Science.gov

Sample records for finnish forest research

  1. www.metla.fi/silvafennica ISSN 0037-5330 The Finnish Society of Forest Science The Finnish Forest Research Institute

    E-print Network

    Tomppo, Erkki

    Forest Research Institute SILVA FENNICA Silva Fennica 43(2) review articles Common Tree Definitions assessment, the clarification of tree-related terms is an important part of COST Action E43 to harmonise, refined and newly established definitions. The definitions presented in this paper provide a firm basis

  2. www.metla.fi/silvafennica ISSN 0037-5330 The Finnish Society of Forest Science The Finnish Forest Research Institute

    E-print Network

    Tomppo, Erkki

    Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and its Kyoto Protocol. The analysis is based, Kyoto Protocol, UNFCCC Correspondence Emil Cienciala, Institute of Forest Ecosystem Research (IFER emissions by sources and sinks, while the Kyoto Protocol (1997) aims at the actual reduction of emissions

  3. www.metla.fi/silvafennica ISSN 0037-5330 The Finnish Society of Forest Science The Finnish Forest Research Institute

    E-print Network

    Kotiaho, Janne S.

    . 2005, Jönsson and Jonsson 2007). The volume of coarse woody debris (CWD) in natural forests can be up and importance of CWD. This is because the occurrence of several endangered species is associated to high volumes of CWD and to large-diameter logs and snags (Siitonen 2001a, 2001b). Recently, some studies have also

  4. Special Education in Swedish and Finnish Schools: Seeing the Forest or the Trees?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takala, Marjatta; Ahl, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the content of the work of two special education professions in Sweden, special teachers and special pedagogues. In addition, we compare their work to the work of Finnish special teachers. The Swedish participants were 74 special educators: 27 special teachers and 47 special pedagogues. The Finnish data…

  5. Effects of biomass utilization on the carbon balance of Finnish forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievänen, Risto; Salminen, Olli; Kallio, Maarit

    2015-04-01

    The boreal forests cover three fourths of the land area of Finland. About 80 per cent of the total forest area is managed for commercial forestry. The forests produce timber for wood processing and pulp and paper industries and provide also bioenergy. The harvests of timber vary depending on demand of products of forest industry; the harvest level has been on average about 70 per cent of growth in recent years. The utilization of forest biomass is therefore the most important factor affecting the carbon balance of Finnish forests. We made projections of carbon balance of Finnish forests during 2012-2050 based on scenarios of timber and bioenergy demands. To assess the changes in carbon stock of forests, we combined three models: a large-scale forestry model, the soil carbon model Yasso07 for mineral soils, and a method based on emission factors for peatland soils. We considered two harvest scenarios based on the recent projections of plausible levels (min, max) of timber demand. For the bioenergy demand, we compared cases in which the wood energy use was low or high. In the past decades, the Finnish forests have been a steadily growing and substantial carbon sink. Its size has been more than 40% of the national GHG emissions during 1990-2012. The planned use of wood from the forests to forest and energy industry does not threaten the increasing trend of the forest sink; with the lowest use of forest biomass the sink may even match the national GHG emissions until 2050. The stock change of trees is the most important component of carbon balance of forests; it accounts for approximately 80 % of the total stock change. Trees and mineral soils act as carbon sinks and the drained peatland soils as a carbon source. By comparing the scenarios of wood energy use we conclude that the amount of carbon emissions avoided by replacing fossil fuels with stemwood is outweighed by the loss in carbon sequestration.

  6. BLOWING THE WHISTLE ON FINNISH FOREST CRIME Crime file -September 2006

    E-print Network

    logging is widely acknowledged as a serious social, economic and environmental problem. · Russian timber obligation to make all forest management plans subject to an Environmental Impact Assessment (see Appendix A for the Finnish market causes environmental damage in Russia, resulting in over-harvesting2 and increasing

  7. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  8. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-print Network

    of Agriculture, Fisheries and Fooda , the Department of Trade and Industry, the Department of the Environment Funded by the Forestry Commission 64 Research Contracts Awarded by Forest Research 70 Contract Work research, development, surveys and related services to the forest industry and to provide authoritative

  9. infrastructure Report by Forest Research

    E-print Network

    Benefits of green infrastructure Report by Forest Research Promoting sustainable greenspace #12 greenspace Benefits of green infrastructure Report by Forest Research #12;Benefits of green infrastructure be cited as: Forest Research (2010). Benefits of green infrastructure. Report by Forest Research. Forest

  10. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  11. Forest Research Phytophthora austrocedrae

    E-print Network

    Forest Research Phytophthora austrocedrae on juniper Factsheet The Research Agency of the Forestry Phytophthora austrocedrae primarily attacks the roots and stem bases of juniper. Infections may extend to 50 cm or more up diseased stems. Infected trees have foliage reddening and browning over all or most

  12. A Moral Economy of Patents: Case of Finnish Research Universities' Patent Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauppinen, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of the concept of moral economy for higher education studies through a study of Finnish research universities' patent policies. Patent policies not only stimulate the commercialization of research, they also set norms for behavior and aim to clarify how to distribute rights…

  13. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-print Network

    Research Report Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management #12;#12;Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management Gregory Valatin Forestry Commission: Edinburgh-0-85538-815-7 Valatin, G. (2010). Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management. Forestry Commission

  14. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-print Network

    Research Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry, baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FC

  15. Forest Service Research Note

    E-print Network

    .3. Inventorying National Forest Resources... for P/anning-Programing-8udgeting System Miles R. Hill Elliot L.16 cents per acre. An area the size of a National Forest appears to be the upper limit for the system. Hand of the Eldorado National Forest required such data from eight forest resource systems . These data, independently

  16. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 20022003

    E-print Network

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2002­2003 The research agency of the Forestry Commission.00 HC 156 The research agency of the Forestry Commission Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2002­2003 #12;Advisory Committee on Forest Research 2 Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2002

  17. Applying a framework for landscape planning under climate change for the conservation of biodiversity in the Finnish boreal forest.

    PubMed

    Mazziotta, Adriano; Triviño, Maria; Tikkanen, Olli-Pekka; Kouki, Jari; Strandman, Harri; Mönkkönen, Mikko

    2015-02-01

    Conservation strategies are often established without consideration of the impact of climate change. However, this impact is expected to threaten species and ecosystem persistence and to have dramatic effects towards the end of the 21st century. Landscape suitability for species under climate change is determined by several interacting factors including dispersal and human land use. Designing effective conservation strategies at regional scales to improve landscape suitability requires measuring the vulnerabilities of specific regions to climate change and determining their conservation capacities. Although methods for defining vulnerability categories are available, methods for doing this in a systematic, cost-effective way have not been identified. Here, we use an ecosystem model to define the potential resilience of the Finnish forest landscape by relating its current conservation capacity to its vulnerability to climate change. In applying this framework, we take into account the responses to climate change of a broad range of red-listed species with different niche requirements. This framework allowed us to identify four categories in which representation in the landscape varies among three IPCC emission scenarios (B1, low; A1B, intermediate; A2, high emissions): (i) susceptible (B1 = 24.7%, A1B = 26.4%, A2 = 26.2%), the most intact forest landscapes vulnerable to climate change, requiring management for heterogeneity and resilience; (ii) resilient (B1 = 2.2%, A1B = 0.5%, A2 = 0.6%), intact areas with low vulnerability that represent potential climate refugia and require conservation capacity maintenance; (iii) resistant (B1 = 6.7%, A1B = 0.8%, A2 = 1.1%), landscapes with low current conservation capacity and low vulnerability that are suitable for restoration projects; (iv) sensitive (B1 = 66.4%, A1B = 72.3%, A2 = 72.0%), low conservation capacity landscapes that are vulnerable and for which alternative conservation measures are required depending on the intensity of climate change. Our results indicate that the Finnish landscape is likely to be dominated by a very high proportion of sensitive and susceptible forest patches, thereby increasing uncertainty for landscape managers in the choice of conservation strategies. PMID:25044467

  18. Democratic Deliberations in the Finnish Elementary Classroom: The Dilemmas of Deliberations and the Teacher's Role in an Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tammi, Tuure

    2013-01-01

    Finnish youth are found to be, despite their broad knowledge, uninterested in politics and in societal participation. As a remedy, international studies suggest enabling democratic experiences in schools. This article discusses an action research project aimed at developing deliberation-based democratic practice in an elementary classroom. Results…

  19. Learning Outcomes and Knowledge Sharing using Web-based Technologies in Finnish Forest Education from an Educational Experience Point of View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Belle Selene; Rekola, Mika

    2013-01-01

    Learning outcomes, as a conceptual base, are a recognised phenomenon in higher education. Advances in technology, such as web-based technologies in teaching, have facilitated learning efficiency, while such technologies relation to learning outcomes remains a popular topic of research. In this article, we have employed the feedback of 312 Finnish

  20. Researching the Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chazdon, Robin L.

    1995-01-01

    An autobiography of a female ecologist working in the Costa Rican rainforest is provided as an inspiration for girls. The scientist briefly tells her life story and describes her research activities. (LZ)

  1. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 20012002

    E-print Network

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 An Agency of the Forestry Commission #12;#12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor General on Forest Research Chairman PROFESSOR H.G. MILLER, OBE Professor of Forestry University of Aberdeen

  2. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 20012002

    E-print Network

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 An Agency of the Forestry Commission #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor General on Forest Research Chairman PROFESSOR H.G. MILLER, OBE Professor of Forestry University of Aberdeen

  3. Forest Research Much more than trees

    E-print Network

    Forest Research Much more than trees #12;Welcome to Forest Research. We are the research agency much more than trees ­ it's about adapting to, and mitigating the risks from, climate change and land-use management, whose work focuses on the use of applied science for tree, woodland and forest

  4. Binarized Forest to String Translation Google Research

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Corinna

    Binarized Forest to String Translation Hao Zhang Google Research haozhang@google.com Licheng Fang-aware and efficient but sensitive to parsing errors. Forest- to-string translation approaches mitigate the risk of propagating parser errors into transla- tion errors by considering a forest of alterna- tive trees

  5. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station

    E-print Network

    Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer of the USDA Forest Service (USDA-FS) and the Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS). In particular, we of cacti in the driest desert in the world (Warren) IN THIS ISSUE Rocky Mountain Research Station Grassland

  6. Forest Research Increasing the adaptation potential of

    E-print Network

    Forest Research Increasing the adaptation potential of native tree species to global change is a `keystone' species; its decline or loss from the forest ecosystem can threaten the very existence of that ecosystem and its associated ecosystem services. Aims Efforts towards ensuring that native tree species

  7. CLIMATE CHANGE MODELS AND FOREST IMPACTS RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recent Earth Summit in Rio has once again focused world attention on the importance of climate, human and biological interactions. nder programs such as the Forest Service Global Change Research Program (FSGCRP), scientists are exploring and assessing a variety of forest reso...

  8. Finnish Forest Certification System Seeks Endorsement by PEFC for the 3rd Time FEB 24 2010 | INTERNATIONAL

    E-print Network

    | INTERNATIONAL PEFC Finland has become the first national forest certification system that is undergoing PEFCFinnish Forest Certification System Seeks Endorsement by PEFC for the 3rd Time FEB 24 2010 Gunneberg, PEFC Secretary General. "This is way we require all national certification systems aiming

  9. Forest Fragmentation in Connecticut: 1985 2006 Research Summary

    E-print Network

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Forest Fragmentation in Connecticut: 1985 ­ 2006 Research Summary About the Project Forest fragmentation--the breaking up of large forested tracts into smaller and smaller pieces--is considered resources. Figure 1. 2006 forest fragmentation map, with core forest areas in shades of green. To get a feel

  10. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts

    E-print Network

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2004­2005 40 Innovative tests for nursery management Unravelling molecular events in dormancy and cold hardiness of tree seedlings to inform operational practice is for geographically distinct planting sites. Efficient management requires that operational handling of seedlings

  11. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts

    E-print Network

    time lag between the planting of floodplain woodland and any significant effect on flood flows the flood and pollution control functions of floodplain woodland. Forest Research's involvement began understand and help quantify these effects. Work on investigating the role of floodplain woodland in flood

  12. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts I20042005

    E-print Network

    : The Stationery Office £22.10 #12;Advisory Committee on Forest Research Chairman PROFESSOR D. J. READ, FRS Commission #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts I 2004­2005 Together with the Comptroller) amongst beech and ivy leaves in woodland, Selborne, Hants. #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts

  13. Recent Finnish Research on Higher Education, 1985. Kasvatustieteiden Tutkimuslaitoksen Julkaisuja 364.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makinen, Raimo, Ed.; And Others

    The results of current research in higher education in Finland are described in 11 articles, published with the aim of reinforcing contacts with international researchers. Articles' titles and authors include: "University Development, Social Change, and Regional Policy" (Ari Antikainen); "Research on the Economics of Higher Education in Finland"…

  14. The Competitive Funding of University Research: The Case of Finnish Science Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tammi, Timo

    2009-01-01

    The present European higher education policy and research policy can be characterized as emphasizing external financing of universities, competition between and within universities, and the need for a more practical and economically profitable output from research and education. A theoretical framework of analysing the impacts of this new…

  15. ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics

    E-print Network

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    , drivers and impacts of deciduousness in tropical Up to 40% of tropical forests are deciduous or semi-deciduous demonstrated that percent deciduousness of a tropical forest stand can be precisely quantified on a landscapeONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics There is a need

  16. TEOS 07 New Technologies in Tropical Forest Research Team Members

    E-print Network

    Soatto, Stefano

    TEOS 07 New Technologies in Tropical Forest Research Team Members · Michael Allen, Faculty · Eric to uncover new aspects of the ecology of tropical forests. It was expected that this PASI would have its canopy towers and walkway. The tropical forest sensor network project has carried out the deployment

  17. Towards Communication and Learning Based Leadership: Observations in Finnish Public Research Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saari, Eveliina; Talja, Heli

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Management systems designed for the purposes of the industrial era are not sufficient to rise to the challenge of knowledge-creating organizations. This paper seeks to analyse how the motives and aims of top management and knowledge workers differ from each other. In order to avoid confrontation between managerialism and research work…

  18. Distinguishing the Forest from the Trees: Synthesizing IHRMP Research1

    E-print Network

    Distinguishing the Forest from the Trees: Synthesizing IHRMP Research1 Gregory B. Greenwood2 Protection, Sacra mento. such things as elevation, soil texture, vegetation, ownership, etc. Processes, both

  19. Management of Giant Sequoia at Blodgett Forest Research Station1

    E-print Network

    Management of Giant Sequoia at Blodgett Forest Research Station1 Robert C. Heald2 Abstract: Researchers at Blodgett Forest Research Station, University of Cal ifornia, are studying giant sequoia to the presence of several shrub species and five native conifers. The sequoias are also being studied under

  20. [Medical Service of the Finnish Defence Forces].

    PubMed

    Golota, A S; Krassi?, A B; Mikheev, A V; Morovikova, T V; Shalakhin, R A

    2015-01-01

    Thee article is a brief description of the current state of the Finnish Defence Forces medical service and is based on the study of the open access foreign sources. At the beginning, the general information about Finland, the Finnish Defence Forces, and their medical service is presented. Then some particular features are described with more detail, namely, the organization of the inpatient and outpatient treatment, medical supply, scientific research, combat medicine, medical staff education and training, medical , service personnel income. PMID:25916039

  1. 25 CFR 163.37 - Forest management research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Forest management research. 163.37 Section 163.37 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest... authorized Indian representatives' is authorized to perform forestry research activities to improve the...

  2. 25 CFR 163.37 - Forest management research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Forest management research. 163.37 Section 163.37 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest... authorized Indian representatives' is authorized to perform forestry research activities to improve the...

  3. 25 CFR 163.37 - Forest management research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forest management research. 163.37 Section 163.37 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest... authorized Indian representatives' is authorized to perform forestry research activities to improve the...

  4. 25 CFR 163.37 - Forest management research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Forest management research. 163.37 Section 163.37 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest... authorized Indian representatives' is authorized to perform forestry research activities to improve the...

  5. 25 CFR 163.37 - Forest management research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Forest management research. 163.37 Section 163.37 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest... authorized Indian representatives' is authorized to perform forestry research activities to improve the...

  6. POST-GRADUATE RESEARCH INTERN Forest Simulation Modeling

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    use of the model to study effects of changing climate and fire. The post-graduate research internPOST-GRADUATE RESEARCH INTERN Forest Simulation Modeling Position description. A temporary, full to parameterize and test a process-based simulation model for subalpine conifer forests in Yellowstone, supporting

  7. Applied Vegetation Science && (2014) The Tropical managed Forests Observatory: a research

    E-print Network

    Rossi, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    Applied Vegetation Science && (2014) REPORT The Tropical managed Forests Observatory: a research network addressing the future of tropical logged forests Plinio Sist, Ervan Rutishauser, Marielos Pe managed Forests Observatory; Tropical forests Received 20 June 2014 Accepted 30 June 2014 Co

  8. 43 CFR 8224.1 - Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area. 8224.1 Section...RECREATION PROGRAMS PROCEDURES Fossil Forest Research Natural Area § 8224.1 Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area....

  9. 43 CFR 8224.1 - Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area. 8224.1 Section...RECREATION PROGRAMS PROCEDURES Fossil Forest Research Natural Area § 8224.1 Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area....

  10. 43 CFR 8224.1 - Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area. 8224.1 Section...RECREATION PROGRAMS PROCEDURES Fossil Forest Research Natural Area § 8224.1 Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area....

  11. The Finnish Public Discussion of Giftedness and Gifted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laine, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the results of research in which the Finnish public discussion of giftedness and gifted children, and conceptions of giftedness and gifted children presented in it, were examined. The research was conducted by analyzing articles from the Finnish newspaper "Helsingin Sanomat" and the teachers' periodical…

  12. FOREST RESPONSE PROGRAM: NATIONAL RESEARCH ON FOREST DECLINE AND AIR POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Forest Response Program (FRP) is a major research undertaking. t is fortunate to have the support of many of the nation's top scientists. he involvement of the Forest Service, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the broader scientific community gives the program a unique...

  13. Publications Forest Research publishes a wide range

    E-print Network

    in tourism The impact of trees on the well-being of residents on two inner-London social housing estates for recreation and nature tourism ­ European COST Action E33 Forest School: a marvellous opportunity to learn Annual Report and Accounts 2008­2009 #12;Publications New Forest Rural Pathfinder project: stakeholder

  14. Forest Research "Assessing the contribution of forestry grants to

    E-print Network

    Forest Research "Assessing the contribution of forestry grants to equal access for disabled people and toolkit for assessing the contribution of forestry grants to equal access for disabled people to recreation in Scottish forests. Forestry grants have long been an important mechanism for providing public

  15. Liz O'Brien Social Research Group, Forest Research Trees and woodlands

    E-print Network

    Liz O'Brien Social Research Group, Forest Research Trees and woodlands Nature's health service #12;1Trees and woodlands: nature's health service Trees and woodlands Nature's health service Liz O'Brien Social Research Group Forest Research #12;2 Trees and woodlands: nature's health service Acknowledgements

  16. Finnish Municipal Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekkanen, Paavo

    1973-01-01

    The Finnish Municipal Association offers planning, consulting, and training services to the municipalities to assist them in the management and development of their administration and economy. (Author/GB)

  17. 25 CFR 163.37 - Forest management research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.37...authorized Indian representatives' is authorized to perform forestry research activities to improve the basis for determining...

  18. 25 CFR 163.37 - Forest management research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.37...authorized Indian representatives' is authorized to perform forestry research activities to improve the basis for determining...

  19. 25 CFR 163.37 - Forest management research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.37...authorized Indian representatives' is authorized to perform forestry research activities to improve the basis for determining...

  20. 25 CFR 163.37 - Forest management research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.37...authorized Indian representatives' is authorized to perform forestry research activities to improve the basis for determining...

  1. 25 CFR 163.37 - Forest management research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GENERAL FORESTRY REGULATIONS Forest Management and Operations § 163.37...authorized Indian representatives' is authorized to perform forestry research activities to improve the basis for determining...

  2. Forest Research "Assessing the contribution of forestry grants to

    E-print Network

    Forest Research "Assessing the contribution of forestry grants to equal access for disabled people the contribution of forestry grants to equal access for disabled people to recreation goods, facilities

  3. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts

    E-print Network

    Hendry 57 Conservation of black poplar (Populus nigra L.) Joan Cottrell 58 The products of conifer tree Craig and John Proudfoot 63 Managing light to enable natural regeneration in British conifer forests

  4. The Last 40 Years in Finnish Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirri, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    This article sets out to identify and discuss the changes that have taken place in Finnish teacher education during the last 40 years (1974-2014). A brief history of teacher education in Finland is presented, followed by the goals and aims of current research-based teacher education in Finland. Finally, the major changes in Finnish teacher…

  5. Structural Development of Finnish Universities: Achieving Competitiveness and Academic Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirronen, Jarkko; Nokkala, Terhi

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses strategic instruments that are used to enhance the competitiveness of Finnish universities in the context of globalisation, internationalisation and commercialisation of research and education. The Finnish higher education system is currently undergoing a major policy reform, which aims to enhance the competitiveness of…

  6. Acquisition and Analysis of Airborne Carbon Flux Measurements for Use with High-Resolution Satellite and Airborne Hyperspectral Vegetation Products: A study in Finnish boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, T. J.; Drolet, G.; Nichol, C. J.; Porcar-Castell, A.; Nikinmaa, E.; Vesala, T.; Kolari, P.; Moncrieff, J. B.; Clement, R.

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial carbon sinks are currently believed to be responsible for the sequestration of a significant fraction of anthropogenic carbon emissions from the atmosphere, and have become the focus of wide-ranging scientific studies in recent years. The ability to study the dynamics of carbon uptake in different ecosystems at scales meaningful to climatic forcing is essential for understanding the key processes involved and identifying crucial sensitivities and thresholds. Furthermore, the development of reliable algorithms to allow global estimates of carbon sequestration rates from satellite based observations (potentially providing both high spatial and temporal resolution) is a high priority for monitoring the behaviour of these sinks in a changing climate. Combined studies linking airborne and satellite hyperspectral observations of vegetation properties in combination with flux measurements provide one method to develop ecosystem process knowledge and suitable algorithms for carbon flux estimates. However significant challenges remain in obtaining direct flux measurements over larger areas than can be measured with traditional tower based eddy covariance. We present new techniques for the acquisition and analysis of airborne CO2 flux measurements capable of sampling extensive areas while resolving spatial patterns of surface carbon fluxes at scales suitable for analysis alongside hyperspectral vegetation products (such as PRI, NVDI and solar induced fluorescence signatures). We conducted a series of airborne CO2 flux measurement and remote sensing campaigns over a Scots Pine forest in and around the Hyytiälä forest research station in southern Finland in summer 2010. Airborne CO2 flux measurements using the University of Edinburgh’s research aircraft were acquired by flying repeat transects (of up to 35km in length) each day over several days, from a height of 30m to 200m above canopy. We explore a number of techniques including wavelet analysis and flux fragmentation methods with varying combinations of averaging length, multi-pass averaging and allowance for flux divergence, in order to identify the most reliable approach to return relatively high spatial resolution measurements with acceptable levels of uncertainty. In each case direct comparisons with canopy tower-based measurements are made.

  7. Carabid (Coleoptera) type collection at National Forest Insect Collection (NFIC), Forest Research Institute, Dehradun (India).

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohammad; Singh, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Members of family Carabidae (Insecta: Coleoptera) are a dominant group of terrestrial predators. National Forest Insect Collection (NFIC) of Forest Research Institute, Dehradun (India) has a good collection of carabids rich in type material. Here we report the details of the type specimens of 139 species included in 49 genera, 24 tribes and 14 subfamilies. Colour automontaged photographs of each type along with its original labels are also included. PMID:24869540

  8. Forest Inventory Attribute Estimation Using Airborne Laser Scanning, Aerial Stereo Imagery, Radargrammetry and Interferometry-Finnish Experiences of the 3d Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holopainen, M.; Vastaranta, M.; Karjalainen, M.; Karila, K.; Kaasalainen, S.; Honkavaara, E.; Hyyppä, J.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) remote sensing has enabled detailed mapping of terrain and vegetation heights. Consequently, forest inventory attributes are estimated more and more using point clouds and normalized surface models. In practical applications, mainly airborne laser scanning (ALS) has been used in forest resource mapping. The current status is that ALS-based forest inventories are widespread, and the popularity of ALS has also raised interest toward alternative 3D techniques, including airborne and spaceborne techniques. Point clouds can be generated using photogrammetry, radargrammetry and interferometry. Airborne stereo imagery can be used in deriving photogrammetric point clouds, as very-high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are used in radargrammetry and interferometry. ALS is capable of mapping both the terrain and tree heights in mixed forest conditions, which is an advantage over aerial images or SAR data. However, in many jurisdictions, a detailed ALS-based digital terrain model is already available, and that enables linking photogrammetric or SAR-derived heights to heights above the ground. In other words, in forest conditions, the height of single trees, height of the canopy and/or density of the canopy can be measured and used in estimation of forest inventory attributes. In this paper, first we review experiences of the use of digital stereo imagery and spaceborne SAR in estimation of forest inventory attributes in Finland, and we compare techniques to ALS. In addition, we aim to present new implications based on our experiences.

  9. Forest Research No. 36 March 2007

    E-print Network

    of forestry and biodiversity in the UK, climate change and forest genetic diversity were covered. As you ­ the slight hiatus in Ecotype production has been caused by a change of editor. I am pleased to welcome Andrea to the Land Regeneration & Urban Greening Group in the Environmental and Human Sciences Division here

  10. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    E-print Network

    - 1 - Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research February 27, 2013 New print edition of the journal Nature Climate Change released this week features as its cover story the tree-stress research news release and the Nature Climate Change current issue. Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC

  11. [Research progress on musk secretion mechanism of forest musk deer].

    PubMed

    Jie, Hang; Feng, Xiao-Lan; Zhao, Gui-Jun; Zeng, De-Jun; Zhang, Cheng-Lu; Chen, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    Forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii), a rare wild medicinal animal, is listed under the category of the state key protected wildlife list of China. Musk, secreted by the musk glands, is with high economic and medicinal value and used as precious traditional medicine in China. In order to meet the needs of musk in Chinese traditional medicine, forest musk deer farming was conducted in 1950s, but the research progress on musk secretion mechanism was slow. Therefore, by reviewing the histological and anatomical structure of forest musk deer musk gland, the relationship between sex hormones and the musk secretion process, and the molecular mechanism of the musk secretion, the existing problems in investigating the musk secretion mechanism were analyzed and the development trends in this field were also discussed, in order to provide a reference for further studies on the musk secretion mechanism and improve musk production of forest musk deer. PMID:25911794

  12. The Moral Orientations of Finnish Peacekeepers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryhanen, Timo

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the moral orientation of Finnish peacekeepers in the field of civil and military cooperation. This aim is studied through identifying different voices in peacekeepers' narratives. Following previously published research on the ethics of justice, the ethics of care and the ethics of empowerment related to moral orientation,…

  13. RESPONSES OF FORESTS TO ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION. NATIONAL RESEARCH PLAN FOR THE FOREST RESPONSE PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document presents the national research plan for the Forest Response Program. The introduction provides an overview, a statement of the program objective, and a brief description of the program's organizational structure. A Program Foundations section forms the heart of the r...

  14. Biogeographical and taxonomic biases in tropical forest fragmentation research.

    PubMed

    Deikumah, Justus P; McAlpine, Clive A; Maron, Martine

    2014-12-01

    Despite several decades of research on the effects of fragmentation and habitat change on biodiversity, there remain strong biases in the geographical regions and taxonomic species studied. The knowledge gaps resulting from these biases are of particular concern if the forests most threatened with modification are also those for which the effects of such change are most poorly understood. To quantify the nature and magnitude of such biases, we conducted a systematic review of the published literature on forest fragmentation in the tropics for the period 1980-2012. Studies included focused on any type of response of single species, communities, or assemblages of any taxonomic group to tropical forest fragmentation and on fragmentation-related changes to forests. Of the 853 studies we found in the SCOPUS database, 64% were conducted in the Neotropics, 13% in Asia, 10% in the Afrotropics, and 5% in Australasia. Thus, although the Afrotropics is subject to the highest rates of deforestation globally, it was the most disproportionately poorly studied biome. Significant taxonomic biases were identified. Of the taxonomic groups considered, herpetofauna was the least studied in the tropics, particularly in Africa. Research examining patterns of species distribution was by far the most common type (72%), and work focused on ecological processes (28%) was rare in all biomes, but particularly in the Afrotropics and for fauna. We suggest research efforts be directed toward less-studied biogeographic regions, particularly where the threat of forest fragmentation continues to be high. Increased research investment in the Afrotropics will be important to build knowledge of threats and inform responses in a region where almost no efforts to restore its fragmented landscapes have yet begun and forest protection is arguably most tenuous. PMID:25065550

  15. Publications Forest Research publishes a wide range of

    E-print Network

    resources in helping British forests respond to climate change Jason Hubert and Joan Cottrell 87 Resistance) FCRN101 Impacts of climate change on forestry in Scotland ­ a synopsis of spatial modelling research and metal-contaminated soil. Microbial Ecology 54 (2), 306­313. A'Hara, S.W. and Cottrell, J.E. (2007

  16. UBC RESEARCH FORESTS APPLICATION FOR INTERNATIONAL INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    UBC RESEARCH FORESTS APPLICATION FOR INTERNATIONAL INTERNSHIP PROGRAM PERSONAL INFORMATION Name) Preferred Length of Stay (Note: preference is given to internships of two months or longer in duration Lake, BC) #12;PAST WORK EXPERIENCE To help us choose appropriate candidates for the Internship Program

  17. University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research

    SciTech Connect

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2010-11-23

    This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

  18. Climate change models and forest research

    SciTech Connect

    Cooter, E.J.; Eder, B.K.; LeDuc, S.K.; Truppi, L. )

    1993-09-01

    Sophisticated climate models have projected that global warming of 1.5[degrees]-4.5[degrees]C will take place over a period of 50-100 years (Bretherton et al. 1990). They also predict changes in the global water cycle in response to this warming. Some regions could become wetter while others become drier. Seasonal patterns of precipitation would likely change. Although historical and paleoclimatic records provide examples of a warmer earth in some geographic locations, other regions could experience conditions unlike those of any period in the earth's history (Cooperative Holocene Mapping Project 1988). General circulation models (GCM) offer one means of obtaining a portrait of what the climatological future holds based on our current understanding of the global environment. GCMs are powerful tools, but our knowledge of the processes and interactions that they attempt to model is incomplete. As many as 19 GCMs have been identified (Randall et al. 1992). No particular model can hope to be completely accurate; and, in fact, no two are in complete agreement concerning the present climate of our world. Nevertheless, policy recommendations must be made with the information available. Although the perfect climate forecast is still far in the future, we know enough to be able to make responsible use of the data produced by GCMs. Responsible use requires knowing which predictions have been evaluated against historical records and the degree to which processes critical to forest assessments are explicitly modeled (or missing) from a particular GCM. These insights can guide the scientist in selecting appropriate GCMs, using their predictions in particular applications, and interpreting the final results. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. A trial site planted with ash saplings. During the past year, Forest Research has continued to

    E-print Network

    .forestry.gov.uk/fr/ woodlandforwater Abies amabilis in the Kilmun Forest Garden. Areas eligible for additional grant payment to reduceA trial site planted with ash saplings. Our Research During the past year, Forest Research has continued to address its objectives through a combination of research in Britain's forests and woodlands

  20. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2012201316 Annual Report and Accounts

    E-print Network

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2012­201316 Annual Report and Accounts for the year ended 31 March 2013 #12;Annual Report and Accounts 2012­2013 Forest Research 17 Accounts for the year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2012­201318 Annual Report for the year ended 31

  1. 43 CFR 8224.1 - Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...disturb the natural, educational, and scientific research values of the Fossil Forest...area's existing natural, educational, and scientific research values, including paleontological study, excavation, and interpretation....

  2. Finnish care integrated?

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, J. Jouni

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The public Finnish social and health care system has been challenged by the economic crisis, administrative reforms and increased demands. Better integration as a solution includes many examples, which have been taken to use. The most important are the rewritten national and municipals strategies and quality recommendations, where the different sectors and the levels of care are seen as one entity. Many reorganisations have taken place, both nationally and locally, and welfare clusters have been established. The best examples of integrated care are the forms of teamwork, care management, emphasis on non-institutional care and the information technology. PMID:16896395

  3. Safe and Encouraging Home Providing the Countdown to Leadership? Finnish Female Leaders' Childhood Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyvärinen, Sanna; Uusiautti, Satu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to dissect the connection between childhood homes and leadership. The study forms a part of a larger study on Finnish female leaders and their life paths. The following research question was set for this study: how did Finnish female leaders describe their childhood and home environment? It was studied through two…

  4. Research article Factors responsible for the co-occurrence of forested and unforested rock

    E-print Network

    Asselin, Hugo

    Research article Factors responsible for the co-occurrence of forested and unforested rock outcrops forest, Diverging types, Fire, Primary succession, Secondary succession Abstract Rock outcrops-occurrence of forested and unforested rock outcrops: (1) differences in bedrock geology, with unforested outcrops

  5. Research article Disturbance and landscape dynamics in the Chequamegon National Forest

    E-print Network

    Chen, Jiquan

    Science, University of Toledo, OH 43606, USA; 2 School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science Land uses, especially harvesting and road building, are considered to be the primary cause of forestResearch article Disturbance and landscape dynamics in the Chequamegon National Forest Wisconsin

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Forest recovery in a tropical landscape: what is the relative

    E-print Network

    Uriarte, Maria

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Forest recovery in a tropical landscape: what is the relative importance to other areas in the tropics that are undergoing rapid economic development. Keywords Secondary forest forest cover in many tropical regions (Franco et al. 1997; Rudel et al. 2000; Chang and Tsai 2002

  7. Overview of contemporary issues of forest research and management in China.

    PubMed

    He, Hong S; Shifley, Stephen R; Thompson, Frank R

    2011-12-01

    With 207 million ha of forest covering 22% of its land area, China ranks fifth in the world in forest area. Rapid economic growth, climate change, and forest disturbances pose new, complex challenges for forest research and management. Progress in meeting these challenges is relevant beyond China, because China's forests represent 34% of Asia's forests and 5% of the worlds' forests. To provide a broader understanding of these management challenges and of research and policies that address them, we organized this special issue on contemporary forest research and management issues in China. At the national level, papers review major forest types and the evolution of sustainable forestry, the development of China's forest-certification efforts, the establishment of a forest inventory system, and achievements and challenges in insect pest control in China. Papers focused on Northern China address historical, social, and political factors that have shaped the region's forests; the use of forest landscape models to assess how forest management can achieve multiple objectives; and analysis and modeling of fuels and fire behavior. Papers addressing Central and South China describe the "Grain for Green" program, which converts low productivity cropland to grassland and woodland to address erosion and soil carbon sequestration; the potential effects of climate change on CO(2) efflux and soil respiration; and relationships between climate and net primary productivity. China shares many forest management and research issues with other countries, but in other cases China's capacity to respond to forest management challenges is unique and bears watching by the rest of the world. PMID:22075940

  8. Finnish and English Children's Color Use to Depict Affectively Characterized Figures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkitt, Esther; Tala, Katri; Low, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Recent research has shown that children use colors systematically in relation to how they feel about certain colors and the figures that they draw. This study explored cultural differences between Finnish and English children's use of color to represent figures with contrasting emotional characters. One hundred and eight children (54 Finnish, 54…

  9. Forest statistics for Michigan`s northern lower peninsula unit, 1993. Forest Service research bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Leatherberry, E.C.

    1994-10-30

    Michigan`s Northern Lower Peninsula Unit (fig. 1) is comprised of 33 counties. This region of the State is rich with resources that support a network of social, economic, and ecological processes that are forest dependent. The forest resource of the Unit presently supports an industry that operates on a sustaining basis. In 1990 nearly half of Michigan`s saw-log production--297 million board feet--was harvest in the Unit. The forests of the Northern Lower Peninsula are vital to the region. The forest contains a variety of both deciduous and coniferous forest species, which results in regionally unique ecosystems that contribute to biodiversity.

  10. Thematic Mapper simulator research for forest resource mapping in the Clearwater National Forest, Idaho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brass, J. A.; Peterson, D. L.; Spanner, M. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Ulliman, J. J.; Brockhaus, J.

    1984-01-01

    Per-pixel maximum likelihood digital classification and photo interpretation of Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) composited images for a managed conifer forest were used to evaluate both land cover and forest structure characteristics. TMS channels 4, 7, 5 and 3, which were found to be optimal for forest vegetation analysis, used the full range of the Thematic Mapper's spectral capability. Photo interpretation results indicate that a false color composite from TMS channels 4, 7, and 2 provided the highest accuracies; the combination of improved spatial, spectral and radiometric resolution of the Thematic Mapper yielded greater sensitivity to forest structural characteristics.

  11. The Predictiveness of the Finnish Matriculation: a Differential Psychology Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehtovaara, A.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of part of a comprehensive research project concerning the Finnish matriculation examination. The goal of the project was to explore the matriculation examination as a series of tests indicative of ability differences between individuals, regardless of their causes. The…

  12. Adolescents' Nutrition Health Issues: Opinions of Finnish Seventh-Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiha, Teija; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele; Enkenberg, Jorma; Halonen, Pirjo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine Finnish seventh-graders' (13 to 14 years old) nutrition health attitudes, perceptions of skills, reported behaviour and perceptions of families' and friends' nutrition health-related behaviour. Design/methodology/approach: The research data were collected in a baseline situation through a…

  13. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2003200466 Monitoring of forest health in Britain

    E-print Network

    tree health problems but provides information of relevance to studies of pollution effects, climate to incorporate older crops of the coniferous species. Plots were also established on private land to increase and Boswell, 1987). Forest decline was linked with air pollution by certain scientists and foresters during

  14. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station General Technical Report RMRS-GTR-331 March 2015 United States Department of Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station General Technical Report RMRS-GTR-331 March 2015 the potential to provide a century-long history of northern Rocky Mountain forest ecosystems. The record, which of the dominant forest types within the northern Rocky Mountains, from the xeric ponderosa pine forest type

  15. Remote sensing of tropical forests - An overview of research and applications using non-photographic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sader, Steven A.; Stone, Thomas A.; Joyce, Armond T.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive overview is presented on how remote sensing technology has been applied to tropical forest monitoring over the past 20 years. Research needs for monitoring the condition and extent of tropical forests are suggested. The discussion focuses on nonphotographic sensors, especially those on orbiting satellites. Several remote sensing approaches to tropical forest monitoring are outlined, including NOAA AVHRR, Landsat MSS, the Landsat Thematic Mapper, SPOT-1, and Synthetic Aperture Radar. Suggested research needs are addressed, along with discussions on the use of Geographic Information Systems, and multistage and multisensor approaches in data analysis and acquisition. It is concluded that additional research and technique development is urgently needed to advance the utility of remotely sensed data for tropical forest monitoring. However, there is sufficient information available now to prototype a global tropical forest monitoring system that would utilize current satellite sensors complemented with airborne sensors for detailed measurements on sample locations.

  16. Forest Service Career Guide. Professional Opportunities in Natural Resource Management, Planning, and Research. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    The guide provides information on professional opportunities in natural resource management, planning, and research. Reasons for careers in forest service are presented and a brief description of the forest service is provided. Career opportunities in the following areas are described: forestry, engineering, geology, hydrology, landscape…

  17. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2003200438 Continuous cover forestry in British

    E-print Network

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2003­200438 Continuous cover forestry in British conifer alternative methods of developing irregular structures in broadleaved and conifer stands in lowland Britain. The focus here is on the use of CCF in conifer plantation forests in upland Britain since this is where

  18. Urban Forestry at Virginia Tech Promoting sustainable urban forests through education and research

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    Urban Forestry at Virginia Tech Promoting sustainable urban forests through education and research's undergraduate curriculum holds Society of American Foresters Specialized Accreditation in Urban Forestry. This accreditation assures that the curriculum has both breadth and depth specifically in urban forestry and meets

  19. Agenda 2020: A Technology Vision and Research Agenda for America's Forest, Wood and Paper Industry

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1994-11-01

    In November 1994, the forest products industry published Agenda 2020: A Technology Vision and Research Agenda for America's Forest, Wood and Paper Industry, which articulated the industry's vision. This document set the foundation for collaborative efforts between the industry and the federal government.

