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Sample records for fish consumption methylmercury

  1. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    SciTech Connect

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks in the highest fish-consuming group ({approx}3 times

  2. Recognizing and Preventing Overexposure to Methylmercury from Fish and Seafood Consumption: Information for Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Silbernagel, Susan M.; Carpenter, David O.; Gilbert, Steven G.; Gochfeld, Michael; Groth, Edward; Hightower, Jane M.; Schiavone, Frederick M.

    2011-01-01

    Fish is a valuable source of nutrition, and many people would benefit from eating fish regularly. But some people eat a lot of fish, every day or several meals per week, and thus can run a significant risk of overexposure to methylmercury. Current advice regarding methylmercury from fish consumption is targeted to protect the developing brain and nervous system but adverse health effects are increasingly associated with adult chronic low-level methylmercury exposure. Manifestations of methylmercury poisoning are variable and may be difficult to detect unless one considers this specific diagnosis and does an appropriate test (blood or hair analysis). We provide information to physicians to recognize and prevent overexposure to methylmercury from fish and seafood consumption. Physicians are urged to ask patients if they eat fish: how often, how much, and what kinds. People who eat fish frequently (once a week or more often) and pregnant women are advised to choose low mercury fish. PMID:21785592

  3. Methylmercury in fish: a review of residue levels, fish consumption and regulatory action in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Tollefson, L.; Cordle, F.

    1986-09-01

    The dangers associated with the consumption of large amounts of methylmercury in fish are well recognized, and there is some evidence to suggest that methylmercury may be the cause of subtle neurological impairments when ingested at even low to moderate levels, particularly the prenatal and early childhood periods. This concern has prompted a continuing assessment of the risk of methylmercury toxicity among fish consumers in the US as well as other countries. The toxicokinetics of methylmercury in humans are reviewed and used to estimate body burdens associated with toxic effects. To determine seafood consumption patterns among the continental US population the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has analyzed data from a diary study commissioned by the Tuna Research Foundation. Mercury residue levels in domestic fish sampled by the FDA were used to determine the level of exposure to methylmercury. Until evidence is presented that substantially lowers the known body burden of methylmercury which causes toxicity, calculations indicate that the current 1.0 ppm regulatory level provides adequate protection for the average fish consumer, for young children, and for a significant number of consumers exceeding the acceptable daily intake. However, additional studies are being carried out in a continuing process to ensure that safe levels of prenatal exposure to mercury residues in fish are maintained.

  4. New Evidence on Variations of Human Body Burden of Methylmercury from Fish Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Canuel, René; de Grosbois, Sylvie Boucher; Atikessé, Laura; Lucotte, Marc; Arp, Paul; Ritchie, Charles; Mergler, Donna; Chan, Hing Man; Amyot, Marc; Anderson, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies commonly use mercury (Hg) level in hair as a valid proxy to estimate human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) through fish consumption. This study presents the results yielded by a complete data set on fish consumption habits, Hg levels in edible fish resources, and corresponding Hg accumulation in hair, gathered in three distinct communities of eastern Canada. For one of these communities, the average hair Hg concentration was 14 times less than the expected value based on calculated daily oral exposure and current knowledge of MeHg metabolism. This finding could be explained by differences in specific genetic characteristics and/or interactive effects of other dietary components. PMID:16451872

  5. Methylmercury Exposure and Health Effects from Rice and Fish Consumption: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Feng, Xinbin; Qiu, Guangle

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is highly toxic, and its principal target tissue in humans is the nervous system, which has made MeHg intoxication a public health concern for many decades. The general population is primarily exposed to MeHg through consumption of contaminated fish and marine mammals, but recent studies have reported high levels of MeHg in rice and confirmed that in China the main human exposure to MeHg is related to frequent rice consumption in mercury (Hg) polluted areas. This article reviews the progress in the research on MeHg accumulation in rice, human exposure and health effects, and nutrient and co-contaminant interactions. Compared with fish, rice is of poor nutritional quality and lacks specific micronutrients identified as having health benefits (e.g., n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid, selenium, essential amino acids). The effects of these nutrients on the toxicity of MeHg should be better addressed in future epidemiologic and clinical studies. More emphasis should be given to assessing the health effects of low level MeHg exposure in the long term, with appropriate recommendations, as needed, to reduce MeHg exposure in the rice-eating population. PMID:20644695

  6. Deleterious effects in mice of fish-associated methylmercury contained in a diet mimicking the Western populations' average fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Fujimura, Masatake; Laclau, Muriel; Sawada, Masumi; Yasutake, Akira

    2011-02-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin, and human beings are mainly exposed to this pollutant through fish consumption. Only a few contradictory epidemiological studies are currently available examining the impact of fish consumption on human populations. In the present study, we wanted to address whether a diet mimicking the fish consumption of Western populations could result in observable adverse effects in mice, and whether beneficial nutriments from fish were able to counterbalance the deleterious effects of MeHg, if any. In Europe and the United States, fish consumption varies widely between countries, from 11 to 100 g fish/day. A mid-range value of 25 g fish/day corresponds to a fish contribution to the total diet of 1.25% on a dry weight basis. We decided to supplement a vegetarian-based mouse diet with 1.25% of lyophilized salmon flesh (SAL diet), or 1.25% of a blend of lyophilized cod, tuna, and swordfish (CTS diet). Total mercury contents were 1.15±0.15, 2.3±0.1 and 35.75±0.15 ng Hg/g of food pellets for the control, SAL and CTS diets, respectively. After two months feeding, the CTS diet resulted in significant observable effects as compared to the control and SAL diets, encompassing decreased body growth, altered behavioral performance and increased anxiety level, modification of mitochondrial respiratory protein subunit concentrations in kidney and brain structures, modified gene expression patterns in kidneys, liver and muscles, and a decrease of dopamine concentrations in the hypothalamus and striatum. Our findings have health implications, firstly because 1.25% of CTS flesh in the diet corresponds to an average exposure to MeHg below the WHO provisory tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) (1.6 μg MeHg/kg of body weight/week), and secondly because many people in Western populations, among them women of child-bearing age, are exceeding the PTWI value (for instance, 35% of the French population inhabiting the Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts). PMID

  7. Balancing the benefits of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the risks of methylmercury exposure from fish consumption

    PubMed Central

    Mahaffey, Kathryn R; Sunderland, Elsie M; Chan, Hing Man; Choi, Anna L; Grandjean, Philippe; Mariën, Koenraad; Oken, Emily; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Schoeny, Rita; Weihe, Pál; Yan, Chong-Huai; Yasutake, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Fish and shellfish are widely available foods that provide important nutrients, particularly n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), to many populations globally. These nutrients, especially docosahexaenoic acid, confer benefits to brain and visual system development in infants and reduce risks of certain forms of heart disease in adults. However, fish and shellfish can also be a major source of methylmercury (MeHg), a known neurotoxicant that is particularly harmful to fetal brain development. This review documents the latest knowledge on the risks and benefits of seafood consumption for perinatal development of infants. It is possible to choose fish species that are both high in n-3 PUFAs and low in MeHg. A framework for providing dietary advice for women of childbearing age on how to maximize the dietary intake of n-3 PUFAs while minimizing MeHg exposures is suggested. PMID:21884130

  8. Mercury in women exposed to methylmercury through fish consumption, and in their newborn babies and breast milk

    SciTech Connect

    Skerfving, S.

    1988-10-01

    The presence of methylmercury in fish is a major environmental problem. During the major epidemics of methylmercury poisoning through sea food in Minamata in Japan, and through dressed seed in Iraq, there was a high prevalence of infants, who developed cerebral palsy. This was generally assumed to be due to intrauterine methylmercury poisoning, as it is well known, that methylmercury is transferred through the placenta into the fetus. There is also a possibility that exposure occurred through breast milk, as high levels of mercury in breast milk have been reported in mothers from Minamata. Information on the relationship between methylmercury exposure, mercury levels in blood of mothers and their babies, and levels in breast milk are reported here.

  9. Quantitative Approach for Incorporating Methylmercury Risks and Omega-3 Fatty Acid Benefits in Developing Species-Specific Fish Consumption Advice

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Gary L.; Toal, Brian F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite general agreement about the toxicity of methylmercury (MeHg), fish consumption advice remains controversial. Concerns have been raised that negative messages will steer people away from fish and omega-3 fatty acid (FA) benefits. One approach is to provide advice for individual species that highlights beneficial fish while cautioning against riskier fish. Objectives Our goal in this study was to develop a method to quantitatively analyze the net risk/benefit of individual fish species based on their MeHg and omega-3 FA content. Methods We identified dose–response relationships for MeHg and omega-3 FA effects on coronary heart disease (CHD) and neurodevelopment. We used the MeHg and omega-3 FA content of 16 commonly consumed species to calculate the net risk/benefit for each species. Results Estimated omega-3 FA benefits outweigh MeHg risks for some species (e.g., farmed salmon, herring, trout); however, the opposite was true for others (swordfish, shark). Other species were associated with a small net benefit (e.g., flounder, canned light tuna) or a small net risk (e.g., canned white tuna, halibut). These results were used to place fish into one of four meal frequency categories, with the advice tentative because of limitations in the underlying dose–response information. Separate advice appears warranted for the neurodevelopmental risk group versus the cardiovascular risk group because we found a greater net benefit from fish consumption for the cardiovascular risk group. Conclusions This research illustrates a framework for risk/benefit analysis that can be used to develop categories of consumption advice ranging from “do not eat” to “unlimited,” with the caveat that unlimited may need to be tempered for certain fish (e.g., farm-raised salmon) because of other contaminants and end points (e.g., cancer risk). Uncertainties exist in the underlying dose–response relationships, pointing in particular to the need for more research on

  10. Methods for Individualized Determination of Methylmercury Elimination Rate and De-Methylation Status in Humans Following Fish Consumption.

    PubMed

    Rand, Mathew D; Vorojeikina, Daria; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Jackson, Brian P; Scrimale, Thomas; Zareba, Grazyna; Love, Tanzy M; Myers, Gary J; Watson, Gene E

    2016-02-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) exposure via fish in the diet remains a priority public health concern. Individual variation in response to a given MeHg exposure and the biotransformation of MeHg that follows complicate our understanding of this issue. MeHg elimination from the human body occurs slowly (elimination rate (kel) approximately 0.01 day(-1) or approximately 70 days half-life [t1/2]) and is a major determinant of the Hg body burden resulting from fish consumption. The underlying mechanisms that control MeHg elimination from the human body remain poorly understood. We describe here improved methods to obtain a MeHg elimination rate via longitudinal Hg analysis in hair using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. We measured MeHg elimination rates in eight individuals following the consumption of 3 fish meals in two 75-day trials separated by a 4-month washout period. In addition, since MeHg biotransformation to inorganic Hg (I-Hg) is associated with Hg excretion, we speciated Hg in feces samples to estimate individual MeHg de-methylation status. We observed a wide range of MeHg elimination rates between individuals and within individuals over time (kel = 0.0163-0.0054 day(-1); estimated t1/2 = 42.5-128.3 days). The ratio of MeHg and I-Hg in feces also varied widely among individuals. While the %I-Hg in feces was likely influenced by dental amalgams, findings with subjects who lacked amalgams suggest that faster MeHg elimination is associated with a higher %I-Hg in feces indicating more complete de-methylation. We anticipate these methods will contribute to future investigations of genetic and dietary factors that influence MeHg disposition in people. PMID:26572661

  11. Disparity between state fish consumption advisory systems for methylmercury and US Environmental Protection Agency recommendations: A case study of the south central United States.

    PubMed

    Adams, Kimberly J; Drenner, Ray W; Chumchal, Matthew M; Donato, David I

    2016-01-01

    Fish consumption advisories are used to inform citizens in the United States about noncommercial game fish with hazardous levels of methylmercury (MeHg). The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) suggests issuing a fish consumption advisory when concentrations of MeHg in fish exceed a human health screening value of 300 ng/g. However, states have authority to develop their own systems for issuing fish consumption advisories for MeHg. Five states in the south central United States (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Texas) issue advisories for the general human population when concentrations of MeHg exceed 700 ng/g to 1000 ng/g. The objective of the present study was to estimate the increase in fish consumption advisories that would occur if these states followed USEPA recommendations. The authors used the National Descriptive Model of Mercury in Fish to estimate the mercury concentrations in 5 size categories of largemouth bass-equivalent fish at 766 lentic and lotic sites within the 5 states. The authors found that states in this region have not issued site-specific fish consumption advisories for most of the water bodies that would have such advisories if USEPA recommendations were followed. One outcome of the present study may be to stimulate discussion between scientists and policy makers at the federal and state levels about appropriate screening values to protect the public from the health hazards of consuming MeHg-contaminated game fish. PMID:26605989

  12. Disparity between state fish consumption advisory systems for Methylmercury and US Environmental Protection Agency recommendations: a case study of the South Central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Kimberly; Drenner, Ray W.; Chumchal, Matthew M.; Donato, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Fish consumption advisories are used to inform citizens in the United States about noncommercial game fish with hazardous levels of methylmercury (MeHg). The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) suggests issuing a fish consumption advisory when concentrations of MeHg in fish exceed a human health screening value of 300 ng/g. However, states have authority to develop their own systems for issuing fish consumption advisories for MeHg. Five states in the south central United States (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Texas) issue advisories for the general human population when concentrations of MeHg exceed 700 ng/g to 1000 ng/g. The objective of the present study was to estimate the increase in fish consumption advisories that would occur if these states followed USEPA recommendations. The authors used the National Descriptive Model of Mercury in Fish to estimate the mercury concentrations in 5 size categories of largemouth bass–equivalent fish at 766 lentic and lotic sites within the 5 states. The authors found that states in this region have not issued site-specific fish consumption advisories for most of the water bodies that would have such advisories if USEPA recommendations were followed. One outcome of the present study may be to stimulate discussion between scientists and policy makers at the federal and state levels about appropriate screening values to protect the public from the health hazards of consuming MeHg-contaminated game fish.

  13. Methylmercury in populations eating large quantities of marine fish

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.D.; Marsh, D.O.; Smith, J.C.; Inglis, J.B.; Clarkson, T.W.; Rubio, C.E.; Chiriboga, J.; Chiriboga, C.C.

    1980-11-01

    A Peruvian population was identified that was chronically exposed to methylmercury from the longterm consumption of ocean fish. The weekly fish intake averaged 10.1 kg per average family of 6.2 persons. Blood methylmercury concentrations ranged from 11 to 275 ng/ml, with a mean of 82 ng/ml. Paresthesias were reported by 29.5% of the population. In contrast, a nearby control population had a mean weekly fish consumption of 1.9 kg per average family of 6.4 persons. Their blood methylmercury levels were 3.3-25.1 ng/ml, with a mean of 9.9 ng/ml. Paresthesias were reported by 49.5% of this control group. No individual was identified with symptoms or signs that could be attributed to methylmercury intoxication.

  14. THE COMPETITION BETWEEN METHYLMERCURY RISKS AND OMEGA-3 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACID BENEFITS: A REVIEW OF CONFLICTING EVIDENCE ON FISH CONSUMPTION AND CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH.

    SciTech Connect

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2006-10-31

    The health concerns of methylmercury (MeHg) contamination of seafood have recently been extended to include cardiovascular effects, especially premature mortality. Although the fatty acids (fish oils) found in most species are thought to confer a wide range of health benefits, especially to the cardiovascular system, some epidemiological studies have suggested that such benefits may be offset by adverse effects of MeHg. This comprehensive review is based on searches of the NIH MEDLINE database and compares and contrasts 145 published studies involving cardiovascular effects and exposures to mercury and other fish contaminants, intake of fatty acids including dietary supplements of fish oils, and rates of seafood consumption. Since few of these studies include adequate simultaneous measurements of all of these potential predictor variables, we summarized their effects separately, across the available studies of each, and then drew conclusions based on the aggregated findings. It is important to realize that studies of seafood consumption encompass the net effects of all of these predictor variables, but that seafood intake studies are rarely supported by human biomarker measurements that reflect the actual uptake of harmful as well as beneficial fish ingredients. As a result, exposure measurement error is an issue when comparing studies and predictor variables. It is also possible that the observed benefits of eating fish may relate more to the characteristics of the consumers than to those of the fish. We found the evidence for adverse cardiovascular effects of MeHg to be sparse and unconvincing. Studies of cardiovascular mortality show net benefits, and the findings of adverse effects are mainly limited to studies Finland at high mercury exposure levels. By contrast, a very consistent picture of beneficial effects is seen for fatty acids, after recognizing the effects of exposure uncertainties and the presence of threshold effects. Studies based on measured

  15. Modeled methylmercury exposure and risk from rice consumption for vulnerable populations in a traditional fish-eating area in China.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yin-Dong; Ou, Lang-Bo; Chen, Long; Wang, Huan-Huan; Chen, Cen; Wang, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Qi-Guang

    2015-05-01

    The circulation of rice from contaminated areas could escalate exposure risk from a local problem to a national issue and affect a wider population beyond the region of origin, as confirmed by the "Poison Rice Incident" in May 2013 in Guangzhou, China. In the present study, the authors established a food chain model based on the aquivalence method to identify major sources of methylmercury (MeHg), estimate the levels of MeHg, and quantify exposure to MeHg via rice and aquatic food consumption. Different types of organism samples from the Haihe River also were collected to verify the calculated values. The MeHg intake in pregnant women was 1529.1 ng/d from the aquatic food chain and as high as 2804.0 ng/d from rice, although the intake varied among scenarios. The maximum possible MeHg concentration in the blood of pregnant women was 5.21 µg/L, higher than the threshold value of MeHg recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency (4.4 µg/L), which indicated that pregnant women could face risk from MeHg exposure. The authors also assessed the risk of MeHg exposure in pregnant women and their breastfed infants using a new index, HQEquivalent . In 4 scenarios, the HQEquivalent indices ranged from 0.42 to 1.18 for pregnant women and from 0.29 to 0.83 for breastfed infants. PMID:25639888

  16. Is susceptibility to prenatal methylmercury exposure from fish consumption non-homogeneous? Tree-structured analysis for the Seychelles Child Development Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Shan; Myers, Gary J; Davidson, Philip W; Cox, Christopher; Xiao, Fenyuan; Thurston, Sally W; Cernichiari, Elsa; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Sloane-Reeves, Jean; Georger, Lesley; Clarkson, Thomas W

    2007-11-01

    Studies of the association between prenatal methylmercury exposure from maternal fish consumption during pregnancy and neurodevelopmental test scores in the Seychelles Child Development Study have found no consistent pattern of associations through age 9 years. The analyses for the most recent 9-year data examined the population effects of prenatal exposure, but did not address the possibility of non-homogeneous susceptibility. This paper presents a regression tree approach: covariate effects are treated non-linearly and non-additively and non-homogeneous effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure are permitted among the covariate clusters identified by the regression tree. The approach allows us to address whether children in the lower or higher ends of the developmental spectrum differ in susceptibility to subtle exposure effects. Of 21 endpoints available at age 9 years, we chose the Weschler Full Scale IQ and its associated covariates to construct the regression tree. The prenatal mercury effect in each of the nine resulting clusters was assessed linearly and non-homogeneously. In addition we reanalyzed five other 9-year endpoints that in the linear analysis had a two-tailed p-value <0.2 for the effect of prenatal exposure. In this analysis, motor proficiency and activity level improved significantly with increasing MeHg for 53% of the children who had an average home environment. Motor proficiency significantly decreased with increasing prenatal MeHg exposure in 7% of the children whose home environment was below average. The regression tree results support previous analyses of outcomes in this cohort. However, this analysis raises the intriguing possibility that an effect may be non-homogeneous among children with different backgrounds and IQ levels. PMID:17942158

  17. Estimated intake levels for Finnish children of methylmercury from fish.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, Anna K; Hallikainen, Anja; Hirvonen, Tero; Kiviranta, Hannu; Knip, Mikael; Kronberg-Kippilä, Carina; Leino, Olli; Simell, Olli; Sinkko, Harri; Tuomisto, Jouni T; Veijola, Riitta; Venäläinen, Eija-Riitta; Virtanen, Suvi M

    2013-04-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a well-known neurotoxic agent, and consumption of contaminated fish is the principal environmental source of MeHg exposure in humans. Children are more susceptible to adverse effects than adults. No previous specific data exist for intake by Finnish children of methylmercury from fish. We estimated fish consumption and MeHg intakes from species most commonly consumed by Finnish children aged 1-6 years. The total mercury concentrations were determined in fish species consumed, and age-specific methylmercury intakes were derived. We also examined safety margins and the proportion of children exceeding the tolerable daily intakes set by international expert bodies. The daily intake of MeHg ranged from 0 to 0.33 μg/kg bw. The strictest reference value 0.1 μg/kg bw/day for MeHg, proposed by USEPA, was exceeded by 1-15% of the study population, and FAO/WHO JECFA provisional tolerable weekly intake of 1.6 μg/kg bw was exceeded by 1% of boys and 2.5% of girls aged 6 years. Intakes of 1-year old girls were higher than of boys, whereas for 3-year olds they were the opposite. The highest intakes were observed for 6-year-old boys and girls. There was great variation in the estimated MeHg intakes among Finnish children. PMID:22425939

  18. Awareness of methylmercury in fish and fish consumption among pregnant and postpartum women and women of childbearing age in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lando, Amy M; Fein, Sara B; Choinière, Conrad J

    2012-07-01

    In 2004, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reissued joint advice recommending that pregnant women, nursing mothers, young children, and women who may become pregnant not consume fish high in mercury such as shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish, and not consume more than 12 ounces (340.2g) of other lower mercury fish per week. These groups were encouraged to eat up to 12 ounces (340.2g) of low mercury fish per week to get the health benefits of fish. Using a survey of 1286 pregnant women, 522 postpartum women, and a control group of 1349 non-pregnant/non-postpartum women of childbearing age, this study evaluated awareness of mercury as a problem in food and examined fish consumption levels across groups using regression analysis. We also compared awareness of mercury as a problem in food to awareness of Listeria, dioxins and PCBs. We found that the majority of all 3 groups of women were aware of mercury and that nearly all women in all 3 groups limited consumption consistent with the advice; they ate less than 340.2g (12 oz) of fish per week and no high mercury fish. Compared with the control group, pregnant and postpartum women were more likely to be aware of mercury as a problem in food, and pregnant women ate less total fish and were less likely to eat fish, to eat more than 340.2g (12 oz) of fish, and to eat high mercury fish. However, all groups ate much less than the recommended 340.2g (12 oz) of low mercury fish per week for optimum health benefits. Among women who ate fish, the median intake of total fish was 51.6 g/wk (1.8 oz/wk), 71.4 g/wk (2.5 oz/wk), and 85.3 g/wk (3.0 oz/wk) for the pregnant, postpartum, and control groups, respectively. Thus, it appears that the targeted groups of women were more aware of mercury and were eating fish within the FDA/EPA guidelines, but these women may be missing the health benefits to themselves and their children of eating a sufficient amount of fish. PMID

  19. Behavioral teratology of methylmercury in fish

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, P.; Weis, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    Embryos of the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, were exposed to 2, 5, or 10 ug/l methylmercury throughout development. These are concentrations below those that can cause teratological effects. After hatching, larvae were maintained in clean sea water and tested for prey capture ability, using Artemia nauplii as prey. Individual fish larvae were provided with five brine shrimp and their capture times recorded. In all experiments, larvae that had been exposed to 10 ug/l methylmercury initially exhibited slower prey capture ability than the other groups. This is an indication of a subtle functional impairment due to the toxicant (``behavioral teratology``). However, the effect was transitory, and by about one week after hatching the prey capture of these larvae equaled that of the controls and the other treated groups. Growth of these larvae also equaled that of controls and the other groups. The embryonic exposure may have caused retardation of neurological development, which was subsequently compensated for, and therefore no permanent effects were produced. In the field, however, embryos exposed to such toxicants would probably continue to be exposed as larvae, and would not have the opportunity to recover from the effects, but rather might have them reinforced.

  20. Which Fish Should I Eat? Perspectives Influencing Fish Consumption Choices

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Anna L.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Mariën, Koenraad; Rheinberger, Christoph M.; Schoeny, Rita; Sunderland, Elsie; Korrick, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diverse perspectives have influenced fish consumption choices. Objectives: We summarized the issue of fish consumption choice from toxicological, nutritional, ecological, and economic points of view; identified areas of overlap and disagreement among these viewpoints; and reviewed effects of previous fish consumption advisories. Methods: We reviewed published scientific literature, public health guidelines, and advisories related to fish consumption, focusing on advisories targeted at U.S. populations. However, our conclusions apply to groups having similar fish consumption patterns. Discussion: There are many possible combinations of matters related to fish consumption, but few, if any, fish consumption patterns optimize all domains. Fish provides a rich source of protein and other nutrients, but because of contamination by methylmercury and other toxicants, higher fish intake often leads to greater toxicant exposure. Furthermore, stocks of wild fish are not adequate to meet the nutrient demands of the growing world population, and fish consumption choices also have a broad economic impact on the fishing industry. Most guidance does not account for ecological and economic impacts of different fish consumption choices. Conclusion: Despite the relative lack of information integrating the health, ecological, and economic impacts of different fish choices, clear and simple guidance is necessary to effect desired changes. Thus, more comprehensive advice can be developed to describe the multiple impacts of fish consumption. In addition, policy and fishery management inter-ventions will be necessary to ensure long-term availability of fish as an important source of human nutrition. PMID:22534056

  1. [Fish and seafood as a source of human exposure to methylmercury].

