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Sample records for finite impulse response

  1. Finite impulse response utilizing the principle of superposition.

    PubMed

    Carter, S E; Malocha, D C

    1997-01-01

    A critical parameter in any finite impulse response (FIR) design is the impulse response length, which must be optimized for the given design specifications in order to reduce the size of the filter. To this end, many design algorithms have been introduced, such as Remez exchange, linear programming, and least mean squares. A new algorithm has been derived that is simple, efficient, and accurate for the design of arbitrary filter specifications and requires fewer computations than many other FIR approaches. This paper provides the definition of the basic functions used for the design process. An overview of the design process is given and the design technique used to design filters with tailored passband and stopband responses to yield a near-optimum time length is presented. This design can be very useful when compensating for the effects of a second transducer or other second order effects in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. The effects of monotonically increasing sidelobes on the impulse response length are discussed and illustrated. The addition of arbitrary phase response to the filter design process is discussed. The results of the current FIR approach are discussed and compared with other design techniques. PMID:18244136

  2. Design and application of finite impulse response digital filters.

    PubMed

    Miller, T R; Sampathkumaran, K S

    1982-01-01

    The finite impulse response (FIR) digital filter is a spatial domain filter with a frequency domain representation. The theory of the FIR filter is presented and techniques are described for designing FIR filters with known frequency response characteristics. Rational design principles are emphasized based on characterization of the imaging system using the modulation transfer function and physical properties of the imaged objects. Bandpass, Wiener, and low-pass filters were designed and applied to 201Tl myocardial images. The bandpass filter eliminates low-frequency image components that represent background activity and high-frequency components due to noise. The Wiener, or minimum mean square error filter 'sharpens' the image while also reducing noise. The Wiener filter illustrates the power of the FIR technique to design filters with any desired frequency response. The low-pass filter, while of relative limited use, is presented to compare it with a popular elementary 'smoothing' filter. PMID:7060600

  3. Clock recovering characteristics of adaptive finite-impulse-response filters in digital coherent optical receivers.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2011-03-14

    We analyze the clock-recovery process based on adaptive finite-impulse-response (FIR) filtering in digital coherent optical receivers. When the clock frequency is synchronized between the transmitter and the receiver, only five taps in half-symbol-spaced FIR filters can adjust the sampling phase of analog-to-digital conversion optimally, enabling bit-error rate performance independent of the initial sampling phase. Even if the clock frequency is not synchronized between them, the clock-frequency misalignment can be adjusted within an appropriate block interval; thus, we can achieve an asynchronous clock mode of operation of digital coherent receivers with block processing of the symbol sequence. PMID:21445201

  4. A Methodology for Rapid Prototyping Peak-Constrained Least-Squares Bit-Serial Finite Impulse Response Filters in FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreira, Alex; Fox, Trevor W.; Turner, Laurence E.

    2003-12-01

    Area-efficient peak-constrained least-squares (PCLS) bit-serial finite impulse response (FIR) filter implementations can be rapidly prototyped in field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) with the methodology presented in this paper. Faster generation of the FPGA configuration bitstream is possible with a new application-specific mapping and placement method that uses JBits to avoid conventional general-purpose mapping and placement tools. JBits is a set of Java classes that provide an interface into the Xilinx Virtex FPGA configuration bitstream, allowing the user to generate new configuration bitstreams. PCLS coefficient generation allows passband-to-stopband energy ratio (PSR) performance to be traded for a reduction in the filter's hardware cost without altering the minimum stopband attenuation. Fixed-point coefficients that meet the frequency response and hardware cost specifications can be generated with the PCLS method. It is not possible to meet these specifications solely by the quantization of floating-point coefficients generated in other methods.

  5. Temporal Preparation, Response Inhibition and Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Angel; Trivino, Monica; Perez-Duenas, Carolina; Acosta, Alberto; Lupianez, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Temporal preparation and impulsivity involve overlapping neural structures (prefrontal cortex) and cognitive functions (response inhibition and time perception), however, their interrelations had not been investigated. We studied such interrelations by comparing the performance of groups with low vs. high non-clinical trait impulsivity during a…

  6. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  7. Finite-element nonlinear transient response computer programs PLATE 1 and CIVM-PLATE 1 for the analysis of panels subjected to impulse or impact loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, R. L.; Witmer, E. A.; French, S. E.; Rodal, J. J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two computer programs are described for predicting the transient large deflection elastic viscoplastic responses of thin single layer, initially flat unstiffened or integrally stiffened, Kirchhoff-Lov ductile metal panels. The PLATE 1 program pertains to structural responses produced by prescribed externally applied transient loading or prescribed initial velocity distributions. The collision imparted velocity method PLATE 1 program concerns structural responses produced by impact of an idealized nondeformable fragment. Finite elements are used to represent the structure in both programs. Strain hardening and strain rate effects of initially isotropic material are considered.

  8. Intensity impulse response of SDM links.

    PubMed

    Mecozzi, Antonio; Antonelli, Cristian; Shtaif, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We study the response of space-division multiplexed fiber links to an excitation by a short impulse of the optical intensity. We show that, in the presence of full mixing, the intensity impulse response is Gaussian, confirming recently reported experimental observations, and relate its variance to the mean square of the mode dispersion vector of the link τ(->). The good agreement between our theory and the previously published experiments provides solid foundations to the random coupling model of SDM fiber links, and provides a tool for efficient design of MIMO-DSP receivers. PMID:25836803

  9. Lewis rats have greater response impulsivity than Fischer rats.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Potenza, Marc N; Grunberg, Neil E

    2014-11-01

    Impulsivity, a tendency toward immediate action without consideration of future consequences, is associated with a wide array of problematic behaviors. Response impulsivity, a type of behaviorally-assessed impulsivity characterized by behavioral disinhibition, is also associated with health risk behaviors. Response impulsivity is distinct from choice impulsivity, which is characterized by intolerance for delay. Lewis rats have higher levels of choice impulsivity than Fischer rats (Anderson & Woolverton, 2005; Madden et al., 2008; Stein et al., 2012). However, no studies have examined whether Lewis and Fischer rats have different levels of response impulsivity. The present research examined response impulsivity in the two rat strains. Subjects were 16 male Lewis and Fischer rats. Rats' response impulsivity was measured using the Five Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (5-CSRTT). In addition, their locomotor activity was measured in locomotor activity chambers. Lewis rats had more premature responses than Fischer rats during the 5-CSRTT assessment [F(1, 14)=5.34, p<0.05], indicating higher levels of response impulsivity. Locomotor activity did not differ between rat strain groups [F(1, 14)=3.05, p=.10], suggesting that overall movement did not account for group differences in response impulsivity on the 5-CSRTT. It can be concluded from this research that Lewis rats have higher levels of response impulsivity than Fischer rats, and therefore provide a valid rat model of individual differences in impulsivity. PMID:24613059

  10. SAR impulse response with residual chirps.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-06-01

    A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

  11. Subjective field study of response to impulsive helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    Subjects, located outdoors and indoors, judged the noisiness and other subjective noise characteristics of flyovers of two helicopters and a propeller driven airplane as part of a study of the effects of impulsiveness on the subjective response to helicopter noise. In the first experiment, the impulsive characteristics of one helicopter was controlled by varying the main rotor speed while maintaining a constant airspeed in level flight. The second experiment which utilized only the helicopters, included descent and level flight operations. The more impulsive helicopter was consistently judged less noisy than the less impulsive helicopter at equal effective perceived noise levels (EPNL). The ability of EPNL to predict noisiness was not improved by the addition of either of two proposed impulse corrections. A subjective measure of impulsiveness, however, which was not significantly related to the proposed impulse corrections, was found to improve the predictive ability of EPNL.

  12. Calculation of impulse responses with a cellular automata algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barjau, Ana

    2001-05-01

    The air columns in musical instruments usually have a predominant dimension and thus are very often modeled as 1D systems where uniparametric waves propagate. Different algorithms can be found in the literature to simulate this propagation. The more widely used are finite difference schemes and delay lines. A finite difference scheme (FD) is a numerical integration of a differential formulation (the wave equation), while delay lines (DL) use analytical exact solutions of the wave equation over finite lengths. A new and different approach is that of a cellular automaton (CA) scheme. The underlying philosophy is opposite those of FD and DL, as the starting point is not the wave equation. In a CA approach, the phenomenon to be studied is reduced to a few simple physical laws that are applied to a set of cells representing the physical system (in the present case, the propagation medium). In this paper, a CA will be proposed to obtain the impulse response of different bore geometries. The results will be compared to those obtained with other algorithms.

  13. Estimating the impulse response of buried objects from ground-penetrating radar signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lijn, Fedde; Roth, Friedrich; Verhaegen, Michel

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents a novel deconvolution algorithm designed to estimate the impulse response of buried objects based on ground penetrating radar (GPR) signals. The impulse response is a rich source of information about the buried object and therefore very useful for intelligent signal processing of GPR data. For example, it can be used in a target classification scheme to reduce the false alarm rate in demining operations. Estimating the target impulse response from the incident and scattered radar signals is a basic deconvolution problem. However, noise sensitivity and ground dispersion prevent the use of simple deconvolution methods like linear least squares deconvolution. Instead, a new deconvolution algorithm has been developed that computes estimates adhering to a physical impulse response model and that can be characterized by a limited number of parameters. It is shown that the new algorithm is robust with respect to noise and that it can deal with ground dispersion. The general performance of the algorithm has been tested on data generated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. The results demonstrate that the algorithm can distinguish between different dielectric and metal targets, making it very suitable for use in a classification scheme. Moreover, since the estimated impulse responses have physical meaning they can be related to target characteristics such as size and material properties. A direct application of this is the estimation of the permittivity of a dielectric target from its impulse response and that of a calibration target.

  14. Understanding the impulse response method applied to concrete bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clem, D. J.; Popovics, J. S.; Schumacher, T.; Oh, T.; Ham, S.; Wu, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Impulse Response (IR) method is a well-established form of non-destructive testing (NDT) where the dynamic response of an element resulting from an impact event (hammer blow) is measured with a geophone to make conclusions about the element's integrity, stiffness, and/or support conditions. The existing ASTM Standard C1740-10 prescribes a set of parameters that can be used to evaluate the conditions above. These parameters are computed from the so-called `mobility' spectrum which is obtained by dividing the measured bridge deck response by the measured impact force in the frequency domain. While applying the test method in the laboratory as well as on an actual in-service concrete bridge deck, the authors of this paper observed several limitations that are presented and discussed in this paper. In order to better understand the underlying physics of the IR method, a Finite Element (FE) model was created. Parameters prescribed in the Standard were then computed from the FE data and are discussed. One main limitation appears to be the use of a fixed upper frequency of 800 Hz. Test data from the real bridge deck as well as the FE model both show that most energy is found above that limit. This paper presents and discusses limitations of the ASTM Standard found by the authors and suggests ways for improving it.

  15. Inattention, impulsive action, and subjective response to d-amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Weafer, Jessica; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-01-01

    Background Both impulsivity and sensitivity to the rewarding effects of drugs have long been considered risk factors for drug abuse. There is some preclinical evidence to suggest that the two are related; however, there is little information about how specific behavioral components of impulsivity are related to the acute euphorigenic effects of drugs in humans. The aim of the current study was to examine the degree to which both inattention and impulsive action predicted subjective response to amphetamine. Methods Healthy adults (n=165) performed the behavioral tasks and rated their subjective response to amphetamine (0, 5, 10, and 20 mg). Inattention was assessed as attention lapses on a simple reaction time task, and impulsive action was measured by stop RT on the stop task. Subjective response to amphetamine was assessed with the Drug Effects Questionnaire (DEQ) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results Hierarchical linear regression analyses showed significant negative associations between attention lapses and subjective response to amphetamine on DEQ measures. By contrast, stop RT was positively associated with responses on both DEQ and POMS measures. Additionally, a dose-response relationship was observed, such that the strength of these associations increased with higher doses of amphetamine. Conclusions These findings suggest that inattention is associated with less subjective response to amphetamine. By contrast, the heightened sensitivity to stimulant drug reward observed in individuals high in impulsive action suggests that this might be one mechanism contributing to increased risk for stimulant drug abuse in these individuals. PMID:23790566

  16. Open-loop dereverberation of multichannel room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bowon; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark A.; Goudeseune, Camille

    2003-04-01

    We are developing the audio display for a CAVE-type virtual reality theater, a 3-m cube with displays covering all six rigid faces. The user's headgear continuously reports ear positions so headphones would be possible, but we nevertheless prefer loudspeakers because this enhances the sense of total immersion. Because sounds produced at the loudspeakers are distorted by the room impulse responses, we therefore face the problem of controlling the sound at the listener's two ears. Our proposed solution consists of open-loop acoustic point control, i.e., dereverberation. The room impulse responses from each loudspeaker to each ear of the listener are inverted using multichannel inversion methods, to create exactly the desired sound field at the listener's ears. Because the actual room impulse responses cannot be measured in real time (as the listener walks around), instead the impulse responses simulated by the image-source method is used. A new evaluation criterion is proposed to quantitatively evaluate both the simulation and the open-loop dereverberation. The actual impulse responses used for this evaluation are measured with a starter pistol, since this best approximates the point source assumed by the image-source method.

  17. Can an "impulse response" really be defined for a photoreceiver?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile-Pelaez, F. Javier

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we examine the validity of the concept of impulse response employed to characterize the time response and the signal-to-noise ratio of p-i-n and similar photodetecting devices. We analyze critically the way in which the formalism of analog linear systems has been extrapolated, by employing results from macroscopic electromagnetic theory such as the Shockley-Ramo theorem or any equivalent approach, to the extreme case of a single-photon detection. We argue that the concept of "response to an optical impulse" is ill-defined in the customary terms it is envisioned in the literature, this is, as an output current pulse having a certain predictable, calculated temporal shape, in response to the detection of an optical "Dirac delta" impulse, conceived in turn as the absorption of a single photon.

  18. Fracture and impulse based finite-discrete element modeling of fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluszny, A.; Tang, X. H.; Zimmerman, R. W.

    2013-11-01

    A numerical method for fragmentation is presented that combines the finite element method with the impulse-based discrete element method (impulse-based FDEM). In contrast to existing methods, fragments are not represented as a conglomeration of spheres; instead, their shapes are represented using solid modeling techniques, and are the result of multiple fracture growth. Fracture growth within each three-dimensional fragment is controlled by stress intensity factors computed using the finite element method and the reduced virtual integration technique. Non-convex fragment interaction and movement is modeled using impulse dynamics, rather than a penalty-based method. Collisions leading to fracture are handled individually by propagating pre-existing internal flaws and cracks. The method utilizes decoupled geometry and mesh representation, and local failure and propagation criteria. Fractures that reach volume boundaries lead to further fragmentation. The approach is demonstrated by the fragmentation of a sphere, which exhibits a velocity-dependent fragment size distribution. The distribution is characterized by a two-parameter Weibull distribution, an emergent property of the simulation. Results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  19. Impulse and Frequency Response of a Moving Coil Galvanometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeill, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which a moving coil galvanometer is studied and the electromotive force generated by the swinging coil provides the impulse response information in a form suitable for digitizing and inputing to a microcomputer. Background information and analysis of typical data are included. (JN)

  20. Understanding Computation of Impulse Response in Microwave Software Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potrebic, Milka M.; Tosic, Dejan V.; Pejovic, Predrag V.

    2010-01-01

    In modern microwave engineering curricula, the introduction of the many new topics in microwave industrial development, or of software tools for design and simulation, sometimes results in students having an inadequate understanding of the fundamental theory. The terminology for and the explanation of algorithms for calculating impulse response in…

  1. Inhibition and impulsivity: behavioral and neural basis of response control.

    PubMed

    Bari, Andrea; Robbins, Trevor W

    2013-09-01

    In many circumstances alternative courses of action and thoughts have to be inhibited to allow the emergence of goal-directed behavior. However, this has not been the accepted view in the past and only recently has inhibition earned its own place in the neurosciences as a fundamental cognitive function. In this review we first introduce the concept of inhibition from early psychological speculations based on philosophical theories of the human mind. The broad construct of inhibition is then reduced to its most readily observable component which necessarily is its behavioral manifestation. The study of 'response inhibition' has the advantage of dealing with a relatively simple and straightforward process, the overriding of a planned or already initiated action. Deficient inhibitory processes profoundly affect everyday life, causing impulsive conduct which is generally detrimental for the individual. Impulsivity has been consistently linked to several types of addiction, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, mania and other psychiatric conditions. Our discussion of the behavioral assessment of impulsivity will focus on objective laboratory tasks of response inhibition that have been implemented in parallel for humans and other species with relatively few qualitative differences. The translational potential of these measures has greatly improved our knowledge of the neurobiological basis of behavioral inhibition and impulsivity. We will then review the current models of behavioral inhibition along with their expression via underlying brain regions, including those involved in the activation of the brain's emergency 'brake' operation, those engaged in more controlled and sustained inhibitory processes and other ancillary executive functions. PMID:23856628

  2. Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Vassiliadis, D.

    2011-01-01

    We show how a general class of spatio-temporal nonlinear impulse-response forecast networks (Volterra networks) can be constructed from a taxonomy of nonlinear autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous inputs (NAR-MAX) input-output equations, and used to model the evolution of energetic particle f uxes in the Van Allen radiation belts. We present initial results for the nonlinear response of the radiation belts to conditions a month earlier. The essential features of spatio-temporal observations are recovered with the model echoing the results of state space models and linear f nite impulse-response models whereby the strongest coupling peak occurs in the preceding 1-2 days. It appears that such networks hold promise for the development of accurate and fully data-driven space weather modelling, monitoring and forecast tools.

  3. Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Vassiliadis, D.

    2011-01-04

    We show how a general class of spatio-temporal nonlinear impulse-response forecast networks (Volterra networks) can be constructed from a taxonomy of nonlinear autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous inputs (NAR-MAX) input-output equations, and used to model the evolution of energetic particle f uxes in the Van Allen radiation belts. We present initial results for the nonlinear response of the radiation belts to conditions a month earlier. The essential features of spatio-temporal observations are recovered with the model echoing the results of state space models and linear f nite impulse-response models whereby the strongest coupling peak occurs in the preceding 1-2 days. It appears that such networks hold promise for the development of accurate and fully data-driven space weather modelling, monitoring and forecast tools.

  4. Auditorium acoustics evaluation based on simulated impulse response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuoxian; Wang, Hongwei; Zhao, Yuezhe

    2001-05-01

    The impulse responses and other acoustical parameters of Huangpu Teenager Palace in Guangzhou were measured. Meanwhile, the acoustical simulation and auralization based on software ODEON were also made. The comparison between the parameters based on computer simulation and measuring is given. This case study shows that auralization technique based on computer simulation can be used for predicting the acoustical quality of a hall at its design stage.

  5. Impulse control and criminal responsibility: lessons from neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Penney, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Almost all of the world's legal systems recognize the "M'Naghten" exception to criminal responsibility: the inability to appreciate the wrongfulness of action. This exception rests on the assumption that punishment is morally justified only if the defendant was able to choose whether to do wrong. Jurists and jurisdictions differ, however, on whether to extend M'Naghten's logic to cases where the defendant understood the wrongfulness of an act but was incapable of resisting an impulse to commit it. In this article I ask whether contemporary neuroscience can help lawmakers to decide whether to adopt or retain this defense, known variously as the "irresistible impulse" defense or the "control" or "volitional" test for insanity. More specifically, I ask firstly, whether it is empirically true that a person can understand the wrongfulness of an act yet be powerless to refrain from committing it; and second (assuming an affirmative answer to the first), whether the law of criminal responsibility can practically accommodate this phenomenon? After canvassing the relevant neuroscientific literature, I conclude that the answer to the first question is "yes." After examining the varied treatment of the defense in the United States and other nations, I also give an affirmative answer to the second question, but only in limited circumstances. In short, the defense of irresistible impulse should be recognized, but only when it can be shown that the defendant experienced a total incapacity to control his or her conduct in the circumstances. PMID:22261322

  6. Finite Element Modeling of Impulsive Excitation and Shear Wave Propagation in an Incompressible, Transversely Isotropic Medium

    PubMed Central

    Rouze, Ned C.; Wang, Michael H.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Nightingale, Kathy R.

    2013-01-01

    Elastic properties of materials can be measured by observing shear wave propagation following localized, impulsive excitations and relating the propagation velocity to a model of the material. However, characterization of anisotropic materials is difficult because of the number of elasticity constants in the material model and the complex dependence of propagation velocity relative to the excitation axis, material symmetries, and propagation directions. In this study, we develop a model of wave propagation following impulsive excitation in an incompressible, transversely isotropic (TI) material such as muscle. Wave motion is described in terms of three propagation modes identified by their polarization relative to the material symmetry axis and propagation direction. Phase velocities for these propagation modes are expressed in terms of five elasticity constants needed to describe a general TI material, and also in terms of three constants after the application of two constraints that hold in the limit of an incompressible material. Group propagation velocities are derived from the phase velocities to describe the propagation of wave packets away from the excitation region following localized excitation. The theoretical model is compared to the results of finite element (FE) simulations performed using a nearly incompressible material model with the five elasticity constants chosen to preserve the essential properties of the material in the incompressible limit. Propagation velocities calculated from the FE displacement data show complex structure that agrees quantitatively with the theoretical model and demonstrates the possibility of measuring all three elasticity constants needed to characterize an incompressible, TI material. PMID:24094454

  7. Rapid-Response Impulsivity: Definitions, Measurement Issues, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kristen R.; Littlefield, Andrew K.; Anastasio, Noelle C.; Cunningham, Kathryn A.; Fink, Latham H.; Wing, Victoria C.; Mathias, Charles W.; Lane, Scott D.; Schutz, Christian; Swann, Alan C.; Lejuez, C.W.; Clark, Luke; Moeller, F. Gerard; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity is a multi-faceted construct that is a core feature of multiple psychiatric conditions and personality disorders. However, progress in understanding and treating impulsivity in the context of these conditions is limited by a lack of precision and consistency in its definition and assessment. Rapid-response-impulsivity (RRI) represents a tendency toward immediate action that occurs with diminished forethought and is out of context with the present demands of the environment. Experts from the International Society for Research on Impulsivity (InSRI) met to discuss and evaluate RRI-measures in terms of reliability, sensitivity, and validity with the goal of helping researchers and clinicians make informed decisions about the use and interpretation of findings from RRI-measures. Their recommendations are described in this manuscript. Commonly-used clinical and preclinical RRI-tasks are described, and considerations are provided to guide task selection. Tasks measuring two conceptually and neurobiologically distinct types of RRI, “refraining from action initiation” (RAI) and “stopping an ongoing action” (SOA) are described. RAI and SOA-tasks capture distinct aspects of RRI that may relate to distinct clinical outcomes. The InSRI group recommends that: 1) selection of RRI-measures should be informed by careful consideration of the strengths, limitations, and practical considerations of the available measures; 2) researchers use both RAI and SOA tasks in RRI studies to allow for direct comparison of RRI types and examination of their associations with clinically relevant measures; and, 3) similar considerations should be made for human and non-human studies in an effort to harmonize and integrate pre-clinical and clinical research. PMID:25867840

  8. Simultaneous identification of residual unbalances and bearing dynamic parameters from impulse responses of rotor bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, R.; Chakravarthy, V.

    2006-10-01

    An identification algorithm for simultaneous estimation of residual unbalances and bearing dynamic parameters by using impulse response measurements is presented for multi-degree-of-freedom ( mdofs) flexible rotor-bearing systems. The algorithm identifies speed-dependent bearing dynamic parameters for each bearing and residual unbalances at predefined balancing planes. Bearing dynamic parameters consist of four stiffness and four damping coefficients and residual unbalances contain the magnitude and phase information. Timoshenko beam with gyroscopic effects are included in the system finite element modelling. To overcome the practical difficulty of number of responses that can be measured, the standard condensation is used to reduce the number of degrees of freedom ( dofs) of the model. For illustration, responses in time domain are simulated due to impulse forces in the presence of residual unbalances from a rotor-bearing model and transformed to frequency domain. The identification algorithm uses these responses to estimate bearing dynamic parameters along with residual unbalances. The proposed algorithm has the flexibility to incorporate any type and any number of bearings including seals. The identification algorithm has been tested with the measurement noise in the simulated response. Identified parameters match quite well with assumed parameters used for the simulation of responses. The response reproduction capability of identified parameters has been found to be excellent.

  9. Direction Finding Using an Antenna with Direction Dependent Impulse Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foltz, Heinrich; Kegege, Obadiah

    2016-01-01

    Wideband antennas may be designed to have an impulse response that is direction dependent, not only in amplitude but also in waveform shape. This property can be used to perform direction finding using a single fixed antenna, without the need for an array or antenna rotation. In this paper direction finding is demonstrated using a simple candelabra-shaped monopole operating in the 1-3 GHz range. The method requires a known transmitted pulse shape and high signal-to-noise ratio, and is not as accurate or robust as conventional methods. However, it can add direction finding capability to a wideband communication system without the addition of any hardware.

  10. Response of a seat-passenger system to impulsive loading.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. A.; Turnbow, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of a study of the dynamic response of an aircraft seat-passenger system to impulsive loading typical of aircraft crash situations. A brief description of the computer model SIMULA is presented, and selected data from 305 separate cases which have been studied are discussed. Maximum system forces, displacements, velocities, and accelerations are presented as functions of velocity change, aircraft deceleration, crash pulse shape, passenger weight, and seat belt slack. Data from both single and coupled parameter studies are included. A correlation of SIMULA results with experimentally obtained data is made.

  11. Infinite impulse response modal filtering in visible adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapito, G.; Arcidiacono, C.; Quirós-Pacheco, F.; Puglisi, A.; Esposito, S.

    2012-07-01

    Diffraction limited resolution adaptive optics (AO) correction in visible wavelengths requires a high performance control. In this paper we investigate infinite impulse response filters that optimize the wavefront correction: we tested these algorithms through full numerical simulations of a single-conjugate AO system comprising an adaptive secondary mirror with 1127 actuators and a pyramid wavefront sensor (WFS). The actual practicability of the algorithms depends on both robustness and knowledge of the real system: errors in the system model may even worsen the performance. In particular we checked the robustness of the algorithms in different conditions, proving that the proposed method can reject both disturbance and calibration errors.

  12. Impulse response method for characterization of echogenic liposomesa)

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Jason L.; Luan, Ying; van Rooij, Tom; Kooiman, Klazina; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D.; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico; Holland, Christy K.

    2015-01-01

    An optical characterization method is presented based on the use of the impulse response to characterize the damping imparted by the shell of an air-filled ultrasound contrast agent (UCA). The interfacial shell viscosity was estimated based on the unforced decaying response of individual echogenic liposomes (ELIP) exposed to a broadband acoustic impulse excitation. Radius versus time response was measured optically based on recordings acquired using an ultra-high-speed camera. The method provided an efficient approach that enabled statistical measurements on 106 individual ELIP. A decrease in shell viscosity, from 2.1 × 10−8 to 2.5 × 10−9 kg/s, was observed with increasing dilatation rate, from 0.5 × 106 to 1 × 107 s−1. This nonlinear behavior has been reported in other studies of lipid-shelled UCAs and is consistent with rheological shear-thinning. The measured shell viscosity for the ELIP formulation used in this study [κs = (2.1 ± 1.0) × 10−8 kg/s] was in quantitative agreement with previously reported values on a population of ELIP and is consistent with other lipid-shelled UCAs. The acoustic response of ELIP therefore is similar to other lipid-shelled UCAs despite loading with air instead of perfluorocarbon gas. The methods described here can provide an accurate estimate of the shell viscosity and damping for individual UCA microbubbles. PMID:25920822

  13. Loss Factor Estimation Using the Impulse Response Decay Method on a Stiffened Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph; Schiller, Noah; Allen, Albert; Moeller, Mark

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency vibroacoustic modeling is typically performed using energy-based techniques such as Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA). Energy models require an estimate of the internal damping loss factor. Unfortunately, the loss factor is difficult to estimate analytically, and experimental methods such as the power injection method can require extensive measurements over the structure of interest. This paper discusses the implications of estimating damping loss factors using the impulse response decay method (IRDM) from a limited set of response measurements. An automated procedure for implementing IRDM is described and then evaluated using data from a finite element model of a stiffened, curved panel. Estimated loss factors are compared with loss factors computed using a power injection method and a manual curve fit. The paper discusses the sensitivity of the IRDM loss factor estimates to damping of connected subsystems and the number and location of points in the measurement ensemble.

  14. Deriving a dosage-response relationship for community response to high-energy impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Pearsons, Karl S.

    1994-01-01

    The inability to systematically predict community response to exposure to sonic booms (and other high energy impulsive sounds) is a major impediment to credible analyses of the environmental effects of supersonic flight operations. Efforts to assess community response to high energy impulsive sounds are limited in at least two important ways. First, a paucity of appropriate empirical data makes it difficult to infer a dosage-response relationship by means similar to those used in the case of general transportation noise. Second, it is unclear how well the 'equal energy hypothesis' (the notion that duration, number, and level of individual events are directly interchangeable determinants of annoyance) applies to some forms of impulsive noise exposure. Some of the issues currently under consideration by a CHABA working group addressing these problems are discussed. These include means for applying information gained in controlled exposure studies about different rates of growth of annoyance with impulsive and non-impulsive sound exposure levels, and strategies for developing a dosage-response relationship in a data-poor area.

  15. Impulsive choice and response in dopamine agonist-related impulse control behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Voon, Valerie; Reynolds, Brady; Brezing, Christina; Gallea, Cecile; Skaljic, Meliha; Ekanayake, Vindhya; Fernandez, Hubert; Potenza, Marc N; Dolan, Raymond J; Hallett, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Dopaminergic medication-related Impulse Control Disorders (ICDs) such as pathological gambling and compulsive shopping have been reported in Parkinson disease (PD). Hypothesis We hypothesized that dopamine agonists (DAs) would be associated with greater impulsive choice, or greater discounting of delayed rewards, in PD patients with ICDs (PDI). Methods Fourteen PDI patients, 14 PD controls without ICDs and 16 medication-free matched normal controls were tested on (i) the Experiential Discounting Task (EDT), a feedback-based intertemporal choice task, (ii) spatial working memory and (iii) attentional set shifting. The EDT was used to assess impulsivity choice (hyperbolic K-value), reaction time (RT) and decision conflict RT (the RT difference between high conflict and low conflict choices). PDI patients and PD controls were tested on and off DA. Results On the EDT, there was a group by medication interaction effect [F(1,26)=5.62; p=0.03] with pairwise analyses demonstrating that DA status was associated with increased impulsive choice in PDI patients (p=0.02) but not in PD controls (p=0.37). PDI patients also had faster RT compared to PD controls F(1,26)=7.51 p=0.01]. DA status was associated with shorter RT [F(3,24)=8.39, p=0.001] and decision conflict RT [F(1,26)=6.16, p=0.02] in PDI patients but not in PD controls. There were no correlations between different measures of impulsivity. PDI patients on DA had greater spatial working memory impairments compared to PD controls on DA (t=2.13, df=26, p=0.04). Conclusion Greater impulsive choice, faster RT, faster decision conflict RT and executive dysfunction may contribute to ICDs in PD. PMID:19838863

  16. Spatial organization of the impulse response in a karst aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbart, C.; Valdés, D.; Barbecot, F.; Tognelli, A.; Couchoux, L.

    2016-06-01

    Karst aquifers are characterized by a strong heterogeneity in their physical properties. The purpose of the study is the spatial variability of water transfers in a carbonated karstic aquifer. To this end, a high spatial density of information about the water transfer is needed. The characteristics of the site, a topographic hill of 13 km2 with eight boreholes, which was monitored hourly over four years, allows the study of the spatial variability of water transfers. The variability of the impulse response of the system is studied using autocorrelation and cross-correlation analysis between the rainfall and piezometric level time series. The shapes of the autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions vary according to the geographical location of the boreholes, that proves a spatial organization of the groundwater transfer. The response time varies depending on the thickness of the unsaturated zone by an unusual inverse correlation. In this case, the water level signal spatially integrates the signal transfer of the unsaturated zone and the signal transfer of the saturated part of the aquifer. Consequently, inertia and response time increased with the distance between the borehole and the top of piezometric dome. This description supports highly organized fast transfers in this karst aquifer and a highly connected fracture network.

  17. Responsibility and impulsivity and their interaction in relation to obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Smári, Jakob; Bouranel, Guethrún; Thornóra Eiethsdóttir, Sigríethur

    2008-09-01

    In the present study, the role of responsibility and impulsivity and their interaction in obsessive-compulsive symptoms was investigated. The obsessive-compulsive inventory-revised (OCI-R), an attention deficit and hyperactivity/impulsivity self-report scale (AD/HD-SR), the responsibility attitudes scale (RAS), Eysenck's impulsiveness/venturesomeness/empathy questionnaire (IVE), the community epidemiological survey-depression (CES-D) and the Penn State worry questionnaire (PSWQ) were administered to a sample of 405 Icelandic university students. Responsibility attitudes (RAS) and impulsivity measures were significantly related to scores on the OCI-R total scale, even when depression had been taken into consideration. The interaction between responsibility and hyperactivity/impulsivity added to the prediction of OCI-R scores over and above simple effects. PMID:17692284

  18. An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Impulsive Behaviors Checklist for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Jianing; Leung, Freedom; Lai, Ching-man; Fu, Kei

    2011-01-01

    This study used item response theory (IRT) to examine the Impulsive Behaviors Checklist for Adolescents (IBCL-A) among 6,276 (67.7% girls) Chinese secondary school students. The IBCL-A included 15 maladaptive impulsive behaviors adapted from the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines. The authors obtained the severity and discrimination…

  19. Subjective diffuseness of music signals convolved with binaural impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokura, Ryota; Tronchin, Lamberto; Cocchi, Alessandro; Soeta, Yoshiharu

    2011-07-01

    The spatial impression of sound in a hall can be quantified using sound field factors such as the interaural cross-correlation coefficient (IACC) calculated from binaural impulse response (BIR), henceforth denoted by IACC IR. The subjective diffuseness for the listener is a spatial attribute which depends on factors associated both with the source signal and with the actual sound field, and is quantified using the IACC of the signal received by the listener, henceforth denoted by IACC SR. Therefore, the subjective diffuseness in a given hall may change with the music. The aims of this study are to estimate the IACC SR from the IACC IR and the factors, which is obtained from autocorrelation function (ACF) of music signal, and to evaluate the subjective diffuseness by these factors. First, the relationship between the IACC IR and IACC SR was investigated. Second, subjective diffuseness was measured by a psycho-acoustical experiment. As a result, the IACC SR could be estimated from the IACC IR of the BIR and the effective duration ( τe) from the ACF of music signal. It was found that the effects of BIRs on subjective diffuseness could be evaluated by IACC IR for almost all subjects, while the effects of music signals could be evaluated by the τe and the width of the peak at τ=0 ( Wϕ(0) ) of the ACF.

  20. Impulse Response Measurements Over Space-Earth Paths Using the GPS Coarse/Acquisition Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemmon, J. J.; Papazian, P. B.

    1995-01-01

    The impulse responses of radio transmission channels over space-earth paths were measured using the course/acquisition code signals from the Global Positioning System of satellites. The data acquisition system and signal processing techniques used to develop the impulse responses are described. Examples of impulse response measurements are presented. The results indicate that this measurement approach enables detection of multipath signals that are 20 dB or more below the power of the direct arrival. Channel characteristics that could be investigated with additional measurements and analyses are discussed.

  1. Matched-impulse-response processing for shallow-water localization and geoacoustic inversion

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou

    2000-11-01

    In this paper, impulse response matching is proposed for source localization and environmental inversion. The ocean impulse response is estimated using a cross-correlation procedure applied to data from the propagation of a broadband pulse in a shallow-water environment. Source localization and geoacoustic parameter estimation are then performed through time-domain correlations between the estimated impulse responses at spatially separated phones and synthetic replica impulse responses. The method is both spatially and temporally coherent. Parameter space search uses a hierarchical scheme designed to exploit the sensitivity of the acoustic field to the unknown parameters. Tested on the SWellEX-96 and synthetic data, the proposed method is shown to be more robust than conventional (linear), incoherent, broadband matched field processing. PMID:11108345

  2. Decreased caudate response to milkshake is associated with higher body mass index and greater impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Babbs, R. Keith; Sun, Xue; Felsted, Jennifer; Chouinard-Decorte, Francois; Veldhuizen, Maria G.; Small, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations consistently report a negative association between body mass index (BMI) and response in the caudate nucleus during the consumption of palatable and energy dense food. Since this response has also been linked to weight gain, we sought to replicate this finding and determine if the reduced response is associated with measures of impulsivity or food reward. Two studies were conducted in which fMRI was used to measure brain response to milkshake and a tasteless control solution. In study 1 (n = 25) we also assessed self-reported impulsivity, willingness to work for food, and subjective experiences of the pleasantness of milkshake taste and aroma. Replicating prior work, we report a negative association between BMI and brain response to milkshake vs. tasteless in the caudate nucleus. The opposite pattern was observed in the ventral putamen, with greater response observed in the 13 overweight compared to the 12 healthy weight subjects. Regression of brain response against impulsivity and food reward measures revealed one significant association: in the overweight but not healthy weight group self-reported impulsivity was negatively associated with caudate response to milkshake. In study 2 (n = 14), in addition to assessing brain response to milkshake and tasteless solutions subjects completed a go/no-go task outside the scanner. As predicted, we identified an inverse relationship between caudate response to milkshake vs. tasteless and failure to inhibit responses on the no go trials. We conclude that the inverse correlation between BMI and caudate response to milkshake is associated with impulsivity but not food reward. These findings suggest that response to milkshake in the dorsal striatum may be related to weight gain by promoting impulsive eating behavior. PMID:23562867

  3. Blunted hormone responses to Ipsapirone are associated with trait impulsivity in personality disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Minzenberg, Michael J; Grossman, Robert; New, Antonia S; Mitropoulou, Vivian; Yehuda, Rachel; Goodman, Marianne; Reynolds, Diedre A; Silverman, Jeremy M; Coccaro, Emil F; Marcus, Sue; Siever, Larry J

    2006-01-01

    Impulsive aggression is associated with central serotonergic dysfunction. Animal models particularly implicate the 5-HT(1A) receptor in this behavior. We tested the hypothesis that central 5-HT(1A) receptor function is impaired in impulsive aggressive personality disorder patients. A total of 52 individuals with DSM-III-R personality disorders, all medically healthy adult outpatients without concurrent psychiatric medication treatment, underwent serial plasma cortisol, prolactin, and temperature measurements before and after ipsapirone 20 mg oral administration. Subjects completed self-report measures of impulsivity, hostility, depression and anxiety, and childhood maltreatment. Stepwise regression analysis revealed impulsivity alone among symptom measures to be associated with significantly decreased peak cortisol and prolactin responses. Diagnoses of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and intermittent explosive disorder-revised (IED-R) were associated with significantly increased and decreased cortisol responses, respectively. However, post hoc analyses indicated that impulsivity was significantly negatively correlated with cortisol responses in the BPD group, and may mediate the association of both BPD and IED-R with altered cortisol responses. Temperature response was associated with neither diagnostic nor symptom measures. Neither diagnostic nor dimensional measures of depression or anxiety, nor severity of childhood maltreatment, were significantly associated with cortisol, prolactin, or temperature responses. Impulsivity is related to impaired function at (or downstream to) postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors, and this relationship may be partly responsible for the association of impaired serotonergic function with diagnoses such as BPD and IED-R. In addition, D(2) receptor dysfunction may play a role in impulsivity, whereas 5-HT(1A) cell-body autoreceptor function may be spared in these disorders. PMID:16123761

  4. Growth function for human response to large-amplitude impulse noise.

    PubMed

    Schomer, P D

    1978-12-01

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the use of C-weighted day/night level for the assessment of impulse noise such as the noise resulting from sonic boom, blast noise (artillery, armor, demolition, etc.) and other large-amplitude impulse sources. One remaining question pertaining to the use of C-weighting has been the growth function for human response to impulse noise. This question arises because work by Kryter and by Young using peak values and/or small amplitudes exhibited growth functions of 6--7dB for a doubling of annoyance, while the growth function for human response to common sources (planes, vehicles, etc.) increases by about 10 dB for a doubling of annoyance. Kyter's and Young's data are reanalyzed herein by using C-weighting and by including only large-amplitude data. This reanalysis results in a growth function for human response to impulse noise which increases by about 10 dB for a doubling of annoyance. This equality of growth function between common A-weighted noise and C-weighted impulse noise further supports the use of C-weighted day/night level for assessment of sonic boom, blast noise, or other large-amplitude impulse noises having similar spectral content. PMID:739098

  5. Effects of deindividuation, removal of responsibility, and coaction on impulsive and cyclical aggression.

    PubMed

    Paloutzian, R F

    1975-07-01

    The influence of two deindividuating variables, altered responsibility and coaction in groups, on one's tendency to deliver noxious or helpful stimulation impulsively and in a cyclical pattern to a target person was investigated in a laboratory experiment with use of 96 male and female junior college students. Analysis of variance revealed that, as hypothesized, Ss who coacted in groups of three and who had the responsibility for their behavior removed delivered noxious (but not helpful) stimuli more impulsively than Ss who worked alone and were made to feel responsible (p less than .01). Ss responded in a more cyclical pattern which delivering aversive tones than when delivering facilitating tones (p less than .005). A marginally significant finding was that Ss in groups responded in a more cyclical pattern than Ss alone only when the response was seen as aversive. It was concluded that the probability of impulsive and cyclical aggression may be increased by altered responsibility and coaction. PMID:1195142

  6. An item response theory analysis of the Impulsive Behaviors Checklist for Adolescents.

    PubMed

    You, Jianing; Leung, Freedom; Lai, Ching-man; Fu, Kei

    2011-12-01

    This study used item response theory (IRT) to examine the Impulsive Behaviors Checklist for Adolescents (IBCL-A) among 6,276 (67.7% girls) Chinese secondary school students. The IBCL-A included 15 maladaptive impulsive behaviors adapted from the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines. The authors obtained the severity and discrimination parameters for each item in the IBCL-A, examined differential item functioning across gender and age groups, and tested reliability and concurrent validity of the IBCL-A IRT-scaled score. Most items in the IBCL-A were the most accurate in assessing moderate to high levels of impulsivity and discriminated well among adolescents with varied levels of impulsivity. Differential item functioning emerged in several items across gender. The IRT-scaled score showed good construct validity and incremental predictive validity. Findings demonstrate the sound psychometric properties of the IBCL-A and support the clinical utility of this scale. PMID:21041521

  7. Finite element simulation of pipe dynamic response

    SciTech Connect

    Slagis, G.C.; Litton, R.W.

    1996-12-01

    Nonlinear finite element dynamic analyses of the response of a pipe span to controlled-displacement, sinusoidal vibration have been performed. The objective of this preliminary study is to compare strain and acceleration response data to those generated by Beaney in the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories experiments. Results for an unpressurized, 5 Hz, carbon steel pipe are in good agreement with the experiments. Hence, it appears that analytical simulation will be useful to assess seismic margins. Recommendations for additional studies are provided. The analyses confirm the test results--dynamic response is greatly attenuated by material plasticity. Analytical strains and accelerations are about 30% higher than test data. There are several possible explanations for the differences. To assess the effect of frequency on response, the length of the pipe span was increased. Analysis of the longer, 2 Hz, pipe span shows significantly greater cyclic strains than the 5 Hz span at the same input excitation levels.

  8. A theoretical and experimental investigation of the linear and nonlinear impulse responses from a magnetoplasma column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grody, N. C.

    1973-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear responses of a magnetoplasma resulting from inhomogeneity in the background plasma density are studied. The plasma response to an impulse electric field was measured and the results are compared with the theory of an inhomogeneous cold plasma. Impulse responses were recorded for the different plasma densities, static magnetic fields, and neutral pressures and generally appeared as modulated, damped oscillations. The frequency spectra of the waveforms consisted of two separated resonance peaks. For weak excitation, the results correlate with the linear theory of a cold, inhomogeneous, cylindrical magnetoplasma. The damping mechanism is identified with that of phase mixing due to inhomogeneity in plasma density. With increasing excitation voltage, the nonlinear impulse responses display stronger damping and a small increase in the frequency of oscillation.

  9. Singularity expansion method formulation for impulse response of a perfectly conducting thick cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, C.-I.; Nyquist, D. P.; Chen, K.-M.; Drachman, B. C.

    1985-10-01

    The impulse response of an infinite, perfectly conducting thick cylinder to normally incident, transversely polarized, impulsive plane wave illumination is determined. Spectral-domain analysis based upon the singularity expansion method reveals that this response consists of a discrete series of natural resonance modes (natural frequencies are computed) augmented by a series of continuous-spectrum terms. The resultant late-time response demonstrates the correct 'creeping wave' behavior as predicted by the Fourier synthesis technique, but with far fewer terms required for convergence.

  10. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Impulse Responses to Figure Motion in Optic Flow Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Jen; Jönsson, H. Olof; Nordström, Karin

    2015-01-01

    White noise techniques have been used widely to investigate sensory systems in both vertebrates and invertebrates. White noise stimuli are powerful in their ability to rapidly generate data that help the experimenter decipher the spatio-temporal dynamics of neural and behavioral responses. One type of white noise stimuli, maximal length shift register sequences (m-sequences), have recently become particularly popular for extracting response kernels in insect motion vision. We here use such m-sequences to extract the impulse responses to figure motion in hoverfly lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs). Figure motion is behaviorally important and many visually guided animals orient towards salient features in the surround. We show that LPTCs respond robustly to figure motion in the receptive field. The impulse response is scaled down in amplitude when the figure size is reduced, but its time course remains unaltered. However, a low contrast stimulus generates a slower response with a significantly longer time-to-peak and half-width. Impulse responses in females have a slower time-to-peak than males, but are otherwise similar. Finally we show that the shapes of the impulse response to a figure and a widefield stimulus are very similar, suggesting that the figure response could be coded by the same input as the widefield response. PMID:25955416

  11. Attending at a Low Intensity Increases Impulsivity in an Auditory Sustained Attention to Response Task.

    PubMed

    Roebuck, Hettie; Guo, Kun; Bourke, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Why attention lapses during prolonged tasks is debated, specifically whether errors are a consequence of under-arousal or exerted effort. To explore this, we investigated whether increased impulsivity is associated with effortful processing by modifying the demand of a task by presenting it at a quiet intensity. Here, we consider whether attending at low but detectable levels affects impulsivity in a population with intact hearing. A modification of the Sustained Attention to Response Task was used with auditory stimuli at two levels: the participants' personal "lowest detectable" level and a "normal speaking" level. At the quiet intensity, we found that more impulsive responses were made compared with listening at a normal speaking level. These errors were not due to a failure in discrimination. The findings suggest an increase in processing time for auditory stimuli at low levels that exceeds the time needed to interrupt a planned habitual motor response. This leads to a more impulsive and erroneous response style. These findings have important implications for understanding the nature of impulsivity in relation to effortful processing. They may explain why a high proportion of individuals with hearing loss are also diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. PMID:26562860

  12. Kurtosis of room impulse responses as a diffuseness measure for reverberation chambers.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a kurtosis analysis of room impulse responses as a potential room diffuseness measure. The early part of an impulse response contains a direct sound and strong reflections. As these reflections are sparse and strong, the sound field is unlikely to be diffuse. Such deterministic reflections are extreme events, which prevent the pressure samples from being distributed Gaussianly, leading to a high kurtosis. This indicates that the kurtosis can be used as a diffuseness measure. Two rooms are analyzed. A non-uniform surface absorption distribution tends to increase the kurtosis significantly in a small room. A full scale reverberation chamber is tested with different diffuser settings, which shows that the kurtosis calculated from broadband impulse responses from 125 Hz to 4 kHz has a good correlation with the Sabine absorption coefficient according to ISO 354 (International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2003). PMID:27250175

  13. Interval analysis method and convex models for impulsive response of structures with uncertain-but-bounded external loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiping; Wang, Xiaojun

    2006-06-01

    Two non-probabilistic, set-theoretical methods for determining the maximum and minimum impulsive responses of structures to uncertain-but-bounded impulses are presented. They are, respectively, based on the theories of interval mathematics and convex models. The uncertain-but-bounded impulses are assumed to be a convex set, hyper-rectangle or ellipsoid. For the two non-probabilistic methods, less prior information is required about the uncertain nature of impulses than the probabilistic model. Comparisons between the interval analysis method and the convex model, which are developed as an anti-optimization problem of finding the least favorable impulsive response and the most favorable impulsive response, are made through mathematical analyses and numerical calculations. The results of this study indicate that under the condition of the interval vector being determined from an ellipsoid containing the uncertain impulses, the width of the impulsive responses predicted by the interval analysis method is larger than that by the convex model; under the condition of the ellipsoid being determined from an interval vector containing the uncertain impulses, the width of the interval impulsive responses obtained by the interval analysis method is smaller than that by the convex model.

  14. Multifractal analysis of visualized room impulse response for detecting early reflections.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Milan; Ristić, Dragan M; Reljin, Irini; Mijić, Miomir

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes an improved method for detecting early reflections in the initial part of the room impulse response using multifractals. The proposed method uses the two-dimensional multifractal analysis. The room impulse response is visualized as a spectrogram image which is then subjected to the multifractal analysis. The algorithm is based on describing local regularity in the image using distribution of Hölder exponents. The time positions of the selected Hölder exponents in the image are utilized in detecting early reflections. The obtained results show better efficiency of the proposed algorithm compared to the previous one-dimensional multifractal analysis based algorithm. PMID:27250194

  15. Analysis of an impulse response measured at the basilar membrane of the chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Wit, Hero P; Bell, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    In a recent paper [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2224-2239 (2013)], Shera and Cooper report on the impulse response of the basilar membrane (BM) of a chinchilla, a waveform which shows repetitive bursts. They explain the bursts in terms of repeated coherent reflection at BM discontinuities and partial reflection at the stapes ("coherent reflection filtering"). Here the same waveform is examined in detail, highlighting features which indicate that the coherent reflection model, with calls for the same repetitive process to act on each successive burst, does not fully account for the shape of the measured impulse response. PMID:26233010

  16. Where the ocean influences the impulse response and its effect on synchronous changes of acoustic travel time.

    PubMed

    Spiesberger, John L

    2011-12-01

    In 1983, sounds at 133 Hz, 0.06 s resolution were transmitted in the Pacific for five days at 2 min intervals over 3709 km between bottom-mounted instruments maintained with atomic clocks. In 1989, a technique was developed to measure changes in acoustic travel time with an accuracy of 135 microseconds at 2 min intervals for selected windows of travel time within the impulse response. The data have short-lived 1 to 10 ms oscillations of travel time with periods less than a few days. Excluding tidal effects, different windows exhibited significant synchronized changes in travel time for periods shorter than 10 h. In the 1980s, this phenomenon was not understood because internal waves have correlation lengths of a few kilometers which are smaller than the way sound was thought to sample the ocean along well-separated and distinct rays corresponding to different windows. The paradox's resolution comes from modern theories that replace the ray-picture with finite wavelength representations that predict sound can be influenced in the upper ocean over horizontal scales such as 20 km or more. Thus, different windows are influenced by the same short-scale fluctuations of sound speed. This conclusion is supported by the data and numerical simulations of the impulse response. PMID:22225021

  17. Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of…

  18. Impulsive response of nonuniform density liquid in a laterally excited tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Chang, Y. W.

    1994-04-01

    A study on the impulsive component of the dynamic response of a liquid of nonuniform density in a tank undergoing lateral base excitations is presented. The system considered is a circular cylindrical tank containing an incompressible and inviscid liquid whose density increases with the liquid depth. The density distribution along the depth can be of any arbitrary continuous or discontinuous function. In the analysis, the liquid field is divided into n layers. The thickness of the liquid layers can be different, but the density of each liquid layer is considered to be uniform and is equal to the value of the original liquid density at the mid-height of that layer. The problem is solved by the eigenfunction expansion in conjunction with the transfer matrix technique. The effect of the nonuniform liquid density on the impulsive component of the dynamic response is illustrated in a numerical example in which the linear and cosine distributions of the liquid density are assumed. The response quantities examined include the impulsive pressure, base shear, and moments. The results are presented in tabular and graphical forms. It is found that the impulsive pressure distribution along the tank wall is not sensitive to the detailed distribution function of the density, and the base shear and moments for the nonuniform liquid can be estimated by assuming an equivalent uniform liquid density that preserves the total liquid weight. The effect of tank flexibility is assessed by a simple approach in which the response quantities for flexible tanks are evaluated by simplified equations.

  19. Reverberation time measurement using integrated impulse response and sweep sine excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabuco, Marco; Brando, Paulo

    2002-11-01

    As the capacity and speed of digital processing systems becomes much higher, the integrated impulsive response for reverberation time measurements by the indirect method also becomes more feasible and faster. The MLS technique to obtain the impulse response for LTI has been developed during the last several years and it is very well reported by the bibliography. Some frequency analyzers available in the market are capable to generate and process MLS to get the impulse responses very easily. Sometimes, when the room to be tested is very reverberant, sequences of higher order and a certain number of average are necessary to assure acceptable signal-to-noise ratio. The sweep sine technique or the deconvolution method to obtain impulsive responses presents many new advantages, most of them still reported in various technical documents. This paper presents the results of application of this technique to measure the reverberation time in two different reverberation rooms. Comparisons with MLS, ensemble, and reverberation time averages are presented. The sweep sine technique repeatability was verified in a reverberation chamber for a polyurethane foam sample and showed smaller standard deviations when compared with other techniques. (To be presented in Portuguese.)

  20. Comparison of the response of a heterodyne receiver to video-pulse and impulse-type signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprio, S. J.

    1980-02-01

    This paper presents some of the limitations of available impulse generators and suggests a criterion to determine the useful frequency range for impulse generators based on the requirements in MIL-STD-461. This paper also discusses a technique that can be used to generate a transient response of a heterodyne receiver that closely approximates the impulse response of the receiver. The technique uses a video pulse from a commercial pulse generator. The transient response of the receiver, measured at IF, will differ from the true impulse response in IF phase only. Available data indicates that this technique may be useful to generate impulse-like responses for RF amplifiers and broad-band amplifiers that operate at frequencies as high as 100 GHz.

  1. Reduced Prefrontal Cortex Hemodynamic Response in Adults with Methamphetamine Induced Psychosis: Relevance for Impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Kimoto, Sohei; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Naoko; Nakanishi, Yoko; Tanaka, Shohei; Ota, Toyosaku; Makinodan, Manabu; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with methamphetamine abuse/dependence often exhibit high levels of impulsivity, which may be associated with the structural abnormalities and functional hypoactivities observed in the frontal cortex of these subjects. Although near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a simple and non-invasive method for characterizing the clinical features of various psychiatric illnesses, few studies have used NIRS to directly investigate the association between prefrontal cortical activity and inhibitory control in patients with methamphetamine-induced psychosis (MAP). Using a 24-channel NIRS system, we compared hemodynamic responses during the Stroop color-word task in 14 patients with MAP and 21 healthy controls matched for age, sex and premorbid IQ. In addition, we used the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11) to assess impulsivity between subject groups. The MAP group exhibited significantly less activation in the anterior and frontopolar prefrontal cortex accompanied by lower Stroop color-word task performance, compared with controls. Moreover, BIS-11 scores were significantly higher in the MAP group, and were negatively correlated with the hemodynamic responses in prefrontal cortex. Our data suggest that reduced hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal cortex might reflect higher levels of impulsivity in patients with MAP, providing new insights into disrupted inhibitory control observed in MAP. PMID:27050450

  2. Reduced Prefrontal Cortex Hemodynamic Response in Adults with Methamphetamine Induced Psychosis: Relevance for Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Kimoto, Sohei; Iida, Junzo; Kishimoto, Naoko; Nakanishi, Yoko; Tanaka, Shohei; Ota, Toyosaku; Makinodan, Manabu; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with methamphetamine abuse/dependence often exhibit high levels of impulsivity, which may be associated with the structural abnormalities and functional hypoactivities observed in the frontal cortex of these subjects. Although near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a simple and non-invasive method for characterizing the clinical features of various psychiatric illnesses, few studies have used NIRS to directly investigate the association between prefrontal cortical activity and inhibitory control in patients with methamphetamine-induced psychosis (MAP). Using a 24-channel NIRS system, we compared hemodynamic responses during the Stroop color-word task in 14 patients with MAP and 21 healthy controls matched for age, sex and premorbid IQ. In addition, we used the Barrett Impulsivity Scale-11 (BIS-11) to assess impulsivity between subject groups. The MAP group exhibited significantly less activation in the anterior and frontopolar prefrontal cortex accompanied by lower Stroop color-word task performance, compared with controls. Moreover, BIS-11 scores were significantly higher in the MAP group, and were negatively correlated with the hemodynamic responses in prefrontal cortex. Our data suggest that reduced hemodynamic responses in the prefrontal cortex might reflect higher levels of impulsivity in patients with MAP, providing new insights into disrupted inhibitory control observed in MAP. PMID:27050450

  3. Automated estimation of the truncation of room impulse response by applying a nonlinear decay model.

    PubMed

    Janković, Marko; Ćirić, Dejan G; Pantić, Aleksandar

    2016-03-01

    Noise represents one of the most significant disturbances in measured room impulse responses (RIRs), and it has a potentially large impact on evaluation of the decay parameters. In order to reduce noise effects, various methods have been applied, including truncation of an RIR. In this paper, a procedure for the response truncation based on a model of RIR (nonlinear decay model) is presented. The model is represented by an exponential decay plus stationary noise. Unknown parameters of the model are calculated by an optimization that minimizes the difference between the curve generated by the model and the target one of the response to be truncated. Different curves can be applied in the optimization-absolute value of the RIR, logarithmic decay curve, and Schroeder curve obtained by the backward integration of the RIR. The proposed procedure is tested on various synthesized and measured impulse responses. It is compared with the procedure taken from the literature, often applied in practice. PMID:27036242

  4. Derivation of a new parametric impulse response matrix utilized for nodal wind load identification by response measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi Amiri, A.; Bucher, C.

    2015-05-01

    This paper provides new formulations to derive the impulse response matrix, which is then used in the problem of load identification with application to wind induced vibration. The applied loads are inversely identified based on the measured structural responses by solving the associated discrete ill-posed problem. To this end - based on an existing parametric structural model - the impulse response functions of acceleration, velocity and displacement have been computed. Time discretization of convolution integral has been implemented according to an existing and a newly proposed procedure, which differ in the numerical integration methods. The former was evaluated based on a constant rectangular approximation of the sampled data and impulse response function in a number of steps corresponding to the sampling rate, while the latter interpolates the sampled data in an arbitrary number of sub-steps and then integrates over the sub-steps and steps. The identification procedure was implemented for a simulation example as well as an experimental laboratory case. The ill-conditioning of the impulse response matrix made it necessary to use Tikhonov regularization to recover the applied force from noise polluted measured response. The optimal regularization parameter has been obtained by L-curve and GCV method. The results of simulation represent good agreement between identified and measured force. In the experiments the identification results based on the measured displacement as well as acceleration are provided. Further it is shown that the accuracy of experimentally identified load depends on the sensitivity of measurement instruments over the different frequency ranges.

  5. Comparison of New Methods for Assessing Community Response to High Energy Impulsive Sounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Pearsons, Karl S.

    1996-01-01

    The latest CHABA Working Group to have reviewed published information about the effects of high energy impulsive sounds (such as sonic booms) on communities has recommended abandonment of the dosage-response relationship identified by its predecessor in favor of two alternate prediction method. Both of the new assessment methods continue to rely on C-weighted measurements of impulsive sounds One of the two assessment methods retains the standard assumptions of the 'equal energy hypothesis' (the notion that annoyance is governed simply by the product of level, duration, and number noise events), and further assumes that the rate of growth of the prevalence of annoyance is proportional to the rate of growth of loudness with level. The other assessment method, however, assumes a level dependent (non-equal energy) summation of the C-weighted sound exposure levels of individual impulsive events. Since predictions of the second method are distribution-dependent, they are not readily represents graphically in the form of a single dosage-response function. The effects on annoyance predictions of variance in distributions of CSEL values of impulsive sounds are explored in this presentation.

  6. Magnetospheric impulse response for many levels of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bargatze, L. F.; Baker, D. N.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The temporal relationship between the solar wind and magnetospheric activity has been studied using 34 intervals of high time resolution IMP 8 solar wind data and the corresponding AL auroral activity index. The median values of the AL index for each interval were utilized to rank the intervals according to geomagnetic activity level. The linear prediction filtering technique was then applied to model magnetospheric response as measured by the AL index to the solar wind input function VB(s). The linear prediction filtering routine produces a filter of time-lagged response coefficients which estimates the most general linear relationship between the chosen input and output parameters of the magnetospheric system. It is found that the filters are composed of two response pulses speaking at time lags of 20 and 60 min. The amplitude of the 60-min pulse is the larger for moderate activity levels, while the 20-min pulse is the larger for strong activity levels. A possible interpretation is that the 20-min pulse represents magnetospheric activity driven directly by solar wind coupling and that the 60-min pulse represents magnetospheric activity driven by the release of energy previously stored in the magnetotail. If this interpretation is correct, the linear filtering results suggest that both the driven and the unloading models of magnetospheric response are important facets of a more comprehensive response model.

  7. Neonatal handling causes impulsive behavior and decreased pharmacological response to methylphenidate in male adult wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lazzaretti, Camilla; Kincheski, Grasielle Clotildes; Pandolfo, Pablo; Krolow, Rachel; Toniazzo, Ana Paula; Arcego, Danusa Mar; Couto-Pereira, Natividade de Sá; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Galvalisi, Martin; Costa, Gustavo; Scorza, Cecilia; Souza, Tadeu Mello E; Dalmaz, Carla

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal handling has an impact on adult behavior of experimental animals and is associated with rapid and increased palatable food ingestion, impaired behavioral flexibility, and fearless behavior to novel environments. These symptoms are characteristic features of impulsive trait, being controlled by the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Impulsive behavior is a key component of many psychiatric disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), manic behavior, and schizophrenia. Others have reported a methylphenidate (MPH)-induced enhancement of mPFC functioning and improvements in behavioral core symptoms of ADHD patients. The aims of the present study were: (i) to find in vivo evidence for an association between neonatal handling and the development of impulsive behavior in adult Wistar rats and (ii) to test whether neonatal handling could have an impact on monoamine levels in the mPFC and the pharmacological response to MPH in vivo. Therefore, experimental animals (litters) were classified as: "non-handled" and "handled" (10[Formula: see text]min/day, postnatal days 1-10). After puberty, they were exposed to either a larger and delayed or smaller and immediate reward (tolerance to delay of reward task). Acute MPH (3[Formula: see text]mg/Kg. i.p.) was used to suppress and/or regulate impulsive behavior. Our results show that only neonatally handled male adult Wistar rats exhibit impulsive behavior with no significant differences in monoamine levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, together with a decreased response to MPH. On this basis, we postulate that early life interventions may have long-term effects on inhibitory control mechanisms and affect the later response to pharmacological agents during adulthood. PMID:26620193

  8. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  9. Does Impulsiveness Moderate Response to Financial Incentives for Smoking Cessation Among Pregnant and Newly Postpartum Women?