  20. 2006 Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 83 Research Applications of Ecosystem

    E-print Network

    National Park, MN.(Photograph by Jack Boucher, National Park Service.) #12;84 2006 Proceedings2006 Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 83 Research). For example, an area of spruce forests and glacially scoured lakes in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

  1. Research article Habitat selection and breeding success in a forest-nesting Alcid, the marbled

    E-print Network

    Research article Habitat selection and breeding success in a forest-nesting Alcid, the marbled of a protected seabird (family Alcidae), the marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus), in a relatively intact habitat fragmentation. We conclude that marbled murrelets can successfully breed in old-growth forests

  2. Forest models: their development and potential applications for air pollution effects research

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, H.H.; McLaughlin, S.B.; West, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    As research tools for evaluating the effects of chronic air pollution stress, forest simulation models offer one means of integrating forest growth and development data with generalized indices of pollution stress. This approach permits consideration of both the competitive interactions of trees in the forest stand and the influences of the stage of stand development on sensitivity of component species. A review of forest growth models, including tree, stand, and gap models, is provided as a means of evaluating relative strengths, weaknesses, and limits of applicability of representative examples of each type. Data from recent simulations with a gap model of eastern deciduous forest responses to air pollution stress are presented to emphasize the potential importance of competition in modifying individual species' responses in a forest stand. Recent developments in dendroecology are discussed as a potential mechanism for model validation and extended application.

  3. Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site

    DOE Data Explorer

    Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

  4. Research in Support of Forest Management. Final report, 1986--1991

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, D.H.

    1991-12-01

    This final research report on Research in Support of Forest Management for the Savannah River Forest Station covers the period 1986 thru 1991. This report provides a list of publications resulting from research accomplished by SEFES scientists and their cooperators, and a list of continuing research study titles. Output is 22 research publications, 23 publications involving technology transfer of results to various user groups, and 11 manuscripts in pre-publication format. DOE funding contributed approximately 15 percent of the total cost of the research.

  5. JanuaryMarch 2012 Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station New Publications April to June 2014

    E-print Network

    January­March 2012 Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station New Publications April to June 2014 United States Department of Agriculture April to June 2014 Rocky Mountain Research Station New. The Rocky Mountain Research Station The Rocky Mountain Research Sta- tion is one of five regional units

  6. JanuaryMarch 2012 Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station New Publications July to September 2014

    E-print Network

    January­March 2012 Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station New Publications July to September 2014 United States Department of Agriculture July to September 2014 Rocky Mountain Research. The Rocky Mountain Research Station The Rocky Mountain Research Sta- tion is one of five regional units

  7. Research article Influence of forest management alternatives and land type on

    E-print Network

    Mladenoff, David

    S. He2 and David J. Mladenoff3 1USDA Forest Service, North Central Research Station, 5985 Highway K that are less susceptible to fire ignition and spread. In addition to timber production, manag- ers seek

  8. Additions to the list of Finnish Bibionomorpha (Diptera, Nematocera)

    PubMed Central

    Kaunisto, Kari M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A total of 12 gnat species are reported for the first time from Finland (3 Cecidomyiidae, 1 Keroplatidae, 8 Mycetophilidae), and the occurrence of Macrocera nigropicea Lundström in Finland is verified. All material was collected from the Finnish Lapland, mainly from the north boreal ecoregion. Two of the recorded species are likely to be pyrophilous, associated with forest fire sites. A photo of the ventral appendage of the gonocoxite of Brevicornu setigerum Zaitzev is provided for the first time. The male hypopygium of Mycetophila haruspica Plassmann is redescribed. PMID:26175613

  9. Idaho forestry best management practices: Compilation of research on their effectiveness. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Seyedbagheri, K.A.

    1996-10-01

    A search was conducted for quantitative Idaho research results on the effectiveness of the Idaho Forest Practices Act rules and regulations pertaining to timber harvest and forest road construction and maintenance. These rules and regulations are designated as the `best management practices` for the prevention of nonpoint source pollution from silviculture under provisions of the Federal Clean Water Act. For each practice, the relevant research results are summarized; more general summaries for related groups of practices are also provided.

  10. Managing coarse woody debris in forests of the Rocky Mountains. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.T.; Harvey, A.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Jain, T.B.; Tonn, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Recommendations for managing coarse woody debris after timber harvest were developed for 14 habitat types, ranging from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) habitat types of Arizona to subalpine fir (Abis lasiocarpa) habitat types of western Montana. Ectomycorrhizae were used as a bioindicator of health, productive forest soils. Undisturbed stands were studied to determine the optimum amounts of organic material for ectomycorrhizal activity. The management recommendations are intentionally conservative to ensure that enough organic matter is left after timber harvest to maintain long-term forest productivity.

  11. Forests under climate change and air pollution: gaps in understanding and future directions for research.

    PubMed

    Matyssek, R; Wieser, G; Calfapietra, C; de Vries, W; Dizengremel, P; Ernst, D; Jolivet, Y; Mikkelsen, T N; Mohren, G M J; Le Thiec, D; Tuovinen, J-P; Weatherall, A; Paoletti, E

    2012-01-01

    Forests in Europe face significant changes in climate, which in interaction with air quality changes, may significantly affect forest productivity, stand composition and carbon sequestration in both vegetation and soils. Identified knowledge gaps and research needs include: (i) interaction between changes in air quality (trace gas concentrations), climate and other site factors on forest ecosystem response, (ii) significance of biotic processes in system response, (iii) tools for mechanistic and diagnostic understanding and upscaling, and (iv) the need for unifying modelling and empirical research for synthesis. This position paper highlights the above focuses, including the global dimension of air pollution as part of climate change and the need for knowledge transfer to enable reliable risk assessment. A new type of research site in forest ecosystems ("supersites") will be conducive to addressing these gaps by enabling integration of experimentation and modelling within the soil-plant-atmosphere interface, as well as further model development. PMID:22035926

  12. JanuaryMarch 2012 Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station New Publications January to March 2015

    E-print Network

    January­March 2012 Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station New Publications January to March 2015 United States Department of Agriculture January to March 2015 Rocky Mountain Research Station New the last page.2 RMRS New Publications January to March 2015 The Rocky Mountain Research Station The U

  13. JanuaryMarch 2012 Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station New Publications October to December 2014

    E-print Network

    January­March 2012 Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station New Publications October to December 2014 United States Department of Agriculture October to December 2014 Rocky Mountain Research, please see the last page.2 RMRS New Publications October to December 2014 The Rocky Mountain Research

  14. RESEARCH ARTICLE On the vulnerability of oasis forest to changing

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Qi-Bin

    Abstract In water-limited regions, oases are impor- tant localities for maintaining ecological biodiversity and supporting social and economic development. For oases situated by the side of rivers, variability of streamflow is often considered as a dominant factor influencing the vulnerability of oases forest, whereas

  15. About Forest Research 1 Scots pine at Exeter

    E-print Network

    of Agriculture, Fisheries and Fooda , the Department of Trade and Industry, the Department of the Environment, development, surveys and related services to the forest industry and to provide authoritative advice the full economic costs of the Agency from charges to customers. Customers Most of our work is funded

  16. Automatic Discrimination of Emotion from Spoken Finnish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toivanen, Juhani; Vayrynen, Eero; Seppanen, Tapio

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, experiments on the automatic discrimination of basic emotions from spoken Finnish are described. For the purpose of the study, a large emotional speech corpus of Finnish was collected; 14 professional actors acted as speakers, and simulated four primary emotions when reading out a semantically neutral text. More than 40 prosodic…

  17. Finnish Higher Education Reforms: Responding to Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjeldvoll, Arild

    2009-01-01

    The international academic success of Finnish secondary schooling in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the triumph of the Finnish technology company NOKIA have stimulated national ambitions to improve higher education institutions in Finland. Because secondary schooling and technology in Finland receive world recognition,…

  18. New tree Pests and DiseasesForest Research The Research Agency of the Forestry Commission Crown Copyright 2015

    E-print Network

    New tree Pests and DiseasesForest Research The Research Agency of the Forestry Commission© Crown Copyright 2015 FR(GB-SP)/A0/JUL12/0038 www.forestry.gov.uk/pestsanddiseases Asian longhorn beetle Oak Current outbreaks February 2015 Widespread throughout Britain Chalara dieback of ash page on the Forestry

  19. Past and Prospective Carbon Stocks of United States Forests: Implications for Research Priorities and Mitigation Policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsey, R.; Pan, Y.; McGuire, A. D.; Zhang, F.; Chen, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    United States forests and wood products have been a significant and persistent carbon sink of 100-200 million tons annually since 1950, currently offsetting about 12% of U.S. emissions of CO2. This carbon sink is caused by recovery of forest C stocks following timber harvest and abandonment of agricultural land over the last 150 years, and more recently the growth-enhancing effects of N deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and climate variability. The forest carbon sink would have been significantly larger if not for continued losses of forest to other land uses such as urban development, and increasing impacts from natural disturbances such as fire and insect outbreaks. Projections of the future U.S. C sink have raised concerns that it may disappear in a few decades because of slower growth, continued losses of forest area, and increasing demand for timber products especially bioenergy. However, continuing atmospheric and climate changes may delay this projected decline in the sink strength for another 50 years or longer. Research is urgently needed to improve projections of land-use changes and demand for timber, quantify the large-scale effects of atmospheric change and climate variability, and develop modeling approaches that can effectively integrate these multiple factors. Policy decisions to meet emissions reduction targets are partially dependent on assumptions about the magnitude of the future forest carbon sink; therefore, it is important to have convincing projections about how these various driving factors will affect forests in the future.

  20. 43 CFR 8224.1 - Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... disturb the natural, educational, and scientific research values of the Fossil Forest. Grazing permits or... impairment of the area's existing natural, educational, and scientific research values, including paleontological study, excavation, and interpretation. (j) The regulations in 43 CFR part 7 apply to...

  1. VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010

    E-print Network

    Borissova, Daniela

    VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010 WRF-Fire wildfire@math.bas.bg Georgi Jordanov National Institute for Geophysics, Geodesy and Geography ­ Bulgarian Academy of Sciences Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model is a next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system

  2. Nitrogen dynamics in managed boreal forests: Recent advances and future research directions.

    PubMed

    Sponseller, Ryan A; Gundale, Michael J; Futter, Martyn; Ring, Eva; Nordin, Annika; Näsholm, Torgny; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) availability plays multiple roles in the boreal landscape, as a limiting nutrient to forest growth, determinant of terrestrial biodiversity, and agent of eutrophication in aquatic ecosystems. We review existing research on forest N dynamics in northern landscapes and address the effects of management and environmental change on internal cycling and export. Current research foci include resolving the nutritional importance of different N forms to trees and establishing how tree-mycorrhizal relationships influence N limitation. In addition, understanding how forest responses to external N inputs are mediated by above- and belowground ecosystem compartments remains an important challenge. Finally, forestry generates a mosaic of successional patches in managed forest landscapes, with differing levels of N input, biological demand, and hydrological loss. The balance among these processes influences the temporal patterns of stream water chemistry and the long-term viability of forest growth. Ultimately, managing forests to keep pace with increasing demands for biomass production, while minimizing environmental degradation, will require multi-scale and interdisciplinary perspectives on landscape N dynamics. PMID:26744052

  3. "Virtuoso Ideal Daddy": Finnish Children's Perceptions of Good Fatherhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hietanen, Riika; Määttä, Kaarina; Uusiautti, Satu

    2013-01-01

    Changes in family structures, such as the increase in the number of cohabiting couples, divorces, and blended families pose new challenges for fatherhood and research on fatherhood has been mainly adult-centred. This research studied how Finnish children perceive good fatherhood and what expectations they set for fathers. The following research

  4. Wake Forest NCORP Research Base | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content Division of Cancer Prevention Search form Search Main menu Home Major Programs Research Networks Map Alliance of Glycobiologists for Detection of Cancer Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) Cancer Prevention

  5. Status of the Southern Carpathian forests in the long-term ecological research network.

    PubMed

    Badea, Ovidiu; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Silaghi, Diana; Neagu, Stefan; Barbu, Ion; Iacoban, Carmen; Iacob, Corneliu; Guiman, Gheorghe; Preda, Elena; Seceleanu, Ioan; Oneata, Marian; Dumitru, Ion; Huber, Viorela; Iuncu, Horia; Dinca, Lucian; Leca, Stefan; Taut, Ioan

    2012-12-01

    Air pollution, bulk precipitation, throughfall, soil condition, foliar nutrients, as well as forest health and growth were studied in 2006-2009 in a long-term ecological research (LTER) network in the Bucegi Mountains, Romania. Ozone (O(3)) was high indicating a potential for phytotoxicity. Ammonia (NH(3)) concentrations rose to levels that could contribute to deposition of nutritional nitrogen (N) and could affect biodiversity changes. Higher that 50% contribution of acidic rain (pH?forest soils. Foliar N concentrations for Norway spruce (Picea abies), Silver fir (Abies alba), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), and European beech (Fagus sylvatica) were normal, phosphorus (P) was high, while those of potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), and especially of manganese (Mn) were significantly below the typical European or Carpathian region levels. The observed nutritional imbalance could have negative effects on forest trees. Health of forests was moderately affected, with damaged trees (crown defoliation >25%) higher than 30%. The observed crown damage was accompanied by the annual volume losses for the entire research forest area up to 25.4%. High diversity and evenness specific to the stand type's structures and local climate conditions were observed within the herbaceous layer, indicating that biodiversity of the vascular plant communities was not compromised. PMID:22234644

  6. The Association of Finnish Cities and Towns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, L. O.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the Association of Finnish Cities and Towns as an organization that enhances the cooperation and administration of municipal matters, including adult education, in the cities and boroughs of Finland. (GB)

  7. 55USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Oak Research Needs1

    E-print Network

    55USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Oak Research Needs1 Enoch F. Bell2 If you," but perhaps you have not heard about the oak tree that "wood knot," slight pun intended. It would oaks and oak woodlands. I will divide my brief remarks into biological and social aspects. Biological

  8. 43 CFR 8224.1 - Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... paleontological study, excavation, and interpretation. (j) The regulations in 43 CFR part 7 apply to the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS PROCEDURES Fossil...

  9. 43 CFR 8224.1 - Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... paleontological study, excavation, and interpretation. (j) The regulations in 43 CFR part 7 apply to the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS PROCEDURES Fossil...

  10. 43 CFR 8224.1 - Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... paleontological study, excavation, and interpretation. (j) The regulations in 43 CFR part 7 apply to the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of the Fossil Forest Research Natural...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS PROCEDURES Fossil...

  11. 78 FR 22225 - Solicitation of Input From Stakeholders Regarding the Integrated Forest Products Research Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ...As part of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture's (NIFA) strategy to successfully implement the Integrated Forest Products Research (FPR) program and specifically design a response to current and emerging wood utilization issues, NIFA is soliciting stakeholder input that will allow it to identify the needs and opportunities of the different regions of the country but within a......

  12. Forest Technician Barksdale AFB, Louisiana

    E-print Network

    Forest Technician Open Pool Barksdale AFB, Louisiana POSITION Forest Technician (Research Associate objective of forest management on AF installations is to maintain and enhance the ecological integrity of forested landscapes while supporting the military mission. RESPONSIBILITIES The forest technician positions

  13. Tropical forest responses to increasing [CO2]: current knowledge and opportunities for future research

    SciTech Connect

    Cernusak, Lucas; Winter, Klaus; Dalling, James; Holtum, Joseph; Jaramillo, Carlos; Korner, Christian; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Norby, Richard J; Poulter, Benjamin; Turner, Benjamin; Wright, S. Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric [CO2] (ca) will undoubtedly affect the metabolism of tropical forests worldwide; however, critical aspects of how tropical forests will respond remain largely unknown. Here we review the current state of knowledge about physiological and ecological responses, with the aim of providing a framework that can help to guide future experimental research. Modelling studies have indicated that elevated ca can potentially stimulate photosynthesis more in the tropics than at higher latitudes, because suppression of photorespiration by elevated ca increases with temperature. However, canopy leaves in tropical forests could also potentially reach a high temperature threshold under elevated ca that will moderate the rise in photosynthesis. Belowground responses, including fine root production, nutrient foraging, and soil organic matter processing, will be especially important to the integrated ecosystem response to elevated CO2. Water-use efficiency will increase as ca rises, potentially impacting upon soil moisture status and nutrient availability. Recruitment may be differentially altered for some functional groups, potentially decreasing ecosystem carbon storage. Whole-forest CO2 enrichment experiments are urgently needed to test predictions of tropical forest functioning under elevated ca. Smaller scale experiments in the understory and in gaps would also be informative, and could provide stepping stones toward stand-scale manipulations.

  14. Multidisciplinary Research on Canopy Photosynthetic Productivity in a Cool-Temperate Deciduous Broadleaf Forest in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, H.; Noda, H. M.; Saitoh, T. M.; Nagai, S.

    2014-12-01

    Forest canopy has crucial roles in regulating energy and material exchange between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems and in ecological processes with respect to carbon cycle and growth in the ecosystems. Challenges to the canopy of tall forests for such research involve the access to the leaves for ecophysiological observations, responses of leaves to the changing environments from seconds to years, and up-scaling the leaf-level phenomena to canopy and landscape-levels. A long-term, multidisciplinary approach has been conducted in a cool-temperate deciduous broadleaf forest in Takayama site (ca. 1400m a.s.l.) in central Japan. This forest canopy is dominated by Quercus crispula and Betula ermanii. We have been focusing on the phenology of photosynthetic productivity from a single leaf to canopy, and to landscape level, by combining leaf ecophysiological research, optical observations by spectroradiometers and time-laps cameras with the aid of "Phenological Eyes Network (PEN)", and process-based modellings. The canopy-level photosynthesis is then compared with the micrometeorolgical observation of CO2 flux at the site. So far we have been clarifying that (1) inter-annual variations in seasonal growth rate and senescence rate of leaf photosynthetic capacity and canopy leaf area are largely responsible for the inter-annual change in forest photosynthesis, and (2) spectral vegetation indices such as enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and chlorophyll index (CCI) can be the indicator to observe the phenology of forest canopy photosynthesis. In addition to these efforts since 2003, we established an open-field warming experiment on the branches of the canopy trees, to investigate the possible influence of temperature increase on leaf photosynthetic and optical properties and then to examine whether the optical satellite remote sensing can detect the changes in photosynthetic capacity and phenology by ongoing global warming.

  15. The Search for Forest Facts: A History of the Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, 19262000 Chapter 3: 19261932, Forestry Research Comes

    E-print Network

    Station, 1926­2000 105 Chapter 3: 1926­1932, Forestry Research Comes of Age in California By the time the California Forest Experiment Station (CFES) was established in the latter half of 1926, forestry research in the United States had gone through many decades of change. In a lecture before a forestry school class

  16. Assistant Research Professor of Forest Biogeosciences School of Natural Resources

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    / moisture profile monitoring system - An automated daily data quality checking and reporting system - Other by the Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Environmental Research (BER), and develop innovative, externally tower instrumented with two independent sets of eddy covariance system, a 12-level CO2/H2O profile

  17. PNG Forest Authority Vacancies: Biological Research on Birds

    E-print Network

    work ethic. The positions are open for candidates from grade 10 to University degree level to be undertaken with the New Guinea Binatang Research Center, the PNG University of Technology and the Food-week long job interview in Madang. #12;

  18. USDA Forest Service Research & Development Code of Scientific Ethics

    E-print Network

    and extensive research on science ethics. The code is based on the Code of Scientific Ethics of the USDA of scientific ethics would occur. A corollary was to help educate collaborators and clients about ethics help encourage ethical conduct in science as a fundamental theme in FS R&D activities. The intent

  19. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station General Technical Report RMRS-GTR-333 June 2015 United States Department of Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Kelvey, Michael K. Schwartz #12;Wade, Alisa A.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Schwartz, Michael K. 2015. Resistance for practitioners. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-333. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Missoula, Montana. Kevin S. McKelvey and Michael K. Schwartz are research ecologists, U.S. Forest Service

  20. Tracking changes in the susceptibility of forest land infested with gypsy moth. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Gansner, D.A.; Quimby, J.W.; King, S.L.; Arner, S.L.; Drake, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The report questions the forest land subject to intensive outbreaks of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) which become less susceptible to defoliation. A model for estimating the lifelihood of gypsy moth defoliation has been developed and validated. It was applied to forest-inventory plot data to quantity trends in the susceptibility of forest land in south-central Pennsylvania during a period of intensive infestation. Results show that even though susceptibility of the region's forest apparently has declined, the potential for future infestations remains relatively high.

  1. Finnish-American Academic and Professional Exchanges: Analyses and Reminiscences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, William, Ed.; And Others

    The origins, evolution, and current state of Finnish-American academic and professional exchange are reviewed. Personal evaluations by Finnish scholars are provided as follows: "Scholarly Exchanges with Finland: The Benefits to the United States" (Allan A. Kuusisto); "Finnish-American Academic and Professional Exchanges, A History" (Yrjo…

  2. Sawing hardwoods in five tropical countries. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Loehnertz, S.P.; Vazquez Cooz, I.; Guerrero, J.

    1994-09-01

    In this study, hardwood sawing technology was identified in five tropical countries: Ghana, Brazil, Venezuela, Indonesia, and Malaysia. The density of wood and presence of silica make it a challenge to saw many tropical hardwoods. The handsaw is the most commonly used machine and is employed in many sizes and configurations. Sawblade parameters and operating procedures vary according to the nature of the species being sawn and are influenced as much by local custom as technical knowledge of the process. The most commonly reported problems include poor saw maintenance, lack of trained personnel, obsolete equipment, and inadequate sawtooth geometry and wear resistance. Some problems can be addressed by technology transfer, others must be addressed by research.

  3. A Validation of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System in Finnish Kindergartens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakarinen, Eija; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Kiuru, Noona; Siekkinen, Martti; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2010-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined the validity and reliability of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS; R. C. Pianta, K. M. La Paro, & B. K. Hamre, 2008) in Finnish kindergartens. A pair of trained observers used the CLASS to observe 49 kindergarten teachers (47 female, 2 male) on two different days. Questionnaires measuring…

  4. Not Babies Anymore: Young Children's Narrative Identities in Finnish Day Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puroila, Anna-Maija; Estola, Eila

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of deepening understanding of young children's identity construction, the study explores small stories produced in a Finnish day care center context. Small stories are understood as identity-constituting social practices that occur and recur in day care settings. Taking ideas on narrative ethnography as starting point, research

  5. Having, Loving, and Being: Children's Narrated Well-Being in Finnish Day Care Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puroila, Anna-Maija; Estola, Eila; Syrjala, Leena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to answer the following question: what do children tell about their well-being in Finnish day care centres? The theoretical and methodological framework of this study is based on a narrative approach. The research material was collected by participating in the everyday life of three groups of children and listening to…

  6. Vocational Career Decision-Making of Finnish Upper Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meriläinen, Matti; Puhakka, Helena; Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to clarify the characteristics of Finnish upper secondary school students as vocational decision-makers. The focus was especially on what skills and competences were related to decision-making at different phases of the decision-making process. Altogether, 216 upper secondary school students filled in the…

  7. Transforming Causal Logics in Finnish Adult Education: Historical and Moral Transitions Rewritten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koski, Leena; Filander, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the historical representations of adulthood, citizenship and the ideal social bonds of an individual and the society in the transforming moral orders of Finnish adult education. The research is based on a thematic reading of data, which consist of texts written during the past 150 years by theorists of adult…

  8. Identifying Finnish Children's Impulsivity Trajectories from Kindergarten to Grade 4: Associations with Academic and Socioemotional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirvonen, Riikka; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Pakarinen, Eija; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to identify the developmental trajectories of impulsive behavior among 378 Finnish children who were followed from kindergarten to 4th grade. In addition to ratings of children's impulsivity, the analyses included measures of motivation, cognitive skills, socioemotional adjustment, and…

  9. The Relationship between Finnish Student Teachers' Practical Theories, Sources, and Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitkäniemi, Harri; Karlsson, Liisa; Stenberg, Katariina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is two-fold: 1) to describe what kind of practical theories student teachers have in the Finnish class teacher education context and 2) to analyse their differences and similarities at the initial and final phase of teacher education. We further analyse the relationship between the practical theories and their sources.…

  10. Answering Questions and Explaining Answers: A Study of Finnish-Speaking Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loukusa, Soile; Ryder, Nuala; Leinonen, Eeva

    2008-01-01

    This research explores, within the framework of Relevance Theory, how children's ability to answer questions and explain their answers develops between the ages of 3 and 9 years. Two hundred and ten normally developing Finnish-speaking children participated in this study. The children were asked questions requiring processing of inferential…

  11. Identities of Special Needs Education in the Discourse of Finnish Professors of the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vehkakoski, Tanja; Sume, Helena; Puro, Erika

    2011-01-01

    This article examines both the discourses upon which Finnish special needs education professors draw when speaking about their field, and the consequent identities for it. The research material consists of theme interviews with 10 professors of special needs education and is analysed from a socio-constructionist, discourse analytical perspective.…

  12. Forest management under changing climate conditions: Is timing a tool for Sustainable Forest Management? Relevant questions for research development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aprile, Fabrizio; McShane, Paul; Tapper, Nigel

    2013-04-01

    Change of climate conditions influence energy fluxes applicable to forest ecosystems. These affect cycles of nutrients and materials, primary productivity of the ecosystem, biodiversity, ecological functionality and, consequently, carbon equilibria of the forest ecosystem. Temporal factors influence physical, biological, ecological, and climatic processes and functions. For example, seasonality, cycles, periodicity, and trends in climate variables; tree growth, forest growth, and forest metabolic activities (i.e., photosynthesis and respiration) are commonly known to be time-related. In tropical forests, the impacts of changing climate conditions may exceed temperature and/or precipitation thresholds critical to forest tree growth or health. Historically, forest management emphasises growth rates and financial returns as affected by species and site. Until recently, the influence of climate variability on growth dynamics has not been influential in forest planning and management. Under this system, especially in climatic and forest regions where most of species are stenoecious, periodical wood harvesting may occur in any phase of growth (increasing, decreasing, peak, and trough). This scenario presents four main situations: a) harvesting occurs when the rate of growth is decreasing: future productivity is damaged; the minimum biomass capital may be altered, and CO2 storage is negatively affected; b) harvesting occurs during a trough of the rate of growth: the minimum biomass capital necessary to preserve the resilience of the forest is damaged; the damage can be temporary (decades) or permanent; CO2 storage capacity is deficient - which may be read as an indirect emission of CO2 since the balance appears negative; c) harvesting occurs when the rate of growth is increasing: the planned wood mass can be used without compromising the resilience and recovery of the forest; CO2 storage remains increasing; d) harvesting occurs during a peak period of growth: the wood mass harvested can be even higher than planned, and the rate of CO2 storage can be above the average. A real risk for SFM under changing climatic conditions is that negative effects may be amplified; critical thresholds of temperature and/or rainfall for tree growth and stress may be exceeded with impacts on growth response, resilience, and CO2 balance that are not completely known. Furthermore, temporal changes in silvicultural and harvesting operations may lead to increased carbon emissions. Under this scenario and the consequent risks to SFM forestry operations should be planned or scheduled in periods when climate variables influencing tree growth and stress are within the relative thresholds. In this way, silvicultural operations and harvesting are going to be optimised to climate variability and forest growth responses, rather than just forest timber production.

  13. Biomass relations for components of five minnesota shrubs. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Buech, R.R.; Rugg, D.J.

    1995-08-31

    The tall shrub stratum is an important component of upland forests in the Lake States, especially of deciduous forest communities. The prevalance of tall shrubs has produced a recurring research interest in this stratum both in ecological studies and wildlife habitat surveys within the region. For such purposes, estimates of the biomass of tall shrubs or their component parts are often needed. The authors examine goodness of fit of two predictor variables (shrub height and stem diameter class) in three relations. The authors provide equations that use stem diameter class or stem diameter class and height to estimate biomass of six components of five shrub species, as well as generalized equations derived from a composite of all five species. Finally, the authors provide the information needed to construct standard errors for biomass estimates.

  14. A Century of Experimental Forest and Range Research at the US Forest Service: Recent Synthesis Efforts and Opportunities for Cross-Site Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, S. D.; McGuire, K. J.; Johnson, S. L.; Wohlgemuth, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    The US Forest Service Experimental Forest and Range (EF&R) network was established a century ago at Fort Valley, Arizona, now includes 81 sites, and is the backbone of a continental-scale research platform for studying ecosystem functions. These sites span the nation and encompass large gradients of climate, forest types, environmental factors, and disturbance regimes. Long-term data collected from network sites are 1) publicly-available, important records of climate, hydrology, and ecosystem productivity, and 2) instrumental in quantifying how diverse ecosystems respond to disturbances, atmospheric deposition, and climate change. We present examples of success stories that outline the significant contributions of these sites to science, land management, and society, and outline emerging synthesis efforts that are realizing the legacy of long- term data collected at these networked sites to advance fundamental and emerging topics in ecosystem sciences.

  15. Finnish Higher Education Expansion and Regional Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saarivirta, Toni

    2010-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the expansion of Finnish higher education between the 1960s and 1970s, exposes its background in the light of the policy decisions that were made, compares the unique features of this expansion with those of certain other countries, discusses the impact of the controlled "top down" governance of higher education policy,…

  16. "Bildung" and Music Education: A Finnish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimonen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    The article addresses "Bildung" from a Finnish perspective and asks: Are there specific meanings of Bildung that are typical of a certain time and place? The author applies a multi-layered theory of critical positivism, adapting its three-level structure to music education and the concept of "Bildung." First, she discusses…

  17. Are Students Customers in Finnish Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuori, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    This study examines Finnish higher education students' perceptions of whether students are customers, based on qualitative interview data. The article contributes to the discussion on students as customers by giving attention to students' own voices from a country where tuition fees are not generally collected. The data are presented and analysed…

  18. Forest Landscape Description and

    E-print Network

    Forest Landscape Description and Inventories a basis for landplanning and design Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Berkeley, California U. S. D. A. Forest Service Research Paper PSW-49 1968 #12;Litton, R. Burton, Jr. 1968. Forest

  19. Botanical reconnaissance of Big Run Bog Candidate Research Natural Area. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Muzika, R.M.; Hunsucker, R.; DeMeo, T.

    1996-07-25

    To document the botanical diversity of the Big Run Bog candidate Research Natural Area on the Monongahela National Forest in West Virginia, a botanical survey was conducted in 1993-94. The survey identified 193 species of vascular plants in 118 genera and 52 families. Six species of rare vascular plants were found. Vascular plant families with the most species present were Cyperaceae (24), Asteraceae (23), Poaceae (16), and Ericaceae (14). For each taxon, family, species, habitat and estimated abundance are reported. Nonvascular plants totaled 87 species in 55 genera and 33 families.

  20. Genetic variation and seed zones of douglas-fir in the Siskiyou National Forest. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.K.; Sugano, A.I.

    1993-07-01

    The provisional seed zones and breeding zones were developed for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Siskiyou National Forest in southwestern Oregon. Zones were based on maps of genetic variation patterns obtained by evaluating genotypes of trees from 260 locations in the region. Genotypes controlling growth vigor and growth rhythm were assessed in the common garden. Within the Forest, three breeding blocks were recommended, with different numbers of elevational bands in each block: from 0 to 610 meters, from 611 to 838 meters, and then a series of bands 152 meters wide at higher elevations.

  1. Stories of Change: TieVie - The Support Service for Finnish Universities Toward the Information Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairamo, Anna-Kaarina; Sinko, Matti

    In this article, the authors discuss and evaluate the TieVie capacity building project for Finnish universities in a larger historical context of strategic developments in the use of information and communications technology (ICT) in learning. The TieVie project was a support service project for the Finnish Virtual University (FVU) which offered training in the educational use of ICT to the staff of Finnish universities in 2001-2008. It was financed by the Ministry of Education as part of the Virtual University project funding till the end of 2006. During 2007-2008, the program was fee-funded. The project was designed and implemented by the educational development support service units of five universities: Universities of Oulu, Turku, Jyväskylä, and Helsinki, and Helsinki University of Technology. The TieVie project was launched on the basis of the need to strengthen the e-Learning skills and expertise among Finnish university staff. This need was recognized in the national strategy for education, training, and research in the information society outlined by the Ministry of Education in 2000.

  2. Monitoring firefighter exposure to air toxins at prescribed burns of forest and range biomass. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, T.E.

    1991-10-01

    A variety of potent air toxins are in the smoke produced by burning forest and range biomass. Preliminary data on firefighter exposures to carbon monoxide and formaldehyde at four prescribed burns of Western United States natural fuels are presented. Formaldehyde may be correlated to carbon monoxide emissions. The firefighters' exposures to these compounds relative to workplace standards are discussed.

  3. Responding to Agenda 2020: A technology vision and research agenda for America`s forest, wood and paper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, K.S.

    1995-03-01

    This document presents project summaries that demonstrate specific capabilities of interest to the forest, wood and paper industry in areas where PNL offers significant depth of experience or unique expertise. Though PNL possesses a wide range of capabilities across many of the technology-related issues identified by the industry, this document focuses on capabilities that meet the specific forest, wood and paper industry needs of the following research areas: forest inventory; human and environmental effects; energy and environmental tradeoffs; reduction of impacts of liquid effluent; solid wastes; removal of non-process elements in pulp and paper operations; life cycle assessment; and process measurement and controls. In addition, PNL can provide the forest, wood and paper industry with support in areas such as strategic and program planning, stakeholder communications and outreach, budget defense and quality metrics. These are services PNL provides directly to several programs within DOE.

  4. Height-diameter relationships for conifer species on the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest. Forest Service research note (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Dolph, K.L.; Mori, S.R.; Oliver, W.W.

    1995-03-01

    An equation is presented for predicting total height as a function of diameter outside bark at breast height for conifer species of the eastside pine type on the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest in northeastern California. Weighted nonlinear regression was used to estimate the equation coefficients. The equation, along with the species-specific regression coefficients, provides a reliable basis for estimating missing heights on inventory and growth plots.

  5. Diel patterns of soil respiration in a moist subtropical forest: key drivers and future research needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez del Arroyo, O.; Wood, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    Moist tropical forests have the highest soil respiration rates (Rs) of any terrestrial ecosystem and account for approximately one third of the world's soil carbon (C) pool. Small increases in the magnitude of Rs in these ecosystems can result in high rates of soil C loss, with significant consequences for global climate change. Identifying the climatic controls of Rs in moist subtropical forests will improve our ability to predict how this large C flux will respond to climate change. Our objectives were (1) to determine whether Rs varies on diel timescales, (2) whether diel Rs patterns vary seasonally, and (3) identify biophysical drivers of this temporal variation. We measured hourly Rs in a secondary, moist subtropical forest in Puerto Rico for a 3-year period using an automated soil respiration system (LI-COR 8100/8150 with six chambers). Concomitant with Rs we measured hourly variation in several climatic drivers (air/soil temperature, soil moisture, relative humidity, and photosynthetically active radiation). Soil respiration showed significant diel variation, with the magnitude, amplitude, and shape of these curves varying throughout the year. Overall, diel Rs peaked in the late afternoon and reached a minimum in the early morning. Diel amplitudes ranged from 1 to 7 ?mol CO2 m-2 s-1, with larger amplitudes occurring in warmer months that also have higher rates of Rs. In warmer months Rs exhibited a strong bimodal pattern, and a narrower diel range with a single peak in cooler and drier months. Diel Rs was positively correlated with soil temperature, but this relationship was non-linear during the day and linear at night (i.e., hysteresis). The bimodal pattern of Rs may be due to a mid-day depression of photosynthesis when humidity is low and air temperature is high, thereby reducing transport of photosynthate to the roots and decreasing rhizospheric respiration. The hysteresis between Rs and temperature suggests multiple controls on Rs on diel time-scales. Research that partitions Rs into its components could provide insight into their respective sensitivities to different climatic drivers, improving our capacity to understand the effects of climate change on the tropical forest C cycle.

  6. Research On A SOA Like Forest Fire Hotspot Detection Based On MODIS Data Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Guang; Qin, Xianlin; Li, Zengyuan; Xu, Zhang; Huang, Zhengchun; Li, Guoqing; Cai, Huide; Cassanova, J. L.; Calle, A.; Goldammer, Johann

    2010-10-01

    The goal of the research is to study a new kind of forest fire hotspot detection workflow based on MODIS data source and put this application on a SOA like system. The investigated workflow can make use of a great amount of MODIS data and auxiliary vector data physically dispersed over different storage facilities. To achieve this goal, the algorithm,data and result presentation are integrated in a Grid based infrastructure. We use web service technology to encapsulate the program in our web-based spatial processing service test bed. The particular information of the test bed which is supported by SIRGE middleware to bolster the computing resources and SIGApp middleware to manage the spatial processing services is given. Through a dedicated web portal users can have easy and fast access to the different data regardless the place where they are physically located.

  7. Appendix 33 Forest Resources of the Flathead National Forest

    E-print Network

    of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station July 1999 Forest ResourcesForest Resources;Rocky Mountain Research Station 324 25th Street Ogden, UT 84401 About the author) Program of the U.S. Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station (now called Rocky Mountain Research

  8. How Do Finnish Teacher Educators Implement Entrepreneurship Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seikkula-Leino, Jaana; Satuvuori, Timo; Ruskovaara, Elena; Hannula, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to ascertain how the people who train Finnish teachers implement entrepreneurship education in the guidance they provide. The authors show how learning through, for and about entrepreneurship manifests in the self-evaluations of Finnish teacher educators. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected in…

  9. The Finnish Broadcasting Company: Serving the Public's Language Interests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hautamaki, Sirkka

    1992-01-01

    Discusses radio and television programing in Finland by the Finnish Broadcasting Company (YLE) and describes programs that have been developed to cover the country's three official languages: Finnish, Swedish, and Saame. Language courses offered by the YLE are described, and the importance of languages in the community is considered. (LRW)

  10. British and Finnish Baseball: International Variations on an American Pastime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Emyr W.; Romar, Jan-Erik; Hartman, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Both British and Finnish baseball are easy to introduce, as the specific skills involved in both sports are identical to those used in traditional baseball. If students have the skills to play traditional baseball, they have the skills to play British and Finnish baseball as well. After a brief overview of the unique rules and strategies of these…

  11. Finnish Vocational Education and Training in Comparison: Strengths and Weaknesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virolainen, Maarit; Stenström, Marja-Leena

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates how the Finnish model of providing initial vocational education and training (IVET) has succeeded in terms of enhancing educational progress and employability. A relatively high level of participation in IVET makes the Finnish model distinctive from those of three other Nordic countries: Denmark, Norway and Sweden. All four…

  12. Heavy metals in muscle, liver, and kidney from Finnish reindeer in 1990-91 and 1991-92

    SciTech Connect

    Rintala, R.; Venaelaeinen, E.R.; Hirvi, T.

