithm allows the solution of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids. Mesh generation methods for unstructured grids are described which lead to efficient flow calculations. Turbulent flow is calculated by using an algebraic turbulence model. To test the numerical accuracy, a laminar and turbulent flow over a flat plate and the supersonic flow in a corner has been calculated. For validation the method is applied to the simulation of the inviscid flow through a transonic turbine cascade and the viscous flow through a subsonic turbine cascade.

  6. Hybrid finite element and Brownian dynamics method for charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Gary A.; Miao, Yinglong; Zhou, Shenggao; Li, Bo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Diffusion is often the rate-determining step in many biological processes. Currently, the two main computational methods for studying diffusion are stochastic methods, such as Brownian dynamics, and continuum methods, such as the finite element method. A previous study introduced a new hybrid diffusion method that couples the strengths of each of these two methods, but was limited by the lack of interactions among the particles; the force on each particle had to be from an external field. This study further develops the method to allow charged particles. The method is derived for a general multidimensional system and is presented using a basic test case for a one-dimensional linear system with one charged species and a radially symmetric system with three charged species.

  7. A comparison of the finite difference and finite element methods for heat transfer calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Mortazavi, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The finite difference method and finite element method for heat transfer calculations are compared by describing their bases and their application to some common heat transfer problems. In general it is noted that neither method is clearly superior, and in many instances, the choice is quite arbitrary and depends more upon the codes available and upon the personal preference of the analyst than upon any well defined advantages of one method. Classes of problems for which one method or the other is better suited are defined.

  8. Finite-element methods for spatially resolved mesoscopic electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    A finite-element method is presented for calculating the quantum conductance of mesoscopic two-dimensional electron devices of complex geometry attached to semi-infinite leads. For computational purposes, the leads must be cut off at some finite length. To avoid spurious, unphysical reflections, this is modeled by transparent boundary conditions. We introduce the Hardy space infinite-element technique from acoustic scattering as a way of setting up transparent boundary conditions for transport computations spanning the range from the quantum mechanical to the quasiclassical regime. These boundary conditions are exact even for wave packets and thus are especially useful in the limit of high energies with many excited modes. Yet, they possess a memory-friendly sparse matrix representation. In addition to unbounded domains, Hardy space elements allow us to truncate those parts of the computational domain which are irrelevant for the calculation of the transport properties. Thus, the computation can be done only on the region that is essential for a physically meaningful simulation of the scattering states. The benefits of the method are demonstrated by three examples. The convergence properties are tested on the transport through a quasi-one-dimensional quantum wire. It is shown that higher-order finite elements considerably improve current conservation and establish the correct phase shift between the real and the imaginary parts of the electron wave function. The Aharonov-Bohm effect demonstrates that characteristic features of quantum interference can be assessed. A simulation of electron magnetic focusing exemplifies the capability of the computational framework to study the crossover from quantum to quasiclassical behavior.

  9. Simulating Space Capsule Water Landing with Explicit Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2007-01-01

    A study of using an explicit nonlinear dynamic finite element code for simulating the water landing of a space capsule was performed. The finite element model contains Lagrangian shell elements for the space capsule and Eulerian solid elements for the water and air. An Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) solver and a penalty coupling method were used for predicting the fluid and structure interaction forces. The space capsule was first assumed to be rigid, so the numerical results could be correlated with closed form solutions. The water and air meshes were continuously refined until the solution was converged. The converged maximum deceleration predicted is bounded by the classical von Karman and Wagner solutions and is considered to be an adequate solution. The refined water and air meshes were then used in the models for simulating the water landing of a capsule model that has a flexible bottom. For small pitch angle cases, the maximum deceleration from the flexible capsule model was found to be significantly greater than the maximum deceleration obtained from the corresponding rigid model. For large pitch angle cases, the difference between the maximum deceleration of the flexible model and that of its corresponding rigid model is smaller. Test data of Apollo space capsules with a flexible heat shield qualitatively support the findings presented in this paper.

  10. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  11. Scientific use of the finite element method in Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Knop, Luegya; Gandini, Luiz Gonzaga; Shintcovsk, Ricardo Lima; Gandini, Marcia Regina Elisa Aparecida Schiavon

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The finite element method (FEM) is an engineering resource applied to calculate the stress and deformation of complex structures, and has been widely used in orthodontic research. With the advantage of being a non-invasive and accurate method that provides quantitative and detailed data on the physiological reactions possible to occur in tissues, applying the FEM can anticipate the visualization of these tissue responses through the observation of areas of stress created from applied orthodontic mechanics. OBJECTIVE: This article aims at reviewing and discussing the stages of the finite element method application and its applicability in Orthodontics. RESULTS: FEM is able to evaluate the stress distribution at the interface between periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and the shifting trend in various types of tooth movement when using different types of orthodontic devices. Therefore, it is necessary to know specific software for this purpose. CONCLUSIONS: FEM is an important experimental method to answer questions about tooth movement, overcoming the disadvantages of other experimental methods. PMID:25992996

  12. Large-eddy simulation using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Gresho, P.M.; Leone, J.M. Jr.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-10-01

    In a large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows, the large-scale motion is calculated explicitly (i.e., approximated with semi-empirical relations). Typically, finite difference or spectral numerical schemes are used to generate an LES; the use of finite element methods (FEM) has been far less prominent. In this study, we demonstrate that FEM in combination with LES provides a viable tool for the study of turbulent, separating channel flows, specifically the flow over a two-dimensional backward-facing step. The combination of these methodologies brings together the advantages of each: LES provides a high degree of accuracy with a minimum of empiricism for turbulence modeling and FEM provides a robust way to simulate flow in very complex domains of practical interest. Such a combination should prove very valuable to the engineering community.

  13. Seakeeping with the semi-Lagrangian particle finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadukandi, Prashanth; Servan-Camas, Borja; Becker, Pablo Agustín; Garcia-Espinosa, Julio

    2016-07-01

    The application of the semi-Lagrangian particle finite element method (SL-PFEM) for the seakeeping simulation of the wave adaptive modular vehicle under spray generating conditions is presented. The time integration of the Lagrangian advection is done using the explicit integration of the velocity and acceleration along the streamlines (X-IVAS). Despite the suitability of the SL-PFEM for the considered seakeeping application, small time steps were needed in the X-IVAS scheme to control the solution accuracy. A preliminary proposal to overcome this limitation of the X-IVAS scheme for seakeeping simulations is presented.

  14. Modeling of coal stockpiles using a finite elements method

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdeniz, A.H.; Sensogut, C.

    2008-07-01

    In the case of coal stockpiles finding suitable environmental conditions, spontaneous combustion phenomenon will be unavoidable. In this study, an industrial-sized stockpile having a shape of triangle prism was constituted in a coal stockyard of Western Lignite Corporation (WLC), Turkey. The parameters of time, humidity and temperature of air, atmospheric pressure, velocity and direction of wind values that are effective on coal stockpile were measured in a continuous manner. These experimental works were transferred into a computer media in order to obtain similar outcomes by carrying out 2-dimensional analysis of the stockpile with Finite Elements Method (FEM). The performed experimental studies and obtained results were then compared.

  15. Immersed finite element method and its applications to biological systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wing Kam; Liu, Yaling; Farrell, David; Zhang, Lucy; Wang, X Sheldon; Fukui, Yoshio; Patankar, Neelesh; Zhang, Yongjie; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Lee, Junghoon; Hong, Juhee; Chen, Xinyu; Hsu, Huayi

    2006-02-15

    This paper summarizes the newly developed immersed finite element method (IFEM) and its applications to the modeling of biological systems. This work was inspired by the pioneering work of Professor T.J.R. Hughes in solving fluid-structure interaction problems. In IFEM, a Lagrangian solid mesh moves on top of a background Eulerian fluid mesh which spans the entire computational domain. Hence, mesh generation is greatly simplified. Moreover, both fluid and solid domains are modeled with the finite element method and the continuity between the fluid and solid subdomains is enforced via the interpolation of the velocities and the distribution of the forces with the reproducing Kernel particle method (RKPM) delta function. The proposed method is used to study the fluid-structure interaction problems encountered in human cardiovascular systems. Currently, the heart modeling is being constructed and the deployment process of an angioplasty stent has been simulated. Some preliminary results on monocyte and platelet deposition are presented. Blood rheology, in particular, the shear-rate dependent de-aggregation of red blood cell (RBC) clusters and the transport of deformable cells, are modeled. Furthermore, IFEM is combined with electrokinetics to study the mechanisms of nano/bio filament assembly for the understanding of cell motility. PMID:20200602

  16. The mixed finite element multigrid method for stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Muzhinji, K; Shateyi, S; Motsa, S S

    2015-01-01

    The stable finite element discretization of the Stokes problem produces a symmetric indefinite system of linear algebraic equations. A variety of iterative solvers have been proposed for such systems in an attempt to construct efficient, fast, and robust solution techniques. This paper investigates one of such iterative solvers, the geometric multigrid solver, to find the approximate solution of the indefinite systems. The main ingredient of the multigrid method is the choice of an appropriate smoothing strategy. This study considers the application of different smoothers and compares their effects in the overall performance of the multigrid solver. We study the multigrid method with the following smoothers: distributed Gauss Seidel, inexact Uzawa, preconditioned MINRES, and Braess-Sarazin type smoothers. A comparative study of the smoothers shows that the Braess-Sarazin smoothers enhance good performance of the multigrid method. We study the problem in a two-dimensional domain using stable Hood-Taylor Q2-Q1 pair of finite rectangular elements. We also give the main theoretical convergence results. We present the numerical results to demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the multigrid method and confirm the theoretical results. PMID:25945361

  17. Immersed finite element method and its applications to biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wing Kam; Liu, Yaling; Farrell, David; Zhang, Lucy; Wang, X. Sheldon; Fukui, Yoshio; Patankar, Neelesh; Zhang, Yongjie; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Lee, Junghoon; Hong, Juhee; Chen, Xinyu; Hsu, Huayi

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the newly developed immersed finite element method (IFEM) and its applications to the modeling of biological systems. This work was inspired by the pioneering work of Professor T.J.R. Hughes in solving fluid–structure interaction problems. In IFEM, a Lagrangian solid mesh moves on top of a background Eulerian fluid mesh which spans the entire computational domain. Hence, mesh generation is greatly simplified. Moreover, both fluid and solid domains are modeled with the finite element method and the continuity between the fluid and solid subdomains is enforced via the interpolation of the velocities and the distribution of the forces with the reproducing Kernel particle method (RKPM) delta function. The proposed method is used to study the fluid–structure interaction problems encountered in human cardiovascular systems. Currently, the heart modeling is being constructed and the deployment process of an angioplasty stent has been simulated. Some preliminary results on monocyte and platelet deposition are presented. Blood rheology, in particular, the shear-rate dependent de-aggregation of red blood cell (RBC) clusters and the transport of deformable cells, are modeled. Furthermore, IFEM is combined with electrokinetics to study the mechanisms of nano/bio filament assembly for the understanding of cell motility. PMID:20200602

  18. The Mixed Finite Element Multigrid Method for Stokes Equations

    PubMed Central

    Muzhinji, K.; Shateyi, S.; Motsa, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    The stable finite element discretization of the Stokes problem produces a symmetric indefinite system of linear algebraic equations. A variety of iterative solvers have been proposed for such systems in an attempt to construct efficient, fast, and robust solution techniques. This paper investigates one of such iterative solvers, the geometric multigrid solver, to find the approximate solution of the indefinite systems. The main ingredient of the multigrid method is the choice of an appropriate smoothing strategy. This study considers the application of different smoothers and compares their effects in the overall performance of the multigrid solver. We study the multigrid method with the following smoothers: distributed Gauss Seidel, inexact Uzawa, preconditioned MINRES, and Braess-Sarazin type smoothers. A comparative study of the smoothers shows that the Braess-Sarazin smoothers enhance good performance of the multigrid method. We study the problem in a two-dimensional domain using stable Hood-Taylor Q2-Q1 pair of finite rectangular elements. We also give the main theoretical convergence results. We present the numerical results to demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the multigrid method and confirm the theoretical results. PMID:25945361

  19. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  20. Accurate optical CD profiler based on specialized finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrero, Jesus; Perçin, Gökhan

    2012-03-01

    As the semiconductor industry is moving to very low-k1 patterning solutions, the metrology problems facing process engineers are becoming much more complex. Choosing the right optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology technique is essential for bridging the metrology gap and achieving the required manufacturing volume throughput. The critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) measurement is usually distorted by the high aspect ratio of the photoresist and hard mask layers. CD-SEM measurements cease to correlate with complex three-dimensional profiles, such as the cases for double patterning and FinFETs, thus necessitating sophisticated, accurate and fast computational methods to bridge the gap. In this work, a suite of computational methods that complement advanced OCD equipment, and enabling them to operate at higher accuracies, are developed. In this article, a novel method for accurately modeling OCD profiles is presented. A finite element formulation in primal form is used to discretize the equations. The implementation uses specialized finite element spaces to solve Maxwell equations in two dimensions.

  1. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  2. High-order finite element methods for cardiac monodomain simulations.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Kevin P; Gonzales, Matthew J; Gillette, Andrew K; Villongco, Christopher T; Pezzuto, Simone; Omens, Jeffrey H; Holst, Michael J; McCulloch, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling of tissue-scale cardiac electrophysiology requires numerically converged solutions to avoid spurious artifacts. The steep gradients inherent to cardiac action potential propagation necessitate fine spatial scales and therefore a substantial computational burden. The use of high-order interpolation methods has previously been proposed for these simulations due to their theoretical convergence advantage. In this study, we compare the convergence behavior of linear Lagrange, cubic Hermite, and the newly proposed cubic Hermite-style serendipity interpolation methods for finite element simulations of the cardiac monodomain equation. The high-order methods reach converged solutions with fewer degrees of freedom and longer element edge lengths than traditional linear elements. Additionally, we propose a dimensionless number, the cell Thiele modulus, as a more useful metric for determining solution convergence than element size alone. Finally, we use the cell Thiele modulus to examine convergence criteria for obtaining clinically useful activation patterns for applications such as patient-specific modeling where the total activation time is known a priori. PMID:26300783

  3. High-order finite element methods for cardiac monodomain simulations

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kevin P.; Gonzales, Matthew J.; Gillette, Andrew K.; Villongco, Christopher T.; Pezzuto, Simone; Omens, Jeffrey H.; Holst, Michael J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling of tissue-scale cardiac electrophysiology requires numerically converged solutions to avoid spurious artifacts. The steep gradients inherent to cardiac action potential propagation necessitate fine spatial scales and therefore a substantial computational burden. The use of high-order interpolation methods has previously been proposed for these simulations due to their theoretical convergence advantage. In this study, we compare the convergence behavior of linear Lagrange, cubic Hermite, and the newly proposed cubic Hermite-style serendipity interpolation methods for finite element simulations of the cardiac monodomain equation. The high-order methods reach converged solutions with fewer degrees of freedom and longer element edge lengths than traditional linear elements. Additionally, we propose a dimensionless number, the cell Thiele modulus, as a more useful metric for determining solution convergence than element size alone. Finally, we use the cell Thiele modulus to examine convergence criteria for obtaining clinically useful activation patterns for applications such as patient-specific modeling where the total activation time is known a priori. PMID:26300783

  4. Finite-size scaling for quantum criticality using the finite-element method.

    PubMed

    Antillon, Edwin; Wehefritz-Kaufmann, Birgit; Kais, Sabre

    2012-03-01

    Finite size scaling for the Schrödinger equation is a systematic approach to calculate the quantum critical parameters for a given Hamiltonian. This approach has been shown to give very accurate results for critical parameters by using a systematic expansion with global basis-type functions. Recently, the finite-element method was shown to be a powerful numerical method for ab initio electronic-structure calculations with a variable real-space resolution. In this work, we demonstrate how to obtain quantum critical parameters by combining the finite-element method (FEM) with finite size scaling (FSS) using different ab initio approximations and exact formulations. The critical parameters could be atomic nuclear charges, internuclear distances, electron density, disorder, lattice structure, and external fields for stability of atomic, molecular systems and quantum phase transitions of extended systems. To illustrate the effectiveness of this approach we provide detailed calculations of applying FEM to approximate solutions for the two-electron atom with varying nuclear charge; these include Hartree-Fock, local density approximation, and an "exact" formulation using FEM. We then use the FSS approach to determine its critical nuclear charge for stability; here, the size of the system is related to the number of elements used in the calculations. Results prove to be in good agreement with previous Slater-basis set calculations and demonstrate that it is possible to combine finite size scaling with the finite-element method by using ab initio calculations to obtain quantum critical parameters. The combined approach provides a promising first-principles approach to describe quantum phase transitions for materials and extended systems. PMID:22587208

  5. Finite-size scaling for quantum criticality using the finite-element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antillon, Edwin; Wehefritz-Kaufmann, Birgit; Kais, Sabre

    2012-03-01

    Finite size scaling for the Schrödinger equation is a systematic approach to calculate the quantum critical parameters for a given Hamiltonian. This approach has been shown to give very accurate results for critical parameters by using a systematic expansion with global basis-type functions. Recently, the finite-element method was shown to be a powerful numerical method for ab initio electronic-structure calculations with a variable real-space resolution. In this work, we demonstrate how to obtain quantum critical parameters by combining the finite-element method (FEM) with finite size scaling (FSS) using different ab initio approximations and exact formulations. The critical parameters could be atomic nuclear charges, internuclear distances, electron density, disorder, lattice structure, and external fields for stability of atomic, molecular systems and quantum phase transitions of extended systems. To illustrate the effectiveness of this approach we provide detailed calculations of applying FEM to approximate solutions for the two-electron atom with varying nuclear charge; these include Hartree-Fock, local density approximation, and an “exact” formulation using FEM. We then use the FSS approach to determine its critical nuclear charge for stability; here, the size of the system is related to the number of elements used in the calculations. Results prove to be in good agreement with previous Slater-basis set calculations and demonstrate that it is possible to combine finite size scaling with the finite-element method by using ab initio calculations to obtain quantum critical parameters. The combined approach provides a promising first-principles approach to describe quantum phase transitions for materials and extended systems.