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Alexa A.; Skelly, Joan M.; White, Thomas J.; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether impulsiveness moderates response to financial incentives for cessation among pregnant smokers. All participants were randomized to either a condition wherein financial incentives were delivered contingent on smoking abstinence or to a control condition wherein incentives were delivered independent of smoking status. The study was conducted in two steps: First, we examined associations between baseline impulsiveness scores and abstinence at late pregnancy and 24-weeks postpartum as part of a planned prospective study of this topic using data from a recently completed, randomized controlled clinical trial (N = 118). Next, to increase statistical power, we conducted a second analysis collapsing results across that recent trial and two prior trials involving the same contingent incentive and control conditions (N = 236). Impulsivity was assessed using a delay discounting (DD) of hypothetical monetary rewards task in all three trials and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) in the most recent trial. Neither DD nor BIS predicted antepartum or postpartum smoking status in the single or combined trials. Receiving abstinence-contingent incentives, lower baseline smoking rate (cigs/day), and a history of quit attempts pre-pregnancy predicted greater odds of antepartum abstinence across the single and combined trials. No variable predicted postpartum abstinence across the single and combined trials, although a history of antepartum quit attempts and receiving abstinence-contingent incentives predicted in the single and combined trials, respectively. Overall, this study provides no evidence that impulsiveness as assessed by DD or BIS moderates response to this treatment approach while underscoring a substantial association of smoking rate and prior quit attempts with abstinence across the contingent incentives and control treatment conditions. PMID:25730417

  10. Response of TGS ferroelectric samples to rapid temperature impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trybus, M.; Proszak, W.; Woś, B.

    2013-11-01

    Tryglicine sulphate (TGS) is one of the most extensively studied ferroelectric materials, which undergoes second order phase transition and shows the pyroelectric effect. In our present experiments we study the electric properties of TGS, in relation to domain switching, observing the samples' response to controlled temperature pulses. The charge released in the processes of domain switching was previously studied under constant temperature growth. Our method allows us to observe the released pyroelectric charge in both the ferroelectric and paraelectric phases. To perform our experiment we designed new measurement software and constructed a novel thermostatic sample holder containing Peltier's cells as heating/cooling elements.

  11. Relationships between trait impulsivity and cognitive control: the effect of attention switching on response inhibition and conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Rotem

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between trait impulsivity and cognitive control, as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and a focused attention dichotic listening to words task, respectively. In the task, attention was manipulated in two attention conditions differing in their cognitive control demands: one in which attention was directed to one ear at a time for a whole block of trials (blocked condition) and another in which attention was switched pseudo-randomly between the two ears from trial to trial (mixed condition). Results showed that high impulsivity participants exhibited more false alarm and intrusion errors as well as a lesser ability to distinguish between stimuli in the mixed condition, as compared to low impulsivity participants. In the blocked condition, the performance levels of the two groups were comparable with respect to these measures. In addition, total BIS scores were correlated with intrusions and laterality index in the mixed but not the blocked condition. The findings suggest that high impulsivity individuals may be less prone to attentional difficulties when cognitive load is relatively low. In contrast, when attention switching is involved, high impulsivity is associated with greater difficulty in inhibiting responses and resolving cognitive conflict than is low impulsivity, as reflected in error-prone information processing. The conclusion is that trait impulsivity in a non-clinical population is manifested more strongly when attention switching is required than during maintained attention. This may have important implications for the conceptualization and treatment of impulsivity in both non-clinical and clinical populations. PMID:26245649

  12. Quality of sound in large rooms: Alteration of room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linusson, Per

    1993-02-01

    Psychoacoustic testing of Room Impulse Responses (RIR), using editing techniques and listening tests with help of auralization is considered. Using these techniques the question of when the reverberation tail is subjectively diffuse was studied. This question is of great interest, for example for auralization techniques. Binaural Room Impulse Responses (BRIR's) were measured in two positions in a concert hall. Their respective reverberation tails were substituted by editing. Listening tests indicated that even with a connection time of 400 ms, some test persons could consistently detect differences with speech as source signal. With music (piano) as source signal the 'limit' of the diffuse part was somewhere between 200 to 400 ms. In the second listening test an individual reflection was substituted with a diffuse one by editing. Three types of diffuse reflections were used. The results indicated that it is possible to improve the subjective quality with a diffuse reflection. Furthermore the character of the diffuse reflection is significant.

  13. Tomographic reconstruction of indoor spatial temperature distributions using room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleisteiner, M.; Barth, M.; Raabe, A.

    2016-03-01

    Temperature can be estimated by acoustic travel time measurements along known sound paths. By using a multitude of known sound paths in combination with a tomographic reconstruction technique a spatial and temporal resolution of the temperature field can be achieved. Based on it, this article focuses on an experimental method in order to determine the spatially differentiated development of room temperature with only one loudspeaker and one microphone. The theory of geometrical room acoustics is being used to identify sound paths under consideration of reflections. The travel time along a specific sound path is derived from the room impulse response. Temporal variances in room impulse response can be attributed primarily to a change in air temperature and airflow. It is shown that in the absence of airflow a 3D acoustic monitoring of the room temperature can be realized with a fairly limited use of hardware.

  14. Impulse Response Estimation for Spatial Resolution Enhancement in Ultrasonic NDE Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G A

    2004-06-25

    This report describes a signal processing algorithm and MATLAB software for improving spatial resolution in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) imaging of materials. Given a measured reflection signal and an associated reference signal, the algorithm produces an optimal least-squares estimate of the impulse response of the material under test. This estimated impulse response, when used in place of the raw reflection signal, enhances the spatial resolution of the ultrasonic measurements by removing distortion caused by the limited-bandwidth transducers and the materials under test. The theory behind the processing algorithms is briefly presented, while the reader is referred to the bibliography for details. The main focus of the report is to describe how to use the MATLAB software. Two processing examples using actual ultrasonic measurements are provided for tutorial purposes.

  15. Pseudorational Impulse Responses — Algebraic System Theory for Distributed Parameter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yutaka

    This paper gives a comprehensive account on a class of distributed parameter systems, whose impulse response is called pseudorational. This notion was introduced by the author in 1980's, and is particularly amenable for the study of systems with bounded-time memory. We emphasize algebraic structures induced by this class of systems. Some recent results on coprimeness issues and H∞ control are discussed and illustrated.

  16. Finite Post Synaptic Potentials Cause a Fast Neuronal Response

    PubMed Central

    Helias, Moritz; Deger, Moritz; Rotter, Stefan; Diesmann, Markus

    2011-01-01

    A generic property of the communication between neurons is the exchange of pulses at discrete time points, the action potentials. However, the prevalent theory of spiking neuronal networks of integrate-and-fire model neurons relies on two assumptions: the superposition of many afferent synaptic impulses is approximated by Gaussian white noise, equivalent to a vanishing magnitude of the synaptic impulses, and the transfer of time varying signals by neurons is assessable by linearization. Going beyond both approximations, we find that in the presence of synaptic impulses the response to transient inputs differs qualitatively from previous predictions. It is instantaneous rather than exhibiting low-pass characteristics, depends non-linearly on the amplitude of the impulse, is asymmetric for excitation and inhibition and is promoted by a characteristic level of synaptic background noise. These findings resolve contradictions between the earlier theory and experimental observations. Here we review the recent theoretical progress that enabled these insights. We explain why the membrane potential near threshold is sensitive to properties of the afferent noise and show how this shapes the neural response. A further extension of the theory to time evolution in discrete steps quantifies simulation artifacts and yields improved methods to cross check results. PMID:21427776

  17. Repair monitoring of cracked concrete floor using the impulse response method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoidis, Nikolaos; Tatsis, Efthymios; Vlachopoulos, Christos; Gotzamanis, Anastasios; Stærke Clausen, Jesper; Aggelis, Dimitrios; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2014-04-01

    The objective of the present study was the repair monitoring of an extensively cracked concrete floor using the Impulse - Response method. The study included the evaluation of the condition of the concrete floor that suffered from extensive cracking on its surface, through systematic tests. The purpose of the study was to investigate the causes that led to extensive cracking on the floor surface in order to plan the repair strategy. The investigation included a thorough visual inspection and recording of cracks, estimation of the crack depth using ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements, investigation for voids between the concrete floor and the underlying aggregate layer using the Impulse - Response method, concrete floor thickness estimation using the Impact - Echo method and concrete quality estimation using cores cutting. The repair method that was chosen was based on grout injections in order to fill the voids located between the concrete and the underlying aggregate layer. The area, where the injections took place, was inspected using the Impulse - Response method before and after the injections for monitoring purposes and a secondary grid was designed after considering the results. The area was inspected for a third time, after injecting in the secondary grid, in order to confirm the successful filling of the voids.

  18. Multi-input Multi-output System Identification Using Impulse Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Isao; Kasai, Tokio; Igawa, Hirotaka

    This paper presents a new algorithm for multi-input multi-output (MIMO) system identification in the time domain using impulse responses. The algorithm is suitable for the on-orbit system identification of spacecraft using the responses to thruster impulse inputs measured by typical satellite on-board sensors. The Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) realizes a multi-input multi-output (MIMO) system using asynchronous impulse responses in the time domain. Our new method identifies the input and output matrices of a MIMO collocated system by applying a recursive least-squares iteration scheme to refine the matrices obtained from conventional ERA. In this manner, the input matrix is considered to be constructed by the mode shape vectors and the actuator sensitivity matrix. A numerical simulation of an actual spacecraft, the Engineering Test Satellite-VI (ETS-VI), is performed to verify the algorithm. The nominal dynamics model of ETS-VI, which has six rigid body modes and fourteen elastic modes due to large flexible solar panels, is excited by six body-mounted thrusters, and the translational velocities and attitude rates are measured simultaneously. Our method successfully identifies all of the fourteen natural frequencies, damping ratios and mode shape vectors, confirming its validity.

  19. Acoustic analysis by spherical microphone array processing of room impulse responses.

    PubMed

    Khaykin, Dima; Rafaely, Boaz

    2012-07-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been recently used for room acoustics analysis, to detect the direction-of-arrival of early room reflections, and compute directional room impulse responses and other spatial room acoustics parameters. Previous works presented methods for room acoustics analysis using spherical arrays that are based on beamforming, e.g., delay-and-sum, regular beamforming, and Dolph-Chebyshev beamforming. Although beamforming methods provide useful directional selectivity, optimal array processing methods can provide enhanced performance. However, these algorithms require an array cross-spectrum matrix with a full rank, while array data based on room impulse responses may not satisfy this condition due to the single frame data. This paper presents a smoothing technique for the cross-spectrum matrix in the frequency domain, designed for spherical microphone arrays, that can solve the problem of low rank when using room impulse response data, therefore facilitating the use of optimal array processing methods. Frequency smoothing is shown to be performed effectively using spherical arrays, due to the decoupling of frequency and angular components in the spherical harmonics domain. Experimental study with data measured in a real auditorium illustrates the performance of optimal array processing methods such as MUSIC and MVDR compared to beamforming. PMID:22779475

  20. Modelling based on Spatial Impulse Response Model for Optimization of Inter Digital Transducers (SAW Sensors) for Non Destructive Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, D.; Duquennoy, M.; Ouaftouh, M.; Piwakowski, B.; Jenot, F.

    This study deals with modelling SAW-IDT transducers for their optimization. These sensors are specifically developed to characterize properties of thin layers, coatings and functional surfaces. Among the methods of characterization, the ultrasonic methods using Rayleigh surface waves are particularly interesting because the propagation of these waves is close to the surface of material and the energy is concentrated within a layer under the surface of about one wavelength thick. In order to characterize these coatings and structures, it is necessary to work in high frequencies, this is why in this study, SAW-IDT sensors are realized for surface acoustic wave generation. For optimization of these SAW-IDT sensors, particularly their band-width, it is necessary to study various IDT configurations by varying the number of electrodes, dimensions of the electrodes, their shapes and spacings. Thus it is necessary to implement effective and rapid technique for modelling. The originality of this study is to develop simulation tools based on Spatial Impulse Response model. Therefore it will be possible to reduce considerably computing time and results are obtained in a few seconds, instead of several hours (or days) by using finite element method. In order to validate this method, theoretical and experimental results are compared with finite element method and Interferometric measurements. The results obtained show a good overall concordance and confirm effectiveness of suggested method.

  1. Dose-response relationship of autonomic nervous system responses to individualized training impulse in marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Vincenzo; Castagna, Carlo; Padua, Elvira; Lombardo, Mauro; D'Ottavio, Stefano; Massaro, Michele; Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2009-06-01

    In athletes, exercise training induces autonomic nervous system (ANS) adaptations that could be used to monitor training status. However, the relationship between training and ANS in athletes has been investigated without regard for individual training loads. We tested the hypothesis that in long-distance athletes, changes in ANS parameters are dose-response related to individual volume/intensity training load and could predict athletic performance. A spectral analysis of heart rate (HR), systolic arterial pressure variability, and baroreflex sensitivity by the sequences technique was investigated in eight recreational athletes during a 6-mo training period culminating with a marathon. Individualized training load responses were monitored by a modified training impulse (TRIMP(i)) method, which was determined in each athlete using the individual HR and lactate profiling determined during a treadmill test. Monthly TRIMP(i) steadily increased during the training period. All the ANS parameters were significantly and very highly correlated to the dose of exercise with a second-order regression model (r(2) ranged from 0.90 to 0.99; P < 0.001). Variance, high-frequency oscillations of HR variability (HRV), and baroreflex sensitivity resembled a bell-shaped curve with a minimum at the highest TRIMP(i), whereas low-frequency oscillations of HR and systolic arterial pressure variability and the low frequency (LF)-to-high frequency ratio resembled an U-shaped curve with a maximum at the highest TRIMP(i). The LF component of HRV assessed at the last recording session was significantly and inversely correlated to the time needed to complete the nearing marathon. These results suggest that in recreational athletes, ANS adaptations to exercise training are dose related on an individual basis, showing a progressive shift toward a sympathetic predominance, and that LF oscillations in HRV at peak training load could predict athletic achievement in this athlete population. PMID

  2. Identification of Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses Using Digital Filter Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mathematical existence and the numerically-correct identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Tbeodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This paper establishes the aerodynamic impulse response function as the most fundamental, and, therefore, the most computationally efficient, aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this paper help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modem three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. First, the method is applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example. Next the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear, discrete-time problems.

  3. Identification of Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses Using Digital Filter Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mathematical existence and the numerically-correct identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Theodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This paper establishes the aerodynamic impulse response function as the most fundamental, and, therefore, the most computationally efficient, aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this paper help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modern three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. First, the method is applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example. Next the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear, discrete-time problems.

  4. Comparison of methods of predicting community response to impulsive and nonimpulsive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Pearsons, Karl S.

    1994-02-01

    Several scientific, regulatory, and policy-coordinating bodies have developed methods for predicting community response to sonic booms. The best known of these is the dosage-response relationship of Working Group 84 of the National Academy of Science's Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics and Biomechanics. This dosage-response relationship between C-weighted DayNight Average Sound Level and the prevalence of annoyance with high energy impulsive sounds was derived from limited amounts of information about community response to regular, prolonged, and expected exposure to artillery and sonic booms. U.S. Army Regulation 201 adapts this approach to predictions of the acceptability of impulsive noise exposure in communities. This regulation infers equivalent degrees of effect with respect to a well known dosage-response relationship for general (nonimpulsive) transportation noise. Differences in prevalence of annoyance predicted by various relationships lead to different predictions of the compatibility of land uses with sonic boom exposure. An examination of these differences makes apparent several unresolved issues in current practice for predicting and interpreting the prevalence of annoyance due to sonic boom exposure.

  5. Comparison of methods of predicting community response to impulsive and nonimpulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Pearsons, Karl S.

    1994-01-01

    Several scientific, regulatory, and policy-coordinating bodies have developed methods for predicting community response to sonic booms. The best known of these is the dosage-response relationship of Working Group 84 of the National Academy of Science's Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics and Biomechanics. This dosage-response relationship between C-weighted DayNight Average Sound Level and the prevalence of annoyance with high energy impulsive sounds was derived from limited amounts of information about community response to regular, prolonged, and expected exposure to artillery and sonic booms. U.S. Army Regulation 201 adapts this approach to predictions of the acceptability of impulsive noise exposure in communities. This regulation infers equivalent degrees of effect with respect to a well known dosage-response relationship for general (nonimpulsive) transportation noise. Differences in prevalence of annoyance predicted by various relationships lead to different predictions of the compatibility of land uses with sonic boom exposure. An examination of these differences makes apparent several unresolved issues in current practice for predicting and interpreting the prevalence of annoyance due to sonic boom exposure.

  6. Using a signal cancellation technique involving impulse response to assess directivity of hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Bentler, Ruth A

    2009-12-01

    The directional microphone systems of modern digital hearing aids are capable of changing their spatial directivity pattern and/or the microphone mode in response to changes in the properties of environmental sounds. These adaptive/automatic features make measurement of a hearing aid's directivity in a given test environment very difficult. Assessing the directivity of such systems requires a signal that can record the system's response while not changing the system's directivity. This paper proposes a method using a signal cancellation technique involving impulse responses to acoustically assess a hearing aid's directivity (referred to as the IR method). The impulse is presumed to be undetectable to the adaptive/automatic system because it contains little energy and a short response could be recorded before the system actually reacts. In the current study, the IR method was evaluated by testing five adaptive/automatic directional hearing aids in noise of various intensities. The results revealed that the IR method was an accurate and repeatable way to assess slow-acting directional systems in noise of varying intensities and fast-acting systems in noise of high intensities. PMID:20000935

  7. Reduced-Order Models Based on Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a method for the identification and application of reduced-order models based on linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse responses. The Volterra theory of nonlinear systems and an appropriate kernel identification technique are described. Insight into the nature of kernels is provided by applying the method to the nonlinear Riccati equation in a non-aerodynamic application. The method is then applied to a nonlinear aerodynamic model of RAE 2822 supercritical airfoil undergoing plunge motions using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes flow solver with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Results demonstrate the computational efficiency of the technique.

  8. Reduced Order Models Based on Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a method for the identification and application of reduced-order models based on linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse responses. The Volterra theory of nonlinear systems and an appropriate kernel identification technique are described. Insight into the nature of kernels is provided by applying the method to the nonlinear Riccati equation in a non-aerodynamic application. The method is then applied to a nonlinear aerodynamic model of an RAE 2822 supercritical airfoil undergoing plunge motions using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes flow solver with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Results demonstrate the computational efficiency of the technique.

  9. A nonlinear impulse response model of the coupled carbon cycle-climate system (NICCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooss, G.; Voss, R.; Hasselmann, K.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Joos, F.

    Impulse-response-function (IRF) models are designed for applications requiring a large number of climate change simulations, such as multi-scenario climate impact studies or cost-benefit integrated-assessment studies. The models apply linear response theory to reproduce the characteristics of the climate response to external forcing computed with sophisticated state-of-the-art climate models like general circulation models of the physical ocean-atmosphere system and three-dimensional oceanic-plus-terrestrial carbon cycle models. Although highly computer efficient, IRF models are nonetheless capable of reproducing the full set of climate-change information generated by the complex models against which they are calibrated. While limited in principle to the linear response regime (less than about 3∘C global-mean temperature change), the applicability of the IRF model presented has been extended into the nonlinear domain through explicit treatment of the climate system's dominant nonlinearities: CO2 chemistry in ocean water, CO2 fertilization of land biota, and sublinear radiative forcing. The resultant nonlinear impulse-response model of the coupled carbon cycle-climate system (NICCS) computes the temporal evolution of spatial patterns of climate change for four climate variables of particular relevance for climate impact studies: near-surface temperature, cloud cover, precipitation, and sea level. The space-time response characteristics of the model are derived from an EOF analysis of a transient 850-year greenhouse warming simulation with the Hamburg atmosphere-ocean general circulation model ECHAM3-LSG and a similar response experiment with the Hamburg carbon cycle model HAMOCC. The model is applied to two long-term CO2 emission scenarios, demonstrating that the use of all currently estimated fossil fuel resources would carry the Earth's climate far beyond the range of climate change for which reliable quantitative predictions are possible today, and that even a

  10. Application of damage detection methods using passive reconstruction of impulse response functions.

    PubMed

    Tippmann, J D; Zhu, X; Lanza di Scalea, F

    2015-02-28

    In structural health monitoring (SHM), using only the existing noise has long been an attractive goal. The advances in understanding cross-correlations in ambient noise in the past decade, as well as new understanding in damage indication and other advanced signal processing methods, have continued to drive new research into passive SHM systems. Because passive systems take advantage of the existing noise mechanisms in a structure, offshore wind turbines are a particularly attractive application due to the noise created from the various aerodynamic and wave loading conditions. Two damage detection methods using a passively reconstructed impulse response function, or Green's function, are presented. Damage detection is first studied using the reciprocity of the impulse response functions, where damage introduces new nonlinearities that break down the similarity in the causal and anticausal wave components. Damage detection and localization are then studied using a matched-field processing technique that aims to spatially locate sources that identify a change in the structure. Results from experiments conducted on an aluminium plate and wind turbine blade with simulated damage are also presented. PMID:25583863

  11. Behavioral components of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Christoph; Voss, Andreas; Schmitz, Florian; Nuszbaum, Mandy; Tüscher, Oliver; Lieb, Klaus; Klauer, Karl Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Acting in accord with long-term goals requires control of interfering impulses, the success of which depends on several different processes. Using a structural-equation modeling approach, we investigated 5 behavioral components of impulsivity: the control of stimulus interference, proactive interference, and response interference, as well as decisional and motivational impulsivity. Results support the existence of 5 correlated but separable components of impulsive behavior. The present study is the 1st to demonstrate the separability of stimulus and response interference. It also supports the notion that control of response-related interference is not a unitary construct: Response-selection demands were separable from those of withholding or stopping. Relations between behavioral impulsivity components and self-report measures of impulsivity were largely absent. We conclude that as the construct of impulsivity has been extended to describe an increasingly diverse set of phenomena and processes, it has become too broad to be helpful in guiding future research. PMID:23957282

  12. Repeated exposure reduces the response to impulsive noise in European seabass.

    PubMed

    Radford, Andrew N; Lèbre, Laurie; Lecaillon, Gilles; Nedelec, Sophie L; Simpson, Stephen D

    2016-10-01

    Human activities have changed the acoustic environment of many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems around the globe. Mounting evidence indicates that the resulting anthropogenic noise can impact the behaviour and physiology of at least some species in a range of taxa. However, the majority of experimental studies have considered only immediate responses to single, relatively short-term noise events. Repeated exposure to noise could lead to a heightened or lessened response. Here, we conduct two long-term (12 week), laboratory-based exposure experiments with European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) to examine how an initial impact of different sound types potentially changes over time. Naïve fish showed elevated ventilation rates, indicating heightened stress, in response to impulsive additional noise (playbacks of recordings of pile-driving and seismic surveys), but not to a more continuous additional noise source (playbacks of recordings of ship passes). However, fish exposed to playbacks of pile-driving or seismic noise for 12 weeks no longer responded with an elevated ventilation rate to the same noise type. Fish exposed long-term to playback of pile-driving noise also no longer responded to short-term playback of seismic noise. The lessened response after repeated exposure, likely driven by increased tolerance or a change in hearing threshold, helps explain why fish that experienced 12 weeks of impulsive noise showed no differences in stress, growth or mortality compared to those reared with exposure to ambient-noise playback. Considering how responses to anthropogenic noise change with repeated exposure is important both when assessing likely fitness consequences and the need for mitigation measures. PMID:27282635

  13. fMRI investigation of response inhibition, emotion, impulsivity, and clinical high-risk behavior in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew R. G.; Benoit, James R. A.; Juhás, Michal; Dametto, Ericson; Tse, Tiffanie T.; MacKay, Marnie; Sen, Bhaskar; Carroll, Alan M.; Hodlevskyy, Oleksandr; Silverstone, Peter H.; Dolcos, Florin; Dursun, Serdar M.; Greenshaw, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    High-risk behavior in adolescents is associated with injury, mental health problems, and poor outcomes in later life. Improved understanding of the neurobiology of high-risk behavior and impulsivity shows promise for informing clinical treatment and prevention as well as policy to better address high-risk behavior. We recruited 21 adolescents (age 14–17) with a wide range of high-risk behavior tendencies, including medically high-risk participants recruited from psychiatric clinics. Risk tendencies were assessed using the Adolescent Risk Behavior Screen (ARBS). ARBS risk scores correlated highly (0.78) with impulsivity scores from the Barratt Impulsivity scale (BIS). Participants underwent 4.7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an emotional Go/NoGo task. This task presented an aversive or neutral distractor image simultaneously with each Go or NoGo stimulus. Risk behavior and impulsivity tendencies exhibited similar but not identical associations with fMRI activation patterns in prefrontal brain regions. We interpret these results as reflecting differences in response inhibition, emotional stimulus processing, and emotion regulation in relation to participant risk behavior tendencies and impulsivity levels. The results are consistent with high impulsivity playing an important role in determining high risk tendencies in this sample containing clinically high-risk adolescents. PMID:26483645

  14. State-space models of impulse hemodynamic responses over motor, somatosensory, and visual cortices

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Keum-Shik; Nguyen, Hoang-Dung

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents state space models of the hemodynamic response (HR) of fNIRS to an impulse stimulus in three brain regions: motor cortex (MC), somatosensory cortex (SC), and visual cortex (VC). Nineteen healthy subjects were examined. For each cortex, three impulse HRs experimentally obtained were averaged. The averaged signal was converted to a state space equation by using the subspace method. The activation peak and the undershoot peak of the oxy-hemoglobin (HbO) in MC are noticeably higher than those in SC and VC. The time-to-peaks of the HbO in three brain regions are almost the same (about 6.76 76 ± 0.2 s). The time to undershoot peak in VC is the largest among three. The HbO decreases in the early stage (~0.46 s) in MC and VC, but it is not so in SC. These findings were well described with the developed state space equations. Another advantage of the proposed method is its easy applicability in generating the expected HR to arbitrary stimuli in an online (or real-time) imaging. Experimental results are demonstrated. PMID:24940540

  15. A no a priori knowledge estimation of the impulse response for satellite image noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benbouzid, A. B.; Taleb, N.

    2015-04-01

    Due to launching vibrations and space harsh environment, high resolution remote sensing satellite imaging systems require permanent assessment and control of image quality, which may vary between ground pre-launch measurements, after launch and over satellite lifetime. In order to mitigate noise, remove artifacts and enhance image interpretability, the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the imaging system is estimated. Image deconvolution can be performed across the characterization of the actual Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of the imaging system. In this work we focus on adapting and applying a no reference method to characterize in orbit high resolution satellite images in terms of geometrical performance. Moreover, we use natural details contained in images as edges transitions to estimate the impulse response via the assessment of the MTF image. The obtained results are encouraging and promising.

  16. Closed-form impulse response model of non-line-of-sight single-scatter propagation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Zhan, Yafeng

    2016-04-01

    For optical scattering communication, a closed-form expression of channel impulse response (CIR) is favorable for further system design and channel capacity analysis. Combining the mean value theorem of integrals and L'Hôpital's rule, the exact non-line-of-sight (NLOS) single-scatter propagation model is simplified to a closed-form CIR model for a laser source with a narrow beam. Based on this model, by joint geometrical and empirical approaches, a piecewise CIR expression is presented under certain system NLOS geometries. Through numerical results on CIR for various NLOS geometries, the proposed model is verified with the exact NLOS single-scatter propagation model and the previous Gamma fitting model, showing that our model agrees better with the former than the latter. PMID:27140787

  17. The generation of shared cryptographic keys through channel impulse response estimation at 60 GHz.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Derek P.; Forman, Michael A.; Dowdle, Donald Ryan

    2010-09-01

    Methods to generate private keys based on wireless channel characteristics have been proposed as an alternative to standard key-management schemes. In this work, we discuss past work in the field and offer a generalized scheme for the generation of private keys using uncorrelated channels in multiple domains. Proposed cognitive enhancements measure channel characteristics, to dynamically change transmission and reception parameters as well as estimate private key randomness and expiration times. Finally, results are presented on the implementation of a system for the generation of private keys for cryptographic communications using channel impulse-response estimation at 60 GHz. The testbed is composed of commercial millimeter-wave VubIQ transceivers, laboratory equipment, and software implemented in MATLAB. Novel cognitive enhancements are demonstrated, using channel estimation to dynamically change system parameters and estimate cryptographic key strength. We show for a complex channel that secret key generation can be accomplished on the order of 100 kb/s.

  18. Responses of free-living coastal pelagic fish to impulsive sounds.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Anthony D; Roberts, Louise; Cheesman, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    The behavior of wild, pelagic fish in response to sound playback was observed with a sonar/echo sounder. Schools of sprat Sprattus sprattus and mackerel Scomber scombrus were examined at a quiet coastal location. The fish were exposed to a short sequence of repeated impulsive sounds, simulating the strikes from a pile driver, at different sound pressure levels. The incidence of behavioral responses increased with increasing sound level. Sprat schools were more likely to disperse and mackerel schools more likely to change depth. The sound pressure levels to which the fish schools responded on 50% of presentations were 163.2 and 163.3 dB re 1 μPa peak-to-peak, and the single strike sound exposure levels were 135.0 and 142.0 dB re 1 μPa(2) s, for sprat and mackerel, respectively, estimated from dose response curves. For sounds leading to mackerel responses, particle velocity levels were also estimated. The method of observation by means of a sonar/echo sounder proved successful in examining the behavior of unrestrained fish exposed to different sound levels. The technique may allow further testing of the relationship between responsiveness, sound level, and sound characteristics for different types of man-made sound, for a variety of fish species under varied conditions. PMID:24926505

  19. The transient response of finite open circular cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftimiu, C.; Huddleston, P. L.

    1984-04-01

    An eigenmode expansion formulation of the singularity expansion method based on the electric field integral equation is developed for the transient response of conducting finite open cylinders. The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the impedance operator are calculated by the Galerkin method using entire domain expansion functions. The transient surface current density and backscattered far field in response to an incident electromagnetic pulse are calculated for cylinders of various aspect ratios.

  20. A Fresh Look at Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as…

  1. Increased impulsivity in response to food cues after sleep loss in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    Cedernaes, Jonathan; Brandell, Jon; Ros, Olof; Broman, Jan-Erik; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S; Schiöth, Helgi B; Benedict, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether acute total sleep deprivation (TSD) leads to decreased cognitive control when food cues are presented during a task requiring active attention, by assessing the ability to cognitively inhibit prepotent responses. Methods Fourteen males participated in the study on two separate occasions in a randomized, crossover within-subject design: one night of TSD versus normal sleep (8.5 hours). Following each nighttime intervention, hunger ratings and morning fasting plasma glucose concentrations were assessed before performing a go/no-go task. Results Following TSD, participants made significantly more commission errors when they were presented “no-go” food words in the go/no-go task, as compared with their performance following sleep (+56%; P<0.05). In contrast, response time and omission errors to “go” non-food words did not differ between the conditions. Self-reported hunger after TSD was increased without changes in fasting plasma glucose. The increase in hunger did not correlate with the TSD-induced commission errors. Conclusions Our results suggest that TSD impairs cognitive control also in response to food stimuli in healthy young men. Whether such loss of inhibition or impulsiveness is food cue-specific as seen in obesity—thus providing a mechanism through which sleep disturbances may promote obesity development—warrants further investigation. PMID:24839251

  2. Neuroticism-Anxiety, Impulsive-Sensation Seeking and autonomic responses to somatosensory stimuli.

    PubMed

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Valerio, Elena; Santoro, Mariacaterina; Cacace, Immacolata

    2007-01-01

    This study focused on autonomic responding in participants who scored high vs. low on the Neuroticism-Anxiety (N-Anx) and Impulsive-Sensation Seeking (Imp-SS) dimensions of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire--Form III. Participants were presented with series of tones (standards, deviants and novels) and they received a mild electric shock (one, two or three pulses) at each 15th tone. Resting pre-stimulus skin conductance level (SCL) and heart rate (HR) level was recorded, as well as the skin conductance response (SCR) and (anticipatory) HR response to the electric stimuli. The autonomic measures differentiated between high- vs. low Imp-SS participants but failed to discriminate between high- vs. low N-Anx participants, with the exception that high N-Anx participants showed smaller SCRs on some trials compared to the low N-Anx participants. High Imp-SS had a lower pre-stimulus SCL and smaller SCRs to deviant stimuli compared to low Imp-SS participants. Additionally, their HR acceleration was smaller in anticipation of the first and the deviant tones whereas their deceleratory response was larger relative to the HR changes observed for the low Imp-SS participants. This pattern of findings was taken to suggest that high Imp-SS participants are more arousable and less prone to defensive reactions to novel or aversive stimulation. PMID:16899317

  3. Vaporization response of evaporating drops with finite thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosta, V. D.; Hammer, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    A numerical computing procedure was developed for calculating vaporization histories of evaporating drops in a combustor in which travelling transverse oscillations occurred. The liquid drop was assumed to have a finite thermal conductivity. The system of equations was solved by using a finite difference method programmed for solution on a high speed digital computer. Oscillations in the ratio of vaporization of an array of repetitivity injected drops in the combustor were obtained from summation of individual drop histories. A nonlinear in-phase frequency response factor for the entire vaporization process to oscillations in pressure was evaluated. A nonlinear out-of-phase response factor, in-phase and out-of-phase harmonic response factors, and a Princeton type 'n' and 'tau' were determined. The resulting data was correlated and is presented in graphical format. Qualitative agreement with the open literature is obtained in the behavior of the in-phase response factor. Quantitatively the results of the present finite conductivity spray analysis do not correlate with the results of a single drop model.

  4. Digital high-pass filter deconvolution by means of an infinite impulse response filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Födisch, P.; Wohsmann, J.; Lange, B.; Schönherr, J.; Enghardt, W.; Kaever, P.

    2016-09-01

    In the application of semiconductor detectors, the charge-sensitive amplifier is widely used in front-end electronics. The output signal is shaped by a typical exponential decay. Depending on the feedback network, this type of front-end electronics suffers from the ballistic deficit problem, or an increased rate of pulse pile-ups. Moreover, spectroscopy applications require a correction of the pulse-height, while a shortened pulse-width is desirable for high-throughput applications. For both objectives, digital deconvolution of the exponential decay is convenient. With a general method and the signals of our custom charge-sensitive amplifier for cadmium zinc telluride detectors, we show how the transfer function of an amplifier is adapted to an infinite impulse response (IIR) filter. This paper investigates different design methods for an IIR filter in the discrete-time domain and verifies the obtained filter coefficients with respect to the equivalent continuous-time frequency response. Finally, the exponential decay is shaped to a step-like output signal that is exploited by a forward-looking pulse processing.

  5. Impulse response characterization of breast tomosynthesis reconstruction with parallel imaging configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balla, Apuroop; Zhou, Weihua; Chen, Ying

    2010-04-01

    Early detection, diagnosis, and suitable treatment are known to significantly improve the chance of survival for breast cancer (BC) patients. To date, the most cost effective method for screening and early detection is mammography, which is also the tool that has demonstrated its ability to reduce BC mortality. Tomosynthesis is an emerging technology that offers an alternative to conventional two-dimensional mammography. Tomosynthesis produces three-dimensional (volumetric) images of the breast that may be superior to planar imaging due to improved visualization. In this paper we examined the effect of varying the number of projections (N) and total view angle (VA) on the shift-and-add (SAA), back projection (BP) and filtered back projection (FBP) image reconstruction response characterized by impulse response (IR) simulations. IR data were generated by simulating the projection images of a very thin wire, using various combinations of VA and N. Results suggested that BP and FBP performed better for in-plane performance than that of SAA. With bigger number of projection images, the investigated reconstruction algorithms performed the best by obtaining sharper in-focus IR with simulated parallel imaging configurations.

  6. Uncertainties of reverberation time estimation via adaptively identified room impulse responses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lifu; Qiu, Xiaojun; Burnett, Ian; Guo, Yecai

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the reverberation time estimation methods which employ backward integration of adaptively identified room impulse responses (RIRs). Two kinds of conditions are considered; the first is the "ideal condition" where the anechoic and reverberant signals are both known a priori so that the RIRs can be identified using system identification methods. The second is that only the reverberant speech signal is available, and blind identification of the RIRs via dereverberation is employed for reverberation time estimation. Results show that under the "ideal condition," the average relative errors in 7 octave bands are less than 2% for white noise and 15% for speech, respectively, when both the anechoic and reverberant signals are available. In contrast, under the second condition, the average relative errors of the blindly identified RIR-based reverberation time estimation are around 20%-30% except the 63 Hz octave band. The fluctuation of reverberation times estimated under the second condition is more severe than that under the ideal condition and the relative error for low frequency octave bands is larger than that for high octave bands under both conditions. PMID:27036246

  7. On the consideration of motion effects in the computation of impulse response for underwater acoustics inversion.

    PubMed

    Josso, Nicolas F; Ioana, Cornel; Mars, Jérôme I; Gervaise, Cédric; Stéphan, Yann

    2009-10-01

    The estimation of the impulse response (IR) of a propagation channel may be of great interest for a large number of underwater applications: underwater communications, sonar detection and localization, marine mammal monitoring, etc. It quantifies the distortions of the transmitted signal in the underwater channel and enables geoacoustic inversion. The propagating signal is usually subject to additional and undesirable distortions due to the motion of the transmitter-channel-receiver configuration. This paper shows the effects of the motion while estimating the IR by matched filtering between the transmitted and the received signals. A methodology to compare IR estimation with and without motion is presented. Based on this comparison, a method for motion effect compensation is proposed in order to reduce motion-induced distortions. The proposed methodology is applied to real data sets collected in 2007 by the Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine in a shallow water environment, proving its interest for motion effect analysis. Motion compensated estimation of IRs is computed from sources transmitting broadband linear frequency modulations moving at up to 12 knots in the shallow water environment of the Malta plateau, South of Sicilia. PMID:19813789

  8. Extracting the frequencies of the pinna spectral notches in measured head related impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raykar, Vikas C.; Duraiswami, Ramani; Yegnanarayana, B.

    2005-07-01

    The head related impulse response (HRIR) characterizes the auditory cues created by scattering of sound off a person's anatomy. The experimentally measured HRIR depends on several factors such as reflections from body parts (torso, shoulder, and knees), head diffraction, and reflection/diffraction effects due to the pinna. Structural models (Algazi et al., 2002; Brown and Duda, 1998) seek to establish direct relationships between the features in the HRIR and the anatomy. While there is evidence that particular features in the HRIR can be explained by anthropometry, the creation of such models from experimental data is hampered by the fact that the extraction of the features in the HRIR is not automatic. One of the prominent features observed in the HRIR, and one that has been shown to be important for elevation perception, are the deep spectral notches attributed to the pinna. In this paper we propose a method to robustly extract the frequencies of the pinna spectral notches from the measured HRIR, distinguishing them from other confounding features. The method also extracts the resonances described by Shaw (1997). The techniques are applied to the publicly available CIPIC HRIR database (Algazi et al., 2001c). The extracted notch frequencies are related to the physical dimensions and shape of the pinna.

  9. Influence of wall scattering on the early fine structures of measured room impulse responses.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Jang, Hyung Suk; Kim, Yong Hee; Vorländer, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The effects of wall diffusing elements on sound-field diffuseness were investigated in a tenth-scale model hall and in a real recital hall. Acoustical measurements were carried out in both halls to measure the surface diffusivity of the lateral walls. In the scale model, the surfaces of the lateral walls and the soffits were covered with diffusers; in the recital hall, the front halves of both lateral walls were treated using reflective panels and absorptive materials. Objective characteristics were investigated using conventional room acoustic parameters and the number of peaks (Np) computed for the measured impulse responses, which were recorded under diffusive, reflective, and absorptive conditions. In addition, as a measure of the diffuse sound fields, the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the acoustical parameters were investigated. The diffusive surfaces caused a decrease in the standard deviation of the early decay time and an increase in the Np at higher frequency bands. Auditory experiments using a paired comparison method revealed that the perception of subjective diffuseness could be quantified by using Np. In addition, one listener group's preference was correlated with Np and varied depending on different wall surface treatments. PMID:25786926

  10. Preamplifier impulse-response shape-driven shot-noise in direct-detection photon-counting laser radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Douglas G.

    2001-09-01

    The number of photons returning form a target in a given time interval is well described by a negative-binomial distributed random variable. A photomultipler tube (PMT) photon-counting detector is optimal for direct detection, and the number of detected-photon 'electron pulses' produced is also negative-binomially distributed per time bin, with a reduced mean due to the device quantum efficiency. These time distributed electron pulses are amplified and filtered by the preamplifier electronics prior to digitization and signal processing. The voltage output pulse per individual photo-electron event is known as the 'impulse-response- function' of the detector and preamplifier. In this study we employ a typical analog preamplifier filter response, modeled as a Butterworth lowpass filter of order two, which filters a 200 ps wideband PMT input voltage pulse. The random summation of these lowpass voltage impulse-responses, as created by the negative-binomial photon arrival times and random photo-electron creation, is the classical electronic 'shot-noise' random process. We derive numerically the voltage probability density function of this negative- binomial/impulse-response driven shot-noise random process following the stochastic process literature. We also show a technique to include PMT variations in gain, known as the 'pulse height distribution,' and to incorporate Gaussian baseline-noise voltage. Agreement with AMOR experiments is shown to be excellent. In addition, a Monte Carlo realization is presented, using the same impulse-response temporal shape, which also gives excellent agreement with AMOR data and with the analytical/numerical calculations.

  11. The plastic response of a cylindrical shell subjected to an internal blast wave with a finite width shock front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivity, Y.; Florie, C.; Lenselink, H.

    1993-02-01

    This paper considers the plastic deformation of a thin cylindrical shell subjected to an internal explosion. It is assumed that the explosive charge is placed on the axis of symmetry of the shell so that an axisymmetric blast wave is produced. The shell response is calculated assuming an elastic-perfectly plastic material. The plastic response is evaluated for two types of loads. In the first type, the blast is assumed to have an ideal shock front with a discontinuous jump to the peak pressure. In the second type of loading, the shock front has a finite rise-time. This type of loading was introduced to study the effect of finite width shock fronts. Such finite width shock fronts are typical of hydrocode calculations when simulating problems involving blast waves and their interactions with adjacent structures. It is found that for equal impulse loads, the numerical rise-time reduces the shell plastic response significantly. Numerical calculations with a three-dimensional hydrocode are presented to illustrate the analytical results. A generalization of the analysis is given which may be used to determine the required mesh resolution of a hydrocode calculation in order to obtain a prescribed accuracy in the shell response.

  12. The application of finite impulse response filters to the detection of fetal electrocardiogram signals.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, R G; Crowe, J A; Gibson, N M; Peasgood, W; Woolfson, M S; Faulkner, T R

    1993-01-01

    An investigation is made into the potential application of linear phase digital filters to the detection of fetal electrocardiogram signals buried in noise. Such an assessment is made by applying both matched and linear phase filters to six computer simulated fetal signals and also to experimental data. The number of times that the R-wave locations are correctly located (N), the RMS error in R-wave location (RMS) and the correlation coefficient between the averaged and clean signals are computed. It is found that the averaged fetal complexes computed using these two types of filter are almost identical. However, for three of the signals, the values for N and RMS obtained using the linear phase filter are inferior to the corresponding results obtained with the matched filter. It is suggested that the averaged complex obtained using the linear phase filter could be used as an approximation to the matched filter template; it is found that this procedure results in an effectiveness of detecting R-waves that is, for the most part, comparable with the performance of a matched filter based on the QRS complex. PMID:8107669

  13. Instantaneous Impulses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Describes an experiment that extends Newton's instantaneous-impulse method of orbital analysis to a graphical method of orbit determination. Discusses the experiment's usefulness for teaching both horizontal projectile motion and instantaneous impulse. (WRM)

  14. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  15. Measurement of the responses of polyurethane and CONFOR(TM) foams and the development of a system identification technique to estimate polyurethane foam parameters from experimental impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Vaidyanadan

    Flexible polyurethane foam is the main cushioning element used in car seats. Optimization of an occupied seat's static and dynamic behavior requires models of foam that are accurate over a wide range of excitation and pre-compression conditions. Experiments were conducted to measure the response of foam over a wide range of excitation which include slowly varying uniaxial compression tests on a 3 inch cube foam sample, base excitation and impulse excitation test on a foam-mass system. The foam used was the same in all of the experiments, thus obtaining all the responses on the same foam sample which helps eliminate the sample to sample variation. Similar efforts were taken to conduct impulse and base excitation tests on CONFOR(TM) foam to help in future modeling efforts of CONFOR(TM) foam. All the experimental protocols and data pre-processing protocols along with results are presented. Previous researcher developed a linear model for a single-degree of freedom foam-mass system subjected to an impulsive excitation. Free response data from impulse tests on a foam-mass system with different masses was used to identify model parameters at various pre-compression levels (settling points). The free response of the system was modeled as a Prony series (sum of exponentials) whose parameters can be related to the parameters in the foam-mass system model. Models identified from tests at one settling point performed poorly when used to predict the response at other settling points. In this research, a method is described to estimate the parameters of a global model of the foam behavior from data gathered in a series of impulse tests at different settling points. The global model structure includes a nonlinear elastic term and a hereditary viscoelastic term. The model can be used to predict the settling point for each mass used and, by expanding the model about that settling point, local linear models of the response to impulsive excitation can be derived. From this analysis

  16. Groundwater recharge and time lag measurement through Vertosols using impulse response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Mark; Kelly, Bryce F. J.

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the world there are many stressed aquifers used to support irrigated agriculture. The Condamine River catchment (southern Queensland, Australia) is one example of a globally significant agricultural region where groundwater use has exceeded recharge over the last 50 years. There is a high dependence on groundwater in this catchment, because yearly rainfall is highly variable, and actual evapotranspiration often exceeds rainfall. To better manage the aquifer there is a need to correctly conceptualise the primary inputs and outputs of the system, and characterise the lags in system response to all forcings. In catchment models it is particularly important to correctly proportion diffuse (areal) rainfall recharge and to account for the lag between rainfall and recharge at the water table. Throughout large portions of the Condamine Catchment, groundwater levels are now 20 or more metres below the ground surface. This study aimed to better quantify the lag between rainfall and recharge at the water table using the predefined impulse response function in continuous time method (PIRFICT; von Asmuth et al., 2002; von Asmuth, 2012). The PIRFICT method was applied to 255 multi-decadal groundwater level data sets throughout the catchment. Inputs into the modelling include rainfall, irrigation deep drainage, stream water level, evapotranspiration, and groundwater extractions. As an independent check the PIRFICT model derived diffuse recharge estimates are compared to point lysimeter and geochemical recharge estimates in the Vertosol soils within this catchment. It is estimated using the PIRFICT method that in the Condamine Catchment between 1990 and 2012, the mean rain-derived groundwater recharge is 4.4 mm/year. Mean groundwater response from rainfall was determined to be 5.3 years: range 188 days to 48 years. The recharge estimates are consistent with both geochemical and lysimeter point measurements of recharge. It is concluded that where extensive groundwater

  17. Kinetics of respiratory and circulatory responses to step, impulse, sinusoidal and ramp forcings of exercise load in humans.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Y

    1992-01-01

    Transient responses of minute ventilation (VE), oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide output (VCO2), cardiac output (Q) and heart rate (HR) to step, impulse, sinusoidal and ramp changes in exercise load were studied in healthy human subjects at the moderate load range. Exercise was performed in the upright position using a bicycle ergometer. The transient responses to step and impulse forcings fitted essentially to a second-order model consisting of a fast and a slow component, while the responses to sinusoidal and ramp forcings fitted to a first-order model. No significant asymmetry was observed between the on- and off-responses to step forcing. On the contrary, the mean response time (MRT = pure time delay + time constant) of variables to ascending ramp forcing was prolonged, while the MRT to descending ramp was shortened with decreasing ramp slope. The on- and off asymmetry of the MRT was observed in VE, VO2 and VCO2 and, to a lesser extent, also in HR and Q. A non-linear blood flow model, which simulates changes in the wash-in and wash-out time of metabolic substances into and from the chemoreceptor, has been proposed as a likely explanation for the asymmetrical responses. It was concluded that the regulatory system of respiration and circulation might be essentially non-linear in its operation, despite the fact that the cardiorespiratory responses during exercise seemed to fit linear models. PMID:1599881

  18. Finite element cochlear models and their steady state response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Y.; Yamabuchi, T.; Watanabe, N.; Mizoguchi, T.

    1987-12-01

    Numerical cochlear models are constructed by means of a finite element approach and their frequency and spatial responses are calculated. The cochlea is modelled as a coupled fluid-membrane system, for which both two- and three-dimensional models are considered. The fluid in the scala canals is assumed to be incompressible and the basilar membrane is assumed to be a locally reactive impedance wall or a lossy elastic membrane. With the three-dimensional models, the effects are examined of the spiral configuration of the cochlea, of the presence of the lamina and the ligament that narrows the coupling area between the two fluid canals (scala vestibuli and scala tympani), and of the extended reaction of the basilar membrane which cannot be included in case of the two-dimensional models. The conclusion is that these effects on the cochlear response and the inherent mechanism governing the cochlear behaviour are found to be rather secondary.

  19. Examination of trait impulsivity on the response to a brief mindfulness intervention among college student drinkers.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Christine; Peltier, MacKenzie; Waldo, Krystal; Kinsaul, Jessica; Shah, Sonia; Coffey, Scott F; Copeland, Amy L

    2016-08-30

    Mindfulness-based strategies show promise for targeting the construct of impulsivity and associated variables among problematic alcohol users. This study examined the moderating role of intervention (mindfulness vs relaxation vs control) on trait impulsivity and three outcomes examined post-intervention (negative affect, positive affect, and urge to drink) among 207 college students with levels of at-risk drinking. Moderation analyses revealed that the relationship between baseline impulsivity and the primary outcomes significantly differed for participants who underwent the mindfulness versus relaxation interventions. Notably, simple slope analyses revealed that negative urgency was positively associated with urge to drink following the mindfulness intervention. Among participants who underwent the relaxation intervention, analysis of simple slopes revealed that negative urgency was negatively associated with urge to drink, while positive urgency was positively associated with positive affect following the relaxation intervention. Findings suggest that level (low vs high) and subscale of impulsivity matter with regard to how a participant will respond to a mindfulness versus relaxation intervention. PMID:27344030

  20. Auditory and behavioral responses of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) to single underwater impulses from an arc-gap transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneran, James J.; Dear, Randall; Carder, Donald A.; Ridgway, Sam H.

    2003-09-01

    A behavioral response paradigm was used to measure underwater hearing thresholds in two California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) before and after exposure to underwater impulses from an arc-gap transducer. Preexposure and postexposure hearing thresholds were compared to determine if the subjects experienced temporary shifts in their masked hearing thresholds (MTTS). Hearing thresholds were measured at 1 and 10 kHz. Exposures consisted of single underwater impulses produced by an arc-gap transducer referred to as a ``pulsed power device'' (PPD). The electrical charge of the PPD was varied from 1.32 to 2.77 kJ; the distance between the subject and the PPD was varied over the range 3.4 to 25 m. No MTTS was observed in either subject at the highest received levels: peak pressures of approximately 6.8 and 14 kPa, rms pressures of approximately 178 and 183 dB re: 1 μPa, and total energy fluxes of 161 and 163 dB re: 1 μPa2s for the two subjects. Behavioral reactions to the tests were observed in both subjects. These reactions primarily consisted of temporary avoidance of the site where exposure to the PPD impulse had previously occurred.

  1. Neuroendocrine responses to a glucose challenge in substance users with high and low levels of aggression, impulsivity, and antisocial personality.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, D H; Dax, E; Lozovsky, D B; Jaffe, J H

    1992-01-01

    Plasma glucose concentrations, and plasma prolactin and cortisol responses to a 5-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 37 substance abusers, were examined to assess the relationship between varying degrees of antisocial personality, impulsivity, and aggressiveness and measures of endocrine function. Childhood and presenting aggression, impulsivity and antisocial personality features were evaluated by several self-report questionnaires. Those with high scores for psychopathic deviance (MMPI) differed in glucose levels following OGTT from those with low scores. Lower cortisol nadir levels were associated with higher scores on measures of antisocial personality and aggressiveness. Also, prolactin response to glucose was attenuated relative to baseline levels in the more antisocial and aggressive subjects. The results indicate that substance abusers with high levels of self-reported antisocial personality and aggressive behavior have altered neuroendocrine responses to glucose challenge, although there was no evidence of hypoglycemia. No one personality or behavioral trait, as measured by our test battery, more strongly predicted neuroendocrine responses to glucose administration. Thus, our data partially support other reports of altered neuroendocrine responses to stressful challenges in aggressive/antisocial individuals. PMID:1625777

  2. Structural characteristic responses for finite element model updating of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Linren; Wang, Lei; Ou, Jinping

    2014-04-01

    The field measurements of structures are very important to the structural finite element (FE) model updating because the errors and uncertainties of a FE model are corrected directly through closing the discrepancies between the analytical responses from FE model and the measurements from field testing of a structure. Usually, the accurate and reliable field measurements are very limited. Therefore, it is very important to make full use of the limited and valuable field measurements in structural model updating to achieve a best result with the lowest cost. In this paper, structural FE model updating is investigated in the point of view of solving a mathematical problem, and different amount and category of structural dynamic responses and static responses are considered as constraints to explore their effects on the updated results of different degree and types of structural damages. The numerical studies are carried out on a space truss. Accounting for the numerical results, some inherent phenomena and connections taking account of the updating parameters, output responses and the updated results are revealed and discussed. Some useful and practicable suggestions about using the field measurements for FE model updating are provided to achieve efficient and reliable results.

  3. Computation of Schenberg response function by using finite element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frajuca, C.; Bortoli, F. S.; Magalhaes, N. S.

    2016-05-01

    Schenberg is a detector of gravitational waves resonant mass type, with a central frequency of operation of 3200 Hz. Transducers located on the surface of the resonating sphere, according to a distribution half-dodecahedron, are used to monitor a strain amplitude. The development of mechanical impedance matchers that act by increasing the coupling of the transducers with the sphere is a major challenge because of the high frequency and small in size. The objective of this work is to study the Schenberg response function obtained by finite element modeling (FEM). Finnaly, the result is compared with the result of the simplified model for mass spring type system modeling verifying if that is suitable for the determination of sensitivity detector, as the conclusion the both modeling give the same results.

  4. Finite element simulation of impact response of wire mesh screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Caizheng; Shankar, Krishna; Fien, Alan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the response of wire mesh screens to low velocity impact with blunt objects is investigated using finite element (FE) simulation. The woven wire mesh is modelled with homogeneous shell elements with equivalent smeared mechanical properties. The mechanical behaviour of the woven wire mesh was determined experimentally with tensile tests on steel wire mesh coupons to generate the data for the smeared shell material used in the FE. The effects of impacts with a low mass (4 kg) and a large mass (40 kg) providing the same impact energy are studied. The joint between the wire mesh screen and the aluminium frame surrounding it is modelled using contact elements with friction between the corresponding elements. Damage to the screen of different types compromising its structural integrity, such as mesh separation and pulling out from the surrounding frame is modelled. The FE simulation is validated with results of impact tests conducted on woven steel wire screen meshes.

  5. Linking impulse response functions to reaction time: Rod and cone reaction time data and a computational model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dingcai; Zele, Andrew J.; Pokorny, Joel

    2007-01-01

    Reaction times for incremental and decremental stimuli were measured at five suprathreshold contrasts for six retinal illuminance levels where rods alone (0.002–0.2 Trolands), rods and cones (2–20 Trolands) or cones alone (200 Trolands) mediated detection. A 4-primary photostimulator allowed independent control of rod or cone excitations. This is the first report of reaction times to isolated rod or cone stimuli at mesopic light levels under the same adaptation conditions. The main findings are: 1) For rods, responses to decrements were faster than increments, but cone reaction times were closely similar. 2) At light levels where both systems were functional, rod reaction times were ~20 ms longer. The data were fitted with a computational model that incorporates rod and cone impulse response functions and a stimulus-dependent neural sensory component that triggers a motor response. Rod and cone impulse response functions were derived from published psychophysical two-pulse threshold data and temporal modulation transfer functions. The model fits were accomplished with a limited number of free parameters: two global parameters to estimate the irreducible minimum reaction time for each receptor type, and one local parameter for each reaction time versus contrast function. This is the first model to provide a neural basis for the variation in reaction time with retinal illuminance, stimulus contrast, stimulus polarity, and receptor class modulated. PMID:17346763

  6. Ice Sheet Roughness Estimation Based on Impulse Responses Acquired in the Global Ice Sheet Mapping Orbiter Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niamsuwan, N.; Johnson, J. T.; Jezek, K. C.; Gogineni, P.

    2008-12-01

    The Global Ice Sheet Mapping Orbiter (GISMO) mission was developed to address scientific needs to understand the polar ice subsurface structure. This NASA Instrument Incubator Program project is a collaboration between Ohio State University, the University of Kansas, Vexcel Corporation and NASA. The GISMO design utilizes an interferometric SAR (InSAR) strategy in which ice sheet reflected signals received by a dual-antenna system are used to produce an interference pattern. The resulting interferogram can be used to filter out surface clutter so as to reveal the signals scattered from the base of the ice sheet. These signals are further processed to produce 3D-images representing basal topography of the ice sheet. In the past three years, the GISMO airborne field campaigns that have been conducted provide a set of useful data for studying geophysical properties of the Greenland ice sheet. While topography information can be obtained using interferometric SAR processing techniques, ice sheet roughness statistics can also be derived by a relatively simple procedure that involves analyzing power levels and the shape of the radar impulse response waveforms. An electromagnetic scattering model describing GISMO impulse responses has previously been proposed and validated. This model suggested that rms-heights and correlation lengths of the upper surface profile can be determined from the peak power and the decay rate of the pulse return waveform, respectively. This presentation will demonstrate a procedure for estimating the roughness of ice surfaces by fitting the GISMO impulse response model to retrieved waveforms from selected GISMO flights. Furthermore, an extension of this procedure to estimate the scattering coefficient of the glacier bed will be addressed as well. Planned future applications involving the classification of glacier bed conditions based on the derived scattering coefficients will also be described.

  7. Robust and low complexity localization algorithm based on head-related impulse responses and interaural time difference.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinwang; Liang, Juan

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a biologically inspired localization algorithm using two microphones, for a mobile robot. The proposed algorithm has two steps. First, the coarse azimuth angle of the sound source is estimated by cross-correlation algorithm based on interaural time difference. Then, the accurate azimuth angle is obtained by cross-channel algorithm based on head-related impulse responses. The proposed algorithm has lower computational complexity compared to the cross-channel algorithm. Experimental results illustrate that the localization performance of the proposed algorithm is better than those of the cross-correlation and cross-channel algorithms. PMID:23298016

  8. Finite-strain large-deflection elastic-viscoplastic finite-element transient response analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodal, J. J. A.; Witmer, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    A method of analysis for thin structures that incorporates finite strain, elastic-plastic, strain hardening, time dependent material behavior implemented with respect to a fixed configuration and is consistently valid for finite strains and finite rotations is developed. The theory is formulated systematically in a body fixed system of convected coordinates with materially embedded vectors that deform in common with continuum. Tensors are considered as linear vector functions and use is made of the dyadic representation. The kinematics of a deformable continuum is treated in detail, carefully defining precisely all quantities necessary for the analysis. The finite strain theory developed gives much better predictions and agreement with experiment than does the traditional small strain theory, and at practically no additional cost. This represents a very significant advance in the capability for the reliable prediction of nonlinear transient structural responses, including the reliable prediction of strains large enough to produce ductile metal rupture.

  9. Experimental investigation on the dynamic response of clamped corrugated sandwich plates subjected to underwater impulsive loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Dacheng; Hypervelocity Impact Research Center Team

    2015-06-01

    Corrugated sandwich plates are widely used in marine industry because such plates have high strength-to-weight ratios and blast resistance. The laboratory-scaled fluid-structure interaction experiments are performed to demonstrate the shock resistance of solid monolithic plates and corrugated sandwich plates by quantifying the permanent transverse deflection at mid-span of the plates as a function of impulsive loadings per areal mass. Sandwich structures with 6mm-thick and 10mm-thick 3003 aluminum corrugated core and 5A06 face sheets are compared with the 5A06 solid monolithic plates in this paper. The dynamic deformation of plates are captured with the the 3D digital speckle correlation method (DIC). The results affirm that sandwich structures show a 30% reduction in the maximum plate deflection compare with a monolithic plate of identical mass per unit area, and the peak value of deflection effectively reduced by increasing the thickness core. The failure modes of sandwich plates consists of core crushing, imprinting, stretch tearing of face sheets, bending and permanent deformation of entire structure with the increasing impulsive loads, and the failure mechanisms are analyzed with the postmortem panels and dynamic deflection history captured by cameras. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO.: 11372088).

  10. Finite orbit energetic particle linear response to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Ye, Huanchun . Inst. for Fusion Studies); Breizman, B.N. . Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1991-07-01

    The linear response of energetic particles to the TAE modes is calculated taking into account their finite orbit excursion from the flux surfaces. The general expression reproduces the previously derived theory for small banana width: when the banana width {triangle}{sub b} is much larger than the mode thickness {triangle}{sub m}, we obtain a new compact expression for the linear power transfer. When {triangle}{sub m}/{triangle}{sub b} {much lt} 1, the banana orbit effect reduces the power transfer by a factor of {triangle}{sub m}/{triangle}{sub b} from that predicted by the narrow orbit theory. A comparison is made of the contribution to the TAE growth rate of energetic particles with a slowing-down distribution arising from an isotropic source, and a balance-injected beam source when the source speed is close to the Alfven speed. For the same stored energy density, the contribution from the principal resonances ({vert bar}{upsilon}{sub {parallel}}{vert bar} = {upsilon}{sub A} is substantially enhanced in the beam case compared to the isotropic case, while the contribution at the higher sidebands ({vert bar}{upsilon}{sub {parallel}}{vert bar}) = {upsilon}{sub A}/(2{ell} {minus} 1) with {ell} {ge} 2) is substantially reduced. 10 refs.