    PubMed

    Mania, Monika; Wojciechowska-Mazurek, Maria; Starska, Krystyna; Rebeniak, Małgorzata; Postupolski, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Fish and seafood are recommended diet constituents providing high quality protein, vitamins, minerals and omega-3 fatty acids, mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, these foodstuffs can also be the major source ofmethylmercury intake in humans. In general, more than 90% of the mercury in fish is found as methylmercury, but contents of methylmercury can vary considerably between species. Predatory species that are at the top of the food chain and live a long time, may accumulate higher levels of methylmercury. This paper contains information about sources of human exposure to organic compounds of mercury, toxicity, metabolism and transformation of mercury in the environment. Assessment of methylmercury by international risk assessment bodies such as the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and U.S. National Research Council (NRC) were presented. Climate changes and their influence on the mercury cycle in the environment especially mercury methylation and concentrations of methylmercury in marine species were also presented. Consumer advice prepared by European Commission and Member States as regards consumption of predatory fishes such as swordfish, tuna, shark, marlin and pike, taking into account the most vulnerable groups of population e.g. women planning pregnancy, pregnant or breastfeeding women and children were presented. Mercury and methylmercury contamination of fishes and seafood on the basis of the literature references as well as intake of mercury with fish and fish products in Poland and other European country were discussed. The role of selenium as a factor which counteracts methylmercury toxicity and protects against some neurological effects of methylmercury exposure in humans, as well as information on potential etiological factors connected with autism disorder were also described. Attention has also been drawn to increasing number of notifications to Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed

  2. Effects of Methylmercury Contained in a Diet Mimicking the Wayana Amerindians Contamination through Fish Consumption: Mercury Accumulation, Metallothionein Induction, Gene Expression Variations, and Role of the Chemokine CCL2

    PubMed Central

    Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Laclau, Muriel; Maury-Brachet, Régine; Gonzalez, Patrice; Baudrimont, Magalie; Mesmer-Dudons, Nathalie; Fujimura, Masatake; Marighetto, Aline; Godefroy, David; Rostène, William; Brèthes, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin, and human beings are mainly exposed to this pollutant through fish consumption. We addressed the question of whether a diet mimicking the fish consumption of Wayanas Amerindians from French Guiana could result in observable adverse effects in mice. Wayanas adult men are subjected to a mean mercurial dose of 7 g Hg/week/kg of body weight. We decided to supplement a vegetarian-based mice diet with 0.1% of lyophilized Hoplias aimara fish, which Wayanas are fond of and equivalent to the same dose as that afflicting the Wayanas Amerindians. Total mercury contents were 1.4 ± 0.2 and 5.4 ± 0.5 ng Hg/g of food pellets for the control and aimara diets, respectively. After 14 months of exposure, the body parts and tissues displaying the highest mercury concentration on a dry weight (dw) basis were hair (733 ng/g) and kidney (511 ng/g), followed by the liver (77 ng/g). Surprisingly, despite the fact that MeHg is a neurotoxic compound, the brain accumulated low levels of mercury (35 ng/g in the cortex). The metallothionein (MT) protein concentration only increased in those tissues (kidney, muscles) in which MeHg demethylation had occurred. This can be taken as a molecular sign of divalent mercurial contamination since only Hg2+ has been reported yet to induce MT accumulation in contaminated tissues. The suppression of the synthesis of the chemokine CCL2 in the corresponding knockout (KO) mice resulted in important changes in gene expression patterns in the liver and brain. After three months of exposure to an aimara-containing diet, eight of 10 genes selected (Sdhb, Cytb, Cox1, Sod1, Sod2, Mt2, Mdr1a and Bax) were repressed in wild-type mice liver whereas none presented a differential expression in KO Ccl2−/− mice. In the wild-type mice brain, six of 12 genes selected (Cytb, Cox1, Sod1, Sod2, Mdr1a and Bax) presented a stimulated expression, whereas all remained at the basal level of expression in KO Ccl2−/− mice. In the

  3. Effects of methylmercury contained in a diet mimicking the Wayana Amerindians contamination through fish consumption: mercury accumulation, metallothionein induction, gene expression variations, and role of the chemokine CCL2.

    PubMed

    Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Laclau, Muriel; Maury-Brachet, Régine; Gonzalez, Patrice; Baudrimont, Magalie; Mesmer-Dudons, Nathalie; Fujimura, Masatake; Marighetto, Aline; Godefroy, David; Rostène, William; Brèthes, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin, and human beings are mainly exposed to this pollutant through fish consumption. We addressed the question of whether a diet mimicking the fish consumption of Wayanas Amerindians from French Guiana could result in observable adverse effects in mice. Wayanas adult men are subjected to a mean mercurial dose of 7 g Hg/week/kg of body weight. We decided to supplement a vegetarian-based mice diet with 0.1% of lyophilized Hoplias aimara fish, which Wayanas are fond of and equivalent to the same dose as that afflicting the Wayanas Amerindians. Total mercury contents were 1.4 ± 0.2 and 5.4 ± 0.5 ng Hg/g of food pellets for the control and aimara diets, respectively. After 14 months of exposure, the body parts and tissues displaying the highest mercury concentration on a dry weight (dw) basis were hair (733 ng/g) and kidney (511 ng/g), followed by the liver (77 ng/g). Surprisingly, despite the fact that MeHg is a neurotoxic compound, the brain accumulated low levels of mercury (35 ng/g in the cortex). The metallothionein (MT) protein concentration only increased in those tissues (kidney, muscles) in which MeHg demethylation had occurred. This can be taken as a molecular sign of divalent mercurial contamination since only Hg(2+) has been reported yet to induce MT accumulation in contaminated tissues. The suppression of the synthesis of the chemokine CCL2 in the corresponding knockout (KO) mice resulted in important changes in gene expression patterns in the liver and brain. After three months of exposure to an aimara-containing diet, eight of 10 genes selected (Sdhb, Cytb, Cox1, Sod1, Sod2, Mt2, Mdr1a and Bax) were repressed in wild-type mice liver whereas none presented a differential expression in KO Ccl2(-/-) mice. In the wild-type mice brain, six of 12 genes selected (Cytb, Cox1, Sod1, Sod2, Mdr1a and Bax) presented a stimulated expression, whereas all remained at the basal level of expression in KO Ccl2(-/-) mice. In the

  4. Healthy fish consumption and reduced mercury exposure

    PubMed Central

    Abelsohn, Alan; Vanderlinden, Loren D.; Scott, Fran; Archbold, Josephine A.; Brown, Tara L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide family physicians with a practical, evidence-based approach to counseling women about healthy fish eating. Sources of information MEDLINE was searched for articles published between 1999 and 2008. Most studies described in this article provide level II or III evidence. Main message Fish is an important component of a healthy diet for women in their reproductive years owing to the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids on the neurologic development of the fetus. However, some fish species contain considerable methylmercury, which crosses the placenta and has harmful effects on neurobehavioural development. As many jurisdictions have issued fish consumption advisories, which can be confusing, women would benefit from individualized assistance from a trusted source, their family physicians, to clarify the risks and benefits of eating fish. Conclusion We recommend that family physicians counsel women in their reproductive years about healthy choices regarding fish in their diet, and provide appropriate resources. PMID:21322285

  5. Methylmercury and trace elements in the marine fish from coasts of East China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chonghuan; Wu, Xiaoguo; Lam, James C W; Xie, Zhouqing; Lam, Paul K S

    2013-01-01

    Fish consumption is an important source of human exposure to heavy metals. To determine the health risks for metals by consumption of marine fish in China, three species of fish, namely large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea), small yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena polyactis) and silver pomfret (Pampus argenteus) were collected and analyzed for methylmercury (MeHg), total mercury (T-Hg), selenium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, strontium and zinc. The large yellow croakers had the highest concentrations of mercury, lead, nickel and zinc, and the levels of MeHg were positively correlated to T-Hg. The ratios of MeHg to T-Hg in yellow croakers were significantly higher than those in silver pomfret, indicating differences in accumulation and magnification of MeHg in these two types of fish. The concentration of T-Hg was found to decrease as the Se level in fish tissues increased. Cadmium levels in 16% of the samples were higher than the criterion recommended by the European Commission Regulation. The concentrations of other metals were well below international standards. A human health risk assessment showed that the estimated daily intake of these metals did not exceed the reference dose established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The hazard quotients (HQs) were all less than 1, indicating a situation of no risk for consumption of these fish. PMID:23802158

  6. Risks and Benefits of Consumption of Great Lakes Fish

    PubMed Central

    Bhavsar, Satyendra P.; Bowerman, William; Boysen, Eric; Clark, Milton; Diamond, Miriam; Mergler, Donna; Pantazopoulos, Peter; Schantz, Susan; Carpenter, David O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Beneficial effects of fish consumption on early cognitive development and cardiovascular health have been attributed to the omega-3 fatty acids in fish and fish oils, but toxic chemicals in fish may adversely affect these health outcomes. Risk–benefit assessments of fish consumption have frequently focused on methylmercury and omega-3 fatty acids, not persistent pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, and none have evaluated Great Lakes fish consumption. Objectives: The risks and benefits of fish consumption have been established primarily for marine fish. Here, we examine whether sufficient data are available to evaluate the risks and benefits of eating freshwater fish from the Great Lakes. Methods: We used a scoping review to integrate information from multiple state, provincial, and federal agency sources regarding the contaminants and omega-3 fatty acids in Great Lakes fish and fish consumers, consumption rates and fish consumption advisories, and health effects of contaminants and omega-3 fatty acids. Data synthesis: Great Lakes fish contain persistent contaminants—many of which have documented adverse health effects —that accumulate in humans consuming them. In contrast, data are sparse on omega-3 fatty acids in the fish and their consumers. Moreover, few studies have documented the social and cultural benefits of Great Lakes fish consumption, particularly for subsistence fishers and native communities. At this time, federal and state/provincial governments provide fish consumption advisories based solely on risk. Conclusions: Our knowledge of Great Lakes fish has critical gaps, particularly regarding the benefits of consumption. A risk–benefit analysis requires more information than is currently available on the concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in Great Lakes fish and their absorption by fish eaters in addition to more information on the social, cultural, and health consequences of changes in the amount of fish consumed. PMID

  7. Performance Evaluation of an Improved GC-MS Method to Quantify Methylmercury in Fish.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Rieko; Hayashi, Tomoko; Akaki, Koichi; Teshima, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    Here, we set out to improve our previously developed methylmercury analytical method, involving phenyl derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In the improved method, phenylation of methylmercury with sodium tetraphenylborate was carried out in a toluene/water two-phase system, instead of in water alone. The modification enabled derivatization at optimum pH, and the formation of by-products was dramatically reduced. In addition, adsorption of methyl phenyl mercury in the GC system was suppressed by co-injection of PEG200, enabling continuous analysis without loss of sensitivity. The performance of the improved analytical method was independently evaluated by three analysts using certified reference materials and methylmercury-spiked fresh fish samples. The present analytical method was validated as suitable for determination of compliance with the provisional regulation value for methylmercury in fish, set in the Food Sanitation haw. PMID:26156161

  8. Fish consumption during pregnancy: an overview of the risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Dovydaitis, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Evidence supports the benefits of fish consumption during pregnancy, primarily because of the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the neurodevelopment of the fetus. Many fish may also be potent sources of methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenol exposure, which have been shown to have severe negative impacts on both the mother and fetus. Therefore, all women of childbearing age should be informed of both the benefits and risks of fish consumption. PMID:18586185

  9. Methylmercury Concentration in Fish and Risk-Benefit Assessment of Fish Intake among Pregnant versus Infertile Women in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Hsu, You-Wen; Chang, Tien-Chin; Chien, Ling-Chu

    2016-01-01

    This study examined methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish, the daily MeHg exposure dose, and the risk-benefit of MeHg, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) related to fish intake among pregnant and infertile women in Taiwan. The measured MeHg concentrations in fish did not exceed the Codex guideline level of 1 mg/kg. Swordfish (0.28 ± 0.23 mg/kg) and tuna (0.14 ± 0.13 mg/kg) had the highest MeHg concentrations. The MeHg concentration in the hair of infertile women (1.82 ± 0.14 mg/kg) was significantly greater than that of pregnant women (1.24 ± 0.18 mg/kg). In addition, 80% of infertile women and 68% of pregnant women had MeHg concentrations in hair that exceeded the USEPA reference dose (1 mg/kg). The MeHg concentrations in hair were significantly and positively correlated with the estimated daily MeHg exposure dose. Based on the risk-benefit evaluation results, this paper recommends consumption of fish species with a low MeHg concentration and high concentrations of DHA + EPA and ω-3 PUFA (e.g., salmon, mackerel, and greater amberjack). PMID:27187161

  10. Methylmercury Concentration in Fish and Risk-Benefit Assessment of Fish Intake among Pregnant versus Infertile Women in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Hsu, You-Wen; Chang, Tien-Chin; Chien, Ling-Chu

    2016-01-01

    This study examined methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish, the daily MeHg exposure dose, and the risk–benefit of MeHg, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) related to fish intake among pregnant and infertile women in Taiwan. The measured MeHg concentrations in fish did not exceed the Codex guideline level of 1 mg/kg. Swordfish (0.28 ± 0.23 mg/kg) and tuna (0.14 ± 0.13 mg/kg) had the highest MeHg concentrations. The MeHg concentration in the hair of infertile women (1.82 ± 0.14 mg/kg) was significantly greater than that of pregnant women (1.24 ± 0.18 mg/kg). In addition, 80% of infertile women and 68% of pregnant women had MeHg concentrations in hair that exceeded the USEPA reference dose (1 mg/kg). The MeHg concentrations in hair were significantly and positively correlated with the estimated daily MeHg exposure dose. Based on the risk–benefit evaluation results, this paper recommends consumption of fish species with a low MeHg concentration and high concentrations of DHA + EPA and ω-3 PUFA (e.g., salmon, mackerel, and greater amberjack). PMID:27187161

  11. Mercury and methylmercury concentrations in high altitude lakes and fish (Arctic charr) from the French Alps related to watershed characteristics.

    PubMed

    Marusczak, Nicolas; Larose, Catherine; Dommergue, Aurélien; Paquet, Serge; Beaulne, Jean-Sébastien; Maury-Brachet, Régine; Lucotte, Marc; Nedjai, Rachid; Ferrari, Christophe P

    2011-04-15

    Total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations were measured in the muscle of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) and in the water column of 4 lakes that are located in the French Alps. Watershed characteristics were determined (6 coverage classes) for each lake in order to evaluate the influence of watershed composition on mercury and methylmercury concentrations in fish muscle and in the water column. THg and MeHg concentrations in surface water were relatively low and similar among lakes and watershed characteristics play a major role in determining water column Hg and MeHg levels. THg muscle concentrations for fish with either a standardized length of 220mm, a standardized age of 5 years or for individualuals did not exceed the 0.5mg kg(-1) fish consumption advisory limit established for Hg by the World Health Organization (WHO, 1990). These relatively low THg concentrations can be explained by watershed characteristics, which lead to short Hg residence time in the water column, and also by the short trophic chain that is characteristic of mountain lakes. Growth rate did not seem to influence THg concentrations in fish muscles of these lakes and we observed no relationship between fish Hg concentrations and altitude. This study shows that in the French Alps, high altitude lakes have relatively low THg and MeHg concentrations in both the water column and in Arctic charr populations. Therefore, Hg does not appear to present a danger for local populations and the fishermen of these lakes. PMID:21371737

  12. Neurodevelopmental Effects of Maternal Nutritional Status and Exposure to Methylmercury from Eating Fish during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Philip W.; Strain, J.J.; Myers, Gary J.; Thurston, Sally W.; Bonham, Maxine P.; Shamlaye, Conrad F.; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Wallace, Julie M.W.; Robson, Paula J.; Duffy, Emeir M.; Georger, Lesley A.; Sloane-Reeves, Jean; Cernichiari, Elsa; Canfield, Richard L.; Cox, Christopher; Huang, Li Shan; Janciuras, Joanne; Clarkson, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Fish contain nutrients that promote optimal brain growth and development but also contain methylmercury (MeHg) that can have toxic effects. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intake of selected nutrients in fish or measures of maternal nutritional status may represent important confounders when estimating the effects of prenatal methylmercury exposure on child development. The study took place in the Republic of Seychelles, an Indian Ocean archipelago where fish consumption is high. A longitudinal cohort study design was used. A total of 300 mothers were enrolled early in pregnancy. Nutrients considered to be important for brain development were measured during pregnancy along with prenatal MeHg exposure. The children were evaluated periodically to age 30 months. There were 229 children with complete outcome and covariate data for analysis. The primary endpoint was the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II (BSID-II), administered at 9 and 30 months of age. Combinations of four secondary measures of infant cognition and memory were also given at 5, 9 and 25 months. Cohort mothers consumed an average of 537 gm of fish (9 meals containing fish) per week. The average prenatal MeHg exposure was 5.9 ppm in maternal hair. The primary analysis examined the associations between MeHg, maternal nutritional measures and children’s scores on the BSID-II and showed an adverse association between MeHg and the mean Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) score at 30 months. Secondary analyses of the association between the PDI and only MeHg alone or nutritional factors alone showed only a borderline significant association between MeHg and the PDI at 30 months and no associations with nutritional factors. One experimental measure at 5 months of age was positively associated with iodine status, but not prenatal MeHg exposure. These findings suggest a possible confounding role of maternal nutrition in studies examining associations between prenatal MeHg exposures and

  13. Comparison of direct mercury analyzer and FIA-CV-AAS in determination of methylmercury in fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, J. C.; Hortellani, M. A.; Sarkis, J. E. S.; Nakatsubo, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) has been determined in fish reference materials by direct mercury analyzer (DMA 80) and FIA-CV-AAS. In order to evaluate accuracy, certified reference materials (Fish protein, NRCC - Dorm 4 and fish material, Ipen - Dourada 1) were analyzed after extraction and separation of mercury species. Good agreement of the results have been obtained (relative error of the determination between the methods varied from 1.5% to 39%). The repeatability of the results varied from 4% to 26%.

  14. Total mercury, methylmercury and ethylmercury in marine fish and marine fishery products sold in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju-Sung; Jung, So-Young; Son, Yeo-Joon; Choi, Su-Jeong; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Jeong-Gon; Park, So-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Me; Chae, Young-Zoo; Kim, Min-Young

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, a survey of 177 samples of fish and fishery products from the markets in Seoul was carried out to investigate total mercury and organic mercury (methylmercury) concentrations and to establish a correlation, if any, between total and organic mercury levels. Concentrations of total and organic mercury in canned tuna ranged 0.001-2.581 and 0.003-1.307 mg/kg, respectively; those for fish, such as cod or salmon, ranged 0.012-2.529 and 0.021-0.507 mg/kg, respectively. Ethylmercury was not detected. More than 50% of total mercury in the samples existed as organic mercury. The correlation coefficients (r(2)) between total mercury and methylmercury concentrations of fish and fishery products found to have methylmercury were 0.844 and 0.976, respectively, which was statistically significant. There was a higher correlation in fishery products than in fish. Although there was no product in which mercury exceeded the standard set by the Food Code in 2008, with the exception of marlin steak, a processed food, which contained 1.307 mg/kg methylmercury. None exceeded the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) for mercury. Collectively, the results indicate that fish or fishery products marketed in Seoul, with the exception of marlin, have low levels of total or organic mercury and, thus, intake of these products is not a risk to public health. PMID:24786250

  15. Neurodevelopment of Amazonian children exposed to ethylmercury (from Thimerosal in vaccines) and methylmercury (from fish).

    PubMed

    Marques, Rejane C; Abreu, Luciana; Bernardi, José V E; Dórea, José G

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have addressed co-occurring methylmercury (MeHg) from maternal origin and ethylmercury (EtHg) from Thimerosal-containing vaccines (TCVs) during infant's neurodevelopment. We studied children (n=1139) from the Western Amazon based on combined (low, intermediate, and high) exposure to chronic MeHg from fish consumption and acute TCV- EtHg. Neurodevelopment outcomes were age of walking and age of talking, and the Bayley Scale of Infant Development (BSID). The Mental Developmental Index (MDI) and Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) were measured at six and 24 months of age. Median hair-Hg (HHg) at birth was 6.4µgg(-1) in mothers, and 1.94µgg(-1) in newborns; total (pregnancy and infancy) EtHg exposure ranged from 0 to 187.5µg. The combined (MeHg+EtHg) exposure showed significant differences for MDI but not for PDI; however, there was a significant decrease in both MDI and PDI scores at 24 months. The increase in BSID delays (scores <80) between six and 24 months was not discernible with regards to EtHg or MeHg exposure. We found a statistically significant increase in neurodevelopmental (BSID) delays related to the combined exposure to Hg (MeHg>EtHg). Neurodevelopment delays due to low-doses of organic mercury (albeit undiscernible) are not predictable but can be avoided by choosing low-Hg fish and providing Thimerosal-free vaccines. PMID:26774584

  16. Global methylmercury exposure from seafood consumption and risk of developmental neurotoxicity: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Thomas A; Navas-Acien, Ana; Breysse, Patrick N; McGready, John; Fox, Mary A

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine biomarkers of methylmercury (MeHg) intake in women and infants from seafood-consuming populations globally and characterize the comparative risk of fetal developmental neurotoxicity. Methods A search was conducted of the published literature reporting total mercury (Hg) in hair and blood in women and infants. These biomarkers are validated proxy measures of MeHg, a neurotoxin found primarily in seafood. Average and high-end biomarkers were extracted, stratified by seafood consumption context, and pooled by category. Medians for average and high-end pooled distributions were compared with the reference level established by a joint expert committee of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Findings Selection criteria were met by 164 studies of women and infants from 43 countries. Pooled average biomarkers suggest an intake of MeHg several times over the FAO/WHO reference in fish-consuming riparians living near small-scale gold mining and well over the reference in consumers of marine mammals in Arctic regions. In coastal regions of south-eastern Asia, the western Pacific and the Mediterranean, average biomarkers approach the reference. Although the two former groups have a higher risk of neurotoxicity than the latter, coastal regions are home to the largest number at risk. High-end biomarkers across all categories indicate MeHg intake is in excess of the reference value. Conclusion There is a need for policies to reduce Hg exposure among women and infants and for surveillance in high-risk populations, the majority of which live in low-and middle-income countries. PMID:24700993

  17. Percent methylmercury and organic mercury in tissues of marine mammals and fish using different experimental and calculation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemann, R.; Trebacz, E.; Hunt, R.; Boila, G.

    1997-09-01

    Muscle and liver tissues of marine mammals and fish were extracted with methylene chloride-hexane (DCM-hexane) or toluene and the extracts were analyzed for organic mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS) and for methylmercury by gas liquid chromatography with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD). Total mercury in tissues was determined by VCAAS. Methylmercury and organic mercury concentrations in muscle agreed with each other and with total mercury for both marine mammals and fish, indicating that on average 100% of the total mercury in this tissue was in the form of methylmercury. Either total mercury or organic mercury determined by CVAAS was found to be a valid measure of the average methylmercury concentration in muscles of marine mammals and fish. In liver, the CVAAS method produced higher mercury values (15% organic mercury) than the GC-ECD method (6% methylmercury), methylmercury being only 38% of organic mercury. From this, the presence of organic mercury compound(s) other than methylmercury was inferred. The CVAAS method produced a biased estimate of methylmercury in liver; an accurate measure of methylmercury in this tissue was obtained by GC-ECD, either with DCM-hexane or with toluene extraction. The DCM-hexane extract could be directly analyzed by CVAAS for organic mercury while toluene required an additional back-extraction step for such a determination. In calculating the average percentage of methylmercury and organic mercury in a sample, three different calculation methods were used. Only one of them, linear, robust regression analysis produced acceptable results when the variables (MeHg, organic Hg, total Hg) were significantly correlated. The other two methods overestimated the mean percentage under these conditions.

  18. In Inland China, Rice, Rather than Fish, Is the Major Pathway for Methylmercury Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Feng, Xinbin; Larssen, Thorjørn; Qiu, Guangle; Vogt, Rolf D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Fish consumption is considered the primary pathway of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure for most people in the world. However, in the inland regions of China, most of the residents eat little fish, but they live in areas where a significant amount of mercury (Hg) is present in the environment. Objectives We assessed concentrations of total Hg and MeHg in samples of water, air, agricultural products, and other exposure media to determine the main exposure pathway of Hg in populations in inland China. Methods We selected Guizhou Province for our study because it is highly contaminated with Hg and therefore is representative of other Hg-contaminated areas in China. We selected four study locations in Guizhou Province: three that represent typical environments with severe Hg pollution [due to Hg mining and smelting (Wanshan), traditional zinc smelting (recently closed; Weining), and heavy coal-based industry (Qingzhen)], and a village in a remote nature reserve (Leigong). Results The probable daily intake (PDI) of MeHg for an adult population based on 60 kg body weight (bw) was considerably higher in Wanshan than in the other three locations. With an average PDI of 0.096 μg/kg bw/day (range, 0.015–0.45 μg/kg bw/day), approximately 34% of the inhabitants in Wanshan exceeded the reference dose of 0.1 μg/kg bw/day established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The PDI of MeHg for residents in the three other locations were all well below 0.1 μg/kg bw/day (averages from 0.017 to 0.023 μg/kg bw/day, with a maximum of 0.095 μg/kg bw/day). In all four areas, rice consumption accounted for 94–96% of the PDI of MeHg. Conclusion We found that rice consumption is by far the most important MeHg exposure route; however, most of the residents (except those in Hg-mining areas) have low PDIs of MeHg. PMID:20378486

  19. NHD INDEXED LOCATIONS FOR FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish consumption advisories and fish tissue sampling stations are reported to EPA by the states. Sampling stations are the locations where a state has collected fish tissue data for use in advisory determinations. Fish consumption advisory locations are coded onto route.drain (...