  6. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Zapp, John; Hsa, Chang-Yu; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    An extension of a two dimensional formulation is presented for a three dimensional body of revolution. With the introduction of a Fourier expansion of the vector electric and magnetic fields, a coupled two dimensional system is generated and solved via the finite element method. An exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the mesh and the fast fourier transformation (FFT) is used to evaluate the boundary integrals for low O(n) memory demand when an iterative solution algorithm is used. By virtue of the finite element method, the algorithm is applicable to structures of arbitrary material composition. Several improvements to the two dimensional algorithm are also described. These include: (1) modifications for terminating the mesh at circular boundaries without distorting the convolutionality of the boundary integrals; (2) the development of nonproprietary mesh generation routines for two dimensional applications; (3) the development of preprocessors for interfacing SDRC IDEAS with the main algorithm; and (4) the development of post-processing algorithms based on the public domain package GRAFIC to generate two and three dimensional gray level and color field maps.

  7. An analytically enriched finite element method for cohesive crack modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, James V.

    2010-04-01

    Meaningful computational investigations of many solid mechanics problems require accurate characterization of material behavior through failure. A recent approach to fracture modeling has combined the partition of unity finite element method (PUFEM) with cohesive zone models. Extension of the PUFEM to address crack propagation is often referred to as the extended finite element method (XFEM). In the PUFEM, the displacement field is enriched to improve the local approximation. Most XFEM studies have used simplified enrichment functions (e.g., generalized Heaviside functions) to represent the strong discontinuity but have lacked an analytical basis to represent the displacement gradients in the vicinity of the cohesive crack. As such, the mesh had to be sufficiently fine for the FEM basis functions to capture these gradients.In this study enrichment functions based upon two analytical investigations of the cohesive crack problem are examined. These functions have the potential of representing displacement gradients in the vicinity of the cohesive crack with a relatively coarse mesh and allow the crack to incrementally advance across each element. Key aspects of the corresponding numerical formulation are summarized. Analysis results for simple model problems are presented to evaluate if quasi-static crack propagation can be accurately followed with the proposed formulation. A standard finite element solution with interface elements is used to provide the accurate reference solution, so the model problems are limited to a straight, mode I crack in plane stress. Except for the cohesive zone, the material model for the problems is homogenous, isotropic linear elasticity. The effects of mesh refinement, mesh orientation, and enrichment schemes that enrich a larger region around the cohesive crack are considered in the study. Propagation of the cohesive zone tip and crack tip, time variation of the cohesive zone length, and crack profiles are presented. The analysis

  8. Numerical Analysis of a Finite Element/Volume Penalty Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maury, Bertrand

    The penalty method makes it possible to incorporate a large class of constraints in general purpose Finite Element solvers like freeFEM++. We present here some contributions to the numerical analysis of this method. We propose an abstract framework for this approach, together with some general error estimates based on the discretization parameter ɛ and the space discretization parameter h. As this work is motivated by the possibility to handle constraints like rigid motion for fluid-particle flows, we shall pay a special attention to a model problem of this kind, where the constraint is prescribed over a subdomain. We show how the abstract estimate can be applied to this situation, in the case where a non-body-fitted mesh is used. In addition, we describe how this method provides an approximation of the Lagrange multiplier associated to the constraint.

  9. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  10. Modelling the core convection using finite element and finite difference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. H.; Li, Ligang; Liao, Xinhao

    2006-08-01

    Applications of both parallel finite element and finite difference methods to thermal convection in a rotating spherical shell modelling the fluid dynamics of the Earth's outer core are presented. The numerical schemes are verified by reproducing the convection benchmark test by Christensen et al. [Christensen, U.R., Aubert, J., Cardin, P., Dormy, E., Gibbons, S., Glatzmaier, G.A., Grote, E., Honkura, Y., Jones, C., Kono, M., Matsushima, M., Sakuraba, A., Takahashi, F., Tilgner, A., Wilcht, J., Zhang, K., 2001. A numerical dynamo benchmark. Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors 128, 25-34.]. Both global average and local characteristics agree satisfactorily with the benchmark solution. With the element-by-element (EBE) parallelization technique, the finite element code demonstrates nearly optimal linear scalability in computational speed. The finite difference code is also efficient and scalable by utilizing a parallel library Aztec [Tuminaro, R.S., Heroux, M., Hutchinson, S.A., Shadid, J.N., 1999. Official AZTEC User's Guide: Version 2.1.].

  11. Nonlinear analysis of structures. [within framework of finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armen, H., Jr.; Levine, H.; Pifko, A.; Levy, A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of nonlinear analysis techniques within the framework of the finite-element method is reported. Although the emphasis is concerned with those nonlinearities associated with material behavior, a general treatment of geometric nonlinearity, alone or in combination with plasticity is included, and applications presented for a class of problems categorized as axisymmetric shells of revolution. The scope of the nonlinear analysis capabilities includes: (1) a membrane stress analysis, (2) bending and membrane stress analysis, (3) analysis of thick and thin axisymmetric bodies of revolution, (4) a general three dimensional analysis, and (5) analysis of laminated composites. Applications of the methods are made to a number of sample structures. Correlation with available analytic or experimental data range from good to excellent.

  12. HIFU Induced Heating Modelling by Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, R.; Vera, A.; Leija, L.

    High intensity focused ultrasound is a thermal therapy method used to treat malignant tumors and other medical conditions. Focused ultrasound concentrates acoustic energy at a focal zone. There, temperature rises rapidly over 56 °C to provoke tissue necrosis. Device performance depends on its fabrication placing computational modeling as a powerful tool to anticipate experimentation results. Finite element method allows modeling of multiphysics systems. Therefore, induced heating was modeled considering the acoustic field produced by a concave radiator excited with electric potentials from 5 V to 20 V. Nonlinear propagation was neglected and a linear response between the acoustic fields and pressure distribution was obtained. Finally, the results showed that acoustic propagation and heating models should be improved and validated with experimental measurements.

  13. Discussion of the finite element method in optical diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobera, Julia; Coupland, Jeremy

    2006-04-01

    In Optical Diffraction Tomography (ODT) the refractive index is reconstructed from images with different illuminating wavefronts. In most cases the Born approximation is assumed, although this limits the applicability of the technique to weak-scattering problems. In this work we examine the scattering problem from first principles beginning from the Helmholtz equation that governs scalar diffraction and wave propagation. We demonstrate the use of the Born approximation and show typical errors when it is applied in practice. Solution of the Helmholtz equation using a Finite Element Method (FEM) with an appropriate Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC) is described, and a non-linear optimization technique, the Conjugate Gradient Method (CGM), previously proposed for microwave imaging, is applied to the inverse problem.

  14. Architecting the Finite Element Method Pipeline for the GPU

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhisong; Lewis, T. James; Kirby, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a widely employed numerical technique for approximating the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) in various science and engineering applications. Many of these applications benefit from fast execution of the FEM pipeline. One way to accelerate the FEM pipeline is by exploiting advances in modern computational hardware, such as the many-core streaming processors like the graphical processing unit (GPU). In this paper, we present the algorithms and data-structures necessary to move the entire FEM pipeline to the GPU. First we propose an efficient GPU-based algorithm to generate local element information and to assemble the global linear system associated with the FEM discretization of an elliptic PDE. To solve the corresponding linear system efficiently on the GPU, we implement a conjugate gradient method preconditioned with a geometry-informed algebraic multi-grid (AMG) method preconditioner. We propose a new fine-grained parallelism strategy, a corresponding multigrid cycling stage and efficient data mapping to the many-core architecture of GPU. Comparison of our on-GPU assembly versus a traditional serial implementation on the CPU achieves up to an 87 × speedup. Focusing on the linear system solver alone, we achieve a speedup of up to 51 × versus use of a comparable state-of-the-art serial CPU linear system solver. Furthermore, the method compares favorably with other GPU-based, sparse, linear solvers. PMID:25202164

  15. Architecting the Finite Element Method Pipeline for the GPU.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhisong; Lewis, T James; Kirby, Robert M; Whitaker, Ross T

    2014-02-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a widely employed numerical technique for approximating the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) in various science and engineering applications. Many of these applications benefit from fast execution of the FEM pipeline. One way to accelerate the FEM pipeline is by exploiting advances in modern computational hardware, such as the many-core streaming processors like the graphical processing unit (GPU). In this paper, we present the algorithms and data-structures necessary to move the entire FEM pipeline to the GPU. First we propose an efficient GPU-based algorithm to generate local element information and to assemble the global linear system associated with the FEM discretization of an elliptic PDE. To solve the corresponding linear system efficiently on the GPU, we implement a conjugate gradient method preconditioned with a geometry-informed algebraic multi-grid (AMG) method preconditioner. We propose a new fine-grained parallelism strategy, a corresponding multigrid cycling stage and efficient data mapping to the many-core architecture of GPU. Comparison of our on-GPU assembly versus a traditional serial implementation on the CPU achieves up to an 87 × speedup. Focusing on the linear system solver alone, we achieve a speedup of up to 51 × versus use of a comparable state-of-the-art serial CPU linear system solver. Furthermore, the method compares favorably with other GPU-based, sparse, linear solvers. PMID:25202164

  16. Progress on hybrid finite element methods for scattering by bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Progress on the development and implementation of hybrid finite element methods for scattering by bodies of revolution are described. It was found that earlier finite element-boundary integral formulations suffered from convergence difficulties when applied to large and thin bodies of revolution. An alternative implementation is described where the finite element method is terminated with an absorbing termination boundary. In addition, an alternative finite element-boundary integral implementation is discussed for improving the convergence of the original code.

  17. Finite element method application for turbulent and transitional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sváček, Petr

    2016-03-01

    This paper is interested in numerical simulations of the interaction of the fluid flow with an airfoil. Particularly, the problem of the turbulent flow around the airfoil with elastic support is considered. The main attention is paid to the numerical approximation of the flow problem using the finite element approximations. The laminar - turbulence transition of the flow on the surface airfoil is considered. The chois of the transition model is discussed. The transition model based on the two equation k-ω turbulence model is used. The structure motion is described with the aid of two degrees of freedom. The motion of the computational domain is treated with the aid of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method. Numerical results are shown.

  18. Structural optimization of thin shells using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work was the structural optimization of thin shell structures that are subjected to stress and displacement constraints. In order to accomplish this, the structural optimization computer program DESAP1 was modified and improved. In the static analysis part of the DESAP1 computer program the torsional spring elements, which are used to analyze thin, shallow shell structures, were eliminated by modifying the membrane stiffness matrix of the triangular elements in the local coordinate system and adding a fictitious rotational stiffness matrix. This simplified the DESAP1 program input, improved the accuracy of the analysis, and saved computation time. In the optimization part of the DESAP1 program the stress ratio formula, which redesigns the thickness of each finite element of the structure, was solved by an analytical method. This scheme replaced the iterative solution that was previously used in the DESAP1 program, thus increasing the accuracy and speed of the design. The modified program was used to design a thin, cylindrical shell structure with optimum weight, and the results are reported in this paper.

  19. Nitsche Extended Finite Element Methods for Earthquake Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, Ethan T.

    Modeling earthquakes and geologically short-time-scale events on fault networks is a difficult problem with important implications for human safety and design. These problems demonstrate a. rich physical behavior, in which distributed loading localizes both spatially and temporally into earthquakes on fault systems. This localization is governed by two aspects: friction and fault geometry. Computationally, these problems provide a stern challenge for modelers --- static and dynamic equations must be solved on domains with discontinuities on complex fault systems, and frictional boundary conditions must be applied on these discontinuities. The most difficult aspect of modeling physics on complicated domains is the mesh. Most numerical methods involve meshing the geometry; nodes are placed on the discontinuities, and edges are chosen to coincide with faults. The resulting mesh is highly unstructured, making the derivation of finite difference discretizations difficult. Therefore, most models use the finite element method. Standard finite element methods place requirements on the mesh for the sake of stability, accuracy, and efficiency. The formation of a mesh which both conforms to fault geometry and satisfies these requirements is an open problem, especially for three dimensional, physically realistic fault. geometries. In addition, if the fault system evolves over the course of a dynamic simulation (i.e. in the case of growing cracks or breaking new faults), the geometry must he re-meshed at each time step. This can be expensive computationally. The fault-conforming approach is undesirable when complicated meshes are required, and impossible to implement when the geometry is evolving. Therefore, meshless and hybrid finite element methods that handle discontinuities without placing them on element boundaries are a desirable and natural way to discretize these problems. Several such methods are being actively developed for use in engineering mechanics involving crack

  20. Non-conforming finite element methods for transmission eigenvalue problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yidu; Han, Jiayu; Bi, Hai

    2016-08-01

    The transmission eigenvalue problem is an important and challenging topic arising in the inverse scattering theory. In this paper, for the Helmholtz transmission eigenvalue problem, we give a weak formulation which is a nonselfadjoint linear eigenvalue problem. Based on the weak formulation, we first discuss the non-conforming finite element approximation, and prove the error estimates of the discrete eigenvalues obtained by the Adini element, Morley-Zienkiewicz element, modified-Zienkiewicz element et. al. And we report some numerical examples to validate the efficiency of our approach for solving transmission eigenvalue problem.

  1. A new finite element and finite difference hybrid method for computing electrostatics of ionic solvated biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Jinyong; Xie, Dexuan

    2015-10-01

    The Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) is one widely-used implicit solvent continuum model for calculating electrostatics of ionic solvated biomolecule. In this paper, a new finite element and finite difference hybrid method is presented to solve PBE efficiently based on a special seven-overlapped box partition with one central box containing the solute region and surrounded by six neighboring boxes. In particular, an efficient finite element solver is applied to the central box while a fast preconditioned conjugate gradient method using a multigrid V-cycle preconditioning is constructed for solving a system of finite difference equations defined on a uniform mesh of each neighboring box. Moreover, the PBE domain, the box partition, and an interface fitted tetrahedral mesh of the central box can be generated adaptively for a given PQR file of a biomolecule. This new hybrid PBE solver is programmed in C, Fortran, and Python as a software tool for predicting electrostatics of a biomolecule in a symmetric 1:1 ionic solvent. Numerical results on two test models with analytical solutions and 12 proteins validate this new software tool, and demonstrate its high performance in terms of CPU time and memory usage.

  2. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-03-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  3. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  4. Control volume finite element method with multidimensional edge element Scharfetter-Gummel upwinding. Part 1, formulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2011-06-01

    We develop a new formulation of the Control Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM) with a multidimensional Scharfetter-Gummel (SG) upwinding for the drift-diffusion equations. The formulation uses standard nodal elements for the concentrations and expands the flux in terms of the lowest-order Nedelec H(curl; {Omega})-compatible finite element basis. The SG formula is applied to the edges of the elements to express the Nedelec element degree of freedom on this edge in terms of the nodal degrees of freedom associated with the endpoints of the edge. The resulting upwind flux incorporates the upwind effects from all edges and is defined at the interior of the element. This allows for accurate evaluation of integrals on the boundaries of the control volumes for arbitrary quadrilateral elements. The new formulation admits efficient implementation through a standard loop over the elements in the mesh followed by loops over the element nodes (associated with control volume fractions in the element) and element edges (associated with flux degrees of freedom). The quantities required for the SG formula can be precomputed and stored for each edge in the mesh for additional efficiency gains. For clarity the details are presented for two-dimensional quadrilateral grids. Extension to other element shapes and three dimensions is straightforward.

  5. Hierarchical flux-based thermal-structural finite element analysis method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polesky, Sandra P.

    1992-01-01

    A hierarchical flux-based finite element method is developed for both a one and two dimensional thermal structural analyses. Derivation of the finite element equations is presented. The resulting finite element matrices associated with the flux based formulation are evaluated in a closed form. The hierarchical finite elements include additional degrees of freedom in the approximation of the element variable distributions by the use of nodeless variables. The nodeless variables offer increased solution accuracy without the need for defining actual nodes and rediscretizing the finite element model. Thermal and structural responses are obtained from a conventional linear finite element method and exact solutions. Results show that the hierarchical flux-based method can provide improved thermal and structural solution accuracy with fewer elements when compared to results for the conventional linear element method.

  6. Iterative methods for elliptic finite element equations on general meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolaides, R. A.; Choudhury, Shenaz

    1986-01-01

    Iterative methods for arbitrary mesh discretizations of elliptic partial differential equations are surveyed. The methods discussed are preconditioned conjugate gradients, algebraic multigrid, deflated conjugate gradients, an element-by-element techniques, and domain decomposition. Computational results are included.

  7. Numerical performance of projection methods in finite element consolidation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambolati, Giuseppe; Pini, Giorgio; Ferronato, Massimiliano

    2001-12-01

    Projection, or conjugate gradient like, methods are becoming increasingly popular for the efficient solution of large sparse sets of unsymmetric indefinite equations arising from the numerical integration of (initial) boundary value problems. One such problem is soil consolidation coupling a flow and a structural model, typically solved by finite elements (FE) in space and a marching scheme in time (e.g. the Crank-Nicolson scheme). The attraction of a projection method stems from a number of factors, including the ease of implementation, the requirement of limited core memory and the low computational cost if a cheap and effective matrix preconditioner is available. In the present paper, biconjugate gradient stabilized (Bi- CGSTAB) is used to solve FE consolidation equations in 2-D and 3-D settings with variable time integration steps. Three different nodal orderings are selected along with the preconditioner ILUT based on incomplete triangular factorization and variable fill-in. The overall cost of the solver is made up of the preconditioning cost plus the cost to converge which is in turn related to the number of iterations and the elementary operations required by each iteration. The results show that nodal ordering affects the perfor mance of Bi-CGSTAB. For normally conditioned consolidation problems Bi-CGSTAB with the best ILUT preconditioner may converge in a number of iterations up to two order of magnitude smaller than the size of the FE model and proves an accurate, cost-effective and robust alternative to direct methods.