  11. Vibration Response of Multi Storey Building Using Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chik, T. N. T.; Zakaria, M. F.; Remali, M. A.; Yusoff, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between building, type of foundation and the geotechnical parameter of ground may trigger a significant effect on the building. In general, stiffer foundations resulted in higher natural frequencies of the building-soil system and higher input frequencies are often associated with other ground. Usually, vibrations transmitted to the buildings by ground borne are often noticeable and can be felt. It might affect the building and become worse if the vibration level is not controlled. UTHM building is prone to the ground borne vibration due to closed distance from the main road, and the construction activities adjacent to the buildings. This paper investigates the natural frequency and vibration mode of multi storey office building with the presence of foundation system and comparison between both systems. Finite element modelling (FEM) package software of LUSAS is used to perform the vibration analysis of the building. The building is modelled based on the original plan with the foundation system on the structure model. The FEM results indicated that the structure which modelled with rigid base have high natural frequency compare to the structure with foundation system. These maybe due to soil structure interaction and also the damping of the system which related to the amount of energy dissipated through the foundation soil. Thus, this paper suggested that modelling with soil is necessary to demonstrate the soil influence towards vibration response to the structure.

  12. Millennial scale system impulse response of polar climates - deconvolution results between δ 18O records from Greenland and Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischmann, E.; Yang, X.; Rial, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Deconvolution has long been used in science to recover real input given a system's impulse response and output. In this study, we applied spectral division deconvolution to select, polar, δ 18O time series to investigate the possible relationship between the climates of the Polar Regions, i.e. the equivalent to a climate system's ';impulse response.' While the records may be the result of nonlinear processes, deconvolution remains an appropriate tool because the two polar climates are synchronized, forming a Hilbert transform pair. In order to compare records, the age models of three Greenland and four Antarctica records have been matched via a Monte Carlo method using the methane-matched pair GRIP and BYRD as a basis for the calculations. For all twelve polar pairs, various deconvolution schemes (Wiener, Damped Least Squares, Tikhonov, Kalman filter) give consistent, quasi-periodic, impulse responses of the system. Multitaper analysis reveals strong, millennia scale, quasi-periodic oscillations in these system responses with a range of 2,500 to 1,000 years. These are not symmetric, as the transfer function from north to south differs from that of south to north. However, the difference is systematic and occurs in the predominant period of the deconvolved signals. Specifically, the north to south transfer function is generally of longer period than the south to north transfer function. High amplitude power peaks at 5.0ky to 1.7ky characterize the former, while the latter contains peaks at mostly short periods, with a range of 2.5ky to 1.0ky. Consistent with many observations, the deconvolved, quasi-periodic, transfer functions share the predominant periodicities found in the data, some of which are likely related to solar forcing (2.5-1.0ky), while some are probably indicative of the internal oscillations of the climate system (1.6-1.4ky). The approximately 1.5 ky transfer function may represent the internal periodicity of the system, perhaps even related to the

  13. The atomic oxygen green and red line emission response to sudden impulses of the solar wind dynamic pressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Ludmila; Leonovich, Vitaly; Tashchilin, Anatoly

    The atomic oxygen green and red line emission response to sudden impulses of the solar wind dynamic pressure was revealed at mid-latitudes. The paper presents the study results of the dependence of the observed emissions intensity from the sudden variations in the solar wind and the geomagnetic field. These results show a relationship of the emissions disturbance amplitude with the solar wind speed, as well as with the geomagnetic field variations. We used the zenith photometer optical data, the geomagnetic field and the total electron content variations obtained for the Eastern Siberia region (52(°) N, 103(°) E). The investigation was supported by the RFFI grants № 12-05-00024-а, № 13-05-00733.

  14. A family of variable step-size affine projection adaptive filter algorithms using statistics of channel impulse response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams Esfand Abadi, Mohammad; AbbasZadeh Arani, Seyed Ali Asghar

    2011-12-01

    This paper extends the recently introduced variable step-size (VSS) approach to the family of adaptive filter algorithms. This method uses prior knowledge of the channel impulse response statistic. Accordingly, optimal step-size vector is obtained by minimizing the mean-square deviation (MSD). The presented algorithms are the VSS affine projection algorithm (VSS-APA), the VSS selective partial update NLMS (VSS-SPU-NLMS), the VSS-SPU-APA, and the VSS selective regressor APA (VSS-SR-APA). In VSS-SPU adaptive algorithms the filter coefficients are partially updated which reduce the computational complexity. In VSS-SR-APA, the optimal selection of input regressors is performed during the adaptation. The presented algorithms have good convergence speed, low steady state mean square error (MSE), and low computational complexity features. We demonstrate the good performance of the proposed algorithms through several simulations in system identification scenario.

  15. Field-Aligned Current Reconfiguration and Magnetospheric Response to an Impulse in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field BY Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, F. D.; Eriksson, S.; Korth, H.; Hairston, M. R.; Baker, J. B.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    When the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is dawnward or duskward, magnetic merging between the IMF and the geomagnetic field occurs near the cusp on the dayside flanks of the magnetosphere. During these intervals, flow channels in the ionosphere with velocities in excess of 2 km/s have been observed, which can deposit large amounts of energy into the high-latitude thermosphere. In this study, we analyze an interval on 5 April 2010 where there was a strong dawnward impulse in the IMF, followed by a gradual decay in IMF magnitude at constant clock angle. Data from the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar and the DMSP spacecraft were used to investigate ionospheric convection during this interval, and data from the Active Magnetospheric and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) were used to investigate the associated Field-Aligned Current (FAC) system. Additionally, data from AMPERE were used to investigate the time response of the dawn-side FAC pair. We find there is a delay of approximately 1.25 hours between the arrival of the dawnward IMF impulse at the magnetopause and strength of the dawnward FAC pair, which is comparable to substorm growth and expansion time scales under southward IMF. Additionally, we find at the time of the peak FAC, there is evidence of a reconfiguring four-sheet FAC system in the morning local time sector of the ionosphere. Additionally, we find an inverse correlation between the dawn FAC strength and both the solar wind Alfvénic Mach number and the SYM-H index. No statistically significant correlation between the FAC strength and the solar wind dynamic pressure was found.

  16. Impulsive Action but Not Impulsive Choice Determines Problem Gambling Severity

    PubMed Central

    Brevers, Damien; Cleeremans, Axel; Verbruggen, Frederick; Bechara, Antoine; Kornreich, Charles; Verbanck, Paul; Noël, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Background Impulsivity is a hallmark of problem gambling. However, impulsivity is not a unitary construct and this study investigated the relationship between problem gambling severity and two facets of impulsivity: impulsive action (impaired ability to withhold a motor response) and impulsive choice (abnormal aversion for the delay of reward). Methods The recruitment includes 65 problem gamblers and 35 normal control participants. On the basis of DSM-IV-TR criteria, two groups of gamblers were distinguished: problem gamblers (n = 38) and pathological gamblers (n = 27) with similar durations of gambling practice. Impulsive action was assessed using a response inhibition task (the stop-signal task). Impulsive choice was estimated with the delay-discounting task. Possible confounds (e.g., IQ, mood, ADHD symptoms) were recorded. Results Both problem and pathological gamblers discounted reward at a higher rate than their controls, but only pathological gamblers showed abnormally low performance on the most demanding condition of the stop-signal task. None of the potential confounds covaried with these results. Conclusions These results suggest that, whereas abnormal impulsive choice characterizes all problem gamblers, pathological gamblers' impairments in impulsive action may represent an important developmental pathway of pathological gambling. PMID:23209796

  17. In situ investigation of the dynamic response of energetic materials using IMPULSE at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, K. J.; Jensen, B. J.; Iverson, A. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Carlson, C. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Thompson, D. G.; Fezzaa, K.; Hooks, D. E.

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical and chemical response of energetic materials is controlled by a convolution of deformation mechanisms that span length scales and evolve during impact. Traditional methods use continuum measurements to infer the microstructural response whereas advances in synchrotron capabilities and diagnostics are providing new, unique opportunities to interrogate materials in real time and in situ. Experiments have been performed on a new gas-gun system (IMPact system for Ultrafast Synchrotron Experiments) using single X-ray bunch phase contrast imaging (PCI) and Laue diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The low absorption of molecular materials maximizes x-ray beam penetration, allowing measurements in transmission using the brilliance currently available at APS Sector 32. The transmission geometry makes it possible to observe both average lattice response and spatially heterogeneous, continuum response (1-4 um spatial resolution over ~2 × 2 mm area, 80 ps exposure, 153 ns frame-rate) in energetic materials ranging from single crystals to plastic-bonded composites. The current work describes our progress developing and using these diagnostics to observe deformation mechanisms relevant to explosives and the first experiments performed with explosives on IMPULSE at APS.

  18. A touch screen based Stop Signal Response Task in rhesus monkeys for studying impulsivity associated with chronic cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijing; Heitz, Richard P; Bradberry, Charles W

    2009-02-15

    Among a range of cognitive deficits, human cocaine addicts display increased impulsivity and decreased performance monitoring. In order to establish an animal model that can be used to study the underlying neurobiology of these deficits associated with addiction, we have developed a touch screen based Stop Signal Response Task for rhesus monkeys. This task is essentially identical to the clinically used Stop Signal Task employed for diagnostic and research purposes. In this task, impulsivity is reflected in the amount of time needed to inhibit a response after it has been initiated, the Stop Signal Response Time (SSRT). Performance monitoring is reflected by the slowing of response times following Stop trials (Post-Stop Slowing, PSS). Herein we report on the task structure, the staged methods for training animals to perform the task, and a comparison of performance values for control and cocaine experienced animals. Relative to controls, monkeys that had self-administered cocaine, followed by 18 months abstinence, displayed increased impulsivity (increased SSRT values), and decreased performance monitoring (decreased PSS values). Our results are consistent with human data, and thereby establish an ideal animal model for studying the etiology and underlying neurobiology of cocaine-induced impulse control and performance monitoring deficits. PMID:18948136

  19. Preventing (impulsive) errors: Electrophysiological evidence for online inhibitory control over incorrect responses

    PubMed Central

    van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.; Spieser, Laure; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In a rich environment, with multiple action affordances, selective action inhibition is critical in preventing the execution of inappropriate responses. Here, we studied the origin and the dynamics of incorrect response inhibition and how it can be modulated by task demands. We used EEG in a conflict task where the probability of compatible and incompatible trials was varied. This allowed us to modulate the strength of the prepotent response, and hence to increase the risk of errors, while keeping the probability of the two responses equal. The correct response activation and execution was not affected by compatibility or by probability. In contrast, incorrect response inhibition in the primary motor cortex ipsilateral to the correct response was more pronounced on incompatible trials, especially in the condition where most of the trials were compatible, indicating a modulation of inhibitory strength within the course of the action. Two prefrontal activities, one medial and one lateral, were also observed before the response, and their potential links with the observed inhibitory pattern observed are discussed. PMID:27005956

  20. Finite element model calibration using frequency responses with damping equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsson, T. J. S.; Kammer, D. C.

    2015-10-01

    Model calibration is a cornerstone of the finite element verification and validation procedure, in which the credibility of the model is substantiated by positive comparison with test data. The calibration problem, in which the minimum deviation between finite element model data and experimental data is searched for, is normally characterized as being a large scale optimization problem with many model parameters to solve for and with deviation metrics that are nonlinear in these parameters. The calibrated parameters need to be found by iterative procedures, starting from initial estimates. Sometimes these procedures get trapped in local deviation function minima and do not converge to the globally optimal calibration solution that is searched for. The reason for such traps is often the multi-modality of the problem which causes eigenmode crossover problems in the iterative variation of parameter settings. This work presents a calibration formulation which gives a smooth deviation metric with a large radius of convergence to the global minimum. A damping equalization method is suggested to avoid the mode correlation and mode pairing problems that need to be solved in many other model updating procedures. By this method, the modal damping of a test data model and the finite element model is set to be the same fraction of critical modal damping. Mode pairing for mapping of experimentally found damping to the finite element model is thus not needed. The method is combined with model reduction for efficiency and employs the Levenberg-Marquardt minimizer with randomized starts to achieve the calibration solution. The performance of the calibration procedure, including a study of parameter bias and variance under noisy data conditions, is demonstrated by two numerical examples.

  1. An impulse response function for the "long tail" of excess atmospheric CO2 in an Earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lord, N. S.; Ridgwell, A.; Thorne, M. C.; Lunt, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate fate of (fossil fuel) CO2 emitted to the atmosphere is governed by a range of sedimentological and geological processes operating on timescales of up to the ca. hundred thousand year response of the silicate weathering feedback. However, how the various geological CO2 sinks might saturate and feedbacks weaken in response to increasing total emissions is poorly known. Here we explore the relative importance and timescales of these processes using a 3-D ocean-based Earth system model. We first generate an ensemble of 1 Myr duration CO2 decay curves spanning cumulative emissions of up to 20,000 Pg C. To aid characterization and understanding of the model response to increasing emission size, we then generate an impulse response function description for the long-term fate of CO2 in the model. In terms of the process of carbonate weathering and burial, our analysis is consistent with a progressively increasing fraction of total emissions that are removed from the atmosphere as emissions increase, due to the ocean carbon sink becoming saturated, together with a lengthening of the timescale of removal from the atmosphere. However, we find that in our model the ultimate CO2 sink—silicate weathering feedback—is approximately invariant with respect to cumulative emissions, both in terms of its importance (it removes the remaining excess ~7% of total emissions from the atmosphere) and timescale (~270 kyr). Because a simple pulse-response description leads to initially large predictive errors for a realistic time-varying carbon release, we also develop a convolution-based description of atmospheric CO2 decay which can be used as a simple and efficient means of making long-term carbon cycle perturbation projections.

  2. Optimization of the matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) impulse response and modulation transfer function characteristics for chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Devon J.; McAdams, H.P.; Dobbins, James T. III

    2006-03-15

    Matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) uses linear systems theory, along with a priori knowledge of the imaging geometry, to deterministically distinguish between true structure and overlying tomographic blur in a set of conventional tomosynthesis planes. In this paper we examine the effect of total scan angle (ANG), number of input projections (N), and plane separation/number of reconstructed planes (NP) on the MITS impulse response (IR) and modulation transfer function (MTF), with the purpose of optimizing MITS imaging of the chest. MITS IR and MTF data were generated by simulating the imaging of a very thin wire, using various combinations of ANG, N, and NP. Actual tomosynthesis data of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were acquired with a prototype experimental system, using the same imaging parameter combinations as those in the simulations. Thoracic projection data from two human subjects were collected for corroboration of the system response analysis in vivo. Results suggest that ANG=20 deg. , N=71, NP=69 is the optimal combination for MITS chest imaging given the inherent constraints of our prototype system. MITS chest data from human subjects demonstrates that the selected imaging strategy can effectively produce high-quality MITS thoracic images in vivo.

  3. A TEM-horn antenna with dielectric lens for fast impulse response

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    We designed and constructed a pair of TEM-horn antennas specifically for the very fast time-domain boresight response. Two physical topologies were made. A printed-board configuration has much slower transient response, which we think is due to pulse-smearing of the antenna currents in the dielectric substrate of the printed wiring boards. The solid state version has a 20 ps transition duration response in the main beam endfire (boresight) direction, which is the fastest we have seen to date. And since the antenna has a round trip antenna current propagation time of 6 ns, it offers clean radiated electromagnetic field measurement capability with a clear time of several nanoseconds. The printed board version has resistive loading at the aperture end of the conductors, which should offer better low- frequency performance. The dielectric lens certainly does improve the transient performance of the TEM horn, and was simple to design.

  4. Adolescent Impulsivity: Findings from a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Martial

    2005-01-01

    Impulsivity is central to several psychopathological states in adolescence. However, there is little consensus concerning the definition of impulsivity and its core dimensions. In response to this lack of consensus, Whiteside and Lynam (2001, "Pers. Individ. Differ." 30, 669-689) have developed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale, which is able to…

  5. Finite-element impact response of debonded composite turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sudip; Karmakar, Amit

    2014-02-01

    This paper investigates on the transient behavior of debonded composite pretwisted rotating shallow conical shells which could be idealized as turbine blades subjected to low velocity normal impact using finite-element method. Lagrange's equation of motion is used to derive the dynamic equilibrium equation and the moderate rotational speeds are considered neglecting the Coriolis effect. An eight-noded isoparametric plate bending element is employed in the finite element formulation incorporating rotary inertia and effects of transverse shear deformation based on Mindlin's theory. The modified Hertzian contact law which accounts for permanent indentation is utilized to compute the impact parameters. The time-dependent equations are solved by using Newmark's time integration scheme. Parametric studies are performed to investigate the effects of triggering parameters like angle of twist, rotational speed, laminate configuration and location of debonding considering low velocity normal impact at the center of eight-layered graphite-epoxy composite cantilevered conical shells with bending stiff ([0o2/{±} 30o]s), torsion stiff ([45°/-45°/-45°/45°]s) and cross-ply ([0°/90°/0°/90°]s) laminate configurations.

  6. Directional impulse response of a large cavity inside a sonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Spiousas, Ignacio; Eguia, Manuel C

    2012-10-01

    Both temporal and directional responses of a cavity inside a two-dimensional sonic crystal are investigated. The size of the cavity is large compared to the lattice parameter and the wavelength for the frequency range of interest. Hence, a hybrid method to compute the response is proposed, combining multiscattering theory for the calculation of the reflective properties of the sonic crystal with a modified ray-tracing algorithm for the sound propagation within the cavity. The response of this enclosure displays resonances for certain frequency bands that depend on the geometry of the lattice and the cavity. When a full band gap exists in the sonic crystal, rays cannot propagate through the medium and total reflection occurs for all incidence angles, leading to strong resonances with an isotropic intensity field inside the cavity. When only some propagation directions are forbidden, total reflection occurs for certain ranges of incidence angles, and resonances can also be elicited but with a highly anisotropic intensity field. The spectrum of resonances of the cavity is strongly affected by changes in the lattice geometry, suggesting that they can be tailored to some extent, a feature that can lead to potential applications in architectural acoustics. PMID:23039550

  7. From the channel model of an InSb-based superresolution optical disc system to impulse response and resolution limits.

    PubMed

    Hepper, Dietmar

    2011-06-10

    The signal model of a superresolution optical channel can be an efficient tool for developing components of an associated high-density optical disc system. While the behavior of the laser diode, aperture, lens, and detector are properly described, a general mathematical model of the superresolution disc itself has not yet been available until recently. Different approaches have been made to describe the properties of a mask layer, mainly based on temperature- or power-dependent nonlinear effects. A complete signal-based or phenomenological optical channel model--from non-return-to-zero inverted input to disc readout signal--has recently been developed including the reflectivity of a superresolution disc with InSb used for the mask layer. In this contribution, the model is now extended and applied to a moving disc including a land-and-pit structure, and results are compared with data read from real superresolution discs. Both impulse response and resolution limits are derived and discussed. Thus the model provides a bridge from physical to readout signal properties, which count after all. The presented approach allows judging of the suitability of a mask layer material for storage density enhancement already based on static experiments, i.e., even before developing an associated disc drive. PMID:21673750

  8. Ray-tracing simulations of free-space optical channels for impulse response studies of indoor data links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karppinen, Mikko; Aikio, Sanna M.; Maekinen, Jukka-Tapani; Rajaniemi, Hannu; Karioja, Pentti

    2000-04-01

    Free-space optical transmission provides large bandwidth, small size, lightweight, low cost and good security. Diffuse IR link configuration is also rather robust against shadowing. Its disadvantages are, however, bandwidth degradation due to multipath dispersion, sensitivity to ambient light and limited transmission distance due to the limitations of optical power budget. To specify the bandwidth and power budget requirements of the diffuse link, we performed ray-trace simulations for different room geometries and dimensions, and different transmitter and receiver locations. We considered both diffuse and specular reflections as well as shadowing and reflection effects due to blocking objects, such as furniture. The simulations were verified by analytically calculating the impulse response in simple diffuse reflection geometry. We also analyzed stray light induced shot noise effects. Furthermore, we simulated some properties of a quasi-diffuse link comprising of multi- beam transmitters with restricted beam divergences as well as detectors with narrow fields of view. Based on the study, novel Monte Carlo ray-tracing software packages, such as ASAP, can be used for diffuse link multipath dispersion and optical power path loss analysis. Ray tracing can also be used for parallel channel crosstalk and stray light analysis. Potential applications for these system are high- bit-rate wireless LANs and free-space optical interconnects.

  9. Upper limb dynamic responses to impulsive forces for selected assembly workers.

    PubMed

    Sesto, Mary E; Radwin, Robert G; Block, Walter F; Best, Thomas M

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the upper limb, dynamic, mechanical response parameters for 14 male assembly workers recruited from selected jobs based on power tool use. It was hypothesized that the type of power tool operation would affect stiffness, effective mass, and damping of the upper extremity; and workers with symptoms and positive physical examination findings would have different mechanical responses than asymptomatic workers without physical examination findings. Participants included operators who regularly used torque reaction power hand tools, such as nutrunners and screwdrivers, and nontorque reaction power hand tools, such as riveters. The mechanical parameters of the upper limb were characterized from the loading response of an apparatus having known dynamic properties while worker grasps an oscillating handle in free vibration. In addition, all workers underwent a physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and completed a symptom survey. Workers were categorized as controls or cases based on reported forearm symptoms and physical exam findings. A total of seven workers were categorized as cases and had less average mechanical stiffness (46%, p > 0.01), damping (74%, p > 0.01), and effective mass (59%, p > 0.05) than the seven workers categorized as controls. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggestive of muscle edema were observed for two workers classified as cases and who regularly used torque reaction power tools. No MRI enhancement was observed in the seven subjects who did not regularly use torque reaction power tools. The ergonomic consequences of less stiffness, effective mass, and damping in symptomatic workers may include reduced capacity to react against rapidly building torque reaction forces encountered when operating power hand tools. PMID:16361220

  10. The role of the FM component in shaping the number of impulses and response latency of inferior collicular neurons of Hipposideros armiger elicited by CF-FM sounds.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zi-Ying; Xu, Na; Wang, Jing; Tang, Jia; Jen, Philip Hung-Sun; Chen, Qi-Cai

    2014-07-25

    Previous studies show that when stimulated with constant frequency-frequency modulated (CF-FM) sounds, the inferior collicular neurons of the leaf-nosed bat, Hipposideros armiger, either discharge impulses only to the CF component (single-on, SO neurons) or to both CF and FM components (double-on, DO neurons). In this study, we specifically determine the role of the FM component in shaping the number of impulses and response latency of these two types of neurons in response to CF-FM sounds. Adding the FM component to the CF sounds significantly decreases the number of impulses of both SO and DO neurons but shortens the response latency of DO neurons in response to the CF component of the CF-FM sounds. The possible neural mechanisms underlying these seemingly paradoxical observations are briefly discussed based on our preliminary intracellular recording studies. Biological relevance of these findings in relation to different phases of bats' hunting is also discussed. PMID:24915297

  11. Conformal scanning laser Doppler vibrometer measurement of tenor steelpan response to impulse excitation.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Teresa; O'Malley, Patrick; Glean, Aldo; Vignola, Joseph; Judge, John

    2012-11-01

    A conformal scanning laser Doppler vibrometer system is used in conjunction with a mechanical pannist to measure the surface normal vibration of the entire playing surface of a C-lead tenor steelpan. The mechanical pannist is a device designed to deliver controlled, repeatable strikes that mimic a mallet during authentic use. A description of the measurement system is followed by select examples of behavior common to the results from three different excitation notes. A summary of observed response shapes and associated frequencies demonstrates the concerted placement of note overtones by the craftsmen who manufacture and tune the instruments. The measurements provide a rich mechanical snapshot of the complex motion that generates the distinctive sound of a steelpan. PMID:23145629

  12. Finite Temperature Response of a 2D Dipolar Bose Gas at Different Dipolar Tilt Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Pengtao; Quader, Khandker

    We calculate finite temperature (T) response of a 2D Bose gas, subject to dipolar interaction, within the random phase approximation (RPA). We evaluate the appropriate 2D finite-T pair bubble diagram needed in RPA, and explore ranges of density and temperature for various dipolar tilt angles. We find the system to exhibit a collapse transition and a finite momentum instability, signaling a density wave or striped phase. We construct phase diagrams depicting these instabilities and resulting phases, including a normal Bose gas phase. We also consider the finite-T response of a quasi-2D dipolar Bose gas. We discuss how our results may apply to ultracold dense Bose gas of polar molecules, such as 41K87Rb, that has been realized experimentally. Acknowledge partial support from Institute for Complex Adaptive Matter (ICAM).

  13. An automatic damage detection algorithm based on the Short Time Impulse Response Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auletta, Gianluca; Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Ditommaso, Rocco; Iacovino, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring together with all the dynamic identification techniques and damage detection techniques are increasing in popularity in both scientific and civil community in last years. The basic idea arises from the observation that spectral properties, described in terms of the so-called modal parameters (eigenfrequencies, mode shapes, and modal damping), are functions of the physical properties of the structure (mass, energy dissipation mechanisms and stiffness). Damage detection techniques traditionally consist in visual inspection and/or non-destructive testing. A different approach consists in vibration based methods detecting changes of feature related to damage. Structural damage exhibits its main effects in terms of stiffness and damping variation. Damage detection approach based on dynamic monitoring of structural properties over time has received a considerable attention in recent scientific literature. We focused the attention on the structural damage localization and detection after an earthquake, from the evaluation of the mode curvature difference. The methodology is based on the acquisition of the structural dynamic response through a three-directional accelerometer installed on the top floor of the structure. It is able to assess the presence of any damage on the structure providing also information about the related position and severity of the damage. The procedure is based on a Band-Variable Filter, (Ditommaso et al., 2012), used to extract the dynamic characteristics of systems that evolve over time by acting simultaneously in both time and frequency domain. In this paper using a combined approach based on the Fourier Transform and on the seismic interferometric analysis, an useful tool for the automatic fundamental frequency evaluation of nonlinear structures has been proposed. Moreover, using this kind of approach it is possible to improve some of the existing methods for the automatic damage detection providing stable results

  14. Estimation of Item Response Models Using the EM Algorithm for Finite Mixtures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, David J.; Hanson, Bradley A.

    This paper presents a detailed description of maximum parameter estimation for item response models using the general EM algorithm. In this paper the models are specified using a univariate discrete latent ability variable. When the latent ability variable is discrete the distribution of the observed item responses is a finite mixture, and the EM…

  15. A Novel Translational Assay of Response Inhibition and Impulsivity: Effects of Prefrontal Cortex Lesions, Drugs Used in ADHD, and Serotonin 2C Receptor Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Humby, Trevor; Eddy, Jessica B; Good, Mark A; Reichelt, Amy C; Wilkinson, Lawrence S

    2013-01-01

    Animal models are making an increasing contribution to our understanding of the psychology and brain mechanisms underlying behavioral inhibition and impulsivity. The aim here was to develop, for the first time, a mouse analog of the stop-signal reaction time task with high translational validity in order to be able to exploit this species in genetic and molecular investigations of impulsive behaviors. Cohorts of mice were trained to nose-poke to presentations of visual stimuli. Control of responding was manipulated by altering the onset of an auditory ‘stop-signal' during the go response. The anticipated systematic changes in action cancellation were observed as stopping was made more difficult by placing the stop-signal closer to the execution of the action. Excitotoxic lesions of medial prefrontal cortex resulted in impaired stopping, while the clinically effective drugs methylphenidate and atomoxetine enhanced stopping abilities. The specific 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB242084 also led to enhanced response control in this task. We conclude that stop-signal reaction time task performance can be successfully modeled in mice and is sensitive to prefrontal cortex dysfunction and drug treatments in a qualitatively similar manner to humans and previous rat models. Additionally, using this model we show novel and highly discrete effects of 5-HT2C receptor antagonism that suggest manipulation of 5-HT2C receptor function may be of use in correcting maladaptive impulsive behaviors and provide further evidence for dissociable contributions of serotonergic transmission to response control. PMID:23657439

  16. Cultural Consensus Theory: Aggregating Continuous Responses in a Finite Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelder, William H.; Strashny, Alex; Romney, A. Kimball

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of "informants" to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical responses, e.g. probability estimates, confidence judgments, or similarity judgments. The model assumes that each item generates a latent random representation in each informant, with mean equal to the consensus answer and variance depending jointly on the informant and the location of the consensus answer. The manifest responses may reflect biases of the informants. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods were used to estimate the model, and simulation studies validated the approach. The model was applied to an existing cross-cultural dataset involving native Japanese and English speakers judging the similarity of emotion terms. The results sharpened earlier studies that showed that both cultures appear to have very similar cognitive representations of emotion terms.

  17. Impulsivity and comorbid traits: a multi-step approach for finding putative responsible microRNAs in the amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzykowski, Andrzej Z.; Spijker, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Malfunction of synaptic plasticity in different brain regions, including the amygdala plays a role in impulse control deficits that are characteristics of several psychiatric disorders, such as ADHD, schizophrenia, depression and addiction. Previously, we discovered a locus for impulsivity (Impu1) containing the neuregulin 3 (Nrg3) gene, of which the level of expression determines levels of inhibitory control. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potent regulators of gene expression, and have recently emerged as important factors contributing to the development of psychiatric disorders. However, their role in impulsivity, as well as control of Nrg3 expression or malfunction of the amygdala, is not well established. Here, we used the GeneNetwork database of BXD mice to search for correlated traits with impulsivity using an overrepresentation analysis to filter for biologically meaningful traits. We determined that inhibitory control was significantly correlated with expression of miR-190b, -28a, -340, -219a, and -491 in the amygdala, and that the overrepresented correlated traits showed a specific pattern of coregulation with these miRNAs. A bioinformatics analysis identified that miR-190b, by targeting an Nrg3-related network, could affect synaptic plasticity in the amygdala, targeting bot impulsive and compulsive traits. Moreover, miR-28a, -340, -219a, and possibly -491 could act on synaptic function by determining the balance between neuronal outgrowth and differentiation. We propose that these miRNAs are attractive candidates of regulation of amygdala synaptic plasticity, possibly during development but also in maintaining the impulsive phenotype. These results can help us to better understand mechanisms of synaptic dysregulation in psychiatric disorders. PMID:25561905

  18. Stimulus-Response Theory of Finite Automata, Technical Report No. 133.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppes, Patrick

    The central aim of this paper and its projected successors is to prove in detail that stimulus-response theory, or at least a mathematically precise version, can give an account of the learning of many phrase-structure grammars. Section 2 is concerned with standard notions of finite and probabilistic automata. An automaton is defined as a device…

  19. A finite element large deflection random response analysis of beams and plates subjected to acoustic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Chiang, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    A finite element formulation is presented for the analysis of beams and rectangular plates undergoing large deflections subjected to Gaussian white noise excitations. Single-mode response is assumed in the present formulation. Root-mean-square (RMS) maximum deflections for simply supported and clamped beams and plates at various sound spectrum levels are obtained and compared with solutions using the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation and the equivalent linearization methods. RMS maximum stains and equivalent linear frequencies are compared with the equivalent linearization results for assessment of the accuracy of the finite element method.

  20. Modified impulse method for the measurement of the frequency response of acoustic filters to weakly nonlinear transient excitations

    PubMed

    Payri; Desantes; Broatch

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, a modified impulse method is proposed which allows the determination of the influence of the excitation characteristics on acoustic filter performance. Issues related to nonlinear propagation, namely wave steepening and wave interactions, have been addressed in an approximate way, validated against one-dimensional unsteady nonlinear flow calculations. The results obtained for expansion chambers and extended duct resonators indicate that the amplitude threshold for the onset of nonlinear phenomena is related to the geometry considered. PMID:10687682

  1. Finite-element simulation of transient heat response in ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Ando, E; Kagawa, Y

    1992-01-01

    The application of the finite-element method to a transient heat response problem in electrostrictive ultrasonic transducers during their pulsed operation is described. The temperature and thermal stress distribution are of practical importance for the design of the ultrasonic transducers when they are operated at intense levels. Mechanical vibratory loss is responsible for heat in the elastic parts, while dielectric loss is responsible in the ferroelectric parts. A finite-element computer model is proposed for the temperature change evaluation in the transducers with time. Natural and forced cooling convection and heat radiation from the transducers' boundaries are included. Simulation is made for Langevin-type transducer models, for which comparison is made with experimental data. PMID:18267653

  2. Origin of the sinus impulse.

    PubMed

    Schuessler, R B; Boineau, J P; Bromberg, B I

    1996-03-01

    It was generally accepted that the site of normal impulse origin within the atria was a single static focus within the sinus node. This review will examine how this model of impulse origin came about and has evolved. Early on, conflicting data suggested that the sinus node focus was not static and changed with interventions that changed heart rate, such as vagal stimulation. Furthermore, even with removal of the sinus node, a normal atrial rhythm was generated. High-resolution mapping in humans and dogs showed that the initiation of the impulse was dynamic and could be multicentric, with more than one focus initiating a single beat. Shifts in the site of origin correlated with changes in rate and were consistent with P wave changes routinely observed in the standard ECG. These studies suggested multiple pacemakers were responsible for impulse initiation. However, it was not clear how these widespread pacemakers were coordinated to function synchronously. Recent canine data suggest that the node may be partially insulated from the surrounding atrium, resulting in multicentric origin starting from a single site within the node. What has evolved is a model of impulse origin with a sinus node having discrete exit sites and a dominant pacemaker within the node that can shift to other nodal sites. Complex and changing conduction out of the node, coupled with extranodal pacemakers, which can assume dominance over the node, combine with the autonomic nervous system to control heart rate and the pattern of impulse origin within the atria. PMID:8867301

  3. Comparison of Finite Element Non-Linear Beam Random Response with Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. R.; Mei, C.; Wolfe, HF

    1996-09-01

    A finite element formulation combined with the equivalent linearization technique and normal mode method is developed for the non-linear random response of beams subjected to acoustic and thermal loads applied simultaneously. To validate the present formulation and solution procedure, results are compared with the classical continuum solution and the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation solution. Comparison is also made with experimental data for a pre-stretched clamped beam. Random responses of thermally buckled simply supported beam, clamped beam and simply supported-clamped beam are presented. The comparison of the present simultaneously loaded response with the existing sequentially loaded results shows a significant difference between them.

  4. Impaired Decisional Impulsivity in Pathological Videogamers

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathological gaming is an emerging and poorly understood problem. Impulsivity is commonly impaired in disorders of behavioural and substance addiction, hence we sought to systematically investigate the different subtypes of decisional and motor impulsivity in a well-defined pathological gaming cohort. Methods Fifty-two pathological gaming subjects and age-, gender- and IQ-matched healthy volunteers were tested on decisional impulsivity (Information Sampling Task testing reflection impulsivity and delay discounting questionnaire testing impulsive choice), and motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task testing motor response inhibition, and the premature responding task). We used stringent diagnostic criteria highlighting functional impairment. Results In the Information Sampling Task, pathological gaming participants sampled less evidence prior to making a decision and scored fewer points compared with healthy volunteers. Gaming severity was also negatively correlated with evidence gathered and positively correlated with sampling error and points acquired. In the delay discounting task, pathological gamers made more impulsive choices, preferring smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. Pathological gamers made more premature responses related to comorbid nicotine use. Greater number of hours played also correlated with a Motivational Index. Greater frequency of role playing games was associated with impaired motor response inhibition and strategy games with faster Go reaction time. Conclusions We show that pathological gaming is associated with impaired decisional impulsivity with negative consequences in task performance. Decisional impulsivity may be a potential target in therapeutic management. PMID:24146789

  5. Ultrasonic propagation in finite-length granular chains.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, D A; Yang, J; Akanji, O; Thomas, P J; Davis, L A J; Freear, S; Harput, S; Saffari, N; Gelat, P

    2016-07-01

    A narrowband ultrasound source has been used to generate solitary wave impulses in finite-length chains of spheres. Once the input signal is of sufficient amplitude, both harmonics and sub-harmonics of the input frequency can be generated as non-linear normal modes of the system, allowing a train of impulses to be established from a sinusoidal input. The characteristics of the response have been studied as a function of the physical properties of the chain, the input waveform and the level of static pre-compression. The results agree with the predictions of a theoretical model, based on a set of discrete dynamic equations for the spheres for finite-length chains. Impulses are only created for very small pre-compression forces of the order of 0.01N, where strongly non-linear behaviour is expected. PMID:26548524

  6. Optimizing work output for finite-sized heat reservoirs: Beyond linear response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an optimization principle for the finite-time heat-work conversion process performed between two finite-sized heat reservoirs in the nonlinear response regime that is characterized by rather generic flux-force relations. We solve the problem of maximizing work output in a given time interval by means of the variational method. Moreover, in the limiting case that the cold reservoir is infinite, we find the corresponding optimized process can be determined by a single quantity, which plays the role similar to that of the Hamiltonian in classical mechanics. Some theoretical implications are discussed consequently, under the generalized tight-coupling condition which applies to both linear and nonlinear response cases. Our results can hopefully help design and control realistic thermodynamical processes. PMID:26871037

  7. Optimizing work output for finite-sized heat reservoirs: Beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We uncover an optimization principle for the finite-time heat-work conversion process performed between two finite-sized heat reservoirs in the nonlinear response regime that is characterized by rather generic flux-force relations. We solve the problem of maximizing work output in a given time interval by means of the variational method. Moreover, in the limiting case that the cold reservoir is infinite, we find the corresponding optimized process can be determined by a single quantity, which plays the role similar to that of the Hamiltonian in classical mechanics. Some theoretical implications are discussed consequently, under the generalized tight-coupling condition which applies to both linear and nonlinear response cases. Our results can hopefully help design and control realistic thermodynamical processes.

  8. Finite-element simulation of transient heat response in ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Ei'ichi; Kagawa, Yukio

    1992-05-01

    The application of the finite-element method to a transient heat response problem in electrostrictive ultrasonic transducers during their pulsed operation is described. The temperature and thermal stress distribution are of practical importance for the design of the ultrasonic transducers when they are operated at intense levels. Mechanical vibratory loss is responsible for heat in the elastic parts while dielectric loss in the ferroelectric parts. A finite-element computer model is proposed for the temperature change evaluation in the transducers with time. Natural and forced cooling convection and heat radiation from the transducers' boundaries are included. Simulation is made for Langevin-type transducer models, for which comparison is made with experimental data.

  9. Implementation of structural response sensitivity calculations in a large-scale finite-element analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Rogers, J. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The implementation includes a generalized method for specifying element cross-sectional dimensions as design variables that can be used in analytically calculating derivatives of output quantities from static stress, vibration, and buckling analyses for both membrane and bending elements. Limited sample results for static displacements and stresses are presented to indicate the advantages of analytically calclating response derivatives compared to finite difference methods. Continuing developments to implement these procedures into an enhanced version of the system are also discussed.

  10. Dynamic Response of a Planetary Gear System Using a Finite Element/Contact Mechanics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert G.; Agashe, Vinayak; Vijayakar, Sandeep M.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic response of a helicopter planetary gear system is examined over a wide range of operating speeds and torques. The analysis tool is a unique, semianalytical finite element formulation that admits precise representation of the tooth geometry and contact forces that are crucial in gear dynamics. Importantly, no a priori specification of static transmission error excitation or mesh frequency variation is required; the dynamic contact forces are evaluated internally at each time step. The calculated response shows classical resonances when a harmonic of mesh frequency coincides with a natural frequency. However, peculiar behavior occurs where resonances expected to be excited at a given speed are absent. This absence of particular modes is explained by analytical relationships that depend on the planetary configuration and mesh frequency harmonic. The torque sensitivity of the dynamic response is examined and compared to static analyses. Rotation mode response is shown to be more sensitive to input torque than translational mode response.

  11. Simulation of the ultrasonic array response from real branched cracks using an efficient finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim J.; Dunhill, Tony K.

    2014-02-18

    A hybrid model to simulate the ultrasonic array response from stress corrosion cracks is presented. These cracks are branched and difficult to detect so the model is required to enable optimization of an array design. An efficient frequency-domain finite element method is described and selected to simulate the ultrasonic scattering. Experimental validation results are presented, followed by an example of the simulated ultrasonic array response from a real stress corrosion crack whose geometry is obtained from an X-ray Computed Tomography image. A simulation-assisted array design methodology, which includes the model and use of real crack geometries, is proposed.

  12. Finite element nonlinear random response of beams to acoustic and thermal loads applied simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruixi; Mei, Chuh

    1993-04-01

    A finite element formulation combined with the equivalent linearization technique and the normal mode method is developed for the study of nonlinear random response of beams subjected to simultaneously applied acoustic and thermal loads. Examples include thermally buckled random response of simply supported beam, clamped-clamped beam and simply supported-clamped beam. To compare and validate the present formulation, results are compared with the solutions from existing sequential load method, and significant difference has been found. Results by classical continuum solution and the solution of Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation are also derived and obtained for comparison.

  13. Impulsivity and Psychoeducational Intervention in Hyperactive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ronald T.

    1980-01-01

    Two psychoeducational procedures were investigated for their effects on impulsivity in 120 hyperactive children in two groups: those receiving stimulant drug therapy and those not receiving stimulant drug therapy. Results indicated that the use of psychoeducational treatment approaches are of value in altering the impulsive responses of…

  14. Effects of friction on the unconfined compressive response of articular cartilage: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Spilker, R L; Suh, J K; Mow, V C

    1990-05-01

    A finite element analysis is used to study a previously unresolved issue of the effects of platen-specimen friction on the response of the unconfined compression test; effects of platen permeability are also determined. The finite element formulation is based on the linear KLM biphasic model for articular cartilage and other hydrated soft tissues. A Galerkin weighted residual method is applied to both the solid phase and the fluid phase, and the continuity equation for the intrinsically incompressible binary mixture is introduced via a penalty method. The solid phase displacements and fluid phase velocities are interpolated for each element in terms of unknown nodal values, producing a system of first order differential equations which are solved using a standard numerical finite difference technique. An axisymmetric element of quadrilateral cross-section is developed and applied to the mechanical test problem of a cylindrical specimen of soft tissue in unconfined compression. These studies show that interfacial friction plays a major role in the unconfined compression response of articular cartilage specimens with small thickness to diameter ratios. PMID:2345443

  15. An Unstructured Finite Volume Approach for Structural Dynamics in Response to Fluid Motions

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Guohua; Lin, Ching-Long

    2008-01-01

    A new cell-vortex unstructured finite volume method for structural dynamics is assessed for simulations of structural dynamics in response to fluid motions. A robust implicit dual-time stepping method is employed to obtain time accurate solutions. The resulting system of algebraic equations is matrix-free and allows solid elements to include structure thickness, inertia, and structural stresses for accurate predictions of structural responses and stress distributions. The method is coupled with a fluid dynamics solver for fluid-structure interaction, providing a viable alternative to the finite element method for structural dynamics calculations. A mesh sensitivity test indicates that the finite volume method is at least of second-order accuracy. The method is validated by the problem of vortex-induced vibration of an elastic plate with different initial conditions and material properties. The results are in good agreement with existing numerical data and analytical solutions. The method is then applied to simulate a channel flow with an elastic wall. The effects of wall inertia and structural stresses on the fluid flow are investigated. PMID:18496602

  16. An obesity-associated risk allele within the FTO gene affects human brain activity for areas important for emotion, impulse control and reward in response to food images.

    PubMed

    Wiemerslage, Lyle; Nilsson, Emil K; Solstrand Dahlberg, Linda; Ence-Eriksson, Fia; Castillo, Sandra; Larsen, Anna L; Bylund, Simon B A; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S; Olivo, Gaia; Bandstein, Marcus; Titova, Olga E; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Benedict, Christian; Brooks, Samantha J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how genetics influences obesity, brain activity and eating behaviour will add important insight for developing strategies for weight-loss treatment, as obesity may stem from different causes and as individual feeding behaviour may depend on genetic differences. To this end, we examined how an obesity risk allele for the FTO gene affects brain activity in response to food images of different caloric content via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thirty participants homozygous for the rs9939609 single nucleotide polymorphism were shown images of low- or high-calorie food while brain activity was measured via fMRI. In a whole-brain analysis, we found that people with the FTO risk allele genotype (AA) had increased activity compared with the non-risk (TT) genotype in the posterior cingulate, cuneus, precuneus and putamen. Moreover, higher body mass index in the AA genotype was associated with reduced activity to food images in areas important for emotion (cingulate cortex), but also in areas important for impulse control (frontal gyri and lentiform nucleus). Lastly, we corroborate our findings with behavioural scales for the behavioural inhibition and activation systems. Our results suggest that the two genotypes are associated with differential neural processing of food images, which may influence weight status through diminished impulse control and reward processing. PMID:26797854

  17. Dynamic response of concrete beams externally reinforced with carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) subjected to impulsive loads

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, D.M.; Ross, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    A series of 54 laboratory scale concrete beams 3 x 3 x 30 in. in size were impulsively loaded to failure in a drop weight impact machine. The beams had no internal reinforcement, but instead were externally reinforced on the bottom or tension side of the beams with 1, 2, and 3 ply AS4C/1919 graphite epoxy panels. In addition, several of the beams were also reinforced on the sides with 3 ply CFRP. The beams were simply supported in a drop weight machine and subjected to impact loads with amplitudes up to 10 kips, and durations less than 1 ms, at beam midspan. Measurements made during the loading event included beam total load, midspan displacement, as well as midspan strain at 3 locations in the beam`s cross-section. A high speed framing camera was also used to record the beam`s displacement-time behavior as well as to gain insight into the failure mechanisms. Beam midspan accelerations were determined by double differentiation of the displacement versus time data, and in turn, the beam`s inertial loads were calculated using the beam`s equivalent mass. Beam dynamic bending loads versus time were determined from the difference between the total load versus time and the inertial load versus time data. Bending loads versus displacements were also determined along with fracture energies. Failure to correct the loads for inertia will result in incorrect conclusions being drawn from the data, especially for bending resistance of brittle concrete test specimens. A comparison with quasistatic bending (fracture) energy data showed that the dynamic failure energy absorbed by the beams was always less than the static fracture energy, due to the brittle nature of concrete when impulsively loaded.

  18. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Ablative Thermal Response and Thermostructural Design of Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    A finite element ablation and thermal response program is presented for simulation of three-dimensional transient thermostructural analysis. The three-dimensional governing differential equations and finite element formulation are summarized. A novel probabilistic design methodology for thermal protection systems is presented. The design methodology is an eight step process beginning with a parameter sensitivity study and is followed by a deterministic analysis whereby an optimum design can determined. The design process concludes with a Monte Carlo simulation where the probabilities of exceeding design specifications are estimated. The design methodology is demonstrated by applying the methodology to the carbon phenolic compression pads of the Crew Exploration Vehicle. The maximum allowed values of bondline temperature and tensile stress are used as the design specifications in this study.

  19. Effect of randomness on multi-frequency aeroelastic responses resolved by Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Witteveen, Jeroen A.S. Bijl, Hester

    2009-10-01

    The Unsteady Adaptive Stochastic Finite Elements (UASFE) method resolves the effect of randomness in numerical simulations of single-mode aeroelastic responses with a constant accuracy in time for a constant number of samples. In this paper, the UASFE framework is extended to multi-frequency responses and continuous structures by employing a wavelet decomposition pre-processing step to decompose the sampled multi-frequency signals into single-frequency components. The effect of the randomness on the multi-frequency response is then obtained by summing the results of the UASFE interpolation at constant phase for the different frequency components. Results for multi-frequency responses and continuous structures show a three orders of magnitude reduction of computational costs compared to crude Monte Carlo simulations in a harmonically forced oscillator, a flutter panel problem, and the three-dimensional transonic AGARD 445.6 wing aeroelastic benchmark subject to random fields and random parameters with various probability distributions.

  20. Active muscle response using feedback control of a finite element human arm model.

    PubMed

    Östh, Jonas; Brolin, Karin; Happee, Riender

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical human body models (HBMs) are important research tools that are used to study the human response in car crash situations. Development of automotive safety systems requires the implementation of active muscle response in HBM, as novel safety systems also interact with vehicle occupants in the pre-crash phase. In this study, active muscle response was implemented using feedback control of a nonlinear muscle model in the right upper extremity of a finite element (FE) HBM. Hill-type line muscle elements were added, and the active and passive properties were assessed. Volunteer tests with low impact loading resulting in elbow flexion motions were performed. Simulations of posture maintenance in a gravity field and the volunteer tests were successfully conducted. It was concluded that feedback control of a nonlinear musculoskeletal model can be used to obtain posture maintenance and human-like reflexive responses in an FE HBM. PMID:21294008

  1. Multiple Modes of Impulsivity in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nombela, Cristina; Rittman, Timothy; Robbins, Trevor W.; Rowe, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive problems are a major factor determining quality of life of patients with Parkinson's disease. These include deficits in inhibitory control, ranging from subclinical alterations in decision-making to severe impulse control disorders. Based on preclinical studies, we proposed that Parkinson's disease does not cause a unified disorder of inhibitory control, but rather a set of impulsivity factors with distinct psychological profiles, anatomy and pharmacology. We assessed a broad set of measures of the cognitive, behavioural and temperamental/trait aspects of impulsivity. Sixty adults, including 30 idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients (Hoehn and Yahr stage I–III) and 30 healthy controls, completed a neuropsychological battery, objective behavioural measures and self-report questionnaires. Univariate analyses of variance confirmed group differences in nine out of eleven metrics. We then used factor analysis (principal components method) to identify the structure of impulsivity in Parkinson's disease. Four principal factors were identified, consistent with four different mechanisms of impulsivity, explaining 60% of variance. The factors were related to (1) tests of response conflict, interference and self assessment of impulsive behaviours on the Barrett Impulsivity Scale, (2) tests of motor inhibitory control, and the self-report behavioural approach system, (3) time estimation and delay aversion, and (4) reflection in hypothetical scenarios including temporal discounting. The different test profiles of these four factors were consistent with human and comparative studies of the pharmacology and functional anatomy of impulsivity. Relationships between each factor and clinical and demographic features were examined by regression against factor loadings. Levodopa dose equivalent was associated only with factors (2) and (3). The results confirm that impulsivity is common in Parkinson's disease, even in the absence of impulse control disorders, and that it is

  2. Norepinephrine and impulsivity: Effects of acute yohimbine

    PubMed Central

    Swann, Alan C.; Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D.; Cox, Blake; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Rapid-response impulsivity, characterized by inability to withhold response to a stimulus until it is adequately appraised, is associated with risky behavior and may be increased in a state-dependent manner by norepinephrine. Objective We assessed effects of yohimbine, which increases norepinephrine release by blocking alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors, on plasma catecholamine metabolites, blood pressure, subjective symptoms, and laboratory-measured rapid-response impulsivity. Methods Subjects were twenty-three healthy controls recruited from the community, with normal physical examination and ECG, and negative history for hypertension, cardiovascular illness, and Axis I or II disorder. Blood pressure, pulse, and behavioral measures were obtained before and periodically after 0.4 mg/kg oral yohimbine or placebo in a randomized, counterbalanced design. Metabolites of norepinephrine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, MHPG; vanillylmandelic acid, VMA) and dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA) were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Rapid-response impulsivity was measured by commission errors and reaction times on the Immediate Memory Task (IMT), a continuous performance test designed to measure impulsivity and attention. Results Yohimbine increased plasma MHPG and VMA but not HVA. Yohimbine increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate. On the IMT, yohimbine increased impulsive errors and impulsive response bias and accelerated reaction times. Yohimbine-associated increase in plasma MHPG correlated with increased impulsive response rates. Time courses varied; effects on blood pressure generally preceded those on metabolites and test performance. Conclusions These effects are consistent with increased rapid-response impulsivity after pharmacological noradrenergic stimulation in healthy controls. Labile noradrenergic responses, or increased sensitivity to norepinephrine, may increase risk for impulsive

  3. Finite element model updating of a RC building considering seismic response trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, F.; Omenzetter, P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a study on the seismic response trends evaluation and finite element model updating of a reinforced concrete building monitored for a period of more than two years. The three story reinforced concrete building is instrumented with five tri-axial accelerometers and a free-field tri-axial accelerometer. The time domain N4SID system identification technique was used to obtain the frequencies and damping ratios considering flexible base models taking into account the soil-structure-interaction using 50 earthquakes. Trends of variation of seismic response were developed by correlating the peak response acceleration at the roof level with identified frequencies and damping ratios. A general trend of decreasing frequencies was observed with increased level of shaking. To simulate the varying behavior of the building with response levels, a series of three dimensional finite element models were calibrated considering several points on the developed frequency-response amplitude trend lines as targets for updating. To incorporate real in-situ conditions, soil underneath the foundation and around the building was modeled using spring elements and nonstructural components (claddings and partitions) were also included. Sensitivity based model updating technique was applied taking into account concrete, soil and cladding stiffness as updating parameters. It was concluded from the investigation that knowledge of the variation of seismic response of buildings is necessary to better understand their behavior during earthquakes, and also that the participation of soil and non-structural components is significant towards the seismic response of the building and these should be considered in models to simulate the real behavior.

  4. Two-Dimensional Finite Element Ablative Thermal Response Analysis of an Arcjet Stagnation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Laub, Bernard; Braun, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    The finite element ablation and thermal response (FEAtR, hence forth called FEAR) design and analysis program simulates the one, two, or three-dimensional ablation, internal heat conduction, thermal decomposition, and pyrolysis gas flow of thermal protection system materials. As part of a code validation study, two-dimensional axisymmetric results from FEAR are compared to thermal response data obtained from an arc-jet stagnation test in this paper. The results from FEAR are also compared to the two-dimensional axisymmetric computations from the two-dimensional implicit thermal response and ablation program under the same arcjet conditions. The ablating material being used in this arcjet test is phenolic impregnated carbon ablator with an LI-2200 insulator as backup material. The test is performed at the NASA, Ames Research Center Interaction Heating Facility. Spatially distributed computational fluid dynamics solutions for the flow field around the test article are used for the surface boundary conditions.

  5. Linear optical response of finite systems using multishift linear system solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Hübener, Hannes; Giustino, Feliciano

    2014-07-28

    We discuss the application of multishift linear system solvers to linear-response time-dependent density functional theory. Using this technique the complete frequency-dependent electronic density response of finite systems to an external perturbation can be calculated at the cost of a single solution of a linear system via conjugate gradients. We show that multishift time-dependent density functional theory yields excitation energies and oscillator strengths in perfect agreement with the standard diagonalization of the response matrix (Casida's method), while being computationally advantageous. We present test calculations for benzene, porphin, and chlorophyll molecules. We argue that multishift solvers may find broad applicability in the context of excited-state calculations within density-functional theory and beyond.

  6. Genetics of impulsive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery. PMID:23440466

  7. A finite element large deflection random response of a pipe containing fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, C. K.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach is developed for beam type pipes undergoing large deflections subjected to random loadings. The influence of fluid velocity on the random response is investigated. The root-mean-square (rms) deflections and frequencies for different sound spectrum level values are determined for pipes with both ends either simply supported or clamped. The required number of modes to achieve accurate rms deflections is studied. The prediction of fatigue life is then based on the maximum rms stress. This analytical investigation will help to broaden the basic understanding of the role of fluid flow within structures subjected to random excitations.

  8. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging: Characterizing the mechanical properties of tissues using their transient response to localized force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Congdon, Amy N.; Frinkely, Kristin D.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2001-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging utilizes brief, high energy, focused acoustic pulses to generate radiation force in tissue, and conventional diagnostic ultrasound methods to detect the resulting tissue displacements in order to image the relative mechanical properties of tissue. The magnitude and spatial extent of the applied force is dependent upon the transmit beam parameters and the tissue attenuation. Forcing volumes are on the order of 5 mm3, pulse durations are less than 1 ms, and tissue displacements are typically several microns. Images of tissue displacement reflect local tissue stiffness, with softer tissues (e.g., fat) displacing farther than stiffer tissues (e.g., muscle). Parametric images of maximum displacement, time to peak displacement, and recovery time provide information about tissue material properties and structure. In both in vivo and ex vivo data, structures shown in matched B-mode images are in good agreement with those shown in ARFI images, with comparable resolution. Potential clinical applications under investigation include soft tissue lesion characterization, assessment of focal atherosclerosis, and imaging of thermal lesion formation during tissue ablation procedures. Results from ongoing studies will be presented. [Work supported by NIH Grant R01 EB002132-03, and the Whitaker Foundation. System support from Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc.

  9. Attributional and emotional responses to socially ambiguous cues: validation of a new assessment of social/emotional information processing in healthy adults and impulsive aggressive patients.

    PubMed

    Coccaro, Emil F; Noblett, Kurtis L; McCloskey, Michael S

    2009-07-01

    A self-report questionnaire was developed to assess attributional and emotional responses to aversive, but socially ambiguous, actions by one or more provocateurs. Multiple vignettes were developed and were followed by questions related to attribution of the provocateur's intent and the subject's emotional response to the provocateur's actions. The resulting social information processing-attribution and emotional response questionnaire (SIP-AEQ) was administered to 923 community-based adults (ages 18-45). Factor analysis revealed a three-factor structure reflecting hostile attribution, instrumental attribution, and benign attribution to provocation. A cross-validational study substantiated the factor structure. The modified 8-vignette SIP-AEQ demonstrated good internal reliability, and convergent and discriminant validity. The hostile attribution items showed a significant relationship with measures of emotion processing and responsiveness. Further analysis in a sample of impulsive aggressive patients and healthy control subjects noted similar psychometric properties and good separation between groups. Implications regarding the cognitive and emotional correlates of aggression are discussed. PMID:19345371

  10. Impulsive action: emotional impulses and their control

    PubMed Central

    Frijda, Nico H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel theoretical view on impulsive action, integrating thus far separate perspectives on non-reflective action, motivation, emotion regulation, and impulse control. We frame impulsive action in terms of directedness of the individual organism toward, away, or against other givens – toward future states and away from one’s present state. First, appraisal of a perceived or thought-of event or object on occasion, rapidly and without premonition or conscious deliberation, triggers a motive to modify one’s relation to that event or object. Situational specifics of the event as perceived and appraised motivate and guide selection of readiness for a particular kind of purposive action. Second, perception of complex situations can give rise to multiple appraisals, multiple motives, and multiple simultaneous changes in action readiness. Multiple states of action readiness may interact in generating action, by reinforcing or attenuating each other, thereby yielding impulse control. We show how emotion control can itself result from a motive state or state of action readiness. Our view links impulsive action mechanistically to states of action readiness, which is the central feature of what distinguishes one kind of emotion from another. It thus provides a novel theoretical perspective to the somewhat fragmented literature on impulsive action. PMID:24917835

  11. Fast quasi-explicit finite difference simulation of electrochemical responses initiated by a discontinuous perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Feldberg, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    Commencing in the early 60s the application of explicit finite difference (EFD) methods to the analysis of electrochemical problems paralleled the development and availability of fast, main-frame, digital computers. The appeal of the EFD method has been its simplicity of principle and of application. EFD algorithms, however, are notoriously inefficient for solving certain types of stiff problems (e.g., problems involving a wide dynamic range of time constants). In this presentation the author discusses the principles and some applications of a fast quasi-explicit finite difference (FQEFD) method in which the computational speed is enhanced, by many orders of magnitude in some cases, without compromising the user friendliness which has popularized the EFD method. The method is designed to treat electrochemical responses to a discontinuous (e.g, chronoamperometric) perturbation and utilizes the DuFort-Frankel algorithm (1) with exponentially expanding space (2) and exponentially expanding time grids. (A previously published version of the FQEFD method (3,4) was designed to treat electrochemical responses to a continuous (e.g., cyclic voltammetric) perturbation and utilizes the DuFort-Frankel (3) algorithm in conjunction with an exponentially expanding space grid and a uniform time grid. The development of the basic FQEFD equations was presented there). The protocol for introducing the expanding time grid is straightforward and is discussed. 7 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  12. Electronic chemical response indexes at finite temperature in the canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Assuming that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons and within the extension of density functional theory to finite temperature, the first and second order chemical reactivity response functions of the Helmholtz free energy with respect to the temperature, the number of electrons, and the external potential are derived. It is found that in all cases related to the first or second derivatives with respect to the number of electrons or the external potential, there is a term given by the average of the corresponding derivative of the electronic energy of each state (ground and excited). For the second derivatives, including those related with the temperature, there is a thermal fluctuation contribution that is zero at zero temperature. Thus, all expressions reduce correctly to their corresponding chemical reactivity expressions at zero temperature and show that, at room temperature, the corrections are very small. When the assumption that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons is replaced by the straight lines behavior connecting integer values, as required by the ensemble theorem, one needs to introduce directional derivatives in most cases, so that the temperature dependent expressions reduce correctly to their zero temperature counterparts. However, the main result holds, namely, at finite temperature the thermal corrections to the chemical reactivity response functions are very small. Consequently, the present work validates the usage of reactivity indexes calculated at zero temperature to infer chemical behavior at room and even higher temperatures.

  13. Electronic chemical response indexes at finite temperature in the canonical ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Pérez, Marco E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx Gázquez, José L. E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx; Vela, Alberto E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx

    2015-07-14

    Assuming that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons and within the extension of density functional theory to finite temperature, the first and second order chemical reactivity response functions of the Helmholtz free energy with respect to the temperature, the number of electrons, and the external potential are derived. It is found that in all cases related to the first or second derivatives with respect to the number of electrons or the external potential, there is a term given by the average of the corresponding derivative of the electronic energy of each state (ground and excited). For the second derivatives, including those related with the temperature, there is a thermal fluctuation contribution that is zero at zero temperature. Thus, all expressions reduce correctly to their corresponding chemical reactivity expressions at zero temperature and show that, at room temperature, the corrections are very small. When the assumption that the electronic energy is given by a smooth function of the number of electrons is replaced by the straight lines behavior connecting integer values, as required by the ensemble theorem, one needs to introduce directional derivatives in most cases, so that the temperature dependent expressions reduce correctly to their zero temperature counterparts. However, the main result holds, namely, at finite temperature the thermal corrections to the chemical reactivity response functions are very small. Consequently, the present work validates the usage of reactivity indexes calculated at zero temperature to infer chemical behavior at room and even higher temperatures.

  14. Blast response of curved carbon/epoxy composite panels: Experimental study and finite-element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, V. A.; Kumar, P.; Shukla, A.; Roy, A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    Experimental and numerical studies were conducted to understand the effect of plate curvature on blast response of carbon/epoxy composite panels. A shock-tube system was utilized to impart controlled shock loading to quasi-isotropic composite panels with differing range of radii of curvatures. A 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique coupled with high-speed photography was used to obtain out-of-plane deflection and velocity, as well as in-plane strain on the back face of the panels. Macroscopic post-mortem analysis was performed to compare yielding and deformation in these panels. A dynamic computational simulation that integrates fluid-structure interaction was conducted to evaluate the panel response in general purpose finite-element software ABAQUS/Explicit. The obtained numerical results were compared to the experimental data and showed a good correlation.