    1995-01-01

    Heavy metals were analyzed from reindeer by the Finnish National Veterinary and Food Research Institute. The analyses were part of a larger project during the period 1990-1993, in which residues in vegetables, milk, berries, fish and reindeer were monitored. The main aim of the reindeer study was to investigate possible differences between the heavy metal contents of reindeer samples from northern, eastern, western and southern Lapland. Another objective of the study was also to clarify the environmental effects of industrial activities in the Kola Peninsula and in Tornio on the food products of Finnish Lapland. Analyses of organochlorine compounds from reindeer samples were also performed, but these results will be published later after a larger number of samples has been studied. Results of the reindeer analyses were also compared with previous reindeer and elk studies of the Finnish National Veterinary Institute (1980) and Neimi (1993) and with two Norwegian studies (roslie 1984 and 1986). 13 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Forest Service Pacific Southwest

    E-print Network

    Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station Research Paper P8W-182 Release: PHILIP M. McDONALD is a research forester assigned to the Station's research unit studying, what would be the tradeoffs between stem caliper growth of Douglas-fir seedlings and treatment costs

  14. Look at Me! Does the Adult Truly See and Respond to the Child in Finnish Day-Care Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliala, Marjatta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the Kangaroo research project was to enhance the well-being of children under three years of age in Finnish day-care centres. In this experimental intervention study adults were encouraged to take a more sensitive and active role especially during "free play." In six Kangaroo groups and five control groups adults (N = 28) and children…

  15. Cutin composition of five finnish berries.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Heikki; Nieminen, Riikka; Tuomasjukka, Saska; Hakala, Mari

    2006-01-25

    The raw cutin (i.e., extractive-free isolated cuticular membrane) fraction from Finnish berries, sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides), black currant (Ribes nigrum), cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccos), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), and bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), was depolymerized by NaOMe-catalyzed methanolysis. The composition of cutin monomers was determined by GC-(EI)MS analysis either as methyl esters or as TMSi esters, with OH groups derivatized to TMSi ethers. There was a notable difference in the degree of depolymerization, ranging from 6 to 47%. The extractive-free berry cuticle, that is, raw cutin, thus contains <50% polyester polymer cutin. The predominant cutin monomers were C(16) and C(18) omega-hydroxy acids with midchain functionalities, mainly epoxy and hydroxyl groups. Typically, the major compounds were 9,10-epoxy-18-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid, 10,16-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid, 9,10,18-trihydroxyoctadecanoic acid, 9,10-epoxy-18-hydroxyoctadec-12-enoic acid, and 18-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid. The amount of epoxyacids was rather high in sea buckthorn ( approximately 70%) and cranberry ( approximately 60%), compared with the other berries. The black currant cutin differed from that of the other berries with a significant portion of hydroxyoxohexadecanoic acid ( approximately 12% of total monomers). This investigation of the cuticular hydroxy acids of five Finnish berries is part of the exploitation of the northern natural resources related to the chemical composition, nutritional value, and sensory properties. PMID:16417304

  16. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2003200498 Recent advances in the

    E-print Network

    -purpose perspective. When describing future forest dynamics the environmental implications of climate change on long, as a function of soils, climate, species and management practice I account for the forecasted impacts of climate) for a forest stand of known structure, growing in locally determined soil and climate. Particular attention has

  17. IMPACTS OF AIR POLLUTION AND CLIMATE CHANGE ON FOREST ECOSYSTEMS - EMERGING RESEARCH NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Outcomes from the 22nd meeting for Specialists in Air Pollution Effects on Forest Ecosystems "Forests under Anthropogenic Pressure - Effects of Air Pollution, Climate Change and Urban Development", September 10-16, 2006, Riverside, CA, USA are summarized. Tropospheric ozone is st...

  18. New international long-term ecological research on air pollution effects on the Carpathian Mountain forests, Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Badea, Ovidiu; Barbu, Ion; Fleischer, Peter; Fraczek, Witold; Gancz, Vladimir; Godzik, Barbara; Grodzi?ska, Krystyna; Grodzki, Wojciech; Karnosky, David; Koren, Milan; Krywult, Marek; Krzan, Zbigniew; Longauer, Roman; Mankovska, Blanka; Manning, William J; McManus, Michael; Musselman, Robert C; Novotny, Julius; Popescu, Flaviu; Postelnicu, Daniela; Prus-G?owacki, Wies?aw; Skawi?ski, Pawe?; Skiba, Stefan; Szaro, Robert; Tamas, Stefan; Vasile, Cristian

    2003-06-01

    An international cooperative project on distribution of ozone in the Carpathian Mountains, Central Europe was conducted from 1997 to 1999. Results of that project indicated that in large parts of the Carpathian Mountains, concentrations of ozone were elevated and potentially phytotoxic to forest vegetation. That study led to the establishment of new long-term studies on ecological changes in forests and other ecosystems caused by air pollution in the Retezat Mountains, Southern Carpathians, Romania and in the Tatra Mountains, Western Carpathians on the Polish-Slovak border. Both of these important mountain ranges have the status of national parks and are Man & the Biosphere Reserves. In the Retezat Mountains, the primary research objective was to evaluate how air pollution may affect forest health and biodiversity. The main research objective in the Tatra Mountains was to evaluate responses of natural and managed Norway spruce forests to air pollution and other stresses. Ambient concentrations of ozone (O(3)), sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) as well as forest health and biodiversity changes were monitored on densely distributed research sites. Initial monitoring of pollutants indicated low levels of O(3), SO(2), and NO(x) in the Retezat Mountains, while elevated levels of O(3) and high deposition of atmospheric sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) have characterized the Tatra Mountains. In the Retezat Mountains, air pollution seems to have little effect on forest health; however, there was concern that over a long time, even low levels of pollution may affect biodiversity of this important ecosystem. In contrast, severe decline of Norway spruce has been observed in the Tatra Mountains. Although bark beetle seems to be the immediate cause of that decline, long-term elevated levels of atmospheric N and S depositions and elevated O(3) could predispose trees to insect attacks and other stresses. European and US scientists studied pollution deposition, soil and plant chemistry, O(3)-sensitive plant species, forest insects, and genetic changes in the Retezat and Tatra Mountains. Results of these investigations are presented in a GIS format to allow for a better understanding of the changes and the recommendations for effective management in these two areas. PMID:12676229

  19. Mass Media and Public Opinion: Report of the Soviet-Finnish Seminar (5th, Moscow, USSR, May 18-22, 1987). Publications Series B, Number 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jyrkiainen, Jyrki, Comp.

    A compilation of papers from a joint Finnish-Russian seminar on problems of communication research, this collection presents diverse opinions and results from researchers and observers in both countries. The titles of the papers and their authors are as follows: (1) "Role of Research and Training in Mass Communication and Public Opinion" (Pertti…

  20. The ash in forest fire affected soils control the soil losses. Part 1. The pioneer research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo

    2013-04-01

    After forest fires, the ash and the remaining vegetation cover on the soil surface are the main protection against erosion agents. The control ash exert on runoff generation mechanism was researched during the 90's (Cerdà, 1998a; 1998b). This pioneer research demonstrated that after forest fires there is a short period of time that runoff and surface wash by water is controlled by the high infiltration rates achieved by the soil, which were high due to the effect of ash acting as a mulch. The research of Cerdà (1998a; 1998b) also contributed to demonstrate that runoff was enhanced four month later upon the wash of the ash by the runoff, but also due to the removal of ash due to dissolution and water infiltration. As a consequence of the ephemeral ash cover the runoff and erosion reached the peak after the removal of the ash (usually four month), and for two years the soil erosion reached the peak (Cerdà, 1998a). Research developed during the last decade shown that the ash and the litter cover together contribute to reduce the soil losses after the forest fire (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008). The fate of the ash is related to the climatic conditions of the post-fire season, as intense thunderstorms erode the ash layer and low intensity rainfall contribute to a higher infiltration rate and the recovery of the vegetation. Another, key factor found during the last two decades that determine the fate of the ash and the soil and water losses is the impact of the fauna (Cerdà and Doerr, 2010). During the last decade new techniques were developed to study the impact of ash in the soil system, such as the one to monitor the ash changes by means of high spatial resolution photography (Pérez Cabello et al., 2012), and laboratory approaches that show the impact of ash as a key factor in the soil hydrology throughout the control they exert on the soil water repellency (Bodí et al., 2012). Laboratory approaches also shown that the fire severity is a key factor on the ash chemical composition (Pereira and Úbeda, 2010) and Pereira et al., 2012). Some of the new research challenges related to ash impact in the fire affected soils are related to the ash redistribution after the fire, the impact of ash in soil and water chemistry, the temporal changes of soil erosion, the control ash exert on vegetation recovery and the role to be played by ash in the best management of fire affected land. Those topics needs new ideas and new scientists such as Paulo Pereira show in the Part II of this abstract. Acknowledgements, Lithuanian Research Council. Project LITFIRE, Fire effects on Lithuanian soils and ecosystems (MIP-48/2011) and the research projects GL2008-02879/BTE and LEDDRA 243857. References Bodí, M., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S., and Cerdà, A. 2011b. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. Cerdà, A. 1998a. Postfire dynamics of erosional processes under mediterranean climatic conditions. Z. Geomorphol., 42 (3) 373-398. Cerdà, A. 1998b. Changes in overland flow and infiltration after a rangeland fire in a Mediterranean scrubland. Hydrological Processes, 12, 1031-1042. Cerdà, A., and Doerr, S. H.2010. The effect of ant mounds on overland flow and soil erodibility following a wildfire in eastern Spain. Ecohydrology, 3, 392-401. Cerdà, A., and Doerr, S.H. 2008. The effect of ash and needle cover on surface runoff and erosion in the immediate post-fire period. Catena, 74, 256-263. Pereira, P., and Úbeda, X. 2010. Spatial distribution of heavy metals released from ashes after a wildfire, Journal of Environment Engineering and Landscape Management, 18, 13-22. Pereira, P., Ubeda, X., Martin, D.A. 2012. Fire severity effects on ash chemical composition and extractable elements. Geoderma, 191, 105 - 114. Pérez-Cabello, F., Cerdà, A., de la Riva, J., Echeverría, M.T., García-Martín, A., Ibarra, P., Lasanta, T., Montorio, R., Palacios, V. 2012. Micro-scale post-fire surface cover changes monitored using hig

  1. 78 FR 22225 - Solicitation of Input From Stakeholders Regarding the Integrated Forest Products Research Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ...Agriculture, Department of Agriculture. ACTION: Notice of Request...National Institute of Food and Agriculture's (NIFA) strategy to...necessary to balance the sustainable use of U.S. forest resources...National Institute of Food and Agriculture. [FR Doc....

  2. Soil carbon balance on drained and afforested transitional bog in forest research station Vesetnieki in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi?is, Ain?rs; Lazdi?š, Andis

    2015-04-01

    Around 0.8 mill. ha forests in Latvia are located on organic soils and 0.5 mill. ha of these forests are drained. Drainage of organic soils alters carbon stock and may has impact on the climate change. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of drainage on a soil carbon stock in transitional bog (average growing stock before drainage 50 m3*ha-1) located in central part of Latvia in research station "Vesetnieki". Drainage was done in 1960. Average peat thickness is around 4.5 m; dominant tree species are pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and spruce (Picea abies Karst.) with average growing stock 226 m3*ha-1 and 213 m3*ha-1. Volumetric peat samples were taken from soil surface down to 80 cm depth in 30 sample plots in drained sites and non-drained areas (transitional bog), which have been left as a control. Bulk density, carbon content in peat was determined to evaluate carbon stock changes in soil. Ground surface levelling in drained sites was done before drainage and repeatedly in 1966, 1970, 1975, 1977, 1982 and 2014 to calculate peat subsidence. The rate of peat subsidence after drainage increased rapidly, and 14 years after drainage 15.8 cm decrease of the surface level was found. The rate of the peat subsidence decreased later, and the ground level reduced by 9.9 cm in the following 40 years, reaching 25.7±3.5 cm from initial ground surface level in the 2014. The rapid decrease of the surface level after drainage can be explained by physical alters and by decomposition of the peat surface layers, however, it is not possible to assess now, which of these processes dominated. However, the significant (?=0.05) increase of the peat bulk density and carbon content in upper layers (0-80 cm) in drained sites compared to non-drained leads to conclusion that the compaction was the dominating process. Average carbon stock (0-80 cm deep soil layer) in non-drained areas is 339±29 tons*ha-1 and 513±27 tons*ha-1 in drained sites. We compared carbon stock in upper 80 cm soil layer in transitional bog (339±29 tons*ha-1) with peat layer in drained sites 54.3 cm corresponding to 80 cm in non-drained (359±19 tons*ha-1). The study reveals that soils in drained sites have accumulated 0.36 tons*ha-1*a-1 more carbon than soils in non-drained sites, however the difference on carbon stock between sites is not statistically significant (?=0.05). If non-drained organic soils are considered to be a carbon sink or at least not a carbon source, then we can conclude that drained organic soil in research station "Vesetnieki" in 50 years period did not become a carbon source.

  3. Polarised Multiangular Reflectance Measurements Using the Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Suomalainen, Juha; Hakala, Teemu; Peltoniemi, Jouni; Puttonen, Eetu

    2009-01-01

    The design, operation, and properties of the Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer (FIGIFIGO) are presented. FIGIFIGO is a portable instrument for the measurement of surface Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) for samples with diameters of 10 – 50 cm. A set of polarising optics enable the measurement of linearly polarised BRF over the full solar spectrum (350 – 2,500 nm). FIGIFIGO is designed mainly for field operation using sunlight, but operation in a laboratory environment is also possible. The acquired BRF have an accuracy of 1 – 5% depending on wavelength, sample properties, and measurement conditions. The angles are registered at accuracies better than 2°. During 2004 – 2008, FIGIFIGO has been used in the measurement of over 150 samples, all around northern Europe. The samples concentrate mostly on boreal forest understorey, snow, urban surfaces, and reflectance calibration surfaces. PMID:22412342

  4. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically Viable Forest Harvesting Practices That Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, E.A.; Dail, D.B., Hollinger, D.; Scott, N.; Richardson, A.

    2012-08-02

    Forests provide wildlife habitat, water and air purification, climate moderation, and timber and nontimber products. Concern about climate change has put forests in the limelight as sinks of atmospheric carbon. The C stored in the global vegetation, mostly in forests, is nearly equivalent to the amount present in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Both voluntary and government-mandated carbon trading markets are being developed and debated, some of which include C sequestration resulting from forest management as a possible tradeable commodity. However, uncertainties regarding sources of variation in sequestration rates, validation, and leakage remain significant challenges for devising strategies to include forest management in C markets. Hence, the need for scientifically-based information on C sequestration by forest management has never been greater. The consequences of forest management on the US carbon budget are large, because about two-thirds of the {approx}300 million hectare US forest resource is classified as 'commercial forest.' In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere. However, forest management practices could be designed to meet the multiple goals of providing wood and paper products, creating economic returns from natural resources, while sequestering C from the atmosphere. The shelterwood harvest strategy, which removes about 30% of the basal area of the overstory trees in each of three successive harvests spread out over thirty years as part of a stand rotation of 60-100 years, may improve net C sequestration compared to clear-cutting because: (1) the average C stored on the land surface over a rotation increases, (2) harvesting only overstory trees means that a larger fraction of the harvested logs can be used for long-lived sawtimber products, compared to more pulp resulting from clearcutting, (3) the shelterwood cut encourages growth of subcanopy trees by opening up the forest canopy to increasing light penetration. Decomposition of onsite harvest slash and of wastes created during timber processing releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, thus offsetting some of the C sequestered in vegetation. Decomposition of soil C and dead roots may also be temporarily stimulated by increased light penetration and warming of the forest floor. Quantification of these processes and their net effect is needed. We began studying C sequestration in a planned shelterwood harvest at the Howland Forest in central Maine in 2000. The harvest took place in 2002 by the International Paper Corporation, who assisted us to track the fates of harvest products (Scott et al., 2004, Environmental Management 33: S9-S22). Here we present the results of intensive on-site studies of the decay of harvest slash, soil respiration, growth of the remaining trees, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO{sub 2} during the first six years following the harvest. These results are combined with calculations of C in persisting off-site harvest products to estimate the net C consequences to date of this commercial shelterwood harvest operation. Tower-based eddy covariance is an ideal method for this study, as it integrates all C fluxes in and out of the forest over a large 'footprint' area and can reveal how the net C flux, as well as gross primary productivity and respiration, change following harvest. Because the size of this experiment precludes large-scale replication, we are use a paired-airshed approach, similar to classic large-scale paired watershed experiments. Measurements of biomass and C fluxes in control and treatment stands were compared during a pre-treatment calibration period, and then divergence from pre-treatment relationships between the two sites measured after the harvest treatment. Forests store carbon (C) as they accumulate biomass. Many forests are also commercial sources of timber and wood fiber. In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the at

  5. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service

    E-print Network

    Forest System lands (54 national forests and grasslands). In the lower 48 states, our territory also Location National Forest Experimental Forest Experimental Range We maintain 14 research locationsUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA

  6. Katherine Tubby For over a decade, numerous volunteers have been involved in a Forest Research (FR)-

    E-print Network

    the impact of pinewood nematode Ecology overview Criteria for changing forest land use Conservation measures of the European forestry­wood chain Creating new broadleaved woodlands by direct seeding Tree Health overview the `timber miles' travelled by Scottish wood (page 39). Native Woodlands Survey for Scotland On behalf

  7. Publications Forest Research publishes a wide range of material, from corporate reports and plans, to

    E-print Network

    .50) Practice Guide 17 Managing and controlling invasive rhododendron by Colin Edwards (£6.50) Technical Guide 2 Forest fencing by Roger Trout and Harry Pepper (£7.50) Information Notes (free) 80 An update on nursery Hislop 82 Choosing provenance in broadleaved trees Jason Hubert and Edward Cundall 83 Managing mixed

  8. Future Direction for Research and Management Human Habitat at the Fringe of the Forest

    E-print Network

    of the boundary lie the shadowy depths, on the other a morphology easily converted to human scale. Individuals of the forest. If people feel the need to be there, what are the most reasonable ways to live? Figure 1 to be in dwindling supply and probably rationed well before the latest mortgages are paid. If people were guided

  9. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically viable Forest Harvesting Practices that Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Dail, David Bryan

    2012-08-02

    This technical report covers a 3-year cooperative agreement between the University of Maine and the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station that focused on the characterization of forest stands and the assessment of forest carbon storage (see attached for detailed description of the project). The goal of this work was to compare estimates of forest C storage made via remeasurement of FIA-type plots with eddy flux measurements. In addition to relating whole ecosystem estimates of carbon storage to changes in aboveground biomass, we explored methodologies by partitioning growth estimates from periodic inventory measurements into annual estimates. In the final year, we remeasured plots that were subject to a shelterwood harvest over the winter of 2001-02 to assess the production of coarse woody debris by this harvest, to remeasure trees in a long-term stand first established by NASA, to carry out other field activities at Howland, and, to assess the importance of downed and decaying wood as well as standing dead trees to the C inputs to harvested and non harvested plots.

  10. Research Summary Disturbance of wildlife and the recreational use of forests

    E-print Network

    to the impact of people using forests for recreation upon wildlife and wildlife management. o Consider in this knowledge. Methods o We conducted a desk-based study of primarily peer-reviewed literature identified via a number of bibliographic databases. The search focused on papers published during 1990-2010 but older

  11. Impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds on ozone production at the Taehwa Research Forest near Seoul, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So-Young; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Lee, Meehye; Turnipseed, Andrew; Guenther, Alex; Kim, Jong-Choon; Lee, Suk-Jo; Kim, Saewung

    2013-05-01

    The importance of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in understanding of air-quality and climate on regional to global scales has been highlighted in a number of modeling and observational studies. At the same time, another important emerging research topic in atmospheric chemistry is the regional and global impacts of fast growing East Asian megacities. These two research topics must be integrated in order to adequately understand and address air quality challenges emerging from Eastern Asian megacities surrounded by planted or natural forest areas. We present initial measurement results for May, June and September 2011 from the Taehwa Research Forest (TRF) which has been developed to serve as a long term observatory for investigating biosphere-atmosphere interactions at the edge of the Seoul Metropolitan Area (population of ˜23.5 million). The comprehensive measurement datasets of ozone and its precursors such as CO, NOx, SO2 and VOCs shows that high ozone episodes in the suburban site could not be explained by just anthropogenic pollutants alone. In addition, isoprene (C5H8) and monoterpenes (C10H16) were observed as two of the most important OH chemical sinks inside of the forest canopy. In order to understand the impacts of these BVOCs on ozone and related photochemistry, we conducted model sensitivity simulations using a coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for conditions including with and without BVOC emissions. The modeling results suggest that BVOC emissions could enhance regional daytime ozone production from 5 to 20 ppbv. The observed temporal variations in ozone correspond well with the variations in BVOCs, which likely reflects the influence of BVOCs on ozone formation. These findings strongly suggest that interactions between anthropogenic pollutants and BVOCs must be understood and quantified in order to assess photochemical ozone formation in the regions surrounding East Asian megacities.

  12. Importance of change appraisal for employee well-being during organizational restructuring: findings from the Finnish paper industry's extensive transition.

    PubMed

    Pahkin, Krista; Nielsen, Karina; Väänänen, Ari; Mattila-Holappa, Pauliina; Leppänen, Anneli; Koskinen, Aki

    2014-01-01

    The global recession has forced the Finnish forest industry to carry out major restructuring activities. Employees have faced different kinds of restructuring, mainly aimed at reducing staff and production. Many studies have shown the negative consequences of restructuring on employee well-being by using negative, ill-health indicators. Our aim is to examine the extent to which change appraisal influences both the negative and positive aspects of work-related well-being among employees who continue working in the organization after the restructuring process. We also examine the role of different actors (top management, immediate supervisor, employees themselves) in how the change is appraised. The study investigated blue-collar employees working in the Finnish forest industry during a period of extensive transition (2008-2009). All six participating factories underwent restructuring between baseline and the follow-up survey (n=369). After adjustment for gender, age and baseline well-being, negative change appraisal increased the risk of experiencing more stress and less work enjoyment. Negative change appraisals thus also damaged the positive, motivational aspects of employee well-being. The results showed the importance of offering employees the opportunity to participate in the planning of changes related to their work as regards positive change appraisal. PMID:24975107

  13. Publications of the Finnish Artificial Intelligence Society -23 New Developments in Artificial

    E-print Network

    Hyvönen, Eero

    Publications of the Finnish Artificial Intelligence Society - 23 New Developments in Artificial Intelligence and the Semantic Web Proceedings of the 12th Finnish Artificial Intelligence Conference STeP 2006 Kauppinen, Jukka Kortela, Mikko Laukkanen, Tapani Raiko, and Kim Viljanen Finnish Artificial Intelligence

  14. PISA, TIMSS and Finnish Mathematics Teaching: An Enigma in Search of an Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Paul; Ryve, Andreas; Hemmi, Kirsti; Sayers, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Finnish students' success on all three content domains of each of the four cycles of the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) has created much international interest. It has also prompted Finnish academics to offer systemic explanations typically linked to the structural qualities of Finnish schooling and teacher…

  15. DNA-barcoding clarifies species definitions of Finnish Apatania (Trichoptera: Apataniidae)

    E-print Network

    Wahlberg, Niklas

    DNA-barcoding clarifies species definitions of Finnish Apatania (Trichoptera: Apataniidae) Juha Salokannnel, Markus J. Rantala & Niklas Wahlberg Salokannel, J., Rantala, M. J. & Wahlberg, N. 2010: DNA-barcoding­11. Alltheknown8FinnishApataniaKolenatispecieswereanalysedusingtheDNA barcoding method. The Finnish species were

  16. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-print Network

    PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE. U.S.DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE P.O. UOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 USDA FOREST SERVICE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-23 /1977 FIFTY YEARS OF FORESTRY RESEARCH annotated bibliography of the Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

  17. 2014 Urban Forest Symposium: Climate Change and the Urban Forest May 28, 2014

    E-print Network

    Brown, Sally

    2014 Urban Forest Symposium: Climate Change and the Urban Forest May 28, 2014 Agenda 8:15 ­ 9 Change and the Urban Forest Greg McPherson, Research Forester, USDA Forest Service Urban forestry, and provide updates on efforts to quantify and map statewide urban forest carbon stocks, streamline the urban

  18. Priority-setting in Finnish healthcare.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, P; Häkkinen, U

    1999-12-01

    The characteristics which affect priority setting in the Finnish healthcare system include strong municipal (local) administration, no clear separation between producers and purchasers, a duality in funding, and the potential for physicians in public hospitals to practice in the private sector. This system has its strengths, such as the possibility to effectively co-ordinate social and healthcare services, and a strong incentive to take care of local needs, because of municipal responsibility to finance these services largely through local taxes. However, the municipalities are typically too small to take advantage of these potentials, their knowledge is scarce especially of secondary care and their negotiating power with respect to hospitals is low. Local politicians also have a dual role: they represent the needs of the local population but simultaneously they are decision-makers in hospitals. Full-time physicians are allowed to act in a dual role as well; they can run a private practice, which is paid for on a fee-for-service basis, while the hospital pays (mostly) a fixed monthly salary. The share of financing which flows from the National Sickness Insurance system to healthcare users may have adverse effects on the local use of resources. The broad national consensus statement on patient-level priorities did not reach any general rules on priorities. Strong support was given to citizens' equal right to access all healthcare services. In healthcare practice, this general rule has some exemptions. First, the reimbursement schemes for prescribed drugs vary depending on the severity and chronic nature of the disease. Secondly, the tax-financed dental services for the young are clearly prioritised over those of older citizens. In the consensus statement, emphasis was put on improving the efficiency of producing health services in order to avoid having to impose patient-level priorities. PMID:10827305

  19. TAPIR--Finnish national geochemical baseline database.

    PubMed

    Jarva, Jaana; Tarvainen, Timo; Reinikainen, Jussi; Eklund, Mikael

    2010-09-15

    In Finland, a Government Decree on the Assessment of Soil Contamination and Remediation Needs has generated a need for reliable and readily accessible data on geochemical baseline concentrations in Finnish soils. According to the Decree, baseline concentrations, referring both to the natural geological background concentrations and the diffuse anthropogenic input of substances, shall be taken into account in the soil contamination assessment process. This baseline information is provided in a national geochemical baseline database, TAPIR, that is publicly available via the Internet. Geochemical provinces with elevated baseline concentrations were delineated to provide regional geochemical baseline values. The nationwide geochemical datasets were used to divide Finland into geochemical provinces. Several metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, V, and Zn) showed anomalous concentrations in seven regions that were defined as metal provinces. Arsenic did not follow a similar distribution to any other elements, and four arsenic provinces were separately determined. Nationwide geochemical datasets were not available for some other important elements such as Cd and Pb. Although these elements are included in the TAPIR system, their distribution does not necessarily follow the ones pre-defined for metal and arsenic provinces. Regional geochemical baseline values, presented as upper limit of geochemical variation within the region, can be used as trigger values to assess potential soil contamination. Baseline values have also been used to determine upper and lower guideline values that must be taken into account as a tool in basic risk assessment. If regional geochemical baseline values are available, the national guideline values prescribed in the Decree based on ecological risks can be modified accordingly. The national geochemical baseline database provides scientifically sound, easily accessible and generally accepted information on the baseline values, and it can be used in various environmental applications. PMID:20673967

  20. Finnish remote environmental monitoring field demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Toivonen, H.; Leppaenen, A.; Ylaetalo, S.; Lehtinen, J.; Hokkinen, J.; Tarvainen, M.; Crawford, T.; Glidewell, D.; Smartt, H.; Torres, J.

    1997-10-01

    Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Helsinki, Finland and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), working under the Finnish Support Program to IAEA Safeguards and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) funded International Remote Monitoring Program (Task FIN E 935), have undertaken a joint effort to demonstrate the use of remote monitoring for environmental air sampling and safeguards applications. The results of the task will be used by the IAEA to identify the feasibility, cost-effectiveness, reliability, advantages, and problems associated with remote environmental monitoring. An essential prerequisite for a reliable remote air sampling system is the protection of samples against tampering. Means must be developed to guarantee that the sampling itself has been performed as designed and the original samples are not substituted with samples produced with other equipment at another site. One such method is to label the samples with an unequivocal tag. In addition, the inspection personnel must have the capability to remotely monitor and access the automated environmental air sampling system through the use of various sensors and video imagery equipment. A unique aspect to this project is the network integration of remote monitoring equipment with a STUK radiation monitoring system. This integration will allow inspectors to remotely view air sampler radiation data and sensor/image data through separate software applications on the same review station. A sensor network and video system will be integrated with the SNL developed Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS) to provide a comprehensive remote monitoring approach for safeguards purposes. This field trial system is being implemented through a multiphase approach for use by STUK, SNL, and for possible future use by the IAEA.

  1. Predominant Campylobacter jejuni Sequence Types Persist in Finnish Chicken Production

    PubMed Central

    Llarena, Ann-Katrin; Huneau, Adeline; Hakkinen, Marjaana; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Consumption and handling of chicken meat are well-known risk factors for acquiring campylobacteriosis. This study aimed to describe the Campylobacter jejuni population in Finnish chickens and to investigate the distribution of C. jejuni genotypes on Finnish chicken farms over a period of several years. We included 89.8% of the total C. jejuni population recovered in Finnish poultry during 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2012 and used multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to characterize the 380 isolates. The typing data was combined with isolate information on collection-time and farm of origin. The C. jejuni prevalence in chicken slaughter batches was low (mean 3.0%, CI95% [1.8%, 4.2%]), and approximately a quarter of Finnish chicken farms delivered at least one positive chicken batch yearly. In general, the C. jejuni population was diverse as represented by a total of 63 sequence types (ST), but certain predominant MLST lineages were identified. ST-45 clonal complex (CC) accounted for 53% of the isolates while ST-21 CC and ST-677 CC covered 11% and 9% of the isolates, respectively. Less than half of the Campylobacter positive farms (40.3%) delivered C. jejuni-contaminated batches in multiple years, but the genotypes (ST and PFGE types) generally varied from year to year. Therefore, no evidence for a persistent C. jejuni source for the colonization of Finnish chickens emerged. Finnish chicken farms are infrequently contaminated with C. jejuni compared to other European Union (EU) countries, making Finland a valuable model for further epidemiological studies of the C. jejuni in poultry flocks. PMID:25700264

  2. Plant biomass in the Tanana River Basin, Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    Vegetation biomass tables are presented for the Tanana River Basin. Average biomass for each species of tree, shrub, grass, forb, lichen, and moss in the 13 forest and 30 nonforest vegetation types is shown. These data combined with area estimates for each vegetation type provide a tool for estimating habitat carrying capacity for many wildlife species. Tree biomass is reported for the entire aboveground tree, thereby allowing estimates of total fiber content.

  3. The effectiveness of the Finnish EIA system - What works, what doesn't, and what could be improved?

    SciTech Connect

    Poeloenen, Ismo; Hokkanen, Pekka; Jalava, Kimmo

    2011-03-15

    The article summarises the results of a multidisciplinary research project on the effectiveness of the Finnish EIA system. It examines the main strengths and weaknesses of EIA as a preventive and participatory environmental management tool. The study concludes that EIA has achieved a meaningful role in the environmental policy toolbox in Finland and has clearly enhanced the possibilities for high-quality environmental decision making. The research cites the liaison authority system as a clear strength of the Finnish EIA system in its enabling a single regional authority to specialise in and gain wide experience on EIA issues. In examining potential weaknesses of the regime, the article concludes that the key constraint on EIA effectiveness is inadequacy of the action-forcing mechanisms at the decision-making phase. The primary means to improve the effectiveness of EIA would be to strengthen the legal provisions on development consents. On the whole, the research indicates that the EU and Finnish legislation and guidance on environmental impact assessment provide a good framework for effective utilisation of the instrument.

  4. Distribution and medical impact of loss-of-function variants in the Finnish founder population.

    PubMed

    Lim, Elaine T; Würtz, Peter; Havulinna, Aki S; Palta, Priit; Tukiainen, Taru; Rehnström, Karola; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Inouye, Michael; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Chan, Yingleong; Salem, Rany M; Lek, Monkol; Flannick, Jason; Sim, Xueling; Manning, Alisa; Ladenvall, Claes; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Hämäläinen, Eija; Aalto, Kristiina; Maksimow, Mikael; Salmi, Marko; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Horne, Benjamin; McPherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Gerald K; Reilly, Muredach P; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Farrall, Martin; Girelli, Domenico; Reiner, Alex P; Stitziel, Nathan O; Kathiresan, Sekar; Gabriel, Stacey; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lehtimäki, Terho; Laakso, Markku; Groop, Leif; Kaprio, Jaakko; Perola, Markus; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Metspalu, Andres; Freimer, Nelson B; Zeller, Tanja; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Koskinen, Seppo; Raitakari, Olli; Durbin, Richard; MacArthur, Daniel G; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Daly, Mark J; Palotie, Aarno

    2014-07-01

    Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent bottlenecks offer advantages for studying rare variants in complex diseases as they have deleterious variants that are present at higher frequencies as well as a substantial reduction in rare neutral variation. To explore the potential of the Finnish founder population for studying low-frequency (0.5-5%) variants in complex diseases, we compared exome sequence data on 3,000 Finns to the same number of non-Finnish Europeans and discovered that, despite having fewer variable sites overall, the average Finn has more low-frequency loss-of-function variants and complete gene knockouts. We then used several well-characterized Finnish population cohorts to study the phenotypic effects of 83 enriched loss-of-function variants across 60 phenotypes in 36,262 Finns. Using a deep set of quantitative traits collected on these cohorts, we show 5 associations (p<5×10??) including splice variants in LPA that lowered plasma lipoprotein(a) levels (P?=?1.5×10?¹¹?). Through accessing the national medical records of these participants, we evaluate the LPA finding via Mendelian randomization and confirm that these splice variants confer protection from cardiovascular disease (OR?=?0.84, P?=?3×10??), demonstrating for the first time the correlation between very low levels of LPA in humans with potential therapeutic implications for cardiovascular diseases. More generally, this study articulates substantial advantages for studying the role of rare variation in complex phenotypes in founder populations like the Finns and by combining a unique population genetic history with data from large population cohorts and centralized research access to National Health Registers. PMID:25078778

  5. A national collaboration process: Finnish engineering education for the benefit of people and environment.

    PubMed

    Takala, A; Korhonen-Yrjänheikki, K

    2013-12-01

    The key stakeholders of the Finnish engineering education collaborated during 2006-09 to reform the system of education, to face the challenges of the changing business environment and to create a national strategy for the Finnish engineering education. The work process was carried out using participatory work methods. Impacts of sustainable development (SD) on engineering education were analysed in one of the subprojects. In addition to participatory workshops, the core part of the work on SD consisted of a research with more than 60 interviews and an extensive literature survey. This paper discusses the results of the research and the work process of the Collaboration Group in the subproject of SD. It is suggested that enhancing systematic dialogue among key stakeholders using participatory work methods is crucial in increasing motivation and commitment in incorporating SD in engineering education. Development of the context of learning is essential for improving skills of engineering graduates in some of the key abilities related to SD: systemic- and life-cycle thinking, ethical understanding, collaborative learning and critical reflection skills. This requires changing of the educational paradigm from teacher-centred to learner-centred applying problem- and project-oriented active learning methods. PMID:22095059

  6. Predicting regeneration establishment with the prognosis model. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, D.E.; Carlson, C.E.

    1993-08-01

    The conifer establishment following regeneration timber harvests is predicted by version 2 of the Regeneration Establishment Model, a submodel of the Prognosis Model. The regeneration model covers 10 species for forests in Montana, central Idaho, and northern Idaho. Most harvest and site preparation methods can be simulated so that alternative treatments can be evaluated. Also included in the model is the influence of western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) on regeneration success. The model predicts the probability of stocking, seedling density, species composition, and seedling heights 2 to 20 years after harvest. The paper describes the study design, equation development, model formulation, and model behavior for the Regeneration Establishment Model.

  7. Fuel models to predict fire behavior in untreated conifer slash. Forest Service research note (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, L.A.; Bevins, C.D.

    1984-11-01

    Fire behavior in untreated slash of nine conifer species was simulated for 10 successive years after logging. Two aging factors that affect fire behavior--fuel bed compaction and foliage retention--were modeled by least squares regression techniques. On the basis of spread rate and flame length for a set of weather observations, standard Northern Forest Fire Laboratory fuel models were chosen to predict fire behavior for aging slash of each species at three initial fuel loadings. Differences in the standard fuel model sequences best representing aging process among species were most influenced by foliage surface-area-to-volume ratio, and such differences increased as initial fuel load increased.

  8. Leguminous ground covers could reduce herbicide use in forestry. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Ponder, F.

    1994-01-01

    Establishing tree seedlings in mixed stands after harvesting is difficult without adequate vegetation control. Artificial regeneration can be used to ensure desirable future stands, but competing vegetation decreases survival and growth. Vegetation control can be costly and laborious. Large amounts of herbicides are used annually in forest management to reduce vegetation that competes with trees for growing space, nutrients, water, light, and other essential components. Using herbicides to control weeds is economical, but may not always be environmentally acceptable. One alternative is to establish nitrogen-fixing (legume) ground covers, which may suppress the more competitive weeds and enrich the soil.

  9. Population dynamics of the major north American needle-eating budworms. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.W.

    1993-04-01

    The report includes data from six western States provided 1,251 life tables representing western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis. These data provided projection capabilities for defoliation and successive budworm densities, as well as a basis for comparing survival rates among the three principal North American needle-eating budworms (western and eastern spruce budworms, and the jack pine budworm). Several modifications are suggested in current methods for managing budworm susceptible forests, and suggestions are provided for further studies on the budworm life systems.

  10. Marbled Murrelet Effectiveness Monitoring Northwest Forest Plan

    E-print Network

    Jodice, Patrick

    Marbled Murrelet Effectiveness Monitoring Northwest Forest Plan 2001 Annual Summary Report Patrick Jodice Marbled Murrelet Module Lead Northwest Forest Plan Interagency Monitoring Program March 2002 Team Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station #12;Marbled Murrelet Effectiveness Monitoring Jodice

  11. Critical Incidents in the Lives of Gifted Female Finnish Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirri, Kirsi; Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka

    2002-01-01

    A study investigated critical incidents in the professional and personal lives of 11 gifted Finnish female scientists. All made important life choices that promoted their talent and career development. The majority have also made some compromises related to their scientific interests and careers, as well as personal compromises. (Contains…

  12. Finnish Cooperating Physics Teachers' Conceptions of Physics Teachers' Teacher Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines Finnish cooperating physics teachers' conceptions of teacher knowledge in physics. Six experienced teachers were interviewed. The data was analyzed to form categories concerning the basis of teacher knowledge, and the tradition of German Didaktik and Shulman's theory of teacher knowledge were used in order to understand the…

  13. Using Phone Durations in Finnish Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition

    E-print Network

    Kurimo, Mikko

    Using Phone Durations in Finnish Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition Janne Pylkkönen of the languages where phone durations dis­ criminate between words. They therefore have significant meaning, an extension of an existing speech recognition system to include models for discriminatively important phone

  14. Effective Mathematics Teaching in Finnish and Swedish Teacher Education Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmi, Kirsti; Ryve, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This article explores effective mathematics teaching as constructed in Finnish and Swedish teacher educators' discourses. Based on interview data from teacher educators as well as data from feedback discussions between teacher educators and prospective teachers in Sweden and Finland, the analysis shows that several aspects of the recent…

  15. Wise, Wiser, Teacher: What I Learned in Finnish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Therese

    2010-01-01

    Finns are proud of their uniformly high-quality schools. Unlike in the United States, where parents fret about getting their children into "good" and often private schools with restrictive enrollment, virtually all schools are public, and most Finnish parents send their children to the school closest to their home. Teaching is a desirable…

  16. A tradeoff between reproduction and growth in contemporary Finnish women

    E-print Network

    Helle, Samuli

    A tradeoff between reproduction and growth in contemporary Finnish women Samuli Helle Section for reproduction, as an earlier age at menarche and first birth seem to be related to shorter adult stature. Although women likely accrue fitness benefits by maturing and starting reproduction at young age, short

  17. Religious Conviction, Morality and Social Convention among Finnish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vainio, Annukka

    2011-01-01

    The assumptions of Kohlberg, Turiel and Shweder regarding the features of moral reasoning were compared empirically. The moral reasoning of Finnish Evangelical Lutheran, Conservative Laestadian and non-religious adolescents was studied using Kohlberg's Moral Judgment Interview and Turiel Rule Transgression Interview methods. Religiosity and choice…

  18. The Finnish Foreign Language Diploma for Professional Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langille, John; And Others

    The Finnish Foreign Language Diploma for Professional Purposes, which tests English language skills, is described. The examination is intended for both individuals desiring certification of their knowledge and ability to use English in a professional context and for employers wanting independent evaluation for selection purposes. It measures…

  19. Gendered Hegemony and Its Contradictions among Finnish University Physicists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sannino, Annalisa; Vainio, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of gender imbalance in Finnish universities in the domain of physics as a historical and dialectical phenomenon. Drawing from the Gramscian notion of hegemony and the activity-theoretical notion of contradiction, this paper analyses gendered hegemonic and contradictory forces steering physicists' careers. This…

  20. In-flight breech delivery in Finnish lapland.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, Ilkka; Pirnes, Jari

    2014-01-01

    Although medical crews may initially approach obstetric transport requests with (at least internal) trepidation, it has been shown that the risk of an in-flight delivery occurring is extremely low, even among patients considered high risk.(1-4) Nevertheless, the greatest concern of helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) personnel remains the potential for in-flight delivery.(5) Finland is a Northern European country, with a land area almost equivalent to that of the US state of New Mexico. The Finnish HEMS system is managed by FinnHEMS, and there are 6 HEMS units in Finland. The northernmost HEMS unit, FinnHEMS 51, is based at Rovaniemi Airport in Finnish Lapland, which is located within the Arctic Circle; it operates over a remote and sparsely habited area. Finnish Lapland accounts for almost 30% of Finland by area; however, the density of population is low (only 2.0 persons per square kilometer), and the average annual year-round temperature is only -1°C (30°F).(6) So far, there has been only 1 reported in-flight delivery; in 1939, a baby girl was born in an airplane operated by the Finnish Border Guard.(7.) PMID:25441526

  1. Linguistics in Language Teaching: The Case of Finnish and Hungarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarsoly, Eszter; Valijarvi, Riitta-Liisa

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of various linguistic sub-disciplines in teaching Finnish and Hungarian. We sketch the profile of the two languages, including difficulties in learning and teaching them, and the context in which they are taught in the UK. Using examples from our own teaching, we argue that a linguistically oriented approach is well…

  2. HealthFinland --Finnish Health Information on the Semantic Web

    E-print Network

    Hyvönen, Eero

    HealthFinland --Finnish Health Information on the Semantic Web Eero Hyv¨onen, Kim Viljanen to solving problems of distributed content creation, discovery, linking, aggregation, and reuse in health semantic health portal HEALTH- FINLAND is presented. It provides citizens with intelligent searching

  3. Finnish Superintendents: Leading in a Changing Education Policy Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risku, Mika; Kanervio, Pekka; Björk, Lars G.