  8. Relation between finite element methods and nodal methods in transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between nodal methods and finite-element methods for solving the discrete-ordinates form of the transport equation in x-y geometry. Specifically, we will examine the relation of three finite-element schemes to the linear-linear (LL) and linear-nodal (LN) nodal schemes. The three finite-element schemes are the linear-continuous-diamond-difference (DD) scheme, the linear-discontinuous (LD) scheme, and the quadratic-discontinuous (QD) scheme. A brief derivation of the (LL) and (LN) nodal schemes is given in the third section of this paper. The approximations that cause the LL scheme to reduce to the DD, LD, and QD schemes are then indicated. An extremely simple method of deriving the finite-element schemes is then introduced.

  9. A Successive Selection Method for finite element model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Baiyong; Zhang, Weijie; Lu, Qiuhai; Wang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Finite Element (FE) model can be updated effectively and efficiently by using the Response Surface Method (RSM). However, it often involves performance trade-offs such as high computational cost for better accuracy or loss of efficiency for lots of design parameter updates. This paper proposes a Successive Selection Method (SSM), which is based on the linear Response Surface (RS) function and orthogonal design. SSM rewrites the linear RS function into a number of linear equations to adjust the Design of Experiment (DOE) after every FE calculation. SSM aims to interpret the implicit information provided by the FE analysis, to locate the Design of Experiment (DOE) points more quickly and accurately, and thereby to alleviate the computational burden. This paper introduces the SSM and its application, describes the solution steps of point selection for DOE in detail, and analyzes SSM's high efficiency and accuracy in the FE model updating. A numerical example of a simply supported beam and a practical example of a vehicle brake disc show that the SSM can provide higher speed and precision in FE model updating for engineering problems than traditional RSM.

  10. Integrated force method versus displacement method for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1990-01-01

    A novel formulation termed the integrated force method (IFM) has been developed in recent years for analyzing structures. In this method all the internal forces are taken as independent variables, and the system equilibrium equations (EE's) are integrated with the global compatibility conditions (CC's) to form the governing set of equations. In IFM the CC's are obtained from the strain formulation of St. Venant, and no choices of redundant load systems have to be made, in constrast to the standard force method (SFM). This property of IFM allows the generation of the governing equation to be automated straightforwardly, as it is in the popular stiffness method (SM). In this report IFM and SM are compared relative to the structure of their respective equations, their conditioning, required solution methods, overall computational requirements, and convergence properties as these factors influence the accuracy of the results. Overall, this new version of the force method produces more accurate results than the stiffness method for comparable computational cost.

  11. Integrated force method versus displacement method for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S. N.; Berke, L.; Gallagher, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    A novel formulation termed the integrated force method (IFM) has been developed in recent years for analyzing structures. In this method all the internal forces are taken as independent variables, and the system equilibrium equations (EEs) are integrated with the global compatibility conditions (CCs) to form the governing set of equations. In IFM the CCs are obtained from the strain formulation of St. Venant, and no choices of redundant load systems have to be made, in constrast to the standard force method (SFM). This property of IFM allows the generation of the governing equation to be automated straightforwardly, as it is in the popular stiffness method (SM). In this report IFM and SM are compared relative to the structure of their respective equations, their conditioning, required solution methods, overall computational requirements, and convergence properties as these factors influence the accuracy of the results. Overall, this new version of the force method produces more accurate results than the stiffness method for comparable computational cost.

  12. Basis Functions With Divergence Constraints For The Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinciuc, Christopher Michael

    Maxwell's equations are a system of partial differential equations of vector fields. Imposing the constitutive relations for material properties yields equations for the curl and divergence of the electric and magnetic fields. The curl and divergence equations must be solved simultaneously, which is not the same as solving three separate scalar problems in each component of the vector field. This thesis describes a new method for solving partial differential equations of vector fields using the finite element method. New basis functions are used to solve the curl equation while allowing the divergence to be set as a constraint. The basis functions are defined on a mesh of bricks and the method is applicable for geometries that conform to a Cartesian coordinate system. The basis functions are a combination of cubic Hermite splines and second order Lagrange interpolation polynomials. The method yields a linearly independent set of constraints for the divergence, which is modelled to second order accuracy within each brick. Mesh refinement is accomplished by dividing selected bricks into 2 x 2 x 2 smaller bricks of equal size. The change in the node pattern at an interface where mesh refinement occurs necessitates a modified implementation of the divergence constraints as well as additional constraints for hanging nodes. The mesh can be refined to an arbitrary number of levels. The basis functions can exactly model the discontinuity in the normal component of the field at a planar interface. The method is modified to solve problems with singularities at material boundaries that form 90° edges and corners. The primary test problem of the new basis functions is to obtain the resonant frequencies and fields of three-dimensional cavities. The new basis functions can resolve physical solutions and non-physical, spurious modes. The eigenvalues obtained with the new method are in good agreement with exact solutions and experimental values in cases where they exist. There is

  13. Finite element method - A companion in experimental mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    The hybrid experimental-numerical procedure for structural analysis is described by its applications in fracture mechanics. The procedure was first verified by the excellent agreements between the dynamic stress intensity factors obtained directly by dynamic photoelasticity and those generated by the hybrid procedure where a dynamic finite element code was executed in its generation mode. The hybrid procedure was then used to determine the dynamic fracture toughness of reaction bonded silicon nitride.

  14. Nonlinear stress analysis of titanium implants by finite element method.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Sakae; Hayano, Keigo; Niino, Tooru; Yamakura, Kazunori; Yoshida, Takamitsu; Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Terashima, Nobuyosi; Tamura, Kaoru; Ito, Michio; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Kubota, Osamu; Yoshimura, Masayuki

    2008-07-01

    With use of dental implants on the rise, there is also a tandem increase in the number of implant fracture reports. To the end of investigating the stress occurring in implants, elasticity and plasticity analyses were performed using the finite element method. The following results were obtained: (1) With one-piece type of implants of 3.3 mm diameter, elasticity analysis showed that after applying 500 N in a 45-degree direction, stress exceeding 500 MPa which is the proof stress of grade 4 pure titanium - occurred. This suggested the possibility of fatigue destruction due to abnormal occlusal force, such as during bruxism. (2) With two-piece type of implants that can tolerate vertical loading of 5,000 N, plasticity analysis suggested the possibility of screw area fracture after applying 500 N in a 45-degree direction. (3) On the combined use of an abutment and a fixture from different manufacturers, fracture destruction of even Ti-6Al-4V, which has a high degree of strength, was predicted. PMID:18833779

  15. A Multifunctional Interface Method for Coupling Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods: Two-Dimensional Scalar-Field Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.

    2002-01-01

    A multifunctional interface method with capabilities for variable-fidelity modeling and multiple method analysis is presented. The methodology provides an effective capability by which domains with diverse idealizations can be modeled independently to exploit the advantages of one approach over another. The multifunctional method is used to couple independently discretized subdomains, and it is used to couple the finite element and the finite difference methods. The method is based on a weighted residual variational method and is presented for two-dimensional scalar-field problems. A verification test problem and a benchmark application are presented, and the computational implications are discussed.

  16. Structured Extended Finite Element Methods of Solids Defined by Implicit Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Belytschko, T; Mish, K; Moes, N; Parimi, C

    2002-11-17

    A paradigm is developed for generating structured finite element models from solid models by means of implicit surface definitions. The implicit surfaces are defined by radial basis functions. Internal features, such as material interfaces, sliding interfaces and cracks are treated by enrichment techniques developed in the extended finite element method (X-FEM). Methods for integrating the weak form for such models are proposed. These methods simplify the generation of finite element models. Results presented for several examples show that the accuracy of this method is comparable to standard unstructured finite element methods.

  17. New Application of Finite Element Method to Seamount Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HA, G.; Kim, S. S.; So, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic method can be utilized in a wide range of applications, including investigation of small-scale near-surface targets and characterization of large-scale geologic structures. In particular, marine magnetic studies involve with various interpretation approaches to constrain geophysical information regarding the depth of a particular seamount, its size and shape, and the orientation and magnitude of its magnetization. The accuracy of the estimated information is normally governed by the quality and amount of available data and by the sophistication of the employed modeling techniques. Here we aim to advance geomagnetic modeling approaches using the interactive finite element solver, COMSOL Multiphysics, and improve the degree of detail that can be obtained from the measured magnetic field. First, we carried out benchmark tests by comparing the computed results using the analytic solutions for simple bodies. We built two types of synthetic models with rectangular and sphere shaped ore bodies having high intensity of magnetization and we changed magnetized direction in each calculation. Comparisons of FEM-based results with the analytic ones exhibited good agreement in general. Second, marine magnetic data obtained at seamounts can be very crucial to determine the age and location of seamount formation. Traditional magnetic methods often assume the uniformly magnetized seamounts to simplify computational efforts. However, the inner structures of seamounts constrained by seismic data show a clear distinction between the dense core and edifice layers. Here we divide the seamount into the dense core and edifice layers in a synthetic model, assign different magnetization direction and intensity to them, and optimize these parameters by minimizing differences between the observed and numerical computed data. These examined results will be valuable to understand seamount formation processes in detail. In addition, we discuss FEM-based magnetic models to mimic the

  18. Residual-driven online generalized multiscale finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric T.; Efendiev, Yalchin; Leung, Wing Tat

    2015-12-01

    The construction of local reduced-order models via multiscale basis functions has been an area of active research. In this paper, we propose online multiscale basis functions which are constructed using the offline space and the current residual. Online multiscale basis functions are constructed adaptively in some selected regions based on our error indicators. We derive an error estimator which shows that one needs to have an offline space with certain properties to guarantee that additional online multiscale basis function will decrease the error. This error decrease is independent of physical parameters, such as the contrast and multiple scales in the problem. The offline spaces are constructed using Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods (GMsFEM). We show that if one chooses a sufficient number of offline basis functions, one can guarantee that additional online multiscale basis functions will reduce the error independent of contrast. We note that the construction of online basis functions is motivated by the fact that the offline space construction does not take into account distant effects. Using the residual information, we can incorporate the distant information provided the offline approximation satisfies certain properties. In the paper, theoretical and numerical results are presented. Our numerical results show that if the offline space is sufficiently large (in terms of the dimension) such that the coarse space contains all multiscale spectral basis functions that correspond to small eigenvalues, then the error reduction by adding online multiscale basis function is independent of the contrast. We discuss various ways computing online multiscale basis functions which include a use of small dimensional offline spaces.

  19. An implicit stabilized finite element method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using finite calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouhi, Mohammad; Oñate, Eugenio

    2015-07-01

    A new implicit stabilized formulation for the numerical solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The method is based on the finite calculus (FIC) scheme using the Galerkin finite element method (FEM) on triangular grids. Via the FIC formulation, two stabilization terms, called streamline term and transverse term, are added to the original conservation equations in the space-time domain. The non-linear system of equations resulting from the spatial discretization is solved implicitly using a damped Newton method benefiting from the exact Jacobian matrix. The matrix system is solved at each iteration with a preconditioned GMRES method. The efficiency of the proposed stabilization technique is checked out in the solution of 2D inviscid and laminar viscous flow problems where appropriate solutions are obtained especially near the boundary layer and shock waves. The work presented here can be considered as a follow up of a previous work of the authors Kouhi, Oñate (Int J Numer Methods Fluids 74:872-897, 2014). In that paper, the stabilized Galerkin FEM based on the FIC formulation was derived for the Euler equations together with an explicit scheme. In the present paper, the extension of this work to the Navier-Stokes equations using an implicit scheme is presented.

  20. An implementation analysis of the linear discontinuous finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, T. L.

    2013-07-01

    This paper provides an implementation analysis of the linear discontinuous finite element method (LD-FEM) that spans the space of (l, x, y, z). A practical implementation of LD includes 1) selecting a computationally efficient algorithm to solve the 4 x 4 matrix system Ax = b that describes the angular flux in a mesh element, and 2) choosing how to store the data used to construct the matrix A and the vector b to either reduce memory consumption or increase computational speed. To analyze the first of these, three algorithms were selected to solve the 4 x 4 matrix equation: Cramer's rule, a streamlined implementation of Gaussian elimination, and LAPACK's Gaussian elimination subroutine dgesv. The results indicate that Cramer's rule and the streamlined Gaussian elimination algorithm perform nearly equivalently and outperform LAPACK's implementation of Gaussian elimination by a factor of 2. To analyze the second implementation detail, three formulations of the discretized LD-FEM equations were provided for implementation in a transport solver: 1) a low-memory formulation, which relies heavily on 'on-the-fly' calculations and less on the storage of pre-computed data, 2) a high-memory formulation, which pre-computes much of the data used to construct A and b, and 3) a reduced-memory formulation, which lies between the low - and high-memory formulations. These three formulations were assessed in the Jaguar transport solver based on relative memory footprint and computational speed for increasing mesh size and quadrature order. The results indicated that the memory savings of the low-memory formulation were not sufficient to warrant its implementation. The high-memory formulation resulted in a significant speed advantage over the reduced-memory option (10-50%), but also resulted in a proportional increase in memory consumption (5-45%) for increasing quadrature order and mesh count; therefore, the practitioner should weigh the system memory constraints against any

  1. A Method of Modeling Fabric Shear using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichani, Swapnil; Guha, Anirban

    2015-04-01

    Fabric modeling may be attempted by modeling fibres or yarns or small fabric units. The first is computationally intensive while the third does not allow relationships between the fabric's structure and its mechanical properties to be predicted. The second approach has been the most widely used so far. Out of the various ways in which this has been attempted, the finite element approach offers high flexibility while allowing the procedure to be relatively simple because of the availability of user-friendly softwares. This work explores a two-step finite element approach for modeling in-plane fabric shear. A major innovation of the modeling process was that the path of yarns in the fabric was allowed to evolve through the modeling process rather than being pre-defined. The relationship between shear angle and shear stress predicted by this model was compared with that obtained from a picture frame shear experiment. It was found that modeling the yarn with a set of anisotropic properties, gave very good correlation with experimental results.

  2. Hybrid finite volume/ finite element method for radiative heat transfer in graded index media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhao, J. M.; Liu, L. H.; Wang, S. Y.

    2012-09-01

    The rays propagate along curved path determined by the Fermat principle in the graded index medium. The radiative transfer equation in graded index medium (GRTE) contains two specific redistribution terms (with partial derivatives to the angular coordinates) accounting for the effect of the curved ray path. In this paper, the hybrid finite volume with finite element method (hybrid FVM/FEM) (P.J. Coelho, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf., vol. 93, pp. 89-101, 2005) is extended to solve the radiative heat transfer in two-dimensional absorbing-emitting-scattering graded index media, in which the spatial discretization is carried out using a FVM, while the angular discretization is by a FEM. The FEM angular discretization is demonstrated to be preferable in dealing with the redistribution terms in the GRTE. Two stiff matrix assembly schemes of the angular FEM discretization, namely, the traditional assembly approach and a new spherical assembly approach (assembly on the unit sphere of the solid angular space), are discussed. The spherical assembly scheme is demonstrated to give better results than the traditional assembly approach. The predicted heat flux distributions and temperature distributions in radiative equilibrium are determined by the proposed method and compared with the results available in other references. The proposed hybrid FVM/FEM method can predict the radiative heat transfer in absorbing-emitting-scattering graded index medium with good accuracy.

  3. Singularity computations. [finite element methods for elastoplastic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swedlow, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Direct descriptions of the structure of a singularity would describe the radial and angular distributions of the field quantities as explicitly as practicable along with some measure of the intensity of the singularity. This paper discusses such an approach based on recent development of numerical methods for elastoplastic flow. Attention is restricted to problems where one variable or set of variables is finite at the origin of the singularity but a second set is not.

  4. Adaptive finite element methods for two-dimensional problems in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element methods in two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element methods for validating the new methodology by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  5. Quadratic Finite Element Method for 1D Deterministic Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tolar, Jr., D R; Ferguson, J M

    2004-01-06

    In the discrete ordinates, or SN, numerical solution of the transport equation, both the spatial ({und r}) and angular ({und {Omega}}) dependences on the angular flux {psi}{und r},{und {Omega}}are modeled discretely. While significant effort has been devoted toward improving the spatial discretization of the angular flux, we focus on improving the angular discretization of {psi}{und r},{und {Omega}}. Specifically, we employ a Petrov-Galerkin quadratic finite element approximation for the differencing of the angular variable ({mu}) in developing the one-dimensional (1D) spherical geometry S{sub N} equations. We develop an algorithm that shows faster convergence with angular resolution than conventional S{sub N} algorithms.

  6. Multi-level adaptive finite element methods. 1: Variation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, A.

    1979-01-01

    A general numerical strategy for solving partial differential equations and other functional problems by cycling between coarser and finer levels of discretization is described. Optimal discretization schemes are provided together with very fast general solvers. It is described in terms of finite element discretizations of general nonlinear minimization problems. The basic processes (relaxation sweeps, fine-grid-to-coarse-grid transfers of residuals, coarse-to-fine interpolations of corrections) are directly and naturally determined by the objective functional and the sequence of approximation spaces. The natural processes, however, are not always optimal. Concrete examples are given and some new techniques are reviewed. Including the local truncation extrapolation and a multilevel procedure for inexpensively solving chains of many boundary value problems, such as those arising in the solution of time-dependent problems.