  15. Relations between Reflection-Impulsivity and Behavioral Impulsivity in Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Victor, James B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Reflection-impulsivity was studied in preschoolers to clarify underlying behavioral dimensions, sex differences, and contribution of activity level, mental age, and socioeconomic status. Analyses replicate a previous finding that dimension of behavioral impulsivity characterizes children with long response latency and high error scores, not…

  16. An implicit three-dimensional model for describing the inelastic response of solids undergoing finite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, K. R.; Srinivasa, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a new unified class of 3D nonlinear anisotropic finite deformation inelasticity model that (1) exhibits rate-independent or dependent hysteretic response (i.e., response wherein reversal of the external stimuli does not cause reversal of the path in state space) with or without yield surfaces. The hysteresis persists with quasistatic loading. (2) Encompasses a wide range of different types of inelasticity models (such as Mullins effect in rubber, rock and soil mechanics, traditional metal plasticity, hysteretic behavior of shape memory materials) into a simple unified framework that is relatively easy to implement in computational schemes and (3) does not require any a priori particular notion of plastic strain or yield function. The core idea behind the approach is the development of an system of implicit rate equations that allow for the continuity of the response but with different rates along different directions. The theory, which is in purely mechanical setting, subsumes and generalizes many commonly used approaches for hypoelasticity and rate-independent plasticity. We illustrate its capability by modeling the Mullins effect which is the inelastic behavior of certain rubbery materials. We are able to simulate the entire cyclic response without the use of additional internal variables, i.e., the entire response is modeled by using an implicit function of stress and strain measures and their rates.

  17. A finite element model of region-specific response for mild diffuse brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fijalkowski, Ronald J; Yoganandan, Narayan; Zhang, Jiangyue; Pintar, Frank A

    2009-11-01

    It is well known that rotational loading is responsible for a spectrum of diffuse brain injuries spanning from concussion to diffuse axonal trauma. Many experimental studies have been performed to understand the pathological and biomechanical factors associated with diffuse brain injuries. Finite element models have also been developed to correlate experimental findings with intrinsic variables such as strain. However, a paucity of studies exist examining the combined role of the strain-time parameter. Consequently, using the principles of finite element analysis, the present study introduced the concept of sustained maximum principal strain (SMPS) criterion and explored its potential applicability to diffuse brain injury. An algorithm was developed to determine if the principal strain in a finite element of the brain exceeded a specified magnitude over a specific time interval. The anatomical and geometrical details of the rat for the two-dimensional model were obtained from published data. Using material properties from literature and iterative techniques, the model was validated under three distinct rotational loading conditions indicative of non-injury, concussion, and diffuse axonal trauma. Validation results produced a set of material properties to define the model and were deemed appropriate to examine the role of sustained strain as an indicator of the mechanics of mild diffuse brain injury at the local level. Using a separate set of histological data obtained from graded mild diffuse brain injury experimental studies in rats, different formulations of SMPS criterion were evaluated. For the hippocampus and parietal cortex regions, 4-4 SMPS criterion was found to most closely match with the pattern of histological results. This was further verified by correlating the fractional areas to the time of unconsciousness for each animal group. Although not fully conclusive, these results are valuable in the understanding of diffuse brain injury pathologies

  18. Using cross correlations of turbulent flow-induced ambient vibrations to estimate the structural impulse response. Application to structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sabra, Karim G; Winkel, Eric S; Bourgoyne, Dwayne A; Elbing, Brian R; Ceccio, Steve L; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R

    2007-04-01

    It has been demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that an estimate of the impulse response (or Green's function) between two receivers can be obtained from the cross correlation of diffuse wave fields at these two receivers in various environments and frequency ranges: ultrasonics, civil engineering, underwater acoustics, and seismology. This result provides a means for structural monitoring using ambient structure-borne noise only, without the use of active sources. This paper presents experimental results obtained from flow-induced random vibration data recorded by pairs of accelerometers mounted within a flat plate or hydrofoil in the test section of the U.S. Navy's William B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel. The experiments were conducted at high Reynolds number (Re > 50 million) with the primary excitation source being turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations on the upper and lower surfaces of the plate or foil. Identical deterministic time signatures emerge from the noise cross-correlation function computed via robust and simple processing of noise measured on different days by a pair of passive sensors. These time signatures are used to determine and/or monitor the structural response of the test models from a few hundred to a few thousand Hertz. PMID:17471715

  19. Application of finite element, global polynomial, and kriging response surfaces in Progressive Lattice Sampling designs

    SciTech Connect

    ROMERO,VICENTE J.; SWILER,LAURA PAINTON; GIUNTA,ANTHONY A.

    2000-04-25

    This paper examines the modeling accuracy of finite element interpolation, kriging, and polynomial regression used in conjunction with the Progressive Lattice Sampling (PLS) incremental design-of-experiments approach. PLS is a paradigm for sampling a deterministic hypercubic parameter space by placing and incrementally adding samples in a manner intended to maximally reduce lack of knowledge in the parameter space. When combined with suitable interpolation methods, PLS is a formulation for progressive construction of response surface approximations (RSA) in which the RSA are efficiently upgradable, and upon upgrading, offer convergence information essential in estimating error introduced by the use of RSA in the problem. The three interpolation methods tried here are examined for performance in replicating an analytic test function as measured by several different indicators. The process described here provides a framework for future studies using other interpolation schemes, test functions, and measures of approximation quality.

  20. Advantage of impulse oscillometry over spirometry to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and monitor pulmonary responses to bronchodilators: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Saadeh, Charles; Cross, Blake; Gaylor, Michael; Griffith, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study was a comparative analysis of sensitivity of impulse oscillometry and spirometry techniques for use in a mixed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease group for assessing disease severity and inhalation therapy. Methods: A total of 30 patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were monitored by impulse oscillometry, followed by spirometry. Lung function was measured at baseline after bronchodilation and at follow-up (3–18 months). The impulse oscillometry parameters were resistance in the small and large airways at 5 Hz (R5), resistance in the large airways at 15 Hz (R15), and lung reactance (area under the curve X; AX). Results: After the bronchodilator therapy, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) readings evaluated by spirometry were unaffected at baseline and at follow-up, while impulse oscillometry detected an immediate improvement in lung function, in terms of AX (p = 0.043). All impulse oscillometry parameters significantly improved at follow-up, with a decrease in AX by 37% (p = 0.0008), R5 by 20% (p = 0.0011), and R15 by 12% (p = 0.0097). Discussion: Impulse oscillometry parameters demonstrated greater sensitivity compared with spirometry for monitoring reversibility of airway obstruction and the effect of maintenance therapy. Impulse oscillometry may facilitate early treatment dose optimization and personalized medicine for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. PMID:26770777

  1. Dealing with Impulsivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neidhardt, Janet

    1987-01-01

    A mother recounts her neurologically impaired son's struggles and progress in combating impulsivity in his work and social habits. Now 23 years old, employed full-time, and off medication, the son is still impulsive, has problems with social skills, but has improved his self-image through a photography hobby. (CB)

  2. Impulsiveness in professional fighters.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sarah J; Mayer, Brittany; Obuchowski, Nancy; Shin, Wanyong; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Michael; Modic, Michael; Bernick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Sports involving repeated head trauma are associated with risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Among the behavioral manifestations of CTE is increased impulsiveness. Here, the authors investigate the relationship between impulsiveness and exposure to head trauma in a large group of active professional fighters. Fighters tended to report less impulsiveness than did non-fighting control respondents. Overall, greater fight exposure was associated with higher levels of a specific form of impulsiveness, although there were differences between mixed martial arts fighters and boxers. Fight exposure was associated with reduction in volume of certain brain structures, and these changes were also associated with impulsiveness patterns. Longitudinal studies of professional fighters are important to understand the risk for neuropsychiatric problems. PMID:24515676

  3. Response Operators for Markov Processes in a Finite State Space: Radius of Convergence and Link to the Response Theory for Axiom A Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Using straightforward linear algebra we derive response operators describing the impact of small perturbations to finite state Markov processes. The results can be used for studying empirically constructed—e.g. from observations or through coarse graining of model simulations—finite state approximation of statistical mechanical systems. Recent results concerning the convergence of the statistical properties of finite state Markov approximation of the full asymptotic dynamics on the SRB measure in the limit of finer and finer partitions of the phase space are suggestive of some degree of robustness of the obtained results in the case of Axiom A system. Our findings give closed formulas for the linear and nonlinear response theory at all orders of perturbation and provide matrix expressions that can be directly implemented in any coding language, plus providing bounds on the radius of convergence of the perturbative theory. In particular, we relate the convergence of the response theory to the rate of mixing of the unperturbed system. One can use the formulas derived for finite state Markov processes to recover previous findings obtained on the response of continuous time Axiom A dynamical systems to perturbations, by considering the generator of time evolution for the measure and for the observables. A very basic, low-tech, and computationally cheap analysis of the response of the Lorenz '63 model to perturbations provides rather encouraging results regarding the possibility of using the approximate representation given by finite state Markov processes to compute the system's response.

  4. Specific Impulse and Mass Flow Rate Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Specific impulse is defined in words in many ways. Very early in any text on rocket propulsion a phrase similar to .specific impulse is the thrust force per unit propellant weight flow per second. will be found.(2) It is only after seeing the mathematics written down does the definition mean something physically to scientists and engineers responsible for either measuring it or using someone.s value for it.

  5. Barratt Impulsivity and Neural Regulation of Physiological Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sien; Hu, Jianping; Wu, Po-Lun; Chao, Herta H.; Li, Chiang-shan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Theories of personality have posited an increased arousal response to external stimulation in impulsive individuals. However, there is a dearth of studies addressing the neural basis of this association. Methods We recorded skin conductance in 26 individuals who were assessed with Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and performed a stop signal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging data were processed and modeled with Statistical Parametric Mapping. We used linear regressions to examine correlations between impulsivity and skin conductance response (SCR) to salient events, identify the neural substrates of arousal regulation, and examine the relationship between the regulatory mechanism and impulsivity. Results Across subjects, higher impulsivity is associated with greater SCR to stop trials. Activity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) negatively correlated to and Granger caused skin conductance time course. Furthermore, higher impulsivity is associated with a lesser strength of Granger causality of vmPFC activity on skin conductance, consistent with diminished control of physiological arousal to external stimulation. When men (n = 14) and women (n = 12) were examined separately, however, there was evidence suggesting association between impulsivity and vmPFC regulation of arousal only in women. Conclusions Together, these findings confirmed the link between Barratt impulsivity and heightened arousal to salient stimuli in both genders and suggested the neural bases of altered regulation of arousal in impulsive women. More research is needed to explore the neural processes of arousal regulation in impulsive individuals and in clinical conditions that implicate poor impulse control. PMID:26079873

  6. NIKE3D: an implicit, finite-deformation, finite element code for analyzing the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    A user's manual is provided for NIKE3D, a fully implicit three-dimensional finite element code for analyzing the large deformation static and dynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning without the need of transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 8-node constant pressure solid elements. Bandwidth minimization is optional. Post-processors for NIKE3D include GRAPE for plotting deformed shapes and stress contours and DYNAP for plotting time histories.

  7. Aperture size, materiality of the secondary room and listener location: Impact on the simulated impulse response of a coupled-volume concert hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermann, Michael; Johnson, Marty E.; Harrison, Byron W.

    2003-04-01

    By adding a second room to a concert hall, and designing doors to control the sonic transparency between the two rooms, designers can create a new, coupled acoustic. Concert halls use coupling to achieve a variable, longer and distinct reverberant quality for their musicians and listeners. For this study, a coupled-volume concert hall based on an existing performing arts center is conceived and computer-modeled. It has a fixed geometric volume, form and primary-room sound absorption. Ray-tracing software simulates impulse responses, varying both aperture size and secondary-room sound absorption level, across a grid of receiver (listener) locations. The results are compared with statistical analysis that suggests a highly sensitive relationship between the double-sloped condition and the architecture of the space. This line of study aims to quantitatively and spatially correlate the double-sloped condition with (1) aperture size exposing the chamber, (2) sound absorptance in the coupled volume, and (3) listener location.

  8. Aperture size, materiality of the secondary room, and listener location: Impact on the simulated impulse response of a coupled-volume concert hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermann, Michael; Johnson, Marty E.; Harrison, Byron W.

    2002-11-01

    By adding a second room to a concert hall, and designing doors to control the sonic transparency between the two rooms, designers can create a new, coupled acoustic. Concert halls use coupling to achieve a variable, longer, and distinct reverberant quality for their musicians and listeners. For this study, a coupled-volume concert hall based on an existing performing arts center is conceived and computer modeled. It has a fixed geometric volume, form, and primary-room sound absorption. Ray-tracing software simulates impulse responses, varying both aperture size and secondary-room sound-absorption level, across a grid of receiver (listener) locations. The results are compared with statistical analysis that suggests a highly sensitive relationship between the double-sloped condition and the architecture of the space. This line of study aims to quantitatively and spatially correlate the double-sloped condition with (1) aperture size exposing the chamber, (2) sound absorptance in the coupled volume, and (3) listener location.

  9. Altered profiles of spontaneous novelty seeking, impulsive behavior, and response to D-amphetamine in rats perinatally exposed to bisphenol A.

    PubMed Central

    Adriani, Walter; Seta, Daniele Della; Dessì-Fulgheri, Francesco; Farabollini, Francesca; Laviola, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an environmental estrogen with potentially averse effects on public health. We studied the long-term effects of perinatal exposure to BPA on later behavior in adult rats of both sexes. BPA or vehicle was administered orally to mother rats from mating to pups' weaning, at a concentration (0.040 mg/kg) within the range of human exposure. The offspring of both sexes were tested at adolescence (postnatal days 35-45) for novelty preference (experiment 1). After a 3-day familiarization to one side of a two-chamber apparatus, on day 4 rats were allowed to freely explore the whole apparatus. BPA-exposed females spent significantly less time than did controls in exploration of the novel side (i.e., increased neophobia), whereas no effect was found in the male group. At adulthood, the same animals were food deprived and tested for profiles of impulsive behavior (experiment 2), in operant chambers provided with two nose-poking holes (delivering either five or one food pellet). After the establishment of a baseline preference for the large reinforcer, a delay was introduced before the delivery of the five food pellets, which was progressively increased each day (10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 80, 100 sec). As expected, all animals exhibited a progressive shift toward the immediate but smaller reinforcer. A reduced level of impulsive behavior (i.e., a shift to the right in the intolerance-delay curve) was evidenced in BPA-treated rats. The frequency of inadequate responding (during the length of the delay) also provided a measure of restless behavior. Interestingly, the profile of BPA-treated males was feminized, strongly resembling that of control females. Animals were then tested (experiment 3) for the response to an amphetamine challenge (1 mg/kg, subcutaneously). The drug-induced increment activity was significantly less marked in BPA-treated male rats compared with controls. These findings provide clear indirect evidence of long-term alterations in brain

  10. Parametric Comparisons of Intracranial Mechanical Responses from Three Validated Finite Element Models of the Human Head

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Songbai; Ghadyani, Hamidreza; Bolander, Richard P.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Ford, James C.; Mcallister, Thomas W.; Flashman, Laura A.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Ernstrom, Karin; Jain, Sonia; Raman, Rema; Zhang, Liying; Greenwald, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of human head finite element (FE) models have been developed from different research groups over the years to study the mechanisms of traumatic brain injury. These models can vary substantially in model features and parameters, making it important to evaluate whether simulation results from one model are readily comparable with another, and whether response-based injury thresholds established from a specific model can be generalized when a different model is employed. The purpose of this study is to parametrically compare regional brain mechanical responses from three validated head FE models to test the hypothesis that regional brain responses are dependent on the specific head model employed as well as the region of interest (ROI). The Dartmouth Scaled and Normalized Model (DSNM), the Simulated Injury Monitor (SIMon), and the Wayne State University Head Injury Model (WSUHIM) were selected for comparisons. For model input, 144 unique kinematic conditions were created to represent the range of head impacts sustained by male collegiate hockey players during play. These impacts encompass the 50th, 95th, and 99th percentile peak linear and rotational accelerations at 16 impact locations around the head. Five mechanical variables (strain, strain rate, strain × strain rate, stress, and pressure) in seven ROIs reported from the FE models were compared using Generalized Estimating Equation statistical models. Highly significant differences existed among FE models for nearly all output variables and ROIs. The WSUHIM produced substantially higher peak values for almost all output variables regardless of the ROI compared to the DSNM and SIMon models (p < 0.05). DSNM also produced significantly different stress and pressure compared with SIMon for all ROIs (p < 0.05), but such differences were not consistent across ROIs for other variables. Regardless of FE model, most output variables were highly correlated with linear and rotational peak accelerations. The

  11. Finite-Element Modelling of the Response of the Gerbil Middle Ear to Sound.

    PubMed

    Maftoon, Nima; Funnell, W Robert J; Daniel, Sam J; Decraemer, Willem F

    2015-10-01

    We present a finite-element model of the gerbil middle ear that, using a set of baseline parameters based primarily on a priori estimates from the literature, generates responses that are comparable with responses we measured in vivo using multi-point vibrometry and with those measured by other groups. We investigated the similarity of numerous features (umbo, pars-flaccida and pars-tensa displacement magnitudes, the resonance frequency and break-up frequency, etc.) in the experimental responses with corresponding ones in the model responses, as opposed to simply computing frequency-by-frequency differences between experimental and model responses. The umbo response of the model is within the range of variability seen in the experimental data in terms of the low-frequency (i.e., well below the middle-ear resonance) magnitude and phase, the main resonance frequency and magnitude, and the roll-off slope and irregularities in the response above the resonance frequency, but is somewhat high for frequencies above the resonance frequency. At low frequencies, the ossicular axis of rotation of the model appears to correspond to the anatomical axis but the behaviour is more complex at high frequencies (i.e., above the pars-tensa break-up). The behaviour of the pars tensa in the model is similar to what is observed experimentally in terms of magnitudes, phases, the break-up frequency of the spatial vibration pattern, and the bandwidths of the high-frequency response features. A sensitivity analysis showed that the parameters that have the strongest effects on the model results are the Young's modulus, thickness and density of the pars tensa; the Young's modulus of the stapedial annular ligament; and the Young's modulus and density of the malleus. Displacements of the tympanic membrane and manubrium and the low-frequency displacement of the stapes did not show large changes when the material properties of the incus, stapes, incudomallear joint, incudostapedial joint, and

  12. Finite element modeling of human brain response to football helmet impacts.

    PubMed

    Darling, T; Muthuswamy, J; Rajan, S D

    2016-10-01

    The football helmet is used to help mitigate the occurrence of impact-related traumatic (TBI) and minor traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) in the game of American football. While the current helmet design methodology may be adequate for reducing linear acceleration of the head and minimizing TBI, it however has had less effect in minimizing mTBI. The objectives of this study are (a) to develop and validate a coupled finite element (FE) model of a football helmet and the human body, and (b) to assess responses of different regions of the brain to two different impact conditions - frontal oblique and crown impact conditions. The FE helmet model was validated using experimental results of drop tests. Subsequently, the integrated helmet-human body FE model was used to assess the responses of different regions of the brain to impact loads. Strain-rate, strain, and stress measures in the corpus callosum, midbrain, and brain stem were assessed. Results show that maximum strain-rates of 27 and 19 s(-1) are observed in the brain-stem and mid-brain, respectively. This could potentially lead to axonal injuries and neuronal cell death during crown impact conditions. The developed experimental-numerical framework can be used in the study of other helmet-related impact conditions. PMID:26867124

  13. Biomechanical response of the pubic symphysis in lateral pelvic impacts: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuoping; Kim, Jong-Eun; Davidson, James S; Etheridge, Brandon S; Alonso, Jorge E; Eberhardt, Alan W

    2007-01-01

    Automotive side impacts are a leading cause of injuries to the pubic symphysis, yet the mechanisms of those injuries have not been clearly established. Previous mechanical testing of isolated symphyses revealed increased joint laxity following drop tower lateral impacts to isolated pelvic bone structures, which suggested that the joints were damaged by excessive stresses and/or deformations during the impact tests. In the present study, a finite element (FE) model of a female pelvis including a previously validated symphysis sub-model was developed from computed tomography data. The full pelvis model was validated against measured force-time impact responses from drop tower experiments and then used to study the biomechanical response of the symphysis during the experimental impacts. The FE models predicted that the joint underwent a combination of lateral compression, posterior bending, anterior/posterior and superior/inferior shear that exceeded normal physiological levels prior to the onset of bony fractures. Large strains occurred concurrently within the pubic ligaments. Removal of the contralateral constraints to better approximate the boundary conditions of a seated motor vehicle occupant reduced cortical stresses and deformations of the pubic symphysis; however, ligament strains, compressive and shear stresses in the interpubic disc, as well as posterior bending of the joint structure remained as potential sources of joint damage during automotive side impacts. PMID:17399721

  14. Prediction of the mechanical response of canine humerus to three-point bending using subject-specific finite element modelling.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Cédric P; Böhme, Béatrice; Mengoni, Marlène; d'Otreppe, Vinciane; Balligand, Marc; Ponthot, Jean-Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Subject-specific finite element models could improve decision making in canine long-bone fracture repair. However, it preliminary requires that finite element models predicting the mechanical response of canine long bone are proposed and validated. We present here a combined experimental-numerical approach to test the ability of subject-specific finite element models to predict the bending response of seven pairs of canine humeri directly from medical images. Our results show that bending stiffness and yield load are predicted with a mean absolute error of 10.1% (±5.2%) for the 14 samples. This study constitutes a basis for the forthcoming optimization of canine long-bone fracture repair. PMID:27129383

  15. Short Time Impulse Response Function (STIRF) for automatic evaluation of the variation of the dynamic parameters of reinforced concrete framed structures during strong earthquakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Ditommaso, Rocco

    2015-04-01

    This study presents an innovative strategy for automatic evaluation of the variable fundamental frequency and related damping factor of nonlinear structures during strong motion phases. Most of methods for damage detection are based on the assessment of the variations of the dynamic parameters characterizing the monitored structure. A crucial aspect of these methods is the automatic and accurate estimation of both structural eigen-frequencies and related damping factors also during the nonlinear behaviour. A new method, named STIRF (Short-Time Impulse Response Function - STIRF), based on the nonlinear interferometric analysis combined with the Fourier Transform (FT) here is proposed in order to allow scientists and engineers to characterize frequencies and damping variations of a monitored structure. The STIRF approach helps to overcome some limitation derived from the use of techniques based on simple Fourier Transform. These latter techniques provide good results when the response of the monitored system is stationary, but fails when the system exhibits a non-stationary, time-varying behaviour: even non-stationary input, soil-foundation and/or adjacent structures interaction phenomena can show the inadequacy of classic techniques to analysing the nonlinear and/or non-stationary behaviour of structures. In fact, using this kind of approach it is possible to improve some of the existing methods for the automatic damage detection providing stable results also during the strong motion phase. Results are consistent with those expected if compared with other techniques. The main advantage derived from the use of the proposed approach (STIRF) for Structural Health Monitoring is based on the simplicity of the interpretation of the nonlinear variations of the fundamental frequency and the related equivalent viscous damping factor. The proposed methodology has been tested on both numerical and experimental models also using data retrieved from shaking table tests. Based on

  16. Extended two-temperature model for ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon impulsive optical excitation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Taeho; Teitelbaum, Samuel W; Wolfson, Johanna; Kandyla, Maria; Nelson, Keith A

    2015-11-21

    Thermal modeling and numerical simulations have been performed to describe the ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon optical excitation. A model was established by extending the conventional two-temperature model that is adequate for metals, but not for semiconductors. It considers the time- and space-dependent density of electrons photoexcited to the conduction band and accordingly allows a more accurate description of the transient thermal equilibration between the hot electrons and lattice. Ultrafast thermal behaviors of bismuth, as a model system, were demonstrated using the extended two-temperature model with a view to elucidating the thermal effects of excitation laser pulse fluence, electron diffusivity, electron-hole recombination kinetics, and electron-phonon interactions, focusing on high-density excitation. PMID:26590551

  17. Extended two-temperature model for ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon impulsive optical excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Taeho; Teitelbaum, Samuel W.; Wolfson, Johanna; Nelson, Keith A.; Kandyla, Maria

    2015-11-21

    Thermal modeling and numerical simulations have been performed to describe the ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon optical excitation. A model was established by extending the conventional two-temperature model that is adequate for metals, but not for semiconductors. It considers the time- and space-dependent density of electrons photoexcited to the conduction band and accordingly allows a more accurate description of the transient thermal equilibration between the hot electrons and lattice. Ultrafast thermal behaviors of bismuth, as a model system, were demonstrated using the extended two-temperature model with a view to elucidating the thermal effects of excitation laser pulse fluence, electron diffusivity, electron-hole recombination kinetics, and electron-phonon interactions, focusing on high-density excitation.

  18. Laser thermal response of a finite slab as a function of the laser pulse parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-adawi, M. K.; Shalaby, S. A.; Mostafa, S. S.; Kotkata, M. F.

    2007-03-01

    This paper deals with the problem of heating a finite slab using laser radiation in relation to the parameters characterizing the laser pulse, namely: qmax(W/m 2), the maximum laser power density, t0 the time interval required to reach q and t, the pulse time duration. The pulse shape q(t) is suggested in the form: q(t)=βq(t/t)(1-(t/t))exp-B(t-t0/t), where β and B are parameters. Fitting with published experimental pulse [Ready JF. Effects due to absorption of laser radiation. J Appl Phys 1965;36:462-68] is made. Fourier series expansion technique is considered to solve the problem. The critical time required to initiate melting t is estimated for four metallic elements and five semiconductors, namely: Al, Cu, Ag, Au (aluminum, copper, silver, and gold), cadmium sulfide, germanium, silicon, alpha beryllium oxide, and silicon carbide. Five pulses with different characteristic parameters are considered. Computations revealed that the thermal response of the targets is highly affected by q and t, while the pulse time duration is less effective in determining the value of t. Moreover, it is revealed that the relation between t and the melting temperature for the same laser pulse is nonlinear for the considered targets under the indicated conditions.

  19. Finite element prediction of seismic response modification of monumental structures utilizing base isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanos, Konstantinos; Anifantis, Nikolaos; Kakavas, Panayiotis

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of the mechanical behavior of ancient structures is an essential engineering task concerning the preservation of architectural heritage. As many monuments of classical antiquity are located in regions of earthquake activity, the safety assessment of these structures, as well as the selection of possible restoration interventions, requires numerical models capable of correctly representing their seismic response. The work presented herein was part of a research project in which a better understanding of the dynamics of classical column-architrave structures was sought by means of numerical techniques. In this paper, the seismic behavior of ancient monumental structures with multi-drum classical columns is investigated. In particular, the column-architrave classical structure under strong ground excitations was represented by a finite element method. This approach simulates the individual rock blocks as distinct rigid blocks interconnected with slidelines and incorporates seismic isolation dampers under the basement of the structure. Sliding and rocking motions of individual stone blocks and drums are modeled utilizing non-linear frictional contact conditions. The seismic isolation is modeled through the application of pad bearings under the basement of the structure. These pads are interpreted by appropriate rubber and steel layers. Time domain analyses were performed, considering the geometric and material non-linear behavior at the joints and the characteristics of pad bearings. The deformation and failure modes of drum columns subject to seismic excitations of various types and intensities were analyzed. The adverse influence of drum imperfections on structural safety was also examined.

  20. A Finite Element Study of the Dynamic Response of Brain Based on Two Parasagittal Slice Models

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuewei; Wang, Cong; Hu, Hao; Huang, Tianlun; Jin, Jingxu

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of gyri and sulci on the response of human head under transient loading. To this end, two detailed parasagittal slice models with and without gyri and sulci have been developed. The models comprised not only cerebrum and skull but also cerebellum, brain stem, CSF, and corpus callosum. In addition, white and gray matters were separated. The material properties were adopted from the literature and assigned to different parts of the models. Nahum's and Trosseille's experiments reported in relevant literature were simulated and the simulation results were compared with the test data. The results show that there is no evident difference in terms of intracranial pressure between the models with and without gyri and sulci under simulated conditions. The equivalent stress below gyri and sulci in the model with gyri and sulci is slightly higher than that in the counterpart model without gyri and sulci. The maximum principle strain in brain tissue is lower in the model with gyri and sulci. The stress and strain distributions are changed due to the existence of gyri and sulci. These findings highlight the necessity to include gyri and sulci in the finite element head modeling. PMID:26495034

  1. Impulsivity and methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Semple, Shirley J; Zians, Jim; Grant, Igor; Patterson, Thomas L

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between methamphetamine (meth) use and impulsivity in a sample of 385 HIV-negative heterosexually identified meth users. Participants who scored highest on a self-report measure of impulsivity were compared with those who scored lower in terms of background characteristics, meth use patterns, use of alcohol and other illicit drugs, sexual risk behavior, and psychiatric health variables. Methamphetamine users in the high impulsivity group were younger, less educated, used larger quantities of meth, were more likely to be binge users, had a larger number of sexual partners, engaged in more unprotected vaginal and oral sex, and scored higher on the Beck Depression Inventory as compared with those in the low impulsivity group. In a logistic regression analysis, Beck depression was the factor that best distinguished between meth users who scored high and those who scored low on impulsivity. Neurophysiological pathways that may underlie the relationship between impulsivity and meth use are discussed. PMID:16135337

  2. Finite Element Analysis of the Random Response Suppression of Composite Panels at Elevated Temperatures using Shape Memory Alloy Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Zhong, Z. W.; Mei, Chuh

    1994-01-01

    A feasibility study on the use of shape memory alloys (SMA) for suppression of the random response of composite panels due to acoustic loads at elevated temperatures is presented. The constitutive relations for a composite lamina with embedded SMA fibers are developed. The finite element governing equations and the solution procedures for a composite plate subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads are presented. Solutions include: 1) Critical buckling temperature; 2) Flat panel random response; 3) Thermal postbuckling deflection; 4) Random response of a thermally buckled panel. The preliminary results demonstrate that the SMA fibers can completely eliminate the thermal postbuckling deflection and significantly reduce the random response at elevated temperatures.

  3. A single-degree-of-freedom dynamic model predicts the range of human responses to impulsive forces produced by power hand tools.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Hua; Radwin, Robert G; Richard, Terry G

    2003-12-01

    The human operator is modelled as a single-degree-of-freedom dynamic mechanical system for predicting the response to impulsive torque reaction forces produced by rotating spindle power hand tools such as nutrunners or screwdrivers. The model uses mass, spring and damping elements to represent the standing operator supporting the tool in the hand. It was hypothesized that these mechanical elements are affected by work location and vary among individuals. These elements were ascertained by measuring the resulting frequency and amplitude of a freely oscillating defined mechanical system when externally loaded using maximal effort to oppose its motion. Twenty-five subjects (13 female, 12 male) participated in the full factorial experiment that measured the effects of gender, vertical and horizontal work location for various tool shapes (in-line, pistol, right angle), and orientations (horizontal and vertical). The mean operator stiffness decreased from 1721 to 1195 N/m when the horizontal work location increased from 30 to 90 cm in front of the ankles for a pistol-grip handle used on a vertical surface. Males had greater mass moment of inertia of (0.0099 kg m2) than females (0.0072 kg m2) for an in-line handle used on a horizontal surface. Internal validation by independently measuring apparatus torque found that the model satisfactorily explained the measured operator dynamics with an average error of 2.86%. Group variance reflects the range of operator capacities to react against power hand tool generated forces for the sample group and therefore it may also be useful for understanding the range of capacities among a group of operators performing similar tasks. PMID:14614938

  4. A sum-over-paths algorithm for third-order impulse-response moment extraction within RC IC-interconnect networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, E. A.; Ni, D.; Lam, T. M.; Le Coz, Y. L.

    2015-07-01

    We have created the first stochastic SoP (Sum-over-Paths) algorithm to extract third-order impulse-response (IR) moment within RC IC interconnects. It employs a newly discovered Feynman SoP Postulate. Importantly, our algorithm maintains computational efficiency and full parallelism. Our approach begins with generation of s-domain nodal-voltage equations. We then perform a Taylor-series expansion of the circuit transfer function. These expansions yield transition diagrams involving mathematical coupling constants, or weight factors, in integral powers of complex frequency s. Our SoP Postulate enables stochastic evaluation of path sums within the circuit transition diagram to order s3-corresponding to the order of IR moment (m3) we seek here. We furnish, for the first time, an informal algebraic proof independently validating our SoP Postulate and algorithm. We list, as well, detailed procedural steps, suitable for coding, that define an efficient stochastic algorithm for m3 IR extraction. Origins of the algorithm's statistical "capacitor-number cubed" correction and "double-counting" weight factors are explained, for completeness. Our algorithm was coded and successfully tested against exact analytical solutions for 3-, 5-, and 10-stage RC lines. We achieved better than 0.65% 1-σ error convergence, after only 10K statistical samples, in less than 1 s of 2-GHz Pentium® execution time. These results continue to suggest that stochastic SoP algorithms may find useful application in circuit analysis of massively coupled networks, such as those encountered in high-end digital IC-interconnect CAD.

  5. Quantifying crustal response to deep active intrusions with geodesy-based finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. T.; Pritchard, M. E.; Elliott, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC, 21-24 S, 66-69 W) is a first order feature of the Central Andes Volcanic Arc. The APVC consists of over 10,000 km^3 of dacitic ignimbrites deposited in the late Miocene, making it one of the largest concentrations of silicic volcanism in the world. The persistent and intense magmatic flux in this region has likely contributed to the thickened crust (50-70 km), elevated geotherm (>50 C/km) and extensive partial melt (<20 %) inferred under the APVC in modern times. Furthermore, satellite geodetic measurements show surface deformation centered on Uturuncu Volcano (22.27 S, 67.22 W) that is consistent with an ongoing magmatic intrusion in the middle to lower crust. The unique geologic setting and availability of multiple geophysical datasets provide an exceptional opportunity to locate fluid accumulation depths and model the resulting crustal mechanical response. InSAR data between 05/1992 and 01/2011 show that the deformation anomaly is characterized by axis-symmetric constant vertical uplift of 1-10 mm/yr over a radius of 35 km, which is surrounded by 1-4 mm/yr subsidence out to 75 km. One possible explanation for such a signal is diapiric rise of melt from the middle crust. We seek to determine if observed deformation can be alternatively explained by vertical ascent of magma from the lower (~70 km) to middle crust (~20 km). Such a model would be consistent with the short duration of deformation from geomorphic studies (less than 2200 years) and the potential abrupt cessation of uplift seen in a single continuous GPS station starting in 04/2010 near the center of deformation. We therefore test multiple finite element models that match spatial and temporal surface deformation, achieve mass balance between source and sink reservoirs, and require physically realistic rheological parameters of the crust. Modeling is performed with Pylith finite element software on a cylindrical three dimensional domain with a radius of 300 km

  6. Impulse noise generator--design and operation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, H

    1991-01-01

    In the seventies PFANDER (Pfander, 1975) proposed a screening test with an impulse noise simulator to check the particular responsivity of soldiers on vulnerability of the inner ear concerning the impulse noise-induced hearing loss. According to a system developed at the University of Oldenburg (Germany) (Klug & Radek, 1987), we have constructed an impulse noise generator designed for our specific requirements that will be presented. The simulator consists of an electrical ignited impulse noise spark gap which is supplied by a 3.5 kV high voltage source. At a distance of 1.10 m from the center of the impulse noise spark gap a peak pressure level of 155 dB with a C-Duration (Pfander, 1975) of .2 msec and with the main energy in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 2 kHz was good reproducible. It would be preferable to shift the impulse noise spectrum to lower frequencies but experimental effort has failed so far. PMID:1842469

  7. Genetic association of impulsivity in young adults: a multivariate study

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, S; Narayanan, B; Meda, S A; Gelernter, J; Han, S; Sawyer, B; Aslanzadeh, F; Stevens, M C; Hawkins, K A; Anticevic, A; Potenza, M N; Pearlson, G D

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is a heritable, multifaceted construct with clinically relevant links to multiple psychopathologies. We assessed impulsivity in young adult (N~2100) participants in a longitudinal study, using self-report questionnaires and computer-based behavioral tasks. Analysis was restricted to the subset (N=426) who underwent genotyping. Multivariate association between impulsivity measures and single-nucleotide polymorphism data was implemented using parallel independent component analysis (Para-ICA). Pathways associated with multiple genes in components that correlated significantly with impulsivity phenotypes were then identified using a pathway enrichment analysis. Para-ICA revealed two significantly correlated genotype–phenotype component pairs. One impulsivity component included the reward responsiveness subscale and behavioral inhibition scale of the Behavioral-Inhibition System/Behavioral-Activation System scale, and the second impulsivity component included the non-planning subscale of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and the Experiential Discounting Task. Pathway analysis identified processes related to neurogenesis, nervous system signal generation/amplification, neurotransmission and immune response. We identified various genes and gene regulatory pathways associated with empirically derived impulsivity components. Our study suggests that gene networks implicated previously in brain development, neurotransmission and immune response are related to impulsive tendencies and behaviors. PMID:25268255

  8. Finite element comparison of human and Hybrid III responses in a frontal impact.

    PubMed

    Danelson, Kerry A; Golman, Adam J; Kemper, Andrew R; Gayzik, F Scott; Clay Gabler, H; Duma, Stefan M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-12-01

    The improvement of finite element (FE) Human Body Models (HBMs) has made them valuable tools for investigating restraint interactions compared to anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of various combinations of safety restraint systems on the sensitivity of thoracic injury criteria using matched ATD and Human Body Model (HBM) simulations at two crash severities. A total of seven (7) variables were investigated: 3-point belt with two (2) load limits, frontal airbag, knee bolster airbag, a buckle pretensioner, and two (2) delta-v's - 40kph and 50kph. Twenty four (24) simulations were conducted for the Hybrid III ATD FE model and repeated with a validated HBM for 48 total simulations. Metrics tested in these conditions included sternum deflection, chest acceleration, chest excursion, Viscous Criteria (V*C) criteria, pelvis acceleration, pelvis excursion, and femur forces. Additionally, chest band deflection and rib strain distribution were measured in the HBM for additional restraint condition discrimination. The addition of a frontal airbag had the largest effect on the occupant chest metrics with an increase in chest compression and acceleration but a decrease in excursion. While the THUMS and Hybrid III occupants demonstrated the same trend in the chest compression measurements, there were conflicting results in the V*C, acceleration, and displacement metrics. Similarly, the knee bolster airbag had the largest effect on the pelvis with a decrease in acceleration and excursion. With a knee bolster airbag the simulated occupants gave conflicting results, the THUMS had a decrease in femur force and the ATD had an increase. Preferential use of dummies or HBM's is not debated; however, this study highlights the ability of HBM metrics to capture additional chest response metrics. PMID:26432065

  9. The role of retardation in the structure and linear response of finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Crecca, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional random phase approximation (RPA) and Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) calculations of nuclear structure and the linear response employ interactions between nucleons that are instantaneous. However, N-N interactions derived from the exchange of mesons between nucleons must depend on the space-time separation of the nucleons since the mesons travel at finite speeds. Furthermore, a quantum field theory that contains interacting meson and nucleon degrees of freedom employ the Feynman propagator, i{Delta}{sub F}(x - x{prime}), to connect the nucleon-meson vertices of Feynman diagrams. This raises the question of whether calculations done with space-time dependent interactions differ significantly from the conventional calculations that employ instantaneous forces, and what are the qualitative features of the difference. The inquiry into this question begins by generalizing the traditional RPA and TDA equations into the domain of retarded (space-time dependant) interactions. This entails establishing an integral equation (the Bethe-Salpeter equation) for the polarization propagator with the appropriate RPA or TDA kernel such that the integral equation reduces to the usual RPA or TDA matrix equation for the polarization propagator as the interaction becomes instantaneous. After establishing this generalization of the RPA and TDA, a TDA calculation is performed for an interaction arising from the exchange of a scalar meson. The results are compared with those obtained from the conventional instantaneous reduction of the scalar meson exchange interaction, the Yukawa potential. Upon comparing these results one finds that in general the nuclear structure obtained from scalar meson exchange differ little less than 10%.

  10. Optically measured explosive impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, Matthew M.; McNesby, Kevin L.

    2014-06-01

    An experimental technique is investigated to optically measure the explosive impulse produced by laboratory-scale spherical charges detonated in air. Explosive impulse has historically been calculated from temporal pressure measurements obtained via piezoelectric transducers. The presented technique instead combines schlieren flow visualization and high-speed digital imaging to optically measure explosive impulse. Prior to an explosive event, schlieren system calibration is performed using known light-ray refractions and resulting digital image intensities. Explosive charges are detonated in the test section of a schlieren system and imaged by a high-speed digital camera in pseudo-streak mode. Spatiotemporal schlieren intensity maps are converted using an Abel deconvolution, Rankine-Hugoniot jump equations, ideal gas law, triangular temperature decay profile, and Schardin's standard photometric technique to yield spatiotemporal pressure maps. Temporal integration of individual pixel pressure profiles over the positive pressure duration of the shock wave yields the explosive impulse generated for a given radial standoff. Calculated explosive impulses are shown to exhibit good agreement between optically derived values and pencil gage pressure transducers.

  11. Biomechanical Dynamics of Cranial Sutures during Simulated Impulsive Loading

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z. Q.; Yang, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cranial sutures are deformable joints between the bones of the skull, bridged by collagen fibres. They function to hold the bones of the skull together while allowing for mechanical stress transmission and deformation. Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate how cranial suture morphology, suture material property, and the arrangement of sutural collagen fibres influence the dynamic responses of the suture and surrounding bone under impulsive loads. Methods. An idealized bone-suture-bone complex was analyzed using a two-dimensional finite element model. A uniform impulsive loading was applied to the complex. Outcome variables of von Mises stress and strain energy were evaluated to characterize the sutures' biomechanical behavior. Results. Parametric studies revealed that the suture strain energy and the patterns of Mises stress in both the suture and surrounding bone were strongly dependent on the suture morphologies. Conclusions. It was concluded that the higher order hierarchical suture morphology, lower suture elastic modulus, and the better collagen fiber orientation must benefit the stress attenuation and energy absorption. PMID:27019589

  12. Biomechanical Dynamics of Cranial Sutures during Simulated Impulsive Loading.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Q; Yang, J L

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cranial sutures are deformable joints between the bones of the skull, bridged by collagen fibres. They function to hold the bones of the skull together while allowing for mechanical stress transmission and deformation. Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate how cranial suture morphology, suture material property, and the arrangement of sutural collagen fibres influence the dynamic responses of the suture and surrounding bone under impulsive loads. Methods. An idealized bone-suture-bone complex was analyzed using a two-dimensional finite element model. A uniform impulsive loading was applied to the complex. Outcome variables of von Mises stress and strain energy were evaluated to characterize the sutures' biomechanical behavior. Results. Parametric studies revealed that the suture strain energy and the patterns of Mises stress in both the suture and surrounding bone were strongly dependent on the suture morphologies. Conclusions. It was concluded that the higher order hierarchical suture morphology, lower suture elastic modulus, and the better collagen fiber orientation must benefit the stress attenuation and energy absorption. PMID:27019589

  13. Impulse-Momentum Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengrant, David

    2011-01-01

    Multiple representations are a valuable tool to help students learn and understand physics concepts. Furthermore, representations help students learn how to think and act like real scientists.2 These representations include: pictures, free-body diagrams,3 energy bar charts,4 electrical circuits, and, more recently, computer simulations and animations.5 However, instructors have limited choices when they want to help their students understand impulse and momentum. One of the only available options is the impulse-momentum bar chart.6 The bar charts can effectively show the magnitude of the momentum as well as help students understand conservation of momentum, but they do not easily show the actual direction. This paper highlights a new representation instructors can use to help their students with momentum and impulse—the impulse-momentum diagram (IMD).

  14. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Stanley K.

    1993-01-01

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring.

  15. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, S.K.

    1993-12-21

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring. 4 figures.

  16. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-10-10

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes. 9 figs.

  17. Relativistic impulse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Classical electrodynamics has some annoying rough edges. The self-energy of charges is infinite without a cutoff. The calculation of relativistic trajectories is difficult because of retardation and an average radiation reaction term. By reconceptuallizing electrodynamics in terms of exchanges of impulses rather than describing it by forces and potentials, we eliminate these problems. A fully relativistic theory using photonlike null impulses is developed. Numerical calculations for a two-body, one-impulse-in-transit model are discussed. A simple relationship between center-of-mass scattering angle and angular momentum was found. It reproduces the Rutherford cross section at low velocities and agrees with the leading term of relativistic distinguishable-particle quantum cross sections (Møller, Mott) when the distance of closest approach is larger than the Compton wavelength of the particle. Magnetism emerges as a consequence of viewing retarded and advanced interactions from the vantage point of an instantaneous radius vector. Radiation reaction becomes the local conservation of energy-momentum between the radiating particle and the emitted impulse. A net action is defined that could be used in developing quantum dynamics without potentials. A reinterpretation of Newton's laws extends them to relativistic motion. PMID:21929132

  18. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes.

  19. Finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for threshold detection of stimulus-response curves.

    PubMed

    Duc, Luu Hoang; Chávez, Joseph Páez; Son, Doan Thai; Siegmund, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In biochemical networks transient dynamics plays a fundamental role, since the activation of signalling pathways is determined by thresholds encountered during the transition from an initial state (e.g. an initial concentration of a certain protein) to a steady-state. These thresholds can be defined in terms of the inflection points of the stimulus-response curves associated to the activation processes in the biochemical network. In the present work, we present a rigorous discussion as to the suitability of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and metabolic control coefficients for the detection of inflection points of stimulus-response curves with sigmoidal shape. PMID:27416142

  20. Energetics of impulsive solar flares: Correlating BATSE hard x-ray bursts and the solar atmosphere's soft x-ray response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    This investigation has involved the correlation of BATSE-observed solar hard X-ray emission with the characteristics of soft X-ray emitting plasma observed by the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometers. The goal was to test the hypothesis that localized electron beam heating is the dominant energy transport mechanism in impulsive flares, as formulated in the thick-target electron-heated model of Brown.

  1. Dynamic and thermal response finite element models of multi-body space structural configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edighoffer, Harold H.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is structural dynamics modeling of two multibody space structural configurations. The first configuration is a generic space station model of a cylindrical habitation module, two solar array panels, radiator panel, and central connecting tube. The second is a 15-m hoop-column antenna. Discussed is the special joint elimination sequence used for these large finite element models, so that eigenvalues could be extracted. The generic space station model aided test configuration design and analysis/test data correlation. The model consisted of six finite element models, one of each substructure and one of all substructures as a system. Static analysis and tests at the substructure level fine-tuned the finite element models. The 15-m hoop-column antenna is a truss column and structural ring interconnected with tension stabilizing cables. To the cables, pretensioned mesh membrane elements were attached to form four parabolic shaped antennae, one per quadrant. Imposing thermal preloads in the cables and mesh elements produced pretension in the finite element model. Thermal preload variation in the 96 control cables was adjusted to maintain antenna shape within the required tolerance and to give pointing accuracy.

  2. Finite Mixture Dynamic Regression Modeling of Panel Data with Implications for Dynamic Response Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, David

    2005-01-01

    This article considers the problem of estimating dynamic linear regression models when the data are generated from finite mixture probability density function where the mixture components are characterized by different dynamic regression model parameters. Specifically, conventional linear models assume that the data are generated by a single…

  3. Impulsivity, Frontal Lobes and Risk for Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Fulton Timm; Boettiger, Charlotte Ann

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol and substance abuse disorders involve continued use of substances despite negative consequences, i.e. loss of behavioral control of drug use. The frontal cortical areas of brain oversee behavioral control through executive functions. Executive functions include abstract thinking, motivation, planning, attention to tasks and inhibition of impulsive responses. Impulsiveness generally refers to premature, unduly risky, poorly conceived actions. Dysfunctional impulsivity includes deficits in attention, lack of reflection and/or insensitivity to consequences, all of which occur in addiction (Evenden, 1999; (de Wit, 2009). Binge drinking models indicate chronic alcohol damages corticolimbic brain regions (Crews et al., 2000) causing reversal learning deficits indicative of loss of executive function (Obernier et al., 2002b). Genetics and adolescent age are risk factors for alcoholism that coincide with sensitivity to alcohol induced neurotoxicity. Cortical degeneration from alcohol abuse may increase impulsivity contributing to the development, persistence and severity of alcohol use disorders. Interestingly, abstinence results in bursts of neurogenesis and brain regrowth (Crews and Nixon, 2009). Treatments for alcoholism, including naltrexone pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy may work through improving executive functions. This review will examine the relationships between impulsivity and executive function behaviors to changes in cortical structure during alcohol dependence and recovery. PMID:19410598

  4. SANTOS - a two-dimensional finite element program for the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-07-01

    SANTOS is a finite element program designed to compute the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric solids. The code is derived from the transient dynamic code PRONTO 2D. The solution strategy used to compute the equilibrium states is based on a self-adaptive dynamic relaxation solution scheme, which is based on explicit central difference pseudo-time integration and artificial mass proportional damping. The element used in SANTOS is a uniform strain 4-node quadrilateral element with an hourglass control scheme to control the spurious deformation modes. Finite strain constitutive models for many common engineering materials are included. A robust master-slave contact algorithm for modeling sliding contact is implemented. An interface for coupling to an external code is also provided. 43 refs., 22 figs.

  5. Annoyance of helicopter impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dambra, F.; Damongeot, A.

    1978-01-01

    Psychoacoustic studies of helicopter impulsive noise were conducted in order to qualify additional annoyance due to this feature and to develop physical impulsiveness descriptors to develop impulsivity correction methods. The currently proposed descriptors and methods of impulsiveness correction are compared using a multilinear regression analysis technique. It is shown that the presently recommended descriptor and correction method provides the best correlation with the subjective evaluations of real helicopter impulsive noises. The equipment necessary for data processing in order to apply the correction method is discussed.

  6. ParCYCLIC: finite element modelling of earthquake liquefaction response on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun; Lu, Jinchi; Law, Kincho H.; Elgamal, Ahmed

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents the computational procedures and solution strategy employed in ParCYCLIC, a parallel non-linear finite element program developed based on an existing serial code CYCLIC for the analysis of cyclic seismically-induced liquefaction problems. In ParCYCLIC, finite elements are employed within an incremental plasticity, coupled solid-fluid formulation. A constitutive model developed for simulating liquefaction-induced deformations is a main component of this analysis framework. The elements of the computational strategy, designed for distributed-memory message-passing parallel computer systems, include: (a) an automatic domain decomposer to partition the finite element mesh; (b) nodal ordering strategies to minimize storage space for the matrix coefficients; (c) an efficient scheme for the allocation of sparse matrix coefficients among the processors; and (d) a parallel sparse direct solver. Application of ParCYCLIC to simulate 3-D geotechnical experimental models is demonstrated. The computational results show excellent parallel performance and scalability of ParCYCLIC on parallel computers with a large number of processors. Copyright

  7. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  8. Waiting Impulsivity: The Influence of Acute Methylphenidate and Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Chang-Webb, Yee Chien; Morris, Laurel S.; Cooper, Ella; Sethi, Arjun; Baek, Kwangyeol; Grant, Jon; Robbins, Trevor W.; Harrison, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ability to wait and to weigh evidence is critical to behavioral regulation. These behaviors are known as waiting and reflection impulsivity. In Study 1, we examined the effects of methylphenidate, a dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on waiting and reflection impulsivity in healthy young individuals. In study 2, we assessed the role of learning from feedback in disorders of addiction. Methods: We used the recently developed 4-Choice Serial Reaction Time task and the Beads task. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers were tested twice in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial with 20mg methylphenidate. In the second study, we analyzed premature responses as a function of prior feedback in disorders of addiction. Results: Study 1: Methylphenidate was associated with greater waiting impulsivity to a cue predicting reward along with faster responding to target onset without a generalized effect on reaction time or attention. Methylphenidate influenced reflection impulsivity based on baseline impulsivity. Study 2: More premature responses occurred after premature responses in stimulant-dependent subjects. Conclusions: We show that methylphenidate has dissociable effects on waiting and reflection impulsivity. Chronic stimulant exposure impairs learning from prior premature responses, suggesting a failure to learn that premature responding is suboptimal. These findings provide a greater mechanistic understanding of waiting impulsivity. PMID:26136351

  9. A fuzzy finite element procedure for the calculation of uncertain frequency response functions of damped structures: Part 2—Numerical case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gersem, Hilde; Moens, David; Desmet, Wim; Vandepitte, Dirk

    2005-12-01

    This work introduces a numerical algorithm to calculate frequency response functions of damped finite element models with fuzzy uncertain parameters. Part 1 of this paper focusses on the numerical procedure for the solution of the underlying interval finite element problem, based on the undamped procedure and the principle of Rayleigh damping. Part 2 of this paper illustrates the applicability of the methodology through four case studies. The concepts of the interval and the fuzzy finite element frequency response function analysis are illustrated for different types of uncertainties. The obtained results are compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. Impulse Testing of Corporate-Fed Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel method for detecting faults in antenna arrays. The method, termed Impulse Testing, was developed for corporate-fed patch arrays where the element is fed by a probe and is shorted at its center. Impulse Testing was devised to supplement conventional microwave measurements in order to quickly verify antenna integrity. The technique relies on exciting each antenna element in turn with a fast pulse (or impulse) that propagates through the feed network to the output port of the antenna. The resulting impulse response is characteristic of the path through the feed network. Using an oscilloscope, a simple amplitude measurement can be made to detect faults. A circuit model of the antenna elements and feed network was constructed to assess various fault scenarios and determine fault-detection thresholds. The experimental setup and impulse measurements for two patch array antennas are presented. Advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed along with applications to other antenna array topologies

  11. Dissociated neural substrates underlying impulsive choice and impulsive action.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Chen, Chunhui; Cai, Ying; Li, Siyao; Zhao, Xiao; Zheng, Li; Zhang, Hanqi; Liu, Jing; Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui

    2016-07-01

    There is a growing consensus that impulsivity is a multifaceted construct that comprises several components such as impulsive choice and impulsive action. Although impulsive choice and impulsive action have been shown to be the common characteristics of some impulsivity-related psychiatric disorders, surprisingly few studies have directly compared their neural correlates and addressed the question whether they involve common or distinct neural correlates. We addressed this important empirical gap using an individual differences approach that could characterize the functional relevance of neural networks in behaviors. A large sample (n=227) of college students was tested with the delay discounting and stop-signal tasks, and their performances were correlated with the neuroanatomical (gray matter volume, GMV) and functional (resting-state functional connectivity, RSFC) measures, using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) and 10-fold cross-validation. Behavioral results showed no significant correlation between impulsive choice measured by discounting rate (k) and impulsive action measured by stop signal reaction time (SSRT). The GMVs in the right frontal pole (FP) and left middle frontal gyrus (MFG) were predictive of k, but not SSRT. In contrast, the GMVs in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), supplementary motor area (SMA), and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) could predict individuals' SSRT, but not k. RSFC analysis using the FP and right IFG as seed regions revealed two distinct networks that correspond well to the "waiting" and "stopping" systems, respectively. Furthermore, the RSFC between the FP and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) was predictive of k, whereas the RSFC between the IFG and pre-SMA was predictive of SSRT. These results demonstrate clearly neural dissociations between impulsive choice and impulsive action, provide new insights into the nature of impulsivity, and have implications for impulsivity-related disorders. PMID:27083527

  12. Coronary stent strut size dependent stress-strain response investigated using micromechanical finite element models.

    PubMed

    Savage, P; O'Donnell, B P; McHugh, P E; Murphy, B P; Quinn, D F

    2004-02-01

    Cardiovascular stents are metal scaffolds that are used in the treatment of atherosclerosis. These devices are typically composed of very thin struts (< or = 100 microm thickness, for coronary applications). At this size-scale the question arises as to the suitability of using bulk material properties in stent design. This paper investigates the use of finite element analysis to predict the mechanical failure of stent struts, typical of the strut size used in coronary stents. 316 L stainless steel in uniaxial loading was considered. To accurately represent the constitutive behavior of the material at this size-scale, a computational micromechanics approach was taken involving an explicit representation of the grain structure in the steel struts, and the use of crystal plasticity theory to represent the constitutive behavior of the individual grains. The development of the finite element models is discussed and results are presented for the predictions of tensile mechanical behavior as a function of strut thickness. The results showed that using this modelling approach, a size effect, already seen experimentally, is produced. This has significant implications for stent design, especially in the context of the desire to produce smaller stents for small bore neurovascular and peripheral artery applications. PMID:15008368

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of Flutter Response of a Wing Incorporating Finite-Span Corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issac, Jason Cherian; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1994-01-01

    Flutter analysis of a wing is performed in compressible flow using state-space representation of the unsteady aerodynamic behavior. Three different expressions are used to incorporate corrections due to the finite-span effects of the wing in estimating the lift-curve slope. The structural formulation is based on a Rayleigh-Pitz technique with Chebyshev polynomials used for the wing deflections. The aeroelastic equations are solved as an eigen-value problem to determine the flutter speed of the wing. The flutter speeds are found to be higher in these cases, when compared to that obtained without accounting for the finite-span effects. The derivatives of the flutter speed with respect to the shape parameters, namely: aspect ratio, area, taper ratio and sweep angle, are calculated analytically. The shape sensitivity derivatives give a linear approximation to the flutter speed curves over a range of values of the shape parameter which is perturbed. Flutter and sensitivity calculations are performed on a wing using a lifting-surface unsteady aerodynamic theory using modules from a system of programs called FAST.

  14. The response of cranial biomechanical finite element models to variations in mesh density.

    PubMed

    Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J

    2011-04-01

    Finite element (FE) models provide discrete solutions to continuous problems. Therefore, to arrive at the correct solution, it is vital to ensure that FE models contain a sufficient number of elements to fully resolve all the detail encountered in a continuum structure. Mesh convergence testing is the process of comparing successively finer meshes to identify the point of diminishing returns; where increasing resolution has marginal effects on results and further detail would become costly and unnecessary. Historically, convergence has not been considered in most CT-based biomechanical reconstructions involving complex geometries like the skull, as generating such models has been prohibitively time-consuming. To assess how mesh convergence influences results, 18 increasingly refined CT-based models of a domestic pig skull were compared to identify the point of convergence for strain and displacement, using both linear and quadratic tetrahedral elements. Not all regions of the skull converged at the same rate, and unexpectedly, areas of high strain converged faster than low-strain regions. Linear models were slightly stiffer than their quadratic counterparts, but did not converge less rapidly. As expected, insufficiently dense models underestimated strain and displacement, and failed to resolve strain "hot-spots" notable in contour plots. In addition to quantitative differences, visual assessments of such plots often inform conclusions drawn in many comparative studies, highlighting that mesh convergence should be performed on all finite element models before further analysis takes place. PMID:21370496

  15. Impulse variability in isometric tasks.

    PubMed

    Carlton, L G; Kim, K H; Liu, Y T; Newell, K M

    1993-03-01

    An isometric elbow flexion task was used in two experiments that examined the influence of force-production characteristics on impulse variability. Impulse size was held constant while peak force, time to peak force, rate of force, and, hence, the shape of the criterion force-time curve were manipulated. The results indicated that changes in the force-time curve under conditions of equal impulse bring about systematic changes in impulse variability, and this effect is more pronounced for larger impulse conditions. The inability of existing functions to account for the peak force variability findings led to the generation of a new predicted force variability function. The proposed function accounts for changes in the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of peak force, impulse, and rate of force over a range of force-time conditions. PMID:12730039

  16. Mechanical responses of the periodontal ligament based on an exponential hyperelastic model: a combined experimental and finite element method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huixiang; Tang, Wencheng; Yan, Bin; Wu, Bin; Cao, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The V-W exponential hyperelastic model is adopted to describe the instantaneous elastic response of the periodontal ligament (PDL). The general theoretical framework of constitutive modeling is described based on nonlinear continuum mechanics, and the elasticity tensor used to develop UMAT subroutine is formulated. Nanoindentation experiment is performed to characterize mechanical properties of an adult pig PDL specimen. Then the experiment is simulated by using the finite element (FE) analysis. Meanwhile, the optimized material parameters are identified by the inverse FE method. The good agreement between the simulated results and experimental data demonstrates that the V-W model is capable of describing the mechanical behavior of the PDL. Therefore, the model and its implementation into FE code are validated. By using the model, we simulate the tooth movement under orthodontic loading to predict the mechanical responses of the PDL. The results show that local concentrations of stress and strain in the PDL are found. PMID:25648914

  17. Impulse Control of Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menaldi, Jose-Luis; Sritharan, S. S.

    2000-11-01

    Impulse control corresponds to forcing the fluid at strategic times where the optimal instances of time as well as the strengths of the control are to be determined by control theory of Navier-Stokes equation. This subject can also be exactly rephrased as an optimal weather prediction problem where the initial data is updated at strategic times (in current variational data assimilation literature in meteorology one obtains the optimal initial data just once). The underlying mathematical structure is precisely resolved with very elegant explanations using infinite dimensional free boundary problems where the boundaries of the free boundary correspond to optimal instances.

  18. Calculating room acoustic parameters from pseudo-impulsive acoustic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Martin, Maria L.; Vela, Antonio; San Martin, Ricardo; Arana, Miguel A.