  20. Methylmercury concentrations in six fish species from two Colombian rivers.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Santiago; Jessick, Ashley M; Palacio, Jaime A; Kolok, Alan S

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether fish collected from the La Miel or Nechí Rivers (Colombia) differed in muscle methyl mercury (meHg) concentration. Two fish from six different species were collected from markets adjacent to each river. Overall, fish collected from the market adjacent to the Nechí River contained higher levels of meHg. This result however is being driven by very high meHg concentrations in four individual fish, three of which are Pimelodid, long-whiskered catfish. These catfish may represent ideal sentinel organism for the detection of meHg contamination in Colombian rivers. PMID:22065125

  1. Hair Mercury and Fish Consumption in Residents of O‘ahu, Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Penelope JE; Ji, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have established that men are susceptible to cardiotoxicity from methylmercury exposure, which also poses risks to the pregnant woman. Hair samples were obtained and questionnaires for methylmercury exposure assessment were administered to 110 adults (57 men, 53 women) throughout O‘ahu, Hawai‘i during December 2010 to January 2011. Hair samples were analyzed for total mercury with a direct mercury analyzer. Men ≥ 46 years had a median of 2.0 µg/g, which was above the reference dose of 1 µg/g, as compared to younger men with a median 1.0 µg/g (P < 0.05). Hair concentrations from older women had a median of 1.2 µg/g of mercury compared to 0.6 µg/g for younger women. Additionally, 38% of women of childbearing age had a Hazard Index > 1.0. This indicates that both men and women were at risk for excessive methylmercury exposure. In the final regression model, male gender, age > 45 years, length of residency > 10 years in Hawai‘i, and fish consumption frequency > 1 meal per week were significant factors in increased hair mercury levels. Following safe fish consumption practices allows residents to reap health benefits of fish consumption without excessive toxicant exposure. PMID:24470983

  2. Methylmercury: a new look at the risks.

    PubMed Central

    Mahaffey, K R

    1999-01-01

    In the US, exposure to methylmercury, a neurotoxin, occurs primarily through consumption of fish. Data from recent studies assessing the health impact of methylmercury exposure due to consumption of fish and other sources in the aquatic food web (shellfish, crustacea, and marine mammals) suggest adverse effects at levels previously considered safe. There is substantial variation in human methylmercury exposure based on differences in the frequency and amount of fish consumed and in the fish's mercury concentration. Although virtually all fish and other seafood contain at least trace amounts of methylmercury, large predatory fish species have the highest concentrations. Concerns have been expressed about mercury exposure levels in the US, particularly among sensitive populations, and discussions are underway about the standards used by various federal agencies to protect the public. In the 1997 Mercury Study Report to Congress, the US Environmental Protection Agency summarized the current state of knowledge on methylmercury's effects on the health of humans and wildlife; sources of mercury; and how mercury is distributed in the environment. This article summarizes some of the major findings in the Report to Congress and identifies issues of concern to the public health community. Images p396-a p397-a p399-a p406-a p408-a p410-a PMID:10590759

  3. Consumption patterns and why people fish.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna

    2002-10-01

    Recreational and subsistence fishing play major roles in the lives of many people, although their importance in urban areas is often underestimated. There are fish and shellfish consumption advisories in the New York-New Jersey harbor estuary, particularly in the waters of the Newark Bay Complex. This paper examines fishing behavior, consumption patterns, and the reasons that people fish in the Newark Bay Complex. I test the null hypotheses that there are no differences among Asians, Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites in consumption patterns for fish and crabs and in the reasons that they fish or crab. Most people either fished or crabbed, but not both. People who fish and crab ate more grams of crab than fish in a given meal; people who crab only consumed more grams of crab at a meal than those who fish only consumed of fish. Although 30% or more of the people who fished and crabbed in the Newark Bay Complex did not eat their self-caught fish or crabs 8-25% of the people ate more than 1500 g/month. Some people angling in the Newark Bay Complex are eating crabs at a rate well over 1500 g/month, and about 70% are eating crabs even though there is a total ban on both harvest and consumption because of the health risks from dioxin. Consumption patterns were negatively correlated with mean income and positively correlated with mean age. Most people rated relaxation and being outdoors the highest reasons for angling, although on an open-ended question they usually listed recreation. There were no ethnic differences in reasons for angling, although other studies have shown ethnic differences in consumption. Obtaining fish or crabs to eat, give away, trade, or sell were rated low, suggesting that consumption advisories fail partly because people are not primarily fishing for food. PMID:12483803

  4. Methylmercury and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... king crab, shrimp), or canned fish (including light tuna). Fish sticks and fast-food fish are likely ... with lower levels of methylmercury. Canned albacore (white) tuna and fresh tuna steaks typically have higher mercury ...

  5. Fish consumption recommendations to conform to current advice in regard to mercury intake.

    PubMed

    Vieira, H C; Morgado, F; Soares, A M V M; Abreu, S N

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews fish consumption data, mercury tolerable intake values, and mercury (Hg) content in fish, based on several reports from the Food and Agriculture Organization and European Union. The study assumptions are valid based on the current established USEPA reference dose (RfD). Combining the number of meals (per week), amount of fish ingested (by meal), and levels of MeHg in fish, this study calculates and presents isocurves indicating the maximum number of fishmeal per week without exceeding the USEPA RfD for methylmercury (MeHg). RfD are assumed to be the "exposure dose that is likely to be without deleterious effect even if continued exposure occurs over a lifetime." The study points out that even considering a single 50-g fish meal per week, the USEPA RfD would be exceeded, triggered by values above 0.84 μg g(-1) of MeHg in fish, and this despite being allowed levels up to 1.0 μg g(-1) of MeHg in fish consumption!-Have we a health risk? Fish consumption is expected to be relatively stable, while anthropogenic mercury emissions are expected to stabilize or even to increase beyond current values. How many meals of fish per week can we have, combining the number of fish meals per week, amount of fish ingested by meal, and levels of MeHg in fish? PMID:25948385

  6. Absence of fractionation of mercury isotopes during trophic transfer of methylmercury to freshwater fish in captivity

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sae Yun; Blum, Joel D; Carvan, Michael J; Basu, Niladri; Head, Jessica A; Madenjian, Charles P; David, Solomon R

    2015-01-01

    We performed two controlled experiments to determine the amount of mass-dependent and mass-independent fractionation (MDF and MIF) of methylmercury (MeHg) during trophic transfer into fish. In Experiment 1, juvenile yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were raised in captivity on commercial food pellets and then their diet was either maintained on un-amended food pellets (0.1 µg/g MeHg), or was switched to food pellets with 1.0 µg/g or 4.0 µg/g of added MeHg, for a period of 2 months. The difference in δ202Hg (MDF) and Δ199Hg (MIF) between fish tissues and food pellets with added MeHg were within the analytical uncertainty (δ202Hg; 0.07 ‰, Δ199Hg; 0.06 ‰) indicating no isotope fractionation. In Experiment 2, lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) were raised in captivity on food pellets, and then shifted to a diet of bloater (Coregonus hoyi) for 6 months. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg of the lake trout equaled the isotopic composition of the bloater after 6 months, reflecting re-equilibration of the Hg isotopic composition of the fish to new food sources and a lack of isotope fractionation during trophic transfer. We suggest that the stable Hg isotope ratios in fish can be used to trace environmental sources of Hg in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:22681311

  7. Absence of fractionation of mercury isotopes during trophic transfer of methylmercury to freshwater fish in captivity.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sae Yun; Blum, Joel D; Carvan, Michael J; Basu, Niladri; Head, Jessica A; Madenjian, Charles P; David, Solomon R

    2012-07-17

    We performed two controlled experiments to determine the amount of mass-dependent and mass-independent fractionation (MDF and MIF) of methylmercury (MeHg) during trophic transfer into fish. In experiment 1, juvenile yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were raised in captivity on commercial food pellets and then their diet was either maintained on unamended food pellets (0.1 μg/g MeHg) or was switched to food pellets with 1.0 μg/g or 4.0 μg/g of added MeHg, for a period of 2 months. The difference in δ(202)Hg (MDF) and Δ(199)Hg (MIF) between fish tissues and food pellets with added MeHg was within the analytical uncertainty (δ(202)Hg, 0.07 ‰; Δ(199)Hg, 0.06 ‰), indicating no isotope fractionation. In experiment 2, lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) were raised in captivity on food pellets and then shifted to a diet of bloater (Coregonus hoyi) for 6 months. The δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg of the lake trout equaled the isotopic composition of the bloater after 6 months, reflecting reequilibration of the Hg isotopic composition of the fish to new food sources and a lack of isotope fractionation during trophic transfer. We suggest that the stable Hg isotope ratios in fish can be used to trace environmental sources of Hg in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:22681311

  8. Absence of fractionation of mercury isotopes during trophic transfer of methylmercury to freshwater fish in captivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kwon, Sae Yun; Blum, Joel D.; Carvan, Michael J.; Basu, Niladri; Head, Jessica A.; Madenjian, Charles P.; David, Solomon R.

    2012-01-01

    We performed two controlled experiments to determine the amount of mass-dependent and mass-independent fractionation (MDF and MIF) of methylmercury (MeHg) during trophic transfer into fish. In experiment 1, juvenile yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were raised in captivity on commercial food pellets and then their diet was either maintained on unamended food pellets (0.1 μg/g MeHg) or was switched to food pellets with 1.0 μg/g or 4.0 μg/g of added MeHg, for a period of 2 months. The difference in δ202Hg (MDF) and Δ199Hg (MIF) between fish tissues and food pellets with added MeHg was within the analytical uncertainty (δ202Hg, 0.07 ‰; Δ199Hg, 0.06 ‰), indicating no isotope fractionation. In experiment 2, lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) were raised in captivity on food pellets and then shifted to a diet of bloater (Coregonus hoyi) for 6 months. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg of the lake trout equaled the isotopic composition of the bloater after 6 months, reflecting reequilibration of the Hg isotopic composition of the fish to new food sources and a lack of isotope fractionation during trophic transfer. We suggest that the stable Hg isotope ratios in fish can be used to trace environmental sources of Hg in aquatic ecosystems.

  9. Mercury exposure as a function of fish consumption in two Asian communities in coastal Virginia, USA.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Newman, Michael C

    2015-04-01

    Fish consumption and associated mercury exposure were explored for two Asian-dominated church communities in coastal Virginia and compared with that of two non-Asian church communities. Seafood-consumption rates for the Chinese (36.9 g/person/day) and Vietnamese (52.7 g/person/day) church communities were greater than the general United States fish-consumption rate (12.8 g/person/day). Correspondingly, hair mercury concentrations for people from the Chinese (0.52 µg/g) and the Vietnamese church (1.46 µg/g) were greater than the overall level for United States women (0.20 µg/g) but lower than the published World Health Organization exposure threshold (14 µg/g). A conventional regression model indicated a positive relationship between seafood consumption rates and hair mercury concentrations suggesting the importance of mercury exposure through seafood consumption. The annual-average daily methylmercury intake rate for the studied communities calculated by Monte Carlo simulations followed the sequence: Vietnamese community > Chinese community > non-Asian communities. Regardless, their daily methylmercury intake rates were all lower than the United States Environmental Protection Agency reference dose of 0.1 µg/kg body weight-day. In conclusion, fish-consumption patterns differed among communities, which resulted in different levels of mercury exposure. The greater seafood and mercury ingestion rates of studied Asian groups compared with non-Asian groups suggest the need for specific seafood consumption advice for ethnic communities in the United States. Otherwise the health benefits from fish consumption could be perceived as trivial compared with the ill-defined risk of mercury exposure. PMID:25430872

  10. Fish consumption and track to a fish feed formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai-Juan, Soong; Ramli, Razamin; Rahman, Rosshairy Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Strategically located in the equator, Malaysia is blessed with plenty of fish supply. The high demand in fish consumption has helped the development in the fishery industry and provided numerous jobs in the secondary sector, contributing significantly to the nation's income. A survey was conducted to understand the trend of current demands for fish for the purpose of designing a feed formulation, which is still limited in this area of study. Results showed that grouper fish in restaurants commanded a very high price compared to other species of fish. Tiger grouper gained the highest demand in most restaurants, while giant grouper had the highest price in restaurants. Due to the demand and challenges to culture this type of fish, a framework for fish feed formulation is proposed. The formulation framework when materialized could be an alternative to the use of trash fish as the feed for grouper.

  11. What determines fresh fish consumption in Croatia?

    PubMed

    Tomić, Marina; Matulić, Daniel; Jelić, Margareta

    2016-11-01

    Although fresh fish is widely available, consumption still remains below the recommended intake levels among the majority of European consumers. The economic crisis affects consumer food behaviour, therefore fresh fish is perceived as healthy but expensive food product. The aim of this study was to determine the factors influencing fresh fish consumption using an expanded Theory of Planned Behaviour (Ajzen, 1991) as a theoretical framework. The survey was conducted on a heterogeneous sample of 1151 Croatian fresh fish consumers. The study investigated the relationship between attitudes, perceived behavioural control, subjective norm, moral obligation, involvement in health, availability, intention and consumption of fresh fish. Structural Equation Modeling by Partial Least Squares was used to analyse the collected data. The results indicated that attitudes are the strongest positive predictor of the intention to consume fresh fish. Other significant predictors of the intention to consume fresh fish were perceived behavioural control, subjective norm, health involvement and moral obligation. The intention to consume fresh fish showed a strong positive correlation with behaviour. This survey provides valuable information for food marketing professionals and for the food industry in general. PMID:26721719

  12. Organotin intake through fish consumption in Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Airaksinen, Riikka; Rantakokko, Panu; Turunen, Anu W.; Vartiainen, Terttu; Vuorinen, Pekka J.; Lappalainen, Antti; Vihervuori, Aune; Mannio, Jaakko; Hallikainen, Anja

    2010-08-15

    Background: Organotin compounds (OTCs) are a large class of synthetic chemicals with widely varying properties. Due to their potential adverse health effects, their use has been restricted in many countries. Humans are exposed to OTCs mostly through fish consumption. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe OTC exposure through fish consumption and to assess the associated potential health risks in a Finnish population. Methods: An extensive sampling of Finnish domestic fish was carried out in the Baltic Sea and freshwater areas in 2005-2007. In addition, samples of imported seafood were collected in 2008. The chemical analysis was performed in an accredited testing laboratory during 2005-2008. Average daily intake of the sum of dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), triphenyltin (TPhT) and dioctyltin (DOT) ({Sigma}OTCs) for the Finnish population was calculated on the basis of the measured concentrations and fish consumption rates. Results: The average daily intake of {Sigma}OTCs through fish consumption was 3.2 ng/kg bw day{sup -1}, which is 1.3% from the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) of 250 ng/kg bw day{sup -1} set by the European Food Safety Authority. In total, domestic wild fish accounted for 61% of the {Sigma}OTC intake, while the intake through domestic farmed fish was 4.0% and the intake through imported fish was 35%. The most important species were domestic perch and imported salmon and rainbow trout. Conclusions: The Finnish consumers are not likely to exceed the threshold level for adverse health effects due to OTC intake through fish consumption.

  13. Social communication network analysis of the role of participatory research in the adoption of new fish consumption behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Frédéric; Saint-Charles, Johanne; Mergler, Donna

    2012-08-01

    The formulation and communication of fish advisories are highly complex because of the potential conflict between the nutritional and toxicological issues associated with fish consumption. Government and organization-sponsored fish advisories have had limited success in changing behaviors. Participatory approaches may enhance the understanding of complex issues and the adoption of new behaviors. Here we used social network analysis to investigate the adoption of dietary changes within the context of a community participatory research project. In the Brazilian Amazon, many communities are highly exposed to methylmercury from fish consumption. A participatory intervention based on dietary changes aimed at reducing methylmercury exposure while maintaining fish consumption was initiated in 1995. In 2001, we collected data on individual participation in the research, on the discussion network regarding mercury issues and on changes in fish consumption from 96 of the 110 village households. More than half of men and women had adopted new fish consumption behavior to reduce mercury exposure. Adoption was associated with participation in the research project for both women and men, and with a higher number of discussion partners about mercury issues for women. Adoption was likewise associated with the presence of a female communication partner in the personal networks of both men and women. At the household level, men and women who considered their spouse as a discussion partner were more likely to adopt than those who did not. Opinion le]adership was associated with change in fish consumption only for women. We discuss the contribution of community participation and communication networks to overcome the difficulties in generating complex messages that take into account both health benefits and risks of fish consumption. We also discuss the relevance of building preventive health programs based on participatory research approaches and the roles and relations specific to

  14. Methylmercury exposure in a subsistence fishing community in Lake Chapala, Mexico: an ecological approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Elevated concentrations of mercury have been documented in fish in Lake Chapala in central Mexico, an area that is home to a large subsistence fishing community. However, neither the extent of human mercury exposure nor its sources and routes have been elucidated. Methods Total mercury concentrations were measured in samples of fish from Lake Chapala; in sections of sediment cores from the delta of Rio Lerma, the major tributary to the lake; and in a series of suspended-particle samples collected at sites from the mouth of the Lerma to mid-Lake. A cross-sectional survey of 92 women ranging in age from 18-45 years was conducted in three communities along the Lake to investigate the relationship between fish consumption and hair mercury concentrations among women of child-bearing age. Results Highest concentrations of mercury in fish samples were found in carp (mean 0.87 ppm). Sediment data suggest a pattern of moderate ongoing contamination. Analyses of particles filtered from the water column showed highest concentrations of mercury near the mouth of the Lerma. In the human study, 27.2% of women had >1 ppm hair mercury. On multivariable analysis, carp consumption and consumption of fish purchased or captured from Lake Chapala were both associated with significantly higher mean hair mercury concentrations. Conclusions Our preliminary data indicate that, despite a moderate level of contamination in recent sediments and suspended particulate matter, carp in Lake Chapala contain mercury concentrations of concern for local fish consumers. Consumption of carp appears to contribute significantly to body burden in this population. Further studies of the consequences of prenatal exposure for child neurodevelopment are being initiated. PMID:20064246

  15. Awareness and knowledge of methylmercury in fish in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lando, Amy M; Zhang, Yuanting

    2011-04-01

    In the 1970s several states in the Great Lakes region became concerned about mercury contamination in lakes and rivers and were the first to issue local fish consumption advisories. In 2001, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advised pregnant women, nursing mothers, young children, and women who may become pregnant not to consume shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish and recommended that these women not exceed 12 ounces of other fish per week. In 2004, FDA reissued this advice jointly with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and modified it slightly to provide information about consumption of canned tuna and more details about consumption of recreationally caught fish. Though several studies have examined consumers' awareness of the joint FDA and EPA advisory as well as different state advisories, few used representative data. We examined the changes in awareness and knowledge of mercury as a problem in fish using the pooled nationally representative 2001 and 2006 Food Safety Surveys (FSS) with sample sizes of 4482 in 2001 and 2275 in 2006. Our results indicated an increase in consumers' awareness of mercury as a problem in fish (69% in 2001 to 80% in 2006, p<.001). In our regression models, we found that in both years, parents having children less than 5 years of age were more aware of mercury in fish and knowledgeable about the information contained in the national advisories about mercury in fish (p<.01) than other adults. In both 2001 and 2006, women of childbearing age (aged 18-45) were less aware and knowledgeable about this information than other women. However, women of all age groups had larger gains in awareness and knowledge than their male counterparts during this time. Participants' race, education, income, region, fish preparation experiences, having a foodborne illness in the past year, and risk perceptions about the safety of food were significant predictors of their awareness and knowledge. PMID:21257163

  16. Fish consumption and advisory awareness among low-income women in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

    PubMed

    Silver, Elana; Kaslow, Jessica; Lee, Diana; Lee, Sun; Lynn Tan, May; Weis, Erica; Ujihara, Alyce

    2007-07-01

    Fishing is a culturally important activity to the ethnically diverse population living in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Due to runoff from abandoned gold mines, certain Delta fish are contaminated with methylmercury, a neurodevelopmental toxin. A state health advisory recommends limited consumption of certain Delta fish, to be followed in conjunction with a federal advisory for commercial and sport fish. We conducted a survey of low-income women at a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic, to characterize commercial and sport fish consumption patterns and advisory awareness. Ninety-five percent of women consumed commercial fish. Thirty-two percent consumed sport fish; this proportion was much higher in Hmong (86%) and Cambodian (75%) women. Ninety-nine percent of sport fish consumers also consumed commercial fish. The overall fish consumption rate among consumers was 27.9 g/day (geometric mean, past 30 days, cooked portion); commercial and sport fish consumption rates were 26.3 and 10.5 g/day, respectively. We found ethnic differences in overall fish consumption rates, which were highest in African Americans (41.2 g/day) and Asians (35.6 g/day), particularly Vietnamese and Cambodians. Pregnant women ate less fish overall than other women (16.8 vs. 30.0 g/day, p=0.0001), as did women who demonstrated specific advisory awareness (23.3 vs. 30.3 g/day, p=0.02). Twenty-nine percent of all women exceeded federal fish consumption advisory limits. These results highlight the need for culturally and linguistically appropriate interventions that address both commercial and sport fish consumption. PMID:17459365

  17. RISK COMMUNICATION TOOLS FOR FISH CONSUMPTION ADVISORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In EPA's Mercury Report to Congress an important finding ws that certain populations of subsistence fishermen are at high risk for methyl mercury toxicity because of their high consumption of contaminated fish. Often health risks of Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxicants (PBT) such...

  18. Awareness and knowledge of methylmercury in fish in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lando, Amy M.; Zhang, Yuanting

    2011-04-15

    In the 1970s several states in the Great Lakes region became concerned about mercury contamination in lakes and rivers and were the first to issue local fish consumption advisories. In 2001, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advised pregnant women, nursing mothers, young children, and women who may become pregnant not to consume shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish and recommended that these women not exceed 12 ounces of other fish per week. In 2004, FDA reissued this advice jointly with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and modified it slightly to provide information about consumption of canned tuna and more details about consumption of recreationally caught fish. Though several studies have examined consumers' awareness of the joint FDA and EPA advisory as well as different state advisories, few used representative data. We examined the changes in awareness and knowledge of mercury as a problem in fish using the pooled nationally representative 2001 and 2006 Food Safety Surveys (FSS) with sample sizes of 4482 in 2001 and 2275 in 2006. Our results indicated an increase in consumers' awareness of mercury as a problem in fish (69% in 2001 to 80% in 2006, p<.001). In our regression models, we found that in both years, parents having children less than 5 years of age were more aware of mercury in fish and knowledgeable about the information contained in the national advisories about mercury in fish (p<.01) than other adults. In both 2001 and 2006, women of childbearing age (aged 18-45) were less aware and knowledgeable about this information than other women. However, women of all age groups had larger gains in awareness and knowledge than their male counterparts during this time. Participants' race, education, income, region, fish preparation experiences, having a foodborne illness in the past year, and risk perceptions about the safety of food were significant predictors of their awareness and knowledge. - Research highlights: {yields} We

  19. Great Lakes fish consumption and reproductive outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, E.

    1989-01-01

    This epidemiological investigation determined prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), through contaminated fish consumption, and ascertained reproductive outcomes. Green Bay, Wisconsin was chosen as the study site because it was known for its environmental contamination of PCBs. These chemicals are environmentally stable and persistent, and tend to bioaccumulate up the food chain, with highest levels found in predatory sport fish from Lake Michigan. The Green Bay area provided a population with potential PCB exposure from sport fish consumption. Accidental poisoning incidents showed detrimental reproductive effects of high dose PCB exposures. A Michigan study found significant effects on birth weight and gestational age when mothers consumed two sport fish meals per month. This study population was drawn from women during their first prenatal visit at two Green Bay clinics during a one year period. 1,112 participants completed a self-administered questionnaire. Maternal and cord blood samples were obtained for selected PCB serum analyses. Reproductive outcome measures were abstracted from hospital labor reports. Study results indicated that maternal consumption was correlated to maternal PCB serum levels. Regression techniques estimated significant exposure coefficients for subsets of two birth size parameters. Birth length was positively associated with PCB exposure in shorter mothers. Significant associations of PCB exposure and birth weight percentiles were estimated for two income groups in the urban residence/weight gain less than 34 pounds subset.

  20. A longitudinal study of mercury exposure associated with consumption of freshwater fish from a reservoir in rural south central USA.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhao; Jim, Rebecca C; Hatley, Earl L; Backus, Ann S N; Shine, James P; Spengler, John D; Schaider, Laurel A

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) exposure through fish consumption is a worldwide health concern. Saltwater fish account for most dietary MeHg exposure in the general U.S. population, but less is known about seasonal variations in MeHg exposure and fish consumption among millions of freshwater anglers. This longitudinal study examined associations between MeHg exposure and fish consumption in a rural, low-income population relying on a freshwater reservoir (Oklahoma, USA) for recreational and subsistence fishing. We interviewed 151 participants, primarily anglers and their families, seasonally for one year using 90-day recall food frequency questionnaires to assess general and species-specific fish consumption, and tested hair biomarker samples for total mercury (THg hair). Mean THg hair was 0.27 μg/g (n=595, range: 0.0044-3.1 μg/g), with 4% of participants above U.S. EPA's guideline for women of childbearing age and children. Mean fish consumption was 58 g/d (95% CI: 49-67 g/d), within the range previously reported for recreational freshwater anglers and above the national average. Unlike the general U.S. population, freshwater species contributed the majority of fish consumption (69%) and dietary Hg exposure (60%) among participants, despite relatively low THg in local fish. THg hair increased with fish consumption, age, and education, and was higher among male participants and the lowest in winter. Our results suggest that future studies of anglers should consider seasonality in fish consumption and MeHg exposure and include household members who share their catch. Efforts to evaluate benefits of reducing Hg emissions should consider dietary patterns among consumers of fish from local freshwater bodies. PMID:25460632

  1. A Longitudinal Study of Mercury Exposure Associated with Consumption of Freshwater Fish from a Reservoir in Rural South Central USA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhao; Jim, Rebecca C.; Hatley, Earl L.; Backus, Ann S. N.; Shine, James P.; Spengler, John D.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) exposure through fish consumption is a worldwide health concern. Saltwater fish account for most dietary MeHg exposure in the general U.S. population, but less is known about seasonal variations in MeHg exposure and fish consumption among millions of freshwater anglers. This longitudinal study examined associations between MeHg exposure and fish consumption in a rural, low-income population relying on a freshwater reservoir (Oklahoma, USA) for recreational and subsistence fishing. We interviewed 151 participants, primarily anglers and their families, seasonally for one year using 90-day recall food frequency questionnaires to assess general and species-specific fish consumption, and tested hair biomarker samples for total mercury (THghair). Mean THghair was 0.27 μg/g (n=595, range: 0.0044–3.1 μg/g), with 4% of participants above U.S. EPA's guideline for women of childbearing age and children. Mean fish consumption was 58 g/d (95% CI: 49–67 g/d), within the range previously reported for recreational freshwater anglers and above the national average. Unlike the general U.S. population, freshwater species contributed the majority of fish consumption (69%) and dietary Hg exposure (60%) among participants, despite relatively low THg in local fish. THghair increased with fish consumption, age, and education, and was higher among male participants and lowest in winter. Our results suggest that future studies of anglers should consider seasonality in fish consumption and MeHg exposure and include household members who share their catch. Efforts to evaluate benefits of reducing Hg emissions should consider dietary patterns among consumers of fish from local freshwater bodies. PMID:25460632

  2. Methylmercury Exposure and Health Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young-Seoub; Kim, Yu-Mi

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury is a hazardous substance that is of interest with regard to environmental health, as inorganic mercury circulating in the general environment is dissolved into freshwater and seawater, condensed through the food chain, ingested by humans, and consequently affects human health. Recently, there has been much interest and discussion regarding the toxicity of methylmercury, the correlation with fish and shellfish intake, and methods of long-term management of the human health effects of methylmercury. What effects chronic exposure to a low concentration of methylmercury has on human health remains controversial. Although the possibility of methylmercury poisoning the heart and blood vessel system, the reproductive system, and the immune system is continuously raised and discussed, and the carcinogenicity of methylmercury is also under discussion, a clear conclusion regarding the human health effects according to exposure level has not yet been drawn. The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives proposed to prepare additional fish and shellfish intake recommendations for consumers based on the quantified evaluation of the hazardousness of methylmercury contained in fish and shellfish, methylmercury management in the Korea has not yet caught up with this international trend. Currently, the methylmercury exposure level of Koreans is known to be very high. The starting point of methylmercury exposure management is inorganic mercury in the general environment, but food intake through methylation is the main exposure source. Along with efforts to reduce mercury in the general environment, food intake management should be undertaken to reduce the human exposure to methylmercury in Korea. PMID:23230465

  3. PILOT STUDY: CCQM-P39: As, Hg, Pb, Se and methylmercury in tuna fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aregbe, Y.; Quétel, C.; Taylor, P. D. P.