  7. Transient analysis of 1D inhomogeneous media by dynamic inhomogeneous finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zailin; Wang, Yao; Hei, Baoping

    2013-12-01

    The dynamic inhomogeneous finite element method is studied for use in the transient analysis of onedimensional inhomogeneous media. The general formula of the inhomogeneous consistent mass matrix is established based on the shape function. In order to research the advantages of this method, it is compared with the general finite element method. A linear bar element is chosen for the discretization tests of material parameters with two fictitious distributions. And, a numerical example is solved to observe the differences in the results between these two methods. Some characteristics of the dynamic inhomogeneous finite element method that demonstrate its advantages are obtained through comparison with the general finite element method. It is found that the method can be used to solve elastic wave motion problems with a large element scale and a large number of iteration steps.

  8. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  9. A mixed finite element domain decomposition method for nearly elastic wave equations in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiaobing

    1996-12-31

    A non-overlapping domain decomposition iterative method is proposed and analyzed for mixed finite element methods for a sequence of noncoercive elliptic systems with radiation boundary conditions. These differential systems describe the motion of a nearly elastic solid in the frequency domain. The convergence of the iterative procedure is demonstrated and the rate of convergence is derived for the case when the domain is decomposed into subdomains in which each subdomain consists of an individual element associated with the mixed finite elements. The hybridization of mixed finite element methods plays a important role in the construction of the discrete procedure.

  10. An Imbricate Finite Element Method (I-FEM) using full, reduced, and smoothed integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazes, Fabien; Meschke, Günther

    2013-11-01

    A method to design finite elements that imbricate with each other while being assembled, denoted as imbricate finite element method, is proposed to improve the smoothness and the accuracy of the approximation based upon low order elements. Although these imbricate elements rely on triangular meshes, the approximation stems from the shape functions of bilinear quadrilateral elements. These elements satisfy the standard requirements of the finite element method: continuity, delta function property, and partition of unity. The convergence of the proposed approximation is investigated by means of two numerical benchmark problems comparing three different schemes for the numerical integration including a cell-based smoothed FEM based on a quadratic shape of the elements edges. The method is compared to related existing methods.

  11. Unconstrained paving and plastering method for generating finite element meshes

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L.; Owen, Steven J.; Blacker, Teddy D.; Kerr, Robert

    2010-03-02

    Computer software for and a method of generating a conformal all quadrilateral or hexahedral mesh comprising selecting an object with unmeshed boundaries and performing the following while unmeshed voids are larger than twice a desired element size and unrecognizable as either a midpoint subdividable or pave-and-sweepable polyhedra: selecting a front to advance; based on sizes of fronts and angles with adjacent fronts, determining which adjacent fronts should be advanced with the selected front; advancing the fronts; detecting proximities with other nearby fronts; resolving any found proximities; forming quadrilaterals or unconstrained columns of hexahedra where two layers cross; and establishing hexahedral elements where three layers cross.

  12. An implicit finite element method for discrete dynamic fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Jobie M. Gerken

    1999-12-01

    A method for modeling the discrete fracture of two-dimensional linear elastic structures with a distribution of small cracks subject to dynamic conditions has been developed. The foundation for this numerical model is a plane element formulated from the Hu-Washizu energy principle. The distribution of small cracks is incorporated into the numerical model by including a small crack at each element interface. The additional strain field in an element adjacent to this crack is treated as an externally applied strain field in the Hu-Washizu energy principle. The resulting stiffness matrix is that of a standard plane element. The resulting load vector is that of a standard plane element with an additional term that includes the externally applied strain field. Except for the crack strain field equations, all terms of the stiffness matrix and load vector are integrated symbolically in Maple V so that fully integrated plane stress and plane strain elements are constructed. The crack strain field equations are integrated numerically. The modeling of dynamic behavior of simple structures was demonstrated within acceptable engineering accuracy. In the model of axial and transverse vibration of a beam and the breathing mode of vibration of a thin ring, the dynamic characteristics were shown to be within expected limits. The models dominated by tensile forces (the axially loaded beam and the pressurized ring) were within 0.5% of the theoretical values while the shear dominated model (the transversely loaded beam) is within 5% of the calculated theoretical value. The constant strain field of the tensile problems can be modeled exactly by the numerical model. The numerical results should therefore, be exact. The discrepancies can be accounted for by errors in the calculation of frequency from the numerical results. The linear strain field of the transverse model must be modeled by a series of constant strain elements. This is an approximation to the true strain field, so some

  13. A Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Changqing; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving the nonlinear Hamilton-Jacobi equations. This method is based on the Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving conservation laws. The method has the flexibility of treating complicated geometry by using arbitrary triangulation, can achieve high order accuracy with a local, compact stencil, and are suited for efficient parallel implementation. One and two dimensional numerical examples are given to illustrate the capability of the method.

  14. True Concurrent Thermal Engineering Integrating CAD Model Building with Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panczak, Tim; Ring, Steve; Welch, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Thermal engineering has long been left out of the concurrent engineering environment dominated by CAD (computer aided design) and FEM (finite element method) software. Current tools attempt to force the thermal design process into an environment primarily created to support structural analysis, which results in inappropriate thermal models. As a result, many thermal engineers either build models "by hand" or use geometric user interfaces that are separate from and have little useful connection, if any, to CAD and FEM systems. This paper describes the development of a new thermal design environment called the Thermal Desktop. This system, while fully integrated into a neutral, low cost CAD system, and which utilizes both FEM and FD methods, does not compromise the needs of the thermal engineer. Rather, the features needed for concurrent thermal analysis are specifically addressed by combining traditional parametric surface based radiation and FD based conduction modeling with CAD and FEM methods. The use of flexible and familiar temperature solvers such as SINDA/FLUINT (Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Fluid Integrator) is retained.

  15. Domain decomposition methods for nonconforming finite element spaces of Lagrange-type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowsar, Lawrence C.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, we consider the application of three popular domain decomposition methods to Lagrange-type nonconforming finite element discretizations of scalar, self-adjoint, second order elliptic equations. The additive Schwarz method of Dryja and Widlund, the vertex space method of Smith, and the balancing method of Mandel applied to nonconforming elements are shown to converge at a rate no worse than their applications to the standard conforming piecewise linear Galerkin discretization. Essentially, the theory for the nonconforming elements is inherited from the existing theory for the conforming elements with only modest modification by constructing an isomorphism between the nonconforming finite element space and a space of continuous piecewise linear functions.

  16. A finite element method for analysis of vibration induced by maglev trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, S. H.; Ho, Y. S.; Leong, C. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper developed a finite element method to perform the maglev train-bridge-soil interaction analysis with rail irregularities. An efficient proportional integral (PI) scheme with only a simple equation is used to control the force of the maglev wheel, which is modeled as a contact node moving along a number of target nodes. The moving maglev vehicles are modeled as a combination of spring-damper elements, lumped mass and rigid links. The Newmark method with the Newton-Raphson method is then used to solve the nonlinear dynamic equation. The major advantage is that all the proposed procedures are standard in the finite element method. The analytic solution of maglev vehicles passing a Timoshenko beam was used to validate the current finite element method with good agreements. Moreover, a very large-scale finite element analysis using the proposed scheme was also tested in this paper.

  17. Numerical simulation of fluid-structure interactions with stabilized finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sváček, Petr

    2016-03-01

    This paper is interested to the interactions of the incompressible flow with a flexibly supported airfoil. The bending and the torsion modes are considered. The problem is mathematically described. The numerical method is based on the finite element method. A combination of the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin and pressure stabilizing/Petrov-Galerkin method is used for the stabilization of the finite element method. The numerical results for a three-dimensional problem of flow over an airfoil are shown.

  18. A finite element method for the computation of transonic flow past airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, A.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element method for the computation of the transonic flow with shocks past airfoils is presented using the artificial viscosity concept for the local supersonic regime. Generally, the classic element types do not meet the accuracy requirements of advanced numerical aerodynamics requiring special attention to the choice of an appropriate element. A series of computed pressure distributions exhibits the usefulness of the method.

  19. A Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Key, S.W.

    1998-11-12

    A method is presented for connecting dissimilar finite element meshes in three dimensions. The method combines the concept of master and slave surfaces with the uniform strain approach for surface, corrections finite elements- By modifyhg the are made to element formulations boundaries of elements on the slave such that first-order patch tests are passed. The method can be used to connect meshes which use different element types. In addition, master and slave surfaces can be designated independently of relative mesh resolutions. Example problems in three-dimensional linear elasticity are presented.

  20. Design of an Electrostatic Comb Actuator Based on Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, Thet Thet; Ghazalli, Zakri; Ahmad, Asnul Hadi; Ismail, Mohd Fazli; Muhamad, Khairul Fikri

    2011-05-01

    Electrostatic comb actuators were designed using finite element modeling and analysis, so-called finite element method (FEM). Design objective was to generate maximum actuating force within the constraints. 2D and 3D FE models of the comb structures were developed in general-purpose FE code. The element geometries were 4-node plate element for 2D model and 8-node brick element for 3D models. Electrostatic field strength and voltage analysis of the FE models were performed to compute generated voltage and electrostatic force in the structure. Subsequently done was the structural analysis to examine structural response to the electrostatic force. The initial finite element model was verified with the published experimental result. Based on the amount of force generated and lateral deflection of the comb fingers, the best possible design of choice was determined. The finite element computations show that the comb structure having high aspect ratio with smaller gaps can provide higher actuation force.

  1. Experimental validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, T. W.; Wu, X. F.

    1994-01-01

    This research report is presented in three parts. In the first part, acoustical analyses were performed on modes of vibration of the housing of a transmission of a gear test rig developed by NASA. The modes of vibration of the transmission housing were measured using experimental modal analysis. The boundary element method (BEM) was used to calculate the sound pressure and sound intensity on the surface of the housing and the radiation efficiency of each mode. The radiation efficiency of each of the transmission housing modes was then compared to theoretical results for a finite baffled plate. In the second part, analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise level radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, while the BEM was used to predict the sound intensity and total radiated sound power using surface vibration as the input data. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis; noise predicted by the BEM was validated by measurements of sound intensity. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: sound power predicted by the BEM model using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and sound power measured by an acoustic intensity scan. In the third part, the structure used in part two was modified. A rib was attached to the top plate of the structure. The FEM and BEM were then used to predict structural vibration and radiated noise respectively. The predicted vibration and radiated noise were then validated through experimentation.

  2. A comparison of finite-difference and finite-element methods for calculating free edge stresses in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauld, N. R., Jr.; Goree, J. G.; Tzeng, L.-S.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that edge delamination is a serious failure mechanism for laminated composite materials. Various numerical methods have been utilized in attempts to calculate the interlaminar stress components which precede delamination in a laminate. There are, however, discrepancies regarding the results provided by different methods, taking into account a finite-difference procedure, a perturbation procedure, and finite element approaches. The present investigation has the objective to assess the capacity of a finite difference method to predict the character and magnitude of the interlaminar stress distributions near an interface corner. A second purpose of the investigation is to determine if predictions by finite element method in-plane, interlaminar stress components near an interface corner represent actual laminate behavior.

  3. An adaptive finite element method for convective heat transfer with variable fluid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Dominique; Ilinca, Florin; Hetu, Jean-Francois

    1993-07-01

    This paper presents an adaptive finite element method based on remeshing to solve incompressible viscous flow problems for which fluid properties present a strong temperature dependence. Solutions are obtained in primitive variables using a highly accurate finite element approximation on unstructured grids. Two general purpose error estimators, that take into account fluid properties variations, are presented. The methodology is applied to a problem of practical interest: the thermal convection of corn syrup in an enclosure with localized heating. Predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The method leads to improved accuracy and reliability of finite element predictions.

  4. Representation of bioelectric current sources using Whitney elements in the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, I Oğuz; Järvenpää, Seppo; Nenonen, Jukka; Somersalo, Erkki

    2005-07-01

    Bioelectric current sources of magneto- and electroencephalograms (MEG, EEG) are usually modelled with discrete delta-function type current dipoles, despite the fact that the currents in the brain are naturally continuous throughout the neuronal tissue. In this study, we represent bioelectric current sources in terms of Whitney-type elements in the finite element method (FEM) using a tetrahedral mesh. The aim is to study how well the Whitney elements can reproduce the potential and magnetic field patterns generated by a point current dipole in a homogeneous conducting sphere. The electric potential is solved for a unit sphere model with isotropic conductivity and magnetic fields are calculated for points located on a cap outside the sphere. The computed potential and magnetic field are compared with analytical solutions for a current dipole. Relative difference measures between the FEM and analytical solutions are less than 1%, suggesting that Whitney elements as bioelectric current sources are able to produce the same potential and magnetic field patterns as the point dipole sources. PMID:15972978

  5. Representation of bioelectric current sources using Whitney elements in the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguz Tanzer, I.; Järvenpää, Seppo; Nenonen, Jukka; Somersalo, Erkki

    2005-07-01

    Bioelectric current sources of magneto- and electroencephalograms (MEG, EEG) are usually modelled with discrete delta-function type current dipoles, despite the fact that the currents in the brain are naturally continuous throughout the neuronal tissue. In this study, we represent bioelectric current sources in terms of Whitney-type elements in the finite element method (FEM) using a tetrahedral mesh. The aim is to study how well the Whitney elements can reproduce the potential and magnetic field patterns generated by a point current dipole in a homogeneous conducting sphere. The electric potential is solved for a unit sphere model with isotropic conductivity and magnetic fields are calculated for points located on a cap outside the sphere. The computed potential and magnetic field are compared with analytical solutions for a current dipole. Relative difference measures between the FEM and analytical solutions are less than 1%, suggesting that Whitney elements as bioelectric current sources are able to produce the same potential and magnetic field patterns as the point dipole sources.

  6. A parallel implementation of an EBE solver for the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.P.; Las Casas, E.B.; Carvalho, M.L.B.

    1994-12-31

    A parallel implementation using PVM on a cluster of workstations of an Element By Element (EBE) solver using the Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) method is described, along with an application in the solution of the linear systems generated from finite element analysis of a problem in three dimensional linear elasticity. The PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) system, developed at the Oak Ridge Laboratory, allows the construction of a parallel MIMD machine by connecting heterogeneous computers linked through a network. In this implementation, version 3.1 of PVM is used, and 11 SLC Sun workstations and a Sun SPARC-2 model are connected through Ethernet. The finite element program is based on SDP, System for Finite Element Based Software Development, developed at the Brazilian National Laboratory for Scientific Computation (LNCC). SDP provides the basic routines for a finite element application program, as well as a standard for programming and documentation, intended to allow exchanges between research groups in different centers.

  7. System and Method for Finite Element Simulation of Helicopter Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, R. E. (Inventor); Dulsenberg, Ken (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a turbulence model that has been developed for blade-element helicopter simulation. This model uses an innovative temporal and geometrical distribution algorithm that preserves the statistical characteristics of the turbulence spectra over the rotor disc, while providing velocity components in real time to each of five blade-element stations along each of four blades. for a total of twenty blade-element stations. The simulator system includes a software implementation of flight dynamics that adheres to the guidelines for turbulence set forth in military specifications. One of the features of the present simulator system is that it applies simulated turbulence to the rotor blades of the helicopter, rather than to its center of gravity. The simulator system accurately models the rotor penetration into a gust field. It includes time correlation between the front and rear of the main rotor, as well as between the side forces felt at the center of gravity and at the tail rotor. It also includes features for added realism, such as patchy turbulence and vertical gusts in to which the rotor disc penetrates. These features are realized by a unique real time implementation of the turbulence filters. The new simulator system uses two arrays one on either side of the main rotor to record the turbulence field and to produce time-correlation from the front to the rear of the rotor disc. The use of Gaussian Interpolation between the two arrays maintains the statistical properties of the turbulence across the rotor disc. The present simulator system and method may be used in future and existing real-time helicopter simulations with minimal increase in computational workload.

  8. Large-eddy simulation in complex domains using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Kornblum, B.T.; Kollman, W.

    1996-11-12

    Finite element methods (FEM) are demonstrated in combination with large-eddy simulations (LES) as a valuable tool for the study of turbulent, separating channel flows, specifically the flow over a backward facing step.

  9. Orthodontic forces generated by a simulated archwire appliance evaluated by the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Spyrakos, C C; Bernard, D O

    1990-01-01

    The finite element method has been used to determine the stress distribution generated by the initial placement of a simulated preset bracket-type orthodontic appliance utilizing titanium-nickel alloy archwire. PMID:2256565

  10. The use of Galerkin finite-element methods to solve mass-transport equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, David B.

    1977-01-01

    The partial differential equation that describes the transport and reaction of chemical solutes in porous media was solved using the Galerkin finite-element technique. These finite elements were superimposed over finite-difference cells used to solve the flow equation. Both convection and flow due to hydraulic dispersion were considered. Linear and Hermite cubic approximations (basis functions) provided satisfactory results: however, the linear functions were computationally more efficient for two-dimensional problems. Successive over relaxation (SOR) and iteration techniques using Tchebyschef polynomials were used to solve the sparce matrices generated using the linear and Hermite cubic functions, respectively. Comparisons of the finite-element methods to the finite-difference methods, and to analytical results, indicated that a high degree of accuracy may be obtained using the method outlined. The technique was applied to a field problem involving an aquifer contaminated with chloride, tritium, and strontium-90. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. A Family of Uniform Strain Tetrahedral Elements and a Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Jung, J.; Key, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents a collection of papers on a family of uniform strain tetrahedral finite elements and their connection to different element types. Also included in the report are two papers which address the general problem of connecting dissimilar meshes in two and three dimensions. Much of the work presented here was motivated by the development of the tetrahedral element described in the report "A Suitable Low-Order, Eight-Node Tetrahedral Finite Element For Solids," by S. W. Key {ital et al.}, SAND98-0756, March 1998. Two basic issues addressed by the papers are: (1) the performance of alternative tetrahedral elements with uniform strain and enhanced uniform strain formulations, and (2) the proper connection of tetrahedral and other element types when two meshes are "tied" together to represent a single continuous domain.