    2002-11-01

    The impulse response function provides complete information to predict the acoustic response of a room to an acoustic input of arbitrary characteristics. At this job study, small explosions of firecrackers are proposed to be used as pseudo-impulsive acoustics sources to determine some acoustic parameters of a room such as reverberation time, definition, and clarity, comparing these results to those obtained with other techniques. A previous characterization of these sources allows us to state that they can be used for this purpose because they are, in practice, omnidirectional, their temporary pattern is highly repetitive and their spectral power is, as well, repetitive and with enough power in octave bands from 125 Hz to 8 kHz. If the linear time-invariant system impulse response h(t) is known, output signal s(t) regarding any arbitrary signal s(t) can be obtained. For our pseudo-impulsive sources, the output signal s(t) has been taken as impulse response h(t). Using the integrated impulse response method suggested by Schroeder, it has been stated that both the mean values and standard deviations for some parameters are practically identical to results obtained with other usual techniques. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  19. Impulsivity in disorders of food and drug misuse

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Tom B.; Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Collins, Phoebe; Mitchell, Simon P.; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Voon, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests some overlap between the pathological use of food and drugs, yet how impulsivity compares across these different clinical disorders remains unclear. Substance use disorders are commonly characterized by elevated impulsivity, and impulsivity subtypes may show commonalities and differences in various conditions. We hypothesized that obese subjects with binge eating disorder (BED) and abstinent alcohol-dependent cohorts would have relatively more impulsive profiles compared to obese subjects without BED. We also predicted decision impulsivity impairment in obesity with and without BED. Methods Thirty obese subjects with BED, 30 without BED and 30 abstinent alcohol-dependent subjects and age- and gender-matched controls were tested on delay discounting (preference for a smaller immediate reward over a larger delayed reward), reflection impulsivity (rapid decision making prior to evidence accumulation) and motor response inhibition (action cancellation of a prepotent response). Results All three groups had greater delay discounting relative to healthy volunteers. Both Obese subjects without BED and alcohol dependent subjects had impaired motor response inhibition. Only Obese subjects without BED had impaired integration of available information to optimize outcomes over later trials with a cost condition. Conclusions Delay discounting appears to be a common core impairment across disorders of food and drug intake. Unexpectedly, obese subjects without BED showed greater impulsivity than obese subjects with BED. We highlight the dissociability and heterogeneity of impulsivity subtypes and add to the understanding of neurocognitive profiles across disorders involving food and drugs. Our results have therapeutic implications suggesting that disorder-specific patterns of impulsivity could be targeted. PMID:25118940

  20. Impulsive phase transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Bely-Dubau, Francoise; Brown, John C.; Dulk, George A.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Enome, Shinzo; Gabriel, Alan H.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Melrose, Donald; Neidig, Donald F.

    1986-01-01

    The transport of nonthermal electrons is explored. The thick-target electron beam model, in which electrons are presumed to be accelerated in the corona and typically thermalized primarily in the chromosphere and photosphere, is supported by observations throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. At the highest energies, the anisotropy of gamma-ray emission above 10 MeV clearly indicates that these photons are emitted by anisotropically-directed particles. The timing of this high-energy gamma-radiation with respect to lower-energy hard X-radiation implies that the energetic particles have short life-times. For collisional energy loss, this means that they are stopped in the chromosphere or below. Stereoscopic (two-spacecraft) observations at hard X-ray energies (up to 350 keV) imply that these lower-energy (but certainly nonthermal) electrons are also stopped deep in the chromosphere. Hard X-ray images show that, in spatially resolved flares whose radiation consists of impulsive bursts, the impulsive phase starts with X-radiation that comes mostly from the foot-points of coronal loops whose coronal component is outlined by microwaves.

  1. A Coupled Experiment-finite Element Modeling Methodology for Assessing High Strain Rate Mechanical Response of Soft Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Rajkumar; Whittington, Wilburn R; Patnaik, Sourav S; Mao, Yuxiong; Begonia, Mark T; Williams, Lakiesha N; Liao, Jun; Horstemeyer, M F

    2015-01-01

    This study offers a combined experimental and finite element (FE) simulation approach for examining the mechanical behavior of soft biomaterials (e.g. brain, liver, tendon, fat, etc.) when exposed to high strain rates. This study utilized a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) to generate strain rates of 100-1,500 sec(-1). The SHPB employed a striker bar consisting of a viscoelastic material (polycarbonate). A sample of the biomaterial was obtained shortly postmortem and prepared for SHPB testing. The specimen was interposed between the incident and transmitted bars, and the pneumatic components of the SHPB were activated to drive the striker bar toward the incident bar. The resulting impact generated a compressive stress wave (i.e. incident wave) that traveled through the incident bar. When the compressive stress wave reached the end of the incident bar, a portion continued forward through the sample and transmitted bar (i.e. transmitted wave) while another portion reversed through the incident bar as a tensile wave (i.e. reflected wave). These waves were measured using strain gages mounted on the incident and transmitted bars. The true stress-strain behavior of the sample was determined from equations based on wave propagation and dynamic force equilibrium. The experimental stress-strain response was three dimensional in nature because the specimen bulged. As such, the hydrostatic stress (first invariant) was used to generate the stress-strain response. In order to extract the uniaxial (one-dimensional) mechanical response of the tissue, an iterative coupled optimization was performed using experimental results and Finite Element Analysis (FEA), which contained an Internal State Variable (ISV) material model used for the tissue. The ISV material model used in the FE simulations of the experimental setup was iteratively calibrated (i.e. optimized) to the experimental data such that the experiment and FEA strain gage values and first invariant of stresses were in

  2. Finite Element Simulation of the Atmosphere's Electromagnetic Response to Charge Perturbations Associated with Lightning.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginski, Michael Edward

    Middle atmospheric (altitudes ~ 30-50 km) transient electromagnetic fields generated by lightning-induced charge perturbations are investigated via a simulation of the complete set of Maxwell's equations. A time domain finite element analysis is employed for the simulations. The atmosphere is modeled as a region contained within a right circular cylinder with a height of 80 km and radius of 60 km. All electromagnetic parameters are set equal to their free space value with the exception of the conductivity. Three altitude-varying conductivities, a simple exponential (sigma = sigma _{rm o}exp(z/6000)), the Gish model, and a profile based on measured data are used. The simulation's charge perturbations are designed to temporally and spatially approximate the rearrangement of charge following lightning. Previous investigations of this phenomenon have usually assumed a conservative electric field and, as a consequence, constrained the electric field to decay exponentially in time (nablatimes E = -mu_{rm o}partial H/partialt = 0, E ~ exp(-{rm t}sigma /varepsilon)). The present study simulates field behavior that is in good agreement with data. This simulated behavior is not possible if a conservative electric field restriction is enacted. A concatenation of the simulated electric field signatures is included.

  3. Light and thermal responses of liquid-crystal-network films: A finite element study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hayoung; Choi, Joonmyung; Yun, Jung-Hoon; Cho, Maenghyo

    2015-04-01

    As a polymeric system incorporating rigid molecules within its structure, the liquid-crystal network (LCN) has been envisaged as a novel heterogeneous material. Under the influence of external stimuli, the orientational order of the liquid-crystalline phase becomes dilute and overall anisotropy is hence decreased; the actinic light absorbed by photochromic molecules, for example, induces the geometric isomerization and subsequently yields internal stress within the local network. In this study we investigate light- and temperature-induced spontaneous deformations of the LCN structure via a three-dimensional finite element model that incorporates geometric nonlinearity with a photomechanical constitutive model. We first examine the bending behavior and its nonlinearity and then parametrically study the various behaviors that stem from different origins ranging from the microscale to the macroscale: (i) the geometry of the LCN film, (ii) the macroscopic global order, (iii) the distorted mesogenic orientation due to the Fredericks distortion, and (iv) defect-induced instability. These interrelated behaviors demonstrate both the simulation capability and the necessity of the presenting framework. By employing a nonlinear consideration along with a microscopic shape parameter r the present approach facilitates further understanding of photomechanical physics such as the deconvolution of various stimuli and the deformed shape obtained due to snap-through instability. Furthermore, this study may offer insight into the design of light-sensitive actuation systems by deepening our knowledge and providing an efficient measure.

  4. Active control of the forced and transient response of a finite beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Structural vibrations from a point force are modelled on a finite beam. This research explores the theoretical limit on controlling beam vibrations utilizing another point source as an active controller. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. For harmonic excitation, control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam. Control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the required interval, is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. The form of the controller is specified as either one or two delayed pulses, thus constraining the controller to be casual. The best possible control is examined while varying the region of control and the controller location. It is found that control is always possible using either one or two control pulses.

  5. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model. PMID:26723661

  6. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Pérez, Marco E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Ayers, Paul W. E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Gázquez, José L. E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx; Vela, Alberto E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca E-mail: avela@cinvestav.mx

    2015-12-28

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model.

  7. Impulsivity and alcohol consumption in young social drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Henges, Amy L.; Marczinski, Cecile A.

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity may have different facets that contribute to drinking patterns in young people. This research examined how aspects of impulse control, especially the ability to inhibit a response, predicted recent alcohol use patterns in young social drinkers. Participants (N = 109) between the ages of 18 and 21 performed a cued go/no-go task that required quick responses to go targets and the inhibition of responses to no-go targets. Participants also completed several questionnaires that assessed drinking habits (TLFB) and self-reported impulsivity (BIS-11). Regression analyses revealed that both the impulsivity questionnaire scores and the inhibitory failures observed on the behavioral task predicted various aspects of recent drinking. However, only the inhibitory failures from the behavioral task, and not the impulsivity questionnaire scores, predicted the highest number of drinks consumed on one occasion during the past month. These findings are consistent with the notion that impulsivity may have different components that may be contributing the drinking patterns, and this research suggests that the inability to withhold a response is a strong predictor of the binge use of alcohol. PMID:21981824

  8. Targeting the finite-deformation response of wavy biological tissues with bio-inspired material architectures.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqiong; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    The Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm driven by a homogenized-based model is employed to target the response of three types of heart-valve chordae tendineae with different stiffening characteristics due to different degrees of waviness of collagen fibril/fiber bundles. First, geometric and material parameters are identified through an extensive parametric study that produce excellent agreement of the simulated response based on simplified unit cell architectures with the actual response of the complex biological tissue. These include amplitude and wavelength of the crimped chordae microstructure, elastic moduli of the constituent phases, and degree of microstructural refinement of the stiff phase at fixed volume fraction whose role in the stiffening response is elucidated. The study also reveals potential non-uniqueness of bio-inspired wavy microstructures in attaining the targeted response of certain chordae tendineae crimp configurations. The homogenization-based Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm, whose predictions are validated through the parametric study, is then shown to be an excellent tool in identifying optimal unit cell architectures in the design space that exhibits very steep gradients. Finally, defect criticality of optimal unit cell architectures is investigated in order to assess their feasibility in replacing actual biological tendons with stiffening characteristics. PMID:24018396

  9. Teaching about Impulse and Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Bill

    2004-01-01

    This American Association of Physics Teachers/Physics Teaching Resource Agents (APPT/PTRA) spiral-bound manual features labs and demos physics teachers can use to give students hands-on opportunities to learn about impulse and momentum. "Make-and-take activities" include AAPT Apparatus Contest winners "An Air Impulse Rocket," "A Fan Driven…

  10. The generalized Kadanoff-Baym ansatz. Computing nonlinear response properties of finite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzer, K.; Hermanns, S.; Bonitz, M.

    2013-03-01

    For a minimal Hubbard-type system at different interaction strengths U, we investigate the density-response for an excitation beyond the linear regime using the generalized Kadanoff-Baym ansatz (GKBA) and the second Born (2B) approximation. We find strong correlation features in the response spectra and establish the connection to an involved double excitation process. By comparing approximate and exact Green's function results, we also observe an anomalous U-dependence of the energy of this double excitation in 2B+GKBA. This is in accordance with earlier findings [K. Balzer et al., EPL 98, 67002 (2012)] on double excitations in quantum wells.

  11. Development of a Finite Element Model of the Human Shoulder to Investigate the Mechanical Responses and Injuries in Side Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Masami; Miki, Kazuo; Yang, King H.

    Previous studies in both fields of automotive safety and orthopedic surgery have hypothesized that immobilization of the shoulder caused by the shoulder injury could be related to multiple rib fractures, which are frequently life threatening. Therefore, for more effective occupant protection, it is important to understand the relationship between shoulder injury and multiple rib fractures in side impact. The purpose of this study is to develop a finite element model of the human shoulder in order to understand this relationship. The shoulder model included three bones (the humerus, scapula and clavicle) and major ligaments and muscles around the shoulder. The model also included approaches to represent bone fractures and joint dislocations. The relationships between shoulder injury and immobilization of the shoulder are discussed using model responses for lateral shoulder impact. It is also discussed how the injury can be related to multiple rib fractures.

  12. Nonsputtering impulse magnetron discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Khodachenko, G. V.; Mozgrin, D. V.; Fetisov, I. K.; Stepanova, T. V.

    2012-01-15

    Experiments with quasi-steady high-current discharges in crossed E Multiplication-Sign B fields in various gases (Ar, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and SF{sub 6}) and gas mixtures (Ar/SF{sub 6} and Ar/O{sub 2}) at pressures from 10{sup -3} to 5 Torr in discharge systems with different configurations of electric and magnetic fields revealed a specific type of stable low-voltage discharge that does not transform into an arc. This type of discharge came to be known as a high-current diffuse discharge and, later, a nonsputtering impulse magnetron discharge. This paper presents results from experimental studies of the plasma parameters (the electron temperature, the plasma density, and the temperature of ions and atoms of the plasma-forming gas) of a high-current low-pressure diffuse discharge in crossed E Multiplication-Sign B fields.

  13. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may provide insight into new treatment options that target elevated impulsivity and psychopathologies such as addictions. PMID:25431750

  14. Deformation and fracture of impulsively loaded sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadley, H. N. G.; Børvik, T.; Olovsson, L.; Wetzel, J. J.; Dharmasena, K. P.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Deshpande, V. S.; Hutchinson, J. W.

    2013-02-01

    Light metal sandwich panel structures with cellular cores have attracted interest for multifunctional applications which exploit their high bend strength and impact energy absorption. This concept has been explored here using a model 6061-T6 aluminum alloy system fabricated by friction stir weld joining extruded sandwich panels with a triangular corrugated core. Micro-hardness and miniature tensile coupon testing revealed that friction stir welding reduced the strength and ductility in the welds and a narrow heat affected zone on either side of the weld by approximately 30%. Square, edge clamped sandwich panels and solid plates of equal mass per unit area were subjected to localized impulsive loading by the impact of explosively accelerated, water saturated, sand shells. The hydrodynamic load and impulse applied by the sand were gradually increased by reducing the stand-off distance between the test charge and panel surfaces. The sandwich panels suffered global bending and stretching, and localized core crushing. As the pressure applied by the sand increased, face sheet fracture by a combination of tensile stretching and shear-off occurred first at the two clamped edges of the panels that were parallel with the corrugation and weld direction. The plane of these fractures always lay within the heat affected zone of the longitudinal welds. For the most intensively loaded panels additional cracks occurred at the other clamped boundaries and in the center of the panel. To investigate the dynamic deformation and fracture processes, a particle-based method has been used to simulate the impulsive loading of the panels. This has been combined with a finite element analysis utilizing a modified Johnson-Cook constitutive relation and a Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion that accounted for local variation in material properties. The fully coupled simulation approach enabled the relationships between the soil-explosive test charge design, panel geometry, spatially varying

  15. Structural Responses and Finite Element Modeling of Hakka Tulou Rammed Earth Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sranislawski, Daniel

    Hakka Tulous are rammed earth structures that have survived the effects of aging and natural elements upwards of even over a thousand years. These structures have housed the Hakka people of the Fujian Province, China in natural yet modern housing that has provided benefits over newer building materials. The key building material, rammed earth, which is used for the walls of the Hakka Tulou structures, has provided structural stability along with thermal comfort to the respective inhabitants of the Hakka Tulous. Through material testing and analysis this study has examined how the Tulou structures have maintained their structural stability while also providing thermal comfort. Reports of self healing cracks in the rammed earth walls were also analyzed for their validity in this study. The study has found that although the story of the self healing crack cannot be validated, there is reason to believe that with the existence of lime, some type of autogenous healing could occur on a small scale. The study has also found, through the use of nondestructive testing, that both the internal wooden systems (flooring, roof, and column support) and the rammed earth walls, are still structurally sound. Also, rammed earth's high thermal mass along with the use of sufficient shading has allowed for a delay release of heat energy from the walls of the Tulous, thus providing thermal comfort that can be felt during both night and day temperatures. The Hakka Tulou structures have been found to resist destruction from natural disasters such as strong earthquakes even when more modern construction has not. Through finite element modeling, this study has shown that the high volume of rammed earth used in the construction of the Hakka Tulous helps dissipate lateral force energy into much lower stresses for the rammed earth wall. This absorption of lateral force energy allows the rammed earth structures to survive even the strongest of earthquakes experienced in the region. The Hakka

  16. Active Control of the Forced and Transient Response of a Finite Beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John Theodore

    1989-01-01

    When studying structural vibrations resulting from a concentrated source, many structures may be modelled as a finite beam excited by a point source. The theoretical limit on cancelling the resulting beam vibrations by utilizing another point source as an active controller is explored. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. In each case, a cost function is defined and minimized for numerous parameter variations. For the case of harmonic excitation, the cost function is obtained by integrating the mean squared displacement over a region of the beam in which control is desired. A controller is then found to minimize this cost function in the control interval. The control interval and controller location are continuously varied for several frequencies of excitation. The results show that control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam, but control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, the cost function is realized by integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the interval of the beam in which control is desired. This is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. A cost function representative of the beam vibration is obtained by integrating the transient displacement squared over a region of the beam and over all time. The form of the controller is chosen a priori as either one or two delayed pulses. Delays

  17. Validation of Shoulder Response of Human Body Finite-Element Model (GHBMC) Under Whole Body Lateral Impact Condition.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwansik; Kim, Taewung; Panzer, Matthew B; Crandall, Jeff R

    2016-08-01

    In previous shoulder impact studies, the 50th-percentile male GHBMC human body finite-element model was shown to have good biofidelity regarding impact force, but under-predicted shoulder deflection by 80% compared to those observed in the experiment. The goal of this study was to validate the response of the GHBMC M50 model by focusing on three-dimensional shoulder kinematics under a whole-body lateral impact condition. Five modifications, focused on material properties and modeling techniques, were introduced into the model and a supplementary sensitivity analysis was done to determine the influence of each modification to the biomechanical response of the body. The modified model predicted substantially improved shoulder response and peak shoulder deflection within 10% of the observed experimental data, and showed good correlation in the scapula kinematics on sagittal and transverse planes. The improvement in the biofidelity of the shoulder region was mainly due to the modifications of material properties of muscle, the acromioclavicular joint, and the attachment region between the pectoralis major and ribs. Predictions of rib fracture and chest deflection were also improved because of these modifications. PMID:26753830

  18. Effects of the tensor force on the multipole response in finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Ligang; Colo, G.; Sagawa, H.; Bortignon, P. F.; Sciacchitano, L.

    2009-12-15

    We present a thorough analysis of the effects of tensor interaction on the multipole response of magic nuclei, using the fully self-consistent random phase approximation model with Skyrme interactions. We disentangle the modifications to the static mean field induced by the tensor terms, and the specific features of the residual particle-hole (p-h) tensor interaction, for quadrupole (2{sup +}), octupole (3{sup -}), and also magnetic dipole (1{sup +}) responses. It is pointed out that the tensor force has a larger effect on the magnetic dipole states than on the natural parity states 2{sup +} and 3{sup -}, especially at the mean-field level. Perspectives for a better assessment of the tensor force parameters are discussed.

  19. The rate dependent response of a bistable chain at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benichou, Itamar; Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K.; Givli, Sefi

    2016-10-01

    We study the rate dependent response of a bistable chain subjected to thermal fluctuations. The study is motivated by the fact that the behavior of this model system is prototypical to a wide range of nonlinear processes in materials physics, biology and chemistry. To account for the stochastic nature of the system response, we formulate a set of governing equations for the evolution of the probability density of meta-stable configurations. Based on this approach, we calculate the behavior for a wide range of parametric values, such as rate, temperature, overall stiffness, and number of elements in the chain. Our results suggest that fundamental characteristics of the response, such as average transition stress and hysteresis, can be captured by a simple law which folds the influence of all these factors into a single non-dimensional quantity. We also show that the applicability of analytical results previously obtained for single-well systems can be extended to systems having multiple wells by proper definition of rate and of the transition stress.

  20. Dynamical Spatially Resolved Response Function of Finite 1-D Nano Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitza, Thomas; Reinholz, Heidi; Röpke, Gerd

    2011-03-01

    The dynamical response of one dimensional chains containing 55 till 309 atoms is investigated using a restricted molecular dynamics simulation scheme. The total momentum correlation function of an electron cloud shows resonances that are related to different collective excitation modes of the nano plasma. Spatially resolved cross correlation functions are calculated to deduce the spatial structure and strength of these resonance modes. The dependence of the corresponding resonance frequencies on temperature, density and chain size is investigated. The width of the resonances is analyzed in terms of a mode dependent collision frequency.

  1. Head and brain response to blast using sagittal and transverse finite element models.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dilaver; Cronin, Duane S; Haladuick, Tyler N

    2014-04-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury caused by blast exposure from Improvised Explosive Devices has become increasingly prevalent in modern conflicts. To investigate head kinematics and brain tissue response in blast scenarios, two solid hexahedral blast-head models were developed in the sagittal and transverse planes. The models were coupled to an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian model of the surrounding air to model blast-head interaction, for three blast load cases (5 kg C4 at 3, 3.5 and 4 m). The models were validated using experimental kinematic data, where predicted accelerations were in good agreement with experimental tests, and intracranial pressure traces at four locations in the brain, where the models provided good predictions for frontal, temporal and parietal, but underpredicted pressures at the occipital location. Brain tissue response was investigated for the wide range of constitutive properties available. The models predicted relatively low peak principal brain tissue strains from 0.035 to 0.087; however, strain rates ranged from 225 to 571 s-1. Importantly, these models have allowed us to quantify expected strains and strain rates experienced in brain tissue, which can be used to guide future material characterization. These computationally efficient and predictive models can be used to evaluate protection and mitigation strategies in future analysis. PMID:24293124

  2. Dopamine Gene Profiling to Predict Impulse Control and Effects of Dopamine Agonist Ropinirole.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Hayley J; Stinear, Cathy M; Ren, April; Coxon, James P; Kao, Justin; Macdonald, Lorraine; Snow, Barry; Cramer, Steven C; Byblow, Winston D

    2016-07-01

    Dopamine agonists can impair inhibitory control and cause impulse control disorders for those with Parkinson disease (PD), although mechanistically this is not well understood. In this study, we hypothesized that the extent of such drug effects on impulse control is related to specific dopamine gene polymorphisms. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study aimed to examine the effect of single doses of 0.5 and 1.0 mg of the dopamine agonist ropinirole on impulse control in healthy adults of typical age for PD onset. Impulse control was measured by stop signal RT on a response inhibition task and by an index of impulsive decision-making on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task. A dopamine genetic risk score quantified basal dopamine neurotransmission from the influence of five genes: catechol-O-methyltransferase, dopamine transporter, and those encoding receptors D1, D2, and D3. With placebo, impulse control was better for the high versus low genetic risk score groups. Ropinirole modulated impulse control in a manner dependent on genetic risk score. For the lower score group, both doses improved response inhibition (decreased stop signal RT) whereas the lower dose reduced impulsiveness in decision-making. Conversely, the higher score group showed a trend for worsened response inhibition on the lower dose whereas both doses increased impulsiveness in decision-making. The implications of the present findings are that genotyping can be used to predict impulse control and whether it will improve or worsen with the administration of dopamine agonists. PMID:26942320

  3. Wave spectral response to sudden changes in wind direction in finite-depth waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aijaz, Saima; Rogers, W. Erick; Babanin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The response of a wind-sea spectrum to sudden changes in wind directions of 180° and 90° is investigated. Numerical simulations using the third-generation wave spectral model SWAN have been undertaken at micro timescales of 30 s and fine spatial resolution of less than 10 m. The results have been validated against the wave data collected during the field campaign at Lake George, Australia. The newly implemented 'ST6' physics in the SWAN model has been evaluated using a selection of bottom-friction terms and the two available functions for the nonlinear energy transfer: (1) exact solution of the nonlinear term (XNL), and (2) discrete interactions approximation (DIA) that parameterizes the nonlinear term. Good agreement of the modelled data is demonstrated directly with the field data and through the known experimental growth curves obtained from the extensive Lake George data set. The modelling results show that of the various combinations of models tested, the ST6/XNL model provides the most reliable computations of integral and spectral wave parameters. When the winds and waves are opposing (180° wind turn), the XNL is nearly twice as fast in the aligning the young wind-sea with the new wind direction than the DIA. In this case, the young wind-sea gradually decouples from the old waves and forms a new secondary peak. Unlike the 180° wind turn, there is no decoupling in the 90° wind turn and the entire spectrum rotates smoothly in the new direction. In both cases, the young wind-sea starts developing in the new wind direction within 10 min of the wind turn for the ST6 while the directional response of the default physics lags behind with a response time that is nearly double of ST6. The modelling results highlight the differences in source term balance among the different models in SWAN. During high wind speeds, the default settings provide a larger contribution from the bottom-friction dissipation than the whitecapping. In contrast, the whitecapping

  4. Effect of clenching on biomechanical response of human mandible and temporomandibular joint to traumatic force analyzed by finite element method

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sugiura, Tsutomu; Kawakami, Masayoshi; Kang, Yu B.; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to analyze the effect of clenching on the biomechanical response of human mandible and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) to traumatic force by the finite element (FE) method. Material and Methods: FE models of the mandible and the TMJ in resting and clenching positions were prepared. Distribution and magnitude of von Mises stress were analyzed by applying force as a point load in the symphyseal, canine, body and angle regions of the mandible. In addition, strain energy density (SED) at the articular disc and in posterior connective tissue of TMJ was analyzed. Results: In the resting position, von Mises stress was mainly concentrated at the condylar neck and in the retromolar region of the mandible. In the clenching position, the stress at the condylar neck decreased in all loadings. The stress in the retromolar region similary decreased in the symphyseal, canine and body loading, respectively; however, higher stress was observed in the retromolar region on the loading side in the angle loading. High SED was generated at the articular disc and in posterior connective tissues of TMJ in the resting position. The SED in these tissues decreased in all loadings in the clenching position. Conclusions: Clenching generally reduces stress at the condylar neck and in the retromolar region of the mandible, and strain energy at the articular disc and in posterior connective tissue of TMJ by traumatic forces on the mandible; however, clenching induces greater stress in the retromolar region on the loading side by traumatic force to the angle region. Key words:Mandibular, temporomandibular joint, traumatic force, clenching, finite element analysis. PMID:23524422

  5. Eyes Wide Shopped: Shopping Situations Trigger Arousal in Impulsive Buyers

    PubMed Central

    Serfas, Benjamin G.; Büttner, Oliver B.; Florack, Arnd

    2014-01-01

    The present study proposes arousal as an important mechanism driving buying impulsiveness. We examined the effect of buying impulsiveness on arousal in non-shopping and shopping contexts. In an eye-tracking experiment, we measured pupil dilation while participants viewed and rated pictures of shopping scenes and non-shopping scenes. The results demonstrated that buying impulsiveness is closely associated with arousal as response to viewing pictures of shopping scenes. This pertained for hedonic shopping situations as well as for utilitarian shopping situations. Importantly, the effect did not emerge for non-shopping scenes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that arousal of impulsive buyers is independent from cognitive evaluation of scenes in the pictures. PMID:25489955

  6. Eyes wide shopped: shopping situations trigger arousal in impulsive buyers.

    PubMed

    Serfas, Benjamin G; Büttner, Oliver B; Florack, Arnd

    2014-01-01

    The present study proposes arousal as an important mechanism driving buying impulsiveness. We examined the effect of buying impulsiveness on arousal in non-shopping and shopping contexts. In an eye-tracking experiment, we measured pupil dilation while participants viewed and rated pictures of shopping scenes and non-shopping scenes. The results demonstrated that buying impulsiveness is closely associated with arousal as response to viewing pictures of shopping scenes. This pertained for hedonic shopping situations as well as for utilitarian shopping situations. Importantly, the effect did not emerge for non-shopping scenes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that arousal of impulsive buyers is independent from cognitive evaluation of scenes in the pictures. PMID:25489955

  7. A cell-centered Lagrangian finite volume approach for computing elasto-plastic response of solids in cylindrical axisymmetric geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar; Shashkov, Mikhail J.; Burton, Donald E.

    2013-03-01

    A finite volume cell-centered Lagrangian formulation is presented for solving large deformation problems in cylindrical axisymmetric geometries. Since solid materials can sustain significant shear deformation, evolution equations for stress and strain fields are solved in addition to mass, momentum and energy conservation laws. The total strain-rate realized in the material is split into an elastic and plastic response. The elastic and plastic components in turn are modeled using hypo-elastic theory. In accordance with the hypo-elastic model, a predictor-corrector algorithm is employed for evolving the deviatoric component of the stress tensor. A trial elastic deviatoric stress state is obtained by integrating a rate equation, cast in the form of an objective (Jaumann) derivative, based on Hooke's law. The dilatational response of the material is modeled using an equation of state of the Mie-Grüneisen form. The plastic deformation is accounted for via an iterative radial return algorithm constructed from the J2 von Mises yield condition. Several benchmark example problems with non-linear strain hardening and thermal softening yield models are presented. Extensive comparisons with representative Eulerian and Lagrangian hydrocodes in addition to analytical and experimental results are made to validate the current approach.

  8. Finite element modeling of the dynamic response of a composite reinforced concrete bridge for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanjani Zadeh, V.; Patnaik, A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) modeling of a composite steel stinger supported reinforced concrete (RC) deck highway bridge subjected to moving truck loads. FE models were validated using test data that were generated elsewhere for structural health monitoring. The FE models were established using a commercial FE analysis package called ABAQUS/standard. The case study bridge was discretized to a combination of shell and solid elements which represent the deck and piers, respectively. Numerous constrain interactions were defined to make the model suitable to obtain accurate results. Moving loads induced by two standard AASHTO trucks were developed through a specific load-time history, applied on 35 nodes on the superstructure. To study the dynamic behavior of the bridge under a moving load, a modal analysis followed by an implicit dynamic analysis was carried out. Acceptable agreement was found between the field measurements and FE simulation. Most concerned dynamic response was strains at different locations in bridge girders and columns, because it is the only critical parameter that can be measured with confidence during SHM at site. The range of strains determined in analysis was reasonably close to the measured strains at the site of the study bridge. Several parameters including damping, truck weight and speed, and material properties were studied. Truck speed had the highest effect on strain response of both girders and columns.

  9. Does impulsivity predict outcome in treatment for binge eating disorder? A multimodal investigation.

    PubMed

    Manasse, Stephanie M; Espel, Hallie M; Schumacher, Leah M; Kerrigan, Stephanie G; Zhang, Fengqing; Forman, Evan M; Juarascio, Adrienne S

    2016-10-01

    Multiple dimensions of impulsivity (e.g., affect-driven impulsivity, impulsive inhibition - both general and food-specific, and impulsive decision-making) are associated with binge eating pathology cross-sectionally, yet the literature on whether impulsivity predicts treatment outcome is limited. The present pilot study explored impulsivity-related predictors of 20-week outcome in a small open trial (n = 17) of a novel treatment for binge eating disorder. Overall, dimensions of impulsivity related to emotions (i.e., negative urgency) and food cues emerged as predictors of treatment outcomes (i.e., binge eating frequency and global eating pathology as measured by the Eating Disorders Examination), while more general measures of impulsivity were statistically unrelated to global eating pathology or binge frequency. Specifically, those with higher levels of negative urgency at baseline experienced slower and less pronounced benefit from treatment, and those with higher food-specific impulsivity had more severe global eating pathology at baseline that was consistent at post-treatment and follow-up. These preliminary findings suggest that patients high in negative urgency and with poor response inhibition to food cues may benefit from augmentation of existing treatments to achieve optimal outcomes. Future research will benefit from replication with a larger sample, parsing out the role of different dimensions of impulsivity in treatment outcome for eating disorders, and identifying how treatment can be improved to accommodate higher levels of baseline impulsivity. PMID:27230611

  10. Executive (Dys)Functioning and Impulsivity as Possible Vulnerability Factors for Aggression in Forensic Patients.

    PubMed

    Tonnaer, Franca; Cima, Maaike; Arntz, Arnoud

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated whether executive dysfunction and impulsivity are both predictors of reactive aggression and is the first to use behavioral assessment of aggression in response to provocation by means of a personalized boxing body opponent bag giving harassing feedback. Aggressive behavior, self-reported aggression, executive functioning (ie, working memory, flexibility, and divided attention), and impulsivity dimensions (i.e., Sensation Seeking, Impulsive Decision Making, and [inadequate] Response Inhibition) were measured in 44 incarcerated psychiatric patients. Results show that both executive functioning (working memory) and impulsivity (Impulsive Decision Making) predicted self-reported reactive aggression, whereas Response Inhibition was the only predictor for reactive aggressive behavioral responses. The study suggests that Response Inhibition is a stronger predictor of reactive aggressive behavior than executive capacities of working memory, flexibility, and divided attention. Therefore, future research should investigate whether (inadequate) Response Inhibition could also be a valuable predictor for violent recidivism. PMID:26894312

  11. Impulsivity and overeating in children in the absence and presence of hunger.

    PubMed

    Nederkoorn, Chantal; Dassen, Fania C M; Franken, Loes; Resch, Christine; Houben, Katrijn

    2015-10-01

    Overweight children appear to be more responsive to environmental, hedonic cues and easily overeat in the current obesogenic environment. They are also found to overeat in the absence of hunger, and this overeating seems related to impulsivity: impulsive participants are more prone to external eating. However, some studies showed that impulsive adults are also more prone to hunger cues: impulsive participants overate especially when feeling hungry. This would mean impulsive people are more reactive to both external and internal cues. The overeating was limited to palatable high energy-dense foods: hunger made them fancy a snack. In the current study, we wanted to test the interaction between impulsivity, hunger and consumption of food type in children. Impulsivity was measured in 88 children between the ages of 7 and 9. Next, half of the participants performed a taste test before their own regular lunch and half of the participants immediately after their lunch. During the taste test, low, medium and high energy-dense food items were presented. Results showed that impulsive children ate more high energy-dense foods than low impulsive children, both before and after their lunch. No differences were found on low or medium energy-dense foods. Impulsive children therefore showed normal sensitivity for internal hunger and satiety cues, but abnormal response to high energy-dense foods. This might render them vulnerable to tasty temptation in the environment and to weight gain in their future. PMID:25841646

  12. Cognitive impulsivity in specific learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Donfrancesco, Renato; Mugnaini, Daniele; Dell'Uomo, Andrea

    2005-08-01

    Many studies on cognitive impulsivity in learning disabled children have been criticized for their methodological limitations, and they have not dealt with the different types of learning disability. The aim of this study was to overcome these limitations and to assess if there was a significant cognitive impulsivity in reading disorder and/or spelling disorder by using the 20-item Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFF20). A total of 110 children (second through eighth grades) were recruited from a cohort of children assessed for the first time in a National Health clinic specialized in the study of specific learning disabilities. In all, 30 dyslexic children and 25 children with spelling disorder (all children without an ADHD comorbidity) were compared with 55 children of a control group on the MMF20 (accuracy and time latency). Results showed that the children with reading disorder were less accurate than the children with spelling disability (p<0.05). Both these groups performed less accurately than the control group. Subjects with dyslexia were faster than both the other groups in response time (p<0.05), clearly showing a significantly higher cognitive impulsivity than the other groups. Hence, data seem to confirm the idea that, similar to ADHD children, dyslexic children have impaired frontal/prefrontal functions. Clinical and treatment implications are discussed. PMID:15981139

  13. Cigarette Cravings, Impulsivity, and the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, Stéphane; Tikàsz, Andràs; Dinh-Williams, Laurence Lê-Anh; Bourque, Josiane; Mendrek, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    Craving is a core feature of tobacco use disorder as well as a significant predictor of smoking relapse. Studies have shown that appetitive smoking-related stimuli (e.g., someone smoking) trigger significant cravings in smokers impede their self-control capacities and promote drug seeking behavior. In this review, we begin by an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies investigating the neural correlates of smokers to appetitive smoking cues. The literature reveals a complex and vastly distributed neuronal network underlying smokers’ craving response that recruits regions involved in self-referential processing, planning/regulatory processes, emotional responding, attentional biases, and automatic conducts. We then selectively review important factors contributing to the heterogeneity of results that significantly limit the implications of these findings, namely between- (abstinence, smoking expectancies, and self-regulation) and within-studies factors (severity of smoking dependence, sex-differences, motivation to quit, and genetic factors). Remarkably, we found that little to no attention has been devoted to examine the influence of personality traits on the neural correlates of cigarette cravings in fMRI studies. Impulsivity has been linked with craving and relapse in substance and tobacco use, which prompted our research team to examine the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings in an fMRI study. We found that the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings was mediated by fronto-cingulate mechanisms. Given the high prevalence of cigarette smoking in several psychiatric disorders that are characterized by significant levels of impulsivity, we conclude by identifying psychiatric patients as a target population whose tobacco-smoking habits deserve further behavioral and neuro-imaging investigation. PMID:26441686

  14. Cigarette Cravings, Impulsivity, and the Brain.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Stéphane; Tikàsz, Andràs; Dinh-Williams, Laurence Lê-Anh; Bourque, Josiane; Mendrek, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    Craving is a core feature of tobacco use disorder as well as a significant predictor of smoking relapse. Studies have shown that appetitive smoking-related stimuli (e.g., someone smoking) trigger significant cravings in smokers impede their self-control capacities and promote drug seeking behavior. In this review, we begin by an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies investigating the neural correlates of smokers to appetitive smoking cues. The literature reveals a complex and vastly distributed neuronal network underlying smokers' craving response that recruits regions involved in self-referential processing, planning/regulatory processes, emotional responding, attentional biases, and automatic conducts. We then selectively review important factors contributing to the heterogeneity of results that significantly limit the implications of these findings, namely between- (abstinence, smoking expectancies, and self-regulation) and within-studies factors (severity of smoking dependence, sex-differences, motivation to quit, and genetic factors). Remarkably, we found that little to no attention has been devoted to examine the influence of personality traits on the neural correlates of cigarette cravings in fMRI studies. Impulsivity has been linked with craving and relapse in substance and tobacco use, which prompted our research team to examine the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings in an fMRI study. We found that the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings was mediated by fronto-cingulate mechanisms. Given the high prevalence of cigarette smoking in several psychiatric disorders that are characterized by significant levels of impulsivity, we conclude by identifying psychiatric patients as a target population whose tobacco-smoking habits deserve further behavioral and neuro-imaging investigation. PMID:26441686

  15. Comparative Lightcraft Impulse Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Franklin B., Jr.; Larson, C. W.; Kalliomaa, Wayne M.

    2001-11-01

    The impulse coupling coefficients, cm, of two radically different laser propulsion thruster concepts (lightcrafts), each 10 cm in diameter, have been measured under equal conditions using two different test stands. Lightcraft one is of toroidal shape and was provided by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). A lightcraft of this shape and size has been used in free flight experiments at White Sands Missile Range, NM. Lightcraft two is bell (e.g., a paraboloid) shaped. With this type of lightcraft, the DLR previously conducted preliminary performance experiments, including vertical wire-bound flights in the laboratory. Both test stands were of the pendulum type. Test stand one was provided by the AFRL, and was a "rigid" pendulum, allowing motion in only one degree of freedom. The second test stand, a DLR design, suspended the lightcraft by thin wires and corresponded to a nearly perfect pendulum in the mathematical sense. All experiments employed the DLR electric-beam sustained, pulsed, CO(2) laser with pulse energies up to 400 J. The laser was operated with two configurations: 1) a stable resonator (flat beam profile); and, 2) an unstable resonator (ring shaped beam profile). All experiments were carried out in the open laboratory environment. Propellant, therefore, was either the surrounding air alone, or Delrin as an added solid propellant. For lightcraft one the cm value increased by a factor of three (450 N/MW) by adding Delrin. With lightcraft two, a comparable cm value of 590 N/MW was obtained. This corresponded to a Delrin loss of 60-SO ug/J. Results of cm as a function of the laser pulse energy for the various experimental conditions will be presented.

  16. Expansion and improvement of the FORMA system for response and load analysis. Volume 2C: Listings, finite element FORMA subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlen, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A listing of the source deck of each finite element FORMA subroutine is given to remove the 'black-box' aura of the subroutines so that the analyst may better understand the detailed operations of each subroutine. The FORTRAN 4 programming language is used in all finite element FORMA subroutines.

  17. Dopamine-agonists and impulsivity in Parkinson's disease: impulsive choices vs. impulsive actions.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Francesca; Ko, Ji Hyun; Miyasaki, Janis; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Valzania, Franco; Ray, Nicola J; Strafella, Antonio P

    2014-06-01

    The control of impulse behavior is a multidimensional concept subdivided into separate subcomponents, which are thought to represent different underlying mechanisms due to either disinhibitory processes or poor decision-making. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), dopamine-agonist (DA) therapy has been associated with increased impulsive behavior. However, the relationship among these different components in the disease and the role of DA is not well understood. In this imaging study, we investigated in PD patients the effects of DA medication on patterns of brain activation during tasks testing impulsive choices and actions. Following overnight withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication, PD patients were studied with a H2 ((15)) O PET before and after administration of DA (1 mg of pramipexole), while they were performing the delay discounting task (DDT) and the GoNoGo Task (GNG). We observed that pramipexole augmented impulsivity during DDT, depending on reward magnitude and activated the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and deactivated ventral striatum. In contrast, the effect of pramipexole during the GNG task was not significant on behavioral performance and involved different areas (i.e., lateral prefrontal cortex). A voxel-based correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between the discounting value (k) and the activation of medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate suggesting that more impulsive patients had less activation in those cortical areas. Here we report how these different subcomponents of inhibition/impulsivity are differentially sensitive to DA treatment with pramipexole influencing mainly the neural network underlying impulsive choices but not impulsive action. PMID:24038587

  18. Probing the Elastic-Plastic, Time-Dependant Response of Test Fasteners using Finite Element Analysis (FEA)

    SciTech Connect

    ML Renauld; H Lien

    2004-12-13

    The evolution of global and local stress/strain conditions in test fasteners under test conditions is investigated using elastic-plastic, time-dependent finite element analyses (FEA). For elastic-plastic response, tensile data from multiple specimens, material heats and test temperatures are integrated into a single, normalized flow curve from which temperature dependency is extracted. A primary creep model is calibrated with specimen- and fastener-based thermal relaxation data generated under a range of times, temperatures, stress levels and environments. These material inputs are used in analytical simulations of experimental test conditions for several types of fasteners. These fastener models are constructed with automated routines and contact conditions prescribed at all potentially mating surfaces. Thermal or mechanical room temperature pre-loading, as appropriate for a given fastener, is followed by a temperature ramp and a dwell time at constant temperature. While the amount of thermal stress relaxation is limited for the conditions modeled, local stress states are highly dependent upon geometry (thread root radius, for example), pre-loading history and thermal expansion differences between the test fastener and test fixture. Benefits of this FE approach over an elastic methodology for stress calculation will be illustrated with correlations of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) initiation time and crack orientations in stress concentrations.

  19. FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION FOR STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF U7MO DISPERSION FUEL PLATES VIA FLUID-THERMAL-STRUCTURAL INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hakan Ozaltun; Herman Shen; Pavel Madvedev

    2010-11-01

    This article presents numerical simulation of dispersion fuel mini plates via fluid–thermal–structural interaction performed by commercial finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics to identify initial mechanical response under actual operating conditions. Since fuel particles are dispersed in Aluminum matrix, and temperatures during the fabrication process reach to the melting temperature of the Aluminum matrix, stress/strain characteristics of the domain cannot be reproduced by using simplified models and assumptions. Therefore, fabrication induced stresses were considered and simulated via image based modeling techniques with the consideration of the high temperature material data. In order to identify the residuals over the U7Mo particles and the Aluminum matrix, a representative SEM image was employed to construct a microstructure based thermo-elasto-plastic FE model. Once residuals and plastic strains were identified in micro-scale, solution was used as initial condition for subsequent multiphysics simulations at the continuum level. Furthermore, since solid, thermal and fluid properties are temperature dependent and temperature field is a function of the velocity field of the coolant, coupled multiphysics simulations were considered. First, velocity and pressure fields of the coolant were computed via fluidstructural interaction. Computed solution for velocity fields were used to identify the temperature distribution on the coolant and on the fuel plate via fluid-thermal interaction. Finally, temperature fields and residual stresses were used to obtain the stress field of the plates via fluid-thermal-structural interaction.

  20. Use of instant messaging predicts self-report but not performance measures of inattention, impulsiveness, and distractibility.

    PubMed

    Levine, Laura E; Waite, Bradley M; Bowman, Laura L

    2013-12-01

    We examined how young adults' use of instant messaging, text messaging, and traditional reading related to their self-reported experience of distractibility and impulsiveness and to their performance on computerized tasks designed to assess inattention and impulsive responses to visual stimuli. Participants reported their media use and completed self-report measures of impulsiveness (i.e., the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale) and distractibility for academic reading. They also completed performance based measures of inattention and impulsiveness using the Tests of Variables of Attention (T.O.V.A.(®)). Results demonstrated that instant message use was significantly related to higher levels of attentional impulsiveness and distractibility on the self-report measures, while traditional reading consistently predicted lower levels of impulsiveness and distractibility. However, media use was not significantly related to the performance measures of inattention and behavioral impulsiveness. PMID:23952624

  1. Determination of acoustical transfer functions using an impulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, J.

    1985-02-01

    The Transfer Function of a system may be defined as the relationship of the output response to the input of a system. Whilst recent advances in digital processing systems have enabled Impulse Transfer Functions to be determined by computation of the Fast Fourier Transform, there has been little work done in applying these techniques to room acoustics. Acoustical Transfer Functions have been determined for auditoria, using an impulse method. The technique is based on the computation of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a non-ideal impulsive source, both at the source and at the receiver point. The Impulse Transfer Function (ITF) is obtained by dividing the FFT at the receiver position by the FFT of the source. This quantity is presented both as linear frequency scale plots and also as synthesized one-third octave band data. The technique enables a considerable quantity of data to be obtained from a small number of impulsive signals recorded in the field, thereby minimizing the time and effort required on site. As the characteristics of the source are taken into account in the calculation, the choice of impulsive source is non-critical. The digital analysis equipment required for the analysis is readily available commercially.

  2. Finite Element Modeling of the Magnetotelluric Phase Tensor Response to Evaluate Sensitivity to Lateral and Vertical Resistivity Contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, S.; McClain, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Phase tensor analysis of magnetotelluric data is a relatively new technique introduced by Caldwell et. al. (2004) and requires substantial research efforts to evaluate the capabilities of the method. We have conducted finite element (FE) modeling using the AC/DC module of Comsol Multiphysics to determine the effect of resistivity structure on the phase tensor response. Measurements are made at eleven frequencies from 10-104 Hz at points on a 5x5 grid above various simple model geometries. Phase tensor plotting methods are adapted from Booker (2013) and involve displaying data graphically as stacks of colored ellipses. This allows for interpretation across the frequency spectrum vertically as well as laterally between stations. Two types of plot are presented for each model, a "ϕmin plot" where the ellipses are colored according to the minimum principle phase and a "delta plot" where the ellipses are colored according to the difference between the principle phases (ϕmax - ϕmin), which provides a quantification of the phase anisotropy. Results suggest that the principle phases ϕmin and ϕmax are sensitive to vertical resistivity contrasts but not lateral resistivity contrasts. Conversely, delta plots reveal sensitivity to lateral resistivity contrasts but not vertical resistivity contrasts. A clear distance relationship is observed with proximity to the boundary controlling the frequency range that senses a lateral resistivity contrast. Rotation of the phase tensor ellipses and increased skew values occur in the presence of resistivity contrasts that strike nonparallel to the source field, with the effect increasing towards lower frequencies. The total phase tensor response is confirmed to be sensitive to both vertical and lateral resistivity contrasts and can be used effectively to interpret subsurface resistivity structure.

  3. Brain Response to Primary Blast Wave Using Validated Finite Element Models of Human Head and Advanced Combat Helmet

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liying; Makwana, Rahul; Sharma, Sumit

    2013-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has emerged as a “signature injury” in combat casualty care. Present combat helmets are designed primarily to protect against ballistic and blunt impacts, but the current issue with helmets is protection concerning blasts. In order to delineate the blast wave attenuating capability of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH), a finite element (FE) study was undertaken to evaluate the head response against blast loadings with and without helmet using a partially validated FE model of the human head and ACH. Four levels of overpressures (0.27–0.66 MPa) from the Bowen’s lung iso-damage threshold curves were used to simulate blast insults. Effectiveness of the helmet with respect to head orientation was also investigated. The resulting biomechanical responses of the brain to blast threats were compared for human head with and without the helmet. For all Bowen’s cases, the peak intracranial pressures (ICP) in the head ranged from 0.68 to 1.8 MPa in the coup cortical region. ACH was found to mitigate ICP in the head by 10–35%. Helmeted head resulted in 30% lower average peak brain strains and product of strain and strain rate. Among three blast loading directions with ACH, highest reduction in peak ICP (44%) was due to backward blasts whereas the lowest reduction in peak ICP and brain strains was due to forward blast (27%). The biomechanical responses of a human head to primary blast insult exhibited directional sensitivity owing to the different geometry contours and coverage of the helmet construction and asymmetric anatomy of the head. Thus, direction-specific tolerances are needed in helmet design in order to offer omni-directional protection for the human head. The blasts of varying peak overpressures and durations that are believed to produce the same level of lung injury produce different levels of mechanical responses in the brain, and hence “iso-damage” curves for brain injury are likely different than the Bowen

  4. Brain response to primary blast wave using validated finite element models of human head and advanced combat helmet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Makwana, Rahul; Sharma, Sumit

    2013-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has emerged as a "signature injury" in combat casualty care. Present combat helmets are designed primarily to protect against ballistic and blunt impacts, but the current issue with helmets is protection concerning blasts. In order to delineate the blast wave attenuating capability of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH), a finite element (FE) study was undertaken to evaluate the head response against blast loadings with and without helmet using a partially validated FE model of the human head and ACH. Four levels of overpressures (0.27-0.66 MPa) from the Bowen's lung iso-damage threshold curves were used to simulate blast insults. Effectiveness of the helmet with respect to head orientation was also investigated. The resulting biomechanical responses of the brain to blast threats were compared for human head with and without the helmet. For all Bowen's cases, the peak intracranial pressures (ICP) in the head ranged from 0.68 to 1.8 MPa in the coup cortical region. ACH was found to mitigate ICP in the head by 10-35%. Helmeted head resulted in 30% lower average peak brain strains and product of strain and strain rate. Among three blast loading directions with ACH, highest reduction in peak ICP (44%) was due to backward blasts whereas the lowest reduction in peak ICP and brain strains was due to forward blast (27%). The biomechanical responses of a human head to primary blast insult exhibited directional sensitivity owing to the different geometry contours and coverage of the helmet construction and asymmetric anatomy of the head. Thus, direction-specific tolerances are needed in helmet design in order to offer omni-directional protection for the human head. The blasts of varying peak overpressures and durations that are believed to produce the same level of lung injury produce different levels of mechanical responses in the brain, and hence "iso-damage" curves for brain injury are likely different than the Bowen curves for lung

  5. Comparison of finite-element predictions and experimental data for the forced response of the DOE 100-kW vertical-axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Sullivan, W.N.

    1983-01-01

    A specialized finite-element capability has been developed to predict dynamic structural response of the vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). This report is concerned with evaluating this finite-element analysis technique. To achieve this, several types of experimental data taken from the DOE 100-kW rotor are compared with predictions. These data include parked rotor natural frequencies, very low wind centrifugal and gravitational load response, and vibratory response from wind loads covering the rotor operational spectrum. Generally, the agreement between theory and experiment is very satisfactory. It is concluded that the analysis package is suitable for engineering design. Short-comings observed in modeling accuracy are believed to be due primarily to inadequacies in blade aerodynamic-load calculations.

  6. Comparison of finite element predictions and experimental data for the forced response of the DOE 100 kW vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Sullivan, W.N.

    1984-02-01

    A specialized finite element capability has been developed to predict dynamic structural response of the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). This report is concerned with evaluating this finite element analysis technique. To achieve this, several types of experimental data taken from the DOE 100 kW rotor are compared with predictions. These data include parked rotor natural frequencies, very low wind centrifugal and gravitational load response, and vibratory response from wind loads covering the rotor operational spectrum. Generally, the agreement between theory and experiment is very satisfactory. It is concluded that the analysis package is suitable for engineering design. Shortcomings observed in modeling accuracy are believed to be due primarily to inadequacies in blade aerodynamic load calculations.

  7. Thoracic response targets for a computational model: a hierarchical approach to assess the biofidelity of a 50th-percentile occupant male finite element model.

    PubMed

    Poulard, David; Kent, Richard W; Kindig, Matthew; Li, Zuoping; Subit, Damien

    2015-05-01

    Current finite element human thoracic models are typically evaluated against a limited set of loading conditions; this is believed to limit their capability to predict accurate responses. In this study, a 50th-percentile male finite element model (GHBMC v4.1) was assessed under various loading environments (antero-posterior rib bending, point loading of the denuded ribcage, omnidirectional pendulum impact and table top) through a correlation metric tool (CORA) based on linearly independent signals. The load cases were simulated with the GHBMC model and response corridors were developed from published experimental data. The model was found to be in close agreement with the experimental data both qualitatively and quantitatively (CORA ratings above 0.75) and the response of the thorax was overall deemed biofidelic. This study also provides relevant corridors and an objective rating framework that can be used for future evaluation of thoracic models. PMID:25681717

  8. Impulsivity is associated with the disinhibition but not restraint factor from the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Yeomans, Martin R; Leitch, Margaret; Mobini, Sirous

    2008-01-01

    Recent data implicate impulsivity as a personality trait associated with obesity, binge eating and restrained eating. However, impulsivity is recognised as having multiple dimensions, and it remains unclear which aspects of impulsive behaviour best predict disordered eating. To try and elucidate further the relationship between impulsivity and eating behaviour, 147 women completed a behavioural measure and two self-report measures of impulsivity along with the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ). Overall scores on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-II), along with scores on the Non-planning and Motor Subscales of the BIS-II, were higher in women scoring high on the TFEQ disinhibition (TFEQ-D) scale. Likewise, women scoring high on the TFEQ-D showed more impulsive choice when discounting hypothetical monetary awards. However, responses to measures of functional relative to dysfunctional impulsivity did not differ depending on TFEQ-D score. No measure of impulsivity was related to scores on the TFEQ restraint scale. These data suggest that a tendency to act impulsively is associated with a tendency to overeat, and may be a factor which predicts the likelihood of the development of binge eating and the breakdown of dieting. PMID:18069081

  9. Do Different Facets of Impulsivity Predict Different Types of Aggression?

    PubMed Central

    Derefinko, Karen; DeWall, C. Nathan; Metze, Amanda V.; Walsh, Erin C.; Lynam, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the relations between impulsivity-related traits (as assessed by the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale) and aggressive behaviors. Results indicated that UPPS-P Lack of Premeditation and Sensation Seeking were important in predicting general violence. In contrast, UPPS-P Urgency was most useful in predicting intimate partner violence. To further explore relations between intimate partner violence and Urgency, a measure of autonomic response to pleasant and aversive stimuli and facets of Neuroticism from the NEO PI-R were used as control variables. Autonomic responsivity was correlated with intimate partner violence at the zero-order level, and predicted significant variance in intimate partner violence in regression equations. However, UPPS-P Urgency was able to account for unique variance in intimate partner violence above and beyond measures of Neuroticism and arousal. Implications regarding the use of a multifaceted conceptualization of impulsivity in the prediction of different types of violent behavior are discussed. PMID:21259270

  10. Do different facets of impulsivity predict different types of aggression?

    PubMed

    Derefinko, Karen; DeWall, C Nathan; Metze, Amanda V; Walsh, Erin C; Lynam, Donald R

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relations between impulsivity-related traits (as assessed by the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale) and aggressive behaviors. Results indicated that UPPS-P Lack of Premeditation and Sensation Seeking were important in predicting general violence. In contrast, UPPS-P Urgency was most useful in predicting intimate partner violence. To further explore relations between intimate partner violence and Urgency, a measure of autonomic response to pleasant and aversive stimuli and facets of Neuroticism from the NEO PI-R were used as control variables. Autonomic responsivity was correlated with intimate partner violence at the zero-order level, and predicted significant variance in intimate partner violence in regression equations. However, UPPS-P Urgency was able to account for unique variance in intimate partner violence, above and beyond measures of Neuroticism and arousal. Implications regarding the use of a multifaceted conceptualization of impulsivity in the prediction of different types of violent behavior are discussed. PMID:21259270

  11. Decreased saliency processing as a neural measure of Barratt impulsivity in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Olivia M.; Hu, Sien; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Chiang-shan R.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive control is necessary to navigating through an uncertain world. With the stop signal task (SST), we measure how cognitive control functions in a controlled environment. There has been conflicting evidence on whether trait impulsivity might reflect differences in cognitive control during the SST. While some studies find that trait impulsivity relates to measures of response inhibition, such as the stop signal reaction time (SSRT), other studies do not. Here, in 92 young adult participants (58 females; age 25 ± 4 years), we examined whether trait impulsivity, measured by the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11), is associated with differences in performance and regional brain activations for the component processes of cognitive control during the SST. Across participants, trait impulsivity showed a trend-level correlation with SSRT (F(1,90)=3.18, p<.07; Pearson regression). In simple regressions, activation of the right anterior dorsal insula and middle frontal cortex (MFC) during stop as compared to go trials negatively correlated with motor and non-planning impulsivity score. Using the generalized form of psychophysiological interaction (gPPI), we showed that functional connectivity of the right insula and MFC with the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and bilateral visual areas were also negatively correlated with impulsivity. None of the other component processes of cognitive control, including response inhibition, error processing, post-error slowing, were significantly related to Barratt impulsivity. These results suggest that trait impulsivity as measured by BIS-11 may have distinct effects on saliency processing in adult individuals. PMID:22885245

  12. Is impulsivity a link between childhood abuse and suicide?

    PubMed

    Braquehais, M Dolores; Oquendo, Maria A; Baca-García, Enrique; Sher, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Childhood abuse and neglect are known to affect psychological states through behavioral, emotional, and cognitive pathways. They increase the risk of having psychiatric diseases in adulthood and have been considered risk factors for suicidal behavior in all diagnostic categories. Early, prolonged, and severe trauma is also known to increase impulsivity, diminishing the capacity of the brain to inhibit negative actions and to control and modulate emotions. Many neurobiological studies hold that childhood maltreatment may lead to a persistent failure of the inhibitory processes ruled mainly by the frontal cortex over a fear-motivated hyperresponsive limbic system. Multiple neurotransmitters and hormones are involved in the stress response, but, to our knowledge, the two major biological consequences of the chronic exposure to trauma are the hypofunction of the serotonergic system and changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function. Some of these findings overlap with the neurobiological features of impulsivity and of suicidal behavior. Impulsivity has also been said to be both a consequence of trauma and a risk factor for the development of a pathological response to trauma. Thus, we suggest that impulsivity could be one of the links between childhood trauma and suicidal behavior. Prevention of childhood abuse could significantly reduce suicidal behavior in adolescents and adults, in part, through a decrease in the frequency of impulsive behaviors in the future. PMID:20152291

  13. Trait impulsivity and increased pre-attentional sensitivity to intense stimuli in bipolar disorder and controls.

    PubMed

    Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D; Moeller, F Gerard; Steinberg, Joel L; Swann, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity and sensation seeking are stimulus-oriented traits. Because they differ in degree of intention and planning, they may have distinct neurophysiological mechanisms. Impulsivity is prominent in bipolar disorder, and may be related to pre-attentional information filtering and stimulus-orientation. We investigated specificity of relationships between impulsivity and sensitivity to stimulus intensity in bipolar disorder and controls, using intensity-sensitivity of auditory evoked potentials. Seventy-six subjects (37 healthy controls, 39 with bipolar disorder) were administered an intensity-sensitivity paradigm. Additional measures included Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and Eysenck Impulsivity and Venturesomeness scores. State-dependent rapid-response impulsivity was measured using the Immediate Memory Task. Intensity-sensitivities of the auditory evoked P1N1, N1P2, P1, N1, and P2 potentials were assessed as the slope of amplitude relative to loudness. Analyses used general linear models (GLM) with impulsivity-related measures as dependent variables and age, gender, education, and diagnosis as dependent variables. BIS-11 total, motor, and attentional impulsivity scores correlated positively with pre-attentional N1 and P1N1 intensity-sensitivity slopes in bipolar disorder, but not in controls. BIS-11 nonplanning and Eysenck Venturesomeness scores did not correlate with intensity-sensitivity. Intensity-sensitivity slopes did not correlate with rapid-response impulsivity. Correlations between N1 or P1N1 slopes and BIS-11 scores in bipolar disorder were not affected by age, education, WAIS, treatment, symptoms, or gender. Trait impulsivity in bipolar disorder may be related to poorly modulated stimulus-driven late pre-attentional responses to stimuli, potentially resulting in exaggerated responses to intense stimuli even before conscious awareness. Components of trait impulsivity are physiologically heterogenous relative to intensity-sensitivity. PMID

  14. Ionospheric current contribution to the main impulse of a negative sudden impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichare, Geeta; Rawat, Rahul; Bhaskar, Ankush; Pathan, Bashir M.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic field response to a moderate-amplitude negative sudden impulse (SI-) that occurred on 14 May 2009 at 10:30 UT was examined at 97 geomagnetic observatories situated all over the globe. The response signature contains a contribution from magnetospheric as well as ionospheric currents. The main impulse (MI) is defined as the maximum depression in the observed geomagnetic field. It is observed that for low-to-high latitudes, the amplitude of the MI is larger in the afternoon to post-dusk sector than in the dawn-noon sector, indicating asymmetry in the MI amplitude. We estimated the contribution at various observatories due to the Chapman-Ferraro magnetopause currents using the Tsyganenko model (T01) and subtracted this from the observed MI amplitude to obtain the contribution due to ionospheric currents. It is found that the ionospheric currents contribute significantly to the MI amplitude of moderate SI- even at low-to-mid latitudes and that the contribution is in the same direction as that from the magnetopause currents near dusk and in the opposite direction near dawn. The equivalent current vectors reveal a clockwise (anticlockwise) ionospheric current loop in the afternoon (morning) sector during the MI of the negative pressure impulse. This evidences an ionospheric twin-cell-vortex current system (DP2) due to field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with the dusk-to-dawn convection electric field during the MI of an SI-. We also estimated the magnetic field variation due to prompt penetration electric fields, which is found to be very small at low latitudes in the present case. The studied SI- is not associated with shock, and hence no preliminary reverse impulse was evident. In addition, the summer hemisphere reveals larger MI amplitudes than the winter hemisphere, indicating once again the role of ionospheric currents.