    2004-01-01

    CCQM-P39 was an activity of the Inorganic Analysis Working Group (IAWG) of CCQM and was organised by the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM, Geel, Belgium) of the European Commission (EC). In CCQM-P39 the amount contents of As, Hg, Pb, Se and methylmercury (CH3Hg) in tuna fish muscle were the measurands under investigation. Besides the National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) who are IAWG members, non-IAWG members, expert laboratories for mercury and methylmercury measurements, were also invited to participate in this pilot study. Finally, results were reported by 13 NMIs and 8 expert laboratories. The results of the IAWG members for arsenic and selenium fall within a range of +/-10% with respect to the mixture model median (MM-median). For lead, the spread was within 2% and for mercury within 4% deviation from the MM-median. Also, for methlymercury the majority of the participating NMIs reported results within 4% deviation from the MM-median. Including the reported results from the invited expert laboratories, the spread of results increased for arsenic, lead, selenium and methlymercury up to 20%-40%. Except for mercury, for this analyte the spread of all the reported results of the IAWG members and the invited expert laboratories was within 4%. The methods applied were isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) using sector field or quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), external calibration using time-of-flight MS, atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) or atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and k0-neutron activation analysis (k0-NAA) were also used as analytical techniques. Each of the five analytes under investigation was measured with at least three of these analytical techniques. IAEA reported two results for arsenic, lead and selenium. They were measured with ICP-MS and AAS, respectively. This report presents the participants’ results in CCQM-P39 for all analytes

  4. Need for improved risk communication of fish consumption advisories to protect maternal and child health: influence of primary informants.

    PubMed

    LePrevost, Catherine E; Gray, Kathleen M; Hernández-Pelletier, Mercedes; Bouma, Brennan D; Arellano, Consuelo; Cope, W Gregory

    2013-05-01

    Fish consumption has established benefits, including the promotion of cardiovascular health and pre- and neonatal brain and eye development, but local freshwater fish may be a source of contaminants that are especially harmful to fetuses and young children, such as the neurotoxic and developmentally toxic methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls. Fish consumption advisories may be issued by state health departments to limit human exposure to these and other toxicants. This study examined the efficacy of a sign designed by the North Carolina Division of Public Health that was posted along a reservoir (Badin Lake) in central North Carolina, USA, for increasing anglers' awareness of a fish consumption advisory, with a special focus on anglers who share their catch with women and children. In this study, 109 anglers were interviewed about their awareness of fish consumption advisories in general and their knowledge of the Badin Lake fish advisory in particular. Shore anglers were significantly less likely to be aware of the term "fish consumption advisory" and of the specific advisory for Badin Lake than boat anglers. Although a significant increase in knowledge of the specific fish consumption advisory was found for the entire sample of study participants after the sign intervention, a commensurate increase in knowledge was not found for a subsample of anglers who reported sharing their catch with women and children. Study findings underscore differences in fish consumption advisory awareness among subpopulations. Specifically, the study revealed the importance of characterizing the communication needs of shore anglers and anglers who share their catch with sensitive subpopulations (e.g., women and children) for the creation of more targeted communications of fish consumption advisories. PMID:23629591

  5. Need for Improved Risk Communication of Fish Consumption Advisories to Protect Maternal and Child Health: Influence of Primary Informants

    PubMed Central

    LePrevost, Catherine E.; Gray, Kathleen M.; Hernández-Pelletier, Mercedes; Bouma, Brennan D.; Arellano, Consuelo; Cope, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Fish consumption has established benefits, including the promotion of cardiovascular health and pre- and neonatal brain and eye development, but local freshwater fish may be a source of contaminants that are especially harmful to fetuses and young children, such as the neurotoxic and developmentally toxic methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls. Fish consumption advisories may be issued by state health departments to limit human exposure to these and other toxicants. This study examined the efficacy of a sign designed by the North Carolina Division of Public Health that was posted along a reservoir (Badin Lake) in central North Carolina, USA, for increasing anglers’ awareness of a fish consumption advisory, with a special focus on anglers who share their catch with women and children. In this study, 109 anglers were interviewed about their awareness of fish consumption advisories in general and their knowledge of the Badin Lake fish advisory in particular. Shore anglers were significantly less likely to be aware of the term “fish consumption advisory” and of the specific advisory for Badin Lake than boat anglers. Although a significant increase in knowledge of the specific fish consumption advisory was found for the entire sample of study participants after the sign intervention, a commensurate increase in knowledge was not found for a subsample of anglers who reported sharing their catch with women and children. Study findings underscore differences in fish consumption advisory awareness among subpopulations. Specifically, the study revealed the importance of characterizing the communication needs of shore anglers and anglers who share their catch with sensitive subpopulations (e.g., women and children) for the creation of more targeted communications of fish consumption advisories. PMID:23629591

  6. Recent evidence from epidemiological studies on methylmercury toxicity.

    PubMed

    Murata, Katsuyuki; Yoshida, Minoru; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Iwai-Shimada, Miyuki; Yaginuma-Sakurai, Kozue; Tatsuta, Nozomi; Iwata, Toyoto; Karita, Kanae; Nakai, Kunihiko

    2011-09-01

    More than fifty years have passed since the outbreak of Minamata disease, and large-scale methylmercury poisoning due to industrial effluents or methylmercury-containing fungicide intoxication has scarcely happened in developed countries. On the other hand, widespread environmental mercury contamination has occurred in gold and mercury mining areas of developing countries. In this article, we provided an overview of recent studies addressing human health effects of methylmercury, which we searched using the PubMed of the US National Library of Medicine. The following suggestions were obtained for low-level methylmercury exposure: (1) In recent years, the proportion of human studies addressing methylmercury has tended to decrease. (2) Prenatal exposure to methylmercury through fish intake, even at low levels, adversely affects child development after adjusting for polychlorinated biphenyls and maternal fish intake during pregnancy, whereas maternal seafood intake has some benefits. (3) Long-term methylmercury exposure through consumption of fish such as bigeye tuna and swordfish may pose a potential risk of cardiac events involving sympathovagal imbalance. (4) In measuring methylmercury levels in preserved umbilical cord collected from inhabitants born in Minamata areas between 1945 and 1989, the elevated concentrations (≥1 mg/g) were observed mainly in inhabitants born between 1947 and 1968, and the peak coincided with the peak of acetaldehyde production in Minamata. (5) Since some developing countries appear to be in similar situations to Japan in the past, attention should be directed toward early recognition of a risky agent and precautions should be taken against it. PMID:21996768

  7. Fish, a Mediterranean source of n-3 PUFA: benefits do not justify limiting consumption.

    PubMed

    Gil, Angel; Gil, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Fish is an important source of energy, high-quality proteins, fat, vitamins and minerals. Within lipids, n-3 long-chain PUFA (n-3 LC PUFA), mainly EPA and DHA, play an important role in health promotion and disease prevention. In contrast to the potential health benefits of dietary fish intake, certain chemical pollutants, namely heavy metals and some organic compounds, contained in seafood have emerged as an issue of concern, particularly for frequent fish consumers and sensitive groups of populations. The present review summarises the health benefits and risks of fish consumption. n-3 LC-PUFA are key compounds of cell membranes and play an important role in human health from conception through every stage of human development, maturation and ageing. DHA has a major role in the development of brain and retina during fetal development and the first 2 years of life and positively influences neurodevelopment, mainly visual acuity and cognitive functions. n-3 LC-PUFA are also effective in preventing cardiovascular events (mainly stroke and acute myocardial infarction) especially in persons with high cardiovascular risk. By contrast, there is convincing evidence of adverse neurological/neurodevelopmental outcomes in infants and young children associated with methylmercury exposure during fetal development due to maternal fish consumption during pregnancy. Dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls present in contaminated fish may also develop a risk for both infants and adults. However, for major health outcomes among adults, the vast majority of epidemiological studies have proven that the benefits of fish intake exceed the potential risks with the exception of a few selected species in sensitive populations. PMID:26148923

  8. Fish gall bladder consumption presenting as acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A; Karnik, ND; Gupta, VA; Hase, NK

    2015-01-01

    A forty two year old male was admitted with history of anuria and breathlessness following consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder. He had azotemia and required hemodialysis. His renal failure improved over a period of about four weeks. Incidences have been reported from South East Asian countries associating consumption of raw rohu fish gall bladder with acute renal failure. PMID:26440398

  9. Organ-specific accumulation, transportation, and elimination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in a low Hg accumulating fish.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaoyan; Liu, Fengjie; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-08-01

    Low mercury (Hg) concentrations down to several nanograms Hg per gram of wet tissue are documented in certain fish species such as herbivorous fish, and the underlying mechanisms remain speculative. In the present study, bioaccumulation and depuration patterns of inorganic Hg(II) and methylmercury (MeHg) in a herbivorous rabbitfish Siganus canaliculatus were investigated at organ and subcellular levels following waterborne or dietary exposures. The results showed that the efflux rate constants of Hg(II) and MeHg were 0.104 d(-1) and 0.024 d(-1) , respectively, and are probably the highest rate constants recorded in fish thus far. The dietary MeHg assimilation efficiency (68%) was much lower than those in other fish species (∼90%). The predominant distribution of MeHg in fish muscle was attributable to negligible elimination of MeHg from muscle (< 0) and efficient elimination of MeHg from gills (0.12 d(-1) ), liver (0.17 d(-1) ), and intestine (0.20 d(-1) ), as well as efficient transportation of MeHg from other organs into muscle. In contrast, Hg(II) was much more slowly distributed into muscle but was efficiently eliminated by the intestine (0.13 d(-1) ). Subcellular distribution indicated that some specific membrane proteins in muscle were the primary binding pools for MeHg, and both metallothionein-like proteins and Hg-rich granules were the important components in eliminating both MeHg and Hg(II). Overall, the present study's results suggest that the low tissue Hg concentration in the rabbitfish was partly explained by its unique biokinetics. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2074-2083. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26756981

  10. Modeling tribal exposures to methyl mercury from fish consumption

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure assessment and risk management considerations for tribal fish consumption are different than for the general U.S. population because of higher fish intake from subsistence fishing and/or from unique cultural practices. This research summarizes analyses of available data ...

  11. Modeling Tribal Exposures to PCBs from Fish Consumption

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have shown that U.S. population continues to be exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), despite the ban ~40 years ago. Fish intake is a major pathway, especially, for high fish-consumption groups. Exposure assessment and risk management considerations for tribal fish...

  12. [Methylmercury exposure in the general population; toxicokinetics; differences by gender, nutritional and genetic factors].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José M; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Sáinz-Martín, María; Bretón-Lesmes, Irene; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Llorente-Ballesteros, M Teresa; Martínez-García, M José; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Cuadrado-Cenzual, M Ángeles; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is an environmental toxicant that causes numerous adverse effects on human health and natural ecosystems. The factors that determine the existance of adverse effects, as well as their severity are, among others: the chemical form of mercury (elemental, inorganic, organic), dosis, age, period of exposure, pathways of exposure and environmental, nutritional and genetic factors. In the aquatic cycle of mercury, once it has been deposited, it is transformed into methylmercury due to the action of certain sulphate-reducing bacteria, which bioaccumulates in the aquatic organisms and moves into the food chain. The methylmercury content of large, long-lived fish such as swordfish, shark, tuna or marlin, is higher. Methylmercury binds to protein in fish and is therefore not eliminated by cleaning or cooking the fish. Fetuses and small children are more vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of methylmercury from the consumption of contaminated fish. Methylmercury is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and crosses the blood-brain barrier and the placenta. The intake of certain dietary components such as polyunsaturated fatty acids, selenium, fiber, thiol compounds, certain phytochemicals and other nutrients can modify methylmercury bioaccesibility and its toxicity. Apart from environmental factors, genetic factors can influence mercury toxicity and explain part of the individual vulnerability. PMID:25365001

  13. Evaluation of a Public Health Intervention to Lower Mercury Exposure from Fish Consumption in Bermuda

    PubMed Central

    Dewailly, Eric; Rouja, Philippe; Forde, Martin; Peek-Ball, Cheryl; Côté, Suzanne; Smith, Emma; Drescher, Olivia; Robertson, Lyndon

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess the efficacy of a public health intervention to reduce blood mercury (Hg) concentration levels in pregnant Bermudian women. Methods In 2003, we conducted a study entitled “Prenatal exposure of the Bermudian Population to Environmental Contaminants” which provided Bermuda’s first baseline data on prenatal exposure to several environmental contaminants, including Hg. The mean Hg concentration from 42 healthy newborns measured in umbilical cord blood was 41.3 nmol/L, ranging from 5–160 nmol/L. This concentration was much higher than expected, being approximately 8 times the general levels found in Canada and the U.S. Furthermore, we estimated that 85% of total Hg measured was in the form of methylmercury (MeHg), indicating that seafood consumption was the primary source of Hg exposure during pregnancy in Bermuda. Locally sourced seafood was identified as the most significant possible contributory source of Hg exposure. In 2005 the authors began a complementary research programme to study the levels of Hg in local commercial fish species. Coming out of this research were specific local fish consumption guidelines issued by the Department of Health advising pregnant women to avoid those local fish species found to be high in Hg while still encouraging consumption of fish species having lower Hg levels. Results In 2010, under another research initiative, we returned to Bermuda to carry out another evaluation of Hg in human blood. Hg was measured in the blood of 49 pregnant women. The arithmetic mean Hg blood concentration was 6.6 nmol/L and the geometric mean 4.2 nmol/L. The maximum concentration found was 24 nmol/L. Conclusions Hg exposure of Bermudian pregnant women has dropped significantly by a factor of around 5 since the foetal cord blood study in 2003. PMID:23077607

  14. A qualitative study of fish consumption during pregnancy123

    PubMed Central

    Bloomingdale, Arienne; Guthrie, Lauren B; Price, Sarah; Wright, Robert O; Platek, Deborah; Haines, Jess; Oken, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many pregnant women in the United States do not consume enough docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)—an essential nutrient found in fish. Apparently conflicting findings that fish consumption is beneficial for the developing fetus, yet potentially toxic because of mercury contamination, have created uncertainty about the appropriate fish-consumption advice to provide to pregnant women. Objective: Our objective was to determine knowledge, behaviors, and received advice regarding fish consumption among pregnant women who are infrequent consumers of fish. Design: In 2009–2010 we conducted 5 focus groups with 22 pregnant women from the Boston area who ate <2 fish servings/wk. We analyzed transcripts by using immersion-crystallization. Results: Many women knew that fish might contain mercury, a neurotoxin, and had received advice to limit fish intake. Fewer women knew that fish contains DHA or what the function of DHA is. None of the women had received advice to eat fish, and most had not received information about which fish types contain more DHA or less mercury. Because of advice to limit fish intake, as well as a lack of information about which fish types they should be eating, many of the women said that they would rather avoid fish than possibly harm themselves or their infants. The participants thought that a physician's advice to eat fish and a readily available reference regarding which fish are safe to consume during pregnancy would likely have encouraged them to eat more fish. Conclusion: Pregnant women might be willing to eat more fish if this were advised by their obstetricians or if they had an accessible reference regarding which types are safe. PMID:20844071

  15. Determining mercury levels in anchovy and in individuals with different fish consumption habits, together with their neurological effects.

    PubMed

    Çamur, Derya; Güler, Çağatay; Vaizoğlu, Songül Acar; Özdilek, Betül

    2016-07-01

    An increase in enviromental pollution may lead to mercury toxicity of fish origin due to the accumulative nature of methylmercury in fish. The main sources of human exposure to organic mercury compounds are contaminated fish and other seafoods. This descriptive study was planned to determine mercury levels in anchovy and in hair samples from individuals with different fish consumption habits, and to evaluate those individuals in terms of toxic effects. For that purpose, we analyzed 100 anchovies from the Black Sea and 100 anchovies from the Sea of Marmara, and assessed 25 wholesale workers in fish markets and 25 cleaning firm employees from both Ankara and Istanbul. Mercury levels in samples were measured using a cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Participants were examined neurologically and mini mental state examination was applied to evaluate their cognitive functions. Mercury levels in fish were found to be below the national and international permitted levels. There was no statistically significant relation between mercury levels and the sea from which fish were caught. Hair mercury levels for all participants were within permitted ranges. However, hair mercury levels in both cities increased significantly with amount and frequency of fish consumption. A significant correlation was determined at correlation analysis between levels of fish consumption and hair mercury levels in the fishmongers and in the entire group (r = 0.32, p = 0.025; r = 0.23, p = 0.023, respectively). Neurological examination results were normal, except for a decrease in deep tendon reflexes in some participants in both cities. There was no correlation between Standardized Mini Mental State Examination results and hair mercury levels. We conclude that establishing a monitoring system for mercury levels in fish and humans will be useful in terms of evaluating potential neurotoxic effects. PMID:27353298

  16. Fish consumption patterns and hair mercury levels in children and their mothers in 17 EU countries.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Argelia; Cutanda, Francisco; Esteban, Marta; Pärt, Peter; Navarro, Carmen; Gómez, Silvia; Rosado, Montserrat; López, Ana; López, Estrella; Exley, Karen; Schindler, Birgit K; Govarts, Eva; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Fiddicke, Ulrike; Koch, Holger; Angerer, Jürgen; Den Hond, Elly; Schoeters, Greet; Sepai, Ovnair; Horvat, Milena; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Aerts, Dominique; Joas, Anke; Biot, Pierre; Joas, Reinhard; Jiménez-Guerrero, José A; Diaz, Gema; Pirard, Catherine; Katsonouri, Andromachi; Cerna, Milena; Gutleb, Arno C; Ligocka, Danuta; Reis, Fátima M; Berglund, Marika; Lupsa, Ioana-Rodica; Halzlová, Katarína; Charlier, Corinne; Cullen, Elizabeth; Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Krsková, Andrea; Jensen, Janne F; Nielsen, Jeanette K; Schwedler, Gerda; Wilhelm, Michael; Rudnai, Peter; Középesy, Szilvia; Davidson, Fred; Fischer, Mark E; Janasik, Beata; Namorado, Sónia; Gurzau, Anca E; Jajcaj, Michal; Mazej, Darja; Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Larsson, Kristin; Lehmann, Andrea; Crettaz, Pierre; Lavranos, Giagkos; Posada, Manuel

    2015-08-01

    The toxicity of methylmercury (MeHg) in humans is well established and the main source of exposure is via the consumption of large marine fish and mammals. Of particular concern are the potential neurodevelopmental effects of early life exposure to low-levels of MeHg. Therefore, it is important that pregnant women, children and women of childbearing age are, as far as possible, protected from MeHg exposure. Within the European project DEMOCOPHES, we have analyzed mercury (Hg) in hair in 1799 mother-child pairs from 17 European countries using a strictly harmonized protocol for mercury analysis. Parallel, harmonized questionnaires on dietary habits provided information on consumption patterns of fish and marine products. After hierarchical cluster analysis of consumption habits of the mother-child pairs, the DEMOCOPHES cohort can be classified into two branches of approximately similar size: one with high fish consumption (H) and another with low consumption (L). All countries have representatives in both branches, but Belgium, Denmark, Spain, Portugal and Sweden have twice as many or more mother-child pairs in H than in L. For Switzerland, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovenia and Slovakia the situation is the opposite, with more representatives in L than H. There is a strong correlation (r=0.72) in hair mercury concentration between the mother and child in the same family, which indicates that they have a similar exposure situation. The clustering of mother-child pairs on basis of their fish consumption revealed some interesting patterns. One is that for the same sea fish consumption, other food items of marine origin, like seafood products or shellfish, contribute significantly to the mercury levels in hair. We conclude that additional studies are needed to assess and quantify exposure to mercury from seafood products, in particular. The cluster analysis also showed that 95% of mothers who consume once per week fish only, and no other marine products

  17. Modeling tribal exposures to methyl mercury from fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie; Mintz, Bruce; Weber, Marc; Bailey, Ken; Geller, Andrew

    2015-11-15

    Exposure assessment and risk management considerations for tribal fish consumption are different than for the general U.S. population because of higher fish intake from subsistence fishing and/or from unique cultural practices. This research summarizes analyses of available data and methodologies for estimating tribal fish consumption exposures to methyl mercury (MeHg). Large MeHg fish tissue data sets from the Environmental Protections Agency's (EPA's) Office of Water, USGS's EMMMA program, and other data sources, were integrated, analyzed, and combined with fish intake (consumption) data for exposure analyses using EPA's SHEDS-Dietary model. Results were mapped with GIS tools to depict spatial distributions of the MeHg in fish tissues and fish consumption exposure patterns. Contribution analyses indicates the major sources for those exposures, such as type and length of fish, geographical distribution (water bodies), and dietary exposure patterns. Sensitivity analyses identify the key variables and exposure pathways. Our results show that MeHg exposure of tribal populations from fish are about 3 to 10 times higher than the US general population and that exposure poses potential health risks. The estimated risks would be reduced as much as 50%, especially for high percentiles, just by avoiding consumption of fish species with higher MeHg concentrations such as walleye and bowfin, even without changing total fish intake. These exposure assessment methods and tools can help inform decisions regarding meal sizes and frequency, types of fish and water bodies to avoid, and other factors to minimize exposures and potential health risks from contaminated fish on tribal lands. PMID:26151654

  18. Exposures of dental professionals to elemental mercury and methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Jaclyn M; Chou, Hwai-Nan; Gruninger, Stephen E; Franzblau, Alfred; Basu, Niladri

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) exposure, a worldwide public health concern, predominantly takes two forms--methylmercury from fish consumption and elemental Hg from dental amalgam restorations. We recruited 630 dental professionals from an American Dental Association meeting to assess Hg body burden and primary sources of exposure in a dually exposed population. Participants described occupational practices and fish consumption patterns via questionnaire. Hg levels in biomarkers of elemental Hg (urine) and methylmercury (hair and blood) were measured with a Direct Mercury Analyzer-80 and were higher than the general US population. Geometric means (95% CI) were 1.28 (1.19-1.37) μg/l in urine, 0.60 (0.54-0.67) μg/g in hair and 3.67 (3.38-3.98) μg/l in blood. In multivariable linear regression, personal amalgams predicted urine Hg levels along with total years in dentistry, amalgams handled, working hours and sex. Fish consumption patterns predicted hair and blood Hg levels, which were higher among Asians compared with Caucasians. Five species contributed the majority of the estimated Hg intake from fish--swordfish, fresh tuna, white canned tuna, whitefish and king mackerel. When studying populations with occupational exposure to Hg, it is important to assess environmental exposures to both elemental Hg and methylmercury as these constitute a large proportion of total exposure. PMID:26329138

  19. Marine biogeochemistry: Methylmercury manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossa, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    The neurotoxin methylmercury can accumulate in marine food webs, contaminating seafood. An analysis of the isotopic composition of fish in the North Pacific suggests that much of the mercury that enters the marine food web originates from low-oxygen subsurface waters.

  20. Eating fish for two

    PubMed Central

    Strain, JJ

    2014-01-01

    Summary This article is based on the British Nutrition Foundation’s Annual Lecture, which focused on maternal fish consumption and the effects of methylmercury (MeHg) on fetal development, with respect to current guidance and policy on fish consumption during pregnancy. Fish makes a valuable contribution to nutrient intakes across the globe and is the primary protein source for many individuals, particularly those in the developing world. Populations with a high fish consumption, such as in the Republic of the Seychelles, have a greater exposure to MeHg, which is present in varying amounts in all fish. Methylmercury is a toxic pollutant, which is known to impair neurodevelopment. The dose of MeHg from fish consumption, however, needed to impair neurodevelopment is unknown. Current UK and US guidance on fish consumption during pregnancy tend to focus more on avoiding risks rather than highlighting the benefits which can be obtained from eating fish. Such recommendations have been mainly based on data arising from epidemiological studies in the Faroe Islands, where methylmercury exposure was largely from pilot whale consumption. Although small adverse effects on child development have been reported in data from the Faroe Islands, data from the on-going Seychelles Child Development Studies have shown no adverse effects of prenatal methlymercury exposure from high maternal fish consumption (9–12 meals containing fish per week) on developmental outcomes. Instead these data suggest that nutrients, including long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs), provided by fish may offer a beneficial effect and attenuate or modify any effects of MeHg on developmental outcomes. Recent expert consultations have concluded that the health benefits of fish consumption outweigh the risks posed by MeHg exposure and have argued the need for improved education and guidance to highlight the importance of consuming nutrients, including LC-PUFAs, from fish for optimal child

  1. Contaminated fish consumption in California's Central Valley Delta.

    PubMed

    Shilling, Fraser; White, Aubrey; Lippert, Lucas; Lubell, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Extensive mercury contamination and angler selection of the most contaminated fish species coincide in California's Central Valley. This has led to a policy conundrum: how to balance the economic and cultural impact of advising subsistence anglers to eat less fish with the economic cost of reducing the mercury concentrations in fish? State agencies with regulatory and other jurisdictional authority lack sufficient data and have no consistent approach to this problem. The present study focused on a critical and contentious region in California's Central Valley (the Sacramento-San Joaquin Rivers Delta) where mercury concentrations in fish and subsistence fishing rates are both high. Anglers and community members were surveyed for their fish preferences, rates of consumption, the ways that they receive health information, and basic demographic information. The rates of fish consumption for certain ethnicities were higher than the rates used by state agencies for planning pollution remediation. A broad range of ethnic groups were involved in catching and eating fish. The majority of anglers reported catching fish in order to feed to their families, including children and women of child-bearing age. There were varied preferences for receiving health information and no correlation between knowledge of fish contamination and rates of consumption. Calculated rates of mercury intake by subsistence anglers were well above the EPA reference dose. The findings here support a comprehensive policy strategy of involvement of the diverse communities in decision-making about education and clean-up and an official recognition of subsistence fishers in the region. PMID:20176346

  2. Total and methylmercury residues in tuna-fish from the Mediterranean sea.

    PubMed

    Storelli, M M; Stuffler, R Giacominelli; Marcotrigiano, G O

    2002-08-01

    This study was carried out to determine the current levels of total mercury and methylmercury in the muscle tissue of albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) caught in the Mediterranean sea with the purpose of ascertaining whether the concentrations exceeded the maximum level fixed by the European Commission Decision. Total mercury concentrations ranged from 0.84 to 1.45 mg kg(-1) w.w. (av. 1.17 mg kg(-1) w.w.) and from 0.16 to 2.59 mg kg(-1) (av. 1.18 mg kg(-1) w.w.) in the muscle of albacore and bluefin tuna, respectively. In 78.6% of albacore and in 61.1% of bluefin tuna analysed, total mercury concentrations exceeded the maximum level fixed by the European Commission Decision (Hg = 1 micro g g(-1) wet wt). In the two species, mercury was present almost completely in the methylated form, with percentages between 77 and 100% (av. 91.3%) in albacore and between 75 and 100% (av. 91%) in bluefin-tuna. In order to assess the potential health impact, the estimated weekly intake was calculated. The estimated weekly intake was far above the established Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake for both species. PMID:12227935

  3. EFFECTS OF DIETARY METHYLMERCURY EXPOSURE ON AMERICAN KESTRELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several recent ecological risk assessments and criteria development efforts suggest that sensitive individuals of some piscivorous (fish eating) wildlife populations may be experiencing adverse effects from methylmercury exposure. The primary exposure route of methylmercury to t...