    2014-01-01

    Finland's education system is regarded as one of the most effective in the world. Shared values of the Finnish welfare society continue to influence national education policies that determine how education is organized, governed, and led. Findings from a national study of the superintendency, however, suggest recent demographic and financial…

  4. Characteristics of Workplace Learning among Finnish Vocational Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virtanen, Anne; Tynjälä, Päivi; Collin, Kaija

    2009-01-01

    In Finnish VET, students' work experience is explicitly defined as workplace learning, instead of the practice of already learnt skills. Therefore, vocational students' learning periods in the workplace are goal-oriented, guided and assessed. This paper examines the characteristics of students' workplace learning and compares them with the…

  5. A Special Education Teacher's Networks: A Finnish Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuomainen, Jenna; Palonen, Tuire; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2010-01-01

    This case study analyzed a special education (SE) teacher's activity within his workplace community and external professional network in a Finnish special education context. The nature of the SE teacher's networks and his networking role were examined using an interview and a questionnaire, completed by the teachers working in the community…

  6. Finnish Children's Views on the Ideal School and Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Marjaana

    2010-01-01

    This grounded-theory study involved how Finnish children describe their ideal school and learning environment and considers how their notions should be valued in the development of schools to better respond to the challenges of the future. The school children, aged 10-12 years, participated in the study by writing a story about a school in which…

  7. COMMUNITY FOREST MANAGEMENT Background Paper for

    E-print Network

    1 COMMUNITY FOREST MANAGEMENT Background Paper for: The United Nations Forum on Forests Secretariat UNFF9: "Forests for People, Livelihoods and Poverty Eradication" Prepared by: Thida Sam, Research-based forest management, to facilitate discussion at the ninth session of the United Nations Forum on Forests

  8. Salvage logging effect on soil properties in a fire-affected Mediterranean forest: a two years monitoring research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Moltó, Jorge; Arcenegui, Vicky; García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Chrenkovà, Katerina; Torres, Pilar; Jara-Navarro, Ana B.; Díaz, Gisela; Izquierdo, Ezequiel

    2015-04-01

    In the Mediterranean countries, forest fires are common and must be considered as an ecological factor, but changes in land use, especially in the last five decades have provoked a modification in their natural regime. Moreover, post-fire management can have an additional impact on the ecosystem; in some cases, even more severe than the fire. Salvage logging is a traditional management in most fire-affected areas. In some cases, the way of doing it, using heavy machinery, and the vulnerability of soils to erosion and degradation make this management potentially very agresive to soil, and therefore to the ecosystem. Very little research has been done to study how this treatment could affect soil health. In this research we show 2 years of monitoring of some soil properties in an area affected by a forest fire, where some months later this treatment was applied. The study area is located in 'Sierra de Mariola Natural Park' in Alcoi, Alicante (E Spain). A big forest fire (>500 has) occurred in July 2012. The forest is composed mainly of Pinus halepensis trees with an understory of typical Mediterranean shrubs species such as Quercus coccifera, Rosmarinus officinalis, Thymus vulgaris, Brachypodium retusum, etc. Soil is classified as a Typic Xerorthent (Soil Survey Staff, 2014) developed over marls. In February 2013, salvage logging (SL) treatment consisting in a complete extraction of the burned wood using heavy machinery was applied in a part of the affected forest. Plots for monitoring this effect were installed in this area and in a similar nearby area where no treatment was done, and then used as control (C) for comparison. Soil samplings were done immediately after treatment and every 6 months. Some soil properties were analysed, including soil organic matter (SOM) content, basal soil respiration (BSR), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), bulk density (BD), soil water repellency (SWR), aggregate stability (AS), field capacity, nitrogen, etc. After two years of research, results showed significant soil degradation as a consequence of the salvage logging treatment. Most of the soil parameters studied showed differences between control and salvage logging treatments, SOM content in first 2.5 cm of topsoil being less than half in SL plots in comparison with C plots. BSR, MBC and AS were also statistically significant lower in SL plots. BD increased as a consequence of SL treatment. In conclusion, we can affirm that with this type of soil, which is very vulnerable to soil degradation, this treatment has a very negative effect on the ecosystem; this was also reflected in the abundance and diversity of plant species. Acknowledgements: to the 'Ministerio de Economía and Competitividad' of Spanish Government for finance the POSTFIRE project (CGL2013- 47862-C2-1-R), Spanish Soil Science Society, FUEGORED, Alcoi council, ACIF Alcoi, and Sierra de Mariola Natural Park for their support.

  9. Discussions on Some Educational Issues II. Research Report 54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansanen, Pertti, Ed.

    This international research report consists of five papers discussing five different topics in education. "Views on the Implementation of the Curriculum--Experiences of the Finnish Practice" (P. Kansanen) analyzes research results regarding the national curriculum for the Finnish comprehensive school system and compares them with a similar system…

  10. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the piedmont. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 16 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Piedmont. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,753 trees sampled in the Piedmont and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  11. Contingent valuation study of the value of reducing fire hazards to old-growth forests in the Pacific northwest. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, J.B.; Gonzalez-Caban, A.; Gregory, R.

    1996-07-01

    A contingent valuation methodology was applied to old-growth forests and critical habitat units for the Northern Spotted Owl in Oregon to esimate the economic value to the public in knowing that rare and unique ecosystems will be protected from fire for current and future generations. Generalizing to the whole state, the total annual willingness-to-pay of Oregon residents ranges from $49.6 to $99 million. In terms of old-growth forests protected from fire, the value is $28 per acre.

  12. Nuclear energy related research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1992-05-01

    The annual Research Program Plan describes publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT) in 1992. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Center for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities, and industry also contribute to many projects.

  13. Self-repair of speech by four-year-old Finnish children.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Tuuli; Laakso, Minna

    2009-09-01

    ABSTRACTThe aim of this study was to examine what four-year-old children repair in their speech. For this purpose, conversational self-repairs (N=316) made by two typically developing Finnish-speaking children (aged 4 ; 8 and 4 ; 11) were examined. The data comprised eight hours of natural interactions videotaped at the children's homes. The tapes were analyzed using conversation analysis. The children made phonological, morphological, syntactic, lexical and non-linguistic self-repairs, and also inserted additional material into their utterances. Finnish-speaking children made more syntactic and fewer morphological self-repairs than the previous research on English-speaking children suggests. Furthermore, most self-repairs were found in talk during pretend play. In designing and engaging in such play, the children skilfully used self-repair to match their talk to meet the requirements of different interactive activities and co-participants. Finally, contextual analysis of children's self-repairs showed that these were also socially motivated, and not just related to slips or errors in speech. PMID:19079829

  14. A Forest Science Effective Research Supervision in the Faculty of Forestry, Universiti Putra Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jusoff, Kamaruzaman; Silikon, Lebuh

    2008-01-01

    At least historically, undergraduate research supervision has predominantly been seen as part of the basic research function of academic staff. In many fields of study, success in research requires not only sophisticated experimental and analytical skills, but good mentoring and managerial skills as well. This paper presents an observational case…

  15. Participatory Action Research and Environmental Learning: Implications for Resilient Forests and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Heidi L.; Belsky, Jill M.

    2010-01-01

    How can a participatory approach to research promote environmental learning and enhance social-ecological systems resilience? Participatory action research (PAR) is an approach to research that its' supporters claim can foster new knowledge, learning, and action to support positive social and environmental change through reorienting the standard…

  16. Investigating the spatial expression of millennial-scale Holocene climate changes: a multi-proxy lake sediment approach, Finnish Lapland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fower, D.; Wilson, G. P.; Pepin, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has identified global Holocene climate instability. Oscillations at c. 2500 year intervals, identified in ocean and ice core records, are thought to be driven by solar variation. The North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC), a regulator of climate, oscillates with quasi-periodicities of c. 1500 years, the cause and spatial expression of which is uncertain. This project investigates how these subtle oscillations influenced the climate of northern Scandinavia through high-resolution, multi-proxy analysis (diatoms, isotope geochemistry, organic content, particle size, biogenic silica) of a lacustrine sediment sequence in Northern Finland. The resulting high-resolution, multi-proxy climate record clarifies the role of the THC in driving terrestrial climate change in this region. A 1.99m sediment core was extracted from Sirrajärvi, Northern Finnish Lapland in March 2012. Lake Sirrajävri (69.761619oN, 26.892815oE) is located 208 m.a.s.l. and lies at the boreal forest-alpine tundra ecotone. It is surrounded by low alpine heaths and isolated stands of birch (Betula pubescens spp. tortuosa). The lake is situated within a nature reserve, and <4km to Kevo subarctic research station, which houses a meteorological station with >50 yrs. of observations. The lake, which is 0.182 km2 in area and 11.2m deep at the centre, is ice covered between Sept. and May. The duration of lake ice cover is the main influencing factor on lake physio- chemistry and thus diatom ecology. The lake is hydrologically open and ?18O analysis of its waters (-11.2‰) predominantly reflects the mean annual weighted isotopic composition of precipitation. The core has been dated at 11160 yrs BP at 195cm and 2810 yrs BP at 69cm. In addition, sediment was collected from 30 lakes along a north-south transect in Finland in July 2012 to form the basis of a diatom-based transfer function, used to identify the major influencing variable(s) on diatom species assemblages which, in turn, is used in a quantitative reconstruction. In addition, monthly monitoring of Lake Sirrajävri ice cover and diatom population dynamics (ongoing since March 2011) further informs palaeoenvironmental interpretation. The resulting high-resolution, multiproxy (diatom, ?18Odiatom, ?13Corganic, C/N, particle size, organic content) palaeoclimate reconstruction provides a much-needed additional record in an area dominated by a complex relationship between the North Atlantic THC and regional terrestrial climate.

  17. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service 1996 annual report wetlands research related to the Pen Branch restoration effort on the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Kolka, R.K.; Trettin, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service and their collaborators (SRTC, SREL, and several universities) in wetlands monitoring and research on the Savannah River Site. This report describes the rationales, methods, and results (when available) of these studies and summarizes and integrates the available information through 1996.

  18. Does Finnish hospital staff job satisfaction vary across occupational groups?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Job satisfaction of staff is an essential outcome variable in research when describing the work environment of successful hospitals. Numerous studies have evaluated the topic, but few previous studies have assessed the job satisfaction of all staff in hospital settings. It is important to discover if there are any unsatisfied groups of people working in hospitals, the aspects they are unsatisfied with and why. The aim of this study was to evaluate job satisfaction of all staff working at a Finnish university hospital, identify differences in job satisfaction between staff groups, and explore the relationship between their self-evaluated quality of work and job satisfaction. Methods Data were collected from 1424 employees of the hospital using the web-based Kuopio University Job Satisfaction Scale survey instrument in autumn 2010. The research data were analysed by using SPSS 19.0 for Windows. Frequency and percentage distributions, as well as mean values, were used to describe the data. A non-parametric test (Kruskal–Wallis test) was used to determine the significance of differences in scores between different groups of staff members and between quality evaluations. Results The overall job satisfaction of the employees was good. They rated both motivating factors of their work and work welfare as excellent. The areas causing most dissatisfaction were work demands and participation in decision making. Physicians formed the most satisfied group, nurses and maintenance staff were the least satisfied, and office and administrative staff were fairly satisfied. Staff who rated the quality of work in their units as high usually also considered their job satisfaction to be excellent. Conclusions Every staff member has an influence on job satisfaction in her/his unit. A culture of participation should be developed and maintained in the units and the whole hospital to ensure that all staff feel they play important roles in the hospital. A university hospital is a complex, continuously changing work environment. Managers of the hospital should continuously evaluate job satisfaction and quickly react to the results gained. PMID:24088218

  19. Research SummaryForest Research Engaging with rivers: using imaginative and creative approaches as a learning tool

    E-print Network

    and allow expert and lay participants to meet on an `equal footing' to communicate, share perspectives review of literature and projects on participatory river basin planning and other innovative engagement (anthology) and disseminate research findings #12;Research Summary Findings The literature review uncovered

  20. The Forest for the Trees: A Systems Approach to Human Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Gohlke, Julia M.; Portier, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    We explore the relationship between current research directions in human health and environmental and public health policy. Specifically, we suggest there is a link between the continuing emphasis in biomedical research on individualized, therapeutic solutions to human disease and the increased reliance on individual choice in response to environmental and/or public health threats. We suggest that continued research emphasis on these traditional approaches to the exclusion of other approaches will impede the discovery of important breakthroughs in human health research necessary to understand the emerging diseases of today. We recommend redirecting research programs to interdisciplinary and population-focused research that would support a systems approach to fully identifying the environmental factors that contribute to disease burden. Such an approach would be able to address the interactions between the social, ecological, and physical aspects of our environment and explicitly include these in the evaluation and management of health risks from environmental exposures. PMID:17805413

  1. Teachers' experiences of English-language-taught degree programs within health care sector of Finnish polytechnics.

    PubMed

    Pitkajarvi, Marianne; Eriksson, Elina; Kekki, Pertti

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to research teachers' experiences of the English-Language-Taught Degree Programs in the health care sector of Finnish polytechnics. More specifically, the focus was on teachers' experiences of teaching methods and clinical practice. The data were collected from eighteen teachers in six polytechnics through focus group interviews. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The results suggested that despite the positive interaction between students and teachers, choosing appropriate teaching methods provided a challenge for teachers, due to cultural diversity of students as well as to the use of a foreign language in tuition. Due to students' language-related difficulties, clinical practice was found to be the biggest challenge in the educational process. Staffs' attitudes were perceived to be significant for students' clinical experience. Further research using stronger designs is needed. PMID:21095046

  2. DETERMINING THE CUMULATIVE EFFECTS OF FORESTED WETLANDS: EPA'S RESEARCH PROGRAM, AND CHOICES FOR RESEARCH AND MONITORING DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cumulative impacts component of EPA's wetlands research arises from a concern - that many individual permit applications for wetland alteration involve seemingly minimal change, yet collectively their impact may be significant. umerous studies have documented the potential be...

  3. A wood and bark fuel economics computer program (FEP). Forest service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Harpole, G.B.; Ince, P.J.; Tschernitz, J.L.; Bilek, E.

    1982-09-01

    Forest products harvesting and manufacturing processes are expected to provide large and continuing supplies of wood and bark residues. At the same time, the demand for wood residue-type materials for production of wood-fiber based products as well as wood and bark fuels is expected to create competing utilization alternatives. Primary objectives of the fuel economics computer program (FEP) presented here are: (1) to provide a means for assessing the relative energy values of fossil fuels and wood/bark fuels, and (2) to provide pre-engineering assessments of the potential investment that may be justified by benefits gained through modification of systems to burn wood/bark fuels. The FEP computer program utilizes readily available fuel and economics information, standard combustion equations, and discounted cash flow analytic techniques. Because the FEP program is designed for preliminary assessments of wood/bark fuel use opportunities it is suggested that more advanced engineering and financial analytic methods be used for further evaluation whenever favorable venture likelihoods are indicated by the FEP program.

  4. Research observation: Hydrolyzable and condensed tannins in plants of northwest Spain forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, M. P.; Karchesy, J.; Starkey, E.E.

    2003-01-01

    Tannins are secondary metabolites that may influence feeding by mammals on plants. We analyzed hydrolyzable and condensed tannins in 30 plant species consumed by livestock and deer, as a preliminary attempt to study their possible implications on browsing and grazing in forest ecosystems. Heathers (Ericaceae) and plants of the Rose (Rosaceae) family had tannins, while forbs, grasses and shrubs other than the heathers did not show astringency properties. We found the highest tannin content of all the species in Rubus sp., with the highest value around 180 mg TAE/g dry weight in spring. Potentilla erecta, Alnus glutinosa and Quercus robur were next with 57 to 44 mg TAE/g dw. Total tannins in heathers ranged from 22 to 36 mg TAE/g dw. Levels of condensed tannins were higher than hydrolyzable for most of the species. Only Betula alba, Calluna vulgaris, Pteridium aquilinum and Vaccinium myrtillus had 100% hydrolyzable tannins. Tannin content of the species changed seasonally with highest values during the growing season, corresponding to late winter or early spring, depending on the species.

  5. Seedfall, regeneration, and seedling development in group-selection openings. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, P.M.; Abbott, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    Forty-eight openings of 30, 60, and 90 feet in diameter were created in previously unmanaged mixed conifer-hardwood stands on a high-quality site in northern California in 1963. They were an attempt to convert an essentially even-aged forest to an uneven-aged arrangement and comprised the initial cut in the group-selection system. Five conifer and three hardwoods produced 36 seed crops that ranged from very light to heavy during the 10-year study period (1964-1973). Sound seed for four conifer species combined (not sugar pine) for 10 years amounted to the equivalent of more than 302,900 seeds per acre and, in general, did not differ significantly among opening sizes. Shade and roots from bordering trees were major influences on seedling survival and development in the openings. Density of established conifer and hardwood seedlings (at least 4 years old) ranged from 12 per acre for incense-cedar in 90-foot openings to about 9,600 ponderosa pines per acre in 60-foot openings after 10 years, and did not differ significantly among opening sizes. Conifer seedling heights ranged from 0.8 to 1.7 feet after 9 years. Average height of ponderosa pines and hardwoods differed significantly between the largest and smallest opening size with height being best in the largest. Normally multi-stemmed and wide-crowned shrubs were conspicuous by their single spindly stems.

  6. Pathfinding in the Research Forest: The Pearl Harvesting Method for Effective Information Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandieson, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of empirical research has become important for everyone involved in education and special education. Policy, practice, and informed reporting rely on locating and understanding unfiltered, original source material. Although access to vast amounts of research has been greatly facilitated by online databases, such as ERIC and PsychInfo,…

  7. Perceptions about Forest Schools: Encouraging and Promoting Archimedes Forest Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawaz, Haq; Blackwell, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find out parents' and children's perception of outdoor learning programmes with specific reference to Archimedes Forest Schools, known as Forest Schools. A review of existing research showed that there had been no rigorous evaluation of perception of forest schools. The study was conducted in the UK and mixed…

  8. Current research in air pollution and climate change effects on

    E-print Network

    Hohtola, Esa

    Current research in air pollution and climate change effects on northern terrestrial ecosystems support of: FEDERATION OF FINNISH LEARNED SOCIETIES FINNISH AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION SOCIETY #12; 3 of individual air pollutants or climate change factors on invidual species, to those at the global scale

  9. PRE-PRESS MANUSCRIPT. CITE AS: Loso, M. G., 1998: Productivity, population structure, and subsistence use of a white spruce forest in the Kennicott Valley, Alaska. Mountain Research and Development, 18: 285-308.

    E-print Network

    Loso, Michael G.

    , and subsistence use of a white spruce forest in the Kennicott Valley, Alaska. Mountain Research and Development, 18: 285-308. PRODUCTIVITY, POPULATION STRUCTURE, AND SUBSISTENCE USE OF A WHITE SPRUCE FOREST IN THE KENNICOTT VALLEY, ALASKA MICHAEL G. LOSO ABSTRACT The dynamics of white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss

  10. Children's Everyday Lives Shadowed by Stalking: Post separation Stalking Narratives of Finnish Children and Women.

    PubMed

    Nikupeteri, Anna; Laitinen, Merja

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study discusses post separation stalking and its implications in children's everyday lives. Based on narratives of 13 Finnish children and 20 women, the research fills a gap in the knowledge regarding the psychosocial, emotional, and physical impacts of stalking on children when their mothers are stalked by a former partner. It identifies four forms of impact: (a) an atmosphere of fear and feelings of insecurity; (b) disguised acts of stalking and the father's performance of care, love, and longing; (c) exploitation of children in stalking; and (d) physical abuse, acts of violence, and threats of death. The findings indicate that stalking severely constrains children's everyday lives and strengthens, yet often distorts, the mother-child bond. The study concludes that in cases where mothers are stalked, professionals in the social and health services, law enforcement, and criminal justice should view the children, too, as victims and construct supportive social relationships for women and children facing threatening life situations. PMID:26299800

  11. Internet use and addiction among Finnish adolescents (15-19 years).

    PubMed

    Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Puhakka, Helena; Meriläinen, Matti

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates Internet use among Finnish adolescents (n = 475) combining qualitative and quantitative research. Internet use was evaluated using the Internet Addiction Test (Young, 1998a, 1998b). The data was divided into three parts according to the test scores: normal users (14.3%), mild over-users (61.5%), and moderate or serious over-users (24.2%). The most common reason for use was having fun. While half the students reported disadvantages associated with their use, further qualitative analysis revealed that students with serious overuse did not report any harm caused by using the Internet. As disadvantages of using the Internet, students reported that it is time-consuming and causes mental, social, and physical harm and poor school attendance. Four factors of Internet addiction were found, and for two of them, a statistical difference between females and males was found. PMID:24439618

  12. Research on Mathematics and Science Education: From Beliefs to Cognition, from Problem Solving to Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahtee, Maija, Ed.; Bjorkqvist, Ole, Ed.; Pehkonen, Erkki, Ed.; Vatanen, Virpi, Ed.

    This book contains selected research papers presented at seminars held throughout the year 2000 in Finland by members of the Finnish Association for Research in Mathematics and Science Education (FARMSE) and students at the Finnish Graduate School of Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry Education. This volume also contains papers professor Laurence…

  13. Outlook to 2060 for World Forests and Forest Industries

    E-print Network

    of Wisconsin, Madison, WI; Ronald Raunikar, Economist, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA; Jeffrey P, Southern Research Station, Research Triangle Park, NC. April 2012 Southern Research Station 200 W. T. Weaver Blvd. Asheville, NC 28804 www.srs.fs.usda.gov #12;Outlook to 2060 for World Forests and Forest

  14. Analysing Phenological Patterns in Boreal Forests using MODIS Time-Series-Derived and Eddy-Covariance Flux Data 

    E-print Network

    Teo, Xu

    2015-11-26

    and 3rd derivatives (1D, 2D, 3D) of the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI). Results from the study based in the southern Finnish boreal forest of Hyytiälä show that relationships between all satellite...

  15. Performance Dialogs Implemented in a Finnish University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takala, Marjatta; Keskinen, Soili

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses performance dialogs (PDs) in the university context in Finland. These are held annually between employers and employees. The study was carried out to assess the efficacy of this technique. Research methods included an electronic questionnaire over two different years delivered to the whole staff of the Department of Teacher…

  16. Importance of Change Appraisal for Employee Well-being during Organizational Restructuring: Findings from the Finnish Paper Industry’s Extensive Transition

    PubMed Central

    PAHKIN, Krista; NIELSEN, Karina; VÄÄNÄNEN, Ari; MATTILA-HOLAPPA, Pauliina; LEPPÄNEN, Anneli; KOSKINEN, Aki

    2014-01-01

    The global recession has forced the Finnish forest industry to carry out major restructuring activities. Employees have faced different kinds of restructuring, mainly aimed at reducing staff and production. Many studies have shown the negative consequences of restructuring on employee well-being by using negative, ill-health indicators. Our aim is to examine the extent to which change appraisal influences both the negative and positive aspects of work-related well-being among employees who continue working in the organization after the restructuring process. We also examine the role of different actors (top management, immediate supervisor, employees themselves) in how the change is appraised. The study investigated blue-collar employees working in the Finnish forest industry during a period of extensive transition (2008–2009). All six participating factories underwent restructuring between baseline and the follow-up survey (n=369). After adjustment for gender, age and baseline well-being, negative change appraisal increased the risk of experiencing more stress and less work enjoyment. Negative change appraisals thus also damaged the positive, motivational aspects of employee well-being. The results showed the importance of offering employees the opportunity to participate in the planning of changes related to their work as regards positive change appraisal. PMID:24975107

  17. Forest Fire Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucca, Carol; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents a model that integrates high school science with the needs of the local scientific community. Describes how a high school ecology class conducted scientific research in fire ecology that benefited the students and a state park forest ecologist. (MKR)

  18. ResearchOur research spans a wide range of issues, from tackling potentially devastating tree diseases to putting forests in the front

    E-print Network

    developing new ways to help foresters adapt their management to maintain a range of ecosystem services diseases to putting forests in the front line of mitigating climate change; from assessing ecosystem of delivering enhanced ecosystem services. For more details, see www.forestry.gov.uk/fr/motive Assisted

  19. An Evaluation of a Spoken Document Retrieval Baseline System in Finnish Mikko Kurimo and Ville Turunen

    E-print Network

    Kurimo, Mikko

    An Evaluation of a Spoken Document Retrieval Baseline System in Finnish Mikko Kurimo and Ville. The evaluations of the state-of-art spoken doc- ument retrieval (SDR) systems for broadcast news data in English of newsreading in Finnish, we ob- tained a fairly low recognition error rate and average doc- ument retrieval

  20. Associations between Lexicon and Grammar at the End of the Second Year in Finnish Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolt, Suvi; Haataja, Leena; Lapinleimu, Helena; Lehtonen, Liisa

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of grammar in relation to lexical growth was analyzed in a sample of Finnish children (N=181) at 2 ; 0. The Finnish version of the Communicative Development Inventory was used to gather information on both language domains. The onset of grammar occurred in close association with vocabulary growth. The acquisition of the nominal and…

  1. The Negotiation Process toward the New Salary System in the Finnish University Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kekale, Jouni

    2008-01-01

    In 2001 the Finnish government decided that the state sector should develop a new salary system that would take more fully into account the actual outcomes and demands of particular posts. Subsequently, in June 2006, an agreement on a new salary system for the Finnish university sector was reached between the negotiating parties, the employers and…

  2. Relationship between Eating Behavior, Breakfast Consumption, and Obesity among Finnish and Greek Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veltsista, Alexandra; Laitinen, Jaana; Sovio, Ulla; Roma, Eleftheria; Jarvelin, Marjo-Ritta; Bakoula, Chryssa

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between eating-related behaviors, particularly breakfast consumption, and weight status in Finnish and Greek adolescents. Methods: A total of 6,468 16-year-old Finnish adolescents and 2,842 17- and 18-year-old Greek adolescents, based on the latest follow-up of 2 population-based cohorts, were studied.…

  3. Ernst Mach and the Epistemological Ideas Specific for Finnish Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siemsen, Hayo

    2011-01-01

    Where does Finnish science education come from? Where will it go? The following outside view reflects on relations, which Finns consider "normal" (and thus unrecognizable in introspection) in science education. But what is "normal" in Finnish culture cannot be considered "normal" for science education in other cultures, for example in Germany. The…

  4. Health Knowledge Construction and Pedagogical Style in Finnish Health Education Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosonen, Anna-Liisa; Haapala, Irja; Kuurala, Sade; Mielonen, Salla; Hanninen, Osmo; Carvalho, Graca S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to compare the construction of health knowledge in the Finnish national curriculum and recent Finnish health education textbooks, at primary and secondary levels of education. The authors examine the visual and textual content of the textbooks in an attempt to identify their pedagogical style and approach to…

  5. Expressing Communicative Intents in Estonian, Finnish, and Swedish Mother-Adolescent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulviste, Tiia; Mizera, Luule; De Geer, Boel

    2004-01-01

    The present article focused on two types of communicative intent (directing behaviour vs. eliciting talk) expressed by mothers and teenagers during everyday family interactions in Estonian, Finnish, and Swedish mono- and bicultural families. Three monocultural groups consisted of 17 Estonian, 19 Swedish, and 18 Finnish families living in their…

  6. Significant Trends in the Development of Finnish Teacher Education Programs (1860-2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uusiautti, Satu; Maatta, Kaarina

    2013-01-01

    The roots of teacher training in Finland extend to the 1860s. The evolution of teacher training was closely connected to the history of elementary education and changes in educational policy and the Finnish society. Recently, the Finnish educational system and its teacher education programs have fared extremely well in international comparisons.…

  7. Associations between Beliefs about Medicines and Medicines Education: A Survey among Finnish Comprehensive School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siitonen, Piia; Vainio, Kirsti; Keinonen, Tuula; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Hämeen-Anttila, Katri

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the association between teachers' beliefs about medicines and teaching about illnesses and medicines-related topics by Finnish comprehensive school teachers. Design: A nationwide postal survey. Setting: Finnish primary and lower secondary school teachers. Method: Data were collected using a nationwide postal survey from a…

  8. Discipline, Availability of Electronic Resources and the Use of Finnish National Electronic Library-- FinELib

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Törmä, Sanna; Vakkari, Pertti

    2004-01-01

    This study elaborated relations between digital library use by university faculty, users' discipline and the availability of key resources in the Finnish National Electronic Library (FinELib), Finnish national digital library, by using nationwide representative survey data. The results show that the perceived availability of key electronic…

  9. Finnish Physical Education Teachers' Self-Reported Use and Perceptions of Mosston and Ashworth's Teaching Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaakkola, Timo; Watt, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to analyze teaching styles used in Finnish physical education. Another aim was to investigate the relationships between background characteristics of teachers and use of teaching styles. The participants of the study were 294 (185 females and 109 males) Finnish physical education teachers. The teachers responded…

  10. Politics of Externalization in Reflexive Times: Reinventing Japanese Education Reform Discourses through "Finnish PISA Success"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takayama, Keita

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on a critical theoretical paradigm and critically engaging with the externalization thesis that Gita Steiner-Khamsi and Jurgen Schriewer have developed, this article examines the politics of "Finnish education" in the ongoing Japanese education reform debate. More specifically, it examines the various discursive uses of "Finnish education…

  11. Argumentative Discussions in Finnish Higher Education: Comparing E-mail and Face-to-Face Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marttunen, Miika; Laurinen, Leena

    A teaching experiment in Finland was designed to clarify ways to teach argumentation in Finnish higher education and how to motivate students to participate in critical content-area discussions. Finnish students traditionally hesitate to criticize each other's opinions or those of the teacher. The experimental teaching method gave them the…

  12. Portraying Intelligence: Children's Drawings of Intelligent Men and Women in Finnish and Russian Karelia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raty, Hannu; Komulainen, Katri; Paajanen, Tuuli; Markkanen, Mia; Skorokhodova, Nina; Kolesnikov, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    This study sets out to examine Finnish and Russian children's representations of intellectual competence as contextualised in the hierarchies of abilities, age and gender. Finnish and Russian pupils, aged 11-12 years, were asked to draw pictures of an intelligent person and an ordinary person. It was found that gender appearance of intelligent men…

  13. Lumber recovery from Pacific yew logs: An exploratory study. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Loehnertz, S.P.; Lowell, E.C.; Simpson, W.T.; McDonald, K.A.

    1993-08-01

    In the past several years, thousands of Pacific yew trees were stripped of their bark from which the cancer-fighting compound taxol is obtained. Research has determined that the wood from the Pacific yew does not yield enough taxol to supplement the supply from the bark. Thus, the objectives of this study were to assess the quantity and quality of lumber that could be produced from debarked yew logs. A sample of good quality yew logs were chosen, sawn, edged, and graded, and volume and quality of the lumber were determined. Although the yew logs contained drying splits, spiral grain, and internal decay, and often were fluted and knobby, the lumber produced from these logs is considered attractive and suitable for specialty uses.

  14. Nightmares: Risk Factors Among the Finnish General Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Sandman, Nils; Valli, Katja; Kronholm, Erkki; Revonsuo, Antti; Laatikainen, Tiina; Paunio, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify risk factors for experiencing nightmares among the Finnish general adult population. The study aimed to both test whether previously reported correlates of frequent nightmares could be reproduced in a large population sample and to explore previously unreported associations. Design: Two independent cross-sectional population surveys of the National FINRISK Study. Setting: Age- and sex-stratified random samples of the Finnish population in 2007 and 2012. Participants: A total of 13,922 participants (6,515 men and 7,407 women) aged 25–74 y. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and results: Nightmare frequency as well as several items related to socioeconomic status, sleep, mental well-being, life satisfaction, alcohol use, medication, and physical well-being were recorded with a questionnaire. In multinomial logistic regression analysis, a depression-related negative attitude toward the self (odds ratio [OR] 1.32 per 1-point increase), insomnia (OR 6.90), and exhaustion and fatigue (OR 6.86) were the strongest risk factors for experiencing frequent nightmares (P < 0.001 for all). Sex, age, a self-reported impaired ability to work, low life satisfaction, the use of antidepressants or hypnotics, and frequent heavy use of alcohol were also strongly associated with frequent nightmares (P < 0.001 for all). Conclusions: Symptoms of depression and insomnia were the strongest predictors of frequent nightmares in this dataset. Additionally, a wide variety of factors related to psychological and physical well-being were associated with nightmare frequency with modest effect sizes. Hence, nightmare frequency appears to have a strong connection with sleep and mood problems, but is also associated with a variety of measures of psychological and physical well-being. Citation: Sandman N, Valli K, Kronholm E, Revonsuo A, Laatikainen T, Paunio T. Nightmares: risk factors among the finnish general adult population. SLEEP 2015;38(4):507–514. PMID:25325474

  15. Biomass and nutrient distributions in central Oregon second-growth ponderosa pine ecosystems. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Little, S.N.; Shainsky, L.J.

    1995-03-01

    We investigated the distributioin of biomass and nurtrients in second-growth ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) ecosystems in central Oregon. Destructive sampling of aboveground and belowground tree biomass was carried out at six sites in the Deschutes National Forest; three of these sites also were intensively sampled for biomass and nutrient concentrations of the soil, forest floor, residue, and shrub components. Tree biomass equations were developed that related component biomass to diameter at breast height and total tree height.

  16. Content of lipids in finnish peat mires

    SciTech Connect

    Fagernaes, L.; Ekman, R.

    1985-01-01

    Peat is a potential raw material for chemical products. Peat extracts, bitumens, obtained from peat with neutral organic solvents, and, in particular, their wax fractions have been of interest with regard to their substituting for other natural waxes. Yields and characteristics of peat extracts have been studied by numerous researchers and acid and saponification values, molecular weights and elements analyses have been determined since the 1930s. New analytical methods have recently been introduced and made it possible to determine the amount and detailed composition of the lipid components of peat extracts by capillary gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry. The aim of this study was to determine the yield and lipid composition of extracts from peat samples collected from different mires in Finland.

  17. A risk analysis of winter navigation in Finnish sea areas.

    PubMed

    Valdez Banda, Osiris A; Goerlandt, Floris; Montewka, Jakub; Kujala, Pentti

    2015-06-01

    Winter navigation is a complex but common operation in north-European sea areas. In Finnish waters, the smooth flow of maritime traffic and safety of vessel navigation during the winter period are managed through the Finnish-Swedish winter navigation system (FSWNS). This article focuses on accident risks in winter navigation operations, beginning with a brief outline of the FSWNS. The study analyses a hazard identification model of winter navigation and reviews accident data extracted from four winter periods. These are adopted as a basis for visualizing the risks in winter navigation operations. The results reveal that experts consider ship independent navigation in ice conditions the most complex navigational operation, which is confirmed by accident data analysis showing that the operation constitutes the type of navigation with the highest number of accidents reported. The severity of the accidents during winter navigation is mainly categorized as less serious. Collision is the most typical accident in ice navigation and general cargo the type of vessel most frequently involved in these accidents. Consolidated ice, ice ridges and ice thickness between 15 and 40cm represent the most common ice conditions in which accidents occur. Thus, the analysis presented in this article establishes the key elements for identifying the operation types which would benefit most from further safety engineering and safety or risk management development. PMID:25819212

  18. Russia: Forest policy during transition

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Russia is a recognized leader in forest conservation, research, and development. This book analyzes the country`s forest sector and the severe management problems that threaten its socioeconomic stability and environmental integrity. It outlines the significance of Russia`s forest resources, review the sector`s performance, identifies the key challenges, proposal and agenda for forest sector reform, and assesses the need for assistance from the international community. The book`s main focus is on Siberia and the Far East. Tables, boxes, and figures show various factors that contribute to and are affected by Russia`s environmental problems and the expected reforms in the forest sector.

  19. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. The role of tropical forests on the world carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.; Lugo, A. E.; Liegel, B.

    1980-08-01

    Tropical forests constitute about half of the world's forest and are characterized by rapid rates of organic matter turnover and high storages of organic matter. Tropical forests are considered to be one of the most significant terrestrial elements in the equation that balances the carbon cycle of the world. As discussed in the paper by Tosi, tropical and subtropical latitudes are more complex in terms of climate and vegetation composition than temperate and boreal latitudes. The implications of the complexity of the tropics and the disregard of this complexity by many scientists is made evident in the paper by Brown and Lugo which shows that biomass estimates for tropical ecosystems have been overestimated by at least 100%. The paper by Brown shows that that rates of succession in the tropics are extremely rapid in terms of the ability of moist and wet forests to accumulate organic matter. Yet, in arid tropical Life Zones succession is slow. This leads to the idea that the question of whether tropical forests are sinks or sources of carbon must be analyzed in relation to Life Zones and to intensities of human activity in these Zones. The paper by Lugo presents conceptual models to illustrate this point and the paper by Tosi shows how land uses in the tropics also correspond to Life Zone characteristics. The ultimate significance of land use to the question of the carbon balance in a large region is addressed in the paper by Detwiler and Hall.