  12. Highly Accurate Beam Torsion Solutions Using the p-Version Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James P.

    1996-01-01

    A new treatment of the classical beam torsion boundary value problem is applied. Using the p-version finite element method with shape functions based on Legendre polynomials, torsion solutions for generic cross-sections comprised of isotropic materials are developed. Element shape functions for quadrilateral and triangular elements are discussed, and numerical examples are provided.

  13. A proposed method for enhanced eigen-pair extraction using finite element methods: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jara-Almonte, J.; Mitchell, L. D.

    1988-01-01

    The paper covers two distinct parts: theory and application. The goal of this work was the reduction of model size with an increase in eigenvalue/vector accuracy. This method is ideal for the condensation of large truss- or beam-type structures. The theoretical approach involves the conversion of a continuum transfer matrix beam element into an 'Exact' dynamic stiffness element. This formulation is implemented in a finite element environment. This results in the need to solve a transcendental eigenvalue problem. Once the eigenvalue is determined the eigenvectors can be reconstructed with any desired spatial precision. No discretization limitations are imposed on the reconstruction. The results of such a combined finite element and transfer matrix formulation is a much smaller FEM eigenvalue problem. This formulation has the ability to extract higher eigenvalues as easily and as accurately as lower eigenvalues. Moreover, one can extract many more eigenvalues/vectors from the model than the number of degrees of freedom in the FEM formulation. Typically, the number of eigenvalues accurately extractable via the 'Exact' element method are at least 8 times the number of degrees of freedom. In contrast, the FEM usually extracts one accurate (within 5 percent) eigenvalue for each 3-4 degrees of freedom. The 'Exact' element results in a 20-30 improvement in the number of accurately extractable eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

  14. A class of hybrid finite element methods for electromagnetics: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, J. L.; Chatterjee, A.; Gong, J.

    1993-01-01

    Integral equation methods have generally been the workhorse for antenna and scattering computations. In the case of antennas, they continue to be the prominent computational approach, but for scattering applications the requirement for large-scale computations has turned researchers' attention to near neighbor methods such as the finite element method, which has low O(N) storage requirements and is readily adaptable in modeling complex geometrical features and material inhomogeneities. In this paper, we review three hybrid finite element methods for simulating composite scatterers, conformal microstrip antennas, and finite periodic arrays. Specifically, we discuss the finite element method and its application to electromagnetic problems when combined with the boundary integral, absorbing boundary conditions, and artificial absorbers for terminating the mesh. Particular attention is given to large-scale simulations, methods, and solvers for achieving low memory requirements and code performance on parallel computing architectures.

  15. Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, T. J.; Karr, Gerald R.

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

  16. Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

  17. On the Finite Element Implementation of the Generalized Method of Cells Micromechanics Constitutive Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    The Generalized Method of Cells (GMC), a micromechanics based constitutive model, is implemented into the finite element code MARC using the user subroutine HYPELA. Comparisons in terms of transverse deformation response, micro stress and strain distributions, and required CPU time are presented for GMC and finite element models of fiber/matrix unit cell. GMC is shown to provide comparable predictions of the composite behavior and requires significantly less CPU time as compared to a finite element analysis of the unit cell. Details as to the organization of the HYPELA code are provided with the actual HYPELA code included in the appendix.

  18. Domain decomposition based iterative methods for nonlinear elliptic finite element problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, X.C.

    1994-12-31

    The class of overlapping Schwarz algorithms has been extensively studied for linear elliptic finite element problems. In this presentation, the author considers the solution of systems of nonlinear algebraic equations arising from the finite element discretization of some nonlinear elliptic equations. Several overlapping Schwarz algorithms, including the additive and multiplicative versions, with inexact Newton acceleration will be discussed. The author shows that the convergence rate of the Newton`s method is independent of the mesh size used in the finite element discretization, and also independent of the number of subdomains into which the original domain in decomposed. Numerical examples will be presented.

  19. A variational multiscale finite element method for monolithic ALE computations of shock hydrodynamics using nodal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Scovazzi, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present a monolithic arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element method for computing highly transient flows with strong shocks. We use a variational multiscale (VMS) approach to stabilize a piecewise-linear Galerkin formulation of the equations of compressible flows, and an entropy artificial viscosity to capture strong solution discontinuities. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of VMS methods for highly transient shock flows, an area of research for which the VMS literature is extremely scarce. In addition, the proposed monolithic ALE method is an alternative to the more commonly used Lagrangian+remap methods, in which, at each time step, a Lagrangian computation is followed by mesh smoothing and remap (conservative solution interpolation). Lagrangian+remap methods are the methods of choice in shock hydrodynamics computations because they provide nearly optimal mesh resolution in proximity of shock fronts. However, Lagrangian+remap methods are not well suited for imposing inflow and outflow boundary conditions. These issues offer an additional motivation for the proposed approach, in which we first perform the mesh motion, and then the flow computations using the monolithic ALE framework. The proposed method is second-order accurate and stable, as demonstrated by extensive numerical examples in two and three space dimensions.

  20. Validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, X. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, and the surface vibration was used as input to the BEM to predict the sound intensity and sound power. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis. Noise predicted by the BEM was validated by sound intensity measurements. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: (1) sound power predicted by the BEM modeling using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; (2) sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and (3) sound power measured by a sound intensity scan. The sound power predicted from the BEM model using measured vibration data yields an excellent prediction of radiated noise. The sound power predicted by the combined FEM/BEM model also gives a good prediction of radiated noise except for a shift of the natural frequencies that are due to limitations in the FEM model.

  1. Finite Frequency Upper Mantle Tomography Using the Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekic, V.; Romanowicz, B.

    2007-12-01

    In the past quarter century, global tomography based on ray theory and first-order perturbation methods has imaged long-wavelength velocity heterogeneities of the Earth's mantle. While these models have contributed significantly to our understanding of mantle circulation, the development of higher resolution images of the Earth's interior holds tremendous promise for understanding the nature of the observed heterogeneities. This endeavor confronts us with two challenges. First, it requires extracting a far greater amount of information from the available seismograms than is generally used. Second, the approximate techniques upon which global tomographers have traditionally relied become inadequate when dealing with short-wavelength heterogeneity. We have developed a novel hybrid approach to long-period waveform tomography in which forward-modeling is performed using the Coupled Spectral Element Method (CSEM: Capdeville et al., 2003), which can accurately model seismic wave propagation in a 3D earth with both short and long wavelength structure, while in the inversion step, the sensitivity kernels are calculated using an approximate, non-linear normal mode summation approach (NACT: Li and Romanowicz, 1995). Our dataset consists of complete 3-component time domain seismograms filtered at periods greater than 80 s for 100 earthquakes observed at well over 100 stations of the IRIS/GSN, GEOSCOPE, GEOFON and various regional broadband networks. Modeling is performed in an iterative fashion, and convergence is achieved as long as the sign of the sensitivity kernels is correct. A further advantage of this hybrid approach is that it allows us - for the first time in global tomography - to accurately account for the effects of crustal structure on the observed seismograms. We illustrate these effects and the consequences of common assumptions such as linear crustal corrections. We present a preliminary model of velocity and radial anisotropy variations in the upper 800 km of

  2. A comparison of boundary element and finite element methods for modeling axisymmetric polymeric drop deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Russell; Toose, Matthijs; Macosko, Christopher W.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2001-12-01

    A modified boundary element method (BEM) and the DEVSS-G finite element method (FEM) are applied to model the deformation of a polymeric drop suspended in another fluid subjected to start-up uniaxial extensional flow. The effects of viscoelasticity, via the Oldroyd-B differential model, are considered for the drop phase using both FEM and BEM and for both the drop and matrix phases using FEM. Where possible, results are compared with the linear deformation theory. Consistent predictions are obtained among the BEM, FEM, and linear theory for purely Newtonian systems and between FEM and linear theory for fully viscoelastic systems. FEM and BEM predictions for viscoelastic drops in a Newtonian matrix agree very well at short times but differ at longer times, with worst agreement occurring as critical flow strength is approached. This suggests that the dominant computational advantages held by the BEM over the FEM for this and similar problems may diminish or even disappear when the issue of accuracy is appropriately considered. Fully viscoelastic problems, which are only feasible using the FEM formulation, shed new insight on the role of viscoelasticity of the matrix fluid in drop deformation. Copyright

  3. Application of the control volume mixed finite element method to a triangular discretization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional control volume mixed finite element method is applied to the elliptic equation. Discretization of the computational domain is based in triangular elements. Shape functions and test functions are formulated on the basis of an equilateral reference triangle with unit edges. A pressure support based on the linear interpolation of elemental edge pressures is used in this formulation. Comparisons are made between results from the standard mixed finite element method and this control volume mixed finite element method. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. ?? 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. Simulation of thin slot spirals and dual circular patch antennas using the finite element method with mixed elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jian; Volakis, John L.; Nurnberger, Michael W.

    1995-01-01

    This semi-annual report describes progress up to mid-January 1995. The report contains five sections all dealing with the modeling of spiral and patch antennas recessed in metallic platforms. Of significance is the development of decomposition schemes which separate the different regions of the antenna volume. Substantial effort was devoted to improving the feed model in the context of the finite element method (FEM). Finally, an innovative scheme for truncating finite element meshes is presented.

  5. Nonlinear Schwarz-Fas Methods for Unstructured Finite Element Elliptic Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J E; Vassilevski, P S; Woodward, C S

    2002-09-30

    This paper provides extensions of an element agglomeration AMG method to nonlinear elliptic problems discretized by the finite element method on general unstructured meshes. The method constructs coarse discretization spaces and corresponding coarse nonlinear operators as well as their Jacobians. We introduce both standard (fairly quasi-uniformly coarsened) and non-standard (coarsened away) coarse meshes and respective finite element spaces. We use both kind of spaces in FAS type coarse subspace correction (or Schwarz) algorithms. Their performance is illustrated on a number of model problems. The coarsened away spaces seem to perform better than the standard spaces for problems with nonlinearities in the principal part of the elliptic operator.

  6. The least-squares finite element method for low-mach-number compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    1994-01-01

    The present paper reports the development of the Least-Squares Finite Element Method (LSFEM) for simulating compressible viscous flows at low Mach numbers in which the incompressible flows pose as an extreme. Conventional approach requires special treatments for low-speed flows calculations: finite difference and finite volume methods are based on the use of the staggered grid or the preconditioning technique; and, finite element methods rely on the mixed method and the operator-splitting method. In this paper, however, we show that such difficulty does not exist for the LSFEM and no special treatment is needed. The LSFEM always leads to a symmetric, positive-definite matrix through which the compressible flow equations can be effectively solved. Two numerical examples are included to demonstrate the method: first, driven cavity flows at various Reynolds numbers; and, buoyancy-driven flows with significant density variation. Both examples are calculated by using full compressible flow equations.

  7. A bibliography on finite element and related methods analysis in reactor physics computations (1971--1997)

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    This bibliography provides a list of references on finite element and related methods analysis in reactor physics computations. These references have been published in scientific journals, conference proceedings, technical reports, thesis/dissertations and as chapters in reference books from 1971 to the present. Both English and non-English references are included. All references contained in the bibliography are sorted alphabetically by the first author`s name and a subsort by date of publication. The majority of the references relate to reactor physics analysis using the finite element method. Related topics include the boundary element method, the boundary integral method, and the global element method. All aspects of reactor physics computations relating to these methods are included: diffusion theory, deterministic radiation and neutron transport theory, kinetics, fusion research, particle tracking in finite element grids, and applications. For user convenience, many of the listed references have been categorized. The list of references is not all inclusive. In general, nodal methods were purposely excluded, although a few references do demonstrate characteristics of finite element methodology using nodal methods (usually as a non-conforming element basis). This area could be expanded. The author is aware of several other references (conferences, thesis/dissertations, etc.) that were not able to be independently tracked using available resources and thus were not included in this listing.

  8. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA USING MIXED FINITE ELEMENT AND FINITE VOLUME METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Dong, C.; Sun, S.

    2010-03-18

    A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods, i.e. mixed finite element (MFE) and the finite volume methods. Adaptive triangle mesh is used for effective treatment of the fractures. A hybrid MFE method is employed to provide an accurate approximation of velocities field for both the fractures and matrix which are crucial to the convection part of the transport equation. The finite volume method and the standard MFE method are used to approximate the convection and dispersion terms respectively. The model is used to investigate the interaction of adsorption with transport and to extract information on effective adsorption distribution coefficients. Numerical examples in different fractured media illustrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed numerical model.

  9. Review of correlation methods for evaluating finite element simulations of impact injury risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Gabler, Hampton C

    2008-01-01

    Finite element models have been used to understand human injury responses in various crash configurations. Most of the model validations were limited to qualitative descriptions. Quantitative analysis was needed for the validation of finite element models against experimental results. The purpose of this study is to compare the existing correlation techniques and to determine the best method to use for evaluating finite element simulations of impact injury risk in vehicle crashes. Five correlation methods in the literature were reviewed for systematic comparisons between simulations and tests. A full frontal impact test of a 1997 Geo Metro was simulated. The finite element model of a 1997 Geo Metro was obtained from NCAC finite element model archive. The acceleration and velocity responses of the vehicle seat were extracted from the simulation and compared to the test data. Evaluations of the validation methods were based on the analysis results compared to the suggested criteria. Performance of the different methods showed that the Comprehensive Error Factor method was the best overall correlation method, and therefore was recommended for assessing occupant injury potentials in vehicle accidents. PMID:19141927

  10. A numerical investigation of the finite element method in compressible primitive variable Navier-Stokes flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive numerical investigation of the basic capabilities of the finite element method (FEM) for numerical solution of compressible flow problems governed by the two-dimensional and axis-symmetric Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables are presented. The strong and weak points of the method as a tool for computational fluid dynamics are considered. The relation of the linear element finite element method to finite difference methods (FDM) is explored. The calculation of free shear layer and separated flows over aircraft boattail afterbodies with plume simulators indicate the strongest assets of the method are its capabilities for reliable and accurate calculation employing variable grids which readily approximate complex geometry and capably adapt to the presence of diverse regions of large solution gradients without the necessity of domain transformation.

  11. Directionally adaptive finite element method for multidimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Zhiqiang; Varghese, Philip L.

    1993-01-01

    A directionally adaptive finite element method for multidimensional compressible flows is presented. Quadrilateral and hexahedral elements are used because they have several advantages over triangular and tetrahedral elements. Unlike traditional methods that use quadrilateral/hexahedral elements, our method allows an element to be divided in each of the three directions in 3D and two directions in 2D. Some restrictions on mesh structure are found to be necessary, especially in 3D. The refining and coarsening procedures, and the treatment of constraints are given. A new implementation of upwind schemes in the constrained finite element system is presented. Some example problems, including a Mach 10 shock interaction with the walls of a 2D channel, a 2D viscous compression corner flow, and inviscid and viscous 3D flows in square channels, are also shown.

  12. Finite element methods and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuvelier, C.; Segal, A.; van Steenhoven, A. A.

    This book is devoted to two and three-dimensional FEM analysis of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations describing one flow of a viscous incompressible fluid. Three different approaches to the NS equations are described: a direct method, a penalty method, and a method that constructs discrete solenoidal vector fields. Subjects of current research which are important from the industrial/technological viewpoint are considered, including capillary-free boundaries, nonisothermal flows, turbulence, and non-Newtonian fluids.

  13. Finite element method for optimal guidance of an advanced launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.; Calise, Anthony J.; Leung, Martin

    1992-01-01

    A temporal finite element based on a mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle is summarized for optimal control problems. The resulting weak Hamiltonian finite element method is extended to allow for discontinuities in the states and/or discontinuities in the system equations. An extension of the formulation to allow for control inequality constraints is also presented. The formulation does not require element quadrature, and it produces a sparse system of nonlinear algebraic equations. To evaluate its feasibility for real-time guidance applications, this approach is applied to the trajectory optimization of a four-state, two-stage model with inequality constraints for an advanced launch vehicle. Numerical results for this model are presented and compared to results from a multiple-shooting code. The results show the accuracy and computational efficiency of the finite element method.

  14. A Floating Node Method for the Modelling of Discontinuities Within a Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinho, Silvestre T.; Chen, B. Y.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the accurate numerical representation of complex networks of evolving discontinuities in solids, with particular emphasis on cracks. The limitation of the standard finite element method (FEM) in approximating discontinuous solutions has motivated the development of re-meshing, smeared crack models, the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the Phantom Node Method (PNM). We propose a new method which has some similarities to the PNM, but crucially: (i) does not introduce an error on the crack geometry when mapping to natural coordinates; (ii) does not require numerical integration over only part of a domain; (iii) can incorporate weak discontinuities and cohesive cracks more readily; (iv) is ideally suited for the representation of multiple and complex networks of (weak, strong and cohesive) discontinuities; (v) leads to the same solution as a finite element mesh where the discontinuity is represented explicitly; and (vi) is conceptually simpler than the PNM.

  15. Analytical finite element matrix elements and global matrix assembly for hierarchical 3-D vector basis functions within the hybrid finite element boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, K.; Li, H.; Eibert, T. F.

    2014-11-01

    A hybrid higher-order finite element boundary integral (FE-BI) technique is discussed where the higher-order FE matrix elements are computed by a fully analytical procedure and where the gobal matrix assembly is organized by a self-identifying procedure of the local to global transformation. This assembly procedure applys to both, the FE part as well as the BI part of the algorithm. The geometry is meshed into three-dimensional tetrahedra as finite elements and nearly orthogonal hierarchical basis functions are employed. The boundary conditions are implemented in a strong sense such that the boundary values of the volume basis functions are directly utilized within the BI, either for the tangential electric and magnetic fields or for the asssociated equivalent surface current densities by applying a cross product with the unit surface normals. The self-identified method for the global matrix assembly automatically discerns the global order of the basis functions for generating the matrix elements. Higher order basis functions do need more unknowns for each single FE, however, fewer FEs are needed to achieve the same satisfiable accuracy. This improvement provides a lot more flexibility for meshing and allows the mesh size to raise up to λ/3. The performance of the implemented system is evaluated in terms of computation time, accuracy and memory occupation, where excellent results with respect to precision and computation times of large scale simulations are found.