  4. A Fish Consumption Survey of the Nez Perce Tribe

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report culminates two years of work—preceded by years of discussion—to characterize the current and heritage fish consumption rates and fishing-related activities of the Nez Perce Tribe. The report contains three volumes in one document. Volume I is concerned with heritage r...

  5. A Fish Consumption Survey of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report culminates two years of work—preceded by years of discussion—to characterize the current and heritage fish consumption rates and fishing-related activities of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes. The report contains three volumes in one document. Volume I is concerned with h...

  6. Ultrasensitive and highly selective detection of bioaccumulation of methyl-mercury in fish samples via Ag⁰/Hg⁰ amalgamation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Li, Yan; Yan, Xiuping; Xiao, Jun; Ma, Cheng; Zheng, Jing; Liu, Shaojun; Yang, Ronghua

    2015-02-17

    Methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)), the common organic source of mercury, is well-known as one of the most toxic compounds that is more toxic than inorganic or elemental mercury. In seabeds, the deposited Hg(2+) ions are converted into CH3Hg(+) by bacteria, where they are subsequently consumed and bioaccumulated in the tissue of fish, and finally, to enter the human diet, causing severe health problems. Therefore, sensitive and selective detection of bioaccumulation of CH3Hg(+) in fish samples is desirable. However, selective assay of CH3Hg(+) in the mercury-containing samples has been seriously hampered by the difficulty to distinguish CH3Hg(+) from ionic mercury. We report here that metal amalgamation, a natural phenomenon occurring between mercury atoms and certain metal atoms, combining with DNA-protected silver nanoparticles, can be used to detect CH3Hg(+) with high sensitivity and superior selectivity over Hg(2+) and other heavy metals. In our proposed approach, discrimination between CH3Hg(+) and Hg(2+) ions was realized by forming Ag/Hg amalgam with a CH3Hg(+)-specific scaffold. We have found that Ag/Hg amalgam can be formed on a CH3Hg(+)-specific DNA template between silver atoms and mercury atoms but cannot between silver atoms and CH3Hg(+). With a dye-labeled DNA strand, the sensor can detect CH3Hg(+) down to the picomolar level, which is >125-fold sensitive over Hg(2+). Moreover, the presence of 50-fold Hg(2+) and 10(6)-fold other metal ions do not interfere with the CH3Hg(+) detection. The results shown herein have important implications for the fast, easy, and selective detection and monitoring of CH3Hg(+) in environmental and biological samples. PMID:25609026

  7. Issues of fish consumption for cardiovascular disease risk reduction.

    PubMed

    Raatz, Susan K; Silverstein, Jeffrey T; Jahns, Lisa; Picklo, Matthew J

    2013-04-01

    Increasing fish consumption is recommended for intake of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids and to confer benefits for the risk reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Most Americans are not achieving intake levels that comply with current recommendations. It is the goal of this review to provide an overview of the issues affecting this shortfall of intake. Herein we describe the relationship between fish intake and CVD risk reduction as well as the other nutritional contributions of fish to the diet. Currently recommended intake levels are described and estimates of fish consumption at a food disappearance and individual level are reported. Risk and benefit factors influencing the choice to consume fish are outlined. The multiple factors influencing fish availability from global capture and aquaculture are described as are other pertinent issues of fish nutrition, production, sustainability, and consumption patterns. This review highlights some of the work that needs to be carried out to meet the demand for fish and to positively affect intake levels to meet fish intake recommendations for CVD risk reduction. PMID:23538940

  8. Before You're Pregnant - Methylmercury

    MedlinePlus

    ... nutrients and it's low in fat. However, some fish contain high levels of methylmercury, which can harm ... a metal that can be found in certain fish, including swordfish , tilefish , king mackerel , and shark . Eating ...

  9. Biomarkers of Methylmercury Exposure Immunotoxicity among Fish Consumers in Amazonian Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Fillion, Myriam; Barbosa, Fernando; Shirley, Devon L.; Chine, Chiameka; Lemire, Melanie; Mergler, Donna; Silbergeld, Ellen K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant with neurodevelopmental and immune system effects. An informative biomarker of Hg-induced immunotoxicity could aid studies on the potential contribution to immune-related health effects. Objectives: Our objectives were to test the hypothesis that methylmercury (MeHg) exposures affect levels of serum biomarkers and to examine interactions between Hg and selenium (Se) in terms of these responses. Methods: This cross-sectional epidemiological study assessed adults living along the Tapajós River, a system long affected by MeHg. We measured antinuclear (ANA) and antinucleolar (ANoA) autoantibody levels and eight cytokines in serum samples (n = 232). Total Hg (including MeHg) and Se were measured in blood, plasma, hair, and urine. Results: The median (range) total Hg concentrations were 14.1 μg/g (1.1–62.4), 53.5 μg/L (4.3–288.9), 8.8 μg/L (0.2–40), and 3.0 μg/L (0.2–16.1) for hair, blood, plasma, and urine, respectively. Elevated titers of ANA (but not ANoA) were positively associated with MeHg exposure (log-transformed, for blood and plasma), unadjusted [odds ratio (OR) = 2.6; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 6.2] and adjusted for sex and age (OR = 2.9; 95% CI: 1.1, 7.5). Proinflammatory [interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon (IFN)-©], anti-inflammatory (IL-4), and IL-17 cytokine levels were increased with MeHg exposure; however, in the subset of the population with elevated ANA, proinflammatory IL-1®, IL-6, IFN-©, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-〈 and anti-inflammatory (IL-4) cytokine levels were decreased with MeHg exposure. Although Se status was associated with MeHg level (correlation coefficient = 0.86; 95% CI: 0.29, 1.43), Se status was not associated with any changes in ANA and did not modify associations between Hg and ANA titers. Conclusions: MeHg exposure was associated with an increased ANA and changes in serum cytokine profile. Moreover, alterations in serum cytokine profiles

  10. Methyl mercury exposure from fish consumption in vulnerable racial/ethnic populations: probabilistic SHEDS-Dietary model analyses using 1999-2006 NHANES and 1990-2002 TDS data.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie G; Liu, Shi V; Geller, Andrew M

    2012-01-01

    NHANES subjects self-identified as "Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, or multiracial" (A/P/N/M) have higher levels of blood organic mercury than other racial/ethnic groups; however, the reasons for this have been unclear. This research uses exposure modeling to determine the reasons for elevated blood methylmercury (MeHg) levels, and also extends previous analyses of observed NHANES blood levels. The probabilistic SHEDS-Dietary model was applied, using MeHg fish residue data from FDA's Total Diet Study (1990-2002) combined with NHANES/WWEIA (1999-2006) fish consumption data, to generate exposure estimates by race/ethnicity, age group, and fish type. Statistical analyses of blood methylmercury levels in the (6 times larger) 1999-2006 NHANES data were compared against previous published results for 1999-2002 data. The A/P/N/M group has higher fish intake, modeled MeHg exposures, and blood levels than the general population and other racial/ethnic groups. Tuna, other saltwater fish, and other freshwater fish are key food types driving dietary MeHg exposure. The 1-<3 years-old A/P/N/M group has the highest mean dietary MeHg intake per body weight (0.06 μg/kg/day; ~2.3 times higher than the rest of the population). Fish intake and modeled exposure predictions correlate well with NHANES blood biomarker levels. This study, using the SHEDS-Dietary model with national data, reinforces and expands upon previous observations that dietary exposure via fish consumption is an important route for methylmercury intake by the general population, and especially for racial/ethnic groups with higher fish consumption. These probabilistic dietary modeling approaches could be applied for local populations (e.g., tribes) and other chemicals and foods, if data are available. PMID:22119327

  11. Effect of Marine Omega 3 Fatty Acids on Methylmercury-Induced Toxicity in Fish and Mammalian Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nøstbakken, O. J.; Bredal, I. L.; Olsvik, P. A.; Huang, T. S.; Torstensen, B. E.

    2012-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant which bioaccumulates in marine biota. Fish constitute an important part of a balanced human diet contributing with health beneficial nutrients but may also contain contaminants such as MeHg. Interactions between the marine n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA) with MeHg-induced toxicity were investigated. Different toxic and metabolic responses were studied in Atlantic salmon kidney (ASK) cell line and the mammalian kidney-derived HEK293 cell line. Both cell lines were preincubated with DHA or EPA prior to MeHg-exposure, and cell toxicity was assessed differently in the cell lines by MeHg-uptake in cells (ASK and HEK293), proliferation (HEK293 and ASK), apoptosis (ASK), oxidation of the red-ox probe roGFP (HEK293), and regulation of selected toxicological and metabolic transcriptional markers (ASK). DHA was observed to decrease the uptake of MeHg in HEK293, but not in ASK cells. DHA also increased, while EPA decreased, MeHg-induced apoptosis in ASK. MeHg exposure induced changes in selected metabolic and known MeHg biomarkers in ASK cells. Both DHA and MeHg, but not EPA, oxidized roGFP in HEK293 cells. In conclusion, marine n-3 fatty acids may ameliorate MeHg toxicity, either by decreasing apoptosis (EPA) or by reducing MeHg uptake (DHA). However, DHA can also augment MeHg toxicity by increasing oxidative stress and apoptosis when combined with MeHg. PMID:22654480

  12. Metallomics investigations on potential binding partners of methylmercury in tuna fish muscle tissue using complementary mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Daniel J; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Bettmer, Jörg

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the binding behaviour of methylmercury (MeHg(+)) towards proteins is investigated. Free sulfhydryl groups in cysteine residues are known to be the most likely binding partners, due to the high affinity of mercury to sulphur. However, detailed knowledge about discrete binding sites in living organisms has been so far scarce. A metallomics approach using different methods like size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as well as complementary mass spectrometric techniques (electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry, ESI-MS/MS) are combined to sequence and identify possible target proteins or peptides after enzymatic digestion. Potential targets for MeHg(+) in tuna fish muscle tissue are investigated using the certified reference material CRM464 as a model tissue. Different extraction procedures appropriate for the extraction of proteins are evaluated for their efficiency using isotope dilution analysis for the determination of total Hg in the extracts. Due to the high chemical stability of the mercury-sulphur bond, the bioconjugate can be quantitatively extracted with a combination of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (TRIS) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). Using different separation techniques such as SEC and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) it can be shown that major binding occurs to a high-molecular weight protein (M(w) > 200 kDa). A potential target protein, skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain, could be identified after tryptic digestion and capillary LC-ESI-MS/MS. PMID:22699869

  13. Biomagnifications of mercury and methylmercury in tuna and mackerel.

    PubMed

    Hajeb, P; Jinap, S; Ahmad, I

    2010-12-01

    Seawater may be contaminated by harmful substances, including toxic elements released by human activities. The present study evaluates the total mercury and methylmercury concentrations and their correlations to fish body size in longtail tuna and short-bodied mackerel from Chendring, Kuantan, at east coast and Kuala Perlis at west costs of Peninsular Malaysia during May to November 2007. Total mercury and methylmercury in muscle tissue of 69 samples of longtail tuna and short-bodied mackerel, ranged from 0.180 to 1.460 μg/g and 0.0.169-0.973 μg/g and 0.251-1.470 μg/g and 0.202-1.352, whereas the methylmercury to total mercury ratio ranged from 70% to 83%, respectively. Samples of both species from the east coast showed higher levels of mercury compared to those from west coast. In all of the locations, significant positive correlations were found between fish body weight and mercury content (R(2) > 0.470). The estimated weekly intake of total mercury and methylmercury from the consumption 66.33 g/week of short-bodied mackerel and 18.34 g/week of longtail tuna (based on local dietry survey) was found to be lower than the maximum limit of 5 and 1.5 μg/kg bodyweight established by FAO/WHO and codex, respectively. PMID:20041345

  14. Consumption of freshwater fish in Kahnawake: Risks and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H.M.; Trifonopoulos, M.; Ing, A.; Receveur, O.; Johnson, E.

    1999-02-01

    Kahnawake is a Mohawk community located on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River near Montreal. A comprehensive study was conducted in 1996--1997 to address the local concern regarding health risks of contaminant exposure associated with freshwater fish consumption. Forty-two participants, including most of the identified active fishermen were interviewed. Walleye, perch, bullhead, and smallmouth bass were the species most consumed. Average daily intake of locally caught fish was 23 g/day. Nutrient and contaminant levels of locally collected fish were analyzed. Fish were good sources of protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids, calcium, zinc, and iron. Levels of cadmium, lead, arsenic, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other chlorinated pesticides were at least 10 times lower than the guideline levels. Mercury levels of some predatory fish exceeded the guideline of 0.5 {micro}g/g. Average daily intakes of all contaminants were below the guideline levels by a factor of 10 except for mercury. Average mercury intake rate was about one-third that of the guideline level. Contrary to residents` perception, Kahnawake fish were not particularly contaminated. In view of the nutritional as well as cultural benefits, fishing and fish consumption may be promoted.

  15. Methylmercury poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... mercury , a metal that is liquid at room temperature. A nickname for mercury is quicksilver. Most compounds ... methylmercury are present in many foods from the ocean, including deep-sea tuna. Fortunately, the levels are ...

  16. Intervention study on cardiac autonomic nervous effects of methylmercury from seafood.

    PubMed

    Yaginuma-Sakurai, Kozue; Murata, Katsuyuki; Shimada, Miyuki; Nakai, Kunihiko; Kurokawa, Naoyuki; Kameo, Satomi; Satoh, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    To scrutinize whether the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI, 3.4 microg/kg body weight/week) of methylmercury in Japan is safe for adults, we conducted an intervention study using heart rate variability (HRV) that has been considered to reflect cardiac events. Fifty-four healthy volunteers were recruited and divided into experimental and control groups. The experimental group was exposed to methylmercury at the PTWI level through consumption of bigeye tuna and swordfish for 14 weeks, and HRV parameters were compared between the two groups. In the experimental group, mean hair mercury levels, determined before and after the dietary methylmercury exposure and after 15-week wash-out period following the cessation of exposure, were 2.30, 8.76 and 4.90 microg/g, respectively. The sympathovagal balance index of HRV was significantly elevated after the exposure, and decreased to the baseline level at the end of this study. Still, such changes in HRV parameters were not found in the control group with a mean hair mercury level of around 2.1 microg/g. In conclusion, the PTWI does not appear to be safe for adult health, because methylmercury exposure from fish consumption induced a temporary sympathodominant state. Rather, long-term exposure to methylmercury may pose a potential risk for cardiac events involving sympathovagal imbalance among fish-consuming populations. PMID:19732823

  17. Comparative Analysis of State Fish Consumption Advisories Targeting Sensitive Populations

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Alison C.; Tsuchiya, Ami; Younglove, Lisa R.; Burbacher, Thomas M.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Fish consumption advisories are issued to warn the public of possible toxicological threats from consuming certain fish species. Although developing fetuses and children are particularly susceptible to toxicants in fish, fish also contain valuable nutrients. Hence, formulating advice for sensitive populations poses challenges. We conducted a comparative analysis of advisory Web sites issued by states to assess health messages that sensitive populations might access. Data sources We evaluated state advisories accessed via the National Listing of Fish Advisories issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Data extraction We created criteria to evaluate advisory attributes such as risk and benefit message clarity. Data synthesis All 48 state advisories issued at the time of this analysis targeted children, 90% (43) targeted pregnant women, and 58% (28) targeted women of childbearing age. Only six advisories addressed single contaminants, while the remainder based advice on 2–12 contaminants. Results revealed that advisories associated a dozen contaminants with specific adverse health effects. Beneficial health effects of any kind were specifically associated only with omega-3 fatty acids found in fish. Conclusions These findings highlight the complexity of assessing and communicating information about multiple contaminant exposure from fish consumption. Communication regarding potential health benefits conferred by specific fish nutrients was minimal and focused primarily on omega-3 fatty acids. This overview suggests some lessons learned and highlights a lack of both clarity and consistency in providing the breadth of information that sensitive populations such as pregnant women need to make public health decisions about fish consumption during pregnancy. PMID:19079708

  18. Effects of trophic poisoning with methylmercury on the appetitive elements of the agonistic sequence in fighting-fish (Betta splendens).

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Amauri; de Oliveira, Caio Maximino; Romão, Cynthia Ferreira; de Brito, Thiago Marques; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2007-11-01

    The aggressive display in Betta splendens is particularly prominent, and vital to its adaptation to the environment. Methylmercury is an organic variation of Hg that presents particularly pronounced neuro-behavioral effects. The present experiments aim to test the effect of acute and chronic poisoning with methylmercury on the display in Bettas. The animals were poisoned by trophic means in both experiments (16 ug/kg in acute poisoning; 16 ug/kg/day for chronic poisoning), and tested in agonistic pairs. The total frequency of the display was recorded, analyzing the topography of the agonistic response. The methylmercury seems to present a dose- and detoxification-dependent effect on these responses, with a more pronounced effect on motivity in acute poisoning and on emotionality in the chronic poisoning. It is possible that this effect could be mediated by alteration in the mono-amino-oxidase systems. PMID:17992970

  19. [Consensus document on the prevention of exposure to methylmercury in Spain].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José M; Sáinz-Martín, María; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Bretón-Lesmes, Irene; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Llorente-Ballesteros, M Teresa; Martínez-García, M José; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Cuadrado-Cenzual, María Ángeles; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Blanco Fuentes, María; Torres-Moreno, Miriam; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Barceló Martín, Bernardino; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effects of fish consumption in both children and adults are well known. However, the intake of methylmercury, mainly from contaminated fish and shellfish, can have adverse health effects. The study group on the prevention of exposure to methylmercury (GEPREM-Hg), made up of representatives from different Spanish scientific societies, has prepared a consensus document in a question and answer format, containing the group's main conclusions, recommendations and proposals. The objective of the document is to provide broader knowledge of factors associated with methylmercury exposure, its possible effects on health among the Spanish population, methods of analysis, interpretation of the results and economic costs, and to then set recommendations for fish and shellfish consumption. The group sees the merit of all initiatives aimed at reducing or prohibiting the use of mercury as well as the need to be aware of the results of contaminant analyses performed on fish and shellfish marketed in Spain. In addition, the group believes that biomonitoring systems should be set up in order to follow the evolution of methylmercury exposure in children and adults and perform studies designed to learn more about the possible health effects of concentrations found in the Spanish population, ta king into account the lifestyle, eating patterns and the Mediterranean diet. PMID:25561095

  20. Issues of fish consumption for cardiovascular disease risk reduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing fish consumption is recommended for intake of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids and to confer benefits for the risk reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Most Americans are not achieving intake levels that comply with current recommendations. It is the goal of this review to provide an overv...

  1. Fish consumption, mercury exposure and serum antinuclear antibody in Amazonians.

    PubMed

    Alves, Maria Francinaire A; Fraiji, Nelson A; Barbosa, Antonio C; De Lima, Domingos S N; Souza, Jurandir R; Dórea, José G; Cordeiro, George W O

    2006-08-01

    Exposure to intrinsic Hg in fish was studied in Amazon populations with high prevalence of malaria disease. High fish-eater riverines were compared to urban (Manaus residents) low fish-eater riverines in regards to Hg exposure (hair-Hg) and serum antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Most riverines (99.0%) ate fish daily compared to only 3% of controls. Fish species high in MeHg was consumed more frequently (45.5%) by riverines than controls (18.8%). Mean hair-Hg (34.5 ppm) of riverines was significantly higher than controls (1.0 ppm). Although positive serum ANA was more frequently observed in riverine fish-eaters (12.4%) than controls (2.9%), there was no significant association between hair-Hg and ANA. High prevalence of malaria reporting among riverines was neither associated with Hg exposure nor with serum ANA. An autoimmune dysfunction is unlikely to occur as a result of MMHg exposure due to fish consumption. PMID:16854670

  2. Persistent Organohalogens in Paired Fish Fillet and Eggs: Implications for Fish Consumption Advisories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianming; Gandhi, Nilima; Bhavsar, Satyendra P

    2016-04-13

    Fish consumption is associated with both health benefits from high-quality proteins, minerals, vitamins, and fatty acids and risks from contaminants in fish. Fish consumption advisories are issued by many government agencies to keep exposure to contaminants at a safe level. Such advisories are typically based on fillets and neglect consumption of other fish parts such as eggs by certain subpopulations. To evaluate potential for dietary exposure to toxic organic chemicals via fish eggs, we analyzed polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dlPCBs), and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs) in paired fillet and eggs of fish from a tributary to Lake Ontario, one of the North American Great Lakes. All wet weight based concentrations in fish eggs were statistically higher than in the paired fillet samples. In fish eggs, concentrations of Σ14PBDEs, Σ14PCNs, and Σ12dlPCBs were 41-118, 0.3-1.7, and 30-128 ng/g wet weight (ww), respectively; Σ3PCDD/Fs and total (dlPCB+ PCDD/Fs) toxic equivalents (TEQs) were 4-22 and 9-54 pg/g ww, respectively. In fillet samples, Σ14PBDEs, Σ14PCNs, and Σ12dlPCBs were 4-116, 0.05-0.66, and 6-85 ng/g, respectively; Σ3PCDD/Fs and TEQs were 2-10 and 3.4-31 pg/g ww, respectively. In contrast, the fillets had higher lipid normalized concentrations than the paired egg samples, suggesting that these chemicals did not reach equilibrium between the fillets and eggs. Accordingly, measured concentrations in eggs or empirical relationship with fillet rather than prediction from equilibrium partitioning model should be used to evaluate contaminant exposure via consumption of fish eggs. For fatty fish from the lower Great Lakes area, we suggest one fillet meal be reduced from the advised fish consumption frequency for consumptions of 207 ± 37, 39 ± 2, 105 ± 51, and 119 ± 9 g fish eggs of brown trout, Chinook salmon, Coho salmon, and rainbow trout, respectively

  3. [Methylmercury: existing recommendations; methods of analysing and interpreting the results; economic evaluation].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Martínez-García, María José; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José María; Llorente-Ballesteros, María Teresa; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Cuadrado-Cenzual, María Ángeles; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Bretón Lesmes, Irene; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Sáinz-Martín, María; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Blanco Fuentes, María; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle Pascual, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effects of fish consumption are well- known. Nevertheless, there is worldwide concern regard methylmercury concentrations in fish, which is why many countries such as the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and numerous European countries have made fish consumption recommendations for their populations, particularly vulnerable groups, in order to México methylmercury intake. Blood and hair are the best biological samples for measuring methylmercury. The most widely-used method to analyse methylmercury is cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, although there are also direct methods based on the thermal decomposition of the sample. In recent years, the number of laboratories that measure mercury by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has increased. In addition, the different kinds of mercury can be distinguished by coupling chromatography methods of separation. Laboratories that analyse mercury in biological samples need to participate in external quality control programmes. Even if mercury emissions are reduced, mercury may remain in the environment for many years, so dietary recommendations are fundamental in order to reduce exposure. It is necessary to propose public health measures aimed at decreasing mercury exposure and to evaluate the benefits of such measures from the economic and social standpoints. PMID:25561094

  4. Neurophysiologic measures of auditory function in fish consumers: associations with long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Dziorny, Adam C.; Orlando, Mark S.; Strain, J. J.; Davidson, Philip W.; Myers, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Determining if associations exist between child neurodevelopment and environmental exposures, especially low level or background ones, is challenging and dependent upon being able to measure specific and sensitive endpoints. Psychometric or behavioral measures of CNS function have traditionally been used in such studies, but do have some limitations. Auditory neurophysiologic measures examine different nervous system structures and mechanisms, have fewer limitations, can more easily by quantified, and might be helpful testing additions. To date, their use in human epidemiological studies has been limited. We reviewed the use of auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and otoacoustic emissions (OAE) in studies designed to determine the relationship of exposures to methyl mercury (MeHg) and nutrients from fish consumption with neurological development. We included studies of experimental animals and humans in an effort to better understand the possible benefits and risks of fish consumption. Objectives We reviewed the literature on the use of ABR and OAE to measure associations with environmental exposures that result from consuming a diet high in fish. We focused specifically on long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) and MeHg. Methods We performed a comprehensive review of relevant studies using web-based search tools and appropriate search terms. Results Gestational exposure to both LCPUFA and MeHg has been reported to influence the developing auditory system. In experimental studies supplemental LCPUFA is reported to prolong ABR latencies and human studies also suggest an association. Experimental studies of acute and gestational MeHg exposure are reported to prolong ABR latencies and impair hair cell function. In humans, MeHg exposure is reported to prolong ABR latencies, but the impact on hair cell function is unknown. Conclusion The auditory system can provide objective measures and may be useful in studying exposures to nutrients and toxicants

  5. A risk-benefit analysis of wild fish consumption for various species in Alaska reveals shortcomings in data and monitoring needs.