  20. Ernst Mach and the Epistemological Ideas Specific for Finnish Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemsen, Hayo

    2011-03-01

    Where does Finnish science education come from? Where will it go? The following outside view reflects on relations, which Finns consider "normal" (and thus unrecognizable in introspection) in science education. But what is "normal" in Finnish culture cannot be considered "normal" for science education in other cultures, for example in Germany. The following article will trace the central ideas, which had a larger influence in the development of this difference. The question is, if and why the Finnish uniqueness in the philosophy of science education is empirically important. This puts Finnish science education into the perspective of a more general epistemological debate around Ernst Mach's Erkenntnistheorie (a German term similar to the meaning of history and philosophy of science, though more general; literally translated "cognition/knowledge theory"). From this perspective, an outlook will be given on open questions within the epistemology of Finnish science education. Following such questions could lead to the adaptation of the "successful" ideas in Finnish science education (indicated by empirical studies, such as the OECD PISA study) as well as the further development of the central ideas of Finnish science education.

  1. Forest pathology in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Native Hawaiian forests are characterised by a high degree of endemism, including pathogens as well as their hosts. With the exceptions of koa (Acacia koa Gray), possibly maile (Alyxia oliviformis Gaud.), and, in the past, sandalwood (Santalum spp.), forest species are of little commercial value. On the other hand, these forests are immensely important from a cultural, ecological, and evolutionary standpoint. Forest disease research was lacking during the mid-twentieth century, but increased markedly with the recognition of ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha Gaud.) decline in the 1970s. Because many pathogens are themselves endemic, or are assumed to be, having evolved with their hosts, research emphasis in natural areas is on understanding host-parasite interactions and evolutionary influences, rather than disease control. Aside from management of native forests, attempts at establishing a commercial forest industry have included importation of several species of pine, Araucaria, and Eucalyptus as timber crops, and of numerous ornamentals. Diseases of these species have been introduced with their hosts. The attacking of native species by introduced pathogens is problematic - for example, Armillaria mellea (Vahl ex Fr.) Que??l. on koa and mamane (Sophora chrysophylla (Salisb.) Seem.). Much work remains to be done in both native and commercial aspects of Hawaiian forest pathology.

  2. Forest Service Research Note

    E-print Network

    confusus; Pinus ponderosa; Lindane -y- isomer; residual life; bark beetles; chemical controls; EHC. QXFORD appl1ed with a pressure-type garden-sprayer unt1l the bark was thoroughly wet . 5 Each log section re

  3. Forest Service Research Note

    E-print Network

    -gr9wth rjdwood (Sequoia sempervirens LD. Don Fndl.) stands in northern California were studied stands at medium to lower elevations. RETRIEVAL TERMS: Sequoia semper- virens; seed tree selection redwoods. OXFORD: 174.7 Sequoia sempervirens --232.311:174.7 Sequoia sempervi r ens --181.523/ 5. Cone

  4. Forest Service Research Note

    E-print Network

    , but should also be easily installed and removed for storage and mainte- nance. Lightweight aluminum mount for strong winds and dry adiabatic conditions . The power law equation is 1 - v2o f20) n--= lhvh in which V20

  5. Forest Research Coporate Plan

    E-print Network

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Science strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Communication, knowledge transfer and innovation

  6. Temperate Evergreen Forest, Temperate Deciduous Forest, Boreal Forest

    E-print Network

    Richerson, Peter J.

    Temperate Evergreen Forest, Temperate Deciduous Forest, Boreal Forest Lectures 11 & 12 #12;Distribution of Temperate Evergreen Forest (5), Temperate Deciduous Forest (6), and Boreal Forest (8) #12;A. Lines on maps! #12;In the Temperate Evergreen Forest and in the warmer parts of the Temperate Deciduous

  7. Kelp Forest

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Kelp forests are often called the rainforest of the sea. They support wide varieties of marine life. Sea otters are both a sentinal and a keystone species for the health of kelp forests. Without sea otters, there is a shift in the ecosystem that can severly damage the kelp forests. USGS scientists s...

  8. Improving Biogenic Emission Estimates of MEGAN v2.1 Using Local Measurement Data : A case study over Taehwa research forest in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Woo, J.; Sunwoo, Y.; Kim, H.; An, S.; Choi, K.; Kim, S.

    2013-12-01

    South Korea is quite vegetation rich country which 64% forests and 20% cropland area. Massive NOx emissions from megacities, therefore, are easily combined with BVOCs emitted from the forest and cropland, then produce high ozone concentration. BVOCs emissions have been estimated using well-known emission models, such as BEIS or MEGAN which were developed using non-Korean emission factors. In this study, we ran MEGAN(Model of Emission of Gases and Aerosol from Nature) v2.1 model to estimate BVOCs emissions in South Korea. The MODIS Land Cover and LAI (Leaf Area Index) products over Korea were used to run the MEGAN model for June 2012. Isoprene and Monoterpenes emissions from the model were inter-compared against the enclosure chamber measurements from Taehwa research forest in South Korea, during June 11 and 12, 2012. For estimating emission fluxes from the enclosed chamber measurement data, LiDAR-based(Light Detection And Ranging) and leaf biomass were used to enhance data credibility. The initial results show that isoprene emissions from the MEGAN model were the emission flux was about three times higher than those from the enclosure chamber measurement, Monoterpenes from the enclosure chamber measurement were up to 3.5 times higher than MEGAN emission fluxes. The differences between two datasets, however, were much smaller during the time of high emissions. More inter-comparison results and the possibilities of improving the MEGAN modeling performance using local measurement data over Korea will be presented and discussed.

  9. Future Forests Program Plan 2013 2016

    E-print Network

    of stakeholders and scientists in mutually benefitting dialogues and collaborative research ­ stakeholder interactive process in shaping the future of forests beyond the program and synthesis of forest futures. Outcomes - scientific value and value to stakeholders

  10. The Finnish disease heritage database (FinDis) update-a database for the genes mutated in the Finnish disease heritage brought to the next-generation sequencing era.

    PubMed

    Polvi, Anne; Linturi, Henna; Varilo, Teppo; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa; Byrne, Myles; Fokkema, Ivo F A C; Almusa, Henrikki; Metzidis, Anthony; Avela, Kristiina; Aula, Pertti; Kestilä, Marjo; Muilu, Juha

    2013-11-01

    The Finnish Disease Heritage Database (FinDis) (http://findis.org) was originally published in 2004 as a centralized information resource for rare monogenic diseases enriched in the Finnish population. The FinDis database originally contained 405 causative variants for 30 diseases. At the time, the FinDis database was a comprehensive collection of data, but since 1994, a large amount of new information has emerged, making the necessity to update the database evident. We collected information and updated the database to contain genes and causative variants for 35 diseases, including six more genes and more than 1,400 additional disease-causing variants. Information for causative variants for each gene is collected under the LOVD 3.0 platform, enabling easy updating. The FinDis portal provides a centralized resource and user interface to link information on each disease and gene with variant data in the LOVD 3.0 platform. The software written to achieve this has been open-sourced and made available on GitHub (http://github.com/findis-db), allowing biomedical institutions in other countries to present their national data in a similar way, and to both contribute to, and benefit from, standardized variation data. The updated FinDis portal provides a unique resource to assist patient diagnosis, research, and the development of new cures. PMID:23904198

  11. Validation Studies of the Finnish Multidimensional Health Assessment Questionnaire (MDHAQ) and Finnish Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

  12. International outreach for promoting open geoscience content in Finnish university libraries - libraries as the advocates of citizen science awareness on emerging open geospatial data repositories in Finnish society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousi, A. M.; Branch, B. D.; Kong, N.; Fosmire, M.

    2013-12-01

    In their Finnish National Spatial Strategy 2010-2015 the Finland's Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry delineated e.g. that spatial data skills should support citizens everyday activities and facilitate decision-making and participation of citizens. Studies also predict that open data, particularly open spatial data, would create, when fully realizing their potential, a 15% increase into the turnovers of Finnish private sector companies. Finnish libraries have a long tradition of serving at the heart of Finnish information society. However, with the emerging possibilities of educating their users on open spatial data a very few initiatives have been made. The National Survey of Finland opened its data in 2012. Finnish technology university libraries, such as Aalto University Library, are open environments for all citizens, and seem suitable of being the first thriving entities in educating citizens on open geospatial data. There are however many obstacles to overcome, such as lack of knowledge about policies, lack of understanding of geospatial data services and insufficient know-how of GIS software among the personnel. This framework examines the benefits derived from an international collaboration between Purdue University Libraries and Aalto University Library to create local strategies in implementing open spatial data education initiatives in Aalto University Library's context. The results of this international collaboration are explicated for the benefit of the field as a whole.

  13. Variability within the 10-Year Pollen Rain of a Seasonal Neotropical Forest and Its Implications for Paleoenvironmental and Phenological Research

    PubMed Central

    Haselhorst, Derek S.; Moreno, J. Enrique; Punyasena, Surangi W.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical paleoecologists use a combination of mud-water interface and modern pollen rain samples (local samples of airborne pollen) to interpret compositional changes within fossil pollen records. Taxonomic similarities between the composition of modern assemblages and fossil samples are the basis of reconstructing paleoclimates and paleoenvironments. Surface sediment samples reflect a time-averaged accumulation of pollen spanning several years or more. Due to experimental constraints, modern pollen rain samples are generally collected over shorter timeframes (1–3 years) and are therefore less likely to capture the full range of natural variability in pollen rain composition and abundance. This potentially biases paleoenvironmental interpretations based on modern pollen rain transfer functions. To determine the degree to which short-term environmental change affects the composition of the aerial pollen flux of Neotropical forests, we sampled ten years of the seasonal pollen rain from Barro Colorado Island, Panama and compared it to climatic and environmental data over the same ten-year span. We establish that the pollen rain effectively captured the strong seasonality and stratification of pollen flow within the forest canopy and that individual taxa had variable sensitivity to seasonal and annual changes in environmental conditions, manifested as changes in pollen productivity. We conclude that modern pollen rain samples capture the reproductive response of moist tropical plants to short-term environmental change, but that consequently, pollen rain-based calibrations need to include longer sampling periods (?7 years) to reflect the full range of natural variability in the pollen output of a forest and simulate the time-averaging present in sediment samples. Our results also demonstrate that over the long-term, pollen traps placed in the forest understory are representative samples of the pollen output of both canopy and understory vegetation. Aerial pollen traps, therefore, also represent an underutilized means of monitoring the pollen productivity and reproductive behavior of moist tropical forests. PMID:23320089

  14. 78 FR 30847 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... Apple, Designated Federal Officer, Forestry Research Advisory Council, USDA Forest Service Research and... INFORMATION CONTACT: Daina Apple, Forest Service Office of the Deputy Chief for Research and Development,...

  15. Methods and practices used in incident analysis in the Finnish nuclear power industry.

    PubMed

    Suksi, Seija

    2004-07-26

    According to the Finnish Nuclear Energy Act it is licensee's responsibility to ensure safe use of nuclear energy. Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is the regulatory body responsible for the state supervision of the safe use of nuclear power in Finland. One essential prerequisite for the safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants is that lessons are learned from the operational experience. It is utility's prime responsibility to assess the operational events and implement appropriate corrective actions. STUK controls licensees' operational experience feedback arrangements and implementation as part of its inspection activities. In addition to this in Finland, the regulatory body performs its own assessment of the operational experience. Review and investigation of operational events is a part of the regulatory oversight of operational safety. Review of operational events is done by STUK basically at three different levels. First step is to perform a general review of all operational events, transients and reactor scram reports, which the licensees submit for information to STUK. The second level activities are related to the clarification of events at site and entering of events' specific data into the event register database of STUK. This is done for events which meet the set criteria for the operator to submit a special report to STUK for approval. Safety significance of operational events is determined using probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) techniques. Risk significance of events and the number of safety significant events are followed by STUK indicators. The final step in operational event assessment performed by STUK is to assign STUK's own investigation team for events deemed to have special importance, especially when the licensee's organisation has not operated as planned. STUK launches its own detail investigation once a year on average. An analysis and evaluation of event investigation methods applied at STUK, and at the two Finnish nuclear power plant operators Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) and Fortum Power and Heat Oy (Fortum) was carried out by the Technical Research Centre (VTT) on request of STUK at the end of 1990s. The study aimed at providing a broad overview and suggestions for improvement of the whole organisational framework to support event investigation practices at the regulatory body and at the utilities. The main objective of the research was to evaluate the adequacy and reliability of event investigation analysis methods and practices in the Finnish nuclear power industry and based on the results to further develop them. The results and suggestions of the research are reviewed in the paper and the corrective actions implemented in event investigation and operating experience procedures both at STUK and at utilities are discussed as well. STUK has developed its own procedure for the risk-informed analysis of nuclear power plant events. The PSA based event analysis method is used to assess the safety significance and importance measures associated with the unavailability of components and systems subject to Technical Specifications. The insights from recently performed PSA based analyses are also briefly discussed in the paper. PMID:15231350

  16. Sound exposure among the Finnish National Opera personnel.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Heli M; Toppila, Esko M; Olkinuora, Pekka S; Kuisma, Kaarina

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine how and when the personnel of the Finnish National Opera are exposed to noise and whether exposure depends on musical selection of repertoire. Additionally, an evaluation of sound exposure level due to individual rehearsals was included. The measurements were done using individual noise dosimeters and fixed-point measurements. From the measurements, annual noise exposure in the Opera was evaluated. The conductors, dancers, and double bass players were exposed to levels below 85 decibels, A-weighted, dB(A), which is the national action level. The choir members were exposed to sound levels of 92 and 94 dB(A). Within the orchestra, the highest sound exposure levels were found among percussionists, 95 dB(A); flute/piccolo players, 95 dB(A); and brass players, 92-94 dB(A). Other sound exposure levels among orchestra members varied from 83 to 89 dB(A). Soloists and rehearsal pianists are likely to be exposed to sound levels exceeding the national action level. From an exposure perspective, the individual rehearsals, 79-100 dB(A), proved to be as important as performances and group rehearsals, 82-99 dB(A), among orchestra musicians and choir singers. The ambient sound level for the lighting crew was 76 +/- 4 dB(A). However, the measured sound levels at the ear varied from 77 to 92 dB(A) due to the communication via headphones that had individual volume control. For the majority of personnel of the Finnish National Opera, sound exposure level exceeded the national action level value of 85 dB(A). Artists exceeded the action level during both individual and group rehearsals, as well as during performances. Hearing protection has been designed for musicians. Education/reinforcement is required to ensure it is worn. PMID:12573963

  17. Architectural Judgements and Their Causes in Finnish and British Architects and Lay People 

    E-print Network

    Willis, Kirsti Kaarina

    2008-06-27

    studies are mixed, but they indicate that architectural knowledge and cultural factors effect architectural judgements. The present study therefore concentrates on two variables: Nationality (British and Finnish) and professionality (architects and lay...

  18. The ash in forest fire affected soils control the soil losses. Part 2. Current and future research challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerdà, Artemi

    2013-04-01

    Ash distribution on soil surface and impacts on soil properties received a great attention in recently (Pereira et al., 2010; Pereira et al., 2013). Ash it is a highly mobile material that can be easily transported wind, especially in severe wildland fires, where organic matter is reduced to dust, due the high temperatures of combustion. In the immediate period after the fire, ash cover rules soil erosion as previous researchers observed (Cerdà, 1998a; 1998b) and have strong influence on soil hydrological properties, such as water retention (Stoof et al. 2011 ) and wettability (Bodi et al., 2011). Ash it is also a valuable source of nutrients important for plant recuperation (Pereira et al., 2011; Pereira et al., 2012), but can act also as a source contamination, since are also rich in heavy metals (Pereira and Ubeda, 2010). Ash has different physical and chemical properties according the temperature of combustion, burned specie and time of exposition (Pereira et al., 2010). Thus this different properties will have different implications on soil properties including erosion that can increase due soil sealing (Onda et al. 2008) or decrease as consequence of raindrop impact reduction (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008). The current knowledge shows that ash has different impacts on soil properties and this depends not only from the type of ash produced, but of the soil properties (Woods and Balfour, 2010). After fire wind and water strong redistribute ash on soil surface, increasing the vulnerability of soil erosion in some areas, and reducing in others. Understand this mobility is fundamental have a better comprehension about the spatial and temporal effects of ash in soil erosion. Have a better knowledge about this mobility is a priority to future research. Other important aspects to have to be assessed in the future are how ash particulates percolate on soil and how ash chemical composition is important to induce soil aggregation and dispersion. How soil micro topography have implications on ash spatial distribution and if soil micro topography changes with time? What the factors that controls it? What it is the impact of ash in vegetation recuperation and the implications of this recover in ash spatial distribution? We need studies with better spatial and temporal resolution, especially in the immediate period after the fire, when the major spatial and temporal changes on ash distribution and impacts occur. Based on high level research conducted by Artemi Cerdà and others, our future research will be focused in these and other aspects in order to have a better knowledge about the impacts of ash on post-fire spatio-temporal erosion. Acknowledgements, Lithuanian Research Council. Project LITFIRE, Fire effects on Lithuanian soils and ecosystems (MIP-48/2011) and the research projects GL2008-02879/BTE and LEDDRA 243857. References Bodí, M., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S., and Cerdà, A. 2011b. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. Cerdà, A. 1998a. Postfire dynamics of erosional processes under mediterranean climatic conditions. Z. Geomorphol., 42 (3) 373-398. Cerdà, A. 1998b. Changes in overland flow and infiltration after a rangeland fire in a Mediterranean scrubland.Hydrological Processes, 12, 1031-1042. Cerdà, A., and Doerr, S.H. 2008. The effect of ash and needle cover on surface runoff and erosion in the immediate post-fire period. Catena, 74, 256-263. Onda, Y., Dietrich W. E., and Booker, F. 2008. Evolution of overland flow after severe forest fire, Point Reyes, California, Catena, 72, 13-20. Pereira, P. Cerdà, A., Úbeda, X., Mataix-Solera, J. Arcenegui, V., Zavala, L. 2013. Modelling the impacts of wildfire on ash thickness in a short-term period, Land Degradation and Development, (In press) Pereira, P., Bodi. M., Úbeda, X., Cerdà, A., Mataix-Solera, J., Balfour, V, Woods, S. 2010. Las cenizas y el ecosistema suelo, In: Cerdà, A. Jordan, A. (eds) Actualización en métodos y técnica

  19. Soil compaction and organic matter affect conifer seedling nonmycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance and diversity. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Amaranthus, M.P.; Page-Dumroese, D.; Harvey, A.; Cazares, E.; Bednar, L.F.

    1996-05-01

    Three levels of organic matter removal (bole only; bole and crowns; and bole, crowns, and forest floor) and three levels of mechanical soil compaction (no compaction, moderate compaction, and severe soil compaction) were studied as they influence Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) and western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) seedlings following outplanting. Moderate and severe soil compaction significantly reduced nonmycorrhizal root tip abundance on both Douglas-fir and western white pine seedlings (p less than or equal to 0.05). Ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in severely compacted areas with bole and crowns and bole, crowns, and forest floor removed. Ectomycorrhizal diversity also was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in all severely compacted areas.

  20. Instar development of the douglas-fir tussock moth in relation to field temperatures. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Beckwith, R.C.; Grimble, D.G.; Weatherby, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    Instar development is recorded for the Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudot-sugata) for two different elevations in the Boise National Forest, Idaho, in 1991. The percentage of the population by instars is associated with accumulated degree-days after eclosion, which can be used to predict the proper timing for spray application. For all practical purposes, areas can be released for spraying when third instars are initially found.

  1. Trials of mixed-conifer plantings for increasing diversity in the lodgepole pine type. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.M.

    1993-03-01

    Greater forest diversity is needed in the lodgepole pine forest cover type--particularly, along and east of the Continental Divide in Montana--if large-scale losses from cyclical bark beetle outbreaks and subsequent wildfires are to be reduced. Three species were compared to lodgepole pine in a test of mixed-species planting in three ecological habitat types of the lodgepole pine type. Differences in seedling survival, condition, and growth were observed among species and among habitat types by the fifth year after planting. The results indicate Englemann spruce and Douglas-fir can be used to attain mixed-species stands by interplanting naturally regenerated lodgepole pine seedling stands. Western larch probably can succeed only when planted in moist Douglas-fir, spruce, or the warmer subalpine fir habitat types east of the Continental Divide. Because of greater frost tolerance, western larch x alpine larch hybrids are promising for increasing forest diversity in some of the colder subalpine fir habitat types.

  2. Water, Energy and Carbon Balance Research: Recovery Trajectories For Oil Sands Reclamation and Disturbed Watersheds in the Western Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, R. M.; Carey, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    The Oil Sand Region (OSR) of North-Central Alberta exists within the sub-humid Boreal Plains (BP) ecozone, with a slight long-term moisture deficit regime. Despite this deficit, the BP is comprised of productive wetland and mixed wood (aspen and conifer dominated) forests. Reclamation activities are now underway at a large number of surface mining operations in the OSR, where target ecosystems are identified, soil prescriptions placed and commercial forest species planted. Some watersheds have been created that now contain wetlands. However, recent work in the BP suggests that over time wetlands supply moisture for the productivity of upland forests. Thus, water use of reclaimed forests is going to be critical in determining the sustainability of these systems and adjacent wetlands, and whether in time, either will achieve some form of equivalent capability that will allow for certification by regulators. A critical component in the success of any reclamation is that sufficient water is available to support target ecosystems through the course of natural climate cycles in the region. Water Use Efficiency (WUE), which links photosynthesis (GEP) with water use (Evapotranspiration (ET)), provides a useful metric to compare ecosystems and evaluate their utilization of resources. In this study, 41 site years of total growing season water and carbon flux data over 8 sites (4 reclamation, 4 regeneration) were evaluated using eddy covariance micrometeorological towers. WUE shows clear discrimination among ecosystem types as aspen stands assimilate more carbon per unit weight of water than conifers. WUEs also change with time as ecosystems become more effective at transpiring water through plant pathways compared with bare-soil evaporation, which allows an assessment of ability to limit water loss without carbon uptake. In addition, clonal rooting systems allow aspen forests to recover quicker after disturbance than reclamation sites in terms of their WUE. For reclamation sites, there is considerable variability in GEP and ET associated with vegetation establishment, with enhanced ET losses over-riding any significant changes in C uptake, suggesting that long-term mine water management must consider ecosystem pathways if down-gradient wetlands and end-pit lakes are to be sustained.

  3. Phenological indicators of forest composition in northern deciduous forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J.

    2007-12-01

    The phenology of deciduous forests in temperate climates is triggered by winter and spring temperatures. While the exact forcing mechanism is still unclear and spatial-temporal models are still in development, the early 20th century Hopkins Law, which estimates leaf emergence from latitude and elevation, still yields roughly accurate predictions. A newly parameterized version of this simple correlation using MODIS satellite phenology suggests that average leaf phenology in New England can be predicted effectively if deciduous-dominated forests are parsed into two communities. Where the Hopkins prediction and satellite phenology indicate discrepancies corresponds closely to the boundary between northern and central hardwood forests. It is suggested that despite the absence of an accurate phenology-climate model, simple average temperature relationships can still be used to explore spatial phenological patterns and detect fundamental forest compositional boundaries. If, in fact, compositional forest boundaries in temperate forests are primarily determined by climatological parameters, this research may further imply that the ability for different forest types to respond phenologically to spring climates plays a key role determining forest composition. The climate-defined boundary zones between forest types may function as a key indicator of climate change on forest function.

  4. World's forests

    SciTech Connect

    Sedjo, R.A.; Clawson, M.

    1982-10-01

    An appropriate rate of deforestation is complicated because forests are associated with many problems involving local economic and social needs, the global need for wood, and the environmental impact on climates and the biological genetic pool. Stable forest land exists in the developed regions of North America, Europe, the USSR, Oceania, and China in the Temperate Zone. Tropical deforestation, however, is estimated at 0.58% per year, with the pressure lowest on virgin forests. While these data omit plantation forests, the level of replacement does not offset the decline. There is some disagreement over the rate and definition of deforestation, but studies showing that the world is in little danger of running out of forests should not discourage tropical areas where forests are declining from making appropriate responses to the problem. 3 references. (DCK)

  5. Unearthing Secrets of the Forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beldin, Sarah I.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2009-01-01

    Forests are a defining feature for large areas of the Pacific northwestern United States from northern California to Alaska. Coniferous temperate rainforests in the western Cascade and coastal mountain ranges are appreciated for their aesthetic value and abundant natural resources. Few people recognize the riches beneath the forest floor; yet, soil is a key ecosystem component that makes each type of forest unique. Soils harbor immense biological diversity and control the release of water and nutrients that support life above ground. Understanding how carbon and nutrients cycle in forests, known as forest biogeochemistry, is crucial for evaluating forest productivity, composition, diversity, and change. At the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, research in the Terrestrial Ecosystems Laboratory focuses on nutrient cycling in five themes: climate change, nutrition and sustainability, fire effects, restoration, and forest-stream linkages. This research is essential to understand the entire forest ecosystem and to use the best science available to make informed policy and management decisions.

  6. Measuring Forest Structure with LiDAR

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) instrument measures the 3-D structure of a ponderosa pine forest stand in Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona, on July 13, 2009. The LiDAR observations support research on remote sensing of forest biomass and carbon sequestration by the USGS Southwe...

  7. The Search for Forest Facts: A History of the Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, 19262000 Chapter 2: 19051925, Forest Service

    E-print Network

    41 The Search for Forest Facts: A History of the Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, 1926­2000 41 Chapter 2: 1905­1925, Forest Service Research in California Before February 1, 1905, the Forest Service--then the Bureau of Forestry--was without executive duties. Instead, it was engaged

  8. Highly stocked coniferous stands on the Olympic Peninsula: chemical composition and implications for harvest strategy. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Little, S.N.; Waddell, D.R.

    1987-10-01

    This report presents an assessment of macronutrients and their distribution within highly stocked, stagnant stands of mixed conifers on the Quilcene Ranger District, Olympic National Forest, northwest Washington. These stands consisted of predominantly three species: western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menzeisii), and western redcedar (Thuja plicata). Preliminary investigation suggests that the living crown contains a small portion of the nutrient capital on the site. Extracting this material from the site during harvest or site preparation should not pose a threat to future production of biomass. Bioassays suggested that no macronutrients were deficient for growth of Douglas-fir seedlings.

  9. Forest biomass as a source of renewable energy in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Tuerker, M.F.; Ayaz, H.; Kaygusuz, K.

    1999-10-01

    In Turkey illegal cutting takes place, which cannot be controlled. Legal cuttings have also been done by several state forest enterprises. As a result, the amount of wood raw material produced by forest enterprises legally and by forest villagers illegally has exceeded the potential capacity of the forest. According to the research related to Macka and other Turkish state forests, the state forests have been decreasing day by day. This is because the amount of wood raw material taken from the forests has exceeded the production potential of the forest. That study concluded that the Macka and other Turkish forests will be exhausted after 64 and 67 years, respectively. This study also examined both establishing and exploiting energy forests near the forest villages and producing fuel briquettes manufactured using the residues of agriculture, forestry, and stock breeding to diminish the demand for illegal fuel wood cutting from the state forests.

  10. Ribbed moraine stratigraphy and formation in southern Finnish Lapland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarala, Pertti

    2006-05-01

    Characteristics of ribbed moraines, the dominating moraine type in southern Finnish Lapland, have been studied in detail. The ridges are composed of several till units, of which the bottommost units consist of mature basal tills and the surficial parts are enriched with local, short-transport rock fragments and boulders in till and at the surface of ridges. As a result of this re-examination a two-step model of the formation process of ribbed moraines is presented. In the first stage, while cold-based conditions prevailed, both the bottommost part of the ice sheet and the frozen, substrate fractured under compressive ice flow. Following glacial transport of fractured blocks and formation of the transverse ridge morphology, erosion between the ridges continued owing to freeze-thaw process under variable pressure conditions. In the areas with a low pre-existing till sheet, the process caused quarrying of the bedrock surface and subsequent deposition of rock fragments and boulders under high pressure on the next ridge. The most suitable conditions for ribbed moraine formation existed during Late Weichselian deglaciation, after the Younger Dryas when the climate warmed very quickly, leading to an imbalance between a warm glacier surface and a cold base. Copyright

  11. Water quality of arctic rivers in Finnish Lapland.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Jorma

    2010-02-01

    The water quality monitoring data of eight rivers situated in the Finnish Lapland above the Arctic Circle were investigated. These rivers are icebound annually for about 200 days. They belong to the International River Basin District founded according to the European Union Water Framework Directive and shared with Norway. They are part of the European river monitoring network that includes some 3,400 river sites. The water quality monitoring datasets available varied between the rivers, the longest comprising the period 1975-2003 and the shortest 1989-2003. For each river, annual medians of eight water quality variables were calculated. In addition, medians and fifth and 95th percentiles were calculated for the whole observation periods. The medians indicated good river water quality in comparison to other national or foreign rivers. However, the river water quality oscillated widely. Some rivers were in practice in pristine state, whereas some showed slight human impacts, e.g., occasional high values of hygienic indicator bacteria. PMID:19225899

  12. Media portrayal of older people as illustrated in Finnish newspapers

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Sanna; Salminen, Leena; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Media portrayals of older people, such as those in newspapers, both inform and reflect public attitudes. By becoming aware of culturally influenced attitudes about older people, and how these attitudes are reflected in the ways older people are viewed, treated, and cared for in society, the healthcare profession can better understand how to provide high-quality care. By applying an ethnographic approach in textual reality, this paper explores how newspaper articles focusing on health portray older people in society, using Finland as an example. The data consist of articles selected from three of the main Finnish daily newspapers during a 3-month period in the spring of 2012. The findings show that, overall, the society regards older people and their care as important. However, there were suggestions of paternalistic attitudes towards older people. Furthermore, the perceptions regarding different groups of older people could lead to the possibility of inequality. The media portrayals of older people worldwide seem to share similarities, although the findings of this study are particularly in accordance with the cultural attributes of the Nordic countries and societies. PMID:25261872

  13. What Lives in Your Belly Button? Study Finds "Rain Forest" of Species1 Thousands of bacteria found in navels. "It's quite beautiful," researcher says.2

    E-print Network

    South Bohemia, University of

    What Lives in Your Belly Button? Study Finds "Rain Forest" of Species1 Thousands of bacteria found. The upshot? Belly buttons, it turns out, are a6 lot like rain forests. The whole thing started about two, they did so in huge numbers. "That makes the belly button a lot like rain forests," Dunn27 said. In any

  14. In: Forest Ecology Research Horizons ISBN: 1-60021-490-8 Editor: Nole C. Verne, pp. 147-166 2007 Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

    E-print Network

    Abrams, Marc David

    in the central Appalachian Mountains of the eastern USA. Forests in this region have undergone profound forest AND VEGETATION IN FREQUENTLY BURNED APPALACHIAN OAK FORESTS Stephen A. Signell1 and Marc D. Abrams 2* 1, located on a military reservation in the Ridge and Valley physiographic region of Pennsylvania

  15. BIOTROPICA *(*): ****** **** 10.1111/j.1744-7429.2007.00337.x Impact of Research Trails on Seedling Dynamics in a Tropical Forest

    E-print Network

    Goldsmith, Greg

    on Seedling Dynamics in a Tropical Forest Liza S. Comita1 Department of Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, survival, and recruitment in a permanent tropical forest plot in Panama. Significant differences were of permanent, long-term study plots in tropical forests (Condit 1995, Rees et al. 2001, Malhi et al. 2002

  16. Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the forest products industry's research and development priorities. The original technology roadmap published by the industry in 1999 and was most recently updated in April 2010.

  17. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation

    E-print Network

    walnut research, and exploring the threat of hybrid Phytopthoras (and how to prevent this). Field trips. The meeting of the Western Forest and Conservation Nursery Association was held at the Red Lion Hotel, Olympia

  18. Impacts of peatland forestation on regional climate conditions in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yao; Markkanen, Tiina; Backman, Leif; Henttonen, Helena M.; Pietikäinen, Joni-Pekka; Laaksonen, Ari

    2014-05-01

    Climate response to anthropogenic land cover change happens more locally and occurs on a shorter time scale than the global warming due to increased GHGs. Over the second half of last Century, peatlands were vastly drained in Finland to stimulate forest growth for timber production. In this study, we investigate the biophysical effects of peatland forestation on near-surface climate conditions in Finland. For this, the regional climate model REMO, developed in Max Plank Institute (currently in Climate Service Center, Germany), provides an effective way. Two sets of 15-year climate simulations were done by REMO, using the historic (1920s; The 1st Finnish National Forest Inventory) and present-day (2000s; the 10th Finnish National Forest Inventory) land cover maps, respectively. The simulated surface air temperature and precipitation were then analyzed. In the most intensive peatland forestation area in Finland, the differences in monthly averaged daily mean surface air temperature show a warming effect around 0.2 to 0.3 K in February and March and reach to 0.5 K in April, whereas a slight cooling effect, less than 0.2 K, is found from May till October. Consequently, the selected snow clearance dates in model gridboxes over that area are advanced 0.5 to 4 days in the mean of 15 years. The monthly averaged precipitation only shows small differences, less than 10 mm/month, in a varied pattern in Finland from April to September. Furthermore, a more detailed analysis was conducted on the peatland forestation area with a 23% decrease in peatland and a 15% increase in forest types. 11 day running means of simulated temperature and energy balance terms, as well as snow depth were averaged over 15 years. Results show a positive feedback induced by peatland forestation between the surface air temperature and snow depth in snow melting period. This is because the warmer temperature caused by lower surface albedo due to more forest in snow cover period leads to a quicker and earlier snow melting. Meanwhile, surface albedo is reduced and consequently surface air temperature is increased. Additionally, the maximum difference from individual gridboxes in this area over 15 years of 11 day running means of daily mean surface air temperature reaches 2 K, which is four times as much as the maximum difference of 15-year regional average of that. This illustrates that the spring warming effect from peatland forestation in Finland is highly heterogeneous spatially and temporally.

  19. Forest Resource Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mrocznyski, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-three processing functions aid in utilizing LANDSAT data for forest resource management. Designed to work primarily with digital data obtained from measurements recorded by multispectral remote sensors mounted on aerospace platforms. communication between processing functions, simplicity of control, and commonality of data files in LARSFRIS enhance usefulness of system as tool for research and development of remote sensing systems.

  20. Pacific Southwest Forest & Range

    E-print Network

    . Rotation of the cups and vanes is detected by means of permanent mag- nets and magnetic reed switches ---.......... J- J·. U.S.O.A. Forest Service Research Note PSW-181 I ' I I ABSTRACT: Heat-resistant anemometers- ment ; anemometers; fire weather data; wind velocity. OXFORD: 431.6--U533.601 - -015. Heat- Resistant

  1. FOREST RESOURCES INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Field Lab Hours: Flexible Office Hours: -By phone/email/Adobe Connect for Plant City instructors -Live and Conservation Gulf Coast Research and Education Center Plant City Education center 1 (Sections: 4A28 and 4G27, Distance Lectures & Labs) Description: Concepts, principles, and applications of forest informatics, remote

  2. An Artful Forest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Possick, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors' kindergarteners and a fellow first-grade class turned their hallway into a forest! Not just any mural, this culmination of a month-long project was based on observing, questioning, taking field trips, conducting library research (including the internet) and asking experts. The students developed skills in forming…

  3. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Gulf and Atlantic coastal plain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 14 species and 9 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plain. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,728 trees sampled in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plain and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  4. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Appalachian area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 20 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Appalachian Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,670 trees sampled in the Appalachian Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  5. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Arkansas area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 9 species and 9 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Arkansas Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 1,417 trees sampled in the Arkansas Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination woth total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  6. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the upper coastal plain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 11 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Upper Coastal Plain. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 521 trees sampled in the Upper Coastal Plain and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  7. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Delta area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 13 species and 6 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Delta Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 990 trees sampled in the Delta Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on diameter outside of the bark (d.o.b.) in combination with height with to a 9-inch d.o.b. top.

  8. Development of a mixed shrub-tanoak-douglas-fir community in a treated and untreated condition. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.

    1996-08-01

    On a medium site in northern California, a tanoak-mixed shrub community was given several treatments (manual release two and three times, a combination chainsaw and cut surface herbicide treatment, two foliar herbicides, and a tank mix of the two herbicides) to study its development in both a natural (control) and treated condition. The herbicides were 2,4-D, Garlon 3A, and Garlon 4, each applied two times. Survival of planted Douglas-fir seedlings was recorded for 11 years and growth was quantified for 9 years after the last treatment application. In addition to Douglas-fir, data are presented individually for the two most abundant species (tanoak and snowbrush), for greenleaf manzanita, and for the hardwood tree and shrubs combined. The treatment response data, cost information, and plant community relationships provides the forest land manager with knowledge on how to attain some specific plant communities in the future, and their developmental potentials.

  9. Distribution of biomass and nutrients in lodgepole pine/bitterbrush ecosystems in central Oregon. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Little, S.N.; Shainsky, L.J.

    1992-09-01

    The authors investigated the distribution of biomass and nutrients in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. murryana Dougl.) ecosystems on pumice soils in south-central Oregon. Sixty-three trees were sampled to develop equations for estimating dry weights of tree crowns, boles, bark, and coarse roots from diameter at breast height and height. The concentrations of total carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur were determined for each of these components. Biomass, nutrient concentrations, and nutrient contents of the associated vegetation, forest floor, woody debris, fine roots, and soil horizons also were determined. An example stand illustrates the use of these data for determining the effects of bole versus whole-tree harvesting on nutrient capital in a lodgepole pine ecosystem.

  10. The Equivalents of the Finnish Passive Voice in English. Contrastive Papers: Jyvaskyla Contrastive Studies, 4. Reports from the Department of English, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karttunen, Kimmo

    Both English and Finnish make use of a category called the passive voice. In most cases these passives correspond to each other, but both are subject to restrictions. This paper attempts to determine how English passives overlap with the semantic area covered by the Finnish passive and what the choices are which face a speaker of Finnish in…

  11. Anti-Racist Strategies in Finnish Children's Literature: Physical Appearance and Language as Signifiers of National Belonging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesonen, Jaana

    2013-01-01

    This article examines anti-racist strategies employed in Finnish children's literature. The examples from four stories illustrate that certain physical characteristics and cultural markers can become strong signifiers of nationality, that is Finnishness. The characters in these stories have to cope with experiences of exclusion and loneliness…

  12. Noun and Noun Phrase Stress: A Phonetic Study of English Supplemented with an Error Analysis Using Finnish Speaker-Hearers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, Jussi

    1979-01-01

    Confirms previous observations about the tonal character of English stress. Notes that Finnish listeners relied on duration as the perceptual cue for noun/noun phrase distinction (blackbird/black bird), reflecting the absence of linguistic contrasts based on an active use of the larynx in standard Finnish stress and intonation. (Author/RL)

  13. Are Cross-National Differences in IQ Profiles Stable? A Comparison of Finnish and U.S. WAIS Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roivainen, Eka

    2013-01-01

    To study the concept of national IQ profile, we compared U.S. and Finnish WAIS, WAIS-R, and WAIS III nonverbal and working memory subtest norms. The U.S. standardization samples had consistently higher scores on the Coding and Digit span subtests, while the Finnish samples had higher scores on the Block design subtest. No stable cross-national…

  14. A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words: A Comparison of Pupils' Images of Intelligence in Finnish and Russian Karelia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raty, Hannu; Komulainen, Katri; Skorokhodova, Nina; Kolesnikov, Vadim; Hamalainen, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The study set out to examine Finnish and Russian children's images of intelligence as contextualized in the systems of the school and gender. Finnish and Russian pupils, aged 11-12 years, were asked to draw pictures of an intelligent and an ordinary pupil and a good and an ordinary pupil. A distinctive feature shared by the children in both…

  15. CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes in Finnish forestry-drained peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojanen, Paavo; Minkkinen, Kari; Alm, Jukka; Penttilä, Timo

    2010-05-01

    In countries like Finland, where forestry-drained peatlands sum up to 4.6 million ha, knowledge on their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is eagerly needed for both annual GHG reporting and when considering ways to mitigate the climate change. To get a good picture of variation in GHG fluxes in Finnish forestry-drained peatlands, this study aimed to cover the climatic and soil properties derived variation occurring in Finland. We measured both total (RTOT) and heterotrophic (RHET) soil respiration. Also the other possibly significant GHG:s, CH4 and N2O, were studied at the same study sites to make it possible to evaluate their significance in the GHG balance. We chose the 69 study sites so that the different site types of forestry-drained peatlands were equally represented in all parts of Finland. At each site, we measured RTOT on 5 vegetated plots and RHET on five trenched plots (roots cut, litter layer and ground vegetation removed) every 2-3 weeks in May-October 2007-2008. Annual values were calculated using an Arrhenius type nonlinear regression between R and peat temperature. CH4 and N2O samples were collected at 4 vegetated plot 5-7 times during the study and annual fluxes were interpolated. The dependency of annual CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes on average May-October air temperature (Tas), tree stand stem volume (V), peat bulk density (BD), average May-October water table depth (WTa) and peat CN ratio (CN) was tested with linear and nonlinear regression models to find suitable variables for upscaling fluxes to country level. Both RTOT and RHET depended on several factors. A linear model with Tas, V, BD and WTa as independents explained 64.2% of RTOT and 62.5% of RHET. Information on V, BD (only limitedly) and Tas for upscaling is found in National Forest inventory (NFI) data and weather statistics. CH4 flux depended nonlinearly on WTa. WTa is not routinely measured in NFI, but can fairly well be substituted with V. N2O flux correlated nonlinearly with CN ratio. Information on CN for upscaling is available in a separate study conducted on NFI sites.