  16. A robust finite element method for nonhomogeneous Dirichlet problems in domains with curved boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; King, J.T.

    1994-07-01

    In this paper the authors consider a simple finite element method on an approximately polygonal domain using linear elements. The Dirichlet data are transferred in a natural way and the resulting linear system can be solved using multigrid techniques. Their analysis takes into account the change in domain and data transfer, and optimal-error estimates are obtained that are robust in the regularity of the boundary data provided they are at least square integrable. It is proved that the natural extension of this finite element approximation to the original domain is optimal-order accurate.

  17. Positivity-preserving, flux-limited finite-difference and finite-element methods for reactive transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Robert J.; Carey, Graham F.

    2003-01-01

    A new class of positivity-preserving, flux-limited finite-difference and Petrov-Galerkin (PG) finite-element methods are devised for reactive transport problems.The methods are similar to classical TVD flux-limited schemes with the main difference being that the flux-limiter constraint is designed to preserve positivity for problems involving diffusion and reaction. In the finite-element formulation, we also consider the effect of numerical quadrature in the lumped and consistent mass matrix forms on the positivity-preserving property. Analysis of the latter scheme shows that positivity-preserving solutions of the resulting difference equations can only be guaranteed if the flux-limited scheme is both implicit and satisfies an additional lower-bound condition on time-step size. We show that this condition also applies to standard Galerkin linear finite-element approximations to the linear diffusion equation. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the behavior of the methods and confirm the theoretical conditions on time-step size, mesh spacing, and flux limiting for transport problems with and without nonlinear reaction.

  18. Petrov-galerkin finite element method for solving the neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, A.; Ferguson, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    A finite element using different trial and test spaces in introduced for solving the neutron transport equation in spherical geometry. It is shown that the widely used discrete ordinates method can also be thought of as such a finite element technique, in which integrals appearing in the difference equations are replaced by one-point Gauss quadrature formulas (midpoint rule). Comparison of accuracy between the new method and the discrete ordinates method is discussed, and numerical examples are given to illustrate the greater accuracy of the new technique.

  19. Calculations of the polycentric linear molecule H 32+ with the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, S.; Heinemann, D.; Kolb, D.; Fricke, B.

    1993-04-01

    A fully numerical two-dimensional solution of the Schrödinger equation is presented for the linear polyatomic molecule H 32+ using the finite element method (FEM). The Coulomb singularities at the nuclei are rectified by using both a condensed element distribution around the singularities and special elements. The accuracy of the results for the lσ and 2σ orbitals is of the order of 10 -7 au.

  20. Advanced finite element method for nano-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschiedrich, Lin; Burger, Sven; Kettner, Benjamin; Schmidt, Frank

    2006-02-01

    Miniaturized optical resonators with spatial dimensions of the order of the wavelength of the trapped light offer prospects for a variety of new applications like quantum processing or construction of meta-materials. Light propagation in these structures is modelled by Maxwell's equations. For a deeper numerical analysis one may compute the scattered field when the structure is illuminated or one may compute the resonances of the structure. We therefore address in this paper the electromagnetic scattering problem as well as the computation of resonances in an open system. For the simulation effcient and reliable numerical methods are required which cope with the infinite domain. We use transparent boundary conditions based on the Perfectly Matched Layer Method (PML) combined with a novel adaptive strategy to determine optimal discretization parameters like the thickness of the sponge layer or the mesh width. Further a novel iterative solver for time-harmonic Maxwell's equations is presented.

  1. Coupling multiscale finite element method for consolidation analysis of heterogeneous saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. W.; Fu, Z. D.; Wu, J. K.

    2009-02-01

    The multiscale finite element method is developed for solving the coupling problems of consolidation of heterogeneous saturated porous media under external loading conditions. Two sets of multiscale base functions are constructed, respectively, for the pressure field of fluid flow and the displacement field of solid skeleton. The coupling problems are then solved with a multiscale numerical procedure in space and time domain. The heterogeneities induced by permeabilities and mechanical parameters of the saturated porous media are both taken into account. Numerical experiments are carried out for different cases in comparison with the standard finite element method. The numerical results show that the coupling multiscale finite element method can be successfully used for solving the complicated coupling problems. It reduces greatly the computing effort in both memory and time for transient problems.

  2. FEMSECT: An inverse section model based on the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losch, M.; Sidorenko, D.; Beszczynska-MöLler, A.

    2005-12-01

    A new inverse model is presented for the analysis of hydrographic section data in conjunction with velocity measurements. The model offers advantages over commonly applied interpolation techniques because it combines data and physical assumptions such as geostrophic balance in the framework of a finite element discretization. Specifically, a quadratic objective function of model-data misfits is minimized to give estimates of transports together with formal error estimates. The finite element method allows the accurate representation of highly irregular bottom topography and ensures consistent interpolation of model variables to measurement points. The model is called Finite Element Method Section model (FEMSECT). FEMSECT also gives improved flexibility and performance over standard box models by allowing dynamic adjustment of the model variables temperature and salinity. Idealized test cases illustrate that the finite element methods solve the thermal wind equations far more accurately than standard finite difference methods, especially in the presence of steep topography. For a more realistic test, FEMSECT is applied to hydrographic conductivity-temperature-depth section data and moored instrument current meter measurements from an array in the Fram Strait. Transport estimates by FEMSECT prove to be more robust and less sensitive to the spatial data resolution than estimates by a conventional interpolation method that only uses information from moored instruments. FEMSECT is available as a highly portable Matlab code and can be run on an ordinary desktop computer.

  3. An exact zooming method for finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirai, I.; Wang, B. P.; Pilkey, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    An exact zooming technique which employs static condensation and exact structural reanalysis methods was developed. Successive application of static condensation reduces the system to one that is only associated with the degrees of freedom (dof) of the original model. Application of an exact static reanalysis technique permits the displacements at the dof of the original model that are contained in the zoomed portion of the structure to be obtained first. The response external to the zoom, as well as the response of additional dof within various levels of zooming, is computed. With the triangular factor of the stiffness matrix of the original system available, this approach involves only the solution of a system of equations of small order.

  4. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2011-11-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  5. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  6. A finite element computational method for high Reynolds number laminar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1987-01-01

    A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. In the method, the velocity variables are interpolated using complete quadratic shape functions, and the pressure is interpolated using linear shape functions which are defined on a triangular element for the two-dimensional case and on a tetrahedral element for the three-dimensional case. The triangular element and the tetrahedral element are contained inside the complete bi- and tri-quadratic elements for velocity variables for two and three dimensional cases, respectively, so that the pressure is discontinuous across the element boundaries. Example problems considered include: a cavity flow of Reynolds numbers 400 through 10,000; a laminar backward facing step flow; and a laminar flow in a square duct of strong curvature. The computational results compared favorably with the finite difference computational results and/or experimental data available. It was found that the present method can capture the delicate pressure driven recirculation zones, that the method did not yield any spurious pressure modes, and that the method requires fewer grid points than the finite difference methods to obtain comparable computational results.

  7. A variational method for finite element stress recovery and error estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, A.; Riggs, H. R.; Macy, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    A variational method for obtaining smoothed stresses from a finite element derived nonsmooth stress field is presented. The method is based on minimizing a functional involving discrete least-squares error plus a penalty constraint that ensures smoothness of the stress field. An equivalent accuracy criterion is developed for the smoothing analysis which results in a C sup 1-continuous smoothed stress field possessing the same order of accuracy as that found at the superconvergent optimal stress points of the original finite element analysis. Application of the smoothing analysis to residual error estimation is also demonstrated.

  8. P1 Nonconforming Finite Element Method for the Solution of Radiation Transport Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Kab S.

    2002-01-01

    The simulation of radiation transport in the optically thick flux-limited diffusion regime has been identified as one of the most time-consuming tasks within large simulation codes. Due to multimaterial complex geometry, the radiation transport system must often be solved on unstructured grids. In this paper, we investigate the behavior and the benefits of the unstructured P(sub 1) nonconforming finite element method, which has proven to be flexible and effective on related transport problems, in solving unsteady implicit nonlinear radiation diffusion problems using Newton and Picard linearization methods. Key words. nonconforrning finite elements, radiation transport, inexact Newton linearization, multigrid preconditioning

  9. Compressible seal flow analysis using the finite element method with Galerkin solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1974-01-01

    High pressure gas sealing involves not only balancing the viscous force with the pressure gradient force but also accounting for fluid inertia--especially for choked flow. The conventional finite element method which uses a Rayleigh-Ritz solution technique is not convenient for nonlinear problems. For these problems, a finite element method with a Galerkin solution technique (FEMGST) was formulated. One example, a three-dimensional axisymmetric flow formulation has nonlinearities due to compressibility, area expansion, and convective inertia. Solutions agree with classical results in the limiting cases. The development of the choked flow velocity profile is shown.

  10. A finite element method for active vibration control of uncertain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A. L.; Rongong, J. A.; Sims, N. D.

    2012-10-01

    This work introduces a fuzzy design method using the finite element procedure to simulate and analyze active vibration control of structures subjected to uncertain parameters. The purpose of this work is to provide a tool for studying the influence of uncertainty propagation on both stability and performance of a vibration control system, whilst avoiding the need for computationally expensive probabilistic methods or complex robust control techniques. The proposed procedure applies a general and efficient strategy for computing fuzzy results to a sequence of finite element calculations. Finally, the applicability of the methodology is illustrated through some realistic case studies related to structural control where spillover instability may arise.

  11. Numerical solution of 3-D magnetotelluric using vector finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prihantoro, Rudy; Sutarno, Doddy; Nurhasan

    2015-09-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) is a passive electromagnetic (EM) method which measure natural variations of electric and magnetic vector fields at the Earth surface to map subsurface electrical conductivity/resistivity structure. In this study, we obtained numerical solution of three-dimensional (3-D) MT using vector finite element method by solving second order Maxwell differential equation describing diffusion of plane wave through the conductive earth. Rather than the nodes of the element, the edges of the element is used as a vector basis to overcome the occurrence of nonphysical solutions that usually faced by scalar (node based) finite element method. Electric vector fields formulation was used and the resulting system of equation was solved using direct solution method to obtain the electric vector field distribution throughout the earth resistivity model structure. The resulting MT response functions was verified with 1-D layered Earth and 3-D2 COMMEMI outcropping structure. Good agreement is achieved for both structure models.

  12. Application of the multi-scale finite element method to wave propagation problems in damaged structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadei, F.; Ruzzene, M.

    2011-04-01

    This work illustrates the possibility to extend the field of application of the Multi-Scale Finite Element Method (MsFEM) to structural mechanics problems that involve localized geometrical discontinuities like cracks or notches. The main idea is to construct finite elements with an arbitrary number of edge nodes that describe the actual geometry of the damage with shape functions that are defined as local solutions of the differential operator of the specific problem according to the MsFEM approach. The small scale information are then brought to the large scale model through the coupling of the global system matrices that are assembled using classical finite element procedures. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated through selected numerical examples that constitute classical problems of great interest to the structural health monitoring community.

  13. Parametric study on single shot peening by dimensional analysis method incorporated with finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xian-Qian; Wang, Xi; Wei, Yan-Peng; Song, Hong-Wei; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2012-06-01

    Shot peening is a widely used surface treatment method by generating compressive residual stress near the surface of metallic materials to increase fatigue life and resistance to corrosion fatigue, cracking, etc. Compressive residual stress and dent profile are important factors to evaluate the effectiveness of shot peening process. In this paper, the influence of dimensionless parameters on maximum compressive residual stress and maximum depth of the dent were investigated. Firstly, dimensionless relations of processing parameters that affect the maximum compressive residual stress and the maximum depth of the dent were deduced by dimensional analysis method. Secondly, the influence of each dimensionless parameter on dimensionless variables was investigated by the finite element method. Furthermore, related empirical formulas were given for each dimensionless parameter based on the simulation results. Finally, comparison was made and good agreement was found between the simulation results and the empirical formula, which shows that a useful approach is provided in this paper for analyzing the influence of each individual parameter.

  14. A massively parallel adaptive finite element method with dynamic load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, K.D.; Flaherty, J.E.; Wheat, S.R.; Maccabe, A.B.

    1993-05-01

    We construct massively parallel, adaptive finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on a 1024-processor nCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method. We describe tiling, a dynamic, element-based data migration system. Tiling dynamically maintains global load balance in the adaptive method by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the dynamic load balancing with adaptive p-refinement examples.

  15. A massively parallel adaptive finite element method with dynamic load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, K.D.; Flaherty, J.E.; Wheat, S.R.; Maccabe, A.B.

    1993-12-31

    The authors construct massively parallel adaptive finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. They demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on a 1024-processor nCUBE/2 hypercube. They present results using adaptive p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method, and tiling, a dynamic, element-based data migration system that maintains global load balance of the adaptive method by overlapping neighborhoods of processors that each perform local balancing.

  16. Least squares finite element method with high continuity NURBS basis for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, De-Xiang; Xu, Zi-Li; Liu, Shi; Feng, Yong-Xin

    2014-03-01

    Modern least squares finite element method (LSFEM) has advantage over mixed finite element method for non-self-adjoint problem like Navier-Stokes equations, but has problem to be norm equivalent and mass conservative when using C0 type basis. In this paper, LSFEM with non-uniform B-splines (NURBS) is proposed for Navier-Stokes equations. High order continuity NURBS is used to construct the finite-dimensional spaces for both velocity and pressure. Variational form is derived from the governing equations with primitive variables and the DOFs due to additional variables are not necessary. There is a novel k-refinement which has spectral convergence of least squares functional. The method also has same advantages as isogeometric analysis like automatic mesh generation and exact geometry representation. Several benchmark problems are solved using the proposed method. The results agree well with the benchmark solutions available in literature. The results also show good performance in mass conservation.

  17. A finite element-boundary integral method for cavities in a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. However, due to a lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, antenna designers resort to measurement and planar antenna concepts for designing non-planar conformal antennas. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We extend this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this report, we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the shape functions, the resulting finite elements and the boundary integral equations, and the solution of the conformal finite element-boundary integral system. Some validation results are presented and we further show how this formulation can be applied with minimal computational and memory resources.

  18. Cyclic-stress analysis of notches for supersonic transport conditions. [using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of using the finite element method to account for the effects of cyclic load and temperature on local stresses and strains at a notch was demonstrated. The behavior of a notched titanium panel was studied under variable loads and temperatures representative of flight conditions for the lower wing surface of a Supersonic Transport (SST). The analysis was performed with the use of the BOPACE finite-element computer program which provides capability to determine high temperature and large viscoplastic effects caused by cyclic thermal and mechanical loads. The analysis involves the development of the finite-element model as well as determination of the structural behavior of the notched panel. Results are presented for twelve SST flights comprised of five different load-temperature cycles. The results show the approach is feasible, but material response to cyclic loads, temperatures, and hold times requires improved understanding to allow proper modeling of the material.

  19. An explicit Lagrangian finite element method for free-surface weakly compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonesi, Massimiliano; Meduri, Simone; Perego, Umberto; Frangi, Attilio

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, an explicit finite element approach to the solution of the Lagrangian formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for weakly compressible fluids or fluid-like materials is investigated. The introduction of a small amount of compressibility is shown to allow for the formulation of a fast and robust explicit solver based on a particle finite element method. Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Bingham laws are considered. A barotropic equation of state completes the model relating pressure and density fields. The approach has been validated through comparison with experimental tests and numerical simulations of free surface fluid problems involving water and water-soil mixtures.

  20. Axisymmetric analysis of a tube-type acoustic levitator by a finite element method.

    PubMed

    Hatano, H

    1994-01-01

    A finite element approach was taken for the study of the sound field and positioning force in a tube-type acoustic levitator. An axisymmetric model, where a rigid sphere is suspended on the tube axis, was introduced to model a cylindrical chamber of a levitation tube furnace. Distributions of velocity potential, magnitudes of positioning force, and resonance frequency shifts of the chamber due to the presence of the sphere were numerically estimated in relation to the sphere's position and diameter. Experiments were additionally made to compare with the simulation. The finite element method proved to be a useful tool for analyzing and designing the tube-type levitator. PMID:18263265

  1. An extended finite element method for dislocations in arbitrary three-dimensional entities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Jay

    A finite element method is developed for dislocations in arbitrary, three-dimensional bodies, including micro-/nano-devices, and layered materials, such as thin films. The method is also compatible with anisotropic materials, and can readily be applied to non-linear media. In this method, dislocation are modeled by adding discontinuities to extend the conventional finite element basis. Two approaches for adding discontinuities to the conventional finite element basis are proposed. In the first, a simple discontinuous enrichment imposes a constant jump in displacement across dislocation glide planes. In the second approach, the enrichments more accurately approximate the dislocations by capture the singular asymptotic behavior near the dislocation core. A basis of singular enrichments are formed from the analytical solutions to straight dislocation lines, but are applicable for more general, curved dislocation configurations. Methods for computing the configurational forces on dislocation lines within the XFEM framework have also been developed. For jump enrichments, an approach based on an energy release rate or J-integral is proposed. When singular enrichments are available, it is shown that the Peach-Koehler equation can be used to compute forces directly. This new approach differs from many existing methods for studying dislocations because it does not rely on superposition of solutions derived analytically or through Green's functions. This extended finite element approach is suitable to study dislocations in micro- and nano-devices, and in specific material micro-structures, where complicated boundaries and material interfaces are pervasive.