  15. Children's Help Seeking and Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puustinen, Minna; Kokkonen, Marja; Tolvanen, Asko; Pulkkinen, Lea

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between students' (100 children aged 8 to 12) help-seeking behavior and impulsivity. Help-seeking behavior was evaluated using a naturalistic experimental paradigm in which children were placed in a problem-solving situation and had the opportunity to seek help from the experimenter, if…

  16. Commentary on Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Goldstein continues the laudable practice of reprinting articles of historical significance in the history of ADHD with this selective reprinting of material from the original article by Maurice Laufer, Eric Denhoff, and Gerald Solomons on hyperkinetic impulsive disorder (HID) in children. This article on HID is among the first articles to…

  17. Trait impulsivity and impaired prefrontal impulse inhibition function in adolescents with internet gaming addiction revealed by a Go/No-Go fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is an impulse disorder, or is at least related to impulse control disorders. In the present study, we hypothesized that different facets of trait impulsivity may be specifically linked to the brain regions with impaired impulse inhibition function in IGA adolescents. Methods Seventeen adolescents with IGA and seventeen healthy controls were scanned during performance of a response-inhibition Go/No-Go task using a 3.0 T MRI scanner. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS)-11 was used to assess impulsivity. Results There were no differences in the behavioral performance on the Go/No-Go task between the groups. However, the IGA group was significantly hyperactive during No-Go trials in the left superior medial frontal gyrus, right anterior cingulate cortex, right superior/middle frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, left precentral gyrus, and left precuneus and cuneus. Further, the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, bilateral inferior temporal gyrus, and right superior parietal lobule were significantly hypoactive during No-Go trials. Activation of the left superior medial frontal gyrus was positively associated with BIS-11 and Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS) total score across IGA participants. Conclusions Our data suggest that the prefrontal cortex may be involved in the circuit modulating impulsivity, while its impaired function may relate to high impulsivity in adolescents with IGA, which may contribute directly to the Internet addiction process. PMID:24885073

  18. Transthoracic Cardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson

    This dissertation investigates the feasibility of a real-time transthoracic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging system to measure myocardial function non-invasively in clinical setting. Heart failure is an important cardiovascular disease and contributes to the leading cause of death for developed countries. Patients exhibiting heart failure with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) can often be identified by clinicians, but patients with preserved LVEF might be undetected if they do not exhibit other signs and symptoms of heart failure. These cases motivate development of transthoracic ARFI imaging to aid the early diagnosis of the structural and functional heart abnormalities leading to heart failure. M-Mode ARFI imaging utilizes ultrasonic radiation force to displace tissue several micrometers in the direction of wave propagation. Conventional ultrasound tracks the response of the tissue to the force. This measurement is repeated rapidly at a location through the cardiac cycle, measuring timing and relative changes in myocardial stiffness. ARFI imaging was previously shown capable of measuring myocardial properties and function via invasive open-chest and intracardiac approaches. The prototype imaging system described in this dissertation is capable of rapid acquisition, processing, and display of ARFI images and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) movies. Also presented is a rigorous safety analysis, including finite element method (FEM) simulations of tissue heating, hydrophone intensity and mechanical index (MI) measurements, and thermocouple transducer face heating measurements. For the pulse sequences used in later animal and clinical studies, results from the safety analysis indicates that transthoracic ARFI imaging can be safely applied at rates and levels realizable on the prototype ARFI imaging system. Preliminary data are presented from in vivo trials studying changes in myocardial stiffness occurring under normal and abnormal

  19. Characteristics of Impulsive Suicide Attempts and Attempters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Thomas R.; Swann, Alan C.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; O'Carroll, Patrick W.

    2002-01-01

    Examined impulsive suicide attempts within a population-based, case-control study of nearly lethal suicide attempts among adolescents and young adults. Impulsive attempts were more likely among those who had been in a physical fight and less likely among those who were depressed. Findings suggest inadequate control of aggressive impulses as a…

  20. A STUDY OF METHODS OF CONTROLLING IMPULSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WHITESIDE, RAY

    THE PERSON LESS ABLE TO CONTROL HIS IMPULSES IS ALSO APT TO EXHIBIT SOCIALLY DISVALUED BEHAVIOR. VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC FAILURE IS A PARTIAL CONSEQUENCE OF IMPULSIVENESS AND LACK OF SELF-CONTROL. TO INVESTIGATE IMPULSE CONTROL, TWO INSTRUMENTS BELIEVED TO MEASURE ATTRIBUTES OF OPPOSITE POLES OF THIS CONCEPT (SEQUENTIAL TESTS OF EDUCATIONAL…

  1. Impulsivity is Associated with Early Sensory Inhibition in Neurophysiological Processing of Affective Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Soshi, Takahiro; Noda, Takamasa; Ando, Kumiko; Nakazawa, Kanako; Tsumura, Hideki; Okada, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity is widely related to socially problematic behaviors and psychiatric illness. Previous studies have investigated the relationship between response inhibition and impulsivity. However, no study has intensively examined how impulsivity correlates with automatic sensory processing before the drive for response inhibition to sensory inputs. Sensory gating (SG) is an automatic inhibitory function that attenuates the neural response to redundant sensory information and protects higher cognitive functions from the burst of information processing. Although SG functions abnormally in several clinical populations, there is very little evidence supporting SG changes in conjunction with impulsivity traits in non-clinical populations. The present study recruited healthy adults (n = 23) to conduct a neurophysiological experiment using a paired-click paradigm and self-report scales assessing impulsive behavioral traits. Auditory stimuli included not only a pure tone but also white noise to explore the differences in auditory-evoked potential (AEP) responses between the two stimuli. White noise is more affective than pure tones; therefore, we predicted that the SG of AEPs (P50, N100, and P200) for white noise would correlate more with self-reported impulsivity than with those for pure tones. Our main findings showed that SG of the P50 and P200 amplitudes significantly correlated with self-reported reward responsiveness and fun-seeking, respectively, only for white noise stimuli, demonstrating that higher-scoring impulsivity subcomponents were related to greater SG. Frequency-domain analyses also revealed that greater desynchronization of the beta band for the second white noise stimulus was associated with higher motor impulsivity scores, suggesting that an impulsivity-related change of SG was associated with attentional modulation. These findings indicate that the measurement of SG of white noise may be an efficient tool to evaluate impulsivity in non

  2. Prefrontal cortical-striatal dopamine receptor mRNA expression predicts distinct forms of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Simon, Nicholas W; Beas, Blanca S; Montgomery, Karienn S; Haberman, Rebecca P; Bizon, Jennifer L; Setlow, Barry

    2013-06-01

    Variation in dopamine receptor levels has been associated with different facets of impulsivity. To further delineate the neural substrates underlying impulsive action (inability to withhold a prepotent motor response) and impulsive choice (delay aversion), we characterised rats in the Differential Reinforcement of Low Rates of Responding task and a delay discounting task. We also measured performance on an effort-based discounting task. We then assessed D1 and D2 dopamine receptor mRNA expression in subregions of the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens using in situ hybridisation, and compared these data with behavioral performance. Expression of D1 and D2 receptor mRNA in distinct brain regions was predictive of impulsive action. A dissociation within the nucleus accumbens was observed between subregions and receptor subtypes; higher D1 mRNA expression in the shell predicted greater impulsive action, whereas lower D2 mRNA expression in the core predicted greater impulsive action. We also observed a negative correlation between impulsive action and D2 mRNA expression in the prelimbic cortex. Interestingly, a similar relationship was present between impulsive choice and prelimbic cortex D2 mRNA, despite the fact that behavioral indices of impulsive action and impulsive choice were uncorrelated. Finally, we found that both high D1 mRNA expression in the insular cortex and low D2 mRNA expression in the infralimbic cortex were associated with willingness to exert effort for rewards. Notably, dopamine receptor mRNA in these regions was not associated with either facet of impulsivity. The data presented here provide novel molecular and neuroanatomical distinctions between different forms of impulsivity, as well as effort-based decision-making. PMID:23510331

  3. Prefrontal cortical–striatal dopamine receptor mRNA expression predicts distinct forms of impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Nicholas W.; Beas, Blanca S.; Montgomery, Karienn S.; Haberman, Rebecca P.; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Setlow, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Variation in dopamine receptor levels has been associated with different facets of impulsivity. To further delineate the neural substrates underlying impulsive action (inability to withhold a prepotent motor response) and impulsive choice (delay aversion), we characterised rats in the Differential Reinforcement of Low Rates of Responding task and a delay discounting task. We also measured performance on an effort-based discounting task. We then assessed D1 and D2 dopamine receptor mRNA expression in subregions of the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens using in situ hybridisation, and compared these data with behavioral performance. Expression of D1 and D2 receptor mRNA in distinct brain regions was predictive of impulsive action. A dissociation within the nucleus accumbens was observed between subregions and receptor subtypes; higher D1 mRNA expression in the shell predicted greater impulsive action, whereas lower D2 mRNA expression in the core predicted greater impulsive action. We also observed a negative correlation between impulsive action and D2 mRNA expression in the prelimbic cortex. Interestingly, a similar relationship was present between impulsive choice and prelimbic cortex D2 mRNA, despite the fact that behavioral indices of impulsive action and impulsive choice were uncorrelated. Finally, we found that both high D1 mRNA expression in the insular cortex and low D2 mRNA expression in the infralimbic cortex were associated with willingness to exert effort for rewards. Notably, dopamine receptor mRNA in these regions was not associated with either facet of impulsivity. The data presented here provide novel molecular and neuroanatomical distinctions between different forms of impulsivity, as well as effort-based decision-making. PMID:23510331

  4. Psychedelic symptoms of cannabis and cocaine use as a function of trait impulsivity.

    PubMed

    van Wel, J H P; Spronk, D B; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Verkes, R J; Ramaekers, J G

    2015-03-01

    Trait impulsivity has been linked to addiction in humans. It has been suggested that drug users with high trait impulsivity levels are more sensitive to subjective drug intoxication. This study assessed whether subjective response to drugs differs between drug users with normal or high levels of trait impulsivity. Regular drug users (N = 122) received doses of cocaine HCl, cannabis, and placebo in a three-way crossover study. Their mood, dissociative state, and psychedelic symptoms were measured with subjective rating scales (CADDS, Bowdle, POMS). Trait impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. Cannabis increased dissociation and psychedelic state, as well as fatigue, confusion, depression and anxiety, and decreased arousal, positive mood, vigor, friendliness, and elation. Cocaine increased dissociation, psychedelic state, vigor, friendliness, elation, positive mood, anxiety and arousal, while decreasing fatigue. Only a few subjective items revealed a drug × trait impulsivity interaction, suggesting that psychedelic symptoms were most intense in high impulsivity subjects. Trait impulsiveness ratings were negatively correlated with ratings of vigor (r = -.197) and positively correlated with ratings of loss of thought control (r = .237) during cannabis intoxication. It is concluded that a broad association between trait impulsivity and psychedelic subjective drug experience appears to be absent. PMID:25572345

  5. Differential susceptibility to motor impulsivity among functional subtypes of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Scott A; van den Wildenberg, Wery; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Claassen, Daniel O; Wooten, George F; Manning, Carol A

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Parkinson’s disease patients with predominant postural instability and gait difficulties (PIGD) may experience unique cognitive difficulties compared to patients with tremor predominant (TD) symptoms. PIGD patients are also at high risk for falling, and some of the worst fallers seem to react impulsively to their environment. We tested the hypothesis that PIGD patients show poorer control over motor impulses compared to TD patients. Methods 34 PD participants were divided into predominant PIGD (n=17) or TD (n=17) functional subtypes based on their presenting symptoms in their optimally treated motor state. All participants performed a speeded reaction task that quantified motor impulsivity and the proficiency of inhibiting prepotent motor impulses. Results The groups showed similar reaction times, but compared to TD patients, PIGD patients made significantly more impulsive motor errors. Notably, when the initial impulsive erroneous response was avoided, PIGD and TD groups were similar in their ability to suppress the incorrect motor impulse from further interfering with the selection of a correct action. Conclusions PD patients with PIGD predominant symptoms show greater susceptibility to acting on prepotent motor impulses compared to TD patients. This finding may have direct implications for fall risk and also points to dissociable neurocognitive pathologies in TD and PIGD subtypes. Clinically, the use of specific cognitive instruments to assess the expression and inhibition of motor impulses may help identify PD patients who have difficulty ‘thinking before they leap’ and are at high risk of falling. PMID:22917670

  6. Impulsivity and Risk Taking in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, L Felice; Lee, Junghee; Davis, Michael C; Altshuler, Lori; Glahn, David C; Miklowitz, David J; Green, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Impulsive risk taking contributes to deleterious outcomes among clinical populations. Indeed, pathological impulsivity and risk taking are common in patients with serious mental illness, and have severe clinical repercussions including novelty seeking, response disinhibition, aggression, and substance abuse. Thus, the current study seeks to examine self-reported impulsivity (Barratt Impulsivity Scale) and performance-based behavioral risk taking (Balloon Analogue Risk Task) in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Participants included 68 individuals with bipolar disorder, 38 with schizophrenia, and 36 healthy controls. Self-reported impulsivity was elevated in the bipolar group compared with schizophrenia patients and healthy controls, who did not differ from each other. On the risk-taking task, schizophrenia patients were significantly more risk averse than the bipolar patients and controls. Aside from the diagnostic group differences, there was a significant effect of antipsychotic (AP) medication within the bipolar group: bipolar patients taking AP medications were more risk averse than those not taking AP medications. This difference in risk taking because of AP medications was not explained by history of psychosis. Similarly, the differences in risk taking between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were not fully explained by AP effects. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:23963117

  7. Relations Between Trait Impulsivity, Behavioral Impulsivity, Physiological Arousal, and Risky Sexual Behavior among Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Derefinko, Karen J.; Peters, Jessica R.; Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A.; Walsh, Erin C.; Adams, Zachary W.; Lynam, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined how impulsivity-related traits (negative urgency, sensation seeking, and positive urgency), behavioral measures of risk taking and reward seeking, and physiological reactivity related to three different risky sexual behaviors in sexually active undergraduate men (N = 135). Regression analyses indicated that sensation seeking and behavioral risk-taking predicted unique variance in number of sexual partners. These findings suggest that, for young men, acquisition of new partners is associated with need for excitement and reward and willingness to take risks to meet those needs. Sensation seeking, behavioral risk-taking, and skin conductance reactivity to arousing stimuli was related to ever having engaged in sex with a stranger, indicating that, for men, willingness to have sex with a stranger is related not only to the need for excitement and risk-taking but also with innate responsiveness to arousing environmental triggers. In contrast, regression analyses indicated that young men who were impulsive in the context of negative emotions were less likely to use condoms, suggesting that emotion-based impulsivity may be an important factor in negligent prophylactic use. This study adds to the current understanding of the divergence between the correlates of risky sexual behaviors and may lend utility to the development of individualized HIV prevention programming. PMID:24958252

  8. Relations between trait impulsivity, behavioral impulsivity, physiological arousal, and risky sexual behavior among young men.

    PubMed

    Derefinko, Karen J; Peters, Jessica R; Eisenlohr-Moul, Tory A; Walsh, Erin C; Adams, Zachary W; Lynam, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    The current study examined how impulsivity-related traits (negative urgency, sensation seeking, and positive urgency), behavioral measures of risk taking and reward seeking, and physiological reactivity related to three different risky sexual behaviors in sexually active undergraduate men (N = 135). Regression analyses indicated that sensation seeking and behavioral risk-taking predicted unique variance in number of sexual partners. These findings suggest that, for young men, acquisition of new partners is associated with need for excitement and reward and willingness to take risks to meet those needs. Sensation seeking, behavioral risk-taking, and skin conductance reactivity to arousing stimuli was related to ever having engaged in sex with a stranger, indicating that, for men, willingness to have sex with a stranger is related not only to the need for excitement and risk-taking but also with innate responsiveness to arousing environmental triggers. In contrast, regression analyses indicated that young men who were impulsive in the context of negative emotions were less likely to use condoms, suggesting that emotion-based impulsivity may be an important factor in negligent prophylactic use. This study adds to the current understanding of the divergence between the correlates of risky sexual behaviors and may lend utility to the development of individualized HIV prevention programming. PMID:24958252

  9. Three-dimensional, Impulsive Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    S Dorfman, et al

    2013-05-03

    Impulsive, local, 3-D reconnection is identified for the first time in a laboratory current sheet. The events observed in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) are characterized by large local gradients in the third direction and cannot be explained by 2-D models. Detailed measurements show that the ejection of flux rope structures from the current sheet plays a key role in these events. By contrast, even though electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range are also observed concurrently with the impulsive behavior, they are not the key physics responsible. A qualitative, 3-D, two-fluid model is proposed to explain the observations. The experimental results may be particularly applicable to space and astrophysical plasmas where impulsive reconnection occurs.

  10. THz impulse radar for biomedical sensing: nonlinear system behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. R.; Sung, Shijun; Grundfest, W. S.; Taylor, Z. D.

    2014-03-01

    The THz impulse radar is an "RF-inspired" sensor system that has performed remarkably well since its initial development nearly six years ago. It was developed for ex vivo skin-burn imaging, and has since shown great promise in the sensitive detection of hydration levels in soft tissues of several types, such as in vivo corneal and burn samples. An intriguing aspect of the impulse radar is its hybrid architecture which combines the high-peak-power of photoconductive switches with the high-responsivity and -bandwidth (RF and video) of Schottky-diode rectifiers. The result is a very sensitive sensor system in which the post-detection signal-to-noise ratio depends super-linearly on average signal power up to a point where the diode is "turned on" in the forward direction, and then behaves quasi-linearly beyond that point. This paper reports the first nonlinear systems analysis done on the impulse radar using MATLAB.

  11. An experimentally verified finite element study of the stress-strain response of crack geometries experiencing large-scale yielding

    SciTech Connect

    Panontin, T.L.; Sheppard, S.D.

    1997-12-01

    Large-strain, 3-D finite element analyses with incremental plasticity were performed for a variety of crack geometries to study local crack-tip stress-strain fields and associated global fracture parameters under conditions of large-scale yielding. The geometries analyzed include thin, single-edge crack tension, single-edge crack bending, and center-crack tension fracture specimens with varying crack depth (a/W) ratios. Two materials were investigated: a high-hardening, low-strength steel and a moderate-hardening, high-strength steel. Mesh refinement studies were performed to ensure convergence of the finite element predictions. The studies examine the effects of in-plane crack-tip element size, initial crack-tip radius size, and number of through-thickness layers on predicted distributions of crack-tip stress and plastic strain and predicted values of the J-integral and CTOD. In addition, the finite element predictions of specimen behavior were verified experimentally by direct measurements, namely load displacement, load longitudinal strain, and load CTOS, made during and following testing of the fracture specimens. Representative results of the finite element analyses are presented and compared to previously published data where pertinent. Results from the mesh refinement studies and the verification testing are shown. Predicted trends among the specimens and materials in local distributions of crack-tip plastic strain, triaxiality, and opening stress as well as in global parameters, J-integral and m-factor, are discussed.

  12. Seismic response trends evaluation via long term monitoring and finite element model updating of an RC building including soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, F.; Omenzetter, P.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a study on the seismic response trends evaluation and finite element model updating of a reinforced concrete building monitored for a period of more than two years. The three storey reinforced concrete building is instrumented with five tri-axial accelerometers and a free-field tri-axial accelerometer. The time domain N4SID system identification technique was used to obtain the frequencies and damping ratios considering flexible base models taking into account the soil-structure-interaction (SSI) using 50 earthquakes. Trends of variation of seismic response were developed by correlating the peak response acceleration at the roof level with identified frequencies and damping ratios. A general trend of decreasing frequencies was observed with increased level of shaking. To simulate the behavior of the building, a three dimensional finite element model (FEM) was developed. To incorporate real in-situ conditions, soil underneath the foundation and around the building was modeled using spring elements and non-structural components (claddings and partitions) were also included. The developed FEM was then calibrated using a sensitivity based model updating technique taking into account soil flexibility and non-structural components as updating parameters. It was concluded from the investigation that knowledge of the variation of seismic response of buildings is necessary to better understand their behavior during earthquakes, and also that the participation of soil and non-structural components is significant towards the seismic response of the building and these should be considered in models to simulate the real behavior.

  13. A fuzzy finite element procedure for the calculation of uncertain frequency-response functions of damped structures: Part 1—Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, David; Vandepitte, Dirk

    2005-12-01

    This work introduces a numerical algorithm to calculate frequency-response functions (FRFs) of damped finite element (FE) models with fuzzy uncertain parameters. Part one of this paper describes the numerical algorithm for the solution of the underlying interval finite element (IFE) problem. First, the IFE procedure for the calculation of undamped envelope FRFs is discussed. Starting from the undamped procedure, a strategy is developed to analyse damped structures based on the principle of Rayleigh damping. This is achieved by analysing the effect of the proportional damping coefficients on the subsequent steps of the undamped procedure. This finally results in a procedure for the calculation of fuzzy damped FRFs based on an analytical extension of the undamped algorithm. Part one of this paper introduces the numerical procedure. Part two of this paper illustrates the application of the methodology on four numerical case studies.

  14. Responses to applied forces and the Jarzynski equality in classical oscillator systems coupled to finite baths: an exactly solvable nondissipative nonergodic model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo

    2011-07-01

    Responses of small open oscillator systems to applied external forces have been studied with the use of an exactly solvable classical Caldeira-Leggett model in which a harmonic oscillator (system) is coupled to finite N-body oscillators (bath) with an identical frequency (ω(n) = ω(o) for n = 1 to N). We have derived exact expressions for positions, momenta, and energy of the system in nonequilibrium states and for work performed by applied forces. A detailed study has been made on an analytical method for canonical averages of physical quantities over the initial equilibrium state, which is much superior to numerical averages commonly adopted in simulations of small systems. The calculated energy of the system which is strongly coupled to a finite bath is fluctuating but nondissipative. It has been shown that the Jarzynski equality is valid in nondissipative nonergodic open oscillator systems regardless of the rate of applied ramp force. PMID:21867150

  15. Emotion Regulation and Impulsivity in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Liana R.N.; Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Past research has linked both emotion regulation and impulsivity with the development and maintenance of addictions. However, no research has investigated the relationship between emotion regulation and impulsivity within young adults. In the present study, we analyzed 194 young adults (27.8% female; 21.3 ± 3.32 years old; 91.8% single; 85.1% Caucasian), grouping them as low, average, or high emotionally dysregulated, and compared self-reported impulsivity, impulsive behaviors (such as alcohol and substance use and gambling) and cognitive impulsivity. We hypothesized that those with high levels of emotion dysregulation would score higher on self-reported and cognitive impulsivity, and report more impulsive behaviors. Analysis indicated that compared to low, the high emotion dysregulation group scored significantly higher on two self-report measures of impulsivity, harm avoidance, and cognitive reasoning. No significant differences were found between groups in impulsive behaviors and cognitive impulsivity. Overall, this study highlights the relationship between emotion dysregulation and impulsivity, suggesting that emotion regulation may be an important factor to consider when assessing individuals at a higher risk for developing an addiction. PMID:22385661

  16. A Neurogenetic Approach to Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Congdon, Eliza; Canli, Turhan

    2008-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and multidimensional trait that is of interest to both personality psychologists and to clinicians. For investigators seeking the biological basis of personality traits, the use of neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revolutionized personality psychology in less than a decade. Now, another revolution is under way, and it originates from molecular biology. Specifically, new findings in molecular genetics, the detailed mapping and the study of the function of genes, have shown that individual differences in personality traits can be related to individual differences within specific genes. In this article, we will review the current state of the field with respect to the neural and genetic basis of trait impulsivity. PMID:19012655

  17. Periodic components of hand acceleration/deceleration impulses during telemanipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Handel, S.

    1994-01-01

    Responsiveness is the ability of a telemanipulator to recreate user trajectories and impedance in time and space. For trajectory production, a key determinant of responsiveness is the ability of the system to accept user inputs, which are forces on the master handle generated by user hand acceleration/deceleration (a/d) impulses, and translate them into slave arm acceleration/deceleration. This paper presents observations of master controller a/d impulses during completion of a simple target acquisition task. Power spectral density functions (PSDF`s) calculated from hand controller a/d impulses were used to assess impulse waveform. The relative contributions of frequency intervals ranging up to 25 Hz for three spatially different versions of the task were used to determine which frequencies were most important. The highest relative power was observed in frequencies between 1 Hz and 6 Hz. The key frequencies related to task difficulty were in the range from 2 Hz to 8 Hz. the results provide clues to the source of the performance inhibition.

  18. The static response function in Kohn-Sham theory: An appropriate basis for its matrix representation in case of finite AO basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmar, Christian Neese, Frank

    2014-10-07

    The role of the static Kohn-Sham (KS) response function describing the response of the electron density to a change of the local KS potential is discussed in both the theory of the optimized effective potential (OEP) and the so-called inverse Kohn-Sham problem involving the task to find the local KS potential for a given electron density. In a general discussion of the integral equation to be solved in both cases, it is argued that a unique solution of this equation can be found even in case of finite atomic orbital basis sets. It is shown how a matrix representation of the response function can be obtained if the exchange-correlation potential is expanded in terms of a Schmidt-orthogonalized basis comprising orbitals products of occupied and virtual orbitals. The viability of this approach in both OEP theory and the inverse KS problem is illustrated by numerical examples.

  19. Prediction and analysis of human thoracic impact responses and injuries in cadaver impacts using a full human body finite element model.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jesse; El-Jawahri, Raed; Chai, Li; Barbat, Saeed; Prasad, Priya

    2003-10-01

    Human thoracic dynamic responses and injuries associated with frontal impact, side impact, and belt loading were investigated and predicted using a complete human body finite element model for an average adult male. The human body model was developed to study the impact biomechanics of a vehicular occupant. Its geometry was based on the Visible Human Project (National Library of Medicine) and the topographies from human body anatomical texts. The data was then scaled to an average adult male according to available biomechanical data from the literature. The model includes details of the head, neck, ribcage, abdomen, thoracic and lumbar spine, internal organs of the chest and abdomen, pelvis, and the upper and lower extremities. The present study is focused on the dynamic response and injuries of the thorax. The model was validated at various impact speeds by comparing predicted responses with available experimental cadaver data in frontal and side pendulum impacts, as well as belt loading. Model responses were compared with similar individual cadaver tests instead of using cadaver corridors because the large differences between the upper and lower bounds of the corridors may confound the model validation. The validated model was then used to study thorax dynamic responses and injuries in various simulated impact conditions. Parameters that could induce injuries such as force, deflection, and stress were computed from model simulations and were compared with previously proposed thoracic injury criteria to assess injury potential for the thorax. It has been shown that the model exhibited speed sensitive impact characteristics, and the compressibility of the internal organs significantly influenced the overall impact response in the simulated impact conditions. This study demonstrates that the development of a validated FE human body model could be useful for injury assessment in various cadaveric impacts reported in the literature. Internal organ injuries, which are

  20. Cued to Act on Impulse: More Impulsive Choice and Risky Decision Making by Women Susceptible to Overeating after Exposure to Food Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Yeomans, Martin R.; Brace, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that individual differences in tendency to overeat relate to impulsivity, possibly by increasing reactivity to food-related cues in the environment. This study tested whether acute exposure to food cues enhanced impulsive and risky responses in women classified on tendency to overeat, indexed by scores on the three factor eating questionnaire disinhibition (TFEQ-D), restraint (TFEQ-R) and hunger scales. Ninety six healthy women completed two measures of impulsive responding (delayed discounting, DDT and a Go No-Go, GNG, task) and a measure of risky decision making (the balloon analogue risk task, BART) as well as questionnaire measures of impulsive behaviour either after looking at a series of pictures of food or visually matched controls. Impulsivity (DDT) and risk-taking (BART) were both positively associated with TFEQ-D scores, but in both cases this effect was exacerbated by prior exposure to food cues. No effects of restraint were found. TFEQ-D scores were also related to more commission errors on the GNG, while restrained women were slower on the GNG, but neither effect was modified by cue exposure. Overall these data suggest that exposure to food cues act to enhance general impulsive responding in women at risk of overeating and tentatively suggest an important interaction between tendency for impulsive decision making and food cues that may help explain a key underlying risk factor for overeating. PMID:26378459

  1. Finite-element time-domain algorithms for modeling linear Debye and Lorentz dielectric dispersions at low frequencies.

    PubMed

    Stoykov, Nikolay S; Kuiken, Todd A; Lowery, Madeleine M; Taflove, Allen

    2003-09-01

    We present what we believe to be the first algorithms that use a simple scalar-potential formulation to model linear Debye and Lorentz dielectric dispersions at low frequencies in the context of finite-element time-domain (FETD) numerical solutions of electric potential. The new algorithms, which permit treatment of multiple-pole dielectric relaxations, are based on the auxiliary differential equation method and are unconditionally stable. We validate the algorithms by comparison with the results of a previously reported method based on the Fourier transform. The new algorithms should be useful in calculating the transient response of biological materials subject to impulsive excitation. Potential applications include FETD modeling of electromyography, functional electrical stimulation, defibrillation, and effects of lightning and impulsive electric shock. PMID:12943277

  2. Finite Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-10-01

    The world has agreed on 17 Sustainable Development Goals, to be adopted this week. This is great progress towards acknowledging that the planet's finite resources need to be managed carefully in the face of humanity's unlimited aspirations.

  3. Response of a mechanical oscillator in an optomechanical cavity driven by a finite-bandwidth squeezed vacuum excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfipour, H.; Shahidani, S.; Roknizadeh, R.; Naderi, M. H.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate the displacement and momentum fluctuations spectra of the movable mirror in a standard optomechanical system driven by a finite-bandwidth squeezed vacuum light accompanying a coherent laser field. Two cases in which the squeezed vacuum is generated by degenerate and nondegenerate parametric oscillators (DPO and NDPO) are considered. We find that for the case of finite-bandwidth squeezed vacuum injection, the two spectra exhibit unique features, which strongly differ from those of broadband squeezing excitation. In particular, the spectra exhibit a three-peaked and a four-peaked structure, respectively, for the squeezing injection from DPO and NDPO. Besides, some anomalous characteristics of the spectra such as squeezing-induced pimple, hole burning, and dispersive profile are found to be highly sensitive to the squeezing parameters and the temperature of the mirror. We also evaluate the mean-square fluctuations in position and momentum quadratures of the movable mirror and analyze the influence of the squeezing parameters of the input field on the mechanical squeezing. It will be shown that the parameters of driven squeezed vacuum affects the squeezing. We find the optimal mechanical squeezing is achievable via finite-bandwidth squeezed vacuum injection which is affected by the intensity of squeezed vacuum. We also show that the phase of incident squeezed vacuum determines whether position or momentum squeezing occurs. Our proposed scheme not only provides a feasible experimental method to detect and characterize squeezed light by optomechanical systems, but also suggests a way for controllable transfer of squeezing from an optical field to a mechanical oscillator.

  4. Microwave emission from lead zirconate titanate induced by impulsive mechanical load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, A.; Majcherek, S.; Hirsch, S.; Schmidt, B.

    2015-10-01

    This paper focuses on microwave emission from Lead zirconate titanate Pb [ZrxTi1-x] O3 (PZT) induced by mechanical stressing. The mechanical stress was initiated by impact of a sharp tungsten indenter on the upper surface of PZT ceramic. The sequences of microwave and current impulses, which flew from indenter to electric ground, were detected simultaneously. The voltage between the upper and lower surface of ceramic was measured to obtain the behavior of mechanical force acting on ceramic during the impact. It was found that the amplitude, form, and frequency of measured microwave impulses were different by compression and restitution phase of impact. Two different mechanisms of electron emission, responsible for microwave impulse generation, were proposed based on the dissimilar impulse behavior. The field emission from tungsten indenter is dominant during compression, whereas ferroemission dominates during restitution phase. Indeed, it was observed that the direction of the current flow, i.e., sign of current impulses is changed by transitions from compression to restitution phase of impact. The observed dissimilar behavior of microwave impulses, caused by increasing and decreasing applied force, can be used to calculate the contact time and behavior of mechanical force during mechanical impact on ceramic surface. It is shown that the generation of microwave impulses exhibits high reproducibility, impulse intensity, a low damping factor, and high mechanical failure resistance. Based on these microwave emission properties of PZT, the development of new type of stress sensor with spatial resolution of few microns becomes possible.

  5. Maximization of the effective impulse delivered by a high-frequency/low-frequency planetary drill tool.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Patrick; Lucas, Margaret; Cardoni, Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Ultrasonic tools are used for a variety of cutting applications in surgery and the food industry, but when they are applied to harder materials, such as rock, their cutting performance declines because of the low effective impulse delivered by each vibration cycle. To overcome this problem, a technique known as high-frequency/low-frequency (or alternatively, ultrasonic/sonic) drilling is employed. In this approach, an ultrasonic step-horn is used to deliver an impulse to a free mass which subsequently moves toward a drilling bit, delivering the impulse on contact. The free mass then rebounds to complete the cycle. The horn has time between impacts to build significant vibration amplitude and thus delivers a much larger impulse to the free mass than could be delivered if it were applied directly to the target. To maximize the impulse delivered to the target by the cutting bit, both the momentum transfer from the ultrasonic horn to the free mass and the dynamics of the horn/free mass/cutting bit stack must be optimized. This paper uses finite element techniques to optimize the ultrasonic horns and numerical propagation of the stack dynamics to maximize the delivered effective impulse, validated in both cases by extensive experimental analysis. PMID:22083772

  6. Teens Impulsively React Rather than Retreat from Threat

    PubMed Central

    Dreyfuss, Michael; Caudle, Kristina; Drysdale, Andrew T.; Johnston, Natalie E.; Cohen, Alexandra O.; Somerville, Leah H.; Galván, Adriana; Tottenham, Nim; Hare, Todd A.; Casey, BJ

    2014-01-01

    There is a significant inflection in risk taking and criminal behavior during adolescence, but the basis for this increase remains largely unknown. An increased sensitivity to rewards has been suggested to explain these behaviors. Yet juvenile offenses often occur in emotionally charged situations of negative valence. How behavior is altered by changes in negative emotional processes during adolescence has received less attention than changes in positive emotional processes. The current study uses a measure of impulsivity in combination with cues that signal threat or safety to assess developmental changes in emotional responses to threat cues. We show that adolescents, especially males, impulsively react to threat cues relative to neutral ones, more than adults or children, even when instructed not to respond. This adolescent specific behavioral pattern is paralleled by enhanced activity in limbic cortical regions implicated in detection and assignment of emotional value to inputs and in the subsequent regulation of responses to them when successfully suppressing impulsive responses to threat cues. In contrast, prefrontal control regions implicated in detecting and resolving competing responses show an adolescent emergent pattern (i.e., greater activity in adolescents and adults relative to children) during successful suppression of a response regardless of emotion. Our findings suggest that adolescence is a period of heightened sensitivity to social and emotional cues that results in diminished regulation of behavior in their presence. PMID:24821576

  7. Robust stochastic resonance: Signal detection and adaptation in impulsive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosko, Bart; Mitaim, Sanya

    2001-11-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) occurs when noise improves a system performance measure such as a spectral signal-to-noise ratio or a cross-correlation measure. All SR studies have assumed that the forcing noise has finite variance. Most have further assumed that the noise is Gaussian. We show that SR still occurs for the more general case of impulsive or infinite-variance noise. The SR effect fades as the noise grows more impulsive. We study this fading effect on the family of symmetric α-stable bell curves that includes the Gaussian bell curve as a special case. These bell curves have thicker tails as the parameter α falls from 2 (the Gaussian case) to 1 (the Cauchy case) to even lower values. Thicker tails create more frequent and more violent noise impulses. The main feedback and feedforward models in the SR literature show this fading SR effect for periodic forcing signals when we plot either the signal-to-noise ratio or a signal correlation measure against the dispersion of the α-stable noise. Linear regression shows that an exponential law γopt(α)=cAα describes this relation between the impulsive index α and the SR-optimal noise dispersion γopt. The results show that SR is robust against noise ``outliers.'' So SR may be more widespread in nature than previously believed. Such robustness also favors the use of SR in engineering systems. We further show that an adaptive system can learn the optimal noise dispersion for two standard SR models (the quartic bistable model and the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model) for the signal-to-noise ratio performance measure. This also favors practical applications of SR and suggests that evolution may have tuned the noise-sensitive parameters of biological systems.

  8. Cotton buds, momentum, and impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Ed; Nuñez, Jover; Guirit, Alfredo; van Huis, Cor

    2000-01-01

    Here is a simple experiment demonstrating impulse and momentum that was picked up from a Japanese presenter at a physics teacher conference held in Cebu City. We have not been able to trace the experiment farther and have never seen it in print. After student-author Nuñez demonstrated it during an exam on conducting demonstrations, we converted the qualitative idea into a quanitative experiment and even discovered some possibilities for student research. The lab is also suitable as homework, since it uses universally available "equipment" — cotton buds (swabs), drinking straws, and a ruler.

  9. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  10. High-restrained eaters only overeat when they are also impulsive.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Anita; Nederkoorn, Chantal; van Baak, Lydia; Keirse, Catharine; Guerrieri, Ramona; Havermans, Remco

    2009-02-01

    Recent work shows that the inability to inhibit basic motor responses (like pressing a button) is related to overeating, weight gain and overweight. In the present study it was tested whether this inability to inhibit motor responses--or impulsivity--can differentiate between successful and unsuccessful restrained eaters. A typical preload and food exposure paradigm was used and it was hypothesized that only the high-restrained eaters that are simultaneously inefficient inhibitors of prepotent motor responses would overeat when confronted with tempting foods. In line with the hypothesis, the data show that overeating follows from an interaction between restraint and impulsivity; high-restrained eaters only overate when they were also impulsive. It is concluded that being restrained per se is not a determinant of overeating. Being a restrained eater only bears the risk of overeating in case of coexisting impulsivity. PMID:19038379

  11. Impulsive synchronization of networked nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haibo; Bi, Qinsheng

    2010-06-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the problem of impulsive synchronization of networked multi-agent systems, where each agent can be modeled as an identical nonlinear dynamical system. Firstly, an impulsive control protocol is designed for network with fixed topology based on the local information of agents. Then sufficient conditions are given to guarantee the synchronization of the networked nonlinear dynamical system by using algebraic graph theory and impulsive control theory. Furthermore, how to select the discrete instants and impulsive constants is discussed. The case that the topologies of the networks are switching is also considered. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  12. The annoyance of impulsive helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karamcheti, K.

    1981-01-01

    A total of 96 impulsive and non-impulsive sounds were rated for annoyance by 10 subjects. The signals had the same amplitude spectrum with a maximum frequency of 4.75 kHz. By changing the phase of the spectral components different levels of impulsivity were obtained. The signals had coefficients of impulsivity of 10,8, 7,9, and -0.2 respectively. Further, signals had intensity levels 89 and 95 dBA, pulse repetition rates 10 and 20 Hz, and half the signals had pink noise added at a level 12 dBA lower than the level of the sound. The significant results were: The four females and six male subjects rated the impulsive sounds respectively 3.7 dB less annoying and 2.6 dB more annoying than the non-impulsive sounds. Overall, impulsivity had no effect. The hish pulse repetition rate increased annoyance by 2.2 dB. Addition of pink noise increased annoyance of the non-impulsive sounds 1.2 dB, but decreased the annoyance of the impulsive sounds 0.5 dB.

  13. Brain structure correlates of emotion-based rash impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Muhlert, N.; Lawrence, A.D.

    2015-01-01

    Negative urgency (the tendency to engage in rash, ill-considered action in response to intense negative emotions), is a personality trait that has been linked to problematic involvement in several risky and impulsive behaviours, and to various forms of disinhibitory psychopathology, but its neurobiological correlates are poorly understood. Here, we explored whether inter-individual variation in levels of trait negative urgency was associated with inter-individual variation in regional grey matter volumes. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in a sample (n = 152) of healthy participants, we found that smaller volumes of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and right temporal pole, regions previously linked to emotion appraisal, emotion regulation and emotion-based decision-making, were associated with higher levels of trait negative urgency. When controlling for other impulsivity linked personality traits (sensation seeking, lack of planning/perseverance) and negative emotionality per se (neuroticism), these associations remained, and an additional relationship was found between higher levels of trait negative urgency and smaller volumes of the left ventral striatum. This latter finding mirrors recent VBM findings in an animal model of impulsivity. Our findings offer novel insight into the brain structure correlates of one key source of inter-individual differences in impulsivity. PMID:25957991

  14. Impulsivity moderates the association between racial discrimination and alcohol problems.

    PubMed

    Latzman, Robert D; Chan, Wing Yi; Shishido, Yuri

    2013-12-01

    Alcohol use among university students is a serious public health concern, particularly among minority students who may use alcohol to cope with experiences of racial discrimination. Although the impact of racial discrimination on alcohol use has been well-established, individual differences in factors that may act to either attenuate or exacerbate the negative effects of racial discrimination are largely unknown. One potentially fruitful individual differences trait that has repeatedly been found to predict alcohol problems is the multidimensional personality trait of impulsivity. Nonetheless, the ways in which various aspects of impulsivity interact with racial discrimination is yet unknown. The current study, therefore, examined the joint and interactive contribution of racial discrimination and impulsivity in the prediction of alcohol consumption among racial minority university students. Participants included 336 Black/African-American and Asian/Asian-American university students. Results revealed both racial discrimination and impulsivity to be significantly associated with alcohol problems. Further, individuals' responses to racial discrimination were not uniform. Specifically, the association between racial discrimination and alcohol problems was moderated by lack of Premeditation; racial discrimination was most strongly predictive of alcohol problems for those who reported low level of premeditation. Findings from the present study highlight the importance of investigating risk factors for alcohol problems across multiple levels of the ecology as individual personality traits appear to relate to how one might respond to the experience of racial discrimination. PMID:24051137

  15. The video head impulse test during post-rotatory nystagmus: physiology and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Mantokoudis, Georgios; Tehrani, Ali S Saber; Xie, Li; Eibenberger, Karin; Eibenberger, Bernhard; Roberts, Dale; Newman-Toker, David E; Zee, David S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effects of a sustained nystagmus on the head impulse response of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in healthy subjects. VOR gain (slow-phase eye velocity/head velocity) was measured using video head impulse test goggles. Acting as a surrogate for a spontaneous nystagmus (SN), a post-rotatory nystagmus (PRN) was elicited after a sustained, constant-velocity rotation, and then head impulses were applied. 'Raw' VOR gain, uncorrected for PRN, in healthy subjects in response to head impulses with peak velocities in the range of 150°/s-250°/s was significantly increased (as reflected in an increase in the slope of the gain versus head velocity relationship) after inducing PRN with slow phases of nystagmus of high intensity (>30°/s) in the same but not in the opposite direction as the slow-phase response induced by the head impulses. The values of VOR gain themselves, however, remained in the normal range with slow-phase velocities of PRN < 30°/s. Finally, quick phases of PRN were suppressed during the first 20-160 ms of a head impulse; the time frame of suppression depended on the direction of PRN but not on the duration of the head impulse. Our results in normal subjects suggest that VOR gains measured using head impulses may have to be corrected for any superimposed SN when the slow-phase velocity of nystagmus is relatively high and the peak velocity of the head movements is relatively low. The suppression of quick phases during head impulses may help to improve steady fixation during rapid head movements. PMID:26449967

  16. Impulsivity and the Sexes: Measurement and Structural Invariance of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyders, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Before it is possible to test whether men and women differ in impulsivity, it is necessary to evaluate whether impulsivity measures are invariant across sex. The UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking, with added subscale of positive urgency) is one measure of five…

  17. A Galerkin finite-element flow model to predict the transient response of a radially symmetric aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program developed to evaluate radial flow of ground water, such as at a pumping well, recharge basin, or injection well, is capable of simulating anisotropic, inhomogenous, confined, or pseudo-unconfined (constant saturated thickness) conditions. Results compare well with those calculated from published analytical and model solutions. The program is based on the Galerkin finite-element technique. A sample model run is presented to illustrate the use of the program; supplementary material provides the program listing as well as a sample problem data set and output. From the text and other material presented, one can use the program to predict drawdowns from pumping and ground-water buildups from recharge in a radially symmetric ground-water system.

  18. Impulsive model for reactive collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marron, M. T.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple classical mechanical model of the reactive scattering of a structureless atom A and a quasi-diatomic BC is developed which takes full advantage of energy, linear and angular momentum conservation relations but introduces a minimum of further assumptions. These are as follows: (1) the vibrational degree of freedom of the reactant (BC) and product (AB) molecules is suppressed, so the change in vibrational energy is simply a parameter; (2) straight-line trajectories are assumed outside of a reaction shell; (3) within this zone, momentum transfer occurs impulsively (essentially instantaneously) following mass transfer; (4) the impulse, which may be either positive or negative, is directed along the BC axis, which may, however, assume all orientations with respect to the incident relative velocity. The model yields differential and total cross sections and product rotational energy distributions for a given collision exoergicity Q, or for any known distribution over Q. Numerical results are presented for several prototype reactions whose dynamics have been well-studied.

  19. Frontal Dysfunctions of Impulse Control – A Systematic Review in Borderline Personality Disorder and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Alexandra; Jung, Patrick; Krause-Utz, Annegret; Lieb, Klaus; Schmahl, Christian; Tüscher, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Disorders such as borderline personality disorder (BPD) or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are characterized by impulsive behaviors. Impulsivity as used in clinical terms is very broadly defined and entails different categories including personality traits as well as different cognitive functions such as emotion regulation or interference resolution and impulse control. Impulse control as an executive function, however, is neither cognitively nor neurobehaviorally a unitary function. Recent findings from behavioral and cognitive neuroscience studies suggest related but dissociable components of impulse control along functional domains like selective attention, response selection, motivational control, and behavioral inhibition. In addition, behavioral and neural dissociations are seen for proactive vs. reactive inhibitory motor control. The prefrontal cortex with its sub-regions is the central structure in executing these impulse control functions. Based on these concepts of impulse control, neurobehavioral findings of studies in BPD and ADHD were reviewed and systematically compared. Overall, patients with BPD exhibited prefrontal dysfunctions across impulse control components rather in orbitofrontal, dorsomedial, and dorsolateral prefrontal regions, whereas patients with ADHD displayed disturbed activity mainly in ventrolateral and medial prefrontal regions. Prefrontal dysfunctions, however, varied depending on the impulse control component and from disorder to disorder. This suggests a dissociation of impulse control related frontal dysfunctions in BPD and ADHD, although only few studies are hitherto available to assess frontal dysfunctions along different impulse control components in direct comparison of these disorders. Yet, these findings might serve as a hypothesis for the future systematic assessment of impulse control components to understand differences and commonalities of prefrontal cortex dysfunction in impulsive disorders. PMID

  20. Impulse gage development for the 100-200 ktap range

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, P.C.; Naumann, W.J. . Advanced Technologies Div.)

    1990-07-31

    Special effects underground test (UGT) material response and source diagnostics data require impulse gages that can be used in the 50--150 ktap range and have equilibrated from electrical and mechanical noise sources within 0.001 s. Such gages were designed, analyzed, and tested under this program. One- and two-dimensional stress propagation calculations were performed and predictions were developed for deformation of the gage specimen cup. These predictions were conservative when compared to gas gun test results. The response of the gage will equilibrate within 5% to its final value within 300 {mu}sec. The impulse delivered to the gages for these tests exceeded 250 ktap. The code and experimental results provides a basis for confidence in the operability of the gage in an actual UGT environment.

  1. Reliability and validity of measures of impulsive choice and impulsive action in smokers trying to quit.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Danielle E; Bold, Krysten W; Minami, Haruka; Yeh, Vivian M; Rutten, Emily; Nadkarni, Shruti G; Chapman, Gretchen B

    2016-04-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that smokers are more impulsive than are nonsmokers, but few studies have examined relations between impulsiveness and later success in quitting smoking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and predictive validity of facets of impulsiveness in adult smokers trying to quit. Baseline behavioral measures of impulsive choice (assessed with a delay discounting task) and impulsive action (assessed with a measure of behavioral disinhibition) were used as predictors of smoking cessation success over 12 weeks. The sample included 116 adult (18 years old or older) daily smokers from central New Jersey. Impulsive choice, impulsive action, and self-reported impulsiveness were not significantly related to one another at baseline. Impulsive choice had high test-retest reliability from pre- to postquit, whereas impulsive action was less stable. Test-retest reliability from prequit to 3 weeks' postquit was moderated by achievement of 7-day abstinence. Baseline impulsive action was significantly negatively related to quitting for at least 1 day in the first 2 weeks of a quit attempt and of prolonged abstinence (no relapse over the next 10 weeks). Baseline impulsive choice was robustly associated with biochemically verified 7-day point-prevalence abstinence 12 weeks' postquit, such that those with lower delay discounting were more likely to achieve abstinence. Facets of impulsiveness appear to function largely independently in adult smokers, as indicated by their lack of intercorrelation, differential stability, and differential relations with abstinence. Impulsive action may impede initial quitting, whereas impulsive choice may be an obstacle to maintaining lasting abstinence. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26751623

  2. Reliability and Validity of Measures of Impulsive Choice and Impulsive Action in Smokers Trying to Quit

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Danielle E.; Bold, Krysten W.; Minami, Haruka; Yeh, Vivian M.; Rutten, Emily; Nadkarni, Shruti G.; Chapman, Gretchen B.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that smokers are more impulsive than are non-smokers, but few studies have examined relations between impulsiveness and later success in quitting smoking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and predictive validity of facets of impulsiveness in adult smokers trying to quit. Baseline behavioral measures of impulsive choice (assessed with a delay discounting task) and impulsive action (assessed with a measure of behavioral disinhibition) were used as predictors of smoking cessation success over 12 weeks. The sample included 116 adult (18 years old or older) daily smokers from central New Jersey. Impulsive choice, impulsive action, and self-reported impulsiveness were not significantly related to one another at baseline. Impulsive choice had high test-retest reliability from pre- to post-quit, whereas impulsive action was less stable. Test-retest reliability from pre-quit to three weeks post-quit was moderated by achievement of seven-day abstinence. Baseline impulsive action was significantly negatively related to quitting for at least one day in the first two weeks of a quit attempt and of prolonged abstinence (no relapse over the next 10 weeks). Baseline impulsive choice was robustly associated with biochemically verified seven-day point-prevalence abstinence 12 weeks post-quit, such that those with lower delay discounting were more likely to achieve abstinence. Facets of impulsiveness appear to function largely independently in adult smokers, as indicated by their lack of inter-correlation, differential stability, and differential relations with abstinence. Impulsive action may impede initial quitting, whereas impulsive choice may be an obstacle to maintaining lasting abstinence. PMID:26751623

  3. Impulsive events in the evolution of a forced nonlinear system

    SciTech Connect

    Longcope, D.W.; Sudan, R.N. )

    1992-03-16

    Long-time numerical solutions of a low-dimensional model of the reduced MHD equations show that, when this system is driven quasistatically, the response is punctuated by impulsive events. The statistics of these events indicate a Poisson process; the frequency of these events scales as {Delta}{ital E}{sub {ital M}}{sup {minus}1}, where {Delta}{ital E}{sub {ital M}} is the energy released in one event.

  4. Variable delay-to-signal: a fast paradigm for assessment of aspects of impulsivity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Leite-Almeida, Hugo; Melo, António; Pêgo, José M.; Bernardo, Sara; Milhazes, Nuno; Borges, Fernanda; Sousa, Nuno; Almeida, Armando; Cerqueira, João J.

    2013-01-01

    Testing impulsive behavior in rodents is challenging and labor-intensive. We developed a new behavioral paradigm—the Variable Delay-to-Signal (VDS) test—that provides rapid and simultaneous assessment of response and decision impulsivity in rodents. Presentation of a light at variable delays signals the permission for action (nose poke) contingent with a reward. 2 blocks of 25 trials at 3 s delay flank a block of 70 trials in which light is presented with randomly selected 6 or 12 s delays. Exposure to such large delays boosts the rate of premature responses when the delay drops to 3 s in the final block, an effect that is blunted by an acute methamphetamine challenge and that correlates with the delay-discounting (DD) paradigm (choice impulsivity). Finally, as expected, treatment with the NMDA antagonist MK-801 caused a generalized response increase in all VDS blocks. The pharmacological validation, particularly with methamphetamine which has a well established dual effect on response and decision impulsivity, and the correlations between the impulsive behavior in the DD and VDS paradigms, suggests that the later is able to provide, in a single session, a multi-dimensional assessment of impulsive behavior. PMID:24167478

  5. Reflection-Impulsivity and Wholist-Analytic: Two Fledglings...or is R-I a cuckoo?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anne Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    Considers the theoretical validity of two approaches to cognitive style. Wholist-Analytic maintains that cognitive processes depend on the interaction of two opposing forces, destructive and constructive. Reflection-Impulsivity characterizes learners according to their reflective or impulsive responses to solution hypotheses. Evaluates these…

  6. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2014-01-07

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  7. Impulsivity, School Context, and School Misconduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Matt; Barton, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity holds a central place in the explanations of adolescent delinquency. Recent research suggests that neighborhood characteristics, particularly SES (socioeconomic status), perceived supervision, and collective efficacy, moderate the association between impulsivity and delinquency. However, findings to date have been equivocal, and the…

  8. Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder in Children's Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laufer, Maurice W.; Denhoff, Eric; Solomons, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A very common cause of children's behavior disorder disturbance is an entity described as the hyperkinetic impulse disorder. This is characterized by hyperactivity, short attention span and poor powers of concentration, irritability, impulsiveness, variability, and poor schoolwork. The existence of this complexity may lead to many psychological…

  9. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  10. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1989-05-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during manufacture of paper and similar web products. Impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip where one of the rolls is heated to a very high temperature. Steam generated by contact with the hot roll expands and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is much lower than that required for conventional evaporative drying. Tests have been completed that elucidate the unique displacement mechanism of water removal in the impulse drying process. A pilot roll press has been designed, installed and used to examine impulse drying under conditions that simulate commercial press conditions. The results of this earlier work have been reported in three previous reports. During this report period October, 1987 to September, 1988, the pilot press was equipped with a second impulse drying roll to facilitate studies of surface uniformity in impulse dried paper. Studies have also been completed which examine the origins of sheet delamination that has been been encountered during impulse drying of certain heavyweight paper grades, and which investigate approaches to prevent delamination in these grades. Finally, an experimental plan has been formalized to examine impulse drying of lightweight grades which are candidates for early commercialization. 7 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Covert Suicidal Impulses in Maternally Deprived Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Gilbert; Lubin, Harriet

    This paper discusses the development of suicidal impulses in children who have lost their mothers due to abandonment or death. The paper is based on two psychoanalytic case studies, in which the children were in therapy when the first suicidal impulses emerged. A pattern is described in which bereaved children's intense wishes to have their…

  12. Effects of tryptophan depletion and a simulated alcohol binge on impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Donald M; Mullen, Jillian; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie; Liang, Yuanyuan; Karns, Tara E; Lake, Sarah L; Mathias, Charles W; Roache, John D

    2015-04-01

    Researchers have suggested binge drinkers experience disproportionate increases in impulsivity during the initial period of drinking, leading to a loss of control over further drinking, and that serotonergic mechanisms may underlie such effects. We examined the effects of a simulated alcohol binge and tryptophan depletion on 3 types of impulsivity-response initiation (immediate memory task [IMT]), response inhibition (GoStop task), and delay discounting (single key impulsivity paradigm [SKIP])-and tested whether observed effects were related to real-world binging. Adults (N = 179) with diverse drinking histories completed a within-subject crossover design over 4 experimental days. Each day, participants underwent 1 of 4 test conditions: tryptophan depletion/alcohol, tryptophan depletion/placebo, tryptophan-balanced control/alcohol, or tryptophan-balanced control/placebo. The simulated binge involved consuming 0.3 g/kg of alcohol at 5, 6, and 7 hr after consuming the tryptophan-depletion/balanced mixture. Impulsivity was measured before and after each drink. Relative to the placebo beverage condition, when alcohol was consumed, impulsive responding was increased at moderate and high levels of intoxication on the IMT and the GoStop but only at high levels of intoxication on the SKIP. Tryptophan depletion had no effect on impulsivity. Effects of alcohol and tryptophan manipulations on impulsivity were unrelated to patterns of binge drinking outside the laboratory. The effects of alcohol consumption on impulsivity depend on the component of impulsivity and the dose of alcohol consumed. Such effects do not appear to be a result of reduced serotonin synthesis. In addition, real-world binge drinking behaviors were unrelated to behavioral changes observed in the laboratory. PMID:25730415

  13. Helicopter impulsive noise - Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  14. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  15. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-30

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  16. Helicopter impulsive noise - Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanisms is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanisms of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory/experiment are suggested.

  17. Helicopter impulsive noise: Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  18. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force based elasticity imaging methods are under investigation by many groups. These methods differ from traditional ultrasonic elasticity imaging methods in that they do not require compression of the transducer, and are thus expected to be less operator dependent. Methods have been developed that utilize impulsive (i.e. < 1 ms), harmonic (pulsed), and steady state radiation force excitations. The work discussed herein utilizes impulsive methods, for which two imaging approaches have been pursued: 1) monitoring the tissue response within the radiation force region of excitation (ROE) and generating images of relative differences in tissue stiffness (Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging); and 2) monitoring the speed of shear wave propagation away from the ROE to quantify tissue stiffness (Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging (SWEI)). For these methods, a single ultrasound transducer on a commercial ultrasound system can be used to both generate acoustic radiation force in tissue, and to monitor the tissue displacement response. The response of tissue to this transient excitation is complicated and depends upon tissue geometry, radiation force field geometry, and tissue mechanical and acoustic properties. Higher shear wave speeds and smaller displacements are associated with stiffer tissues, and slower shear wave speeds and larger displacements occur with more compliant tissues. ARFI images have spatial resolution comparable to that of B-mode, often with greater contrast, providing matched, adjunctive information. SWEI images provide quantitative information about the tissue stiffness, typically with lower spatial resolution. A review these methods and examples of clinical applications are presented herein. PMID:22545033

  19. Conversion of Impulse Voltage Generator Into Steep Wave Impulse Test-Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed Zaid; Tanwar, Surender Singh; Dayama, Ravindra; Choudhary, Rahul Raj; Mangal, Ravindra

    This paper demonstrates the alternative measures to generate the Steep wave impulse by using Impulse Voltage Generator (IVG) for high voltage testing of porcelain insulators. The modification of IVG by incorporating compensation of resistor, inductor, and capacitor has been achieved and further performance of the modified system has been analyzed by applying the generated lightning impulse and analyzing the electrical characteristics of impulse waves under standard lightning and fast rise multiple lightning waveform to determine the effect to improve rise time. The advantageous results have been received and being reported such as increase in overshoot compensation, increase in capacitive and inductive load ranges. Such further reduces the duration of oscillations of standard impulse voltages. The reduction in oscillation duration of steep front impulse voltages may be utilized in up gradation of Impulse Voltage Generator System. Stray capacitance could further be added in order to get the minimized difference of measurement between simulation and the field establishment.

  20. Effects of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant on distinct measures of impulsive behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Mieke C. W.; Schepers, Inga; González-Cuevas, Gustavo; de Vries, Taco J.; Schoffelmeer, Anton N. M.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Pathological impulsivity is a prominent feature in several psychiatric disorders, but detailed understanding of the specific neuronal processes underlying impulsive behavior is as yet lacking. Objectives As recent findings have suggested involvement of the brain cannabinoid system in impulsivity, the present study aimed at further elucidating the role of cannabinoid CB1 receptor activation in distinct measures of impulsive behavior. Materials and methods The effects of the selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant (SR141716A) and agonist WIN55,212-2 were tested in various measures of impulsive behavior, namely, inhibitory control in a five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), impulsive choice in a delayed reward paradigm, and response inhibition in a stop-signal paradigm. Results In the 5-CSRTT, SR141716A dose-dependently improved inhibitory control by decreasing the number of premature responses. Furthermore, SR141716A slightly improved attentional function, increased correct response latency, but did not affect other parameters. The CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 did not change inhibitory control in the 5-CSRTT and only increased response latencies and errors of omissions. Coadministration of WIN55,212-2 prevented the effects of SR141716A on inhibitory control in the 5-CSRTT. Impulsive choice and response inhibition were not affected by SR141716A at any dose, whereas WIN55,212-2 slightly impaired response inhibition but did not change impulsive choice. Conclusions The present data suggest that particularly the endocannabinoid system seems involved in some measures of impulsivity and provides further evidence for the existence of distinct forms of impulsivity that can be pharmacologically dissociated. PMID:17387457

  1. Study on the Influence of Different Interface Conditions on the Response of Finite Element Human Head Models under Occipital Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aomura, Shigeru; Fujiwara, Satoshi; Ikoma, Takayuki

    The aim of the present study is to obtain a better understanding of skull-brain interface conditions and the influence of the neck region when the finite element human head model under impact loading is constructed. The three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of skin, skull, CSF and neck is constructed based on MRI and CT data. The material properties are adopted from the literature previously published and are homogeneous and isotropic. Next, a crash test is carried out by crashing an iron block impactor on the occipital region of the physical human head neck model in which water is filled and intracranial pressure and head acceleration are measured. The result of the numerical calculation is compared with the result of the experiment for verification of the computer model and good agreement is obtained. The result shows that the tied-type interface condition is preferable than the slide-type condition in order to represent the phenomenon in the physical model. The presence of the neck is important for analysis but the stiffness of the neck seldom affects the intracranial response.

  2. Head and neck response of a finite element anthropomorphic test device and human body model during a simulated rotary-wing aircraft impact.

    PubMed

    White, Nicholas A; Danelson, Kerry A; Gayzik, F Scott; Stitzel, Joel D

    2014-11-01

    A finite element (FE) simulation environment has been developed to investigate aviator head and neck response during a simulated rotary-wing aircraft impact using both an FE anthropomorphic test device (ATD) and an FE human body model. The head and neck response of the ATD simulation was successfully validated against an experimental sled test. The majority of the head and neck transducer time histories received a CORrelation and analysis (CORA) rating of 0.7 or higher, indicating good overall correlation. The human body model simulation produced a more biofidelic head and neck response than the ATD experimental test and simulation, including change in neck curvature. While only the upper and lower neck loading can be measured in the ATD, the shear force, axial force, and bending moment were reported for each level of the cervical spine in the human body model using a novel technique involving cross sections. This loading distribution provides further insight into the biomechanical response of the neck during a rotary-wing aircraft impact. PMID:25085863

  3. On spurious detection of linear response and misuse of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem in finite time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottwald, Georg A.; Wormell, J. P.; Wouters, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    Using a sensitive statistical test we determine whether or not one can detect the breakdown of linear response given observations of deterministic dynamical systems. A goodness-of-fit statistics is developed for a linear statistical model of the observations, based on results for central limit theorems for deterministic dynamical systems, and used to detect linear response breakdown. We apply the method to discrete maps which do not obey linear response and show that the successful detection of breakdown depends on the length of the time series, the magnitude of the perturbation and on the choice of the observable. We find that in order to reliably reject the assumption of linear response for typical observables sufficiently large data sets are needed. Even for simple systems such as the logistic map, one needs of the order of 106 observations to reliably detect the breakdown with a confidence level of 95 %; if less observations are available one may be falsely led to conclude that linear response theory is valid. The amount of data required is larger the smaller the applied perturbation. For judiciously chosen observables the necessary amount of data can be drastically reduced, but requires detailed a priori knowledge about the invariant measure which is typically not available for complex dynamical systems. Furthermore we explore the use of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT) in cases with limited data length or coarse-graining of observations. The FDT, if applied naively to a system without linear response, is shown to be very sensitive to the details of the sampling method, resulting in erroneous predictions of the response.