  16. MiRNA Profiles in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines of Finnish Prostate Cancer Families

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Daniel; Wahlfors, Tiina; Mattila, Henna; Oja, Hannu; Tammela, Teuvo L. J.; Schleutker, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Background Heritable factors are evidently involved in prostate cancer (PrCa) carcinogenesis, but currently, genetic markers are not routinely used in screening or diagnostics of the disease. More precise information is needed for making treatment decisions to distinguish aggressive cases from indolent disease, for which heritable factors could be a useful tool. The genetic makeup of PrCa has only recently begun to be unravelled through large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The thus far identified Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) explain, however, only a fraction of familial clustering. Moreover, the known risk SNPs are not associated with the clinical outcome of the disease, such as aggressive or metastasised disease, and therefore cannot be used to predict the prognosis. Annotating the SNPs with deep clinical data together with miRNA expression profiles can improve the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of different phenotypes of prostate cancer. Results In this study microRNA (miRNA) profiles were studied as potential biomarkers to predict the disease outcome. The study subjects were from Finnish high risk prostate cancer families. To identify potential biomarkers we combined a novel non-parametrical test with an importance measure provided from a Random Forest classifier. This combination delivered a set of nine miRNAs that was able to separate cases from controls. The detected miRNA expression profiles could predict the development of the disease years before the actual PrCa diagnosis or detect the existence of other cancers in the studied individuals. Furthermore, using an expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) analysis, regulatory SNPs for miRNA miR-483-3p that were also directly associated with PrCa were found. Conclusion Based on our findings, we suggest that blood-based miRNA expression profiling can be used in the diagnosis and maybe even prognosis of the disease. In the future, miRNA profiling could possibly be used in targeted screening, together with Prostate Specific Antigene (PSA) testing, to identify men with an elevated PrCa risk. PMID:26020509

  17. Socialization of Junior Researchers in New Academic Research Environments: Two Case Studies from Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakala, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    The article examines the modes of research training in two Finnish academic research centres, where research is project based, application oriented and externally funded. In particular, the article asks what duties, skills and qualities are considered appropriate for people in different positions (PhD student, post-doctoral researcher,…

  18. Associations between lexicon and grammar at the end of the second year in Finnish children.

    PubMed

    Stolt, Suvi; Haataja, Leena; Lapinleimu, Helena; Lehtonen, Liisa

    2009-09-01

    ABSTRACTThe emergence of grammar in relation to lexical growth was analyzed in a sample of Finnish children (N=181) at 2 ; 0. The Finnish version of the Communicative Development Inventory was used to gather information on both language domains. The onset of grammar occurred in close association with vocabulary growth. The acquisition of the nominal and verbal inflections of Finnish differed when analyzed in relation to the lexicon in which they are used: the strongest growth in the acquisition of case form types occurred when the nominal lexicon size was roughly between 50 and 250 words, whereas verb inflectional types were acquired actively from the beginning of the verb lexicon acquisition. The findings extend the previous findings of the close association between lexicon and grammar (e.g. Bates & Goodman, 1999). The results suggest that different grammatical structures display different degrees and types of lexical dependency. PMID:19000335

  19. Motives for social decision-making strategies among Finnish and Estonian adolescents [corrected].

    PubMed

    Terav, T; Keltikangas-Järvinen, L

    1998-06-01

    Justifications for aggression and withdrawal were compared between Finnish and Estonian adolescents. The former had grown up in a pluralistic Western culture; the latter, in a communist Soviet culture. After receiving a questionnaire with descriptions of 2 everyday social problems, teasing and backbiting, and a list of problem-solving strategies, the participants were asked how they would justify the use of each strategy. The Estonian participants more frequently chose instrumental justifications for aggression, whereas the Finnish participants tended to report that aggressive behavior was "fun." Aggression may be perceived as more deviant in Finland than in Estonia. Among the Finnish participants, withdrawal was motivated by a desire to avoid harm; among the Estonian participants, withdrawal reflected helplessness. The Estonian participants experienced cognitive dissonance between official education and the informal information learned in families; there was also dissonance between inner speech (banned history) and the official history taught in the schools. PMID:9577728

  20. Paternal and maternal DNA lineages reveal a bottleneck in the founding of the Finnish population.

    PubMed Central

    Sajantila, A; Salem, A H; Savolainen, P; Bauer, K; Gierig, C; Pääbo, S

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotypes in several European populations reveals an almost monomorphic pattern in the Finns, whereas Y-chromosomal diversity is significantly higher in other populations. Furthermore, analyses of nucleotide positions in the mitochondrial control region that evolve slowly show a decrease in genetic diversity in Finns. Thus, relatively few men and women have contributed the genetic lineages that today survive in the Finnish population. This is likely to have caused the so-called "Finnish disease heritage"-i.e., the occurrence of several genetic diseases in the Finnish population that are rare elsewhere. A preliminary analysis of the mitochondrial mutations that have accumulated subsequent to the bottleneck suggests that it occurred about 4000 years ago, presumably when populations using agriculture and animal husbandry arrived in Finland. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8876258

  1. Research on: A. Reclamation of borrow pits and denuded lands; B. Biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae of forest trees

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, D.H.

    1990-12-01

    This report furnishes a list of compiled and ongoing studies and a list of publications which resulted from the research accomplished by Institute scientists and other collaborators. The research accomplished can be placed in four categories: I. Research on borrow pit rehabilitation with 12 publications; II. Research on artificial regeneration of southern pines with 34 publications; III. Research on artificial regeneration of eastern hardwoods with 16 publications; and IV. Cooperative research with the University of Georgia on biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae with 5 publications. Major accomplishments of this research are: 1. Procedures to successfully reclaim borrow pits with sludge, subsoiling and seedlings with specific mycorrhizae. 2. Protocols to successfully artificially regenerate southern pines (particularly ling leaf pine) and certain eastern hardwoods. 3. Basic understanding of the biochemistry of mycorrhizae and the discovery of a new pathway for sucrose utilization in plants. 67 refs.

  2. Developing the CLAMS Simulation Units from Topography, Vegetation, and Ownership Coastal Landscape Analysis and Modeling Study; College of Forestry, Oregon State University, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Corvallis, OR; Oregon De

    E-print Network

    Analysis and Modeling Study; College of Forestry, Oregon State University, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Corvallis, OR; Oregon Department of Forestry Pete Bettinger, Department Resources, Oregon State University (Jonathan.Brooks@orst.edu) Andrew Herstrom, Oregon Department of Forestry

  3. Risk factors for skin cancer among Finnish airline cabin crew.

    PubMed

    Kojo, Katja; Helminen, Mika; Pukkala, Eero; Auvinen, Anssi

    2013-07-01

    Increased incidence of skin cancers among airline cabin crew has been reported in several studies. We evaluated whether the difference in risk factor prevalence between Finnish airline cabin crew and the general population could explain the increased incidence of skin cancers among cabin crew, and the possible contribution of estimated occupational cosmic radiation exposure. A self-administered questionnaire survey on occupational, host, and ultraviolet radiation exposure factors was conducted among female cabin crew members and females presenting the general population. The impact of occupational cosmic radiation dose was estimated in a separate nested case-control analysis among the participating cabin crew (with 9 melanoma and 35 basal cell carcinoma cases). No considerable difference in the prevalence of risk factors of skin cancer was found between the cabin crew (N = 702) and the general population subjects (N = 1007) participating the study. The mean risk score based on all the conventional skin cancer risk factors was 1.43 for cabin crew and 1.44 for general population (P = 0.24). Among the cabin crew, the estimated cumulative cosmic radiation dose was not related to the increased skin cancer risk [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57-1.00]. The highest plausible risk of skin cancer for estimated cosmic radiation dose was estimated as 9% per 10 mSv. The skin cancer cases had higher host characteristics scores than the non-cases among cabin crew (adjusted OR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.01-2.04). Our results indicate no difference between the female cabin crew and the general female population in the prevalence of factors generally associated with incidence of skin cancer. Exposure to cosmic radiation did not explain the excess of skin cancer among the studied cabin crew in this study. PMID:23316078

  4. Characterization of fine fraction mined from two Finnish landfills.

    PubMed

    Mönkäre, Tiina J; Palmroth, Marja R T; Rintala, Jukka A

    2016-01-01

    A fine fraction (FF) was mined from two Finnish municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in Kuopio (1- to 10-year-old, referred as new landfill) and Lohja (24- to 40-year-old, referred as old landfill) in order to characterize FF. In Kuopio the FF (<20mm) was on average 45±7% of the content of landfill and in Lohja 58±11%. Sieving showed that 86.5±5.7% of the FF was smaller than 11.2mm and the fraction resembled soil. The total solids (TS) content was 46-82%, being lower in the bottom layers compared to the middle layers. The organic matter content (measured as volatile solids, VS) and the biochemical methane potential (BMP) of FF were lower in the old landfill (VS/TS 12.8±7.1% and BMP 5.8±3.4m(3)CH4/t TS) than in the new landfill (VS/TS 21.3±4.3% and BMP 14.4±9.9m(3)CH4/t TS), and both were lower compared with fresh MSW. In the Kuopio landfill materials were also mechanically sieved in the full scale plant in two size fraction <30mm (VS/TS 31.1% and 32.9m(3)CH4/t TS) and 30-70mm (VS/TS 50.8% and BMP 78.5m(3)CH4/t TS). The nitrogen (3.5±2.0g/kg TS), phosphorus (<1.0-1.5g/kg TS) and soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) (2.77±1.77kg/t TS) contents were low in all samples. Since FF is major fraction of the content of landfill, the characterization of FF is important to find possible methods for using or disposing FF mined from landfills. PMID:25817722

  5. Gene expression profiles in Finnish twins with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Särkijärvi, Silja; Kuusisto, Hanna; Paalavuo, Raija; Levula, Mari; Airla, Nina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kaprio, Jaakko; Koskenvuo, Markku; Elovaara, Irina

    2006-01-01

    Background Since genetic alterations influencing susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS), the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS), are as yet poorly understood, the purpose of this study was to identify genes responsible for MS by studying monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs discordant for MS. Methods In order to identify genes involved in MS development, the gene expression profiles in blood mononuclear cells obtained from eight MZ twin pairs discordant for MS were analyzed by cDNA microarray technology detecting the expression of 8 300 genes. The twins were collected from the Finnish Twin Cohort Study and both affected subjects and their healthy siblings underwent neurological evaluation and cerebral and spinal magnetic resonance imaging. Gene expressions were confirmed by relative quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Results It appeared that 25 genes were at least two-fold up-regulated and 15 genes down-regulated in 25% (2/8) of twins with MS when compared to their healthy siblings. Moreover, 6/25 genes were up-regulated in 40% of MS twins and one gene, interferon alpha-inducible protein (clone IFI-6-16) (G1P3), in 50% of them. The six most constantly expressed genes are (1) G1P3, (2) POU domain, class 3, transcription factor 1, (3) myxovirus resistance 2, (4) lysosomal-associated multispanning membrane protein-5, (5) hemoglobin alpha 2 and (6) hemoglobin beta. Conclusion Over two-fold up-regulation of these six genes in almost half of MZ twins with MS suggests their role in MS pathogenesis. Studies using MZ MS twins obtained from genetically homogeneous population offer a unique opportunity to explore the genetic nature of MS. PMID:16504146

  6. Repatriation and Identification of Finnish World War II Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Palo, Jukka U.; Hedman, Minttu; Söderholm, Niklas; Sajantila, Antti

    2007-01-01

    Aim To present a summary of the organization, field search, repatriation, forensic anthropological examination, and DNA analysis for the purpose of identification of Finnish soldiers with unresolved fate in World War II. Methods Field searches were organized, executed, and financed by the Ministry of Education and the Association for Cherishing the Memory of the Dead of the War. Anthropological examination conducted on human remains retrieved in the field searches was used to establish the minimum number of individuals and description of the skeletal diseases, treatment, anomalies, or injuries. DNA tests were performed by extracting DNA from powdered bones and blood samples from relatives. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence comparisons, together with circumstantial evidence, were used to connect the remains to the putative family members. Results At present, the skeletal remains of about a thousand soldiers have been found and repatriated. In forensic anthropological examination, several injuries related to death were documented. For the total of 181 bone samples, mtDNA HVR-1 and HVR-2 sequences were successfully obtained for 167 (92.3%) and 148 (81.8%) of the samples, respectively. Five samples yielded no reliable sequence data. Our data suggests that mtDNA preserves at least for 60 years in the boreal acidic soil. The quality of the obtained mtDNA sequence data varied depending on the sample bone type, with long compact bones (femur, tibia and humerus) having significantly better (90.0%) success rate than other bones (51.2%). Conclusion Although more than 60 years have passed since the World War II, our experience is that resolving the fate of soldiers missing in action is still of uttermost importance for people having lost their relatives in the war. Although cultural and individual differences may exist, our experience presented here gives a good perspective on the importance of individual identification performed by forensic professionals. PMID:17696308

  7. Mathematics Education Research in Finland Yearbook 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupari, Pekka, Ed.

    For the purpose of promoting international cooperation in mathematics, physics, and chemistry teaching research, this first yearbook of the Finnish Association of Mathematics and Science Education Research contains articles of recent research on mathematics teaching. The contents consist of five articles in English, two in German, and one thesis…

  8. Past forest composition, structures and processes How paleoecology can contribute to forest conservation

    E-print Network

    Butler, David R. - Department of Geography, Texas State University

    Review Past forest composition, structures and processes ­ How paleoecology can contribute to forest conservation Matts Lindbladh a, , Shawn Fraver b , Johannes Edvardsson c , Adam Felton a a Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences ­ SLU, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, PO Box 49, 230 53 Alnarp

  9. Antimicrobial activity of different Finnish monofloral honeys against human pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Huttunen, Sanna; Riihinen, Kaisu; Kauhanen, Jussi; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity and phenolic compounds of five Finnish honey products against important human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus were analyzed. Microbroth dilution method and HPLC-DAD were used in antimicrobial testing and phenolic compound determination, respectively. Significant antimicrobial activity (p?Finnish monofloral honeys against streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria. To our knowledge this is also the first report on the antimicrobial effect of honey against S. pneumoniae. PMID:23278378

  10. The Ants of the Arabuko Sokoke Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandau, E.

    2014-12-01

    The core location of my research project was the Arabuko Sokoke Forest. The forest is located along the east coast of Kenya and belongs to the coastal forest zone of eastern Africa. The forest is considered a biodiversity hotspot, having many species being endemic to this habitat. The Arabuko Sokoke Forest is not a rainforest, like the Kakamega Forest in western Kenya, but a tropical dry forest. The objective of my research was to create a general checklist of the ant species collected in teh Arabuko Sokoke Forest in 2009. The general checklist of ant species will be used to document the differences between the three different forest habitat types (Cynometra, Brachystegia and mixed forest) and ant communities found within the forest, as well as the fauna found in those locations. The ants were collected using the leaf litter extraction method and were then mounted and idenified. The results from my research were that out of 73 specimens, there were 13 genera and 24 different species. Four of the 24 species have not been recorded for this forest before and one of the Tetramorium is likely to be a new species. The results also showed that the species diversity on the two transects are almost the same. There was very low overlap between the two transects as well: there were two shared species between the two different forest habitat types. For future work, there are still many undiscovered ant species in the Arabuko Sokoke Forest. In order to get a more complete faunal overview, more samples have to be collected from different parts of the forest. To do this, the canopy ant fauna might offer additional species that were not collected in the leaf litter samples.

  11. Forest Inventory & Analysis Forests Resource Status & Trends

    E-print Network

    Forest Inventory & Analysis Forests Resource Status & Trends Texas has 63 million acres of the commercially-productive forests is located in East Texas. Those commercial forests directly contribute $16 billion and 63,000 jobs to the Texas economy. Forest inventories provide information on the size, status

  12. In the Forests of the Night: An Inquiry into the Relevance of Social Dreaming for Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balogh, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the potential for using dream material and social dreaming in action research. Access to emotional dimensions of experience is increasingly recognised as an issue for action researchers, raising questions about how to enable such inquiry and how material from the imaginative sphere may be brought into socially constituted…

  13. Habitat Effects on the Breeding Performance of Three Forest-Dwelling Hawks

    PubMed Central

    Björklund, Heidi; Valkama, Jari; Tomppo, Erkki; Laaksonen, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Habitat loss causes population declines, but the mechanisms are rarely known. In the European Boreal Zone, loss of old forest due to intensive forestry is suspected to cause declines in forest-dwelling raptors by reducing their breeding performance. We studied the boreal breeding habitat and habitat-associated breeding performance of the northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis), common buzzard (Buteo buteo) and European honey buzzard (Pernis apivorus). We combined long-term Finnish bird-of-prey data with multi-source national forest inventory data at various distances (100–4000 m) around the hawk nests. We found that breeding success of the goshawk was best explained by the habitat within a 2000-m radius around the nests; breeding was more successful with increasing proportions of old spruce forest and water, and decreasing proportions of young thinning forest. None of the habitat variables affected significantly the breeding success of the common buzzard or the honey buzzard, or the brood size of any of the species. The amount of old spruce forest decreased both around goshawk and common buzzard nests and throughout southern Finland in 1992–2010. In contrast, the area of young forest increased in southern Finland but not around hawk nests. We emphasize the importance of studying habitats at several spatial and temporal scales to determine the relevant species-specific scale and to detect environmental changes. Further effort is needed to reconcile the socioeconomic and ecological functions of forests and habitat requirements of old forest specialists. PMID:26422684

  14. Habitat Effects on the Breeding Performance of Three Forest-Dwelling Hawks.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Heidi; Valkama, Jari; Tomppo, Erkki; Laaksonen, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Habitat loss causes population declines, but the mechanisms are rarely known. In the European Boreal Zone, loss of old forest due to intensive forestry is suspected to cause declines in forest-dwelling raptors by reducing their breeding performance. We studied the boreal breeding habitat and habitat-associated breeding performance of the northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis), common buzzard (Buteo buteo) and European honey buzzard (Pernis apivorus). We combined long-term Finnish bird-of-prey data with multi-source national forest inventory data at various distances (100-4000 m) around the hawk nests. We found that breeding success of the goshawk was best explained by the habitat within a 2000-m radius around the nests; breeding was more successful with increasing proportions of old spruce forest and water, and decreasing proportions of young thinning forest. None of the habitat variables affected significantly the breeding success of the common buzzard or the honey buzzard, or the brood size of any of the species. The amount of old spruce forest decreased both around goshawk and common buzzard nests and throughout southern Finland in 1992-2010. In contrast, the area of young forest increased in southern Finland but not around hawk nests. We emphasize the importance of studying habitats at several spatial and temporal scales to determine the relevant species-specific scale and to detect environmental changes. Further effort is needed to reconcile the socioeconomic and ecological functions of forests and habitat requirements of old forest specialists. PMID:26422684

  15. The Research Agency of the Forestry Commission

    E-print Network

    The Research Agency of the Forestry Commission Forest Research Woods and Forests in British Society, Forest Research, Surrey, 97pp. Forest Research is the Agency of the Forestry Commission and is the leading UK organisation engaged in forestry and tree related research. The Agency aims to support

  16. Geography 111: Forest Ecosystems MW 9:15 to 10:45 AM

    E-print Network

    to write a research report on Forests in a Biodiversity Hotspot. The class will be divided into groups History of US Forest Policy US Policy Organizations 9 Biodiversity Hotspots Endangered forest ecosystems

  17. Southern Idaho`s forest land outside national forests, 1991. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Chojnacky, D.C.

    1995-05-01

    The report presents 59 summary tables of forest statistics for land in southern Idaho outside National Forests. The tables show forest land area, tree numbers, wood volume and growth, and tree mortality organized by ownership, stand, and tree classification variables. These stimates are derived from summarization of 292 field plots and over 100,000 photo points using a two-phase sample design. Of the 292 field plots, 91 were remeasurements of plots established in 1981. The sampling was done in 1991 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) unit located in Ogden, UT. Besides presenting detailed tables, the report briefly explains key FIA terminology, overviews the table formats, highlights some results, and discusses inventory design and data reliability.

  18. Forest Service -U.S. Department of Agriculture ECONOMICS OF REPLACING

    E-print Network

    Forest Service - U.S. Department of Agriculture ECONOMICS OF REPLACING YOUNG-GROWTH PONDEROSA PINE STANDS . . . a case study U.S. FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW-47 1968 Pacific Southwest Forest. Forest & Range Exp. Sta. 16 pp.. illus. (U.S. Forest Serv. Res. Paper PSW-47) Compares the expected

  19. Forest Service -U.S. Department of Agriculture Soil Moisture and Vegetation Patterns

    E-print Network

    pine forests; California mixed conifer forests; vegetation drought index (VM); soil drought index (SDI California Forests U.S. FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW-46 1967 Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station P.O. Box 245, Berkeley, California 94701 #12;Griffin, James R. 1967. Soil moisture

  20. Predicting species diversity in tropical forests Joshua B. Plotkina,b

    E-print Network

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Predicting species diversity in tropical forests Joshua B. Plotkina,b , Matthew D. Pottsc , Douglas Division, Royal Forest Department, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900, Thailand; fCenter for Tropical Forest ScienceCenter for Tropical Forest Science, National Institute of Education, 1025 Singapore; jForest Research Institute

  1. Multidimensional evaluation of training offered by the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH).

    PubMed

    Punnonen, O

    2000-01-01

    This paper is about an evaluation of training offered by the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH). FIOH is a research organisation, which produces, collects and disseminates information about work and health and promotes the utilisation of this knowledge. The target groups of the training are occupational health physicians, occupational health nurses, occupational health physiotherapists, safety officers and other personnel responsible for the development of the working environment. The central aim of the Evaluation Group was to evaluate the quality of the training given at FIOH and to make recommendations for further development in the near future. The evaluation was done by a joint evaluation group. The Evaluation Group consisted of specialists working in the field of occupational health and safety and in adult education outside the Institute, as well as staff members from the Institute. The specific objectives were: to evaluate how the objectives of the training were set and how the training was arranged to meet the needs of society: how relevant the training topics were from the viewpoint of the clients; how the annual planning of the training programme was done; and whether the courses were carried out in such a way that they would have a practical impact. All the evaluation should support the development and assessment skills of the training given by FIOH. Both the relevance of the training was assessed at the level of the society and at the level of training courses. The supply of the training was evaluated by different stakeholders. The quality of the training courses was evaluated by specialists in pedagogics and adult education. They evaluated the planning of the courses, the contents of the courses and teaching methods used at the courses, the course materials and the evaluation practices. The presentation describes the use of the multidimensional, process and participation oriented evaluation model and the outcomes of the evaluation. PMID:10911550

  2. Leisure-Time Physical Activity and the Metabolic Syndrome in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Laaksonen, David E.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Lakka, Timo A.; Lindstr, Jaanaöm; Peltonen, Markku; Aunola, Sirkka; Keinánen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and resistance training on metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in a post hoc analysis of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, a randomized controlled lifestyle counseling trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A cohort of 486 middle-aged overweight men and women with impaired glucose tolerance were followed for an average of 4.1 years. The intervention and control groups were combined in the analyses. LTPA was assessed by questionnaires, dietary intake by food records, and features of the MetS by anthropometric and biochemical measures annually. Resistance training sessions were documented for 137 participants. RESULTS Increased moderate-to-vigorous LTPA, even after adjustments for changes in dietary intakes of total and saturated fat, fiber, and energy, and change in BMI was associated with a greater likelihood for resolution (29.7 vs. 19.1%; P = 0.004 in the upper versus lower third of change) and a lesser likelihood for development (23.5 vs. 44.7%; P = 0.041) of the MetS. Of the components of the MetS, the increase in moderate-to-vigorous LTPA was associated most strongly with improvement of glycemia. Among the 137 participants who participated in resistance training, MetS components were favorable in individuals who were in the upper third of participation rate (median 51 times/year) compared with individuals in the lowest third (median 8.5 times/year). CONCLUSIONS Increased moderate-to-vigorous LTPA was associated with a decreased likelihood of developing the MetS and an increased likelihood of its resolution in individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes. PMID:20413514

  3. Protocol for a process-oriented qualitative evaluation of the Waltham Forest and East London Collaborative (WELC) integrated care pioneer programme using the Researcher-in-Residence model

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, Laura; George, Bethan; Marshall, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The integration of health and social care in England is widely accepted as the answer to fragmentation, financial concerns and system inefficiencies, in the context of growing and ageing populations with increasingly complex needs. Despite an expanding body of literature, there is little evidence yet to suggest that integrated care can achieve the benefits that its advocates claim for it. Researchers have often adopted rationalist and technocratic approaches to evaluation, treating integration as an intervention rather than a process. Results have usually been of limited use to practitioners responsible for health and social care integration. There is, therefore, a need to broaden the evidence base, exploring not only what works but also how integrated care can most successfully be implemented and delivered. For this reason, we are carrying out a formative evaluation of the Waltham Forest and East London Collaborative (WELC) integrated care pioneer programme. Our expectation is that this will add value to the literature by focusing on the processes by which the vision and objectives of integrated care are translated through phases of development, implementation and delivery from a central to a local perspective, and from a strategic to an operational perspective. Methods and analysis The qualitative and process-oriented evaluation uses an innovative participative approach—the Researcher-in-Residence model. The evaluation is underpinned by a critical ontology, an interpretive epistemology and a critical discourse analysis methodology. Data will be generated using interviews, observations and documentary gathering. Ethics and dissemination Emerging findings will be interpreted and disseminated collaboratively with stakeholders, to enable the research to influence and optimise the effective implementation of integrated care across WELC. Presentations and publications will ensure that learning is shared as widely as possible. The study has received ethical approval from University College London's Research Ethics Committee and has all appropriate NHS governance clearances. PMID:26546147

  4. Black carbon concentrations and mixing state in the Finnish Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikainen, T.; Brus, D.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Svensson, J.; Asmi, E.; Lihavainen, H.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol composition was measured using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) in the Finnish Arctic during winter 2011-2012. The Sammaltunturi measurement site at the Pallas GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station receives air masses from different source regions including the Arctic Ocean and continental Europe. The SP2 provides detailed information about mass distributions and mixing state of refractory black carbon (rBC). The measurements showed widely varying rBC mass concentrations (0-120 ng m-3), which were related to varying contributions of different source regions and aerosol removal processes. The rBC mass was log-normally distributed showing a relatively constant rBC core mass mean diameter with an average of 194 nm (75-655 nm sizing range). On average, the number fraction of particles containing rBC was 0.24 (integrated over 350-450 nm particle diameter range) and the average particle diameter to rBC core volume equivalent diameter ratio was 2.0 (averaged over particles with 150-200 nm rBC core volume equivalent diameters). These average numbers mean that the observed rBC core mass mean diameter is similar to those of aged particles, but the observed particles seem to have unusually high particle to rBC core diameter ratios. Comparison of the measured rBC mass concentration with that of the optically detected equivalent black carbon (eBC) using an Aethalometer and a MAAP showed that eBC was larger by a factor of five. The difference could not be fully explained without assuming that only a part of the optically detected light absorbing material is refractory and absorbs light at the wavelength used by the SP2. Finally, climate implications of five different black carbon mixing state representations were compared using the Mie approximation and simple direct radiative forcing efficiency calculations. These calculations showed that the observed mixing state means significantly lower warming effect or even a net cooling effect when compared with that of a homogenous aerosol containing the same amounts of black carbon and non-absorbing material.

  5. CTFS-ForestGEO: a worldwide network monitoring forests in an era of global change.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J; Davies, Stuart J; Bennett, Amy C; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika B; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Wright, S Joseph; Abu Salim, Kamariah; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M; Alonso, Alfonso; Baltzer, Jennifer L; Basset, Yves; Bourg, Norman A; Broadbent, Eben N; Brockelman, Warren Y; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Burslem, David F R P; Butt, Nathalie; Cao, Min; Cardenas, Dairon; Chuyong, George B; Clay, Keith; Cordell, Susan; Dattaraja, Handanakere S; Deng, Xiaobao; Detto, Matteo; Du, Xiaojun; Duque, Alvaro; Erikson, David L; Ewango, Corneille E N; Fischer, Gunter A; Fletcher, Christine; Foster, Robin B; Giardina, Christian P; Gilbert, Gregory S; Gunatilleke, Nimal; Gunatilleke, Savitri; Hao, Zhanqing; Hargrove, William W; Hart, Terese B; Hau, Billy C H; He, Fangliang; Hoffman, Forrest M; Howe, Robert W; Hubbell, Stephen P; Inman-Narahari, Faith M; Jansen, Patrick A; Jiang, Mingxi; Johnson, Daniel J; Kanzaki, Mamoru; Kassim, Abdul Rahman; Kenfack, David; Kibet, Staline; Kinnaird, Margaret F; Korte, Lisa; Kral, Kamil; Kumar, Jitendra; Larson, Andrew J; Li, Yide; Li, Xiankun; Liu, Shirong; Lum, Shawn K Y; Lutz, James A; Ma, Keping; Maddalena, Damian M; Makana, Jean-Remy; Malhi, Yadvinder; Marthews, Toby; Mat Serudin, Rafizah; McMahon, Sean M; McShea, William J; Memiaghe, Hervé R; Mi, Xiangcheng; Mizuno, Takashi; Morecroft, Michael; Myers, Jonathan A; Novotny, Vojtech; de Oliveira, Alexandre A; Ong, Perry S; Orwig, David A; Ostertag, Rebecca; den Ouden, Jan; Parker, Geoffrey G; Phillips, Richard P; Sack, Lawren; Sainge, Moses N; Sang, Weiguo; Sri-Ngernyuang, Kriangsak; Sukumar, Raman; Sun, I-Fang; Sungpalee, Witchaphart; Suresh, Hebbalalu Sathyanarayana; Tan, Sylvester; Thomas, Sean C; Thomas, Duncan W; Thompson, Jill; Turner, Benjamin L; Uriarte, Maria; Valencia, Renato; Vallejo, Marta I; Vicentini, Alberto; Vrška, Tomáš; Wang, Xihua; Wang, Xugao; Weiblen, George; Wolf, Amy; Xu, Han; Yap, Sandra; Zimmerman, Jess

    2015-02-01

    Global change is impacting forests worldwide, threatening biodiversity and ecosystem services including climate regulation. Understanding how forests respond is critical to forest conservation and climate protection. This review describes an international network of 59 long-term forest dynamics research sites (CTFS-ForestGEO) useful for characterizing forest responses to global change. Within very large plots (median size 25 ha), all stems ? 1 cm diameter are identified to species, mapped, and regularly recensused according to standardized protocols. CTFS-ForestGEO spans 25 °S-61 °N latitude, is generally representative of the range of bioclimatic, edaphic, and topographic conditions experienced by forests worldwide, and is the only forest monitoring network that applies a standardized protocol to each of the world's major forest biomes. Supplementary standardized measurements at subsets of the sites provide additional information on plants, animals, and ecosystem and environmental variables. CTFS-ForestGEO sites are experiencing multifaceted anthropogenic global change pressures including warming (average 0.61 °C), changes in precipitation (up to ± 30% change), atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds (up to 3.8 g N m(-2) yr(-1) and 3.1 g S m(-2) yr(-1)), and forest fragmentation in the surrounding landscape (up to 88% reduced tree cover within 5 km). The broad suite of measurements made at CTFS-ForestGEO sites makes it possible to investigate the complex ways in which global change is impacting forest dynamics. Ongoing research across the CTFS-ForestGEO network is yielding insights into how and why the forests are changing, and continued monitoring will provide vital contributions to understanding worldwide forest diversity and dynamics in an era of global change. PMID:25258024

  6. School-External Factors in Finnish Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aro, Sophie; Mikkilä-Erdmann, Mirjamaija

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the English language competence of Finnish bilingual pupils and school-external factors such as parental expectations, home involvement, and exposure to English outside the classroom. Data on the pupils' language competence was collected from n?=?122 6th graders in bilingual education, and…

  7. "Education Is Important, but..." Young People outside of Schooling and the Finnish Policy of "Education Guarantee"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahola, Sakari; Kivela, Suvi

    2007-01-01

    Background: Early school leaving and dropout are widely recognized as problems, leading to further marginalization and exclusion of young people from society at large. The Finnish government has set a target that, by the year 2008, 96% of those who complete compulsory education will continue without interruption in secondary education or in the…

  8. The Implementation of Entrepreneurship Education through Curriculum Reform in Finnish Comprehensive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seikkula-Leino, Jaana

    2011-01-01

    How has entrepreneurship education been implemented in Finnish comprehensive schools. A two-part survey was undertaken in 43 municipalities with different educational and socio-economic backgrounds. The first part, in 2005, dealt with the local curriculum reform with a focus on the development of entrepreneurship education. The second part, in…

  9. Organization and Management of Continuing Education in German and Finnish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Knust, Michaela; Hanft, Anke

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, an international comparison study investigated the organization and management of university continuing education (UCE). The Finnish continuing education system proved to be especially advanced in this study. On the other hand, it became clear that Germany was still lagging behind in continuing education. In this article, German and…

  10. Professionalism--A Breeding Ground for Struggle. The Example of the Finnish Day-Care Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinos, Jarmo

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the Finnish day-care centre out of a neo-Weberian-Bourdieuan frame of reference. The leading idea is that the day-care centre field is continuously shaping as a result of both inner struggles and struggles with other fields. The state, the education system, and trade unions act as the dealers of professional playing cards.…

  11. Debating Educability: Diverging Social Representations of Abilities in Finnish Educational Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Räty, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    By surveying a representative sample of Finnish parents, this study set out to compare two social representations of intelligence current in our educational discourse: the established one, "the idea of natural giftedness", and an emerging one, "the idea of the multifariousness of abilities and support for social equality." It…

  12. Behavioral and Emotional Strength-Based Assessment of Finnish Elementary Students: Psychometrics of the BERS-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sointu, Erkko Tapio; Savolainen, Hannu; Lambert, Matthew C.; Lappalainen, Kristiina; Epstein, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    When rating scales are used in different countries, thorough investigation of the psychometric properties is needed. We examined the internal structure of the Finnish translated Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale-2 (BERS-2) using Rasch and confirmatory factor analysis approaches with a sample of youth, parents, and teachers. The results…

  13. A Purposeful MOOC to Alleviate Insufficient CS Education in Finnish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurhila, Jaakko; Vihavainen, Arto

    2015-01-01

    The Finnish national school curriculum, effective from 2004, does not include any topics related to Computer Science (CS). To alleviate the problem that school students are not able to study CS-related topics, the Department of Computer Science at the University of Helsinki prepared a completely online course that is open to pupils and students in…

  14. Efficiency of Finnish General Upper Secondary Schools: An Application of Stochastic Frontier Analysis with Panel Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirjavainen, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Different stochastic frontier models for panel data are used to estimate education production functions and the efficiency of Finnish general upper secondary schools. Grades in the matriculation examination are used as an output and explained with the comprehensive school grade point average, parental socio-economic background, school resources,…

  15. Finnish Concepts of the Mass Media in 1965 and 1975. Report No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapasalo, Jukka

    The results of a survey conducted in 1975 were compared with the findings of three previous studies of Finnish public awareness of mass media to determine any changes or trends which might have occurred between the years 1967 and 1975. Data were reported in categories based on the public concept of (1) the most important mass medium, (2) the…

  16. A Comparative Analysis of PISA Scientific Literacy Framework in Finnish and Thai Science Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sothayapetch, Pavinee; Lavonen, Jari; Juuti, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    A curriculum is a master plan that regulates teaching and learning. This paper compares Finnish and Thai primary school level science curricula to the PISA 2006 Scientific Literacy Framework. Curriculum comparison was made following the procedure of deductive content analysis. In the analysis, there were four main categories adopted from PISA…

  17. Experiences of School Bullying among Internationally Adopted Children: Results from the Finnish Adoption (FINANDO) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raaska, Hanna; Lapinleimu, Helena; Sinkkonen, Jari; Salmivalli, Christina; Matomaki, Jaakko; Makipaa, Sanna; Elovainio, Marko

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of and factors associated with school bullying and victimization among Finnish international adoptees. The Olweus bully/victim questionnaire was sent to all 9-15-year-old children adopted in Finland between 1985 and 2007 through the mediating organizations officially approved by the Ministry of Social Affairs…

  18. Measuring Phonological Development: A Follow-Up Study of Five Children Acquiring Finnish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saaristo-Helin, Katri

    2009-01-01

    This study applies the Phonological Mean Length of Utterance measurement (PMLU; Ingram & Ingram, 2001; Ingram, 2002) to the data of five children acquiring Finnish and evaluates their phonological development longitudinally at four different age points: 2;0, 2;6, 3;0, and 3;6. The children's results on PMLU and related measures are discussed…

  19. Enhancing Overseas Chinese Graduate Employability: The Case of Chinese Graduates with Finnish Academic Qualifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Yuzhuo

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores ways to enhance overseas Chinese graduate employability by taking Finnish-educated Chinese students/graduates as an example. In so doing, it understands that graduate employability development is a joint effort of multiple stakeholders including students, graduates, academics, program coordinators, employers, and policymakers.…

  20. Dancing in Fetters? Chinese Principals' Perceptions of the Effects of Finnish Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Xin; Dervin, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Although there is an increased interest in overseas training for educational leaders in China, little is known about the value of such programs. This qualitative case study explores Chinese school principals' perceptions of leadership practices and professional development after undertaking a Finnish training program. The article also…

  1. Teachers' Contribution to the Social Life in Finnish Preschool Classrooms during Structured Learning Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen, Jenni; Hännikäinen, Maritta; Poikonen, Pirjo-Liisa; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify and deepen the knowledge on and understanding of the role that teachers' practices during teacher-led learning sessions play in creating and enhancing social life in Finnish preschool classrooms. Observational data pertaining to 20 preschool teachers were analysed according to the principles of thematic analysis.…

  2. Finnish High School Students' Readiness to Adopt Online Learning: Questioning the Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valtonen, Teemu; Kukkonen, Jari; Dillon, Patrick; Vaisanen, Pertti

    2009-01-01

    The Finnish high school system in rural areas is facing challenges because of a decreasing number of the students. This situation places new emphasis on online learning. Online learning offers new possibilities for high schools to provide equal learning opportunities for their students. This paper explores students' readiness to adapt their…

  3. Hybridisation or Ousterisation? The Case of Local Accountability Policy in Finnish Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paananen, Maiju; Lipponen, Lasse; Kumpulainen, Kristiina

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on the analytic concept of imaginary, this study investigates policy hybridisation in the Finnish early childhood education. Specifically, it illuminates how the interplay between different imaginaries enabled the neoliberal imaginary to oust the social-democratic imaginary through a tripartite process in a case of local productivity…

  4. Conceptions of Finnish and Estonian Pre-School Teachers' Goals in Their Pedagogical Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niikko, Anneli; Ugaste, Aino

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the conceptions of the Finnish and Estonian pre-school teachers' goals, and the achievement of these goals in their pedagogical work. The study consisted of 60 (30 from each country) interviews with pre-school teachers. The interview data was analyzed phenomenographically. The findings showed that children…

  5. Geography in the Finnish School Curriculum: Part of the "Success Story"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tani, Sirpa

    2014-01-01

    The article investigates the status of geography education in the Finnish national curricula from the 1970s until today. Conceptions of teaching, learning and change in society are traced through curriculum texts; in addition, the ways in which these are applied in the subject-specified aims and content of the geography curriculum are explored.…

  6. Prevalence and Psychiatric Comorbidity of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in an Adolescent Finnish Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, Susan L.; McGough, James J.; Moilanen, Irma K.; Loo, Sandra K.; Taanila, Anja; Ebeling, Hanna; Hurtig, Tuula; Kaakinen, Marika; Humphrey, Lorie A.; McCracken, James T.; Varilo, Teppo; Yang, May H.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Peltonen, Leena; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine the prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its clinical characteristics in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. The results conclude that ADHD is common among Northern Finnish adolescents and is related with psychiatric comorbidity in adolescence.