    PubMed

    Loring, Philip A; Duffy, Lawrence K; Murray, Maribeth S

    2010-09-15

    Northern peoples face a difficult decision of whether or not to consume wild fish, which may contain dangerous levels of contaminants such as methylmercury (MeHg), but which also offer a number of positive health benefits, and play an important role in rural household economies. Here, new methods for developing consumption advice are applied to an existing data-set for methylmercury (MeHg) levels in Alaskan fish. We apply a quantitative risk-benefit analysis for eight freshwater, saltwater and anadromous fish species, using dose-response relationships to weigh the risks of MeHg bioaccumulation against the benefits of omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) toward cardiovascular and neurodevelopmental health endpoints. Findings suggests that consumption of many of the fish species reviewed here, including northern pike, Pacific Halibut, and arctic grayling, may lead to increased risk of coronary heart disease and declines in infant visual recognition memory. However, we also identify significant variation among regions, among studies within the same region, and also within studies, which make it difficult to craft consistent consumption advice. Whereas salmon consistently shows a net-benefit, for instance, data for arctic grayling, pike, sablefish, and some halibut are all too imprecise to provide consistent recommendations. We argue for more detailed local-scale monitoring, and identification of possible thresholds for increased risk in the future. We caution that MeHg and omega-3 FA are just two variables in a complicated calculus for weighing the risks and benefits of locally-available and culturally-significant foods, and argue for future work that takes both a place-based and plate-based approach to diet and contamination. PMID:20673961

  6. Perceptions of recreational fishing boat captains: knowledge and effects of fish consumption advisories.

    PubMed

    Burger, J; Johnson, B B; Shukla, S; Gochfeld, M

    2003-04-01

    The impacts of fish consumption advisories on recreational and subsistence fishing, particularly in fresh waters, have been examined extensively. By contrast, little attention has focused on organized recreational fishing, such as from party and charter boats, and particularly for salt water fish. We interviewed 93 New Jersey boat captains to determine their knowledge about fish consumption advisories, and whether, in their opinion, clients knew of fish consumption advisories, and whether they thought advisories had an effect on recreational fishing and their businesses. Advisories were ranked by captains as a moderate influence on the success of their business, less so than number of fish caught, strength of the economy, overfishing by commercial boats, and management regulations. Only one boat captain had not heard warnings about eating fish, but what captains said they had heard was mixed in its accuracy and completeness. Clients expect captains to know about fish, and about half of boat captains said clients had asked about the safety of eating fish. Captains who felt advisories were affecting their businesses tended to fish for species without high levels of mercury (except for bluefish) or PCBs, the primary contaminants of concern for state advisories and federal advice. However, these captains worked closer to areas (e.g., Raritan Bay complex and New York Harbor) subject to advisories than did other captains, and were more prone to say that management regulations (e.g., fish size, creel limits, seasons) and marketing and advertising by the industry or state were strong influences on the success of their seasons. Comparing captains who thought advisories had some or great effect (60%) versus those reporting "no effect" (40%), there was no difference in the mean percentage of trips targeting high mercury species such as swordfish and shark. Many captains said they would or might post advisories, but 42% of the boat captains said they would not post consumption

  7. Multiple spiking species-specific isotope dilution analysis by molecular mass spectrometry: simultaneous determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in fish tissues.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Angel; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; Centineo, Giuseppe; Roig-Navarro, Antoni Francesc; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    This work demonstrates, for the first time, the applicability of multiple spiking isotope dilution analysis to molecular mass spectrometry exemplified by the speciation analysis of mercury using GC(EI)MS instrumentation. A double spike isotope dilution approach using isotopically enriched mercury isotopes has been applied for the determination of inorganic mercury Hg(II) and methylmercury (MeHg) in fish reference materials. The method is based on the application of isotope pattern deconvolution for the simultaneous determination of degradation-corrected concentrations of methylmercury and inorganic mercury. Mass isotopomer distributions are employed instead of isotope ratios to calculate the corrected concentrations of the Hg species as well as the extent of species degradation reactions. The isotope pattern deconvolution equations developed here allow the calculation of the different molar fractions directly from the GC(EI)MS mass isotopomer distribution pattern and take into account possible impurities present in the spike solutions employed. The procedure has been successfully validated with the analysis of two different certified reference materials (BCR-464 and DOLT-4) and with the comparison of the results obtained by GC(ICP)MS. For the tuna fish matrix (BCR-464), no interconversion reactions were observed at the optimized conditions of open focused microwave extraction at 70 degrees C during 8 min. However, significant demethylation was found under the same conditions in the case of the certified dogfish liver DOLT-4. Methylation and demethylation factors were confirmed by GC(ICP)MS. Transformation reactions have been found to depend on the sample matrix and on the derivatization reagent employed. Thus, it is not possible to recommend optimum extraction conditions suitable for all types of matrices demonstrating the need to apply multiple spiking methodologies for the determination of MeHg and Hg(II) in biological samples. Double spike isotope dilution

  8. Role of self-caught fish in total fish consumption rates for recreational fishermen: Average consumption for some species exceeds allowable intake.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Studies of fish consumption focus on recreational or subsistence fishing, on awareness and adherence to advisories, consumption patterns, and contaminants in fish. Yet the general public obtains their fish from commercial sources. In this paper I examine fish consumption patterns of recreational fishermen in New Jersey to determine: 1) consumption rates for self-caught fish and for other fish, 2) meals consumed per year, 3) average meal size, and average daily intake of mercury, and 4) variations in these parameters for commonly-consumed fish, and different methods of computing intake. Over 300 people were interviewed at fishing sites and fishing clubs along the New Jersey shore. Consumption patterns of anglers varied by species of fish. From 2 to 90 % of the anglers ate the different fish species, and between 9 and 75 % gave fish away to family or friends. Self-caught fish made up 7 to 92 % of fish diets. On average, self-caught fish were eaten for only 2 to 6 months of the year, whereas other fish (commercial or restaurant) were eaten up to 10 months a year. Anglers consumed from 5 to 36 meals of different fish a year, which resulted in intake of mercury ranging from 0.01 to 0.22 ug/kg/day. Average intake of Mako shark, swordfish, and tuna (sushi, canned tuna, self-caught tuna) exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's oral, chronic reference dose for mercury of 0.1 ug/kg/day. However, computing intake using consumption for the highest month results in average mercury intake exceeding the reference dose for striped bass and bluefish as well. These data, and the variability in consumption patterns, have implications for risk assessors, risk managers, and health professionals. PMID:23914136

  9. Role of self-caught fish in total fish consumption rates for recreational fishermen: Average consumption for some species exceeds allowable intake

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Studies of fish consumption focus on recreational or subsistence fishing, on awareness and adherence to advisories, consumption patterns, and contaminants in fish. Yet the general public obtains their fish from commercial sources. In this paper I examine fish consumption patterns of recreational fishermen in New Jersey to determine: 1) consumption rates for self-caught fish and for other fish, 2) meals consumed per year, 3) average meal size, and average daily intake of mercury, and 4) variations in these parameters for commonly-consumed fish, and different methods of computing intake. Over 300 people were interviewed at fishing sites and fishing clubs along the New Jersey shore. Consumption patterns of anglers varied by species of fish. From 2 to 90 % of the anglers ate the different fish species, and between 9 and 75 % gave fish away to family or friends. Self-caught fish made up 7 to 92 % of fish diets. On average, self-caught fish were eaten for only 2 to 6 months of the year, whereas other fish (commercial or restaurant) were eaten up to 10 months a year. Anglers consumed from 5 to 36 meals of different fish a year, which resulted in intake of mercury ranging from 0.01 to 0.22 ug/kg/day. Average intake of Mako shark, swordfish, and tuna (sushi, canned tuna, self-caught tuna) exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s oral, chronic reference dose for mercury of 0.1 ug/kg/day. However, computing intake using consumption for the highest month results in average mercury intake exceeding the reference dose for striped bass and bluefish as well. These data, and the variability in consumption patterns, have implications for risk assessors, risk managers, and health professionals. PMID:23914136

  10. Possible physiological uptake mechanism of methylmercury by the marine bloodworm (Glycera dibranchiata)

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, D.M.; Cadwell, L.L.; Preston, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of methylmercury by fish has been studied extensively. There have been some studies on marine invertebrates. These studies have been concerned with either the effect of methylmercury on viability or methylmercury distribution among body parts. The physiological uptake mechanisms of methylmercury in aquatic organisms have not been studied. The objective of this paper is to examine the uptake mechanism of methylmercury from water in a lower-food-chain organism, the marine bloodworm (Glycera dibranchi-ata).

  11. Fish Consumption, Sleep, Daily Functioning, and Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anita L.; Dahl, Lisbeth; Olson, Gina; Thornton, David; Graff, Ingvild E.; Frøyland, Livar; Thayer, Julian F.; Pallesen, Staale

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study investigated the effects of fatty fish on sleep, daily functioning and biomarkers such as heart rate variability (HRV), vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) in red blood cells. Moreover the relationship among sleep, daily functioning, HRV, vitamin D status, and levels of EPA+DHA was investigated. Methods: Ninety-five male forensic patients from a secure forensic inpatient facility in the USA were randomly assigned into a Fish or a Control group. The Fish group received Atlantic salmon three times per week from September to February, and the Control group was provided an alternative meal (e.g., chicken, pork, beef), but with the same nutritional value as their habitual diet, three times per week during the same period. Sleep (sleep latency, sleep efficiency, actual sleep time, and actual wake time), self-perceived sleep quality and daily functioning, as well as vitamin D status, EPA+DHA, and HRV, were assessed pre- and post-intervention period. Results: There was a significant increase in sleep latency from pre- to post-test in the Control group. The Fish group reported better daily functioning than the Control group during post-test. Fish consumption throughout the wintertime had also an effect on resting HRV and EPA+DHA, but not on vitamin D status. However, at post-test, the vitamin D status in the Fish group was still closer to the level regarded as optimal compared to the Control group. Vitamin D status correlated negatively with actual wake time and positively with sleep efficiency during pre-test, as well as positively with daily functioning and sleep quality during post-test. Finally, HRV correlated negatively with sleep latency and positively with daily functioning. Conclusions: Fish consumption seemed to have a positive impact on sleep in general and also on daily functioning, which may be related to vitamin D status and HRV. Citation

  12. [The effects of methylmercury on health in children and adults; national and international studies].

    PubMed

    González-Estecha, Montserrat; Bodas-Pinedo, Andrés; Rubio-Herrera, Miguel Ángel; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Trasobares-Iglesias, Elena M; Ordóñez-Iriarte, José M; Guillén-Pérez, José Jesús; Herráiz-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; García-Donaire, José Antonio; Farré-Rovira, Rosaura; Calvo-Manuel, Elpidio; Martínez-Álvarez, Jesús Román; Llorente-Ballesteros, M Teresa; Sáinz-Martín, María; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txantón; Martínez-García, M José; Bretón Lesmes, Irene; Cuadrado-Cenzual, M Ángeles; Prieto-Menchero, Santiago; Gallardo-Pino, Carmen; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Torres-Moreno, Miriam; Arroyo-Fernández, Manuel; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    The benefit of fish consumption in children and adults is well-known. However, it has been pointed out that excessive methylmercury intake due to consumption of contaminated fish leads to neurological toxicity in children, affecting cognitive function, memory, visual-motor function and language. After the intoxications in Minamata and Iraq, wide-ranging epidemiological studies were carried out in New Zealand, the Faroe Islands and the Seychelles and international recommendations were established for fish consumption in pregnant women and small children. In Spain, the Childhood and Environmental project (INMA, its Spanish acronym) has studied the effects of diet and the environment on fetal and childhood development in different geographic areas of Spain. National and international sudies have demonstrated that mercury concentrations are mainly dependent on fish consumption, although there are variations among countries which can be explained not only by the levels of fish consumption, but also by the type or species of fish that is consumed, as well as other factors. Although the best documented adverse effects of methylmercury are the effects on nervous sytem development in fetuses and newborns, an increasing number of studies indicate that cognitive function, reproduction and, especially, cardiovascular risk in the adult population can also be affected. However, more studies are necessary in order to confirm this and establish the existance of a causal relationship. PMID:25365002

  13. A review of methylmercury and child development.

    PubMed

    Myers, G J; Davidson, P W; Shamlaye, C F

    1998-04-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin present in both fresh and saltwater fish throughout the world. Increased levels of MeHg can be found in individuals who regularly consume fish. The developing brain is very sensitive to the deleterious effects of MeHg, and prenatal exposure can occur when the mother has a diet high in fish. If the level of MeHg exposure achieved by eating fish adversely affects the fetus or child's neurological development it could have far reaching public health implications. Studies of human prenatal MeHg poisoning in Iraq suggest that MeHg levels achieved by eating fish may affect neurological development even when the fish MeHg levels are not elevated by obvious pollution. Studies in fish eating populations have identified adverse neurological and developmental outcomes, but these findings have not been consistent. Additional studies are presently underway to determine whether consistent adverse outcomes can be identified using more sensitive testing methods and examining children older than in previous studies. This review examines studies of human prenatal and postnatal MeHg exposure. Studies of poisoning episodes where children are symptomatic and studies of fish eating populations where no symptoms are apparent will be addressed. Individuals around the world depend on fish as a protein source and increasing evidence suggests that regular fish consumption has cardiovascular benefits. It is not presently clear whether MeHg exposures from a high fish diet adversely affect children's neurological development, but it is an important question to answer. PMID:9553968

  14. Methylmercury in hair fisherman for Turkish coasts

    SciTech Connect

    Vural, N.; Uenlue, H.

    1996-10-01

    Environmental methylmercury mainly arises from the methylation of inorganic mercury. The change in speciation of mercury from inorganic to methylated forms is the first step in the aquatic bioaccumulation processes. The bioconcentration factor of methylmercury in fish tissue to that in water is usually between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 5}. Among seafood, fish products are the main source of methylmercury absorbed by men from the environment. Since Minimata epidemic health injuries and deaths in relation to mercury pollution, environmental and biological monitoring of inorganic and organic mercury species has gained importance through out the world and many reports have been published on the health effects and biological monitoring of mercury compounds including some Mediterranean countries. This study focuses on methylmercury in hair of fisherman living in different geographical Turkish coasts and relationship to eating fish habit. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Effect of methylmercury on acetylcholinestrase and serum cholinesterase activity in monkeys, Macaca fascicularis

    SciTech Connect

    Petruccioli, L.; Turillazzi, P.G. )

    1991-05-01

    The consumption of fish and fish-derived products is the main pathway of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg). Methylmercury levels vary widely in fish, depending on age, size, the position of the species in the food chain, and most of all, on pollution levels. MeHg affects the Acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) and the serum Cholinesterase activity (BChE). Histoenzymatic studies showed that 100mg Methyoxyethylmercury chloride administered for 6 days to rats caused a reduction of AChE activity in the thalamus and an increase in different parts of the nervous central system. The present study aims at verifying whether the dose permitted by F.A.O. and doses 10 and 100 fold higher affect the Cholinesterase activity in primates, and whether there is a correlation between AChE and BChE.

  16. MERCURY EXPOSURE FROM FISH CONSUMPTION WITHIN THE JAPANESE AND KOREAN COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public health guidance pertaining to fish consumption requires that we be cognizant of the health concerns associated with eating contaminated fish and the nutritional benefits obtained from fish consumption. In doing so, a need exists for an improved understanding of the extent ...

  17. Benefits and risks associated with consumption of raw, cooked, and canned tuna (Thunnus spp.) based on the bioaccessibility of selenium and methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Afonso, C; Costa, S; Cardoso, C; Oliveira, R; Lourenço, H M; Viula, A; Batista, I; Coelho, I; Nunes, M L

    2015-11-01

    The Se, Hg, and methylmercury (MeHg) levels in raw, cooked (boiled and grilled), and canned tuna (Thunnus spp.) were determined before and after an in vitro digestion, thereby enabling the calculation of the respective bioaccessibility percentages. A risk-benefit evaluation of raw and canned tuna on the basis of the Se and MeHg data was performed. Selenium bioaccessibility was high in tuna, though slightly lower in canned than in raw products. Mercury levels were high in raw and cooked tuna. Hg bioaccessibility percentages were low (39-48%) in the cooked tuna and even lower (<20%) in canned tuna. For the bioaccessible fraction, all molar Se:MeHg ratios were higher than one (between 10 and 74). A probabilistic assessment of MeHg risk vs Se benefit showed that while a weekly meal of canned tuna presents very low risk, raw, boiled, and grilled tuna consumption should not exceed a monthly meal, at least, for pregnant and nursing women. PMID:25962922

  18. A size-based probabilistic assessment of PCB exposure from Lake Michigan fish consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Stow, C.A.; Qian, S.S.

    1998-08-01

    The state of Wisconsin has recently issued a fish consumption advisory that includes suggested consumption rates for Lake Michigan fish, based on fish size and PCB concentration. To evaluate the size-based exposure risk from Lake Michigan fish consumption, the authors estimated PCB exposure probabilities for five Lake Michigan fish species using two Bayesian models. The models confirm that very few individuals of any of the five species are likely to have PCB concentrations low enough to fall into the category in which consumption is unrestricted. Among smaller fish (<50 cm), brown trout have the highest PCB levels, while lake trout are the most contaminated among larger fish (>60 cm). Eating meals from multiple individuals of some species results in a high probability that at least one of the meals will exceed 1.9 mg/kg, the upper PCB concentration recommended for consumption in the advisory.

  19. BIRTH DEFECTS RISK ASSOCIATED WITH MATERNAL SPORT FISH CONSUMPTION: POTENTIAL EFFECT MODIFICATION BY SEX OF OFFSPRING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated sport fish consumption may result in exposure to various reproductive and developmental toxicants, including pesticides and other suspected endocrine disruptors. We investigated the relation between maternal sport fish meals and risk of major birth defects among infa...

  20. Fish consumption among women anglers of childbearing age in the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Nancy A; Bruce Lauber, T; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Knuth, Barbara A

    2016-10-01

    Fish consumption advisories are issued by the federal government for women of childbearing age (WCBA). These advisories make recommendations about the amount and types of fish that should be consumed to provide the greatest health benefits to women and their children while avoiding risks from chemical contaminants. We used diary methods to study fish consumption patterns of 1395 WCBA in the Great Lakes coastal region who purchased fishing licenses, a group which has significant opportunity to eat larger quantities of fish. Very few members of this group reported exceeding the federal recommendations for total fish consumption (between 3% and 5% depending on assumptions about portion sizes), consumption of canned "white" tuna (0%), or consumption of "do not eat" species (4%). They did report eating more fish on average than recent national study estimates, but they did not report consuming as much fish as is recommended to obtain the greatest health benefits of fish consumption. Only 10-12% of study participants reported eating within the recommended range of 8-12oz. of fish per week, with 84-87% eating less than the recommended amount. Additional efforts are likely needed to encourage WCBA to eat more low-risk fish, even among this group of higher-than-average fish consumers. PMID:27309721

  1. Patterns of mercury and methylmercury bioaccumulation in fish species downstream of a long-term mercury-contaminated site in the lower Ebro River (NE Spain).

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Luis; Barata, Carlos; García-Berthou, Emili; Tobias, Aurelio; Bayona, Josep M; Díez, Sergi

    2011-09-01

    Since the 19th century, large amounts of industrial waste were dumped in a reservoir adjacent to a chlor-alkali plant in the lower Ebro River (NE Spain). Previous toxicological analysis of carp populations inhabiting the surveyed area have shown that the highest biological impact attributable to mercury pollution occurred downstream of the discharge site. However, mercury speciation in fish from this polluted area has not been addressed yet. Thus, in the present study, piscivorous European catfish (Silurus glanis) and non-piscivorous common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were selected, to investigate the bioavailability and bioaccumulation capacities of both total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) at the discharge site and downstream points. Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA) was applied to reduce the dimensionality of the data set, and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) models were fitted in order to assess the relationship between both Hg species in fish and different variables of interest. Mercury levels in fish inhabiting the dam at the discharge site were found to be approximately 2-fold higher than those from an upstream site; while mercury pollution progressively increased downstream of the hot spot. In fact, both THg and MeHg levels at the farthest downstream point were 3 times greater than those close to the waste dump. This result clearly indicates downstream transport and increased mercury bioavailability as a function of distance downstream from the contamination source. A number of factors may affect both the downstream transport and increased Hg bioavailability associated with suspended particulate matter (SPM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). PMID:21663932

  2. Examining the Impact of a Public Health Message on Fish Consumption in Bermuda

    PubMed Central

    McLean Pirkle, Catherine; Peek-Ball, Cheryl; Outerbridge, Eugene; Rouja, Philippe Max

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2003 mean cord blood mercury concentrations in pregnant Bermudian women exceeded levels associated with adverse health outcomes in children. The principal mercury source was local fish species. Public health messages were developed suggesting pregnant women reduce consumption of fish species with higher mercury concentrations (e.g. swordfish), substituting species containing lower mercury concentrations, and elevated omega-3 fatty acids (e.g. anchovies). Recent evidence indicates mercury concentrations in Bermuda’s pregnant women have fallen five- fold. Objectives Assess whether changes in women’s fish eating patterns during pregnancy are consistent with the public health messaging. Determine who is making changes to their diet during pregnancy and why. Methods Mixed methods study with a cross-sectional survey of 121 pregnant women, including 13 opened-ended interviews. Health system, social vulnerability, public health messaging, and socio-demographic variables were characterized and related to changes in fish consumption during pregnancy. Qualitative data were coded according to nutritional advice messages, comprehension of communication strategies, and sources of information. Results 95% of women surveyed encountered recommendations about fish consumption during pregnancy. 75% reported modifying fish eating behaviors because of recommendations. Principal sources of information about fish consumption in pregnancy were health care providers and the Internet. 71% of women reported reducing consumption of large fish species with greater mercury levels, but 60% reported reduced consumption of smaller, low mercury fish. No participant mentioned hearing about the benefits of fish consumption. More frequent exposure to public health messages during pregnancy was associated with lower reported consumption. Bermudian born women were less likely to reduce consumption of large fish species during pregnancy. Conclusions In Bermuda, public health messages

  3. Methylmercury risk and awareness among American Indian women of childbearing age living on an inland northwest reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, Sandra W.; Hill, Wade G.; Linkenbach, Jeff W.; Lande, Gary; Larsson, Laura

    2009-08-15

    American Indian women and children may be the most overrepresented among the list of disparate populations exposed to methylmercury. American Indian people fish on home reservations where a state or tribal fishing license (a source of advisory messaging) is not required. The purpose of this study was to examine fish consumption, advisory awareness, and risk communication preferences among American Indian women of childbearing age living on an inland Northwest reservation. For this cross-sectional descriptive study, participants (N=65) attending a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic were surveyed between March and June 2006. An electronic questionnaire adapted from Anderson et al. (2004) was evaluated for cultural acceptability and appropriateness by tribal consultants. Regarding fish consumption, approximately half of the women surveyed (49%) indicated eating locally caught fish with the majority signifying they consumed medium- and large-size fish (75%) that could result in exposure to methylmercury. In addition, a serendipitous discovery indicated that an unanticipated route of exposure may be fish provided from a local food bank resulting from sportsman's donations. The majority of women (80%) were unaware of tribal or state fish advisory messages; the most favorable risk communication preference was information coming from doctors or healthcare providers (78%). Since the population consumes fish and has access to locally caught potentially contaminated fish, a biomonitoring study to determine actual exposure is warranted.

  4. Selenium-mercury relationships in Idaho lake fish versus Northeastern USA lake fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl-mercury (MeHg) exposure to wildlife and humans occurs primarily through the foodweb, notably fish consumption. Selenium moderates the toxicity of MeHg in all animal models that utilize selenoenzymatic protein synthesis, as do humans. A Se:Hg molar ratio of <1:1 appears to...

  5. Fish consumption and mortality in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort.

    PubMed

    Engeset, Dagrun; Braaten, Tonje; Teucher, Birgit; Kühn, Tilman; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Leenders, Max; Agudo, Antonio; Bergmann, Manuela M; Valanou, Elisavet; Naska, Androniki; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Key, Timothy J; Crowe, Francesca L; Overvad, Kim; Sonestedt, Emily; Mattiello, Amalia; Peeters, Petra H; Wennberg, Maria; Jansson, Jan Håkan; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Dossus, Laure; Dartois, Laureen; Li, Kuanrong; Barricarte, Aurelio; Ward, Heather; Riboli, Elio; Agnoli, Claudia; Huerta, José María; Sánchez, María-José; Tumino, Rosario; Altzibar, Jone M; Vineis, Paolo; Masala, Giovanna; Ferrari, Pietro; Muller, David C; Johansson, Mattias; Luisa Redondo, M; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Olsen, Karina Standahl; Brustad, Magritt; Skeie, Guri; Lund, Eiliv

    2015-01-01

    Fish is a source of important nutrients and may play a role in preventing heart diseases and other health outcomes. However, studies of overall mortality and cause-specific mortality related to fish consumption are inconclusive. We examined the rate of overall mortality, as well as mortality from ischaemic heart disease and cancer in relation to the intake of total fish, lean fish, and fatty fish in a large prospective cohort including ten European countries. More than 500,000 men and women completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992-1999 and were followed up for mortality until the end of 2010. 32,587 persons were reported dead since enrolment. Hazard ratios and their 99% confidence interval were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. Fish consumption was examined using quintiles based on reported consumption, using moderate fish consumption (third quintile) as reference, and as continuous variables, using increments of 10 g/day. All analyses were adjusted for possible confounders. No association was seen for fish consumption and overall or cause-specific mortality for both the categorical and the continuous analyses, but there seemed to be a U-shaped trend (p < 0.000) with fatty fish consumption and total mortality and with total fish consumption and cancer mortality (p = 0.046). PMID:25377533

  6. A multidisciplinary approach to promoting healthy subsistence fish consumption in culturally distinct communities.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, David; Sorensen, Asta; Deerhake, Marion

    2012-03-01

    Methyl mercury is a potent neurotoxin that causes developmental delays in young and unborn children and has been linked to neurological and cardiovascular degeneration in adults. Methyl mercury is the basis of a state-sponsored fish advisory to limit consumption of local fish in North Carolina. This study employed methods and analytic constructs from the behavioral and social sciences to assess the determinants of subsistence fishing and to promote informed fish consumption among culturally distinct and lower income subsistence fishers in southeastern North Carolina. Formative research revealed that Native American and African American were more likely than Latino residents to know of the fish advisory, and to practice procurement and preparation strategies that are mistakenly believed to render locally caught fish safe for consumption. Fish advisories were developed for each community to promote informed fish consumption intentions among residents who consume local fish. The interventions were successful in increasing knowledge and healthy intentions among most residents. Adherence to some safe fish consumption practices were constrained by cultural and economic factors. These results demonstrate the utility of multidisciplinary approaches for assessing and reducing human exposure to methyl mercury through subsistence fish consumption. PMID:21730195

  7. Nutrients and Chemical Pollutants in Fish and Shellfish. Balancing Health Benefits and Risks of Regular Fish Consumption.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L

    2016-01-01

    Dietary patterns and lifestyle factors are clearly associated with at least five of the ten leading causes of death, including coronary heart disease, certain types of cancer, stroke, non-insulin insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and atherosclerosis. Concerning specifically fish and seafood consumption, its beneficial health effects in humans are clearly supported by an important number of studies performed in the last 30 years. These studies have repeatedly linked fish consumption, especially those species whose contents in omega-3 fatty acids are high, with healthier hearts in the aging population. The nutritional benefits of fish and seafood are also due to the content of high-quality protein, vitamins, as well as other essential nutrients. However, a number of studies, particularly investigations performed in recent years, have shown that the unavoidable presence of environmental contaminants in fish and shellfish can also mean a certain risk for the health of some consumers. While prestigious international associations as the American Heart Association have recommended eating fish at least two times (two servings a week), based on our own experimental results, as well as in results from other laboratories, we cannot be in total agreement with that recommendation. Although a regular consumption of most fish and shellfish species should not mean adverse health effects for the consumers, the specific fish and shellfish species consumed, the frequency of consumption, as well as the meal size, are essential issues for adequately balancing the health benefits and risks of regular fish consumption. PMID:25486051

  8. Paternal Lake Ontario fish consumption and risk of conception delay, New York state angler cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, G.M.; Mendola, P.; Vena, J.E.; Kostyniak, P.; Greizerstein, H.; Olson, J.; Stephen, F.D.; Sever, L.E.