  2. The L sub 1 finite element method for pure convection problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The least squares (L sub 2) finite element method is introduced for 2-D steady state pure convection problems with smooth solutions. It is proven that the L sub 2 method has the same stability estimate as the original equation, i.e., the L sub 2 method has better control of the streamline derivative. Numerical convergence rates are given to show that the L sub 2 method is almost optimal. This L sub 2 method was then used as a framework to develop an iteratively reweighted L sub 2 finite element method to obtain a least absolute residual (L sub 1) solution for problems with discontinuous solutions. This L sub 1 finite element method produces a nonoscillatory, nondiffusive and highly accurate numerical solution that has a sharp discontinuity in one element on both coarse and fine meshes. A robust reweighting strategy was also devised to obtain the L sub 1 solution in a few iterations. A number of examples solved by using triangle and bilinear elements are presented.

  3. SQA of finite element method (FEM) codes used for analyses of pit storage/transport packages

    SciTech Connect

    Russel, E.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the software quality assurance of finite element method codes used for analyses of pit storage and transport projects. This methodology utilizes the ISO 9000-3: Guideline for application of 9001 to the development, supply, and maintenance of software, for establishing well-defined software engineering processes to consistently maintain high quality management approaches.

  4. A nonlinear, transient finite element method for coupled solvent diffusion and large deformation of hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouklas, Nikolaos; Landis, Chad M.; Huang, Rui

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogels are capable of coupled mass transport and large deformation in response to external stimuli. In this paper, a nonlinear, transient finite element formulation is presented for initial boundary value problems associated with swelling and deformation of hydrogels, based on a nonlinear continuum theory that is consistent with classical theory of linear poroelasticity. A mixed finite element method is implemented with implicit time integration. The incompressible or nearly incompressible behavior at the initial stage imposes a constraint to the finite element discretization in order to satisfy the Ladyzhenskaya-Babuska-Brezzi (LBB) condition for stability of the mixed method, similar to linear poroelasticity as well as incompressible elasticity and Stokes flow; failure to choose an appropriate discretization would result in locking and numerical oscillations in transient analysis. To demonstrate the numerical method, two problems of practical interests are considered: constrained swelling and flat-punch indentation of hydrogel layers. Constrained swelling may lead to instantaneous surface instability for a soft hydrogel in a good solvent, which can be regulated by assuming a stiff surface layer. Indentation relaxation of hydrogels is simulated beyond the linear regime under plane strain conditions, in comparison with two elastic limits for the instantaneous and equilibrium states. The effects of Poisson's ratio and loading rate are discussed. It is concluded that the present finite element method is robust and can be extended to study other transient phenomena in hydrogels.

  5. Compressible seal flow analysis using the finite element method with Galerkin solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1974-01-01

    A finite element method with a Galerkin solution (FEMGS) technique is formulated for the solution of nonlinear problems in high-pressure compressible seal flow analyses. An example of a three-dimensional axisymmetric flow having nonlinearities, due to compressibility, area expansion, and convective inertia, is used for illustrating the application of the technique.

  6. An Introduction of Finite Element Method in the Engineering Teaching at the University of Camaguey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napoles, Elsa; Blanco, Ramon; Jimenez, Rafael; Mc.Pherson, Yoanka

    This paper illuminates experiences related to introducing finite element methods (FEM) in mechanical and civil engineering courses at the University of Camaguey in Cuba and provides discussion on using FEM in postgraduate courses for industry engineers. Background information on the introduction of FEM in engineering teaching is focused on…

  7. A Stimulating Approach To Teaching, Learning and Assessing Finite Element Methods: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karadelis, J. N.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the benefits of introducing finite element methods into the curriculum of undergraduate courses. Analyzes the structure of the computer-assisted-design module and the extent to which it fulfills its main objectives. Discusses the efficiency of modern teaching and learning techniques used to develop skills for solving engineering problems;…

  8. Methods used for assessing stresses in buccomaxillary prostheses: photoelasticity, finite element technique, and extensometry.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Tonella, Bianca Piccolotto; Ribeiro, Paula do Prado; Ferraço, Renato; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2009-03-01

    The authors describe a literature revision on assessing stresses in buccomaxillary prostheses photoelasticity, finite element technique, and extensometry. They describe the techniques and the importance for use of each method in buccomaxillary prostheses with implants and the need of accomplishing more studies in this scarce literary area. PMID:19305257

  9. Simulation of wind effects on tall structures by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Masood

    2016-06-01

    In the present study finite element method is used to predict the wind forces on a tall structure. The governing equations of mass and momentum with boundary conditions are solved. The κ- ɛ turbulence model is utilized to calculate the turbulence viscosity. The results are independent from the generated mesh. The numerical results are validated with American Society of Civil Engineering standards.

  10. Automatic data generation scheme for finite-element method /FEDGE/ - Computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyuz, F.

    1970-01-01

    Algorithm provides for automatic input data preparation for the analysis of continuous domains in the fields of structural analysis, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics. The computer program utilizes the natural coordinate systems concept and the finite element method for data generation.

  11. Simulation of wind effects on tall structures by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Masood

    2015-07-01

    In the present study finite element method is used to predict the wind forces on a tall structure. The governing equations of mass and momentum with boundary conditions are solved. The κ-ɛ turbulence model is utilized to calculate the turbulence viscosity. The results are independent from the generated mesh. The numerical results are validated with American Society of Civil Engineering standards.

  12. Optimizing the seamless tube extrusion process using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Li, Li; Wang, Xiang; Ma, Xu Liang

    2010-03-01

    In order to reveal the mechanism of extrusion forming for large-scale aluminum alloy seamless pipe, in this research the rigid-viscous plastic finite element method was used to analyze the effect of the technological parameters of the aluminum alloy pipe extrusion process, consistent with the use requirements.

  13. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  14. Use of adjoint methods in the probabilistic finite element approach to fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wing Kam; Besterfield, Glen; Lawrence, Mark; Belytschko, Ted

    1988-01-01

    The adjoint method approach to probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM) is presented. When the number of objective functions is small compared to the number of random variables, the adjoint method is far superior to the direct method in evaluating the objective function derivatives with respect to the random variables. The PFEM is extended to probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) using an element which has the near crack-tip singular strain field embedded. Since only two objective functions (i.e., mode I and II stress intensity factors) are needed for PFM, the adjoint method is well suited.

  15. Reliability of the finite element method for calculating free edge stresses in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.; Raju, I. S.; Goree, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    The interlaminar normal stress distributions along the interface between the +45 deg and -45 deg plies of a graphite/epoxy laminate, obtained by various investigators, were found to disagree in both magnitude and sign. The reliability of the displacement-formulated finite element method in analyzing the edge-stress problem of a composite laminate is investigated. The history of the edge-stress problem is reviewed, and two well-known elasticity problems, one involving a stress discontinuity and one a singularity, are analyzed. The finite element analysis in these problems yields accurate stress distributions everywhere except in two elements closest to the stress discontinuity or singularity. Stress distributions for a + or -45 deg ply laminate near the singularity were similar to those of the two elasticity problems, demonstrating the methods, accuracy for calculating interlaminar stresses in composite laminates. The disagreement between the numerical methods was attributed to the unsymmetric stress tensor at singularity.

  16. A finite-element alternating method for two-dimensional Mode-1 crack configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Fichter, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    A finite-element alternating method is presented for 2-D Mode-1 crack problems. An analytical solution for an arbitrary polynomial normal pressure distribution applied to the crack faces is obtained and used as the basic solution in the method. The method is applied to several crack problems to study its efficiency and the results are compared to accurate stress-intensity factor solutions in the literature. The method gave reasonably accurate stress-intensity factors and crack opening displacements with minimal computing effort. Because the method must model only the uncracked body, finite-element models with many degrees of freedom are not warranted and therefore, the method has been implemented on personal computers.

  17. Pipe crack identification based on finite element method of second generation wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Junjie; He, Yumin; Chen, Xuefeng; Zhai, Zhi; Wang, Youming; He, Zhengjia

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, a new method is presented to identify crack location and size, which is based on stress intensity factor suitable for pipe structure and finite element method of second generation wavelets (SGW-FEM). Pipe structure is dispersed into a series of nested thin-walled pipes. By making use of stress intensity factor of the thin-walled pipe, a new calculation method of crack equivalent stiffness is proposed to solve the stress intensity factor of the pipe structure. On this basis, finite element method of second generation wavelets is used to establish the dynamic model of cracked pipe. Then we combine forward problem with inverse problem in order to establish quantitative identification method of the crack based on frequency change, which provides a non-destructive testing technology with vibration for the pipe structure. The efficiency of the proposed method is verified by experiments.

  18. Development of Finite Elements for Two-Dimensional Structural Analysis Using the Integrated Force Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaljevic, Igor; Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    The Integrated Force Method has been developed in recent years for the analysis of structural mechanics problems. This method treats all independent internal forces as unknown variables that can be calculated by simultaneously imposing equations of equilibrium and compatibility conditions. In this paper a finite element library for analyzing two-dimensional problems by the Integrated Force Method is presented. Triangular- and quadrilateral-shaped elements capable of modeling arbitrary domain configurations are presented. The element equilibrium and flexibility matrices are derived by discretizing the expressions for potential and complementary energies, respectively. The displacement and stress fields within the finite elements are independently approximated. The displacement field is interpolated as it is in the standard displacement method, and the stress field is approximated by using complete polynomials of the correct order. A procedure that uses the definitions of stress components in terms of an Airy stress function is developed to derive the stress interpolation polynomials. Such derived stress fields identically satisfy the equations of equilibrium. Moreover, the resulting element matrices are insensitive to the orientation of local coordinate systems. A method is devised to calculate the number of rigid body modes, and the present elements are shown to be free of spurious zero-energy modes. A number of example problems are solved by using the present library, and the results are compared with corresponding analytical solutions and with results from the standard displacement finite element method. The Integrated Force Method not only gives results that agree well with analytical and displacement method results but also outperforms the displacement method in stress calculations.

  19. Application of finite-element method to three-dimensional nuclear reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, K.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the finite element method to solve a realistic one-or-two energy group, multiregion, three-dimensional static neutron diffusion problem is studied. Linear, quadratic, and cubic serendipity box-shape elements are used. The resulting sets of simultaneous algebraic equations with thousands of unknowns are solved by the conjugate gradient method, without forming the large coefficient matrix explicitly. This avoids the complicated data management schemes to store such a large coefficient matrix. Three finite-element computer programs: FEM-LINEAR, FEM-QUADRATIC and FEM-CUBIC were developed, using the linear, quadratic, and cubic box-shape elements respectively. They are self-contained, using simple nodal labeling schemes, without the need for separate finite element mesh generating routines. The efficiency and accuracy of these computer programs are then compared among themselves, and with other computer codes. The cubic element model is not recommended for practical usage because it gives almost identical results as the quadratic model, but it requires considerably longer computation time. The linear model is less accurate than the quadratic model, but it requires much shorter computation time. For a large 3-D problem, the linear model is to be preferred since it gives acceptable accuracy. The quadratic model may be used if improved accuracy is desired.

  20. A general algorithm using finite element method for aerodynamic configurations at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, R.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element algorithm for numerical simulation of two-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flows was developed. The Navier-Stokes equations are suitably modelled to facilitate direct solution for the essential flow parameters. A leap-frog time differencing and Galerkin minimization of these model equations yields the finite element algorithm. The finite elements are triangular with bicubic shape functions approximating the solution space. The finite element matrices are unsymmetrically banded to facilitate savings in storage. An unsymmetric L-U decomposition is performed on the finite element matrices to obtain the solution for the boundary value problem.

  1. A method of coupling discrete dislocation plasticity to the crystal plasticity finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Balint, D. S.; Dini, D.

    2016-05-01

    A method of concurrent coupling of planar discrete dislocation plasticity (DDP) and a crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) method was devised for simulating plastic deformation in large polycrystals with discrete dislocation resolution in a single grain or cluster of grains for computational efficiency; computation time using the coupling method can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to DDP. The method is based on an iterative scheme initiated by a sub-model calculation, which ensures displacement and traction compatibility at all nodes at the interface between the DDP and CPFE domains. The proposed coupling approach is demonstrated using two plane strain problems: (i) uniaxial tension of a bi-crystal film and (ii) indentation of a thin film on a substrate. The latter was also used to demonstrate that the rigid substrate assumption used in earlier DDP studies is inadequate for indentation depths that are large compared to the film thickness, i.e. the effect of the plastic substrate modelled using CPFE becomes important. The coupling method can be used to study a wider range of indentation depths than previously possible using DDP alone, without sacrificing the indentation size effect regime captured by DDP. The method is general and can be applied to any problem where finer resolution of dislocation mediated plasticity is required to study the mechanical response of polycrystalline materials, e.g. to capture size effects locally within a larger elastic/plastic boundary value problem.

  2. Coupling upscaling finite element method for consolidation analysis of heterogeneous saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. W.; Fu, Z. D.

    2010-01-01

    The coupling upscaling finite element method is developed for solving the coupling problems of deformation and consolidation of heterogeneous saturated porous media under external loading conditions. The method couples two kinds of fully developed methodologies together, i.e., the numerical techniques developed for calculating the apparent and effective physical properties of the heterogeneous media and the upscaling techniques developed for simulating the fluid flow and mass transport properties in heterogeneous porous media. Equivalent permeability tensors and equivalent elastic modulus tensors are calculated for every coarse grid block in the coarse-scale model of the heterogeneous saturated porous media. Moreover, an oversampling technique is introduced to improve the calculation accuracy of the equivalent elastic modulus tensors. A numerical integration process is performed over the fine mesh within every coarse grid element to capture the small scale information induced by non-uniform scalar field properties such as density, compressibility, etc. Numerical experiments are carried out to examine the accuracy of the developed method. It shows that the numerical results obtained by the coupling upscaling finite element method on the coarse-scale models fit fairly well with the reference solutions obtained by traditional finite element method on the fine-scale models. Moreover, this method gets more accurate coarse-scale results than the previously developed coupling multiscale finite element method for solving this kind of coupling problems though it cannot recover the fine-scale solutions. At the same time, the method developed reduces dramatically the computing effort in both CPU time and memory for solving the transient problems, and therefore more large and computational-demanding coupling problems can be solved by computers.

  3. Stable Generalized Finite Element Method and associated iterative schemes; application to interface problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kergrene, Kenan; Babuška, Ivo; Banerjee, Uday

    2016-06-01

    The Generalized Finite Element Method (GFEM) is an extension of the Finite Element Method (FEM), where the standard finite element space is augmented with a space of non-polynomial functions, called the enrichment space. The functions in the enrichment space mimic the local behavior of the unknown solution of the underlying variational problem. GFEM has been successfully applied to a wide range of problems. However, it often suffers from bad conditioning, i.e., its conditioning may not be robust with respect to the mesh and in fact, the conditioning could be much worse than that of the standard FEM. In this paper, we present a numerical study that shows that if the "angle" between the finite element space and the enrichment space is bounded away from 0, uniformly with respect to the mesh, then the GFEM is stable, i.e., the conditioning of GFEM is not worse than that of the standard FEM. A GFEM with this property is called a Stable GFEM (SGFEM). The last part of the paper is devoted to the derivation of a robust iterative solver exploiting this angle condition. It is shown that the required "wall-clock" time is greatly reduced compared to popular GFEMs used in the literature.

  4. Coupling finite and boundary element methods for 2-D elasticity problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Raju, I. S.; Sistla, R.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element-boundary element (FE-BE) coupling method for two-dimensional elasticity problems is developed based on a weighted residual variational method in which a portion of the domain of interest is modeled by FEs and the remainder of the region by BEs. The performance of the FE-BE coupling method is demonstrated via applications to a simple 'patch test' problem and three-crack problems. The method passed the patch tests for various modeling configurations and yielded accurate strain energy release rates for the crack problems studied.

  5. Improved accuracy for finite element structural analysis via a new integrated force method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Aiello, Robert A.; Berke, Laszlo

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out to determine the accuracy of finite element analyses based on the stiffness method, a mixed method, and the new integrated force and dual integrated force methods. The numerical results were obtained with the following software: MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA for the stiffness method; an MHOST implementation method for the mixed method; and GIFT for the integrated force methods. The results indicate that on an overall basis, the stiffness and mixed methods present some limitations. The stiffness method generally requires a large number of elements in the model to achieve acceptable accuracy. The MHOST method tends to achieve a higher degree of accuracy for course models than does the stiffness method implemented by MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA. The two integrated force methods, which bestow simultaneous emphasis on stress equilibrium and strain compatibility, yield accurate solutions with fewer elements in a model. The full potential of these new integrated force methods remains largely unexploited, and they hold the promise of spawning new finite element structural analysis tools.

  6. Improved accuracy for finite element structural analysis via an integrated force method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Aiello, R. A.; Berke, L.

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out to determine the accuracy of finite element analyses based on the stiffness method, a mixed method, and the new integrated force and dual integrated force methods. The numerical results were obtained with the following software: MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA for the stiffness method; an MHOST implementation method for the mixed method; and GIFT for the integrated force methods. The results indicate that on an overall basis, the stiffness and mixed methods present some limitations. The stiffness method generally requires a large number of elements in the model to achieve acceptable accuracy. The MHOST method tends to achieve a higher degree of accuracy for course models than does the stiffness method implemented by MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA. The two integrated force methods, which bestow simultaneous emphasis on stress equilibrium and strain compatibility, yield accurate solutions with fewer elements in a model. The full potential of these new integrated force methods remains largely unexploited, and they hold the promise of spawning new finite element structural analysis tools.