  7. Economic difficulties and subsequent sleep problems: Evidence from British and Finnish occupational cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Lallukka, Tea; Ferrie, Jane E.; Kivimäki, Mika; Shipley, Martin J.; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero

    2012-01-01

    Background Social determinants of sleep may prove to be as important as health status. In this study we examined the extent to which persistent and changing economic difficulties are associated with sleep problems in two prospective occupational cohorts. Methods We used data from Finnish (baseline 2000–2002; follow-up 2007; n = 6328) and British (baseline 1997–1999; follow-up 2003–2004; n = 5002) public sector employees. Economic difficulties, sleep problems, and a variety of covariates were assessed at baseline and follow-up. Results Prevalence of frequent sleep problems at follow-up was 27% and 20% among women and men in the Finnish cohort, and 34% and 27% in the British cohort, respectively. Odds for sleep problems were higher among those with persistent economic difficulties (frequent economic difficulties at baseline and follow-up) compared to those with no difficulties. This association remained after multiple adjustments, including parental and current socioeconomic position, in the Finnish (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.35–2.18) cohort. Increases in economic difficulties were similarly associated with sleep problems in the Finnish and the British cohort. Conclusion Evidence from two occupational cohorts suggests strong associations between economic difficulty and poor sleep. Awareness of this association will help health care professionals identify and prevent sleep problems. PMID:22445231

  8. Defining and Measuring Technical Thinking: Students' Technical Abilities in Finnish Comprehensive Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autio, Ossi; Hansen, Ron

    2002-01-01

    A group of 116 Finnish fifth- through ninth-graders used a problem-solving technology and crafts curriculum with computers; a control group (n=151) used traditional crafts curriculum and instruction. Results for motor skill development, technical knowledge, and emotional engagement suggest that all students should receive a balanced curriculum of…

  9. The Transnational Idea of University Autonomy and the Reform of the Finnish Universities Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piironen, Ossi

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the Finnish parliament passed a new Universities Act that aimed to strengthen the institutional autonomy of the country's universities. But why and how did the idea of autonomy come to frame the reform agenda in the overt way it did? In analysing a sample of authoritative policy and strategy papers by the key stakeholders in the…

  10. Analysis of the Development of Academic Writing in the "FJNSc" ("Finnish Journal of Nursing Science")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhanen-Nuutinen, Liisa; Janhonen, Sirpa; Tuomi, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the genre of the reviewed scientific articles published in the "FJNSc" ("Finnish Journal of Nursing Science") during its history. The aim was to bring a critical approach to writing in nursing science and to discuss the dominant conventions of scientific writing in nursing. A total of 27 journals, which…

  11. The Construction of Academic Identity in the Changes of Finnish Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ylijoki, Oili-Helena; Ursin, Jani

    2013-01-01

    This article sets out to explore how academics make sense of the current transformations of higher education and what kinds of academic identities are thereby constructed. Based on a narrative analysis of 42 interviews with Finnish academics, nine narratives are discerned, each providing a different answer as to what it means to be an academic in…

  12. Analysing Finnish Steering System from the Perspective of Social Space: The Case of the "Campus University"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treuthardt, Leena; Valimaa, Jussi

    2008-01-01

    The present study analyses Finnish higher education steering system, management by results, from the perspective of higher education institutions. We ask what happens inside a higher education institution, called here the "Campus University", during the actual negotiations related to the national steering system. We analyse not only the management…

  13. Maternal Smoking Behavior, Background and Neonatal Health in Finnish Children Subsequently Placed in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalland, Mirjam; Sinkkonen, Jari; Gissler, Mika; Merilainen, Jouni; Siimes, Martti A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate retrospectively neonatal health and maternal background among a sample of children taken into custody and placed in foster care and to investigate the relation between medical and social risk in the neonatal period. Method: The data-linkage study combined two registries: the Finnish Medical…

  14. Accurate genetic diagnosis of Finnish pulmonary arterial hypertension patients using oligonucleotide-selective sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vattulainen, Sanna; Aho, Joonas; Salmenperä, Pertteli; Bruce, Siina; Tallila, Jonna; Gentile, Massimiliano; Sankelo, Marja; Laitinen, Tarja; Koskenvuo, Juha W; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Myllykangas, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) among Finnish PAH patients is poorly understood. We adopted a novel-targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach called Oligonucleotide-Selective Sequencing (OS-Seq) and developed a custom data analysis and interpretation pipeline to identify pathogenic base substitutions, insertions, and deletions in seven genes associated with PAH (BMPR2, BMPR1B, ACVRL1, ENG, SMAD9, CAV1, and KCNK3) from Finnish PAH patients. This study represents the first clinical study with OS-Seq technology on patients suffering from a rare genetic disorder. We analyzed DNA samples from 21 Finnish PAH patients, whose BMPR2 and ACVRL1 mutation status had been previously studied using Sanger sequencing. Our sequencing panel covered 100% of the targeted base pairs with >15× sequencing depth. Pathogenic base substitutions were identified in the BMPR2 gene in 29% of the Finnish PAH cases. Two of the pathogenic variant-positive patients had been previously tested negative using Sanger sequencing. No clinically significant variants were identified in the six other PAH genes. Our study validates the use of targeted OS-Seq for genetic diagnostics of PAH and revealed pathogenic variants that had been previously missed using Sanger sequencing. PMID:26247051

  15. Displaying Now-Understanding: The Finnish Change-of-State Token "aa"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koivisto, Aino

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of the Finnish change-of-state token "aa" that has previously not been identified. The central claim is that even though "aa" indicates a cognitive shift experienced by the speaker, it does not function as a receipt of new information. Instead, the token "aa" indicates that the speaker…

  16. Happy Spouses, Happy Parents? Family Relationships among Finnish and Dutch Dual Earners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinen, Kaisa; Kinnunen, Ulla; Tolvanen, Asko; Ronka, Anna; Wierda-Boer, Hilde; Gerris, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In this study links between spousal and parent-child relationships among Finnish (n = 157 couples) and Dutch (n = 276 couples) dual earners with young children were examined using paired questionnaire data. Variable-oriented analyses (structural equation modeling with a multigroup procedure) supported the spillover hypothesis, as higher levels of…

  17. Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents (SAS-A): Measuring Social Anxiety among Finnish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranta, Klaus; Junttila, Niina; Laakkonen, Eero; Uhmavaara, Anni; La Greca, Annette M.; Niemi, Paivi M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate symptoms of social anxiety and the psychometric properties of the "Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents" (SAS-A) among Finnish adolescents, 13-16 years of age. Study 1 (n = 867) examined the distribution of SAS-A scores according to gender and age, and the internal consistency and factor structure of the…

  18. Enacting the Common Script: Management Ideas at Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuori, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the work of mid-level management at Finnish universities of applied sciences. Based on in-depth interviews with 15 line managers, this study investigates how the standardized management ideas of rational management and employee empowerment are used in the leadership of lecturers at these institutions. The findings indicate…

  19. Finnish Pre-Service Teachers' and Upper Secondary Students' Understanding of Division and Reasoning Strategies Used

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaasila, Raimo; Pehkonen, Erkki; Hellinen, Anu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on Finnish pre-service elementary teachers' (N = 269) and upper secondary students' (N = 1,434) understanding of division. In the questionnaire, we used the following non-standard division problem: "We know that 498:6 = 83. How could you conclude from this relationship (without using long-division algorithm) what 491:6 = ?…

  20. Finnish Mentor Mathematics Teachers' Views of the Teacher Knowledge Required for Teaching Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asikainen, Mervi A.; Pehkonen, Erkki; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2013-01-01

    Seven Finnish mentor mathematics teachers were interviewed about their views regarding the teacher knowledge required for teaching mathematics. The results of the interviews revealed not only the teachers' spontaneous views of the knowledge base needed for effective mathematics teaching but also their views of the particular types of teacher…

  1. How Finnish Upper Secondary Students Conceive Transgenerational Responsibility and Historical Reparations: Implications for the History Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Löfström, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses how Finnish upper secondary school students ponder upon the questions of transgenerational responsibility and historical reparation. These questions have got a prominent place in the history culture in many societies in the last 20 years. The philosophical and political dimensions of reparations for historical injustices have…

  2. A Sino-Finnish Initiative for Experimental Teaching Practices Using the Design Factory Pedagogical Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Björklund, Tua A.; Nordström, Katrina M.; Clavert, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents a Sino-Finnish teaching initiative, including the design and experiences of a series of pedagogical workshops implemented at the Aalto-Tongji Design Factory (DF), Shanghai, China, and the experimentation plans collected from the 54 attending professors and teachers. The workshops aimed to encourage trying out interdisciplinary…

  3. Persistent Work for Equity and Lifelong Learning in the Finnish Educational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, Hannele; Isopahkala-Bouret, Ulpukka

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces how the Finnish educational system has been moved systematically towards equal opportunities for all learners. It also describes how principles of equity and lifelong learning are tied together and what consequences this has had on teachers' professional role. Finally, the article reflects on what kind of studies and…

  4. Cultural Differences in the Health Information Environments and Practices between Finnish and Japanese University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askola, Kreetta; Atsushi, Toshimori; Huotari, Maija-Leena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to identify cultural differences in the information environment and information practices, namely active seeking and encountering, of web-based health information between Finnish and Japanese university students. Method: The data were gathered with a Web-based survey among first-year university students at…

  5. Second Home Countryside. Representations of the Rural in Finnish Popular Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vepsalainen, Mia; Pitkanen, Kati

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the representation of post-productive countryside in Finland by exploring how the rural is presented in the context of second home tourism. Being an integral part of rural areas and their history, second homes are an established example of the post-productive consumption of countryside. The international and Finnish

  6. Towards ICT in Everyday Life in Finnish Schools: Seeking Conditions for Good Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, Hannele; Kynaslahti, Heikki; Vahtivuori-Hanninen, Sanna

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses how to strengthen educational use of information and communication technology (ICT) in Finnish schools. The conceptions and experiences of the successful integration of ICT in everyday school settings are reported. Participant observations in 20 schools in different parts of Finland were carried out, including discussions…

  7. Self-Regulation and Moral Orientation among Finnish and Chinese Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, Hannele; He, Jin

    A comparative study of value orientations among Finnish and Chinese adolescents was conducted focusing on how secondary school students in these two cultures understand the purpose and meaningfulness of their lives and the value purposes they foresee in the future. The survey took place in the comprehensive schools of suburban towns in Finland and…

  8. Computer-Based Molecular Modelling: Finnish School Teachers' Experiences and Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksela, Maija; Lundell, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Modern computer-based molecular modelling opens up new possibilities for chemistry teaching at different levels. This article presents a case study seeking insight into Finnish school teachers' use of computer-based molecular modelling in teaching chemistry, into the different working and teaching methods used, and their opinions about necessary…

  9. Non-Linear Modeling of Growth Prerequisites in a Finnish Polytechnic Institution of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nokelainen, Petri; Ruohotie, Pekka

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the factors of growth-oriented atmosphere in a Finnish polytechnic institution of higher education with categorical exploratory factor analysis, multidimensional scaling and Bayesian unsupervised model-based visualization. Design/methodology/approach: This study was designed to examine employee perceptions of…

  10. emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CO2

    E-print Network

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    CO2 emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CO2 Nordic Plus) and Use of serpentinites in energy and metal industry (ECOSERP) Carl-Johan Fogelholm, Project leader, professor Sanni, utilisation and long-term storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the pulp and paper industry. The Geological

  11. Effects of a Group Intervention on the Career Network Ties of Finnish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokisaari, Markku; Vuori, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    The authors evaluated how a group-based career intervention affected career network ties among Finnish adolescents as they made educational choices and prepared for their transition to secondary education. They examined the career-related network ties of 868 students during their last year in comprehensive school (junior high school) in a…

  12. Background factors of enamel focal demineralization in groups of Finnish and Russian children.

    PubMed

    Nyyssonen, V; Honkala, E; Borovsky, E V; Smirnova, T A

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the occurrence of EFD lesions in relation to some background factors in Finnish and Soviet children. Children aged 7, 9 and 12 years (n = 1187) were examined clinically in Helsinki, Kuopio (Finland), Moscow and Leningrad (USSR). A questionnaire sent to the parents was used to collect data on toothbrushing frequency, use of sweets, cakes, soft drinks, sugar-sweetened tea/coffee and mother's education. In addition to bivariate analysis, log-linear regression models were used for comparing the simultaneous association in two ethnic groups. In general, the Finnish children had more EFD lesions than the Soviet children did. Among the Finns no consistent associations were found between the number of EFD lesions and the use of different sugar products or differences in toothbrushing habits. The number of EFD lesions decreased consistently according to mother's education with the Finnish children, but not with the Soviet children. The final multivariate model for Finnish children included age, toothbrushing frequency, place of residence (Kuopio) and use of soft drinks. The respective model for the Soviet children included age and place of residence (Leningrad). Evidently, the demineralization process or tooth resistance differs in these two ethnic groups. PMID:1878328

  13. Interpreting Pronouns and Demonstratives in Finnish: Evidence for a Form-Specific Approach to Reference Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Elsi; Trueswell, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Two Finnish language comprehension experiments are presented which suggest that the referential properties of pronouns and demonstratives cannot be reduced straightforwardly to the salience level of the antecedent. The findings, from a sentence completion study and visual world eye-tracking study, reveal an asymmetry in which features of the…

  14. Finnish Media Literacy Education Policies and Best Practices in Early Childhood Education and Care since 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rantala, Leena

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to describe Finnish media literacy policies and good media education practices in early childhood education and care. This article will focus on describing two central action lines related to the Children and Media Program, initiated by the Division for Cultural Policy of the Ministry of Education and Culture in 2004.…

  15. Cultures in Dialogue: Perceptions and Experiences of Finnish Teachers of Transnational Dances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siljamäki, Mariana Elisabet; Anttila, Eeva; Sääkslahti, Arja

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on a phenomenographic study that focuses on identifying the pedagogical conceptions of Finnish teachers of transnational dances. The purpose is to uncover and understand teachers' conceptions concerning the implications of the cultural contexts of their specific dance forms for their pedagogical practices. Through a…

  16. Validation of the Finnish Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ) for Clinical Settings and Total Population Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattila, Marja-Leena; Jussila, Katja; Linna, Sirkka-Liisa; Kielinen, Marko; Bloigu, Risto; Kuusikko-Gauffin, Sanna; Joskitt, Leena; Ebeling, Hanna; Hurtig, Tuula; Moilanen, Irma

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the validity and determined cut-off scores for the Finnish Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ). A population sample of 8-year-old children (n = 4,408) was rated via the ASSQ by parents and/or teachers, and a subgroup of 104 children was examined via structured interview, semi-structured observation, IQ measurement, school…

  17. National Forest Land Scheme

    E-print Network

    National Forest Land Scheme Guidance #12;National Forest Land Scheme National Forest Land Scheme | 32 | National Forest Land Scheme Contents National Forest Land Scheme 3 Community Acquisition 7 Land national forest land a community can use its rights under Community Right to Buy to apply to buy it

  18. IntegratedScienceWorkingForYou Research Station

    E-print Network

    % of the nation's National Forest System lands (54 National Forests and Grasslands). In the lower 48 states, our, & Aquatic Environments Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute Fire, Fuel, & Smoke Forests & Woodlands: forests and grasslands . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Keeping it wild: an interagency strategy

  19. IntegratedScienceWorkingForYou Research Station

    E-print Network

    % of the nation's National Forest System lands (54 National Forests and Grasslands). In the lower 48 states, our, & Aquatic Environments Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute Fire, Fuel, & Smoke Forests & Woodlands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Third Forest Vegetation Simulator conference proceedings

  20. T. R . Nisbet of Forest Research and C. D. Evans of Centre for Ecology and Hydrology March 2014 Forestry and surface water

    E-print Network

    Forestry and surface water acidification Forests and forest management practices can affect surface water dominated by forestry being more acidic. The introduction of emission control policies in the 1980s has The role of forestry in acidification of freshwaters has been a prominent issue in the UK since the late

  1. Rates of species loss from Amazonian forest fragments

    E-print Network

    Stouffer, Phil

    ; Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project, National Institute for Amazonian Research, Caixa Postal 478Rates of species loss from Amazonian forest fragments Gonc¸alo Ferraz* , Gareth J. Russell*, Philip

  2. Tropical forest conservation and development: A bibliography. Manual No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, J.

    1993-01-01

    Contents: forest resources; deforestation; conservation and sustainable development; indigenous peoples; management, policy, and planning; trade and industrial development; nontimber forest products; research, education, and training; history; bibliographies and general works; author index.

  3. Texas Forest Stewardship Program Certified Forest Steward Nomination Form

    E-print Network

    (over) Texas Forest Stewardship Program Certified Forest Steward Nomination Form OWNERSHIP one): ( ) Landowner ( ) Operator ( ) TFS Forester ( ) Friend ( ) Wildlife Biologist ( ) Family Member ( ) Consulting Forester ( ) Business Partner ( ) Other (specify): ______________________________ PROPERTY

  4. 24 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-print Network

    in the forest products industry. The Convention brings together hundreds of scientists, design professionals to discuss the state of forest products research and learn about innovations in the field. For more details

  5. Forests & Trees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Susan

    1989-01-01

    This newsletter discusses the disappearance of the world's forests and the resulting environmental problems of erosion and flooding; loss of genetic diversity; climatic changes such as less rainfall, and intensifying of the greenhouse effect; and displacement and destruction of indigenous cultures. The articles, lessons, and activities are…

  6. Enhancements in lower stratospheric CH3CN observed by the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder following boreal forest fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Fromm, Michael D.; Waters, Joe W.; Manney, Gloria L.; Santee, Michelle L.; Read, William G.

    2004-03-01

    On 25 August 1992, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite observed a significant enhancement in the abundance of lower stratospheric methyl cyanide (CH3CN) at 100-68 hPa (˜16-19 km altitude) in a small region off the east coast of Florida. The enhancement was seen to decay and move generally westward over ˜6 days. Concentrations up to ˜1500 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) were observed, compared to a typical stratospheric background level of 30 pptv. Aerosol index data from the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, together with trajectory calculations, provide strong evidence that the enhancement arose from the stratospheric injection, associated with strong thunderstorms, of tropospheric air with high CH3CN concentrations, originating in regions of extensive forest fire activity in Idaho (not observed by MLS in this period because of orbital geometry). After being lofted into the lower stratosphere, this air was advected into the regions observed by MLS and subsequently dispersed. These MLS enhanced CH3CN observations add to the growing body of evidence for the occurrence of such episodic injections of tropospheric air into the stratosphere.

  7. The Effect of Pollution on Newly-Formed Particle Composition in Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaattovaara, Petri

    2010-05-01

    Petri Vaattovaara (1), Tuukka Petäjä (2), Jorma Joutsensaari (1), Pasi Miettinen (1), Boris Zaprudin (1,6), Aki Kortelainen (1), Juha Heijari (3,7), Pasi Yli-Pirilä (3), Pasi Aalto (2), Doug R. Worsnop (4), and Ari Laaksonen(1,5) (1) University of Eastern Finland, Finland (2) University of Helsinki, Finland (3) University of Eastern Finland, Finland (4) Aerodyne Research Inc., USA (5) Finnish Meteorological Institute, Finland (6) Currently at University of Turku, Finland (7) Currently at Maritime Research Centre, Finland Email address of the Corresponding author: Petri.Vaattovaara@uef.fi The geographical extent of the tropical, temperate and boreal forests is about 30% of the Earth's land surface. Those forests are located around the world in different climate zones effecting widely on atmospheric composition via new particle formation. The Boreal forests solely cover one third of the forests extent and are one of the largest vegetation environments, forming a circumpolar band throughout the northern hemisphere continents, with a high potential to affect climate processes [1]. In order to more fully understand the possible climatic effects of the forests, the properties of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in varying conditions (e.g. a change in meteorological parameters or in the concentrations of biogenic and antropogenic trace gases) need to be better known. In this study, we applied the UFO-TDMA (ultrafine organic tandem differential mobility analyzer [2]) and the UFH-TDMA (ultrafine hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer [3]) methods parallel to shed light on the evolution of the nucleation and Aitken mode particle compositions (via physic-chemical properties) at a virgin boreal forest site in varying conditions. The measurements were carried out at Hyytiälä forest station in Northern Europe (Finland) during 15 spring nucleation events. We also carried out a statistical analysis using linear correlations in order to explain the variability in the composition behaviour of the particles during multiple nucleation events. The overall results show a clear anthropogenic influence on the nucleation and Aitken mode particle compositions during the events. The SO2/MTOP and NOx/MTOP (MTOP, monoterpene oxidation products) ratios explain most strongly the variation in the nucleation mode composition during clean and pollution-affected events, suggesting also the importance of organic sulfur compounds, in addition to other sulfur, nitrogen and organic compounds, in particle formation, composition and properties. During the cleanest events, MTOP explain significantly the time behaviour of the 10 nm particle composition with an estimated organic fraction of over 95%. [1] P. Tunved et al., 2006, Science, 312, 261-263. [2] P. Vaattovaara et al., 2005, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5, 3277-3287. [3] K. Hämeri et al., 2000, J. Geophys. Res. 105(D17), 22231-22242. [4] K. Sellegri et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5, 373-384. [5] M. Boy et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5, 863-878.

  8. Hydrological recovery in forested landscapes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttle, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Considerable effort has been expended trying to understand how forest landscapes respond hydrologically to natural (e.g. fire) or anthropogenic (e.g. harvesting) disturbance. However, comparable emphasis has not been placed on assessing whether and how these landscapes recover from such disturbances. Hydrological recovery can be defined as the restoration of hydrologic characteristics (e.g. evapotranspiration rates, soil infiltrability) of disturbed and managed sites to a near pre-disturbance condition. Improved and sustainable use of forest resources depends on better knowledge of the spatial and temporal aspects of recovery of hydrologic properties and processes affected by forest disturbance. This enhanced understanding is particularly pressing given such issues as the implications of climate change for forest ecosystems and the transition of forest management in many regions from forestry for wood, pulp and paper to forest harvesting for biofuels, where the potential magnitude of forest disturbances and hydrological recovery times are largely unknown. Initial studies of hydrological recovery focused on streamflow changes at the basin scale due to forest disturbance and regeneration, while more recent work has examined a variety of hydrologic properties and processes across a range of scales. The differing approaches that are currently used to assess hydrological recovery will be examined, drawing examples of recovery rates of various hydrologic processes in different forest landscapes. Counter-intuitive findings of this research will be highlighted, efforts to incorporate models of hydrological recovery into forest management strategies will be reviewed, and important avenues for future research will be discussed.

  9. Sau?-ne? [Finn] : a Finnish steam bath in which the steam is provided by water thrown on hot stones

    E-print Network

    Lindman, Pia Maria, 1965-

    1999-01-01

    A Finnish proverb says that the sauna is the most democratic space in the world . Here, we dismantle our vestments of social status and relax in a distinct social space where everyone shares the same basic needs of comfort ...

  10. Allele frequencies of the major milk proteins in the Finnish Ayrshire and detection of a new kappa-casein variant.

    PubMed

    Ikonen, T; Ruottinen, O; Erhardt, G; Ojala, M

    1996-06-01

    A total of 20990 Finnish Ayrshire cows were phenotyped for the major milk proteins by isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gels. The predominant alleles in the Finnish Ayrshire were alpha S1-casein B (0.999), alpha S2-casein A (0.991), beta-casein A1 (0.509) and alpha 2 (0.490), kappa-casein A (0.612) and beta-lactoglobulin B (0.716). The kappa-casein E allele (0.307) was also rather common in the Finnish Ayrshire. A new kappa-casein variant (kappa-casein F) was demonstrated in two Finnish Ayrshire cows, a dam and a daughter. PMID:8759117

  11. Advances of air pollution science: from forest decline to multiple-stress effects on forest ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, E; Schaub, M; Matyssek, R; Wieser, G; Augustaitis, A; Bastrup-Birk, A M; Bytnerowicz, A; Günthardt-Goerg, M S; Müller-Starck, G; Serengil, Y

    2010-06-01

    Over the past 20 years, the focus of forest science on air pollution has moved from forest decline to a holistic framework of forest health, and from the effects on forest production to the ecosystem services provided by forest ecosystems. Hence, future research should focus on the interacting factorial impacts and resulting antagonistic and synergistic responses of forest trees and ecosystems. The synergistic effects of air pollution and climatic changes, in particular elevated ozone, altered nitrogen, carbon and water availability, must be key issues for research. Present evidence suggests air pollution will become increasingly harmful to forests under climate change, which requires integration amongst various stressors (abiotic and biotic factors, including competition, parasites and fire), effects on forest services (production, biodiversity protection, soil protection, sustained water balance, socio-economical relevance) and assessment approaches (research, monitoring, modeling) to be fostered. PMID:20036449

  12. FOREST CERTIFICATION January 2008

    E-print Network

    FOREST CERTIFICATION January 2008 Forest Certification Forest certification is a voluntary process through which forest landowners allow their lands and management practices to be evaluated by a neutral products and improving forest management are its two primary objectives. Many of the nation's large lumber

  13. Dispersal of forest insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  14. The Many Faces of Research Profiling: Academic Leaders' Conceptions of Research Steering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietilä, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The article examines academic leaders' conceptions of research profiling. Global science policies, including the Finnish governmental policy, promote the identification of areas of research excellence and recommend resource concentration on them. However, as active agents, leaders may have competing, even conflicting views on the pros and…

  15. Forest fires

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.

    1991-01-01

    This book examines the many complex and sensitive issues relating to wildland fires. Beginning with an overview of the fires of 1980s, the book discusses the implications of continued drought and considers the behavior of wildland fires, from ignition and spread to spotting and firestorms. Topics include the effects of weather, forest fuels, fire ecology, and the effects of fire on plants and animals. In addition, the book examines firefighting methods and equipment, including new minimum impact techniques and compressed air foam; prescribed burning; and steps that can be taken to protect individuals and human structures. A history of forest fire policies in the U.S. and a discussion of solutions to fire problems around the world completes the coverage. With one percent of the earth's surface burning every year in the last decade, this is a penetrating book on a subject of undeniable importance.

  16. Conceptions of Research: The Doctoral Student Experience in Three Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubb, Jenni; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Lonka, Kirsti

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how doctoral students perceive research work in the context of their own PhD projects. Thirty-two students from a Finnish university were interviewed, representing three disciplines: medicine, natural sciences and behavioural sciences. Their conceptions of research varied in terms of describing research as "a job to…

  17. Whiteness perception in Japanese and Finnish under cool and warm fluorescent lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayama, Miyoshi; Eloholma, Marjukka; Hyvaerinen, Mikko; Eda, Tetsuya; Kon, Daisuke; Mukai, Kenji; Kanaya, Sueko; Halonen, Liisa

    2002-06-01

    In this study, we conducted the experiment to compare the whiteness perception of Finnish and Japanese observers. The rank order of perceived whiteness among seven nearly white Munsell chips (Value is 9.25 or 9.5, Chroma is 0, 0.5 or 1.0) under the fluorescent lamps of correlated color temperatures of 3000K, 5000K, and 6700K was determined. Observing condition employed in the two laboratories was exactly the same as well as the experimental procedure. In 3000K condition, the results of Japanese and Finnish observers agreed with each other quite well, while as the correlated color temperature becomes higher, the results from the two laboratories showed different tendencies. Negative correlation was found between the whiteness rank order and the metric chroma for all of the results.

  18. UNCERTAINTIES IN COUNTRYWIDE FOREST BIOMASS ESTIMATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Country-wide estimates of forest biomass are the major driver for estimating and understanding carbon pools and flux, a critical component of global change research. mportant determinants in making these estimates include the areal extend of forested lands and their associated bi...

  19. The 1990 forest ecosystem dynamics multisensor aircraft campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Darrel L.; Ranson, K. Jon

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of the Forest Ecosystem Dynamics (FED) research activity is to develop a better understanding of the dynamics of forest ecosystem evolution over a variety of temporal and spatial scales. Primary emphasis is being placed on assessing the ecosystem dynamics associated with the transition zone between northern hardwood forests in eastern North America and the predominantly coniferous forests of the more northerly boreal biome. The approach is to combine ground-based, airborne, and satellite observations with an integrated forest pattern and process model which is being developed to link together existing models of forest growth and development, soil processes, and radiative transfer.

  20. Orbit determination and analysis of meteors recently observed by Finnish Fireball Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, V.; Lupovla, V.; Gritsevich, M.; Lyytinen, E.; Mineeva, S.

    2015-10-01

    We perform orbit determination and analysis of three fireballs recently observed by Finnish Fireball Network (FFN). Precise orbit determination was performed by using integration of differential equations of motion. This technique was implemented into free distributable software "Meteor Toolkit". Accounting of several perturbing forces are discussed. Also estimation of accuracy of orbital elements was obtained by propagation of observational error with using covariance transformation. Long-term backward integration was provided as well.

  1. Possibility of clinical applications of forest medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, we have conducted a series of studies of the effect of forest therapy on human health and established forest therapy as a new preventive strategy. We have found that forest therapy has many beneficial effects on human health. However, there is almost no study dealing with the possibility of clinical applications of forest therapy. In this review, we discuss the possibility of clinical applications of forest therapy from the following viewpoints: 1. Forest therapy can decrease blood pressure, heart rate, sympathetic nerve activity, and levels of stress hormones, such as urinary adrenaline and noradrenaline, and can increase parasympathetic nerve activity, suggesting its preventive effect on hypertension. 2. Forest therapy can also decreace the scores for anxiety, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion and increase the score for vigor in the Profile of Mood States (POMS) test, suggesting its preventive effect on mental depression. 3. Forest therapy can increase the activity and number of human natural killer (NK) cells and the intracellular levels of anticancer proteins, suggesting its preventive effect on cancers. 4. These findings suggest that forest therapy may have preventive effects on lifestyle-related diseases. However, the above preventive effects of forest therapy should be confirmed in clinical research. PMID:24858507

  2. Selecting a Consulting Forester 

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-19

    Forester Eric L. Taylor, Extension Specialist, and C. Darwin Foster, Associate Department Head and Extension Program Leader for Forestry, The Texas A&M University System A consulting forester is an independent forester whose services are avail- able...

  3. Computational Statistics Canonical Forest

    E-print Network

    Ahn, Hongshik

    Computational Statistics Canonical Forest --Manuscript Draft-- Manuscript Number: COST-D-12-00160R3 Full Title: Canonical Forest Article Type: Original Paper Keywords: Canonical linear discriminant analysis; Classification; Ensemble; Linear discriminant analysis; Rotation Forest Corresponding Author

  4. Dietary supplementation habits and perceptions of supplement use among elite Finnish athletes.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Anni; Alaranta, Antti; Helenius, Ilkka; Vasankari, Tommi

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of dietary supplement (DS) use among elite Finnish athletes in 2002 and 2009. In 2009, the authors also wanted to examine the reasons for athletes' DS use, whether athletes feel they have experienced benefits from their supplement use, and whether athletes had had an opportunity to consult dietary specialists. Cross-sectional studies were conducted in 2002 and 2009 among Finnish Olympic athletes. Data were collected using semistructured questionnaires, mainly in national team camps. The study population in 2002 was 446 athletes, and in 2009 it was 372. The number of DS users was high in both study years (81% in 2002 and 73% in 2009). Vitamin D consumption was low in both 2002 and 2009 (0.7% and 2.0%, respectively). An increase was found in consumption of omega-3 fatty acids between study years (11% in 2002 and 19% in 2009; p = .002), and their regular use nearly doubled (8% and 15%, p = .002). For vitamin and mineral users, the main reason for DS use was to prevent nutritional deficiencies, and for nutritional supplement users the main reason was recovery from exercise. Only 27% of all athletes and 30% of DS users had an opportunity to consult dietary specialists in 2009. This survey shows that supplementation rates among elite Finnish athletes are high and there may be over- and underuse of some micronutrient supplements. There is a need for professional nutritional counseling among national elite athletes. PMID:21813910

  5. July 9, 2001 Geometry of the Uniform Spanning Forest

    E-print Network

    Peres, Yuval

    July 9, 2001 Geometry of the Uniform Spanning Forest: Transitions in Dimensions 4, 8, 12, : : : by Itai Benjamini, Harry Kesten, Yuval Peres, Oded Schramm Abstract. The uniform spanning forest (USF 60J15. Key words and phrases. Stochastic dimension , Uniform spanning forest. Research partially

  6. TECHNOLOGICAL 1975 FORESTER

    E-print Network

    DR. ROSWELL K. MILLER Forester Salute The Forester tips its Smokey Bear hat this year to Dr. Roswell ............................. 37 .Alumni Directory . .................... 65 Advertisers ........................... 75 #12;SMOKEY

  7. Comparing Forests across Climates and Biomes: Qualitative Assessments, Reference Forests and Regional Intercomparisons

    PubMed Central

    Salk, Carl F.; Frey, Ulrich; Rusch, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Communities, policy actors and conservationists benefit from understanding what institutions and land management regimes promote ecosystem services like carbon sequestration and biodiversity conservation. However, the definition of success depends on local conditions. Forests' potential carbon stock, biodiversity and rate of recovery following disturbance are known to vary with a broad suite of factors including temperature, precipitation, seasonality, species' traits and land use history. Methods like tracking over-time changes within forests, or comparison with “pristine” reference forests have been proposed as means to compare the structure and biodiversity of forests in the face of underlying differences. However, data from previous visits or reference forests may be unavailable or costly to obtain. Here, we introduce a new metric of locally weighted forest intercomparison to mitigate the above shortcomings. This method is applied to an international database of nearly 300 community forests and compared with previously published techniques. It is particularly suited to large databases where forests may be compared among one another. Further, it avoids problematic comparisons with old-growth forests which may not resemble the goal of forest management. In most cases, the different methods produce broadly congruent results, suggesting that researchers have the flexibility to compare forest conditions using whatever type of data is available. Forest structure and biodiversity are shown to be independently measurable axes of forest condition, although users' and foresters' estimations of seemingly unrelated attributes are highly correlated, perhaps reflecting an underlying sentiment about forest condition. These findings contribute new tools for large-scale analysis of ecosystem condition and natural resource policy assessment. Although applied here to forestry, these techniques have broader applications to classification and evaluation problems using crowdsourced or repurposed data for which baselines or external validations are not available. PMID:24743325

  8. Forests and Soil Erosion across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathurst, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Land use and climate change threaten the ability of Europe's forests to provide a vital service in limiting soil erosion, e.g. from forest fires and landslides. However, our ability to define the threat and to propose mitigation measures suffers from two deficiencies concerning the forest/erosion interface: 1) While there have been a considerable number of field studies of the relationship between forest cover and erosion in different parts of Europe, the data sets are scattered among research groups and a range of literature outlets. There is no comprehensive overview of the forest/erosion interface at the European scale, essential for considering regional variations and investigating the effects of future changes in land use and climate. 2) Compared with forest/water studies, we have a poorer quantitative appreciation of forest/erosion interactions. In the forest/water area it is possible to make quantitative statements such as that a 20% change in forest cover across a river catchment is needed for the effect on annual water yield to be measurable or that a forested catchment in upland UK has an annual water yield around 15% lower than an otherwise comparable grassland catchment. Comparable statements are not yet possible for forest/erosion interactions and there are uncertainties in the mathematical representation of forest/erosion interactions which limit our ability to make predictions, for example of the impact of forest loss in a given area. This presentation therefore considers the next step in improving our predictive capability. It proposes the integration of existing research and data to construct the "big picture" across Europe, i.e. erosion rates and sediment yields associated with forest cover and its loss in a range of erosion regimes (e.g. post-forest fire erosion or post-logging landslides). This would provide a basis for generalizations at the European scale. However, such an overview would not form a predictive capability. Therefore it is also necessary to identify a range of predictive methods, from empirical guidelines to computer models, which can be recommended for applications such as extrapolating from the local to the regional scale and for planning mitigation strategies. Such developments could help improve efficiency in the integrated management of forest, soil and water resources, benefit local engineering projects ranging from hazard mitigation plans to road culvert design, contribute to the implementation of the EU Water Framework Development, form a more objective basis for cost/benefit analysis of proposed management actions and help in putting a value on forest services.

  9. FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest

    E-print Network

    ........................... 25 Water Temperature..................................27 Water Chemistry .............................. 38 Peak Flows and StormflowVolumes ................... 42 Water TemperatureFORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest management on floods, sedimentation, and water supply HENRY

  10. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  11. Preliminary checklist of fungi of the Fernow Experimental Forest. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, S.L.; Kumar, A.; Bhatt, R.; Dubey, T.; Landolt, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The report provides a checklist of fungi found on the Fernow Experimental Forest in West Virginia during 4 years of research and collecting by the authors. More than 500 fungi in seven major taxonomic groups (Acrasiomycetes, Myxomycetes, Chytridiomycetes, Oomycetes, Ascomycetes, Deuteromycetes, and Basidiomycetes) are listed alphabetically by genus and species. Also provided is a general description of the forest vegetation of the Fernow Experimental Forest.

  12. SCANDINAVIAN FOREST ECONOMICS No. 41, 2006

    E-print Network

    ) and Anders Lindhagen (SPM). Last but not least I want to thank the Nordic Forest Research Cooperation Economical success factors of small-scale enterprises in the wood products industry 21 Becker, Maria

  13. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-print Network

    impressed by results of studies using large-scale color 70-mm. aerial photography to detect insect damage with the Station's forest insect research staff. He is now assigned to the Forestry Sciences Laboratory, Pacific from the 1:8,000-scale color photography. #12;I n 1964-65, the Douglas-fir tussock moth (Hemerocampa

  14. Forest management in Northeast China: history, problems, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dapao; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Wangming; Ding, Hong; Wang, Qingwei; Wang, Yue; Wu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Limin

    2011-12-01

    Studies of the history and current status of forest resources in Northeast China have become important in discussions of sustainable forest management in the region. Prior to 1998, excessive logging and neglected cultivation led to a series of problems that left exploitable forest reserves in the region almost exhausted. A substantial decrease in the area of natural forests was accompanied by severe disruption of stand structure and serious degradation of overall forest quality and function. In 1998, China shifted the primary focus of forest management in the country from wood production to ecological sustainability, adopting ecological restoration and protection as key foci of management. In the process, China launched the Natural Forest Conversion Program and implemented a new system of Classification-based Forest Management. Since then, timber harvesting levels in Northeast China have decreased, and forest area and stocking levels have slowly increased. At present, the large area of low quality secondary forest lands, along with high levels of timber production, present researchers and government agencies in China with major challenges in deciding on management models and strategies that will best protect, restore and manage so large an area of secondary forest lands. This paper synthesizes information from a number of sources on forest area, stand characteristics and stocking levels, and forest policy changes in Northeastern China. Following a brief historical overview of forest harvesting and ecological research in Northeast China, the paper discusses the current state of forest resources and related problems in forest management in the region, concluding with key challenges in need of attention in order to meet the demands for multi-purpose forest sustainability and management in the future. PMID:21350964

  15. Forest Management in Northeast China: History, Problems, and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dapao; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Wangming; Ding, Hong; Wang, Qingwei; Wang, Yue; Wu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Limin

    2011-12-01

    Studies of the history and current status of forest resources in Northeast China have become important in discussions of sustainable forest management in the region. Prior to 1998, excessive logging and neglected cultivation led to a series of problems that left exploitable forest reserves in the region almost exhausted. A substantial decrease in the area of natural forests was accompanied by severe disruption of stand structure and serious degradation of overall forest quality and function. In 1998, China shifted the primary focus of forest management in the country from wood production to ecological sustainability, adopting ecological restoration and protection as key foci of management. In the process, China launched the Natural Forest Conversion Program and implemented a new system of Classification-based Forest Management. Since then, timber harvesting levels in Northeast China have decreased, and forest area and stocking levels have slowly increased. At present, the large area of low quality secondary forest lands, along with high levels of timber production, present researchers and government agencies in China with major challenges in deciding on management models and strategies that will best protect, restore and manage so large an area of secondary forest lands. This paper synthesizes information from a number of sources on forest area, stand characteristics and stocking levels, and forest policy changes in Northeastern China. Following a brief historical overview of forest harvesting and ecological research in Northeast China, the paper discusses the current state of forest resources and related problems in forest management in the region, concluding with key challenges in need of attention in order to meet the demands for multi-purpose forest sustainability and management in the future.