    1999-02-01

    The aquatic ecosystems of the Great Lakes are contaminated with a variety of compounds, some of which are considered reproductive toxicants. Few studies of paternal fish consumption and reproductive endpoints have been undertaken and serve as the impetus for study. Standardized telephone interviews were conducted with 2,445 female members of the New York State Angler Cohort (82% response) to update reproductive profiles and to ascertain specific information on time-to-pregnancy (TTP). The study sample includes women with a known TTP and paternal fish consumption data (n = 785). Conception delay was defined as more than 12 cycles of unprotected intercourse to achieve pregnancy. Paternal fish consumption was assessed by three measures: frequency of Lake Ontario sport fish meals in 1991, numbers of years eating fish, and estimated PCB exposure from fish consumption. Adjusted ORs for number of fish meals, based on logistic regression, ranged from 0.69 to 0.80; from 0.61 to .82 for number of years eating fish; and from 0.44 to 1.14 for quartiles of estimated PCB exposure from fish consumption. All confidence intervals included one. These findings suggest that, based on paternal self-reports, Lake Ontario fish consumption does not increase the risk of conception delay.

  9. Levels of nutrients in relation to fish consumption among older male anglers in Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Krista Y.; Thompson, Brooke A.; Werner, Mark; Malecki, Kristen; Imm, Pamela; Anderson, Henry A.

    2016-01-01

    Fish are an important source of nutrients including omega-3 fatty acids, which may reduce risk of adverse health outcomes such as cardiovascular disease; however, fish may also contain significant amounts of environmental pollutants. The Wisconsin Departments of Health Services and Natural Resources developed a survey instrument, along with a strategy to collect human biological samples to assess the risks and benefits associated with long-term fish consumption among older male anglers in Wisconsin. The target population was men aged 50 years and older, who fish Wisconsin waters and live in the state of Wisconsin. Participants provided blood and hair samples and completed a detailed (paper) questionnaire, which included questions on basic demographics, health status, location of catch and species of fish caught/eaten, consumption of locally caught and commercially purchased fish, and awareness and source of information for local and statewide consumption guidelines. Biological samples were used to assess levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA); vitamin D; and selenium in blood. Quantile regression analysis was used to investigate the associations between biomarker levels and self-reported consumption of fish from the Great Lakes and other areas of concern, other locally caught fish, and commercially purchased fish (meals per year). Respondents were largely non-Hispanic white men in their 60’s with at least some college education, and about half were retired. Fish consumption was high (median of 54.5 meals per year), with most fish meals coming from locally-caught fish. Multivariate regression models showed that the effect of supplement use was much greater than that of fish consumption, on nutrient levels, although consumption of fish from the Great Lakes and areas of concern was significantly associated with higher levels of vitamin D even after controlling for supplement usage. PMID:26296180

  10. A regional mass balance of methylmercury in San Francisco Bay, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Yee, Donald; McKee, Lester J; Oram, John J

    2011-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay (California, USA) is a water body listed as impaired because of Hg contamination in sport fish for human consumption, as well as possible effects on resident wildlife. A legacy of Hg mining in local watersheds and Hg used in Au mining in the Sierra Nevada (USA) has contributed to contamination seen in the bay, with additional more recent and ongoing inputs from various sources. Methylmercury is the species of Hg most directly responsible for contamination in biota, so better understanding of its sources, loads, and processes was sought to identify the best means to reduce impacts. A regional scale model of San Francisco Bay was developed to characterize major methylmercury inputs and processes. The model was used to evaluate the potential impact of uncertainties in estimates for methylmercury loading pathways and environmental processes, identify major data gaps, and explore management prospects for reducing methylmercury contamination. External loading pathways considered in the mass balance include methylmercury loads entering via atmospheric deposition to the bay surface, and discharges from the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta, local watersheds, municipal wastewater, and fringing wetlands. Internal processes considered include exchange between bed and suspended sediments and the water column, in situ production and demethylation, biological uptake, and losses via hydrologic transport to the ocean through the Golden Gate. In situ sediment methylation and demethylation were dominant sources and losses determining ambient steady-state concentrations in the model, with changes in external loads and export causing smaller changes. Better information on methylation and demethylation is thus most critical to improving understanding of methylmercury balances and management. PMID:20872899

  11. The past and future of fish consumption: Can supplies meet healthy eating recommendations?

    PubMed

    Thurstan, Ruth H; Roberts, Callum M

    2014-12-15

    In many developed countries fish and shellfish are increasingly promoted as healthy alternatives to other animal protein. We analysed how much fish was available to UK and global populations after accounting for processing losses, and compared this to recommended levels of fish consumption. In 2012, UK domestic fish landings per capita fell 81% below the recommended intake, although declines were masked by increased imports and aquaculture from the 1970s onwards. Global wild fish supply per capita declined by 32% from its peak in 1970. However, overall fish supplies per capita increased by 10% over the same period due to rapidly expanding aquaculture production. Whilst aquaculture has so far prevented a downturn in global fish supplies, many developed nations continue to aspire to consume more fish than they produce. Until demand is balanced with sustainable methods of production governments should consider carefully the social and environmental implications of greater fish consumption. PMID:25261177

  12. Methylmercury Poisoning in Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakir, F.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Discusses incidence of methylmercury poisoning throughout the world with increasing industrial and agricultural use of mercury compounds. Describes recent epidemic in Iraq resulting from use of wheat treated with methylmercurial fungicide. New data are presented on the toxicity of methylmercury and its metabolic fate in the human body. (JR)

  13. Fish consumption pattern among adults of different ethnics in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Nurul Izzah; Wan Mahiyuddin, Wan Rozita; Tengku Mohamad, Tengku Rozaina; Ling, Cheong Yoon; Daud, Siti Fatimah; Hussein, Nasriyah Che; Abdullah, Nor Aini; Shaharudin, Rafiza; Sulaiman, Lokman Hakim

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding different patterns of fish consumption is an important component for risk assessment of contaminants in fish. A few studies on food consumption had been conducted in Malaysia, but none of them focused specifically on fish consumption. The objectives of this study were to document the meal pattern among three major ethnics in Malaysia with respect to fish/seafood consumption, identify most frequently consumed fish and cooking method, and examine the influence of demographic factors on pattern of fish consumption among study subjects. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted between February 2008 and May 2009 to investigate patterns of fish consumption among Malaysian adults in Peninsular Malaysia. Adults aged 18 years and above were randomly selected and fish consumption data were collected using a 3-day prospective food diary. Results A total of 2,675 subjects, comprising male (44.2%) and female (55.7%) participants from major ethnics (Malays, 76.9%; Chinese, 14.7%; Indians, 8.3%) with a mean age of 43.4±16.2 years, were involved in this study. The results revealed 10 most frequently consumed marine fish in descending order: Indian mackerel, anchovy, yellowtail and yellow-stripe scads, tuna, sardines, torpedo scad, Indian and short-fin scads, pomfret, red snapper, and king mackerel. Prawn and squid were also among the most preferred seafood by study subjects. The most frequently consumed freshwater fish were freshwater catfish and snakehead. The most preferred cooking style by Malaysians was deep-fried fish, followed by fish cooked in thick and/or thin chili gravy, fish curry, and fish cooked with coconut milk mixed with other spices and flavorings. Overall, Malaysians consumed 168 g/day fish, with Malay ethnics’ (175±143 g/day) consumption of fish significantly (p<0.001) higher compared with the other two ethnic groups (Chinese=152±133 g/day, Indians=136±141 g/day). Conclusion Fish consumption was significantly associated with

  14. POTENTIAL HEALTH HAZARDS FROM CONSUMPTION OF FISH CAUGHT IN POLLUTED COASTAL WATERS OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was carried out in the Los Angeles metropolitan coastal area during 1980 to assess fishing activity and consumption rates of fish by sport fishermen at local sites which were pollution impacted. Among the 1059 anglers interviewed, 49% of them fish at least one time each ...

  15. Reducing uncertainty in risk modeling for methylmercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, R.; Egeland, G.; Middaugh, J.; Lee, R.

    1995-12-31

    The biomagnification and bioaccumulation of methylmercury in marine species represents a challenge for risk assessment related to the consumption of subsistence foods in Alaska. Because of the profound impact that food consumption advisories have on indigenous peoples seeking to preserve a way of life, there is a need to reduce uncertainty in risk assessment. Thus, research was initiated to reduce the uncertainty in assessing the health risks associated with the consumption of subsistence foods. Because marine subsistence foods typically contain elevated levels of methylmercury, preliminary research efforts have focused on methylmercury as the principal chemical of concern. Of particular interest are the antagonistic effects of selenium on methylmercury toxicity. Because of this antagonism, methylmercury exposure through the consumption of marine mammal meat (with high selenium) may not be as toxic as comparable exposures through other sources of dietary intake, such as in the contaminated bread episode of Iraq (containing relatively low selenium). This hypothesis is supported by animal experiments showing reduced toxicity of methylmercury associated with marine mammal meat, by the antagonistic influence of selenium on methylmercury toxicity, and by negative clinical findings in adult populations exposed to methylmercury through a marine diet not subject to industrial contamination. Exploratory model development is underway to identify potential improvements and applications of current deterministic and probabilistic models, particularly by incorporating selenium as an antagonist in risk modeling methods.

  16. Methylmercury risk assessment issues

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, F.W.; Saroff, L.

    1996-07-01

    This paper reviews the general background of health risks associated with mercury (Hg), primarily methylmercury (MeHg), with a view towards application to advanced technologies that could reduce any contributions from coal combustion. The need for accurate assessment of such risks is discussed, since Hg is now widely dispersed in the environment and cannot easily be eliminated. The primary pathway of MeHg intake is through eating contaminated fish. The issues of concern include identification of critical health outcomes (various neurological indices) and their confounding factors, accurate assessment of MeHg intake rates, and appropriate use of dose-response functions. Ultimately, such information will be used to evaluate alternative coal combustion systems.

  17. Raw fish consumption in liver fluke endemic areas in rural southern Laos.

    PubMed

    Xayaseng, Vilavanh; Phongluxa, Khampheng; van Eeuwijk, Peter; Akkhavong, Kongsap; Odermatt, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Consumption of raw or insufficiently cooked fish is a major public health concern in Southeast Asia, and in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), in particular. We aimed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and practices of villagers in liver fluke endemic areas related to raw fish preparation, consumption and its health consequences. In February 2010, eight focus group discussions (FGDs, 35 men and 37 women total) and direct observations were conducted in four randomly selected villages in Saravane District, Saravane Province (Lao PDR). FGDs distilled the knowledge, attitudes, perceptions and practices of adult community members on raw fish preparation, consumption and its consequences for health. Conversations were transcribed from notes and tape-recorders. MaxQDA software was used for content analysis. Knowledge regarding the health effects of raw fish consumption was heterogeneous. Some participants did not associate liver fluke infection with any ill health, while others linked it to digestive problems. Participants also associated vegetables and tree leave consumption with liver fluke infection. The majority of FGD participants considered fish flesh that had been prepared with weaver ant extract to be safe for consumption. Visual appearance, taste, smell and personal preference were given as reasons for consuming raw fish dishes. Moreover, participants considered it a traditional way of food preparation, practiced for generations in Laos. Ten different fish dishes that use raw or fermented fish were identified. All FGD participants reported consuming dishes with raw fish. This study reveals a low degree of knowledge among local people on the health risks related to frequent consumption of raw or insufficiently cooked fish. Fish dishes were considered to be 'well-prepared' (that is, 'cooked') even though the fish had not been heated. In future, successful health education campaigns will have to address the specific knowledge, attitudes

  18. Public awareness of mercury in fish: analysis of public awareness and assessment of fish consumption in vermont.

    PubMed

    Damsky, William E; Duncan, Elizabeth; Flanagan, Noreen; Fromhold, Karen; Dung, Hyunh; Meyer, Russell; Sax, Jordan; Delaney, Thomas; Bress, William; Hoffman-Contois, Razelle; Carney, Jan K

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to mercury from environmental sources, such as fish consumption, poses potential health risks to the public. The state of Vermont has developed educational brochures and posters displaying safe fish consumption guidelines in order to educate the public regarding mercury exposure through fish. In this study, a group of medical students from the University of Vermont College of Medicine, in partnership with the Vermont Department of Health, conducted a study in Chittenden County, Vermont in order to assess both fish consumption practices and overall awareness of such safe eating guidelines and mercury advisories. A total of 166 Vermont residents were surveyed during a six week period. The results of this survey suggest that in Chittenden county of Vermont, these educational efforts are markedly successful, with 48% of respondents being specifically aware of the safe eating guidelines. Further, these results suggest that 61% of those respondents that reported low monthly canned tuna consumption had a decreased their consumption in response to the safe eating guidelines. last, a series of specific, yet widely applicable recommendations are presented for future public educational efforts regarding mercury exposure through fish consumption. PMID:21152332

  19. Perceptions of health risks and benefits associated with fish consumption among Russian consumers.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Heleen; Fischer, Arnout R H; Honkanen, Pirjo; Frewer, Lynn J

    2011-04-01

    Knowledge about differences in consumer perceptions of health risks and benefits related to fish consumption is important for the development of targeted health interventions associated with dietary choice. The purpose of this study is to identify individual differences in Russian consumers according to their perceptions of health risks and benefits associated with fish consumption. By application of a cluster analysis on perceptions of personal risks and benefits associated with the consumption of fish, four groups of Russian consumers were classified as: very positive; positive; moderately positive; and 'high risk-high benefit' about the healthiness of fish consumption. Differences in perceptions of personal risks and benefits across consumers were related to self-reported fish consumption, optimism about personal risks and benefits, and optimism about personal knowledge about risks and benefits. Implications for the development of targeted health interventions to influence perceptions of risks and benefits associated with fish consumption, and ultimately fish consumption, are discussed. It is concluded that optimism regarding perceptions and knowledge of health risks, and health benefits should be taken into account when developing interventions aimed at consumer health. PMID:21147191

  20. Factors in exposure assessment: Ethnic and socio-economic differences in fishing and consumption of fish caught along the Savannah River

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J. |; Stephens, W.L.; Boring, C.S. |; Kuklinski, M.; Gibbons, J.W.; Gochfeld, M. |

    1999-06-01

    South Carolina has issued fish consumption advisories for the Savannah River based on mercury and radionuclide levels. The authors examine differences in fishing rates and fish consumption of 258 people interviewed while fishing along the Savannah River, as a function of age, education, ethnicity, employment history, and income, and test the assumption that the average consumption of fish is less than the recreational value of 19 kg/year assumed by risk assessors. Ethnicity and education contributed significantly to explaining variations in number of fish meals per month, serving size, and total quantity of fish consumed per year. Blacks fished more often, ate more fish meals of slightly larger serving sizes, and consumed more fish per year than did Whites. Although education and income were correlated, education contributed most significantly to behavior; people who did not graduate from high school ate fish more often, ate more fish per year, and ate more whole fish than people who graduated from high school. Computing consumption of fish for each person individually indicates that (1) people who eat fish more often also eat larger portions, (2) a substantial number of people consume more than the amount of fish used to compute risk to recreational fishermen, (3) some people consume more than the subsistence level default assumption (50 kg/year) and (4) Blacks consume more fish per year than Whites, putting them at greater risk from contaminants in fish. Overall, ethnicity, age, and education contributed to variations in fishing behavior and consumption.

  1. Expanding perceptions of subsistence fish consumption: evidence of high commercial fish consumption and dietary mercury exposure in an urban coastal community.

    PubMed

    Holloman, Erica L; Newman, Michael C

    2012-02-01

    Through collaborative partnerships established between current researchers and The Moton Community House (a local community center), African American women (ages 16-49yrs) from the Southeast Community of Newport News, Virginia, USA were surveyed to assess the reproducibility and consistency of fish consumption patterns (ingestion rates, exposure frequencies, weight, and fish consumption rates) derived from a community-specific fish consumption survey. Women were also surveyed to assess the reliability of the survey responses, and to estimate daily mercury intake. Fish consumption patterns were reproducible and the survey responses were reliable. Comparison between years revealed that fish consumption patterns remained consistent over time. In addition, the high fish consumption rate estimated in 2008 (147.8g/day; 95% CI: 117.6-185.8g/day) was confirmed with a rate (134.9g/day; 95% CI: 88-207g/day) not materially different and still considerably higher than mean fish consumption rates reported for U.S. women. Daily mercury intake rates were estimated using consumption data from 2008 and three consumption scenarios (canned white, canned light, and no tuna) due to confirmed differences in mercury concentration between canned white and light tuna. Arithmetic mean daily mercury intake rates were 0.284μg/kg bw/day (95% CI: 0.229-0.340μg/kg bw/day) using canned white tuna, 0.212μg/kg bw/day (95% CI: 0.165-0.259μg/kg bw/day) using light tuna, and 0.197μg/kg bw/day (95% CI: 0.151-0.243μg/kg bw/day) using no tuna. Approximately 58%-73% of the daily mercury intake rates for African American women in the Southeast Community exceeded US EPA's oral reference dose (RfD) of 0.10μg/kg bw/day for mercury. In addition, 2% of the rates exceeded a level (1.00μg/kg bw/day) documented to produce adverse health effects. Past and current investigations confirmed that even though women in this community were not subsistence fishers, they are subsistence fish consumers. PMID:22225823

  2. Hematological findings in neotropical fish Hoplias malabaricus exposed to subchronic and dietary doses of methylmercury, inorganic lead, and tributyltin chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Ribeiro, C.A. . E-mail: ciro@ufpr.br; Filipak Neto, F.; Mela, M.; Silva, P.H.; Randi, M.A.F.; Rabitto, I.S.; Alves Costa, J.R.M.; Pelletier, E.

    2006-05-15

    Hematological indices are gaining general acceptance as valuable tools in monitoring various aspects the health of fish exposed to contaminants. In this work some effects of methyl mercury (MeHg), inorganic lead (Pb{sup 2+}), and tributyltin (TBT) in a tropical fish species were evaluated by hematological methods after a trophic exposition at a subchronic level. Forty-two mature individuals of the freshwater top predator fish Hoplias malabaricus were exposed to trophic doses (each 5 days) of MeHg (0.075 {mu}g g{sup -1}), Pb{sup 2+} (21 {mu}g g{sup -1}), and TBT (0.3 {mu}g g{sup -1}) using young fish Astyanax sp. as prey vehicle. After 14 successive doses over 70 days, blood was sampled from exposed and control groups to evaluate hematological effects of metals on erythrocytes, total leukocytes and differential leukocytes counts, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, and red blood cell indices mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). Transmission electron microscopy and image analysis of erythrocytes were also used to investigate some morphometric parameters. Results show no significant effects in MCH and MCHC for all tested metals, but differences were found in erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, MCV, and white blood cells counts. The number of leukocytes was increased in the presence of MeHg, suggesting effects on the immune system. Also the MCV increased in individuals exposed to MeHg. No ultrastructural damages were observed in red blood cells but the image analysis using light microscopy revealed differences in area, elongation, and roundness of erythrocytes from individuals exposed to Pb{sup 2+} and TBT but not in the group exposed to MeHg. The present work shows that changes in hematological and blood indices could highlight some barely detectable metal effects in fish after laboratory exposure to contaminated food, but their application in field biomonitoring using H

  3. Fish consumption behavior and rates in native and non-native people in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Batang, Zenon; Alikunhi, Nabeel; Al-Jahdali, Ramzi; Al-Jebreen, Dalal; Aziz, Mohammed A. M.; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz

    2015-01-01

    Fish are a healthy source of protein and nutrients, but contaminants in fish may provide health risks. Determining the risk from contaminants in fish requires site-specific information on consumption patterns. We examine consumption rates for resident and expatriates in the Jeddah region of Saudi Arabia, by species of fish and fishing location. For Saudis, 3.7 % of males and 4.3 % of females do not eat fish; for expatriates, the percent not eating fish is 6.6 % and 6.1 % respectively. Most people eat fish at home (over 90 %), and many eat fish at restaurants (65 % and 48 %, respectively for Saudis and expatriates). Fish eaten at home comes from local fish markets, followed by supermarkets. Saudis included fish in their diets at an average of 1.4±1.2 meals/week at home and 0.8±0.7 meals/week at restaurants, while expats ate 2.0±1.7 meals/week at home and 1.1±1.1 meals/week in restaurants. Overall, Saudis ate 2.2 fish meals/week, while expats ate 3.1 meals/week. Grouper (Epinephelus and Cephalopholis) were eaten by 72% and 60% respectively. Plectropomus pessuliferus was the second favorite for both groups and Hipposcarus harid and Lethrinus lentjan were in 3rd and 4th place in terms of consumption. Average meal size was 68 g for Saudis and 128 g for expatriates. These data can be used by health professionals, risk assessors, and environmental regulators to examine potential risk from contaminants in fish, and to compare consumption rates with other sites. PMID:24926920

  4. Fish consumption behavior and rates in native and non-native people in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Batang, Zenon; Alikunhi, Nabeel; Al-Jahdali, Ramzi; Al-Jebreen, Dalal; Aziz, Mohammed A M; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz

    2014-08-01

    Fish are a healthy source of protein and nutrients, but contaminants in fish may provide health risks. Determining the risk from contaminants in fish requires site-specific information on consumption patterns. We examine consumption rates for resident and expatriates in the Jeddah region of Saudi Arabia, by species of fish and fishing location. For Saudis, 3.7% of males and 4.3% of females do not eat fish; for expatriates, the percent not eating fish is 6.6% and 6.1% respectively. Most people eat fish at home (over 90%), and many eat fish at restaurants (65% and 48%, respectively for Saudis and expatriates). Fish eaten at home comes from local fish markets, followed by supermarkets. Saudis included fish in their diets at an average of 1.4 ± 1.2 meals/week at home and 0.8 ± 0.7 meals/week at restaurants, while expats ate 2.0 ± 1.7 meals/week at home and 1.1 ± 1.1 meals/week in restaurants. Overall, Saudis ate 2.2 fish meals/week, while expats ate 3.1 meals/week. Grouper (Epinephelus and Cephalopholis) were eaten by 72% and 60% respectively. Plectropomus pessuliferus was the second favorite for both groups and Hipposcarus harid and Lethrinus lentjan were in 3rd and 4th place in terms of consumption. Average meal size was 68 g for Saudis and 128 g for expatriates. These data can be used by health professionals, risk assessors, and environmental regulators to examine potential risk from contaminants in fish, and to compare consumption rates with other sites. PMID:24926920

  5. Maternal fish consumption during pregnancy and risk of early childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Salam, Muhammad T; Li, Yu-Fen; Langholz, Bryan; Gilliland, Frank D

    2005-01-01

    Maternal fish consumption during pregnancy may affect children's asthma risk by modulating early-life immune development. Type of fish intake may be important because of differences in fatty acid content. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a nested case-control study, selecting subjects from the Children's Health Study, a population-based study of school-aged children in southern California. Cases had physician-diagnosed asthma and controls were asthma-free by age 5 years. Mothers or guardians provided information on fish consumption during pregnancy in telephone interviews. We computed odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) by using conditional logistic regression models that accounted for the sampling. In children born to mothers with a history of asthma, the OR of asthma was 0.20 (95% CI = 0.06-0.65) when mothers ate oily fish at least monthly during pregnancy compared with no consumption (p(trend) = 0.006). Maternal oily fish consumption during pregnancy did not benefit children of non-asthmatic mothers. In contrast, fish stick (a source of trans-fats) consumption during pregnancy increased asthma risk in children (OR = 2.04; 95% CI = 1.18-3.51). Our results suggest that maternal oily fish intake during pregnancy may protect offspring from asthma; however, eating fish sticks during pregnancy may increase asthma risk in children. PMID:16293548

  6. Neurobehavioral effects of developmental methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, S G; Grant-Webster, K S

    1995-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a global environmental problem and is listed by the International Program of Chemical Safety as one of the six most dangerous chemicals in the world's environment. Human exposure to MeHg primarily occurs through the consumption of contaminated food such as fish, although catastrophic exposures due to industrial pollution have occurred. The fetus is particularly sensitive to MeHg exposure and adverse effects on infant development have been associated with levels of exposure that result in few, if any, signs of maternal clinical illness or toxicity. High levels of prenatal exposure in humans result in neurobehavioral effects such as cerebral palsy and severe mental retardation. Prenatal exposure to MeHg in communities with chronic low-level exposure is related to decreased birthweight and early sensorimotor dysfunction such as delayed onset of walking. Neurobehavioral alterations have also been documented in studies with nonhuman primates and rodents. Available information on the developmental neurotoxic effects of MeHg, particularly the neurobehavioral effects, indicates that the fetus and infant are more sensitive to adverse effects of MeHg. It is therefore recommended that pregnant women and women of childbearing age be strongly advised to limit their exposure to potential sources of MeHg. Based on results from human and animal studies on the developmental neurotoxic effects of methylmercury, the accepted reference dose should be lowered to 0.025 to 0.06 MeHg microgram/kg/day. Continued research on the neurotoxic effects associated with low level developmental exposure is needed. PMID:8549462

  7. Neurobehavioral effects of developmental methylmercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, S.G.; Grant-Webster, K.S.

    1995-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a global environmental problem and is listed by the International Program of Chemical Safety as one of the six most dangerous chemicals in the world`s environment. Human exposure to MeHg primarily occurs through the consumption of contaminated food such as fish, although catastrophic exposures due to industrial pollution have occurred. The fetus is particularly sensitive to MeHg exposure and adverse effects on infant development have been associated with levels of exposure that result in few, if any, signs of maternal clinical illness or toxicity. High levels of prenatal exposure in humans result in neurobehavioral effects such as cerebral palsy and severe mental retardation. Prenatal exposure to MeHg in communities with chronic low-level exposure is related to decreased birthweight and early sensorimotor dysfunction such as delayed onset of walking. Neurobehavioral alterations have also been documented in studies with non human primates and rodents. Available information on the developmental neurotoxic effects of MeHg, particularly the neurobehavioral effects, indicates that the fetus and infant are more sensitive to adverse effects of MEHg. It is therefore recommended that pregnant women and women of childbearing age be strongly advised to limit their exposure to potential sources of MeHg. Based on results from human and animal studies on the developmental neurotoxic effects of methylmercury, the accepted reference dose should be lowered to 0.025 to 0.06 MeHg {mu}g/kg/day. Continued research on the neurotoxic effects associated with low level developmental exposure is needed. 107 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. PARENTAL CONSUMPTION OF CONTAMINATED SPORT FISH FROM LAKE ONTARIO AND PREDICTED FECUNDABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wildlife studies suggest that consumption of contaminated fish from the Great Lakes may expose humans to polychlorinated biphenyls and persistent chlorinated pesticides. To assess whether time to pregnancy or fecundability is affected, we conducted a telephone survey in 1993 with...