  4. Solar impulsive energetic electron events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linghua

    The Sun is capable of accelerating ions from ~ tens of keV up to tens of GeV and electrons from ~ tens of eV up to hundreds of MeVs in transient events such as flares and fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The energized particles escaping into the interplanetary medium are referred to as Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events. The great majority of SEP events are impulsive SEP events that are dominated by ~1-100 keV electrons and ~MeV/nucleon ion emissions, with enhanced 3 He/ 4 He ratios up to 10 4 times the coronal values (also called electron/ 3 He-rich SEP events). This thesis is focused on solar impulsive energetic electron events, the electron part of impulsive SEP events, using electron observations from the 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument (3DP) on the WIND spacecraft near the Earth. First, I present the first comprehensive statistical study of solar energetic electron events over almost one solar cycle. I find that the occurrence rate of solar electron events shows a strong solar-cycle variation; after correction for the background effect, the estimated occurrence frequency exhibits a good power-law distribution, and the estimated occurrence rate near the Earth is ~1000/year at solar maximum and ~30/year at solar minimum for the instrumental sensitivity (~2.9×10^-4 (cm 2 s str eV) -1 for the 40 keV channel) of WIND/3DP, about one order of magnitude larger than the observed occurrence rate. Solar energetic electron events have a one-to-one association with type III radio bursts and a poor association with flares, but a close association with 3 He- rich ion emissions. These 3 He-rich electron events also have a poor association with flares but a close (~ 60%) association with west-limb CMEs. Then I present two case studies: one investigating the temporal relationship between solar impulsive electrons and type III radio emissions, and the second studying the temporal relationship between solar impulsive electrons and 3 He- rich ions. For both

  5. Tourette-like behaviors in the normal population are associated with hyperactive/impulsive ADHD-like behaviors but do not relate to deficits in conditioned inhibition or response inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Heym, Nadja; Kantini, Ebrahim; Checkley, Hannah L. R.; Cassaday, Helen J.

    2014-01-01

    Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Tourette Syndrome (TS) present as distinct conditions clinically; however, comorbidity and inhibitory control deficits have been proposed for both. Whilst such deficits have been studied widely within clinical populations, findings are mixed—partly due to comorbidity and/or medication effects—and studies have rarely distinguished between subtypes of the disorders. Studies in the general population are sparse. Using a continuity approach, the present study examined (i) the relationships between inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive aspects of ADHD and TS-like behaviors in the general population, and (ii) their unique associations with automatic and executive inhibitory control, as well as (iii) yawning (a proposed behavioral model of TS). One hundred and thirty-eight participants completed self-report measures for ADHD and TS-like behaviors as well as yawning, and a conditioned inhibition task to assess automatic inhibition. A sub-sample of fifty-four participants completed three executive inhibition tasks. An exploratory factor analysis of the TS behavior checklist supported a distinction between phonic and motor like pure TS behaviors. Whilst hyperactive/impulsive aspects of ADHD were associated with increased pure and compulsive TS-like behaviors, inattention in isolation was related to reduced obsessive-compulsive TS-like behaviors. TS-like behaviors were associated with yawning during situations of inactivity, and specifically motor TS was related to yawning during stress. Phonic TS and inattention aspects of ADHD were associated with yawning during concentration/activity. Whilst executive interference control deficits were linked to hyperactive/impulsive ADHD-like behaviors, this was not the case for inattentive ADHD or TS-like behaviors, which instead related to increased performance on some measures. No associations were observed for automatic conditioned inhibition. PMID:25228890

  6. Nanoindentation testing and finite element simulations of cortical bone allowing for anisotropic elastic and inelastic mechanical response.

    PubMed

    Carnelli, Davide; Lucchini, Riccardo; Ponzoni, Matteo; Contro, Roberto; Vena, Pasquale

    2011-07-01

    Anisotropy is one of the most peculiar aspects of cortical bone mechanical behaviour, and the numerical approach can be successfully used to investigate aspects of bone tissue mechanics that analytical methods solve in approximate way or do not cover. In this work, nanoindentation experimental tests and finite element simulations were employed to investigate the elastic-inelastic anisotropic mechanical properties of cortical bone. The model allows for anisotropic elastic and post-yield behaviour of the tissue. A tension-compression mismatch and direction-dependent yield stresses are allowed for. Indentation experiments along the axial and transverse directions were simulated with the purpose to predict the indentation moduli and hardnesses along multiple orientations. Results showed that the experimental transverse-to-axial ratio of indentation moduli, equal to 0.74, is predicted with a ∼3% discrepancy regardless the post-yield material behaviour; whereas, the transverse-to-axial hardness ratio, equal to 0.86, can be correctly simulated (discrepancy ∼6% w.r.t. the experimental results) only employing an anisotropic post-elastic constitutive model. Further, direct comparison between the experimental and simulated indentation tests evidenced a good agreement in the loading branch of the indentation curves and in the peak loads for a transverse-to-axial yield stress ratio comparable to the experimentally obtained transverse-to-axial hardness ratio. In perspective, the present work results strongly support the coupling between indentation experiments and FEM simulations to get a deeper knowledge of bone tissue mechanical behaviour at the microstructural level. The present model could be used to assess the effect of variations of constitutive parameters due to age, injury, and/or disease on bone mechanical performance in the context of indentation testing. PMID:21570077

  7. Integration of a Finite Element Model with the DAP Bone Remodeling Model to Characterize Bone Response to Skeletal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Christopher R.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, J. G.; Pennline, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a bone remodeling model that has been validated for predicting volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) changes of trabecular and cortical bone in the absence of mechanical loading. The model was recently updated to include skeletal loading from exercise and free living activities to maintain healthy bone using a new daily load stimulus (DLS). This new formula was developed based on an extensive review of existing DLS formulas, as discussed in the abstract by Pennline et al. The DLS formula incorporated into the bone remodeling model utilizes strains and stress calculated from finite element model (FEM) of the bone region of interest. The proximal femur was selected for the initial application of the DLS formula, with a specific focus on the femoral neck. METHODS: The FEM was generated from CAD geometry of a femur using de-identified CT data. The femur was meshed using linear tetrahedral elements Figure (1) with higher mesh densities in the femoral neck region, which is the primary region of interest for the initial application of the DLS formula in concert with the DAP bone remodeling model. Nodal loads were applied to the femoral head and the greater trochanter and the base of the femur was held fixed. An L2 norm study was conducted to reduce the length of the femoral shaft without significantly impacting the stresses in the femoral neck. The material properties of the FEM of the proximal femur were separated between cortical and trabecular regions to work with the bone remodeling model. Determining the elements with cortical material properties in the FEM was based off of publicly available CT hip scans [4] that were segmented, cleaned, and overlaid onto the FEM.

  8. High levels of impulsivity in rats are not accompanied by sensorimotor gating deficits and locomotor hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Feja, M; Lang, M; Deppermann, L; Yüksel, A; Wischhof, L

    2015-12-01

    High levels of impulsivity have been linked to a number of psychiatric disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, drug abuse and schizophrenia. Additionally, schizophrenia patients commonly show deficits in another rather preattentive form of response inhibition, called sensorimotor gating. Given that higher-order functions, such as impulse control, are protected by early and preattentive processes, disturbed gating mechanisms may hamper more complex cognitive-executive functions. In the present study, we therefore tested whether high levels of impulsivity are accompanied by impaired sensorimotor gating in rats. High (HI) and low impulsive (LI) rats were identified based on the number of premature responses in the 5-choice serial reaction time task. Here, LI rats showed higher numbers of omission errors which may suggest attentional deficits while HI rats completed significantly less trials which could indicate a decrease in motivation. However, HI and LI rats did not differ in terms of impulsive decision-making in a delay-based decision-making T-maze task, prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (a measure of sensorimotor gating mechanisms) or locomotor activity levels. Overall, our data indicate that high motor impulsivity is not a suitable predictor of deficient sensorimotor gating and is further not necessarily associated with attentional deficits and/or locomotor hyperactivity in rats. PMID:26484709

  9. Behavioral assessment of impulsivity in pathological gamblers with and without substance use disorder histories versus healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Ledgerwood, David M.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Phoenix, Natalie; Petry, Nancy M.

    2009-01-01

    Pathological gamblers (PGs) may have high levels of impulsivity, and a correlation between substance use disorders (SUD) and impulsivity is well established. However, only a handful of studies have attempted to assess impulsivity and other impulse-spectrum traits (e.g., sensation seeking) using a variety of behavioral and self-report measures in PGs and few examined the independent impact of SUDs. We compared 30 PGs without SUD histories, 31 PGs with SUD histories and 40 control participants on self-reported impulsivity, delayed discounting, attention/memory, response inhibition, risk taking, sensation seeking and distress tolerance measures. PGs, regardless of SUD history, discounted delayed rewards at greater rates than controls. PGs also reported acting on the spur of the moment, experienced trouble planning and thinking carefully, and noted greater attention difficulties than controls. PGs with SUD took greater risks on a risk-taking task than did PGs without SUD histories, but the two groups did not differ on any other measures of impulsivity. We conclude that PGs are more impulsive than non-problem gamblers in fairly specific ways, but PGs with and without SUD histories differ on few measures. More research should focus on specific ways in which PGs exhibit impulsivity to better address impulsive behaviors in treatment. PMID:19615829

  10. From impulses to maladaptive actions: the insula is a neurobiological gate for the development of compulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Belin-Rauscent, A; Daniel, M-L; Puaud, M; Jupp, B; Sawiak, S; Howett, D; McKenzie, C; Caprioli, D; Besson, M; Robbins, T W; Everitt, B J; Dalley, J W; Belin, D

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity is an endophenotype of vulnerability for compulsive behaviors. However, the neural mechanisms whereby impulsivity facilitates the development of compulsive disorders, such as addiction or obsessive compulsive disorder, remain unknown. We first investigated, in rats, anatomical and functional correlates of impulsivity in the anterior insular (AI) cortex by measuring both the thickness of, and cellular plasticity markers in, the AI with magnetic resonance imaging and in situ hybridization of the immediate early gene zif268, respectively. We then investigated the influence of bilateral AI cortex lesions on the high impulsivity trait, as measured in the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), and the associated propensity to develop compulsivity as measured by high drinking levels in a schedule-induced polydipsia procedure (SIP). We demonstrate that the AI cortex causally contributes to individual vulnerability to impulsive-compulsive behavior in rats. Motor impulsivity, as measured by premature responses in the 5-CSRTT, was shown to correlate with the thinness of the anterior region of the insular cortex, in which highly impulsive (HI) rats expressed lower zif268 mRNA levels. Lesions of AI reduced impulsive behavior in HI rats, which were also highly susceptible to develop compulsive behavior as measured in a SIP procedure. AI lesions also attenuated both the development and the expression of SIP. This study thus identifies the AI as a novel neural substrate of maladaptive impulse control mechanisms that may facilitate the development of compulsive disorders. PMID:26370145

  11. Durable complete responses off all treatment in patients with metastatic malignant melanoma after sequential immunotherapy followed by a finite course of BRAF inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wyluda, Edward J; Cheng, Jihua; Schell, Todd D; Haley, Jeremy S; Mallon, Carol; Neves, Rogerio I; Robertson, Gavin; Sivik, Jeffrey; Mackley, Heath; Talamo, Giampaolo; Drabick, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    We report 3 cases of durable complete response (CR) in patients with BRAF-mutated metastatic melanoma who were initially treated unsuccessfully with sequential immunotherapies (high dose interleukin 2 followed by ipilimumab with or without concurrent radiation therapy). After progression during or post immunotherapy, these patients were given BRAF inhibitor therapy and developed rapid CRs. Based on the concomitant presence of autoimmune manifestations (including vitiligo and hypophysitis), we postulated that there was a synergistic effect between the prior immune therapy and the BRAF targeting agents. Accordingly, the inhibitors were gradually weaned off beginning at 3 months and were stopped completely at 9–12 months. The three patients remain well and in CR off of all therapy at up to 15 months radiographic follow-up. The institution of the BRAF therapy was associated with development of severe rheumatoid-like arthritis in 2 patients which persisted for months after discontinuation of therapy, suggesting it was not merely a known toxicity of BRAF inhibitors (arthralgias). On immunologic analysis, these patients had high levels of non-T-regulatory, CD4 positive effector phenotype T-cells, which persisted after completion of therapy. Of note, we had previously reported a similar phenomenon in patients with metastatic melanoma who failed high dose interleukin-2 and were then placed on a finite course of temozolomide with rapid complete responses that have remained durable for many years after discontinuation of temozolomide. We postulate that a finite course of cytotoxic or targeted therapy specific for melanoma given after apparent failure of prior immunotherapy can result in complete and durable remissions that may persist long after the specific cytotoxic or targeted agents have been discontinued suggesting the existence of sequence specific synergism between immunotherapy and these agents. Here, we discuss these cases in the context of the literature on

  12. Impact response and biomechanical analysis of the knee-thigh-hip complex in frontal impacts with a full human body finite element model.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jesse S; El-Jawahri, Raed; Barbat, Saeed; Rouhana, Stephen W; Prasad, Priya

    2008-11-01

    Changes in vehicle safety design technology and the increasing use of seat-belts and airbag restraint systems have gradually changed the relative proportion of lower extremity injuries. These changes in real world injuries have renewed interest and the need of further investigation into occupant injury mechanisms and biomechanical impact responses of the knee-thigh-hip complex during frontal impacts. This study uses a detailed finite element model of the human body to simulate occupant knee impacts experienced in frontal crashes. The human body model includes detailed anatomical features of the head, neck, shoulder, chest, thoracic and lumbar spine, abdomen, pelvis, and lower and upper extremities. The material properties used in the model for each anatomic part of the human body were obtained from test data reported in the literature. The human body model used in the current study has been previously validated in frontal and side impacts. It was further validated with cadaver knee-thigh-hip impact tests in the current study. The effects of impactor configuration and flexion angle of the knee on biomechanical impact responses of the knee-thigh-hip complex were studied using the validated human body finite element model. This study showed that the knee flexion angle and the impact direction and shape of the impactors affected the injury outcomes of the knee-thigh-hip complex significantly. The 60 degrees flexed knee impact showed the least impact force, knee pressure, femoral von Mises stress, and pelvic von Mises stress but largest relative displacements of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) and Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL). The 90 degrees flexed knee impact resulted in a higher impact force, knee pressure, femoral von Mises stress, and pelvic von Mises stress; but smaller PCL and ACL displacements. Stress distributions of the patella, femur, and pelvis were also given for all the simulated conditions. PMID:19085174

  13. Religiosity and Impulsivity in Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Caribé, André C.; Rocha, Marlos Fernando Vasconcelos; Junior, Davi Félix Martins; Studart, Paula; Quarantini, Lucas C.; Guerreiro, Nicolau; Miranda-Scippa, Ângela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our aim is to evaluate the relationship between religiosity and impulsivity in patients with mental illness who had attempted suicide and in healthy individuals. This is a cross-sectional study that included 61 healthy individuals and 93 patients. The instruments used were a sociodemographic data questionnaire, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and the Duke University Religion Index. The healthy individuals presented higher scores in the religiosity domains (organizational, p = 0.028; non-organizational, p = 0.000; intrinsic, p = 0.000). The patients presented higher scores in the impulsivity dimensions (attentional, p = 0.000; motor, p = 0.000; absence of planning, p = 0.000). In the patient group, intrinsic religiosity had a significant inverse relationship with total impulsivity (p = 0.023), attentional (p = 0.010), and absence of planning (p = 0.007), even after controlling for sociodemographic variables. Healthy individuals were more religious and less impulsive than patients. The relationship between religiosity, impulsiveness, and mental illness could be bidirectional; that is, just as mental illness might impair religious involvement, religiosity could diminish the expression of mental illness and impulsive behaviors. PMID:26020819

  14. Identifying Vulnerable Plaques with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Joshua Ryan

    The rupture of arterial plaques is the most common cause of ischemic complications including stroke, the fourth leading cause of death and number one cause of long term disability in the United States. Unfortunately, because conventional diagnostic tools fail to identify plaques that confer the highest risk, often a disabling stroke and/or sudden death is the first sign of disease. A diagnostic method capable of characterizing plaque vulnerability would likely enhance the predictive ability and ultimately the treatment of stroke before the onset of clinical events. This dissertation evaluates the hypothesis that Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging can noninvasively identify lipid regions, that have been shown to increase a plaque's propensity to rupture, within carotid artery plaques in vivo. The work detailed herein describes development efforts and results from simulations and experiments that were performed to evaluate this hypothesis. To first demonstrate feasibility and evaluate potential safety concerns, finite- element method simulations are used to model the response of carotid artery plaques to an acoustic radiation force excitation. Lipid pool visualization is shown to vary as a function of lipid pool geometry and stiffness. A comparison of the resulting Von Mises stresses indicates that stresses induced by an ARFI excitation are three orders of magnitude lower than those induced by blood pressure. This thesis also presents the development of a novel pulse inversion harmonic tracking method to reduce clutter-imposed errors in ultrasound-based tissue displacement estimates. This method is validated in phantoms and was found to reduce bias and jitter displacement errors for a marked improvement in image quality in vivo. Lastly, this dissertation presents results from a preliminary in vivo study that compares ARFI imaging derived plaque stiffness with spatially registered composition determined by a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) gold standard

  15. Impulsive and non-impulsive suicide attempts in patients treated for alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wojnar, Marcin; Ilgen, Mark A.; Czyz, Ewa; Strobbe, Stephen; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Glass, Jennifer; Brower, Kirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Suicidal behavior has been recognized as an increasing problem among alcohol-dependent subjects. The aim of the study was to identify correlates of impulsive and non-impulsive suicide attempts among a treated population of alcohol-dependent patients. Methods A total of 154 patients with alcohol dependence consecutively admitted for addiction treatment participated in the study. Suicidal behavior was assessed together with severity of alcohol dependence, childhood abuse, impulsivity, and family history. A stop-signal procedure was used as a behavioral measure of impulsivity. Results and conclusions Lifetime suicide attempts were reported by 43% of patients in alcohol treatment; of which 62% were impulsive. Compared to patients without a suicide attempt, those with a non-impulsive attempt were more likely to have a history of sexual abuse (OR = 7.17), a family history of suicide (OR = 4.09), and higher scores on a personality measure of impulsiveness (OR = 2.27). The only significant factor that distinguished patients with impulsive suicide attempts from patients without a suicide attempt and from patients with a non-impulsive suicide attempt was a higher level of behavioral impulsivity (OR = 1.84 – 2.42). Limitations Retrospective self-report of suicide attempts and family history. Lack of diagnostic measure. PMID:18835498

  16. Are impulse-control disorders related to bipolar disorder?

    PubMed

    McElroy, S L; Pope, H G; Keck, P E; Hudson, J I; Phillips, K A; Strakowski, S M

    1996-01-01

    We reviewed available evidence regarding a possible relationship between impulse-control disorders (ICDs) and bipolar disorder. Studies examining the phenomenology, course, comorbidity, family history, biology, and treatment response of ICDs were compared with similar studies of bipolar disorder. Although no studies directly compare a cohort of ICD patients with a cohort of mood disorder patients, available data suggest that ICDs and bipolar disorder share a number of features: (1) phenomenologic similarities, including harmful, dangerous, or pleasurable behaviors, impulsivity, and similar affective symptoms and dysregulation; (2) onset in adolescence or early adulthood and episodic and/or chronic course; (3) high comorbidity with one another and similar comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders; (4) elevated familial rates of mood disorder; (5) possible abnormalities in central serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission; and (6) response to mood stabilizers and antidepressants. However, ICDs and bipolar disorder differ in important respects. In particular, some ICDs may be more closely related to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) than is bipolar disorder. Although the similarities between ICDs and bipolar disorder may be coincidental, they suggest that the two conditions may be related and thus may share at least one common pathophysiologic abnormality. To explain this possible relationship, we hypothesize that impulsivity and bipolarity (or mania) are related, that compulsivity and unipolarity (or depression) are similarly related, and that each state may represent opposing poles of related, or even a single, psychological dimension. PMID:8826686

  17. A semi-automatic method of generating subject-specific pediatric head finite element models for impact dynamic responses to head injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Han, Xiaoqiang; Ge, Hao; Ma, Chunsheng

    2016-07-01

    To account for the effects of head realistic morphological feature variation on the impact dynamic responses to head injury, it is necessary to develop multiple subject-specific pediatric head finite element (FE) models based on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. However, traditional manual model development is very time-consuming. In this study, a new automatic method was developed to extract anatomical points from pediatric head CT scans to represent pediatric head morphological features (head size/shape, skull thickness, and suture/fontanel width). Subsequently, a geometry-adaptive mesh morphing method based on radial basis function was developed that can automatically morph a baseline pediatric head FE model into target FE models with geometries corresponding to the extracted head morphological features. In the end, five subject-specific head FE models of approximately 6-month-old (6MO) were automatically generated using the developed method. These validated models were employed to investigate differences in the head dynamic responses among subjects with different head morphologies. The results show that variations in head morphological features have a relatively large effect on pediatric head dynamic response. The results of this study indicate that pediatric head morphological variation had better be taken into account when reconstructing pediatric head injury due to traffic/fall accidents or child abuses using computational models as well as predicting head injury risk for children with obvious difference in head size and morphologies. PMID:27058003

  18. Psychosocial predictors of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Konopa, Aleksandra; Podgórska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important risk factor of severe course of alcohol dependence. However, the significance of environmental determinants of impulsivity has been underestimated. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial factors increasing the level of impulsivity in alcoholics. Levels of impulsivity were measured in 304 alcohol-dependent patients. The stop-signal task was used to assess behavioral impulsivity, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, to measure global and cognitive impulsivity. Correlations between impulsivity and psychosocial variables were examined. A significant association between level of impulsivity and severity of psychopathological symptoms was observed. Patients who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse, lower social support, and more severe course of alcohol dependence were more impulsive, especially in the cognitive domain. When entered into a linear regression analysis model, severity of alcohol dependence, psychopathology, and childhood physical abuse remained significant. These results suggest that psychosocial variables are important factors associated with high levels of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:23274294

  19. The Influence of Model Complexity on the Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading-Edge Panel Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa E. (Technical Monitor); Stockwell, Alan E.

    2005-01-01

    LS-DYNA simulations were conducted to study the influence of model complexity on the response of a typical Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panel to a foam impact at a location approximately midway between the ribs. A structural model comprised of Panels 10, 11, and TSeal 11 was chosen as the baseline model for the study. A simulation was conducted with foam striking Panel 10 at Location 4 at an alpha angle of 10 degrees, with an impact velocity of 1000 ft/sec. A second simulation was conducted after removing Panel 11 from the model, and a third simulation was conducted after removing both Panel 11 and T-Seal 11. All three simulations showed approximately the same response for Panel 10, and the simplified simulation model containing only Panel 10 was shown to be significantly less expensive to execute than the other two more complex models.

  20. Two-impulse reorientation of asymmetric spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martz, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation conducted to determine minimum maneuver costs for attitude reorientation of spacecraft of all possible inertial distribution over a wide range of maneuver angles by use of a two impulse coning method of reorientation is reported. Maneuver cost, proportional to the product of fuel consumed (total impulse) and time expended during a maneuver is discussed. Assumptions included external impulsive control torques, rigid body spacecraft rest-to-rest maneuvers, and no disturbance torques. Results are presented in terms of average cost and standard deviation for various maneuver ranges. Costs of individual reorientations are calculated with the computer program included.

  1. [Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Joutsa, Juho; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2013-01-01

    Of the patients having Parkinson's disease, up to third encounters some degree of impulse control problems and one out of seven suffers from true impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping and binge eating. Dopaminergic drugs used in anti-Parkinson therapy, especially dopamine agonists, increase the risk of these disorders. Impulse control disorders are associated with a relatively more active dopamine-mediated neurotransmission of the mesolimbic and mesocortical system. Discontinuation of dopamine agonist medication can thus be considered as the first line treatment of these disorders. PMID:24397147

  2. Robust finite-time boundedness of multi-agent systems subject to parametric uncertainties and disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Liming; Kou, Kit Ian; Zhang, Wentao; Liang, Jinling; Liu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider finite-time control problems for linear multi-agent systems subject to exogenous constant disturbances and impulses. Some sufficient conditions are obtained to ensure the finite-time boundedness of the multi-agent systems, which could be then reduced to a feasibility problem involving linear matrix inequalities. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the results.

  3. Behavioral and cognitive impulsivity in obsessive-compulsive disorder and eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Boisseau, Christina Lynn; Thompson-Brenner, Heather; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine; Pratt, Elizabeth; Farchione, Todd; Barlow, David Harrison

    2012-12-30

    This study compared self-reported impulsivity and neurocognitively assessed response inhibition in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), eating disorder (ED), and healthy control participants. Participants completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), stop-signal reaction time task, and measures of OCD and ED symptomatology (Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale and Eating Disorders Examination-Questionnaire). Compared to controls, both clinical groups reported higher levels of impulsivity on the BIS-11 however; only the OCD demonstrated increased stop-signal reaction time. Heightened levels of self-reported impulsivity may reflect the experience of anxiety in both OCD and ED populations whereas a lack of inhibitory control may represent a specific behavioral deficit in OCD. PMID:22749228

  4. Impulsivity, intelligence, and discriminating reinforcement contingencies in a fixed-ratio 3 schedule.

    PubMed

    Lozano Bleda, José Héctor; Pérez Nieto, Miguel Angel

    2012-11-01

    Research conducted in academic contexts suggests a moderating effect of impulsive behavior on the relationship between aptitude and achievement. According to these studies, intelligence scores being equal, higher levels of impulsivity have an adverse effect on achievement (Helmers, Young, & Pihl, 1995; Vigil-Colet & Morales-Vives, 2005; Zeidner, 1995). The present study aims to contrast the aforementioned moderator effect in the context of a discriminant learning task, carried out under a fixed-ratio 3 reinforcement schedule. To that end, an impulsive behavioral pattern was identified in a sample of 1,600 participants' task execution based on response rate and latency. Said pattern was consistent and stable across several trials and can be ascribed to subjects' interactive style (Hernández, 2000). The observed interaction effect supports the hypothesis that impulsivity has a moderating effect on the aptitude-achievement relationship, highlighting how it impacts achievement differentially depending on the subject's level of aptitude. PMID:23156902

  5. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  6. Optical tracking of acoustic radiation force impulse-induced dynamics in a tissue-mimicking phantom

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Streeter, Jason E.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Optical tracking was utilized to investigate the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI)-induced response, generated by a 5-MHz piston transducer, in a translucent tissue-mimicking phantom. Suspended 10-μm microspheres were tracked axially and laterally at multiple locations throughout the field of view of an optical microscope with 0.5-μm displacement resolution, in both dimensions, and at frame rates of up to 36 kHz. Induced dynamics were successfully captured before, during, and after the ARFI excitation at depths of up to 4.8 mm from the phantom’s proximal boundary. Results are presented for tracked axial and lateral displacements resulting from on-axis and off-axis (i.e., shear wave) acquisitions; these results are compared to matched finite element method modeling and independent ultrasonically based empirical results and yielded reasonable agreement in most cases. A shear wave reflection, generated by the proximal boundary, consistently produced an artifact in tracked displacement data later in time (i.e., after the initial ARFI-induced displacement peak). This tracking method provides high-frame-rate, two-dimensional tracking data and thus could prove useful in the investigation of complex ARFI-induced dynamics in controlled experimental settings. PMID:19894849

  7. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  8. Enhancement of the finite-frequency superfluid response in the pseudogap regime of strongly disordered superconducting films

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Mintu; Kamlapure, Anand; Ganguli, Somesh Chandra; Jesudasan, John; Bagwe, Vivas; Benfatto, Lara; Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    2013-01-01

    The persistence of a soft gap in the density of states above the superconducting transition temperature Tc, the pseudogap, has long been thought to be a hallmark of unconventional high-temperature superconductors. However, in the last few years this paradigm has been strongly revised by increasing experimental evidence for the emergence of a pseudogap state in strongly-disordered conventional superconductors. Nonetheless, the nature of this state, probed primarily through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements, remains partly elusive. Here we show that the dynamic response above Tc, obtained from the complex ac conductivity, is highly modified in the pseudogap regime of strongly disordered NbN films. Below the pseudogap temperature, T*, the superfluid stiffness acquires a strong frequency dependence associated with a marked slowing down of critical fluctuations. When translated into the length-scale of fluctuations, our results suggest a scenario of thermal phase fluctuations between superconducting domains in a strongly disordered s-wave superconductor. PMID:23446946

  9. An impulsive fishery model with environmental stochasticity. Feasibility.

    PubMed

    Castro-Santis, Ricardo; Córdova-Lepe, Fernando; Chambio, Walter

    2016-07-01

    An environmental random-effect over a deterministic population model of a resource (e.g., a fish stock) is introduced. It is assumed that the harvest activity is concentrated at a non-predetermined sequence of instants, at which the abundance reaches a certain predetermined level, then falls abruptly by a constant capture quota (pulse harvesting). So, the abundance is modeled by a stochastic impulsive type differential equation, incorporating a standard Brownian motion in the per capita rate of growth. With this random effect, the pulse times are "stopping times" of the stochastic process. The proof of the finite expectation of the next access time, i.e., the feasibility of regulation, is the main result. PMID:27105865

  10. A Discretized Method for Deriving Vortex Impulse from Volumetric Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, Noam; Mendelson, Leah; Techet, Alexandra

    2015-11-01

    Many biological and mechanical systems transfer momentum through a fluid by creating vortical structures. To study this mechanism, we derive a method for extracting impulse and its time derivative from flow fields observed in experiments and simulations. We begin by discretizing a thin-cored vortex filament, and extend the model to account for finite vortex core thickness and asymmetric distributions of vorticity. By solely using velocity fields to extract vortex cores and calculate circulation, this method is applicable to 3D PIV datasets, even with low spatial resolution flow fields and measurement noise. To assess the performance of this analysis method, we simulate vortex rings and arbitrary vortex structures using OpenFOAM computational fluid dynamics software and analyze the wake momentum using this model in order to validate this method. We further examine a piston-vortex experiment, using 3D synthetic particle image velocimetry (SAPIV) to capture velocity fields. Strengths, limitations, and improvements to the framework are discussed.

  11. Impulsive Social Influence Increases Impulsive Choices on a Temporal Discounting Task in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Jodi M.; Curran, Max T.; Calderon, Vanessa; Stoeckel, Luke E.; Evins, A. Eden

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults who affiliate with friends who engage in impulsive behavior are more likely to engage in impulsive behaviors themselves, and those who associate with prosocial (i.e. more prudent, future oriented) peers are more likely to engage in prosocial behavior. However, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of peer influence vs. peer selection (i.e., whether individuals choose friends with similar traits) when interpreting social behaviors. In this study, we combined a novel social manipulation with a well-validated delay discounting task assessing impulsive behavior to create a social influence delay discounting task, in which participants were exposed to both impulsive (smaller, sooner or SS payment) and non-impulsive (larger, later or LL payment) choices from their peers. Young adults in this sample, n = 51, aged 18–25 had a higher rate of SS choices after exposure to impulsive peer influence than after exposure to non-impulsive peer influence. Interestingly, in highly susceptible individuals, the rate of non-impulsive choices did not increase after exposure to non-impulsive influence. There was a positive correlation between self-reported suggestibility and degree of peer influence on SS choices. These results suggest that, in young adults, SS choices appear to be influenced by the choices of same-aged peers, especially for individuals who are highly susceptible to influence. PMID:24988440

  12. Multi-impulsivity of Japanese patients with eating disorders: primary and secondary impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Nagata, T; Kawarada, Y; Kiriike, N; Iketani, T

    2000-07-17

    Several studies have noted that multi-impulsive bulimia nervosa tends to be refractory to treatment. However, it is not known whether these impulsivities are an expression of more fundamental psychopathology or simply the consequence of chaotic eating behaviors. Studies of the temporal relationship between the onset of eating disorder and the occurrence of impulsive behaviors will facilitate a better understanding of these issues. Subjects consisted of 60 patients with anorexia nervosa restricting type (AN-R), 62 patients with anorexia nervosa binge-eating/purging type (AN-BP), 114 patients with bulimia nervosa purging type (BN) and 66 control subjects. Impulsive behaviors and childhood traumatic experiences were assessed by self-report questionnaire. Multi-impulsivity (defined by at least three of the following: heavy regular alcohol drinking; suicide attempt; self-mutilation; repeated shoplifting of items other than food; sexual relationships with persons not well known to the subject) was found in 2% of AN-R, 11% of AN-BP, 18% of BN and 2% of control subjects. Eighty percent of BN patients with multi-impulsivity had a history of suicide attempts or self-mutilation history prior to the onset of bulimia nervosa. In BN patients, there tended to be a relationship between childhood parental loss or borderline personality disorder and multi-impulsivity. In conclusion, primary impulsivity (chronological prior occurrence of impulsive behaviors) does exist even in a very different culture, although the number of patients of this type is very limited. PMID:10889288

  13. Numerical vorticity creation based on impulse conservation.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, D M; Chorin, A J

    1996-01-01

    The problem of creating solenoidal vortex elements to satisfy no-slip boundary conditions in Lagrangian numerical vortex methods is solved through the use of impulse elements at walls and their subsequent conversion to vortex loops. The algorithm is not uniquely defined, due to the gauge freedom in the definition of impulse; the numerically optimal choice of gauge remains to be determined. Two different choices are discussed, and an application to flow past a sphere is sketched. PMID:11607636

  14. Use of Finite Difference Time Domain Simulations and Debye Theory for Modelling the Terahertz Reflection Response of Normal and Tumour Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Anthony J.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma; Wallace, Vincent P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the capabilities of Debye theory combined with Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods to simulate the terahertz (THz) response of breast tissues. Being able to accurately model breast tissues in the THz regime would facilitate the understanding of image contrast parameters used in THz imaging of breast cancer. As a test case, the model was first validated using liquid water and simulated reflection pulses were compared to experimental measured pulses with very good agreement (p = 1.00). The responses of normal and cancerous breast tissues were simulated with Debye properties and the correlation with measured data was still high for tumour (p = 0.98) and less so for normal breast (p = 0.82). Sections of the time domain pulses showed clear differences that were also evident in the comparison of pulse parameter values. These deviations may arise from the presence of adipose and other inhomogeneities in the breast tissue that are not accounted for when using the Debye model. In conclusion, the study demonstrates the power of the model for simulating THz reflection imaging; however, for biological tissues extra Debye terms or a more detailed theory may be required to link THz image contrast to physiological composition and structural changes of breast tissue associated with differences between normal and tumour tissues. PMID:25010734

  15. Individual Differences in Impulsive Action Reflect Variation in the Cortical Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor System

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Latham HL; Anastasio, Noelle C; Fox, Robert G; Rice, Kenner C; Moeller, F Gerard; Cunningham, Kathryn A

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important feature of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, and individual variation in the degree of inherent impulsivity could play a role in the generation or exacerbation of problematic behaviors. Serotonin (5-HT) actions at the 5-HT2AR receptor (5-HT2AR) promote and 5-HT2AR antagonists suppress impulsive action (the inability to withhold premature responses; motor impulsivity) upon systemic administration or microinfusion directly into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a node in the corticostriatal circuit that is thought to play a role in the regulation of impulsive action. We hypothesized that the functional capacity of the 5-HT2AR, which is governed by its expression, localization, and protein/protein interactions (eg, postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95)), may drive the predisposition to inherent impulsive action. Stable high-impulsive (HI) and low-impulsive (LI) phenotypes were identified from an outbred rodent population with the 1-choice serial reaction time (1-CSRT) task. HI rats exhibited a greater head-twitch response following administration of the preferential 5-HT2AR agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI) and were more sensitive to the effects of the selective 5-HT2AR antagonist M100907 to suppress impulsive action relative to LI rats. A positive correlation was observed between levels of premature responses and 5-HT2AR binding density in frontal cortex ([3H]-ketanserin radioligand binding). Elevated mPFC 5-HT2AR protein expression concomitant with augmented association of the 5-HT2AR with PSD95 differentiated HI from LI rats. The observed differential sensitivity of HI and LI rats to 5-HT2AR ligands and associated distinct 5-HT2AR protein profiles provide evidence that spontaneously occurring individual differences in impulsive action reflect variation in the cortical 5-HT2AR system. PMID:25666313

  16. Individual Differences in Impulsive Action Reflect Variation in the Cortical Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor System.

    PubMed

    Fink, Latham H L; Anastasio, Noelle C; Fox, Robert G; Rice, Kenner C; Moeller, F Gerard; Cunningham, Kathryn A

    2015-07-01

    Impulsivity is an important feature of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, and individual variation in the degree of inherent impulsivity could play a role in the generation or exacerbation of problematic behaviors. Serotonin (5-HT) actions at the 5-HT2AR receptor (5-HT2AR) promote and 5-HT2AR antagonists suppress impulsive action (the inability to withhold premature responses; motor impulsivity) upon systemic administration or microinfusion directly into the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a node in the corticostriatal circuit that is thought to play a role in the regulation of impulsive action. We hypothesized that the functional capacity of the 5-HT2AR, which is governed by its expression, localization, and protein/protein interactions (eg, postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95)), may drive the predisposition to inherent impulsive action. Stable high-impulsive (HI) and low-impulsive (LI) phenotypes were identified from an outbred rodent population with the 1-choice serial reaction time (1-CSRT) task. HI rats exhibited a greater head-twitch response following administration of the preferential 5-HT2AR agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI) and were more sensitive to the effects of the selective 5-HT2AR antagonist M100907 to suppress impulsive action relative to LI rats. A positive correlation was observed between levels of premature responses and 5-HT2AR binding density in frontal cortex ([(3)H]-ketanserin radioligand binding). Elevated mPFC 5-HT2AR protein expression concomitant with augmented association of the 5-HT2AR with PSD95 differentiated HI from LI rats. The observed differential sensitivity of HI and LI rats to 5-HT2AR ligands and associated distinct 5-HT2AR protein profiles provide evidence that spontaneously occurring individual differences in impulsive action reflect variation in the cortical 5-HT2AR system. PMID:25666313

  17. Adolescent aggression and social cognition in the context of personality: impulsivity as a moderator of predictions from social information processing.

    PubMed

    Fite, Jennifer E; Goodnight, Jackson A; Bates, John E; Dodge, Kenneth A; Pettit, Gregory S

    2008-01-01

    This study asked how individual differences in social cognition and personality interact in predicting later aggressive behavior. It was hypothesized that the relationship between immediate response evaluations in social information processing (SIP) and later aggressive behavior would be moderated by impulsivity. In particular, the immediate positive evaluations of aggressive responses would be more strongly related to later aggressive behavior for high-impulsive than for low-impulsive individuals, because high-impulsive children would be less likely to integrate peripheral information and consider long-term future consequences of their actions. Participants were 585 adolescents (52% male) and their mothers and teachers from the longitudinal Child Development Project. Structural equation modeling indicated that teacher-reported impulsivity at ages 11-13 moderated the association between adolescents' endorsement of aggressive responses in hypothetical, ambiguous situations and subsequent mother-reported aggressive behavior. Specifically, positive endorsement of aggressive responses at age 13 was significantly related to later aggressive behavior (age 14-17) for participants with high and medium levels of impulsivity, but this association was not significant for participants with low levels of impulsivity. This study provides evidence of personality variables as potential moderators of the link between SIP and behavior. PMID:18459110

  18. Enhanced awakening probability of repetitive impulse sounds.

    PubMed

    Vos, Joos; Houben, Mark M J

    2013-09-01

    In the present study relations between the level of impulse sounds and the observed proportion of behaviorally confirmed awakening reactions were determined. The sounds (shooting sounds, bangs produced by door slamming or by container transshipment, aircraft landings) were presented by means of loudspeakers in the bedrooms of 50 volunteers. The fragments for the impulse sounds consisted of single or multiple events. The sounds were presented during a 6-h period that started 75 min after the subjects wanted to sleep. In order to take account of habituation, each subject participated during 18 nights. At equal indoor A-weighted sound exposure levels, the proportion of awakening for the single impulse sounds was equal to that for the aircraft sounds. The proportion of awakening induced by the multiple impulse sounds, however, was significantly higher. For obtaining the same rate of awakening, the sound level of each of the successive impulses in a fragment had to be about 15-25 dB lower than the level of one single impulse. This level difference was largely independent of the degree of habituation. Various explanations for the enhanced awakening probability are discussed. PMID:23967934

  19. Impulsivity and Concussion in Juvenile Rats: Examining Molecular and Structural Aspects of the Frontostriatal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hehar, Harleen; Yeates, Keith; Kolb, Bryan; Esser, Michael J.; Mychasiuk, Richelle

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity and poor executive control have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many developmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Similarly, concussions/mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) have been associated with increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders and the development of impulsivity and inattention. Researchers and epidemiologists have therefore considered whether or not concussions induce symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or merely unmask impulsive tendencies that were already present. The purpose of this study was to determine if a single concussion in adolescence could induce ADHD-like impulsivity and impaired response inhibition, and subsequently determine if inherent impulsivity prior to a pediatric mTBI would exacerbate post-concussion symptomology with a specific emphasis on impulsive and inattentive behaviours. As these behaviours are believed to be associated with the frontostriatal circuit involving the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the prefrontal cortex (PFC), the expression patterns of 8 genes (Comt, Drd2, Drd3, Drd4, Maoa, Sert, Tph1, and Tph2) from these two regions were examined. In addition, Golgi-Cox staining of medium spiny neurons in the NAc provided a neuroanatomical examination of mTBI-induced structural changes. The study found that a single early brain injury could induce impulsivity and impairments in response inhibition that were more pronounced in males. Interestingly, when animals with inherent impulsivity experienced mTBI, injury-related deficits were exacerbated in female animals. The single concussion increased dendritic branching, but reduced synaptic density in the NAc, and these changes were likely associated with the increase in impulsivity. Finally, mTBI-induced impulsivity was associated with modifications to gene expression that differed dramatically from the gene expression pattern associated with inherent impulsivity, despite very similar behavioural phenotypes. Our findings suggest

  20. The Influence of Mesh Density on the Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading-Edge Panel Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the influence of varying mesh density on an LS-DYNA simulation of a rectangular-shaped foam projectile impacting the space shuttle leading edge Panel 6. The shuttle leading-edge panels are fabricated of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) material. During the study, nine cases were executed with all possible combinations of coarse, baseline, and fine meshes of the foam and panel. For each simulation, the same material properties and impact conditions were specified and only the mesh density was varied. In the baseline model, the shell elements representing the RCC panel are approximately 0.2-in. on edge, whereas the foam elements are about 0.5-in. on edge. The element nominal edge-length for the baseline panel was halved to create a fine panel (0.1-in. edge length) mesh and doubled to create a coarse panel (0.4-in. edge length) mesh. In addition, the element nominal edge-length of the baseline foam projectile was halved (0.25-in. edge length) to create a fine foam mesh and doubled (1.0- in. edge length) to create a coarse foam mesh. The initial impact velocity of the foam was 775 ft/s. The simulations were executed in LS-DYNA version 960 for 6 ms of simulation time. Contour plots of resultant panel displacement and effective stress in the foam were compared at five discrete time intervals. Also, time-history responses of internal and kinetic energy of the panel, kinetic and hourglass energy of the foam, and resultant contact force were plotted to determine the influence of mesh density. As a final comparison, the model with a fine panel and fine foam mesh was executed with slightly different material properties for the RCC. For this model, the average degraded properties of the RCC were replaced with the maximum degraded properties. Similar comparisons of panel and foam responses were made for the average and maximum degraded models.

  1. Divergent responses of the amygdala and ventral striatum predict stress-related problem drinking in young adults: Possible differential markers of affective and impulsive pathways of risk for alcohol use disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova, Yuliya S.; Knodt, Annchen R.; Radtke, Spenser R.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2015-01-01

    Prior work suggests there may be two distinct pathways of alcohol use disorder (AUD) risk: one associated with positive emotion enhancement and behavioral impulsivity, and one associated with negative emotion relief and coping. We sought to map these two pathways onto individual differences in neural reward and threat processing assessed using BOLD fMRI in a sample of 759 undergraduate students (426 women, mean age 19.65±1.24) participating in the Duke Neurogenetics Study. We demonstrate that problem drinking is highest in the context of stress and in those with one of two distinct neural phenotypes: 1) a combination of relatively low reward-related activity of the ventral striatum (VS) and high threat-related reactivity of the amygdala; or 2) a combination of relatively high VS activity and low amygdala reactivity. In addition, we demonstrate that the relationship between stress and problem alcohol use is mediated by impulsivity, as reflected in monetary delay discounting rates, for those with high VS-low amygdala reactivity, and by anxious/depressive symptomatology for those with the opposite neural risk phenotype. Across both neural phenotypes, we found that greater divergence between VS and amygdala reactivity predicted greater risk for problem drinking. Finally, for those individuals with the low VS-high amygdala risk phenotype we found that stress not only predicted the presence of a DSM-IV diagnosed AUD at the time of neuroimaging, but also subsequent problem drinking reported three months following study completion. These results offer new insight into the neural basis of AUD risk and suggest novel biological targets for early individualized treatment or prevention. PMID:26122584

  2. Divergent responses of the amygdala and ventral striatum predict stress-related problem drinking in young adults: possible differential markers of affective and impulsive pathways of risk for alcohol use disorder.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Y S; Knodt, A R; Radtke, S R; Hariri, A R

    2016-03-01

    Prior work suggests that there may be two distinct pathways of alcohol use disorder (AUD) risk: one associated with positive emotion enhancement and behavioral impulsivity, and another associated with negative emotion relief and coping. We sought to map these two pathways onto individual differences in neural reward and threat processing assessed using blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging in a sample of 759 undergraduate students (426 women, mean age 19.65±1.24 years) participating in the Duke Neurogenetics Study. We demonstrate that problem drinking is highest in the context of stress and in those with one of two distinct neural phenotypes: (1) a combination of relatively low reward-related activity of the ventral striatum (VS) and high threat-related reactivity of the amygdala; or (2) a combination of relatively high VS activity and low amygdala reactivity. In addition, we demonstrate that the relationship between stress and problem alcohol use is mediated by impulsivity, as reflected in monetary delay discounting rates, for those with high VS-low amygdala reactivity, and by anxious/depressive symptomatology for those with the opposite neural risk phenotype. Across both neural phenotypes, we found that greater divergence between VS and amygdala reactivity predicted greater risk for problem drinking. Finally, for those individuals with the low VS-high amygdala risk phenotype we found that stress not only predicted the presence of AUD diagnosis at the time of neuroimaging but also subsequent problem drinking reported 3 months following study completion. These results offer new insight into the neural basis of AUD risk and suggest novel biological targets for early individualized treatment or prevention. PMID:26122584

  3. Separation Control in a Multistage Compressor Using Impulsive Surface Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2006-01-01

    Control of flow separation using impulsive surface injection is investigated within the multistage environment of a low speed axial-flow compressor. Measured wake profiles behind a set of embedded stator vanes treated with suction-surface injection indicate significant reduction in flow separation at a variety of injection-pulse repetition rates and durations. The corresponding total pressure losses across the vanes reveal a bank of repetition rates at each pulse duration where the separation control remains nearly complete. This persistence allows for demands on the injected-mass delivery system to be economized while still achieving effective flow control. The response of the stator-vane boundary layers to infrequently applied short injection pulses is described in terms of the periodic excitation of turbulent strips whose growth and propagation characteristics dictate the lower bound on the band of optimal pulse repetition rates. The eventual falloff in separation control at higher repetition rates is linked to a competition between the benefits of pulse-induced mixing and the aggravation caused by the periodic introduction of low-momentum fluid. Use of these observations for impulsive actuator design is discussed and their impact on modeling the time-average effect of impulsive surface injection for multistage steady-flow simulation is considered.

  4. Neurogenetics and Epigenetics in Impulsive Behaviour: Impact on Reward Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Trevor; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Blum, Kenneth; Gold, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Adverse, unfavourable life conditions, particularly during early life stages and infancy, can lead to epigenetic regulation of genes involved in stress-response, behavioral disinhibition, and cognitive-emotional systems. Over time, the ultimate final outcome can be expressed through behaviors bedeviled by problems with impulse control, such as eating disorders, alcoholism, and indiscriminate social behavior. While many reward gene polymorphisms are involved in impulsive behaviors, a polymorphism by itself may not translate to the development of a particular behavioral disorder unless it is impacted by epigenetic effects. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) affects the development and integrity of the noradrenergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic, glutamatergic, and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems, and plasma levels of the neurotrophin are associated with both cognitive and aggressive impulsiveness. Epigenetic mechanisms associated with a multitude of environmental factors, including premature birth, low birth weight, prenatal tobacco exposure, non-intact family, young maternal age at birth of the target child, paternal history of antisocial behavior, and maternal depression, alter the developmental trajectories for several neuropsychiatric disorders. These mechanisms affect brain development and integrity at several levels that determine structure and function in resolving the final behavioral expressions. PMID:23264884

  5. Long Duration Flare Emission: Impulsive Heating or Gradual Heating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.

    2016-03-01

    Flare emissions in X-ray and EUV wavelengths have previously been modeled as the plasma response to impulsive heating from magnetic reconnection. Some flares exhibit gradually evolving X-ray and EUV light curves, which are believed to result from superposition of an extended sequence of impulsive heating events occurring in different adjacent loops or even unresolved threads within each loop. In this paper, we apply this approach to a long duration two-ribbon flare SOL2011-09-13T22 observed by the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly (AIA). We find that to reconcile with observed signatures of flare emission in multiple EUV wavelengths, each thread should be heated in two phases, an intense impulsive heating followed by a gradual, low-rate heating tail that is attenuated over 20-30 minutes. Each AIA resolved single loop may be composed of several such threads. The two-phase heating scenario is supported by modeling with both a zero-dimensional and a 1D hydrodynamic code. We discuss viable physical mechanisms for the two-phase heating in a post-reconnection thread.

  6. A numerical simulation of a negative solar wind impulse: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, S.; Yamagishi, H.; Murata, Ken T.; Den, M.; Tanaka, T.

    2012-09-01

    Response of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to a negative impulse of the solar wind dynamic pressure (the negative SI) is studied again with foci of the following three points; multiple convection oscillations, mirror-image relationship between the negative and positive SIs, and appearance of the overshielding potential. When the negative impulse impinges on the magnetopause, the Region 1 (R1)-type field-aligned current (FAC) and R2-type FAC appears alternatively in the dayside polar ionosphere (˜70°, ˜10 hLT and 14 hLT). These ionospheric current systems shift nightward and poleward. This alternative appearance of FACs invokes positive and negative ionospheric potential patterns switching alternatively. It is revealed that the negative SI is accompanied with multiple convection oscillations repeating more than the positive SI. We also notice that the magnetospheric current system producing the preliminary impulse (PI) of the intensive negative SI is a mirror-image of that of the positive SI. The multiple convection oscillations and the mirror-image relationship were not discussed by Fujita et al. (2004) who studied a moderate-amplitude negative SI. In addition, the R2-type FACs induced by the negative and positive SIs tend to yield the overshielding electric potential in the ionosphere. The shielding potential invoked by the SIs has shorter duration than that for the northward turn of the interplanetary magnetic field. The duration is longer for the negative SI than for the positive SI.

  7. Transition Region and Chromospheric Signatures of Impulsive Heating Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry; Reep, Jeffrey; Crump, Nicholas

    2016-05-01

    We exploit the high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to investigate the response of the transition region and chromosphere to energy deposition during several small flares. We find that during the impulsive phase of these events the intensities of the C II 1334.535 and Si IV 1402.770 A emission lines are characterized by numerous, small-scale impulsive bursts typically lasting 60 s or less followed by a slower decay over several minutes. These variations in intensity are usually accompanied by impulsive redshifts of 20–40 km/s, although some blueshifted profiles are also observed. For one particularly well observed event we combine the IRIS observations with co-temporal measurements of hard X-ray emission from RHESSSI, transition region density from EIS, and high-temperature coronal loops with XRT and AIA to constrain 1D hydrodynamic models of loop evolution. Many aspects of the observations can be explained with simple heating scenarios, but some cannot. The simulated Doppler shifts, for example, show very short-duration redshifts during the initial phase of the heating while the observed redshifts persist over several minutes.

  8. A Mesh Refinement Study on the Impact Response of a Shuttle Leading-Edge Panel Finite Element Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Spellman, Regina L.

    2006-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the influence of varying mesh density on an LS-DYNA simulation of a rectangular-shaped foam projectile impacting the space shuttle leading edge Panel 6. The shuttle leading-edge panels are fabricated of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) material. During the study, nine cases were executed with all possible combinations of coarse, baseline, and fine meshes of the foam and panel. For each simulation, the same material properties and impact conditions were specified and only the mesh density was varied. In the baseline model, the shell elements representing the RCC panel are approximately 0.2-in. on edge, whereas the foam elements are about 0.5-in. on edge. The element nominal edge-length for the baseline panel was halved to create a fine panel (0.1-in. edge length) mesh and doubled to create a coarse panel (0.4-in. edge length) mesh. In addition, the element nominal edge-length of the baseline foam projectile was halved (0.25-in. edge length) to create a fine foam mesh and doubled (1.0-in. edge length) to create a coarse foam mesh. The initial impact velocity of the foam was 775 ft/s. The simulations were executed in LS-DYNA for 6 ms of simulation time. Contour plots of resultant panel displacement and effective stress in the foam were compared at four discrete time intervals. Also, time-history responses of internal and kinetic energy of the panel, kinetic and hourglass energy of the foam, and resultant contact force were plotted to determine the influence of mesh density.

  9. Signaling When (and When Not) to Be Cautious and Self-Protective: Impulsive and Reflective Trust in Close Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Sandra L.; Pinkus, Rebecca T.; Holmes, John G.; Harris, Brianna; Gomillion, Sarah; Aloni, Maya; Derrick, Jaye L.; Leder, Sadie

    2011-01-01

    A dual process model is proposed to explain how automatic evaluative associations to the partner (i.e., impulsive trust) and deliberative expectations of partner caring (i.e., reflective trust) interact to govern self-protection in romantic relationships. Experimental and correlational studies of dating and marital relationships supported the model. Subliminally conditioning more positive evaluative associations to the partner increased confidence in the partner’s caring, suggesting that trust has an impulsive basis. Being high on impulsive trust (i.e., more positive evaluative associations to the partner on the IAT) also reduced the automatic inclination to distance in response to doubts about the partner’s trustworthiness. It similarly reduced self-protective behavioral reactions to these reflective trust concerns. The studies further revealed that the effects of impulsive trust depend on working memory capacity: Being high on impulsive trust inoculated against reflective trust concerns for people low on working memory capacity. PMID:21443370

  10. Signaling when (and when not) to be cautious and self-protective: impulsive and reflective trust in close relationships.

    PubMed

    Murray, Sandra L; Pinkus, Rebecca T; Holmes, John G; Harris, Brianna; Gomillion, Sarah; Aloni, Maya; Derrick, Jaye L; Leder, Sadie

    2011-09-01

    A dual process model is proposed to explain how automatic evaluative associations to the partner (i.e., impulsive trust) and deliberative expectations of partner caring (i.e., reflective trust) interact to govern self-protection in romantic relationships. Experimental and correlational studies of dating and marital relationships supported the model. Subliminally conditioning more positive evaluative associations to the partner increased confidence in the partner's caring, suggesting that trust has an impulsive basis. Being high on impulsive trust (i.e., more positive evaluative associations to the partner on the Implicit Association Test; Zayas & Shoda, 2005) also reduced the automatic inclination to distance in response to doubts about the partner's trustworthiness. It similarly reduced self-protective behavioral reactions to these reflective trust concerns. The studies further revealed that the effects of impulsive trust depend on working memory capacity: Being high on impulsive trust inoculated against reflective trust concerns for people low on working memory capacity. PMID:21443370

  11. Oscillatory Activity in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Nucleus Accumbens Correlates with Impulsivity and Reward Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rich, P. Dylan; Nevado-Holgado, Alejo J.; Fernando, Anushka B. P.; Van Dijck, Gert; Holzhammer, Tobias; Paul, Oliver; Ruther, Patrick; Paulsen, Ole; Robbins, Trevor W.; Dalley, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Actions expressed prematurely without regard for their consequences are considered impulsive. Such behaviour is governed by a network of brain regions including the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAcb) and is prevalent in disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and drug addiction. However, little is known of the relationship between neural activity in these regions and specific forms of impulsive behaviour. In the present study we investigated local field potential (LFP) oscillations in distinct sub-regions of the PFC and NAcb on a 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), which measures sustained, spatially-divided visual attention and action restraint. The main findings show that power in gamma frequency (50–60 Hz) LFP oscillations transiently increases in the PFC and NAcb during both the anticipation of a cue signalling the spatial location of a nose-poke response and again following correct responses. Gamma oscillations were coupled to low-frequency delta oscillations in both regions; this coupling strengthened specifically when an error response was made. Theta (7–9 Hz) LFP power in the PFC and NAcb increased during the waiting period and was also related to response outcome. Additionally, both gamma and theta power were significantly affected by upcoming premature responses as rats waited for the visual cue to respond. In a subgroup of rats showing persistently high levels of impulsivity we found that impulsivity was associated with increased error signals following a nose-poke response, as well as reduced signals of previous trial outcome during the waiting period. Collectively, these in-vivo neurophysiological findings further implicate the PFC and NAcb in anticipatory impulsive responses and provide evidence that abnormalities in the encoding of rewarding outcomes may underlie trait-like impulsive behaviour. PMID:25333512

  12. "Impulsive" suicide attempts: What do we really mean?

    PubMed

    May, Alexis M; Klonsky, E David

    2016-07-01

    Suicide attempts are often regarded as impulsive acts. However, there is little consensus regarding the definition or clinical characteristics of an "impulsive" attempt. To clarify this issue, we examined 3 indicators of the impulsivity of an attempt: (a) preparation, (b) time contemplating the attempt, and (c) self-report that impulsivity motivated the attempt. We examined relationships among the indicators and their relationship to trait impulsivity and characteristics of the suicide attempt. Adult participants (N = 205) with a history of suicide attempts were administered validated interviews and questionnaires. In general, the 3 attempt impulsivity indicators correlated only moderately with each other and not at all with trait impulsivity or with important characteristics of the attempt (e.g., lethality, preattempt communication, motivations). However, there were 2 exceptions. First, intent to die was inversely related to the 3 attempt impulsivity indicators (rs ranged from -.17 to .45) such that more impulsive attempts were associated with lower intent. Second, self-report that the attempt was motivated by impulsivity was related to 3 facets of trait impulsivity (rs ranged from .16 to .41). These findings suggest that individuals endorsing trait impulsivity are likely to describe their attempts as motivated by impulsivity, regardless of the presence of preparation or prolonged contemplation. Overall, study results suggest that the common conception of a unidimensional impulsive attempt may be inaccurate and that the emphasis on general impulsivity in prevention guidelines should be tempered. Implications for suicide risk assessment and prevention are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26653582

  13. BMI predicts emotion-driven impulsivity and cognitive inflexibility in adolescents with excess weight.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Rico, Elena; Río-Valle, Jacqueline S; González-Jiménez, Emilio; Campoy, Cristina; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    Adolescent obesity is increasingly viewed as a brain-related dysfunction, whereby reward-driven urges for pleasurable foods "hijack" response selection systems, such that behavioral control progressively shifts from impulsivity to compulsivity. In this study, we aimed to examine the link between personality factors (sensitivity to reward (SR) and punishment (SP), BMI, and outcome measures of impulsivity vs. flexibility in--otherwise healthy--excessive weight adolescents. Sixty-three adolescents (aged 12-17) classified as obese (n = 26), overweight (n = 16), or normal weight (n = 21) participated in the study. We used psychometric assessments of the SR and SP motivational systems, impulsivity (using the UPPS-P scale), and neurocognitive measures with discriminant validity to dissociate inhibition vs. flexibility deficits (using the process-approach version of the Stroop test). We tested the relative contribution of age, SR/SP, and BMI on estimates of impulsivity and inhibition vs. switching performance using multistep hierarchical regression models. BMI significantly predicted elevations in emotion-driven impulsivity (positive and negative urgency) and inferior flexibility performance in adolescents with excess weight--exceeding the predictive capacity of SR and SP. SR was the main predictor of elevations in sensation seeking and lack of premeditation. These findings demonstrate that increases in BMI are specifically associated with elevations in emotion-driven impulsivity and cognitive inflexibility, supporting a dimensional path in which adolescents with excess weight increase their proneness to overindulge when under strong affective states, and their difficulties to switch or reverse habitual behavioral patterns. PMID:22421897

  14. Convergent pharmacological mechanisms in impulsivity and addiction: insights from rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Jupp, B; Dalley, J W

    2014-01-01

    Research over the last two decades has widely demonstrated that impulsivity, in its various forms, is antecedent to the development of drug addiction and an important behavioural trait underlying the inability of addicts to refrain from continued drug use. Impulsivity describes a variety of rapidly and prematurely expressed behaviours that span several domains from impaired response inhibition to an intolerance of delayed rewards, and is a core symptom of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other brain disorders. Various theories have been advanced to explain how impulsivity interacts with addiction both causally and as a consequence of chronic drug abuse; these acknowledge the strong overlaps in neural circuitry and mechanisms between impulsivity and addiction and the seemingly paradoxical treatment of ADHD with stimulant drugs with high abuse potential. Recent years have witnessed unprecedented progress in the elucidation of pharmacological mechanisms underpinning impulsivity. Collectively, this work has significantly improved the prospect for new therapies in ADHD as well as our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying the shift from recreational drug use to addiction. In this review, we consider the extent to which pharmacological interventions that target impulsive behaviour are also effective in animal models of addiction. We highlight several promising examples of convergence based on empirical findings in rodent-based studies. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Animal Models in Psychiatry Research. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-20 PMID:24866553

  15. Impulsivity and Aggression in Schizophrenia: A Neural Circuitry Perspective with Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hoptman, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevations of impulsive behavior have been observed in a number of serious mental illnesses. These phenomena can lead to harmful behaviors, including violence, and thus represent a serious public health concern. Such violence is often a reason for psychiatric hospitalization, and it often leads to prolonged hospital stays, suffering by patients and their victims, and increased stigmatization. Despite the attention paid to violence, little is understood about its neural basis in schizophrenia. On a psychological level, aggression in schizophrenia has been primarily attributed to psychotic symptoms, desires for instrumental gain, or impulsive responses to perceived personal slights. Often multiple attributions can coexist during a single aggressive incident. In this review, I will discuss the neural circuitry associated with impulsivity and aggression in schizophrenia, with an emphasis on implications for treatment. Impulsivity appears to account for a great deal of aggression in schizophrenia, especially in inpatient settings. Urgency, defined as impulsivity in the context of strong emotion, is the primary focus of this article. It is elevated in several psychiatric disorders, and in schizophrenia, it has been related to aggression. Many studies have implicated dysfunctional frontotemporal circuitry in impulsivity and aggression in schizophrenia, and pharmacological treatments may act via that circuitry to reduce urgency and aggressive behaviors, but more mechanistic studies are critically needed. Recent studies point toward manipulable neurobehavioral targets and suggest that cognitive, pharmacological, neuromodulatory, and neurofeedback treatment approaches can be developed to ameliorate urgency and aggression in schizophrenia. It is hoped that these approaches will improve treatment efficacy. PMID:25900066

  16. Increased Impulsivity Retards the Transition to Dorsolateral Striatal Dopamine Control of Cocaine Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jennifer E.; Dilleen, Ruth; Pelloux, Yann; Economidou, Daina; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; Belin, David; Everitt, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of maladaptive drug-seeking habits occurs in conjunction with a ventral-to-dorsal striatal shift in dopaminergic control over behavior. Although these habits readily develop as drug use continues, high impulsivity predicts loss of control over drug seeking and taking. However, whether impulsivity facilitates the transition to dorsolateral striatum (DLS) dopamine-dependent cocaine-seeking habits or whether impulsivity and cocaine-induced intrastriatal shifts are additive processes is unknown. Methods High- and low-impulsive rats identified in the five-choice serial reaction-time task were trained to self-administer cocaine (.25 mg/infusion) with infusions occurring in the presence of a cue-light conditioned stimulus. Dopamine transmission was blocked in the DLS after three stages of training: early, transition, and late-stage, by bilateral intracranial infusions of α-flupenthixol (0, 5, 10, or 15 μg/side) during 15-min cocaine-seeking test sessions in which each response was reinforced by a cocaine-associated conditioned stimulus presentation. Results In early-stage tests, neither group was affected by DLS dopamine receptor blockade. In transition-stage tests, low-impulsive rats showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in cocaine seeking, whereas high-impulsive rats were still unaffected by α-flupenthixol infusions. In the final, late-stage seeking test, both groups showed dose-dependent sensitivity to dopamine receptor blockade. Conclusions The results demonstrate that high impulsivity is associated with a delayed transition to DLS-dopamine-dependent control over cocaine seeking. This suggests that, if impulsivity confers an increased propensity to addiction, it is not simply through a more rapid development of habits but instead through interacting corticostriatal and striato-striatal processes that result ultimately in maladaptive drug-seeking habits. PMID:24157338

  17. Microwave emission from lead zirconate titanate induced by impulsive mechanical load

    SciTech Connect

    Aman, A.; Majcherek, S.; Hirsch, S.; Schmidt, B.