  16. 78 FR 30847 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Forestry Research Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest...SUMMARY: The Forestry Research Advisory Council will meet in...Apple, Designated Federal Officer, Forestry Research Advisory Council, USDA...

  17. 77 FR 26734 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Forestry Research Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest...SUMMARY: The Forestry Research Advisory Council will meet in...meeting is to discuss emerging issues in forestry research. DATES: The meeting will...

  18. 76 FR 43651 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Forestry Research Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest...SUMMARY: The Forestry Research Advisory Council will meet in...meeting is to discuss emerging issues in forestry research. DATES: The meeting will...

  19. 75 FR 46903 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Forestry Research Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest...SUMMARY: The Forestry Research Advisory Council will meet in...meeting is to discuss emerging issues in forestry research. DATES: The meeting will...

  20. 78 FR 2950 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Forestry Research Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest...SUMMARY: The Forestry Research Advisory Council will meet in...Apple, Designated Federal Officer, Forestry Research Advisory Council, USDA...

  1. Forest Health Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Tara L.

    2014-01-01

    "Forest health" is an important concept often not covered in tree, forest, insect, or fungal ecology and biology. With minimal, inexpensive equipment, students can investigate and conduct their own forest health survey to assess the percentage of trees with natural or artificial wounds or stress. Insects and diseases in the forest are…

  2. A Finnish Viewpoint on Professionalism in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karila, Kirsti

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses professionalism in early childhood education through the analytical tool of a research-based multi-level perspective that sees this as a cultural, communal, organisational, and individual phenomenon. Starting from an understanding of professionalism derived from a model of professional expertise, the article discusses the…

  3. UNIVERSUM STUDENT SURVEY 2012 University Report Finnish Edition

    E-print Network

    Kaski, Samuel

    in the field of employer branding and talent research. Our purpose is to improve the communications between students, career services and employers. We believe that career choice is one of the most important services in their role and 3) help companies to develop their employer value. #12;2. UNIVERSITY EXPERIENCE

  4. Partnership in Education: Lebanese Evolution of a Finnish Educational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosn, Irma-Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, several anti-bullying programs have been developed, for instance in the UK, USA and New Zealand, but how successful these programs might be outside their own cultural context has not been investigated. This paper describes an action research project, the aim of which was to determine whether a pro-active model against intolerance…

  5. Fire in boreal ecosystems of Eurasia: First results of the Bor Forest island fire experiment, Fire Research Campaign Asia-North (FIRESCAN)

    SciTech Connect

    Angelstam, P. ); Bufetov, N.S. ); Clark, J. . Botany Dept.)

    1994-12-01

    Fire is an important natural and anthropogenic factor in the dynamics of the boreal forest system. The ecological and environmental impacts of boreal fires depend on fire weather, fuel availability, fire behavior and history of sand development (frequency and size of fires and other biotic and abiotic disturbances, influence of surrounding landscape on successional developments). About 70% of the global boreal forest is in Eurasia, almost all of it in the Russian Federation. It is estimated that in years with high fire danger up to ca. 10 million ha of forest and other land in the Russian Federation are affected by fire. The demand for reliable information on the role of natural and anthropogenic fire and the necessity to develop adequate fire management systems is basically due to globally increasing concerns about (1) impacts of boreal wildfires on atmosphere and climate, (2) changing utilization and ecologically destructive practices in boreal forestry, and (3) possible consequences of global climate change on the boreal forest system.

  6. Mites (Acari, Mesostigmata) in boreal Scots pine forest floors: effect of distance to stumps.

    PubMed

    Kamczyc, Jacek; Gwiazdowicz, Dariusz J; Teodorowicz, Ewa; Strzymi?ska, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) is a basic component of forest ecosystems and it plays a crucial role in species-poor boreal forests. Generally, previous studies have focused on differences between the forest floor and decaying logs of various tree species. The impact of distance to CWD has been investigated mainly for forest-floor snails and some groups of macrofauna, but not yet for mesostigmatid mites communities. We hypothesized that the effect of CWD decreases with increasing distance from CWD. To test this hypothesis we conducted a study in relatively species-poor Finnish boreal forest (at ca. 100 km northwest of Helsinki). In total, 81 samples were collected in 2007 from nine Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stumps, three microhabitats (CWD, soil/litter at 0.5 m from a stump and soil/litter at 1.5 m from a stump) and in three main directions (9 stumps × 3 microhabitats × 3 directions). Overall, 1965 mesostigmatid mites were collected representing 24 species. The mean number of mite species collected was significantly different between decaying stumps and forest litter; however, there was no significant difference between the litter samples at 0.5 and 1.5 m distance. The evenness index was significantly lower for samples collected from stumps than for litter in close (0.5 m) or far (1.5 m) distance. The most frequently encountered mite species were Veigaia nemorensis, Parazercon radiatus and Zercon zelawaiensis. PMID:24898728

  7. Effects of rapid urban sprawl on urban forest carbon stocks: integrating remotely sensed, GIS and forest inventory data.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yin; Yan, Jing; Wei, Xiaohua; Wang, Yajun; Yang, Yusheng; Hua, Lizhong; Xiong, Yongzhu; Niu, Xiang; Song, Xiaodong

    2012-12-30

    Research on the effects of urban sprawl on carbon stocks within urban forests can help support policy for sustainable urban design. This is particularly important given climate change and environmental deterioration as a result of rapid urbanization. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of urban sprawl on dynamics of forest carbon stock and density in Xiamen, a typical city experiencing rapid urbanization in China. Forest resource inventory data collected from 32,898 patches in 4 years (1972, 1988, 1996 and 2006), together with remotely sensed data (from 1988, 1996 and 2006), were used to investigate vegetation carbon densities and stocks in Xiamen, China. We classified the forests into four groups: (1) forest patches connected to construction land; (2) forest patches connected to farmland; (3) forest patches connected to both construction land and farmland and (4) close forest patches. Carbon stocks and densities of four different types of forest patches during different urbanization periods in three zones (urban core, suburb and exurb) were compared to assess the impact of human disturbance on forest carbon. In the urban core, the carbon stock and carbon density in all four forest patch types declined over the study period. In the suburbs, different urbanization processes influenced forest carbon density and carbon stock in all four forest patch types. Urban sprawl negatively affected the surrounding forests. In the exurbs, the carbon stock and carbon density in all four forest patch types tended to increase over the study period. The results revealed that human disturbance played the dominant role in influencing the carbon stock and density of forest patches close to the locations of human activities. In forest patches far away from the locations of human activities, natural forest regrowth was the dominant factor affecting carbon stock and density. PMID:23122621

  8. L1 and L2 Word Recognotion in Finnish. Examining L1 Effects on L2 Processing of Morphological Complexity and Morphophonological Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vainio, Seppo; Anneli, Pajunen; Hyona, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the first language (L1) on the visual word recognition of inflected nouns in second language (L2) Finnish by native Russian and Chinese speakers. Case inflection is common in Russian and in Finnish but nonexistent in Chinese. Several models have been posited to describe L2 morphological processing. The unified…

  9. Implications of the Bologna Process for Throughput in the Higher Education Sector: An Empirical Illustration Based on a Finnish-British Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindberg, Matti

    2014-01-01

    This study illustrates the differences between Finnish and British graduates in the higher education-to-work transition and related market mechanisms in the year 2000. Specifically, the differences between the Finnish and British students' academic careers and ability to find employment after graduation were evaluated in relation to the…

  10. From Sickness to Cure and Further: Construction of "Quality" in Finnish Higher Education Policy from the 1960s to the Era of the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saarinen, Taina

    2005-01-01

    This article looks into the discursive construction of "quality" and "assessment" in Finnish higher education policy from the 1960s onwards. The theoretical assumption is that the discourse of "quality" not only describes the developments in Finnish higher education policy, but also produces and reproduces our views on that policy and on the…

  11. Turning First Nation Forest Values into Integrated Forest Management Plans: Two Models in Alberta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natcher, David; Hickey, Cliff

    Canada's federal and provincial governments have called upon the forest industry to ensure protection of Aboriginal rights and include Aboriginal communities in forest management. The challenge is to design frameworks for multi-party cooperation in which multiple values and interests can be accommodated. To promote such cooperation, two research

  12. Social Change and Adult Education Research. Adult Education Research in Nordic Countries 1992/93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tampere Univ., Hameelinna (Finland). Dept. of Education.

    This yearbook contains 18 papers reflecting the major trends in adult education research in the Nordic countries in 1992-93. The following papers are included: "Popular Adult Education and Social Mobilization: Reflections in Connection with the Swedish Committee on Power" (Rubenson); "Direction of Finnish Adult Education Policies within the…

  13. Visual aesthetic quality of Northern Ontario's forested shorelines.

    PubMed

    Haider, Wolfgang; Hunt, Len

    2002-03-01

    Only a few empirical studies on forest aesthetics have adopted a water-based perspective for observers and have investigated the perceived visual quality of forested shorelines. In forested environments with many lakes, such as the boreal forest in the Canadian Shield, individuals have greater exposure to forests from water-based rather than in-stand vantage points. This study employed the psychophysical research direction to explore the relationships between scenic beauty and biophysical characteristics of the forested shorelines in the boreal forests. Two model forms were tested. One model related the variation of shoreline forest aesthetic evaluations of near-vista views (140 m offshore) to a set of forest mensuration data. Tree size, tree mortality, conifer shrubs, tree density, amount of hardwood, and slope explained 60.2% of the variance in scenic beauty between the study sites. A second model was calibrated to test the relationship between an already existing ecosystem vegetation classification system and the aesthetic evaluations of the same forested shorelines. When the ecosystem classification was simplified to eight groups, the model explained 48.5% of variance. These models suggest that the psychophysical approach to studying aesthetics can be applied successfully to near-vista evaluations of scenic beauty. The finding that a forest ecosystem classification system is highly related to scenic beauty suggests that, at least in the boreal forest, managers can reasonably estimate the scenic beauty of forested shoreline environments from an ecosystem classification, with little need for intensive data on these sites. PMID:11830763

  14. Mesquite Urban Forest Ecosystem Analysis

    E-print Network

    Mesquite Urban Forest Ecosystem Analysis November 2012 #12;Table of Contents Summary........................................................................................................................................................................ 7 I. Tree Characteristics of the Urban Forest................................................................................................................ 7 II. Urban Forest Cover and Leaf Area

  15. CloudForest: A Scalable and Efficient Random Forest Implementation for Biological Data

    PubMed Central

    Bressler, Ryan; Kreisberg, Richard B.; Bernard, Brady; Niederhuber, John E.; Vockley, Joseph G.; Shmulevich, Ilya; Knijnenburg, Theo A.

    2015-01-01

    Random Forest has become a standard data analysis tool in computational biology. However, extensions to existing implementations are often necessary to handle the complexity of biological datasets and their associated research questions. The growing size of these datasets requires high performance implementations. We describe CloudForest, a Random Forest package written in Go, which is particularly well suited for large, heterogeneous, genetic and biomedical datasets. CloudForest includes several extensions, such as dealing with unbalanced classes and missing values. Its flexible design enables users to easily implement additional extensions. CloudForest achieves fast running times by effective use of the CPU cache, optimizing for different classes of features and efficiently multi-threading. https://github.com/ilyalab/CloudForest. PMID:26679347

  16. Emergent Learning Practices in Globalizing Work: The Case of a Finnish-Chinese Project in a Finnish Technology Consulting Firm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toiviainen, Hanna; Lallimo, Jiri; Hong, Jianzhong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to analyze emergent learning practices for globalizing work through two research questions: "What are the conceptualizations of work represented by the Virtual Factory and how do they mediate globalizing work?" and "What is the potential of expansive learning efforts to expand conceptualizations towards the emergent…

  17. Road-traffic noise: annoyance, risk perception, and noise sensitivity in the Finnish adult population.

    PubMed

    Okokon, Enembe Oku; Turunen, Anu W; Ung-Lanki, Sari; Vartiainen, Anna-Kaisa; Tiittanen, Pekka; Lanki, Timo

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to road-traffic noise commonly engenders annoyance, the extent of which is determined by factors not fully understood. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence and determinants of road-traffic noise annoyance and noise sensitivity in the Finnish adult population, while comparing the perceptions of road-traffic noise to exhausts as environmental health problems. Using a questionnaire that yielded responses from 1112 randomly selected adult Finnish respondents, we estimated road-traffic noise- and exhausts-related perceived exposures, health-risk perceptions, and self-reported annoyance on five-point scales, while noise sensitivity estimates were based on four questions. Determinants of noise annoyance and sensitivity were investigated using multivariate binary logistic regression and linear regression models, respectively. High or extreme noise annoyance was reported by 17% of respondents. Noise sensitivity scores approximated a Gaussian distribution. Road-traffic noise and exhausts were, respectively, considered high or extreme population-health risks by 22% and 27% of respondents. Knowledge of health risks from traffic noise, OR: 2.04 (1.09-3.82) and noise sensitivity, OR: 1.07 (1.00-1.14) were positively associated with annoyance. Knowledge of health risks (p<0.045) and positive environmental attitudes (p<000) were associated with higher noise sensitivity. Age and sex were associated with annoyance and sensitivity only in bivariate models. A considerable proportion of Finnish adults are highly annoyed by road-traffic noise, and perceive it to be a significant health risk, almost comparable to traffic exhausts. There is no distinct noise-sensitive population subgroup. Knowledge of health risks of road-traffic noise, and attitudinal variables are associated with noise annoyance and sensitivity. PMID:26016432

  18. Does the Finnish intervention prevent obstetric anal sphincter injuries? A systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Mette Østergaard; Madsen, Mia Lund; Skriver-Møller, Anne-Cathrine; Overgaard, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A rise in obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) has been observed and a preventive approach, originating in Finland, has been introduced in several European hospitals. The aim of this paper was to systematically evaluate the evidence behind the ‘Finnish intervention’. Design A systematic review of the literature conducted according to the Preferred Reporting for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Outcome measures The primary outcome was OASIS. Secondary outcomes were (perinatal): Apgar scores, pH and standard base excess in the umbilical cord, and (maternal): episiotomy, intact perineum, first and second-degree perineal lacerations, duration of second stage, birth position and women's perceptions/birth experiences. Methods Multiple databases (Cochrane, Embase, Pubmed and SveMed) were systematically searched for studies published up to December 2014. Both randomised controlled trials and observational studies were eligible for inclusion. Studies were excluded if a full-text article was not available. Studies were evaluated by use of international reporting guidelines (eg, STROBE). Results Overall, 1042 articles were screened and 65 retrieved for full-text evaluation. Seven studies, all observational and with a level of evidence at 2c or lower, were included and consistently reported a significant reduction in OASIS. All evaluated episiotomy and found a significant increase. Three studies evaluated perinatal outcomes and reported conflicting results. No study reported on other perineal outcomes, duration of the second stage, birth positions or women's perceptions. Conclusions A reduction in OASIS has been contributed to the Finnish intervention in seven observational studies, all with a low level of evidence. Knowledge about the potential perinatal and maternal side effects and women's perceptions of the intervention is extremely limited and the biological mechanisms underlying the Finnish intervention are not well documented. Studies with a high level of evidence are needed to assess the effects of the intervention before implementation in clinical settings can be recommended. PMID:26369797

  19. Road-Traffic Noise: Annoyance, Risk Perception, and Noise Sensitivity in the Finnish Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Okokon, Enembe Oku; Turunen, Anu W.; Ung-Lanki, Sari; Vartiainen, Anna-Kaisa; Tiittanen, Pekka; Lanki, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to road-traffic noise commonly engenders annoyance, the extent of which is determined by factors not fully understood. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence and determinants of road-traffic noise annoyance and noise sensitivity in the Finnish adult population, while comparing the perceptions of road-traffic noise to exhausts as environmental health problems. Using a questionnaire that yielded responses from 1112 randomly selected adult Finnish respondents, we estimated road-traffic noise- and exhausts-related perceived exposures, health-risk perceptions, and self-reported annoyance on five-point scales, while noise sensitivity estimates were based on four questions. Determinants of noise annoyance and sensitivity were investigated using multivariate binary logistic regression and linear regression models, respectively. High or extreme noise annoyance was reported by 17% of respondents. Noise sensitivity scores approximated a Gaussian distribution. Road-traffic noise and exhausts were, respectively, considered high or extreme population-health risks by 22% and 27% of respondents. Knowledge of health risks from traffic noise, OR: 2.04 (1.09–3.82) and noise sensitivity, OR: 1.07 (1.00–1.14) were positively associated with annoyance. Knowledge of health risks (p < 0.045) and positive environmental attitudes (p < 000) were associated with higher noise sensitivity. Age and sex were associated with annoyance and sensitivity only in bivariate models. A considerable proportion of Finnish adults are highly annoyed by road-traffic noise, and perceive it to be a significant health risk, almost comparable to traffic exhausts. There is no distinct noise-sensitive population subgroup. Knowledge of health risks of road-traffic noise, and attitudinal variables are associated with noise annoyance and sensitivity. PMID:26016432

  20. Gender differences in health information behaviour: a Finnish population-based survey.

    PubMed

    Ek, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Narrowing the gaps in health outcomes, including those between men and women, has been a pronounced goal on the agenda of the Finnish health authorities since the mid-1980s. But still there is a huge gap in favour of women when it comes to life expectancy at birth. People's health information behaviour, that is how people seek, obtain, evaluate, categorize and use relevant health-related information to perform desired health behaviours, is a critical prerequisite to appropriate and consistent performances of these behaviours. With respect to gender, it has been noted that men often are unwilling and lack the motivation to engage with health-related information. The purpose of this study was to investigate how gender affects health information behaviour in the Finnish population aged 18-65 years. The survey data were collected via a questionnaire which was posted to a representative cross section consisting of 1500 Finnish citizens. The statistical analysis consists of ANOVA F-tests and Fisher's exact tests. The results show that women were more interested in and reported much more active seeking of health-related information, paid more attention to potential worldwide pandemics and were much more attentive as to how the goods they purchase in everyday life affect their health than men did. Women also reported receiving far more informal health-related information from close family members, other kin and friends/workmates than men did. Thus, to succeed in public health promotion and interventions the measures taken should be much more sensitive to the gender gap in health information behaviour. PMID:23985248

  1. PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Pacific Southwest Research Station

    E-print Network

    PacificSouthwestResearchStationPrograms Pacific Southwest Research Station Publications List Air Pollution and Global Change Impacts on Western Forest Ecosystems Center for Urban Forest Research Chemical and Fire Effects Research Natural Areas Sierra Nevada Research Center Sudden Oak Death Research Timber

  2. Forest health in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Pautasso, Marco; Schlegel, Markus; Holdenrieder, Ottmar

    2015-05-01

    Forest pathology, the science of forest health and tree diseases, is operating in a rapidly developing environment. Most importantly, global trade and climate change are increasing the threat to forest ecosystems posed by new diseases. Various studies relevant to forest pathology in a changing world are accumulating, thus making it necessary to provide an update of recent literature. In this contribution, we summarize research at the interface between forest pathology and landscape ecology, biogeography, global change science and research on tree endophytes. Regional outbreaks of tree diseases are requiring interdisciplinary collaboration, e.g. between forest pathologists and landscape ecologists. When tree pathogens are widely distributed, the factors determining their broad-scale distribution can be studied using a biogeographic approach. Global change, the combination of climate and land use change, increased pollution, trade and urbanization, as well as invasive species, will influence the effects of forest disturbances such as wildfires, droughts, storms, diseases and insect outbreaks, thus affecting the health and resilience of forest ecosystems worldwide. Tree endophytes can contribute to biological control of infectious diseases, enhance tolerance to environmental stress or behave as opportunistic weak pathogens potentially competing with more harmful ones. New molecular techniques are available for studying the complete tree endobiome under the influence of global change stressors from the landscape to the intercontinental level. Given that exotic tree diseases have both ecologic and economic consequences, we call for increased interdisciplinary collaboration in the coming decades between forest pathologists and researchers studying endophytes with tree geneticists, evolutionary and landscape ecologists, biogeographers, conservation biologists and global change scientists and outline interdisciplinary research gaps. PMID:25502075

  3. Optospectral techniques for urban forest state characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, Maria; Savastru, Roxana; Savastru, Dan; Tautan, Marina; Miclos, Sorin; Baschir, Laurentiu

    2013-06-01

    Spectral patterns of different forest land cover can identify certain pollution compounds, and water stress conditions based on the interaction of photons with the molecular structure of the forest target structure. Based on such methods, the objective of this research was to evaluate and characterize selected forest test area Baneasa- Tunari located in the Northern part of Bucharest metropolitan region, Romania, where the climate and anthropogenic stressors endanger natural and economical values of environment. Based on time-series Landsat TM, ETM, MODIS Terra/Aqua and IKONOS satellite data have been investigated urban forest land cover and forest biophysical parameters (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index- NDVI and Leaf Area Index- LAI) changes over 1990- 2011 period of time. Accuracy of image processing results (spectral classification) was confirmed through in-situ spectroradiometrical analysis of reflectance spectra with portable GER 2600 spectroradiometer.

  4. Biogeophysical impacts of peatland forestation on regional climate changes in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Markkanen, T.; Backman, L.; Henttonen, H. M.; Pietikäinen, J.-P.; Mäkelä, H. M.; Laaksonen, A.

    2014-12-01

    Land cover changes can impact the climate by influencing the surface energy and water balance. Naturally treeless or sparsely treed peatlands were extensively drained to stimulate forest growth in Finland over the second half of 20th century. The aim of this study is to investigate the biogeophysical effects of peatland forestation on regional climate in Finland. Two sets of 18-year climate simulations were done with the regional climate model REMO by using land cover data based on pre-drainage (1920s) and post-drainage (2000s) Finnish national forest inventories. In the most intensive peatland forestation area, located in the middle west of Finland, the results show a warming in April of up to 0.43 K in monthly-averaged daily mean 2 m air temperature, whereas a slight cooling from May to October of less than 0.1 K in general is found. Consequently, snow clearance days over that area are advanced up to 5 days in the mean of 15 years. No clear signal is found for precipitation. Through analysing the simulated temperature and energy balance terms, as well as snow depth over five selected subregions, a positive feedback induced by peatland forestation is found between decreased surface albedo and increased surface air temperature in the snow-melting period. Our modelled results show good qualitative agreements with the observational data. In general, decreased surface albedo in the snow-melting period and increased evapotranspiration in the growing period are the most important biogeophysical aspects induced by peatland forestation that cause changes in climate. The results from this study can be further integrally analysed with biogeochemical effects of peatland forestation to provide background information for adapting future forest management to mitigate climate warming effects. Moreover, they provide insights about the impacts of projected forestation of tundra at high latitudes due to climate change.

  5. SAR Satellite Images and Terrestrial Laser Scanning in Forest Damages Mapping in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjalainen, Mika; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Hyyppa, Juha; Holopainen, Markus; Lyytikainen-Saarenmaa, Paivi; Krooks, Anssi; Jaakkola, Anttoni

    2010-12-01

    Forests are of high importance for the Finnish economy and environment. Forests inventories should not only provide information about the volume of growing stock, but also about the health status of forests, which is an indicator of the annual growth of forests and Carbon balance. One of the forest damage types is defoliation, which causes forest growth reduction and consequently potentially economical losses to the forest owners, but can be seen as an environmental indicator also. For example, in the past ten years, extensive and persistent needle defoliation caused by insects has been observed in the areas of Palokangas and Outokumpu in Eastern Finland. It is expected that the insect outbreaks are becoming more common and new species of insects may be spreading out in Finland due to the climate warming. Traditionally the intensity of needle defoliation has been estimated using visual observations, which are prone to errors and their areal extent is limited. Therefore, remote sensing can be seen as a potential tool for mapping defoliation. In this study, both Terrestrial Laser Scanning data and SAR satellite images have been exploited. On the one hand, Terrestrial Laser Scanning provides means to rapidly and objectively measure critical forest related information. On the other hand, SAR satellite images enable wide-area mapping and constant monitoring, which would be impossible in Finland using optical satellite images due to the cloudiness. The fusion of Laser scanning and SAR information could make a difference in forest health mapping. In this paper, preliminary results of the estimation of the needle defoliation intensity based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning and ERS and Envisat SAR (non-interferometric) satellite data are presented.

  6. Biomass in Serbia - potential of beech forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasanac-Bosanac, Lj.; Cirkovic-Mitrovic, T.; Popovic, V.; Jokanovic, D.

    2012-04-01

    As for the renewable sources for energy production, biomass from forests and wood processing industry comes to the second place. The woody biomass accounts for 1.0 Mtoe, that is equivalent with 1.0 Mtoe of oil. Due to current evaluations, the greatest part of woody biomass would be used for briquettes and pallets production. As the biomass from forests is increasingly becoming the interest of national and international market, a detailed research on overall potential of woody supply from Serbian forests is required. Beech forests account for 29.4 % of forest cover of Serbia. They also have the greatest standing volume (42.4 % of the overall standing volume) and the greatest mean annual increment (32.3 %)(Bankovic,et.al.2009). Herewith, the aim of this poster is to determine the long-term biomass production of these forests.For this purpose a management unit called Lomnicka reka has been chosen. As these beech forests have similar structural development, this location is considered representative for whole Serbia. DBH of all trees were measured with clipper and the accuracy of 0.01 mm, and the heights with a Vertex 3 device (with accuracy of 0.1 m). All measurements were performed on the fields each 500 m2 (square meters). The overall quantity of root biomass was calculated using the allometric equations. The poster shows estimated biomass stocks of beech forests located in Rasina area. Dates are evaluated using non-linear regression (Wutzler,T.et.al.2008). Biomass potential of Serbian beech forests will enable the evaluation of long-term potential of energy generation from woody biomass in agreement with principles of sustainable forest management. The biomass from such beech forests can represent an important substitution for energy production from fossil fuels (e.g. oil) and herewith decrease the CO2 emissions.

  7. Minnesota timber industry: An assessment of timber product output and use, 1990. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, R.L.; Dahlman, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    The bulletin includes recent Minnesota forest industry trends and report the results of a detailed study of forest industry, industrial roundwood production, and associated primary mill wood and bark residue in Minnesota in 1990. Such detailed information is necessary for intelligent planning and decisionmaking in wood procurement, forest resource management, and forest industry development. Likewise, researchers need current forest industry and industrial roundwood information for planning projects.

  8. Wisconsin timber industry: An assessment of timber product output and use, 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, R.L.; Whipple, J.W.

    1997-09-21

    In this bulletin we discuss recent Wisconsin forest industry trends and report the results of a detailed study of forest indsutry, industrial roundwood production, and associated primary mill wood and bark residue in Wisconsin in 1994. Such detailed information is necessary for intelligent planning and decisionmaking in wood procurement, forest resource management, and forest industry development. Likewise, researchers need current forest industry and idustrial roundwood information for planning project.

  9. Minnesota timber industry. An assessment of timber product output and use, 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, R.L.; Dahlman, R.A.

    1997-09-19

    In this bulletin, the authors discuss recent Minnesota forest industry trends and report the results of a detailed study of forest industrial roundwood production, and associated primary mill wood and bark residue in Minnesota in 1992. Such detailed information is necessary for intelligent planning and decisionmaking in wood procurement, forest resource management, and forest industry development. Likewise, researchers need current forest industry and industrial roundwood information for planning projects.

  10. Effort Reporting at Wake Forest

    E-print Network

    Berenhaut, Kenneth S.

    Effort Reporting at Wake Forest University Effort certification at Wake Forest University ............................................................................................................ 3 The Wake Forest University Effort Certification Report and Sponsored Programs Effort Reporting - 2 Effort certification at Wake Forest University Our commitment How

  11. Cyberbullying among Finnish adolescents – a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyberbullying, threatening or harassing another via the internet or mobile phones, does not cause physically harm and thus the consequences are less visible. Little research has been performed on the occurrence of cyberbullying among adolescents or the perception of its seriousness. Only a few population-based studies have been published, none of which included research on the witnessing of cyberbullying. Here, we examined exposure to cyberbullying during the last year, and its frequency and perceived seriousness among 12 to 18-year-old adolescents in Finland. We studied four dimensions of cyberbullying: being a victim, bully, or both victim and bully of cyberbullying, and witnessing the cyberbullying of friends. Methods Self-administered questionnaires, including four questions on cyberbullying, were mailed to a representative sample of 12-, 14-, 16-, and 18-year-old Finns in 2009 (the Adolescent Health and Lifestyle Survey). The respondents could answer via the internet or paper questionnaire. Results The number of respondents was 5516 and the response rate was 56%. Girls more often than boys reported experiencing at least one dimension of cyberbullying during the last year. The proportion was highest among 14-year-olds and lowest among 18-year-olds of both sexes. Among girls, the most commonly encountered dimension was witnessing the cyberbullying of friends (16%); and being a victim was slightly more common than being a bully (11% vs. 9%). Among boys, an equal proportion, approximately 10%, had been a victim, a bully, or had witnessed cyberbullying. The proportion of bully-victims was 4%. Serious and disruptive cyberbullying was experienced by 2% of respondents and weekly cyberbullying by 1%; only 0.5% of respondents had been bullied weekly and considered bullying serious and disruptive. Conclusions Adolescents are commonly exposed to cyberbullying, but it is rarely frequent or considered serious or disruptive. Cyberbullying exposure differed between sexes, such that girls more often than boys witness cyberbullying of friends and boys more often act as the bully than girls. In future studies, the witnessing of cyberbullying and its consequences should be taken into account. PMID:23176715

  12. Modeling Forest Structure and Vascular Plant Diversity in Piedmont Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkenberg, C.

    2014-12-01

    When the interacting stressors of climate change and land cover/land use change (LCLUC) overwhelm ecosystem resilience to environmental and climatic variability, forest ecosystems are at increased risk of regime shifts and hyperdynamism in process rates. To meet the growing range of novel biotic and environmental stressors on human-impacted ecosystems, the maintenance of taxonomic diversity and functional redundancy in metacommunities has been proposed as a risk spreading measure ensuring that species critical to landscape ecosystem functioning are available for recruitment as local systems respond to novel conditions. This research is the first in a multi-part study to establish a dynamic, predictive model of the spatio-temporal dynamics of vascular plant diversity in North Carolina Piedmont mixed forests using remotely sensed data inputs. While remote sensing technologies are optimally suited to monitor LCLUC over large areas, direct approaches to the remote measurement of plant diversity remain a challenge. This study tests the efficacy of predicting indices of vascular plant diversity using remotely derived measures of forest structural heterogeneity from aerial LiDAR and high spatial resolution broadband optical imagery in addition to derived topo-environmental variables. Diversity distribution modelling of this sort is predicated upon the idea that environmental filtering of dispersing species help define fine-scale (permeable) environmental envelopes within which biotic structural and compositional factors drive competitive interactions that, in addition to background stochasticity, determine fine-scale alpha diversity. Results reveal that over a range of Piedmont forest communities, increasing structural complexity is positively correlated with measures of plant diversity, though the nature of this relationship varies by environmental conditions and community type. The diversity distribution model is parameterized and cross-validated using three high quality vegetation survey datasets, including Duke Forest Korstian permanent plots, Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA), and the scale transgressive, nested module Carolina Vegetation Survey (CVS).

  13. 78 FR 2950 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... Forest Service Forestry Research Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Forestry Research Advisory Council will meet in Washington, DC February 7-8, 2013. The... Apple, Designated Federal Officer, Forestry Research Advisory Council, USDA Forest Service Research...

  14. The Potential of Developmental Work Research as a Professional Learning Methodology in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Joce

    2013-01-01

    Developmental Work Research (DWR) is a methodology for simultaneous research and innovation in workplace settings, developed by Finnish researcher Yryo Engestrom. This interventionist approach builds on the principles of cultural-historical activity theory, articulated by developmental psychologists L.S. Vygotsky and A.N. Le'ontev. The…

  15. Quantitative risk assessment on the dietary exposure of Finnish children and adults to nitrite.

    PubMed

    Suomi, Johanna; Ranta, Jukka; Tuominen, Pirkko; Putkonen, Tiina; Bäckman, Christina; Ovaskainen, Marja-Leena; Virtanen, Suvi M; Savela, Kirsti

    2016-01-01

    Nitrite intake from the consumption of cured meat and tap water was estimated for Finnish children of 1, 3 and 6 years as well as Finnish adults of 25-74 years. Nitrite content in the foods was measured by capillary electrophoresis, and was then used together with individual food consumption data from the FINDIET 2007 and DIPP studies in a stochastic exposure assessment by a Monte Carlo Risk Assessment (MCRA) program. Nitrite intake from additive sources and tap water was assessed, and more than every 10th child between the ages 3 and 6 years was estimated to have a nitrite intake exceeding the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of nitrite. The high exposure levels were caused by frequent consumption of large portions of sausages, up to 350 g day(-1) or 750 g in 3 days, among the children. Median nitrite intake from cured meat was 0.016, 0.040, 0.033 and 0.005 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for children of 1, 3 and 6 years and adults, respectively. Bayesian estimation was employed to determine safe consumption levels of sausages and cold cuts for children, and these results gave rise to new national food consumption advice. PMID:26609554

  16. Use of the Finnish Information System on Occupational Exposure (FINJEM) in epidemiologic, surveillance, and other applications.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, Timo; Uuksulainen, Sanni; Saalo, Anja; Mäkinen, Ilpo; Pukkala, Eero

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews the use of the Finnish Information System on Occupational Exposure (Finnish job-exposure matrix, FINJEM) in different applications in Finland and other countries. We describe and discuss studies on FINJEM and studies utilizing FINJEM in regard to the validity of exposure estimates, occupational epidemiology, hazard surveillance and prevention, the assessment of health risks and the burden of disease, the assessment of exposure trends and future hazards, and the construction of job-exposure matrices (JEMs) in countries other than Finland. FINJEM can be used as an exposure assessment tool in occupational epidemiology, particularly in large register-based studies. It also provides information for hazard surveillance at the national level. It is able to identify occupations with high average exposures to chemical agents and can therefore serve the priority setting of prevention. However, it has only limited use at the workplace level due to the variability of exposure between workplaces. The national estimates of exposure and their temporal trends may contribute to the assessment of both the recent and future burden of work-related health outcomes. FINJEM has also proved to be useful in the construction of other national JEMs, for example in the Nordic Occupational Cancer study in the Nordic countries. FINJEM is a quantitative JEM, which can serve many purposes and its comprehensive documentation also makes it potentially useful in countries other than Finland. PMID:24401793

  17. Examining gambling-related crime reports in the National Finnish Police Register.

    PubMed

    Kuoppamäki, Sanna-Mari; Kääriäinen, Juha; Lind, Kalle

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the connection between gambling and criminal activity in the National Finnish Police Register. First, a method was created that enabled the search for gambling-related police reports in the National Finnish Police Register. The method is based on finding gambling-related police reports by using gambling-related headwords. Second, all police reports from 2011 that included any mention of gambling were read through (n = 2,233). Suspected gambling-related of crimes (n = 737) were selected from these reports. Those suspected gambling-related crimes were then described and categorized into six different categories: suspected online-related crimes; suspected crimes that were related to lifestyle-gaming; suspected crimes that involved a gambler as a victim of a crime; criminal activity related to problem gambling; casino-connected crimes, and intimate partnership violence resulting from gambling problems. This study, being the first in Finland, generated information on the connection between gambling and criminal activity from the perspective of police reports. Moreover, the study highlights methodological issues that are involved in studying police reports. PMID:23740350

  18. Casein haplotypes and their association with milk production traits in the Finnish Ayrshire cattle.

    PubMed

    Velmala, R; Vilkki, J; Elo, K; Mäki-Tanila, A

    1995-12-01

    Polymorphism of casein genes was studied in half-sib families of artificial insemination bulls of the Finnish Ayrshire dairy breed. Ten grandsires and 300 of their sons were genotyped for the following polymorphisms: alpha s1-casein (B, C), beta-casein (A1, A2), the microsatellite within the kappa-casein gene (ms5, ms4) and kappa-casein (A, B, E). Nine different combinations of these alleles, casein haplotypes, were found. Associations between casein haplotypes and milk production traits (milk and protein yield, fat and protein percentage and milking speed) were studied with ordinary least-squares analysis to find a direct effect of the haplotypes or an association within individual grandsire families using the granddaughter design. Estimated breeding values of sons were obtained from cow evaluation by animal model. No direct effect of the casein haplotypes on the traits was found. Within grandsire families, in one out of four families the chromosomal segment characterized by haplotype 3 (B-A2-ms4-A) was associated with an increase in milk yield (P < 0.01) and a decrease in fat percentage (P < 0.01) when contrasted with haplotype 8 (B-A1-ms4-E). The results provide evidence that in the Finnish Ayrshire breed at least one quantitative trait locus affecting the genetic variation in yields traits is segregating linked to either haplotype 3 (B-A2-ms4-A) or 8 (B-A1-ms4-E). PMID:8572365

  19. Sociodemographic and socioeconomic differences in sleep duration and insomnia-related symptoms in Finnish adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Poor sleep tends to be patterned by sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors with sleep duration and insomnia-related symptoms across life course. Methods We used cross-sectional Health 2000 Survey (2000–2001) among a total of 5,578 adult Finns, aged 30–79 years, representative of adult Finnish population. Data about sociodemographic and socioeconomic circumstances, insomnia-related symptoms over the previous month as well as average sleep duration were collected by questionnaires. Multinomial logistic regression models were adjusted first for gender and age, second for sociodemographic factors, third additionally for socioeconomic factors, and fourth for all covariates and self-perceived health simultaneously. Results On average 70% of Finnish adults slept 7–8 hours a day. Frequent insomnia-related symptoms were more prevalent among women (14%) than men (10%). Not being married, not having children, having low education, low income, being unemployed, and being a disability retiree were associated with frequent insomnia-related symptoms. Similar factors were associated with short and long sleep duration. However, childhood socioeconomic position was mostly unrelated to sleep in adulthood except parental education had some associations with short sleep duration. Conclusions Disadvantaged socioeconomic position in adulthood, in particular income and employment status, is associated with poorer sleep. When promoting optimal sleep duration and better sleep quality, families with low incomes, unemployed people, and disability retirees should be targeted. PMID:22839359

  20. Public Outcry Increasingly Becoming Safeguard of University Forests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Many universities and colleges own forestland. Although these lands can be worth billions of dollars, most are devoted to the institutional goals of education, research, and outreach. These forests become an integral part of the university and serve as teaching and research laboratories. They are usually called university or college forests or…