  7. Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb method for the fast evaluation of Coulomb integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashige, Yuki; Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2007-04-01

    The authors propose a new linear-scaling method for the fast evaluation of Coulomb integrals with Gaussian basis functions called the Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb (GFC) method. In this method, the Coulomb potential is expanded in a basis of mixed Gaussian and finite-element auxiliary functions that express the core and smooth Coulomb potentials, respectively. Coulomb integrals can be evaluated by three-center one-electron overlap integrals among two Gaussian basis functions and one mixed auxiliary function. Thus, the computational cost and scaling for large molecules are drastically reduced. Several applications to molecular systems show that the GFC method is more efficient than the analytical integration approach that requires four-center two-electron repulsion integrals. The GFC method realizes a near linear scaling for both one-dimensional alanine α-helix chains and three-dimensional diamond pieces.

  8. Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb method for the fast evaluation of Coulomb integrals.

    PubMed

    Kurashige, Yuki; Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2007-04-14

    The authors propose a new linear-scaling method for the fast evaluation of Coulomb integrals with Gaussian basis functions called the Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb (GFC) method. In this method, the Coulomb potential is expanded in a basis of mixed Gaussian and finite-element auxiliary functions that express the core and smooth Coulomb potentials, respectively. Coulomb integrals can be evaluated by three-center one-electron overlap integrals among two Gaussian basis functions and one mixed auxiliary function. Thus, the computational cost and scaling for large molecules are drastically reduced. Several applications to molecular systems show that the GFC method is more efficient than the analytical integration approach that requires four-center two-electron repulsion integrals. The GFC method realizes a near linear scaling for both one-dimensional alanine alpha-helix chains and three-dimensional diamond pieces. PMID:17444700

  9. A Review on the Finite Element Methods for Heat Conduction in Functionally Graded Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R.; Jadon, V. K.; Singh, B.

    2015-01-01

    The review presented in this paper focuses mainly on the application of finite element methods for investigating the effect of heat transfer, variation of temperature and other parameters in the functionally graded materials. Different methods have been investigated for thermal conduction in functionally graded materials. The use of FEM for steady state heat transfer has been addressed in this work. The authors have also discussed the utilization of FEM based shear deformation theories and FEM in combination with other methods for the problems involving complexity of the shape and geometry of functionally graded materials. Finite element methods proved to be effective for the solution of heat transfer problem in functionally graded materials. These methods can be used for steady state heat transfer and as well as for transient state.

  10. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth. PMID:26213205

  11. Probabilistic fracture finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Lua, Y. J.

    1991-01-01

    The Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (PFM) is a promising method for estimating the fatigue life and inspection cycles for mechanical and structural components. The Probability Finite Element Method (PFEM), which is based on second moment analysis, has proved to be a promising, practical approach to handle problems with uncertainties. As the PFEM provides a powerful computational tool to determine first and second moment of random parameters, the second moment reliability method can be easily combined with PFEM to obtain measures of the reliability of the structural system. The method is also being applied to fatigue crack growth. Uncertainties in the material properties of advanced materials such as polycrystalline alloys, ceramics, and composites are commonly observed from experimental tests. This is mainly attributed to intrinsic microcracks, which are randomly distributed as a result of the applied load and the residual stress.

  12. Smoothed finite element method implemented in a resultant eight-node solid-shell element for geometrical linear analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Élie-Dit-Cosaque, Xavier J.-G.; Gakwaya, Augustin; Naceur, Hakim

    2015-01-01

    A smoothed finite element method formulation for the resultant eight-node solid-shell element is presented in this paper for geometrical linear analysis. The smoothing process is successfully performed on the element mid-surface to deal with the membrane and bending effects of the stiffness matrix. The strain smoothing process allows replacing the Cartesian derivatives of shape functions by the product of shape functions with normal vectors to the element mid-surface boundaries. The present formulation remains competitive when compared to the classical finite element formulations since no inverse of the Jacobian matrix is calculated. The three dimensional resultant shell theory allows the element kinematics to be defined only with the displacement degrees of freedom. The assumed natural strain method is used not only to eliminate the transverse shear locking problem encountered in thin-walled structures, but also to reduce trapezoidal effects. The efficiency of the present element is presented and compared with that of standard solid-shell elements through various benchmark problems including some with highly distorted meshes.

  13. A finite element method for shear stresses calculation in composite blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, B.

    1991-09-01

    A finite-element method is developed for accurately calculating shear stresses in helicopter blade models, induced by torsion and shearing forces. The method can also be used to compute the equivalent torsional stiffness of the section, their transverse shear coefficient, and the position of their center of torsion. A grid generator method which is a part of the calculation program is also described and used to discretize the sections quickly and to condition the grid data reliably. The finite-element method was validated on a few sections composed of isotropic materials and was then applied to a blade model sections made of composite materials. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental data.

  14. A fictitious domain approach for the Stokes problem based on the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Court, Sébastien; Fournié, Michel; Lozinski, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we propose to extend to the Stokes problem a fictitious domain approach inspired by eXtended Finite Element Method and studied for Poisson problem in [Renard]. The method allows computations in domains whose boundaries do not match. A mixed finite element method is used for fluid flow. The interface between the fluid and the structure is localized by a level-set function. Dirichlet boundary conditions are taken into account using Lagrange multiplier. A stabilization term is introduced to improve the approximation of the normal trace of the Cauchy stress tensor at the interface and avoid the inf-sup condition between the spaces for velocity and the Lagrange multiplier. Convergence analysis is given and several numerical tests are performed to illustrate the capabilities of the method.

  15. A novel finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-Robot Assisted Orthopedic Surgery System.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiheng; Du, Zhijiang; Monan, Wang

    2006-01-01

    To build a biomechanical human model can make much sense for surgical training and surgical rehearse. Especially, it will be more meaningful to develop a biomechanical model to guide the control strategy for the medical robots in HIT-Robot Assisted Orthopedic Surgery System (HIT-RAOS). In this paper, based the successful work of others, a novel reliable finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-RAOS was developed to simulate the force needed in reposition procedure. Geometrical model was obtained from 3D reconstruction from CT images of a just died man. Using this boundary information, the finite element model of the leg including part of femur, broken upper tibia, broken lower tibia, talus, calcaneus, Kirschner nail, muscles and other soft tissues was created in ANSYS. Furthermore, as it was too difficult to reconstruct the accurate geometry model from CT images, a new simplified muscle model was presented. The bony structures and tendons were defined as linearly elastic, while soft tissues and muscle fibers were assumed to be hyper elastic. To validate this model, the same dead man was involved to simulate the patient, and a set of data of the force needed to separate the two broken bones and the distance between them in reposition procedure was recorded. Then, another set of data was acquired from the finite element analysis. After comparison, the two sets of data matched well. The Finite Element model was proved to be acceptable. PMID:17945663

  16. A novel finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-robot assisted orthopedic surgery system.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiheng; Du, Zhijiang; Wang, Monan

    2006-01-01

    To build a biomechanical human model can make much sense for surgical training and surgical rehearse. Especially, it will be more meaningful to develop a biomechanical model to guide the control strategy for the medical robots in HIT-Robot Assisted Orthopedic Surgery System (HIT-RAOS). In this paper, based the successful work of others, a novel reliable finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-RAOS was developed to simulate the force needed in reposition procedure. Geometrical model was obtained from 3D reconstruction from CT images of a just died man. Using this boundary information, the finite element model of the leg including part of femur, broken upper tibia, broken lower tibia, talus, calcaneus, Kirschner nail, muscles and other soft tissues was created in ANSYS. Furthermore, as it was too difficult to reconstruct the accurate geometry model from CT images, a new simplified muscle model was presented. The bony structures and tendons were defined as linearly elastic, while soft tissues and muscle fibers were assumed to be hyper elastic. To validate this model, the same dead man was involved to simulate the patient, and a set of data of the force needed to separate the two broken bones and the distance between them in reposition procedure was recorded. Then, another set of data was acquired from the finite element analysis. After comparison, the two sets of data matched well. The Finite Element model was proved to be acceptable. PMID:17959437

  17. A finite element method for solving the shallow water equations on the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comblen, Richard; Legrand, Sébastien; Deleersnijder, Eric; Legat, Vincent

    Within the framework of ocean general circulation modeling, the present paper describes an efficient way to discretize partial differential equations on curved surfaces by means of the finite element method on triangular meshes. Our approach benefits from the inherent flexibility of the finite element method. The key idea consists in a dialog between a local coordinate system defined for each element in which integration takes place, and a nodal coordinate system in which all local contributions related to a vectorial degree of freedom are assembled. Since each element of the mesh and each degree of freedom are treated in the same way, the so-called pole singularity issue is fully circumvented. Applied to the shallow water equations expressed in primitive variables, this new approach has been validated against the standard test set defined by [Williamson, D.L., Drake, J.B., Hack, J.J., Jakob, R., Swarztrauber, P.N., 1992. A standard test set for numerical approximations to the shallow water equations in spherical geometry. Journal of Computational Physics 102, 211-224]. Optimal rates of convergence for the P1NC-P1 finite element pair are obtained, for both global and local quantities of interest. Finally, the approach can be extended to three-dimensional thin-layer flows in a straightforward manner.

  18. Dynamic Shape Reconstruction of Three-Dimensional Frame Structures Using the Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A robust and efficient computational method for reconstructing the three-dimensional displacement field of truss, beam, and frame structures, using measured surface-strain data, is presented. Known as shape sensing , this inverse problem has important implications for real-time actuation and control of smart structures, and for monitoring of structural integrity. The present formulation, based on the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM), uses a least-squares variational principle involving strain measures of Timoshenko theory for stretching, torsion, bending, and transverse shear. Two inverse-frame finite elements are derived using interdependent interpolations whose interior degrees-of-freedom are condensed out at the element level. In addition, relationships between the order of kinematic-element interpolations and the number of required strain gauges are established. As an example problem, a thin-walled, circular cross-section cantilevered beam subjected to harmonic excitations in the presence of structural damping is modeled using iFEM; where, to simulate strain-gauge values and to provide reference displacements, a high-fidelity MSC/NASTRAN shell finite element model is used. Examples of low and high-frequency dynamic motion are analyzed and the solution accuracy examined with respect to various levels of discretization and the number of strain gauges.

  19. A p-version finite element method for steady incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterscheidt, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    A new p-version finite element formulation for steady, incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer problems is presented. The steady-state residual equations are obtained by considering a limiting case of the least-squares formulation for the transient problem. The method circumvents the Babuska-Brezzi condition, permitting the use of equal-order interpolation for velocity and pressure, without requiring the use of arbitrary parameters. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and generality of the method.

  20. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method applied to the 1-D spherical neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Machorro, Eric . E-mail: machorro@amath.washington.edu

    2007-04-10

    Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods are used to estimate solutions to the non-scattering 1-D spherical neutron transport equation. Various trial and test spaces are compared in the context of a few sample problems whose exact solution is known. Certain trial spaces avoid unphysical behaviors that seem to plague other methods. Comparisons with diamond differencing and simple corner-balancing are presented to highlight these improvements.

  1. A finite element method for the thermochemical decomposition of polymeric materials. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. M.; Salamon, N. J.

    1992-01-01

    The governing differential equations are developed to model the thermomechanical behavior of chemically decomposing, polymeric materials. These equations account for thermal and gaseous diffusion through a poroelastic, transversely isotropic solid. The Bubnov-Galerkin finite element method is applied to the governing equations to cast the coupled set into a single matrix equation. A method for solving these equations simultaneously at each time step is discussed.

  2. Coupling equivalent plate and finite element formulations in multiple-method structural analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.; Norwood, Keith

    1994-01-01

    A coupled multiple-method analysis procedure for use late in conceptual design or early in preliminary design of aircraft structures is described. Using this method, aircraft wing structures are represented with equivalent plate models, and structural details such as engine/pylon structure, landing gear, or a 'stick' model of a fuselage are represented with beam finite element models. These two analysis methods are implemented in an integrated multiple-method formulation that involves the assembly and solution of a combined set of linear equations. The corresponding solution vector contains coefficients of the polynomials that describe the deflection of the wing and also the components of translations and rotations at the joints of the beam members. Two alternative approaches for coupling the methods are investigated; one using transition finite elements and the other using Lagrange multipliers. The coupled formulation is applied to the static analysis and vibration analysis of a conceptual design model of a fighter aircraft. The results from the coupled method are compared with corresponding results from an analysis in which the entire model is composed of finite elements.

  3. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Woo, Alex C.; Yu, C. Long

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This is due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, and as a result the design of conformal arrays is primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. Herewith we shall extend this formulation for conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation, and it is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements. The implementation shall be discussed in a later report.

  4. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This was due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays. As a result, the design of conformal arrays was primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We are extending this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In doing so, we will develop a mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation. It is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements.

  5. Strain energy release rate determination of stress intensity factors by finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, R. M., Jr.; Pipes, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The stiffness derivative finite element technique is used to determine the Mode I stress intensity factors for three-crack configurations. The geometries examined include the double edge notch, single edge notch, and the center crack. The results indicate that when the specified guidelines of the Stiffness Derivative Method are used, a high degree of accuracy can be achieved with an optimized, relatively coarse finite element mesh composed of standard, four-node, plane strain, quadrilateral elements. The numerically generated solutions, when compared with analytical ones, yield results within 0.001 percent of each other for the double edge crack, 0.858 percent for the single edge crack, and 2.021 percent for the center crack.

  6. Evolutionary topology optimization using the extended finite element method and isolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Meisam; Wildman, Ricky; Ashcroft, Ian

    2014-05-01

    This study presents a new algorithm for structural topological optimization of two-dimensional continuum structures by combining the extended finite element method (X-FEM) with an evolutionary optimization algorithm. Taking advantage of an isoline design approach for boundary representation in a fixed grid domain, X-FEM can be implemented to improve the accuracy of finite element solutions on the boundary during the optimization process. Although this approach does not use any remeshing or moving mesh algorithms, final topologies have smooth and clearly defined boundaries which need no further interpretation. Numerical comparisons of the converged solutions with standard bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization solutions show the efficiency of the proposed method, and comparison with the converged solutions using MSC NASTRAN confirms the high accuracy of this method.

  7. Scattering and radiation analysis of three-dimensional cavity arrays via a hybrid finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jian-Ming; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid numerical technique is presented for a characterization of the scattering and radiation properties of three-dimensional cavity arrays recessed in a ground plane. The technique combines the finite element and boundary integral methods and invokes Floquet's representation to formulate a system of equations for the fields at the apertures and those inside the cavities. The system is solved via the conjugate gradient method in conjunction with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) thus achieving an O(N) storage requirement. By virtue of the finite element method, the proposed technique is applicable to periodic arrays comprised of cavities having arbitrary shape and filled with inhomogeneous dielectrics. Several numerical results are presented, along with new measured data, which demonstrate the validity, efficiency, and capability of the technique.

  8. Adaptive meshless local maximum-entropy finite element method for convection-diffusion problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Young, D. L.; Hong, H. K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a meshless local maximum-entropy finite element method (LME-FEM) is proposed to solve 1D Poisson equation and steady state convection-diffusion problems at various Peclet numbers in both 1D and 2D. By using local maximum-entropy (LME) approximation scheme to construct the element shape functions in the formulation of finite element method (FEM), additional nodes can be introduced within element without any mesh refinement to increase the accuracy of numerical approximation of unknown function, which procedure is similar to conventional p-refinement but without increasing the element connectivity to avoid the high conditioning matrix. The resulted LME-FEM preserves several significant characteristics of conventional FEM such as Kronecker-delta property on element vertices, partition of unity of shape function and exact reproduction of constant and linear functions. Furthermore, according to the essential properties of LME approximation scheme, nodes can be introduced in an arbitrary way and the continuity of the shape function along element edge is kept at the same time. No transition element is needed to connect elements of different orders. The property of arbitrary local refinement makes LME-FEM be a numerical method that can adaptively solve the numerical solutions of various problems where troublesome local mesh refinement is in general necessary to obtain reasonable solutions. Several numerical examples with dramatically varying solutions are presented to test the capability of the current method. The numerical results show that LME-FEM can obtain much better and stable solutions than conventional FEM with linear element.

  9. Finite-Element Methods for Real-Time Simulation of Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basdogan, Cagatay

    2003-01-01

    Two finite-element methods have been developed for mathematical modeling of the time-dependent behaviors of deformable objects and, more specifically, the mechanical responses of soft tissues and organs in contact with surgical tools. These methods may afford the computational efficiency needed to satisfy the requirement to obtain computational results in real time for simulating surgical procedures as described in Simulation System for Training in Laparoscopic Surgery (NPO-21192) on page 31 in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. Simulation of the behavior of soft tissue in real time is a challenging problem because of the complexity of soft-tissue mechanics. The responses of soft tissues are characterized by nonlinearities and by spatial inhomogeneities and rate and time dependences of material properties. Finite-element methods seem promising for integrating these characteristics of tissues into computational models of organs, but they demand much central-processing-unit (CPU) time and memory, and the demand increases with the number of nodes and degrees of freedom in a given finite-element model. Hence, as finite-element models become more realistic, it becomes more difficult to compute solutions in real time. In both of the present methods, one uses approximate mathematical models trading some accuracy for computational efficiency and thereby increasing the feasibility of attaining real-time up36 NASA Tech Briefs, October 2003 date rates. The first of these methods is based on modal analysis. In this method, one reduces the number of differential equations by selecting only the most significant vibration modes of an object (typically, a suitable number of the lowest-frequency modes) for computing deformations of the object in response to applied forces.

  10. Consistent linearization method for finite-element analysis of viscoelastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.D.; Pelessone, D.

    1983-05-01

    A method of formulating material models for viscoelastic analysis using the finite-element method is presented. The method, named consistent linearization, includes the influence of creep in the material stiffness in a theoretically ideal manner. This method has been applied to the linear viscoelastic analysis of graphite subject to irradiation. Previously, using the initial strain method, short time steps had been required to avoid a numerical instability associated with the rapid transient creep. Using the consistent linearization method a factor of 15 reduction in computer time was achieved for the same accuracy.