    2015-10-28

    This paper focuses on microwave emission from Lead zirconate titanate Pb [Zr{sub x}Ti{sub 1−x}] O{sub 3} (PZT) induced by mechanical stressing. The mechanical stress was initiated by impact of a sharp tungsten indenter on the upper surface of PZT ceramic. The sequences of microwave and current impulses, which flew from indenter to electric ground, were detected simultaneously. The voltage between the upper and lower surface of ceramic was measured to obtain the behavior of mechanical force acting on ceramic during the impact. It was found that the amplitude, form, and frequency of measured microwave impulses were different by compression and restitution phase of impact. Two different mechanisms of electron emission, responsible for microwave impulse generation, were proposed based on the dissimilar impulse behavior. The field emission from tungsten indenter is dominant during compression, whereas ferroemission dominates during restitution phase. Indeed, it was observed that the direction of the current flow, i.e., sign of current impulses is changed by transitions from compression to restitution phase of impact. The observed dissimilar behavior of microwave impulses, caused by increasing and decreasing applied force, can be used to calculate the contact time and behavior of mechanical force during mechanical impact on ceramic surface. It is shown that the generation of microwave impulses exhibits high reproducibility, impulse intensity, a low damping factor, and high mechanical failure resistance. Based on these microwave emission properties of PZT, the development of new type of stress sensor with spatial resolution of few microns becomes possible.

  18. Impulsive corporal punishment by mothers and antisocial behavior and impulsiveness of children.

    PubMed

    Straus, M A; Mouradian, V E

    1998-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that corporal punishment (CP), such as spanking or slapping a child for purposes of correcting misbehavior, is associated with antisocial behavior (ASB) and impulsiveness by the child. The data were obtained through interviews with a probability sample of 933 mothers of children age 2-14 in two small American cities. Analyses of variance found that the more CP experienced by the child, the greater the tendency for the child to engage in ASB and to act impulsively. These relationships hold even after controlling for family socioeconomic status, the age and sex of the child, nurturance by the mother, and the level of noncorporal interventions by the mother. There were also significant interaction effects of CP with impulsiveness by the mother. When CP was carried out impulsively, it was most strongly related to child impulsiveness and ASB; when CP was done when the mother was under control, the relationship to child behavior problems was reduced but still present. In view of the fact that there is a high risk of losing control when engaged in CP, even by parents who are not usually impulsive, and the fact that impulsive CP is so strongly associated with child behavior problems, the results of this study suggest that CP is an important risk factor for children developing a pattern of impulsive and antisocial behavior which, in turn, may contribute to the level of violence and other crime in society. PMID:9768466

  19. Effects of R-Phase on Mechanical Responses of a Nickel-Titanium Endodontic Instrument: Structural Characterization and Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Leandro de Arruda; Resende, Pedro Damas; Bahia, Maria Guiomar de Azevedo; Buono, Vicente Tadeu Lopes

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the presence of the R-phase in a near-equiatomic NiTi alloy on the mechanical responses of an endodontic instrument were studied by using finite element analysis. The input data for the constitutive model in the simulation were obtained by tensile testing of three NiTi wires: superelastic austenite NiTi, austenite + R-phase NiTi, and fully R-phased NiTi. The wires were also characterized by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. A commercially available endodontic instrument was scanned using microcomputed tomography, and the resulting images were used to build the geometrical model. The numerical analyses were performed in ABAQUS using load and boundary conditions based on the ISO 3630-1 specification for the bending and torsion of endodontic instruments. The modeled instrument containing only R-phase demanded the lowest moment to be bent, followed by the one with mixed austenite + R-phase. The superelastic instrument, containing essentially austenite, required the highest bending moment. During bending, the fully R-phased instrument reached the lowest stress values; however, it also experienced the highest angular deflection when subjected to torsion. In summary, this simulation showed that NiTi endodontic instruments containing only R-phase in their microstructure would show higher flexibility without compromising their performance under torsion. PMID:27314059

  20. Response of PWR Baffle-Former Bolt Loading to Swelling, Irradiation Creep and Bolt Replacement as Revealed Using Finite Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, Edward P.; Garner, Francis A.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2005-10-01

    Baffle-former bolts in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) tend to degrade with aging, partially due to radiation-induced hardening and also due to the often complex stress history of the bolt in response to time-dependent and spatial gradients in temperature and neutron flux-spectra that can alter the stress distribution of the bolts. The time-integrated stresses must play some role in bolt cracking, however, and therefore it is of interest to study the time dependence of bolt stresses even for idealized cases. These stresses have been quantified in the present analysis using newly developed material constitutive equations for swelling and creep at light-water reactor (LWR)-relevant temperatures and dose rates. ABAQUS finite element calculations demonstrate that irradiation creep in the absence of void swelling tends to relax bolt tension before 10 dpa. Subsequent differential swelling leads to an increase in bolt tension, but only to stresses below the yield strength and usually below the initial bolt loading. Various assumed bolt replacement scenarios are considered with respect to their consequences on future failure possibilities.

  1. A Comparison of Some Model Order Reduction Methods for Fast Simulation of Soft Tissue Response using the Point Collocation-based Method of Finite Spheres (PCMFS).

    PubMed

    Banihani, Suleiman; De, Suvranu

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we develop the Point Collocation-based Method of Finite Spheres (PCMFS) to simulate the viscoelastic response of soft biological tissues and evaluate the effectiveness of model order reduction methods such as modal truncation, Hankel optimal model and truncated balanced realization techniques for PCMFS. The PCMFS was developed in [1] as a physics-based technique for real time simulation of surgical procedures. It is a meshfree numerical method in which discretization is performed using a set of nodal points with approximation functions compactly supported on spherical subdomains centered at the nodes. The point collocation method is used as the weighted residual technique where the governing differential equations are directly applied at the nodal points. Since computational speed has a significant role in simulation of surgical procedures, model order reduction methods have been compared for relative gains in efficiency and computational accuracy. Of these methods, truncated balanced realization results in the highest accuracy while modal truncation results in the highest efficiency. PMID:20300494

  2. Conjugate gradient determination of optimal plane changes for a class of three-impulse transfers between noncoplanar circular orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    A particular type of three-impulse transfer between two circular orbits is analyzed. The possibility of three plane changes is recognized, and the problem is to optimally distribute these plane changes to minimize the sum of the individual impulses. Numerical difficulties and their solution are discussed. Numerical results obtained from a conjugate gradient technique are presented for both the case where the individual plane changes are unconstrained and for the case where they are constrained. Possibly not unexpectedly, multiple minima are found. The techniques presented could be extended to the finite burn case, but primarily the contents are addressed to preliminary mission design and vehicle sizing.

  3. Entrainment and the cranial rhythmic impulse.

    PubMed

    McPartland, J M; Mein, E A

    1997-01-01

    Entrainment is the integration or harmonization of oscillators. All organisms pulsate with myriad electrical and mechanical rhythms. Many of these rhythms emanate from synchronized pulsating cells (eg, pacemaker cells, cortical neurons). The cranial rhythmic impulse is an oscillation recognized by many bodywork practitioners, but the functional origin of this impulse remains uncertain. We propose that the cranial rhythmic impulse is the palpable perception of entrainment, a harmonic frequency that incorporates the rhythms of multiple biological oscillators. It is derived primarily from signals between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Entrainment also arises between organisms. The harmonizing of coupled oscillators into a single, dominant frequency is called frequency-selective entrainment. We propose that this phenomenon is the modus operandi of practitioners who use the cranial rhythmic impulse in craniosacral treatment. Dominant entrainment is enhanced by "centering," a technique practiced by many healers, for example, practitioners of Chinese, Tibetan, and Ayurvedic medicine. We explore the connections between centering, the cranial rhythmic impulse, and craniosacral treatment. PMID:8997803

  4. Development of a human body finite element model with multiple muscles and their controller for estimating occupant motions and impact responses in frontal crash situations.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masami; Nakahira, Yuko; Kimpara, Hideyuki; Sugiyama, Takahiko; Min, Kyuengbo

    2012-10-01

    A few reports suggest differences in injury outcomes between cadaver tests and real-world accidents under almost similar conditions. This study hypothesized that muscle activity could primarily cause the differences, and then developed a human body finite element (FE) model with individual muscles. Each muscle was modeled as a hybrid model of bar elements with active properties and solid elements with passive properties. The model without muscle activation was firstly validated against five series of cadaver test data on impact responses in the anterior-posterior direction. The model with muscle activation levels estimated based on electromyography (EMG) data was secondly validated against four series of volunteer test data on bracing effects for stiffness and thickness of an upper arm muscle, and braced driver's responses under a static environment and a brake deceleration. A muscle controller using reinforcement learning (RL), which is a mathematical model of learning process in the basal ganglia associated with human postural controls, were newly proposed to estimate muscle activity in various occupant conditions including inattentive and attentive conditions. Control of individual muscles predicted by RL reproduced more human like head-neck motions than conventional control of two groups of agonist and antagonist muscles. The model and the controller demonstrated that head-neck motions of an occupant under an impact deceleration of frontal crash were different in between a bracing condition with maximal braking force and an occupant condition predicted by RL. The model and the controller have the potential to investigate muscular effects in various occupant conditions during frontal crashes. PMID:23625563

  5. A note on laminar shear flow over impulsively started bodies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.

    1971-01-01

    Prediction of the shear flow around bodies impulsively set into motion at a uniform velocity. Information is presented on the local wall shear stress, velocity distribution, steady flow times, and thermal response for wedge flows where local flow acceleration occurs. The essential features of the flow field are found to be describable by the approximate series expansion method of Goldstein and Rosenhead (1936). This method would appear to be useful in rapidly calculating the viscous drag on the forward face of various shaped bodies where local flow acceleration occurs.

  6. Acoustic radiation force impulse of the liver

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Crosara, Stefano; De Robertis, Riccardo; Canestrini, Stefano; Demozzi, Emanuele; Gallotti, Anna; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a new and promising ultrasound-based diagnostic technique that, evaluating the wave propagation speed, allows the assessment of the tissue stiffness. ARFI is implemented in the ultrasound scanner. By short-duration acoustic radiation forces (less than 1 ms), localized displacements are generated in a selected region of interest not requiring any external compression so reducing the operator dependency. The generated wave scan provides qualitative or quantitative (wave velocity values) responses. Several non-invasive methods for assessing the staging of fibrosis are used, in order to avoid liver biopsy. Liver function tests and transient elastography are non-invasive, sensitive and accurate tools for the assessment of liver fibrosis and for the discrimination between cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic liver. Many published studies analyse ARFI performance and feasibility in studying diffuse liver diseases and compare them to other diagnostic imaging modalities such as conventional ultrasonography and transient elastography. Solid focal liver lesions, both benign and malignant, are common findings during abdominal examinations. The accurate characterization and differential diagnosis are important aims of all the imaging modalities available today. Only few papers describe the application of ARFI technology in the study of solid focal liver lesions, with different results. In the present study, the existing literature, to the best of our knowledge, about ARFI application on diffuse and focal liver pathology has been evaluated and results and statistical analyses have been compared, bringing to the conclusion that ARFI can be used in the study of the liver with similar accuracy as transient elastography in diagnosing significant fibrosis or cirrhosis and has got some advantages in respect to transient elastography since it does not require separate equipment, better displays anatomical structures and measurements can be

  7. Auto-programmable impulse neural circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watula, D.; Meador, J.

    1990-01-01

    Impulse neural networks use pulse trains to communicate neuron activation levels. Impulse neural circuits emulate natural neurons at a more detailed level than that typically employed by contemporary neural network implementation methods. An impulse neural circuit which realizes short term memory dynamics is presented. The operation of that circuit is then characterized in terms of pulse frequency modulated signals. Both fixed and programmable synapse circuits for realizing long term memory are also described. The implementation of a simple and useful unsupervised learning law is then presented. The implementation of a differential Hebbian learning rule for a specific mean-frequency signal interpretation is shown to have a straightforward implementation using digital combinational logic with a variation of a previously developed programmable synapse circuit. This circuit is expected to be exploited for simple and straightforward implementation of future auto-adaptive neural circuits.

  8. [Impulse galvanization in postoperative urination disorders].

    PubMed

    Kölbl, H; Riss, P

    1988-03-01

    In this study we examined the therapeutic effect of impulse-galvanization in patients with voiding difficulties after anterior vaginal repair. Patients (n = 56/79) revealing residual urine until the sixth postoperative day were studied. Considering the onset of the first spontaneous micturition and the lack of residual urine no significant difference was found in the group undergoing impulse-galvanization (n = 19) compared to a group without therapy (n = 37). By adjuvant treatment with alpha-sympathicolytics, spasmolytics or tranquilizers patients with impulse-galvanization and the comparative group were found to be without residual urine 11.2 and 13 days after surgery, respectively (p less than 0.001). PMID:3259522

  9. Ion acceleration in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinacker, Jurgen; Jaekel, Uwe; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    1993-01-01

    Nonrelativistic spectra of protons and ions accelerated in impulsive solar flares are derived using more realistic turbulence power spectra. The calculation is based on a particle transport equation extracted from a second step acceleration model containing stochastic acceleration. The turbulence model is generalized to waves with a small angle to the magnetic field vector and to turbulence power spectra with spectral indices s smaller than 2. Due to the occurrence of impulsive flares at low coronal heights, Coulomb losses at the dense coronal plasma and diffusive particle escape are taken into account. The ion spectra show deviations from long-duration spectra near the Coulomb barrier, where the losses become maximal. The Z-squared/A-dependence of the Coulomb losses leads to spectral variations for different ions. We present a method to estimate the turbulence parameters and injection conditions of the flare particles using ion ratios like Fe/O of impulsive flares.

  10. Impulsive magnetic pulsations and electrojets in the loop footpoint driven by the fast reconnection jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ugai, M.

    2009-11-15

    It is well known that magnetic pulsations of long periods impulsively occur in accordance with the sudden onset of geomagnetic substorms and drastic enhancement of electrojets in the ionosphere. On the basis of the spontaneous fast reconnection model, the present paper examines the physical mechanism by which both magnetic pulsations and strong electrojets are impulsively driven by the fast (Alfvenic) reconnection jet. When a large-scale plasmoid [or traveling compression region (TCR)], directly caused by the fast reconnection jet, collides with the magnetic loop footpoint, strong electrojets are impulsively driven in a finite extent in the loop footpoint in accordance with the evolution of the current wedge and the generator current circuit. Simultaneously, magnetohydrodynamic (Alfven) waves, accompanied by the TCR, are reflected from the electrojet layer, leading to impulsive magnetic pulsations ahead of the loop footpoint because of the interaction (or resonance) between the reflected waves and the waves traveling toward the footpoint. The pulsations propagate outward in all directions from the source region of the wave reflection, and the pulsation periods are typically estimated to be of several tens of seconds.

  11. Using Dual Process Models to Examine Impulsivity Throughout Neural Maturation.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Rotem

    2016-01-01

    The multivariate construct of impulsivity is examined through neural systems and connections that comprise the executive functioning system. It is proposed that cognitive and behavioral components of impulsivity can be divided into two distinct groups, mediated by (1) the cognitive control system: deficits in top-down cognitive control processes referred to as action/cognitive impulsivity and (2) the socioemotional system: related to bottom-up affective/motivational processes referred to as affective impulsivity. Examination of impulsivity from a developmental viewpoint can guide future research, potentially enabling the selection of more effective interventions for impulsive individuals, based on the cognitive components requiring improvement. PMID:27186976

  12. Out of control: Evidence for anterior insula involvement in motor impulsivity and reactive aggression

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Alexander T.; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Schuhmann, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Inhibiting impulsive reactions while still defending one’s vital resources is paramount to functional self-control and successful development in a social environment. However, this ability of successfully inhibiting, and thus controlling one’s impulsivity, often fails, leading to consequences ranging from motor impulsivity to aggressive reactions following provocation. Although inhibitory failure represents the underlying mechanism, the neurocognition of social aggression and motor response inhibition have traditionally been investigated in separation. Here, we aimed to directly investigate and compare the neural mechanisms underlying the failure of inhibition across those different modalities of self-control. We used functional imaging to reveal the overlap in neural correlates between failed motor response inhibition (measured by a go/no-go task) and reactive aggression (measured by the Taylor aggression paradigm) in healthy males. The core overlap of neural correlates was located in the anterior insula, suggesting common anterior insula involvement in motor impulsivity as well as reactive aggression. This evidence regarding an overarching role of the anterior insula across different modalities of self-control enables an integrative perspective on insula function and a better integration of cognitive, social and emotional factors into a comprehensive model of impulsivity. Furthermore, it can eventually lead to a better understanding of clinical syndromes involving inhibitory deficits. PMID:24837479

  13. Graphics for Finite-Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Sawyer, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    ELPLOT program is a passive computer graphics system that could be utilized for display of models and responses of general finite-element analyses. Program includes: Wide range of view-orientation selections, number of alternative data-input formats, extensive family of finite-element types, and capabilities for both static and dynamic-response displays.

  14. Applying Padé via Lanczos to the finite element method for electromagnetic radiation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slone, Rodney Daryl; Lee, Robert

    2000-03-01

    Recently there has been a great deal of interest in using the Padé via Lanczos (PVL) technique to analyze the transfer functions and impulse responses of large-scale linear circuits. In this paper, matrix-Padé via Lanczos (MPVL), which can be used on multiple-input multiple-output systems, is applied to solve models resulting from applying the finite element method (FEM) to electromagnetic wave propagation problems in the frequency domain. The resulting solution procedure of using MPVL to solve FEM equations allows for wideband frequency simulations with a reduction in total computation time. Several issues arise during this application, and each is addressed in detail. Numerical simulations using this method are shown along with traditional methods using an LU decomposition at each frequency point of interest. Comparisons in accuracy as well as computation time are also given.

  15. Effects of nerve impulses on threshold of frog sciatic nerve fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, S A

    1979-01-01

    persists for at least as long as an absolute superexcitability (with threshold below the resting level) can be measured in the same fibre at rest. 7. The duration of the superexcitable phase interpreted as a relative change in excitability was roughly the same regardless of the level of depression. 8. The magnitude of the oscillation in threshold was give to ten times larger than the grey region (the range of stimuli for which response is probabilistic). It is concluded that at regions of low conduction safety such as axonal branches, where weak forces can influence whether an impulse will pass, such pronounced and long-lasting after-effects of firing can be expected to modulate conduction of nerve impulses. PMID:313985

  16. Mechanical response comparison in an implant overdenture retained by ball attachments on conventional regular and mini dental implants: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih-Hao; Huang, Shiang-Rung; Huang, Shao-Fu; Lin, Chun-Li

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the bone/implant mechanical responses in an implant overdenture retained by ball attachments on two conventional regular dental implants (RDI) and four mini dental implants (MDI) using finite element (FE) analysis. Two FE models of overdentures retained by RDIs and MDIs for a mandibular edentulous patient with validation within 6% variation errors were constructed by integrating CT images and CAD system. Bone grafting resulted in 2 mm thickness at the buccal side constructed for the RDIs-supported model to mimic the bone augmentation condition for the atrophic alveolar ridge. Nonlinear hyperelastic material and frictional contact element were used to simulate characteristic of the ball attachment-retained overdentures. The results showed that a denture supported by MDIs presented higher surrounding bone strains than those supported by RDIs under different load conditions. Maximum bone micro strains were up to 6437/2987 and 13323/5856 for MDIs/RDIs under single centric and lateral contacts, respectively. Corresponding values were 4429/2579 and 9557/5774 under multi- centric and lateral contacts, respectively. Bone micro strains increased 2.06 and 1.96-folds under single contact, 2.16 and 2.24-folds under multiple contacts for MDIs and RDIs when lateral to axial loads were compared. The maximum RDIs and MDIs implant stresses in all simulated cases were found by far lower than their yield strength. Overdentures retained using ball attachments on MDIs in poor edentulous bone structure increase the surrounding bone strain over the critical value, thereby damaging the bone when compared to the RDIs. Eliminating the occlusal single contact and oblique load of an implant-retained overdenture reduces the risk for failure. PMID:26212887

  17. Role of implant configurations supporting three-unit fixed partial denture on mandibular bone response: biological-data-based finite element study.

    PubMed

    Yoda, N; Liao, Z; Chen, J; Sasaki, K; Swain, M; Li, Q

    2016-09-01

    Implant-supported fixed partial denture with cantilever extension can transfer the excessive load to the bone around implants and stress/strain concentration potentially leading to bone resorption. This study investigated the effects of implant configurations supporting three-unit fixed partial denture (FPD) on the stress and strain distribution in the peri-implant bone by combining clinically measured time-dependent loading data and finite element (FE) analysis. A 3-dimensional mandibular model was constructed based on computed tomography (CT) images. Four different configurations of implants supporting 3-unit FPDs, namely three implant-supported FPD, conventional three-unit bridge FPD, distal cantilever FPD and mesial cantilever FPD, were modelled. The FPDs were virtually inserted to the molar area in the mandibular FE models. The FPDs were loaded according to time-dependent in vivo-measured 3-dimensional loading data during chewing. The von Mises stress (VMS) and equivalent strain (EQS) in peri-implant bone regions were evaluated as mechanical stimuli. During the chewing cycles, the regions near implant necks and bottom apexes experienced high VMS and EQS than the middle regions in all implant-supported FPD configurations. Higher VMS and EQS values were also observed at the implant neck region adjacent to the cantilever extension in the cantilevered configurations. The patient-specific dynamic loading data and CT-based reconstruction of full 3D mandibular allowed us to model the biomechanical responses more realistically. The results provided data for clinical assessment of implant configuration to improve longevity and reliability of the implant-supported FPD restoration. PMID:27224022

  18. A model-based analysis of impulsivity using a slot-machine gambling paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Paliwal, Saee; Petzschner, Frederike H.; Schmitz, Anna Katharina; Tittgemeyer, Marc; Stephan, Klaas E.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity plays a key role in decision-making under uncertainty. It is a significant contributor to problem and pathological gambling (PG). Standard assessments of impulsivity by questionnaires, however, have various limitations, partly because impulsivity is a broad, multi-faceted concept. What remains unclear is which of these facets contribute to shaping gambling behavior. In the present study, we investigated impulsivity as expressed in a gambling setting by applying computational modeling to data from 47 healthy male volunteers who played a realistic, virtual slot-machine gambling task. Behaviorally, we found that impulsivity, as measured independently by the 11th revision of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), correlated significantly with an aggregate read-out of the following gambling responses: bet increases (BIs), machines switches (MS), casino switches (CS), and double-ups (DUs). Using model comparison, we compared a set of hierarchical Bayesian belief-updating models, i.e., the Hierarchical Gaussian Filter (HGF) and Rescorla–Wagner reinforcement learning (RL) models, with regard to how well they explained different aspects of the behavioral data. We then examined the construct validity of our winning models with multiple regression, relating subject-specific model parameter estimates to the individual BIS-11 total scores. In the most predictive model (a three-level HGF), the two free parameters encoded uncertainty-dependent mechanisms of belief updates and significantly explained BIS-11 variance across subjects. Furthermore, in this model, decision noise was a function of trial-wise uncertainty about winning probability. Collectively, our results provide a proof of concept that hierarchical Bayesian models can characterize the decision-making mechanisms linked to the impulsive traits of an individual. These novel indices of gambling mechanisms unmasked during actual play may be useful for online prevention measures for at-risk players and

  19. Cortical thickness of superior frontal cortex predicts impulsiveness and perceptual reasoning in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Schilling, C; Kühn, S; Paus, T; Romanowski, A; Banaschewski, T; Barbot, A; Barker, G J; Brühl, R; Büchel, C; Conrod, P J; Dalley, J W; Flor, H; Ittermann, B; Ivanov, N; Mann, K; Martinot, J-L; Nees, F; Rietschel, M; Robbins, T W; Smolka, M N; Ströhle, A; Kathmann, N; Garavan, H; Heinz, A; Schumann, G; Gallinat, J

    2013-05-01

    Impulsiveness is a pivotal personality trait representing a core domain in all major personality inventories. Recently, impulsiveness has been identified as an important modulator of cognitive processing, particularly in tasks that require the processing of large amounts of information. Although brain imaging studies have implicated the prefrontal cortex to be a common underlying representation of impulsiveness and related cognitive functioning, to date a fine-grain and detailed morphometric analysis has not been carried out. On the basis of ahigh-resolution magnetic resonance scans acquired in 1620 healthy adolescents (IMAGEN), the individual cortical thickness (CT) was estimated. Correlations between Cloninger's impulsiveness and CT were studied in an entire cortex analysis. The cluster identified was tested for associations with performance in perceptual reasoning tasks of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC IV). We observed a significant inverse correlation between trait impulsiveness and CT of the left superior frontal cortex (SFC; Monte Carlo Simulation P<0.01). CT within this cluster correlated with perceptual reasoning scores (Bonferroni corrected) of the WISC IV. On the basis of a large sample of adolescents, we identified an extended area in the SFC as a correlate of impulsiveness, which appears to be in line with the trait character of this prominent personality facet. The association of SFC thickness with perceptual reasoning argues for a common neurobiological basis of personality and specific cognitive domains comprising attention, spatial reasoning and response selection. The results may facilitate the understanding of the role of impulsiveness in several psychiatric disorders associated with prefrontal dysfunctions and cognitive deficits. PMID:22665261

  20. Insight Into the Relationship Between Impulsivity and Substance Abuse From Studies Using Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Winstanley, Catharine A.; Olausson, Peter; Taylor, Jane R.; Jentsch, J. David

    2010-01-01

    Drug use disorders are often accompanied by deficits in the capacity to efficiently process reward-related information and to monitor, suppress, or override reward-controlled behavior when goals are in conflict with aversive or immediate outcomes. This emerging deficit in behavioral flexibility and impulse control may be a central component of the progression to addiction, as behavior becomes increasingly driven by drugs and drug-associated cues at the expense of more advantageous activities. Understanding how neural mechanisms implicated in impulse control are affected by addictive drugs may therefore prove a useful strategy in the search for new treatment options. Animal models of impulsivity and addiction could make a significant contribution to this endeavor. Here, some of the more common behavioral paradigms used to measure different aspects of impulsivity across species are outlined, and the importance of the response to reward-paired cues in such paradigms is discussed. Naturally occurring differences in forms of impulsivity have been found to be predictive of future drug self-administration, but drug exposure can also increase impulsive responding. Such data are in keeping with the suggestion that impulsivity may contribute to multiple stages within the spiral of addiction. From a neurobiological perspective, converging evidence from rat, monkey, and human studies suggest that compromised functioning within the orbitofrontal cortex may critically contribute to the cognitive sequelae of drug abuse. Changes in gene transcription and protein expression within this region may provide insight into the mechanism underlying drug-induced cortical hypofunction, reflecting new molecular targets for the treatment of uncontrolled drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior. PMID:20491734

  1. Recognition Memory in Reflective and Impulsive Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Alexander W.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Eight reflective and eight impulsive preschool children were tested in a forced-choice recognition memory task. Reflective children made more correct recognition choices than did impulsive children under all experimental conditions. (ST)

  2. Recent Translational Findings on Impulsivity in Relation to Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Weafer, Jessica; Mitchell, Suzanne H.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive behavior is strongly implicated in drug abuse, as both a cause and a consequence of drug use. To understand how impulsive behaviors lead to and result from drug use, translational evidence from both human and non-human animal studies is needed. Here, we review recent (2009 or later) studies that have investigated two major components of impulsive behavior, inhibitory control and impulsive choice, across preclinical and clinical studies. We concentrate on the stop-signal task as the measure of inhibitory control and delay discounting as the measure of impulsive choice. Consistent with previous reports, recent studies show greater impulsive behavior in drug users compared with non-users. Additionally, new evidence supports the prospective role of impulsive behavior in drug abuse, and has begun to identify the neurobiological mechanisms underlying impulsive behavior. We focus on the commonalities and differences in findings between preclinical and clinical studies, and suggest future directions for translational research. PMID:25678985

  3. Arbitration between controlled and impulsive choices

    PubMed Central

    Economides, M.; Guitart-Masip, M.; Kurth-Nelson, Z.; Dolan, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    The impulse to act for immediate reward often conflicts with more deliberate evaluations that support long-term benefit. The neural architecture that negotiates this conflict remains unclear. One account proposes a single neural circuit that evaluates both immediate and delayed outcomes, while another outlines separate impulsive and patient systems that compete for behavioral control. Here we designed a task in which a complex payout structure divorces the immediate value of acting from the overall long-term value, within the same outcome modality. Using model-based fMRI in humans, we demonstrate separate neural representations of immediate and long-term values, with the former tracked in the anterior caudate (AC) and the latter in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Crucially, when subjects' choices were compatible with long-run consequences, value signals in AC were down-weighted and those in vmPFC were enhanced, while the opposite occurred when choice was impulsive. Thus, our data implicate a trade-off in value representation between AC and vmPFC as underlying controlled versus impulsive choice. PMID:25573670

  4. How Many Impulsivities? A Discounting Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel

    2013-01-01

    People discount the value of delayed and uncertain outcomes, and how steeply individuals discount is thought to reflect how impulsive they are. From this perspective, steep discounting of delayed outcomes (which fails to maximize long-term welfare) and shallow discounting of probabilistic outcomes (which fails to adequately take risk into account)…

  5. GABRA2 Genotype, Impulsivity, and Body Mass

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Lance O.; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Houston, Rebecca J.; Kranzler, Henry R.; Gelernter, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to test a hypothesis associating impulsivity with an elevated body mass index (BMI). Methods To this end, we examined associations of BMI with putative genetic, neurophysiological, psychiatric, and psychological indicators of impulsivity in 78 women and 74 men formerly dependent on alcohol or drugs. A second analysis was designed to test the replicability of the genetic findings in an independent sample of 109 women and 111 men with a similar history of substance dependence. Results The results of the first analysis showed that BMI was positively correlated with Total and Nonplanning Scale Scores on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and the number of childhood symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in women. It was also positively correlated, in women, with a GABRA2 variant previously implicated as a risk factor for substance dependence and an objective electroencephalographic feature previously associated with GABRA2 and relapse risk. The second analysis confirmed that the correlation between BMI and the substance-dependence-associated GABRA2 genotype was reliable and sex-specific. Conclusions We conclude that an elevated BMI is associated with genetic, neurophysiological, psychiatric, and psychological indicators of impulsivity. The sex difference may be explained by greater opportunities to eat and overeat, a preference for higher calorie foods, a longer duration of alcohol/drug abstinence, or previous pregnancies in women. PMID:22882390

  6. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1990-09-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during the manufacture of paper and similar web products. Impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip in which one of the rolls is heated to a high temperature. A steam layer adjacent to the heated surface grows and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is very much less than that required for conventional evaporative drying. Hence, it has been projected that wide commercialization of impulse drying would result in at least a 10% industry-wide energy saving. This report covers work completed between October, 1988 and September, 1989. During this period, pilot press trails demonstrated that newsprint as well as linerboard experience delamination. Hence, the major focus of the research was the resolution of the delamination problem. In order to document potential process improvements, measurement methods were developed to quantify sheet delamination. Using these methods, low thermal diffusivity ceramic roll surfaces were shown to extend the range of impulse drying operating conditions while avoiding sheet delamination. As compared to steel surfaces, ceramics were found to provide significantly higher water volume without inducing sheet delamination. 46 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Impulse noise trauma during army weapon firing.

    PubMed

    Munjal, K R; Singh, V P

    1997-04-01

    A 100 infanty personnel firing modern weapons such as the Anti Tank Guided Missile, 106mm Recoiless Gun (RCL), 84mm Rocket Launcher (RL) and 81mm Mortar were studied for the effect of impulse noise on the ear and the evolution of the Temporary Threshold Shift (TTS), Recovery Time (RT) and Permanent Threshold Shift (PTS) was traced. PMID:23119288

  8. Signal processing in impulsive electromagnetic interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabin, Serena M.

    1993-06-01

    Statistical signal processing functions such as signal detection, estimation, and identification play a key role in the development of effective communications, radar, and sonar systems. For example, advanced statistical methods are emerging as being particularly important in digital communications systems operating in channels corrupted by interference from such phenomena as multiple-access noise, intentional jamming, and impulsive noise sources. Conventional demodulation methods, such as coherent matched filtering, often suffer serious performance degradation when subject to interference of these types; however, this degradation can frequently be eliminated through the use of more sophisticated signal processing techniques. During this reporting period, the focus of our work has been on the problem of obtaining optimum and efficient identification and detection procedures for impulsive channels. Of particular interest is the Middleton Class A noise model, which is a widely-accepted statistical-physical model for impulsive interference superimposed on a Gaussian background. The model has two basic parameters that can be adjusted to fit a wide variety of impulsive noise phenomena occurring in practice.

  9. Impulse Plasma In Surface Engineering - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdunek, K.; Nowakowska-Langier, K.; Chodun, R.; Okrasa, S.; Rabinski, M.; Dora, J.; Domanowski, P.; Halarowicz, J.

    2014-11-01

    The article describes the view of the plasma surface engineering, assuming the role of non-thermal energy effects in the synthesis of materials and coatings deposition. In the following study it was underlined that the vapor excitation through the application of an electric field during coatings deposition gives new possibilities for coatings formation. As an example the IPD method was chosen. During the IPD (Impulse Plasma Deposition) the impulse plasma is generated in the coaxial accelerator by strong periodic electrical pulses. The impulse plasma is distributed in the form of energetic plasma pockets. Due to the almost completely ionization of gas, the nucleation of new phases takes place on ions directly in the plasma itself. As a result the coatings of metastable materials with nano-amorphous structure and excellent adhesion to the non-heated intentionally substrates could be deposited. Recently the novel way of impulse plasma generation during the coatings deposition was proposed and developed by our group. An efficient tool for plasma process control, the plasma forming gas injection to the interelectrode space was used. Periodic changing the gas pressure results in increasing both the degree of dispersion and the dynamics of the plasma pulses. The advantage of the new technique in deposition of coatings with exceptionally good properties has been demonstrated in the industrial scale not only in the case of the IPD method but also in the case of very well known magnetron sputtering method.

  10. Impulse Control Disorders - The Continuum Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The group Parkinson Inside Out is composed of health professionals and academic researchers who have been diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease. In our discussions we try to make use of both our inside perspective as patients, and our outside perspective as professionals. In this paper, we apply the two perspectives to the Impulse Control Disorders. These impulsive behaviour patterns are thought to be relatively uncommon side effects of some of the medication used in dopamine replacement therapy. The phenomenon is usually described as relatively rare (<15%), and mainly confined to patients with special vulnerabilities. In contrast, we propose that having some problems with controlling impulses is a very common experience for patients undergoing dopamine replacement therapy. They result from difficulties in decision making engendered by variations in dopamine accessibility in the reward centre of the brain. Only in a minority do the consequences grow to the damaging proportions of a disorder, but most patients are probably affected to some degree. Seeing, and measuring, decision difficulties as a continuous dimension, rather than as a discrete category, brings increased possibilities for early detection and continuous monitoring. With reliable measures of the propensity for impulsive decision making, it may become possible to both reap the benefits and avoid the dangers of the dopamine agonists. We point to ways of empirically testing our continuity hypothesis. PMID:27031861

  11. Fluctuations of a spherical gravitational impulsive wave.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortaçsu, M.

    1993-02-01

    It is shown that quantum fluctuations, in particular vacuum polarization, vanish in the background of a spherical impulsive wave solution of the Einstein field equations, recently found by Nutku and Penrose. The calculation is done in first-order perturbation theory but arguments are given why it should persist to all orders.

  12. Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

    2009-02-09

    Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

  13. The Relationship among Spontaneity, Impulsivity, and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipper, David A.; Green, Doreen J.; Prorak, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate two characteristics of spontaneity, its relationship to creativity and to impulsivity. We hypothesized a positive relationship between spontaneity and creativity, consistent with Moreno, 1953 "canon of spontaneity-creativity." We also predicted a negative relationship between spontaneity and…

  14. Impulse Magnetization of Nd-Fe-B Sintered Magnets for Sensors.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Marek; Kapelski, Dariusz; Ślusarek, Barbara; Wiak, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Magnetization of large Nd-Fe-B sintered permanent magnets is still challenging. This type of permanent magnet is electrically conductive, so impulse magnetization causes a flow of eddy currents which prevent magnetization of the whole volume of the magnet. The paper deals with the impulse magnetization of sintered Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets and shows a method for the determination of suitable parameters for the supply system. The necessary magnetic field strength for magnetization of the magnet to saturation was determined. The optimal magnetizing fixture supply voltage for magnetization to saturation was determined from simulations in PSpice software, finite element analyses in Maxwell 15 and measurements. Measurements of magnetic induction on the surface of the Nd-Fe-B magnet are also presented to ensure that a magnet with 70 mm diameter and 20 mm in height is fully saturated. PMID:27110783

  15. Impulse Magnetization of Nd-Fe-B Sintered Magnets for Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Przybylski, Marek; Kapelski, Dariusz; Ślusarek, Barbara; Wiak, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Magnetization of large Nd-Fe-B sintered permanent magnets is still challenging. This type of permanent magnet is electrically conductive, so impulse magnetization causes a flow of eddy currents which prevent magnetization of the whole volume of the magnet. The paper deals with the impulse magnetization of sintered Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets and shows a method for the determination of suitable parameters for the supply system. The necessary magnetic field strength for magnetization of the magnet to saturation was determined. The optimal magnetizing fixture supply voltage for magnetization to saturation was determined from simulations in PSpice software, finite element analyses in Maxwell 15 and measurements. Measurements of magnetic induction on the surface of the Nd-Fe-B magnet are also presented to ensure that a magnet with 70 mm diameter and 20 mm in height is fully saturated. PMID:27110783

  16. Destruction of concrete beams with metal and composite reinforcement under impulse action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, A. V.; Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Plevkov, V. S.; Utkin, D. G.

    2015-11-01

    This work presents results of integrated experimental and numerical study of destruction of reinforced concrete beam made of concrete and fiber concrete under shortterm dynamic loading. Experimental studies were carried out using pile driver. Short-term dynamic loading acting on a beam was applied by falling weight, 450 kg, from the height 700 mm. The value of dynamic load in experiments was defined by means of force gauge, linear displacement transducers were used to define linear displacements. Numerical simulation was held three-dimensionally within phenomenological approach of continuum mechanics, the reinforcing elements were clearly defined. Finite element method was modified to solve dynamic tasks. Impact of load on a beam in calculations was replaced by impulse. The dependence of impulse on time was defined from the experiment. The influence of reinforcement on deformation and beam destruction was studied. Correlation of experimental and numerical data was performed.

  17. Infinite horizon optimal impulsive control with applications to Internet congestion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrachenkov, Konstantin; Habachi, Oussama; Piunovskiy, Alexey; Zhang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    We investigate infinite-horizon deterministic optimal control problems with both gradual and impulsive controls, where any finitely many impulses are allowed simultaneously. Both discounted and long-run time-average criteria are considered. We establish very general and at the same time natural conditions, under which the dynamic programming approach results in an optimal feedback policy. The established theoretical results are applied to the Internet congestion control, and by solving analytically and nontrivially the underlying optimal control problems, we obtain a simple threshold-based active queue management scheme, which takes into account the main parameters of the transmission control protocols, and improves the fairness among the connections in a given network.

  18. Opacity Build-up in Impulsive Relativistic Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Granot, Jonathan; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Silva, Eduardo do Couto e

    2007-09-28

    Opacity effects in relativistic sources of high-energy gamma-rays, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) or Blazars, can probe the Lorentz factor of the outflow as well as the distance of the emission site from the source, and thus help constrain the composition of the outflow (protons, pairs, magnetic field) and the emission mechanism. Most previous works consider the opacity in steady state. Here we study the effects of the time dependence of the opacity to pair production ({gamma}{gamma} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) in an impulsive relativistic source, which may be relevant for the prompt gamma-ray emission in GRBs or flares in Blazars. We present a simple, yet rich, semi-analytic model for the time and energy dependence of the optical depth, {tau}{gamma}{gamma}, in which a thin spherical shell expands ultra-relativistically and emits isotropically in its own rest frame over a finite range of radii, R{sub 0} {le} R {le} R{sub 0}+{Delta}R. This is particularly relevant for GRB internal shocks. We find that in an impulsive source ({Delta}R {approx}< R{sub 0}), while the instantaneous spectrum (which is typically hard to measure due to poor photon statistics) has an exponential cutoff above the photon energy {var_epsilon}1(T) where t{gamma}{gamma}({var_epsilon}1) = 1, the time integrated spectrum (which is easier to measure) has a power-law high-energy tail above the photon energy {var_epsilon}1* {approx} {var_epsilon}1({Delta}T) where {Delta}T is the duration of the emission episode. Furthermore, photons with energies {var_epsilon} > {var_epsilon}1* are expected to arrive mainly near the onset of the spike in the light curve or flare, which corresponds to the short emission episode. This arises since in such impulsive sources it takes time to build-up the (target) photon field, and thus the optical depth {tau}{gamma}{gamma}({var_epsilon}) initially increases with time and {var_epsilon}1(T) correspondingly decreases with time, so that photons of energy {var_epsilon} > {var

  19. Designing a Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer for Stochastic Linear and Nonlinear Impulsive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ayati, Moosa; Alwan, Mohamad; Liu Xinzhi; Khaloozadeh, Hamid

    2011-11-30

    State observation (estimation) is a very important issue in system analysis and control. This paper develops a new observer called Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer (SAIO) for the state estimation of impulsive systems. The proposed observer is applicable to linear and nonlinear stochastic impulsive systems. In addition, the effect of parametric uncertainty is considered and unknown parameters of the system are estimated by suitable adaptation laws. Impulsive system theory, particularly stochastic Lyapunov-like function, is used to analyze the stability and convergence of the state estimations. The main advantages of the proposed observer are: 1) it gives continuous estimation from discrete time measurements of the system output, and 2) it is useful for state estimation when continuous measurements are impossible or expensive. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer and we believe that it has many applications in control and estimation theories.

  20. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  1. Measuring Impulsivity in Adolescents with Serious Substance and Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laetitia L.; Whitmore, Elizabeth A.; Raymond, Kristen M.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Adolescents with substance use and conduct disorders have high rates of aggression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), all of which have been characterized in part by impulsivity. Developing measures that capture impulsivity behaviorally and correlate with self-reported impulsivity has been difficult. One promising behavioral…

  2. Sample controllability of impulsive differential systems with random coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuorui; Sun, Jitao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the controllability of impulsive differential systems with random coefficients. Impulsive differential systems with random coefficients are a different stochastic model from stochastic differential equations. Sufficient conditions of sample controllability for impulsive differential systems with random coefficients are obtained by using random Sadovskii's fixed-point theorem. Finally, an example is given to illustrate our results.

  3. Teaching Emotional Intelligence to Impulsive-Aggressive Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Martin; Long, Nicholas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes complex issues involved in helping impulsive-aggressive youth who are devoid of emotional intelligence. Reviews anatomy of impulsivity and the irrational beliefs used as defense mechanisms by impulsive-aggressive students. Discusses two alternative intervention strategies, Life Space Crisis Intervention techniques and the Self Control…

  4. Stability analysis of impulsive functional systems of fractional order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamova, Ivanka; Stamov, Gani

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a class of impulsive fractional functional differential systems is investigated. Sufficient conditions for stability of the zero solution are proved, extending the corresponding theory of impulsive functional differential equations. The investigations are carried out by using the comparison principle, coupled with the Lyapunov function method. We apply our results to an impulsive single species model of Lotka-Volterra type.

  5. Behavioral Assessment of Impulsivity: A Comparison of Children with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neef, Nancy A.; Marckel, Julie; Ferreri, Summer J.; Bicard, David F.; Endo, Sayaka; Aman, Michael G.; Miller, Kelly M.; Jung, Sunhwa; Nist, Lindsay; Armstrong, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a brief computer-based assessment involving choices of concurrently presented arithmetic problems associated with competing reinforcer dimensions to assess impulsivity (choices controlled primarily by reinforcer immediacy) as well as the relative influence of other dimensions (reinforcer rate, quality, and response effort), with 58…

  6. Numerical modeling of on-orbit propellant motion resulting from an impulsive acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, John C.; Mjolsness, Raymond C.; Torrey, Martin D.; Hochstein, John I.

    1987-01-01

    In-space docking and separation maneuvers of spacecraft that have large fluid mass fractions may cause undesirable spacecraft motion in response to the impulsive-acceleration-induced fluid motion. An example of this potential low gravity fluid management problem arose during the development of the shuttle/Centaur vehicle. Experimentally verified numerical modeling techniques were developed to establish the propellant dynamics, and subsequent vehicle motion, associated with the separation of the Centaur vehicle from the shuttle orbiter cargo bay. Although the shuttle/Centaur development activity was suspended, the numerical modeling techniques are available to predict on-orbit liquid motion resulting from impulsive accelerations for other missions and spacecraft.

  7. Hazardous drinking and dimensions of impulsivity, behavioral approach, and inhibition in adult men and women

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Kristen R.; Sinha, Rajita; Potenza, Marc N.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hazardous drinking is characterized by decisions to engage in excessive or risky patterns of alcohol consumption. Levels of impulsivity and behavioral approach and inhibition may differ in hazardous drinkers and nonhazardous drinkers. A comparison of the relative levels of dimensions of impulsivity and behavioral inhibition and approach in adult men and women hazardous and nonhazardous drinkers may inform treatment and prevention efforts. Methods In the present research, 466 men and women from a community sample were administered the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Approach System (BIS/BAS) Scale, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, version 11 (BIS-11). Relations among the dimensions of these constructs were examined using Multivariate Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA), with age and race as covariates. Results There were main effects of hazardous drinking on all three dimensions of impulsivity, the behavioral inhibition system, and the behavioral activation system Reward-Responsiveness, and Fun-Seeking components, with hazardous drinkers scoring higher than non-hazardous drinkers. Conclusion This research provides a better understanding of the manner in which impulsivity and behavioral inhibition and approach tendencies relate to hazardous alcohol use in men and women. The present results have implications for alcohol-related prevention and treatment strategies for adult men and women. PMID:22486201

  8. Impulsivity moderates the effects of movie alcohol portrayals on adolescents' willingness to drink.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Frederick X; Kingsbury, John H; Wills, Thomas A; Finneran, Stephanie D; Dal Cin, Sonya; Gerrard, Meg

    2016-05-01

    This study examined impulsivity as a moderator of adolescents' reactions to positive versus negative portrayals of drinking in American movie clips. Impulsivity, along with willingness and intentions to drink in the future, were assessed in a pretest session. In the experimental sessions, adolescents viewed a series of clips that showed drinking associated with either positive outcomes (e.g., social facilitation) or negative outcomes (fights, arguments). A third group viewed clips with similar positive or negative outcomes, but no alcohol consumption. All participants then responded to an implicit measure of attentional bias regarding alcohol (a dot probe), followed by explicit alcohol measures (self-reports of willingness and intentions to drink). Hypotheses, based on dual-processing theories, were: (a) high-impulsive adolescents would respond more favorably than low-impulsive adolescents to the positive clips, but not the negative clips; and (b) this difference in reactions to the positive clips would be larger on the willingness than the intention measures. Results supported the hypotheses: Adolescents high in impulsivity reported the highest willingness to drink in the positive-clip condition, but were slightly less willing than others in the negative-clip condition. In addition, results on the dot probe task indicated that RTs to alcohol words were negatively correlated with changes in alcohol willingness, but not intention; that is, the faster their response to the alcohol words, the more their willingness increased. The results highlight the utility of a dual-processing perspective on media influence. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27099959

  9. Effects of Marijuana Use on Impulsivity and Hostility in Daily Life

    PubMed Central

    Ansell, Emily B.; Laws, Holly B.; Roche, Michael J.; Sinha, Rajita

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Marijuana use is increasingly prevalent among young adults. While research has found adverse effects associated with marijuana use within experimentally controlled laboratory settings, it is unclear how recreational marijuana use affects day-to-day experiences in users. The present study sought to examine the effects of marijuana use on within-person changes in impulsivity and interpersonal hostility in daily life using smartphone administered assessments. METHODS Forty-three participants with no substance dependence reported on their alcohol consumption, tobacco use, recreational marijuana use, impulsivity, and interpersonal hostility over the course of 14 days. Responses were analyzed using multilevel modeling. RESULTS Marijuana use was associated with increased impulsivity on the same day and the following day relative to days when marijuana was not used, independent of alcohol use. Marijuana was also associated with increased hostile behaviors and perceptions of hostility in others on the same day when compared to days when marijuana was not used. These effects were independent of frequency of marijuana use or alcohol use. There were no significant effects of alcohol consumption on impulsivity or interpersonal hostility. CONCLUSIONS Marijuana use is associated with changes in impulse control and hostility in daily life. This may be one route by which deleterious effects of marijuana are observed for mental health and psychosocial functioning. Given the increasing prevalence of recreational marijuana use and the potential legalization in some states, further research on the potential consequences of marijuana use in young adults’ day-to-day life is warranted. PMID:25595054

  10. Bubble mass center and fluid feedback force fluctuations activated by constant lateral impulse with variable thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1995-01-01

    Sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 are investigated in response to constant lateral impulse with variable thrust. The study, including how the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacts to the constant impulse with variable time period of thrust action in microgravity, how amplitudes of bubble mass center fluctuates with growth and decay of disturbances, and how fluid feedback forces fluctuates in activating on the rotating dewar through the dynamics of sloshing waves are investigated. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertial frame spacecraft bound coordinate with lateral impulses actuating on the rotating dewar in both inertial and non-inertial frames of thrust. Results of the simulations are illustrated.

  11. Ground vibration test results of a JetStar airplane using impulsive sine excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, Michael W.; Voracek, David F.

    1989-01-01

    Structural excitation is important for both ground vibration and flight flutter testing. The structural responses caused by this excitation are analyzed to determine frequency, damping, and mode shape information. Many excitation waveforms have been used throughout the years. The use of impulsive sine (sin omega t)/omega t as an excitation waveform for ground vibration testing and the advantages of using this waveform for flight flutter testing are discussed. The ground vibration test results of a modified JetStar airplane using impulsive sine as an excitation waveform are compared with the test results of the same airplane using multiple-input random excitation. The results indicated that the structure was sufficiently excited using the impulsive sine waveform. Comparisons of input force spectrums, mode shape plots, and frequency and damping values for the two methods of excitation are presented.

  12. Inter-hemispheric comparisons of SPE-associated Impulsive Nitrate Enhancements in Polar Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; Spence, H. E.; Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.; Curran, M.; Dreschhoff, G. A.

    2006-05-01

    Several studies have suggested an association between impulsive nitrate enhancements observed in polar ice and solar proton events (SPEs). However, the validity of this association is still the subject of some controversy. One difficulty in addressing this controversy is the inherently high noise level of unconsolidated firn, which typically constitutes the top few tens of meters of ice cores. This high noise level hampers identification of impulsive nitrate enhancements during the space-age, when routine solar proton measurements are available. To overcome this difficulty we examine cores from both hemispheres, including Summit (Greenland), Windless Bight (Antarctica) and Law Dome (Antarctica). Cross-correlation of the cores reduces the effect of local noise and also provides a picture of the global response and insight into seasonal dependencies. We will compare our list of globally observed impulsive nitrate enhancements to the solar proton record.

  13. Is impulsivity a common trait in bipolar and unipolar disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Henna, Elaine; Hatch, John P; Nicoletti, Mark; Swann, Alan C; Zunta-Soares, Giovana; Soares, Jair C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Impulsivity is increased in bipolar and unipolar disorders during episodes and is associated with substance abuse disorders and suicide risk. Impulsivity between episodes predisposes to relapses and poor therapeutic compliance. However, there is little information about impulsivity during euthymia in mood disorders. We sought to investigate trait impulsivity in euthymic bipolar and unipolar disorder patients, comparing them to healthy individuals and unaffected relatives of bipolar disorder patients. Methods Impulsivity was evaluated by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11A) in 54 bipolar disorder patients, 25 unipolar disorder patients, 136 healthy volunteers, and 14 unaffected relatives. The BIS-11A mean scores for all four groups were compared through the Games–Howell test for all possible pairwise combinations. Additionally, we compared impulsivity in bipolar and unipolar disorder patients with and without history of suicide attempt and substance abuse disorder. Results Bipolar and unipolar disorder patients scored significantly higher than the healthy controls and unaffected relatives on all measures of the BIS-11A except for attentional impulsivity. On the attentional impulsivity measures there were no differences among the unaffected relatives and the bipolar and unipolar disorder groups, but all three of these groups scored higher than the healthy participant group. There was no difference in impulsivity between bipolar and unipolar disorder subjects with and without suicide attempt. However, impulsivity was higher among bipolar and unipolar disorder subjects with past substance use disorder compared to patients without such a history. Conclusions Questionnaire-measured impulsivity appears to be relatively independent of mood state in bipolar and unipolar disorder patients; it remains elevated in euthymia and is higher in individuals with past substance abuse. Elevated attentional and lower non-planning impulsivity in unaffected relatives of

  14. The Stomach-Derived Hormone Ghrelin Increases Impulsive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Fenander, Maya; Richard, Jennifer E; Dickson, Suzanne L; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity, defined as impaired decision making, is associated with many psychiatric and behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as well as eating disorders. Recent data indicate that there is a strong positive correlation between food reward behavior and impulsivity, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Here we hypothesize that ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach and known to increase food reward behavior, also increases impulsivity. In order to assess the impact of ghrelin on impulsivity, rats were trained in three complementary tests of impulsive behavior and choice: differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL), go/no-go, and delay discounting. Ghrelin injection into the lateral ventricle increased impulsive behavior, as indicated by reduced efficiency of performance in the DRL test, and increased lever pressing during the no-go periods of the go/no-go test. Central ghrelin stimulation also increased impulsive choice, as evidenced by the reduced choice for large rewards when delivered with a delay in the delay discounting test. In order to determine whether signaling at the central ghrelin receptors is necessary for maintenance of normal levels of impulsive behavior, DRL performance was assessed following ghrelin receptor blockade with central infusion of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Central ghrelin receptor blockade reduced impulsive behavior, as reflected by increased efficiency of performance in the DRL task. To further investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the impulsivity effect of ghrelin, we microinjected ghrelin into the ventral tegmental area, an area harboring dopaminergic cell bodies. Ghrelin receptor stimulation within the VTA was sufficient to increase impulsive behavior. We further evaluated the impact of ghrelin on dopamine-related gene expression and dopamine turnover in brain areas key in impulsive behavior control. This study provides the first

  15. Single doses of THC and cocaine decrease proficiency of impulse control in heavy cannabis users

    PubMed Central

    van Wel, J H P; Kuypers, K P C; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Spronk, D B; Verkes, R J; Ramaekers, J G

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cannabis is the most popular drug used in the European Union, closely followed by cocaine. Whereas cannabis impairs neurocognitive function in occasional cannabis users, such impairments appear less prominent in heavy users, possibly as a result of tolerance. The present study was designed to assess whether the impairing effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in heavy cannabis users would present in a wide range of neuropsychological functions or selectively affect specific performance domains. We also assessed the acute effects of cocaine on neurocognitive functions of heavy cannabis users. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Heavy cannabis users, who had a history of cocaine use (n = 61), participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-way crossover study. Subjects received single doses of cocaine HCl (300 mg), cannabis (THC μg·kg−1) and placebo, and completed a number of tests measuring impulse control and psychomotor function. KEY RESULTS Single doses of cannabis impaired psychomotor function and increased response errors during impulsivity tasks. Single doses of cocaine improved psychomotor function and decreased response time in impulsivity tasks, but increased errors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Heavy cannabis users display impairments in a broad range of neuropsychological domains during THC intoxication. Impairments observed in psychomotor tasks, but not in impulsivity tasks, appeared smaller in magnitude as compared with those previously reported in occasional cannabis users. Heavy cannabis users were sensitive to the stimulating and inhibitory effects of cocaine on psychomotor function and impulsivity respectively. The reduction in proficiency in impulse control may put drug users at increased risk of repeated drug use and addiction. PMID:24106872

  16. The effects of physical activity on impulsive choice: Influence of sensitivity to reinforcement amount and delay.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Justin C; Feinstein, Max A; Lacy, Ryan T; Smith, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Impulsive choice is a diagnostic feature and/or complicating factor for several psychological disorders and may be examined in the laboratory using delay-discounting procedures. Recent investigators have proposed using quantitative measures of analysis to examine the behavioral processes contributing to impulsive choice. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of physical activity (i.e., wheel running) on impulsive choice in a single-response, discrete-trial procedure using two quantitative methods of analysis. To this end, rats were assigned to physical activity or sedentary groups and trained to respond in a delay-discounting procedure. In this procedure, one lever always produced one food pellet immediately, whereas a second lever produced three food pellets after a 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80-s delay. Estimates of sensitivity to reinforcement amount and sensitivity to reinforcement delay were determined using (1) a simple linear analysis and (2) an analysis of logarithmically transformed response ratios. Both analyses revealed that physical activity decreased sensitivity to reinforcement amount and sensitivity to reinforcement delay. These findings indicate that (1) physical activity has significant but functionally opposing effects on the behavioral processes that contribute to impulsive choice and (2) both quantitative methods of analysis are appropriate for use in single-response, discrete-trial procedures. PMID:26964905

  17. Impulsive Heating of Solar Flare Ribbons Above 10 MK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, P. J. A.; Graham, D. R.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-12-01

    The chromospheric response to the input of flare energy is marked by extended extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ribbons and hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints. These are usually explained as the result of heating and bremsstrahlung emission from accelerated electrons colliding in the dense chromospheric plasma. We present evidence of impulsive heating of flare ribbons above 10 MK in a two-ribbon flare. We analyse the impulsive phase of SOL2013-11-09T06:38, a C2.6 class event using data from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to derive the temperature, emission measure and differential emission measure of the flaring regions and investigate the evolution of the plasma in the flaring ribbons. The ribbons were visible at all SDO/AIA EUV/UV wavelengths, in particular, at 94 and 131 Å filters, sensitive to temperatures of 8 MK and 12 MK. The time evolution of the emission measure of the plasma above 10 MK at the ribbons has a peak near the HXR peak time. The presence of hot plasma in the lower atmosphere is further confirmed by a RHESSI imaging spectroscopy analysis, which shows resolved sources at 11 - 13 MK that are associated with at least one ribbon. We found that collisional beam-heating can only marginally explain the power necessary to heat the 10 MK plasma at the ribbons.

  18. High harmonic generation from impulsively aligned SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devin, Julien; Wang, Song; Kaldun, Andreas; Bucksbaum, Phil

    2016-05-01

    Previous work in high harmonics generation (HHG) in aligned molecular gases has mainly focused on rotational dynamics in order to determine the contributions of different orbitals to the ionization step. In our experiment, we focus on the shorter timescale of vibrational dynamics. We generate high harmonics from impulsively aligned SO2 molecules in a gas jet and record the emitted attosecond pulse trains in a home-built high resolution vacuum ultra violet (VUV) spectrometer. Using the high temporal resolution of our setup, we are able to map out the effects of vibrational wavepackets with a sub-femtosecond resolution. The target molecule, SO2 gas, is impulsively aligned by a near-infrared laser pulse and has accessible vibrations on the timescale of the short laser pulse used. We present first experimental results for the response to this excitation in high-harmonics. We observe both fast oscillations in the time domain as well as shifts of the VUV photon energy outside of the pulse overlaps. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division and by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

  19. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L L

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship. PMID:26217251

  20. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L. L.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship. PMID:26217251