  9. Exposure assessment for trace elements from consumption of marine fish in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Kunito, Takashi; Sudaryanto, Agus; Monirith, In; Kan-Atireklap, Supawat; Iwata, Hisato; Ismail, Ahmad; Sanguansin, Joompol; Muchtar, Muswerry; Tana, Touch Seang; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2007-02-01

    Concentrations of 20 trace elements were determined in muscle and liver of 34 species of marine fish collected from coastal areas of Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. Large regional difference was observed in the levels of trace elements in liver of one fish family (Carangidae): the highest mean concentration was observed in fish from the Malaysian coastal waters for V, Cr, Zn, Pb and Bi and those from the Java Sea side of Indonesia for Sn and Hg. To assess the health risk to the Southeast Asian populations from consumption of fish, intake rates of trace elements were estimated. Some marine fish showed Hg levels higher than the guideline values by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). This suggests that consumption of these fish may be hazardous to the people. PMID:16828209

  10. Mercury concentrations in fish from Lake Mead, USA, related to fish size, condition, trophic level, location, and consumption risk.

    PubMed

    Cizdziel, J V; Hinners, T A; Pollard, J E; Heithmar, E M; Cross, C L

    2002-10-01

    Total mercury (Hg) concentrations were determined in the skeletal muscle of 339 fish collected during the fall of 1998 and spring of 1999 from Lake Mead, USA, the nation's largest human-made reservoir. Five species of fish representing a range of trophic levels and the lake's principal game fishes were studied. Hg generally increased with trophic level and fish size. Median Hg concentrations (ng/g wet mass) were 277 in striped bass, 168 in channel catfish, 160 in largemouth bass, 75 in bluegill, and 8 in blue tilapia. Overall, fish from Las Vegas Bay and Boulder Basin had the lowest Hg concentrations, possibly a result of biodilution in this biologically productive area. In general, fish-mercury advisories might include a warning about consuming fillet from emaciated fish, based on the finding that Hg concentrations in 59 striped bass (captured during a scarce-food season) correlated inversely ( r = -0.89, p < 0.001) with a fish nutritional-status factor. This is consistent with starvation-concentration, whereby Hg in fish muscle is lost at a slower rate than the muscle mass. The median concentration found for 139 striped bass corresponds to a recommended risk-based consumption limit of three 8-oz. (227-g) meals per month for a 70-kg adult. Finally, this paper serves as a useful archive for future research and long-term studies of Hg in Lake Mead fish. PMID:12202927

  11. Fishing, consumption, and risk perception in fisherfolk along an east coast estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.; Sanchez, J.; Gochfeld, M.

    1998-04-01

    Increasingly public and governmental agencies are concerned about the safety of fish and shellfish that recreational fishermen consume. Fishing behavior, consumption patterns, and risk perceptions were examined for people fishing and crabbing in Barnegat Bay, NJ. Women fished in significantly larger groups than men, and their groups included more children. Subjects fished an average of seven times per month and crabbed three times per month; they caught fish on most outings, and 80% ate their catch. Subjects consumed fish an average of five times a month, eating just under 10 oz (ca. 280 g) per meal. Only 25% of the fish consumed by women, and 49% of the fish consumed by men, are self-caught. Nearly 90% of the people believe the fish and crabs from Barnegat Bay are safe to eat, although about 40% have heard some warnings about their safety. Most people heard about advisories from newspapers or television. Most subjects believe that saltwater fish are safer than freshwater fish and that fish they catch themselves or buy in a bay store are safer than those from a supermarket. People generally do not have a clear understanding of the relationship between contaminants and fish size or trophic level, suggesting an avenue for risk reduction.

  12. Fish Consumption in Connecticut, Florida, Minnesota, and North Dakota (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    fish_consum_cover.jpg" alt="Cover of the EPA Fish Consumption Final Report" vspace = "5" hspace="5" align="right" border="1" /> Many state and local health agencies throughout the United States conduct area-specific...

  13. Sport fish consumption and body burden levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons: a study of Wisconsin anglers

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, B.J.; Anderson, H.A.; Hanrahan, L.P.; Olson, L.J.; Sonzogni, W.C.

    1989-03-01

    Sport-caught fish consumption is the major source of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exposure for the general population. To assess this and 2,2'-bis-(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE) exposure, we surveyed 801 Wisconsin anglers for fishing and consumption habits and comprehension of and compliance with the Wisconsin fish consumption health advisory. The mean annual number of sport-caught fish meals was 18. Seventy-two percent of anglers were familiar with the health advisory and 57% had changed their fishing or fish consumption habits as a result of the advisory. The mean PCB serum congener sum level for 192 anglers was 2.2 micrograms/l (range = nondetectable to 27.1 micrograms/l); mean DDE was 6.3 micrograms/l (range = nondetectable to 40.0 micrograms/l). Statistically significant positive Spearman correlations were observed between sport-caught fish meals and PCB and DDE sera levels (R = .21 and .14, respectively) and between kilograms of fish caught and PCB sera levels (R = .25). These results demonstrate that anglers may provide a population for assessment of PCBs and DDE associated morbidity and mortality.

  14. Chronic methylmercurialism in the cat.

    PubMed

    Gruber, T A; Costigan, P; Wilkinson, G T; Seawright, A A

    1978-04-01

    The mercury levels in 69 muscle samples from fish weighing from 0.3 to 200 kg caught in Moreton Bay, Queensland, in the latter half of 1976 ranged from less than 10 to 2,030 ng/g. Mercury levels in blood samples from 53 humans and 100 dogs in Brisbane almost all contained less than 10 ng/ml while the level in 162 cats sampled ranged from less than 10 to 329 ng/ml. Chronic methylmercurialism developed in 2 cats dosed daily with methylmercury, bound to cysteine, at the rate of 0.6 mg/kg body weight for 74 and 77 days respectively. Terminal clinical signs included anorexia, weight loss, knuckling over at the carpus and tarsus, hypermetria initially involving the forelegs and later the hindlegs, sluggish reflexes, paresis involving all limbs, persistent crying, apparent blindness, tonic and clonic convulsions and salivation. Pathological changes were confined to the nervous system and included degeneration of neurones and perivascular cuffing in the cerebrocortical grey matter, focal atrophy of the granular layer, focal spongiosus of the molecular layer and degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum and demyelination in the fibre tracts of the dorsal funiculus, mainly the fasciculus cuneatus and in the lateral and ventral corticospinal tracts. Terminal blood methylmercury levels were in excess of 18 microgram/ml, while brain methylmercury levels ranged from 21.0 to 28.4 microgram/g. The liver and kidney contained the highest total levels of mercury of 50 to 80 microgram/g, of which 23 to 37% was inorganic. PMID:687273

  15. Sport-caught fish consumption and conception delay in licensed Michigan anglers

    SciTech Connect

    Courval, J.M.; DeHoog, J.V.; Stein, A.D.; Tay, E.M.; He, J.; Paneth, N.; Humphrey, H.E.B.

    1999-02-01

    Between 1993 and 1995, the authors surveyed 4,931 licensed anglers aged 17--34 years residing in 10 Michigan counties bordering a Great Lake. Responses were received from 1,443 anglers and 844 of their partners. Lifetime sport-caught fish consumption was estimated as the number of sport-caught fish meals consumed in the previous 12 months times years since 1970 in which sport-caught fish were consumed. Analysis was restricted to currently married couples. Conception delay was reported by 13% of both men and women. Among men, the unadjusted odds ratios (OR) for conception delay were 1.2, 1.3, and 2.0 across the three increasing levels of sport-caught fish consumption compared to none (trend test P = 0.06). After adjustment for age, race, region of Michigan, household income, educational attainment, smoking, alcohol consumption, and partner`s sport fish consumption, the OR for conception delay in men were 1.4, 1.8, and 2.8, respectively. In women, unadjusted OR for conception delay were 0.9, 1.0, and 1.4 with increasing sport-caught fish consumption (trend test P = 0.35). With the same covariates and the sport-caught fish consumption of the woman`s partner included in the model, the OR were 0.8, 0.8, and 1.0, respectively. These data suggest a modest association, in men only, of sport-caught fish consumption with risk of conception delay.

  16. Human exposure to methylmercury from crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qian; Greenfield, Ben K; Dang, Fei; Zhong, Huan

    2016-02-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation in aquatic food raises global concerns about human exposure to MeHg. Crayfish is the world's third largest farmed crustacean species and a favorite aquatic food in many countries. However, human health hazard due to MeHg exposure via crayfish consumption is unclear, partly because appropriate survey data are lacking. We report on mercury concentrations and speciation in edible tail muscle of crayfish collected from restaurants in 23 Chinese cities. On average, MeHg constituted 99.1 % of mercury in tail muscle, and MeHg concentrations were comparable with those reported for fish in China. Variation in MeHg concentrations was not attributable to broad geographic region (i.e., provinces) or tail length. For different populations, potential health risk (characterized by hazard quotient or HQ) of MeHg exposure through crayfish consumption depended largely on crayfish consumption rates. In particular, a health hazard (HQ > 1) was found for high-rate consumers (i.e., 95 %ile or higher) in some cities in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLYR), during the peak consumption season. Our results suggest that more attention should be paid to dietary MeHg intake via crayfish consumption in China, particularly for communities with high consumption in MLYR. PMID:25850898

  17. Local fish consumption and serum PCB concentrations among Mohawk men at Akwesasne

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, E.F.; Deres, D.A.; Hwang, S.A.; Bush, B.; Yang, B.; Tarbell, A.; Jacobs, A.

    1999-02-01

    A study was conducted to assess local fish consumption patterns and their relationship to concentrations of total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the serum of Mohawk men residing near three hazardous waste sites. From 1992 to 1995, 139 men were interviewed and donated a 20-ml venous blood sample. The results indicated that the men ate a mean of 21.2 local fish meals during the past year, compared with annual means of 27.7 meals 1--2 years before and 88.6 meals more than 2 years before. This change is probably a consequence of advisories issued against the consumption of local fish, since 97% of the mean were aware of the advisories and two-third had changed their behavior as a result. Multiple regression analysis revealed that serum PCB levels increased with age and local fish consumption. The data suggest that local fish consumption has contributed to body burdens in this population and that the advisories have been effective in modifying local fish consumption habits.

  18. Consumption of PCB-contaminated sport fish and risk of spontaneous fetal death

    SciTech Connect

    Mendola, P.; Buck, G.M.; Vena, J.E.; Zielezny, M.; Sever, L.E.

    1995-05-01

    Spontaneous fetal death has been observed among various mammalian species after exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Our exposure-based cohort study assessed the relationship between consumption of PCB-contaminated Lake Ontario sport fish and spontaneous fetal death using 1820 multigravid fertile women from the 1990-1991 New York State Angler Cohort Study. Fish consumption data were obtained from food frequency questionnaires and history of spontaneous fetal death from live birth certificates. Analyses were stratified by number of prior pregnancies and controlled for smoking and maternal age. No significant increases in risk for fetal death were observed across four measures of exposure: a lifetime estimate of PCB exposure based on species-specific PCB levels; the number of years of fish consumption; kilograms of sport fish consumed in 1990-1991; and a lifetime estimate of kilograms eaten. A slight risk reduction was seen for women with two prior pregnancies at the highest level of PCB exposure (odds ratio = 0.36; 95% CI, 0.14-0.92) and for women with three or more prior pregnancies with increasing years of fish consumption (odds ratio = 0.97; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99). These findings suggest that consumption of PCB-contaminated sport fish does not increase the risk of spontaneous fetal death. 50 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. An empirical model for estimating annual consumption by freshwater fish populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liao, H.; Pierce, C.L.; Larscheid, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Population consumption is an important process linking predator populations to their prey resources. Simple tools are needed to enable fisheries managers to estimate population consumption. We assembled 74 individual estimates of annual consumption by freshwater fish populations and their mean annual population size, 41 of which also included estimates of mean annual biomass. The data set included 14 freshwater fish species from 10 different bodies of water. From this data set we developed two simple linear regression models predicting annual population consumption. Log-transformed population size explained 94% of the variation in log-transformed annual population consumption. Log-transformed biomass explained 98% of the variation in log-transformed annual population consumption. We quantified the accuracy of our regressions and three alternative consumption models as the mean percent difference from observed (bioenergetics-derived) estimates in a test data set. Predictions from our population-size regression matched observed consumption estimates poorly (mean percent difference = 222%). Predictions from our biomass regression matched observed consumption reasonably well (mean percent difference = 24%). The biomass regression was superior to an alternative model, similar in complexity, and comparable to two alternative models that were more complex and difficult to apply. Our biomass regression model, log10(consumption) = 0.5442 + 0.9962??log10(biomass), will be a useful tool for fishery managers, enabling them to make reasonably accurate annual population consumption predictions from mean annual biomass estimates. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  20. Umbilical cord blood and placental mercury, selenium and selenoprotein expression in relation to maternal fish consumption

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Christy L.; Soon, Reni; Sauvage, Lynnae; Ralston, Nicholas V.C.; Berry, Marla J.

    2015-01-01

    Seafood is an important source of nutrients for fetal neurodevelopment. Most individuals are exposed to the toxic element mercury through seafood. Due to the neurotoxic effects of mercury, United States government agencies recommend no more than 340 g (12 oz) per week of seafood consumption during pregnancy. However, recent studies have shown that selenium, also abundant in seafood, can have protective effects against mercury toxicity. In this study, we analyzed mercury and selenium levels and selenoprotein mRNA, protein, and activity in placenta of a cohort of women in Hawaii in relation to maternal seafood consumption assessed with dietary surveys. Fish consumption resulted in differences in mercury levels in placenta and cord blood. When taken as a group, those who consumed no fish exhibited the lowest mercury levels in placenta and cord blood. However, there were numerous individuals who either had higher mercury with no fish consumption or lower mercury with high fish consumption, indicating a lack of correlation. Placental expression of selenoprotein mRNAs, proteins and enzyme activity was not statistically different in any region among the different dietary groups. While the absence of seafood consumption correlates with lower average placental and cord blood mercury levels, no strong correlations were seen between seafood consumption or its absence and the levels of either selenoproteins or selenoenzyme activity. PMID:25744505

  1. Association between Maternal Fish Consumption and Gestational Weight Gain: Influence of Molecular Genetic Predisposition to Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Sofus C.; Ängquist, Lars; Laurin, Charles; Morgen, Camilla S.; Jakobsen, Marianne U.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Smith, George Davey; Olsen, Sjurdur F.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Nohr, Ellen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that fish consumption can restrict weight gain. However, little is known about how fish consumption affects gestational weight gain (GWG), and whether this relationship depends on genetic makeup. Objective To examine the association between fish consumption and GWG, and whether this relationship is dependent on molecular genetic predisposition to obesity. Design A nested case-cohort study based on the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) sampling the most obese women (n = 990) and a random sample of the remaining participants (n = 1,128). Replication of statistically significant findings was attempted in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) (n = 4,841). We included 32 body mass index (BMI) associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 SNPs found associated with GWG. BMI associated SNPs were combined in a genetic risk score (GRS). Associations between consumption of fish, GRS or individual variants and GWG were analysed, and interactions between fish and the GRS or individual variants were examined. Results In the DNBC, each portion/week (150 g) of fatty fish was associated with a higher GWG of 0.58 kg (95% CI: 0.16, 0.99, P<0.01). For total fish and lean fish, similar patterns were observed, but these associations were not statistically significant. We found no association between GRS and GWG, and no interactions between GRS and dietary fish on GWG. However, we found an interaction between the PPARG Pro12Ala variant and dietary fish. Each additional Pro12Ala G-allele was associated with a GWG of -0.83 kg (95% CI: -1.29, -0.37, P<0.01) per portion/week of dietary fish, with the same pattern for both lean and fatty fish. In ALSPAC, we were unable to replicate these findings. Conclusion We found no consistent evidence of association between fish consumption and GWG, and our results indicate that the association between dietary fish and GWG has little or no dependency on GRS or individual SNPs. PMID:26930408

  2. DOE/FDA/EPA: Workshop on methylmercury and human health

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Saroff, L.; Bolger, M.; Cicmanec, J.; Durkee, S.

    1994-12-31

    In the US the general population is exposed to methylmercury (MeHg) principally through the consumption of fish. There is continuing discussion about the sources of this form of mercury (Hg), the magnitudes and trends in exposures to consumers, and the significance of the sources and their contributions to human health. In response to these discussions, the US Department of Energy, the US Food and Drug Administration, and the US Environmental Protection Agency cosponsored a two-day workshop to discuss data and methods available for characterizing the risk to human health presented by MeHg. This workshop was attended by 45 individuals representing various Federal and state organizations and interested stakeholders. The agenda covered: Agency interests; probabilistic approach to risk assessment; emission sources; atmospheric transport; biogeochemical cycling; exposure assessment; health effects of MeHg; and research needs.

  3. Fish consumption doesn’t reduce the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-Bao; Fu, Qing-Xia; Liu, Hai-Yan; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several observational studies have investigated the association between fish consumption and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), however, the results were inconsistent. Hence, we performed a meta-analysis of observational studies to evaluate the effect of fish consumption on HCC risk. Methods: A systematic search was performed using the Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane Library Central database for case-control and coshort studies that assessed fish intake and HCC risk. Fixed-effect and random-effect models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were also performed. Results: Nine case-control studies and three cohort studies were included, involving a total of 1,071,458 participants and 2,627 HCC cases. Meta-analysis showed that there was no association between fish consumption and a significant reduction in HCC incidence (RR = 0.85, 95% CI [0.62, 1.17]). In our subgroup analyses, the result was substantially affected by adjustment for hepatic viruses’ infection status. Sensitivity analysis confirmed the stability of results. Furthermore, there was no evidence of publication bias as suggested by Begg’s P value (P = 0.411) and Egger’s (P = 0.596) test. Conclusions: In conclusion, our results do not support a significant inverse association of fish consumption with HCC risk. More in-depth studies are warranted to report more detailed results, including stratified results by fish types, preparation methods, and gender. PMID:26379876

  4. Characterization factors for water consumption and greenhouse gas emissions based on freshwater fish species extinction.

    PubMed

    Hanafiah, Marlia M; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A; Pfister, Stephan; Leuven, Rob S E W; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2011-06-15

    Human-induced changes in water consumption and global warming are likely to reduce the species richness of freshwater ecosystems. So far, these impacts have not been addressed in the context of life cycle assessment (LCA). Here, we derived characterization factors for water consumption and global warming based on freshwater fish species loss. Calculation of characterization factors for potential freshwater fish losses from water consumption were estimated using a generic species-river discharge curve for 214 global river basins. We also derived characterization factors for potential freshwater fish species losses per unit of greenhouse gas emission. Based on five global climate scenarios, characterization factors for 63 greenhouse gas emissions were calculated. Depending on the river considered, characterization factors for water consumption can differ up to 3 orders of magnitude. Characterization factors for greenhouse gas emissions can vary up to 5 orders of magnitude, depending on the atmospheric residence time and radiative forcing efficiency of greenhouse gas emissions. An emission of 1 ton of CO₂ is expected to cause the same impact on potential fish species disappearance as the water consumption of 10-1000 m³, depending on the river basin considered. Our results make it possible to compare the impact of water consumption with greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:21574555

  5. Fish consumption and contaminant exposure among Montreal-area sportfishers: Pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Kosatsky, T. |; Przybysz, R.; Shatenstein, B.; Weber, J.P.; Armstrong, B.

    1999-02-01

    A 1995 pilot study assessed sport fish consumption and contaminant exposure among Montreal-area residents fishing the frozen St. Lawrence river. Interviews conducted among 223 ice fishers met on-site were used to create an index of estimated exposure to fish-borne contaminants. A second-stage assessment of sport fish consumption and tissue contaminant burdens included 25 interviewees at the highest level of estimated contaminant exposure and 15 low-exposure fishers. High-level fisher-consumers reported eating 0.92 {+-} 0.99 sport fish meals/week during the previous 3 weeks compared to 0.38 {+-} 0.21 for the low-level group. Based on the product of consumption frequency times mass of sport fish meals consumed, high-level consumers ate a mean of 18.3 kg of sport fish annually versus 3.3 kg for the low-level consumers. Tissue contaminant assessments showed significant groupwise differences: 0--1 cm hair mercury, lipid-adjusted plasma PCB congeners, and lipid-adjusted plasma DDE. No participant had a hair mercury or plasma DDE concentration above Health Canada recommendations but 2/25 high-level participants had plasma Aroclor 1260 concentrations above recommended limits.

  6. Fish consumption and risk of subclinical brain abnormalities on MRI in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, J K.; Siscovick, D S.; Longstreth, W T.; Kuller, L H.; Mozaffarian, D

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between fish consumption and subclinical brain abnormalities. Methods: In the population-based Cardiovascular Health Study, 3,660 participants age ≥65 underwent an MRI scan in 1992–1994. Five years later, 2,313 were scanned. Neuroradiologists assessed MRI scans in a standardized and blinded manner. Food frequency questionnaires were used to assess dietary intakes. Participants with known cerebrovascular disease were excluded from the analyses. Results: After adjustment for multiple risk factors, the risk of having one or more prevalent subclinical infarcts was lower among those consuming tuna/other fish ≥3 times/week, compared to <1/month (relative risk 0.74, 95% CI = 0.54–1.01, p = 0.06, p trend = 0.03). Tuna/other fish consumption was also associated with trends toward lower incidence of subclinical infarcts. Additionally, tuna/other fish intake was associated with better white matter grade, but not with sulcal and ventricular grades, markers of brain atrophy. No significant associations were found between fried fish consumption and any subclinical brain abnormalities. Conclusions: Among older adults, modest consumption of tuna/other fish, but not fried fish, was associated with lower prevalence of subclinical infarcts and white matter abnormalities on MRI examinations. Our results add to prior evidence that suggest that dietary intake of fish with higher eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid content, and not fried fish intake, may have clinically important health benefits. GLOSSARY ARR = absolute risk reduction; BMI = body mass index; CHD = coronary heart disease; CHS = Cardiovascular Health Study; DHA = docosahexaenoic acid; EPA = eicosapentaenoic acid; FFQ = food frequency questionnaire; HDL-C = high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LDL-C = low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; PUFA = polyunsaturated fatty acid; RR = relative risk. PMID:18678827

  7. Effect of regular consumption of oily fish compared with white fish on chronic plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Collier, P M; Ursell, A; Zaremba, K; Payne, C M; Staughton, R C; Sanders, T

    1993-04-01

    The influence of dietary advice on the severity of chronic plaque psoriasis was studied in 18 patients. Medication was standardized in all patients who were advised to eat 170 g white fish daily for a 4 week run-in period. Then the patients were randomized either to continue with the white fish diet or to substitute 170 g oily fish daily for 6 weeks. At the end of this second period the diets were reversed for a further 6 weeks. The oily fish but not the white fish diet led to a modest clinical improvement (11% and 15%, P < 0.01) which was accompanied by a rise in plasma eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) concentrations. It is concluded that dietary advice to increase the daily intake of oily fish is a useful adjunct in the treatment of psoriasis. The fish that should be recommended include mackerel, sardine, salmon, pilchard, kipper and herring. PMID:8491161

  8. Fish consumption and other characteristics of reproductive-aged Michigan anglers--a potential population for studying the effects of consumption of Great Lakes fish on reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Courval, J M; DeHoog, J V; Holzman, C B; Tay, E M; Fischer, L; Humphrey, H E; Paneth, N S; Sweeney, A M

    1996-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the benefits and risks of eating Great Lakes fish, particularly with regard to reproductive health. We report the results of a survey conducted from 1993-1995 among Michigan anglers. The survey was designed to identify a reproductive-aged cohort of persons who consume high or low levels of Great Lakes fish in order to study the impact of polyhalogenated biphenyl (PHB) compounds and other toxins on human reproduction outcomes. Using fishing license data obtained from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, we identified anglers of early reproductive age (18-34 years) in ten Michigan counties. The screening survey ascertained demographic, behavioral, fish consumption, and reproductive history information on anglers and their partners. Over 4,000 angler households were contacted. One thousand nine hundred fifty questionnaires were returned from 1,168 households. The median age of respondents was 30 years; 58% were male and 64% reported being married. Slightly more than one-half the respondents had attended or graduated from college, and less than 10% had not completed high school. In the past year, most respondents (46%) reported having eaten sport-caught fish 1-12 times, while 20% reported having eaten no sport-caught fish; 20% had consumed 13-24 meals. More sport-caught fish was consumed in the spring and summer than in the fall and winter, and males reported eating more fish than females. About 43% of our respondents reported that they intend to have one or more children in the next five years. Of these respondents, 287 couples had no identified impairments to reproduction and therefore would be eligible to participate in the future reproductive study. PMID:8843552

  9. Communicating fish consumption advisories in California: what works, what doesn't.

    PubMed

    Tan, May Lynn; Ujihara, Alyce; Kent, Lani; Hendrickson, Ilinisa

    2011-07-01

    State agencies face many challenges in creating sport fish consumption advisories that can be readily understood by diverse populations. In this study, our objectives were to identify barriers to understanding consumption advisories and recommend more effective approaches for communicating advisory concepts. We conducted key informant interviews with demographically diverse consumers of sport fish from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta watershed in California to explore how intended audiences perceive consumption advisories and identify factors that influence comprehension. Some barriers to communication included the use of portion sizes that departed from commonly consumed amounts, poorly understood terminology, misleading category headings, and ineffective visual tools. Comprehension was enhanced when advisory information did not contradict existing beliefs about fish or fish consumption, and when advisories provided information about contaminant levels in specific kinds of fish. Using certain methods, such as portion sizes that reflect commonly consumed amounts, mercury meters to convey contaminant levels, three advice categories (e.g., high, medium, low), and population definitions that identify specific age ranges, improved the clarity of advisory concepts for intended audiences. PMID:21231943

  10. Development of a single-meal fish consumption advisory for methyl mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, G.L.; Toal, B.F.

    2000-02-01

    Methyl mercury (meHg) contamination of fish is the leading cause of fish consumption advisories in the US. These advisories have focused upon repeated or chronic exposure, whereas risks during pregnancy may also exist from a single-meal exposure if the fish tissue concentration is high enough. In this study, acute exposure to meHg from a single fish meal was analyzed by using the one-compartment meHg biokinetic model to predict maternal hair concentrations. These concentrations were evaluated against the mercury hair concentration corresponding to the US Environmental Protection Agency's reference dose (RfD), which is intended to protect against neurodevelopmental effects. The one-compartment model was validated against blood concentrations from three datasets in which human subjects ingested meHg in fish, either as a single meal or multiple meals. Model simulations of the single-meal scenario at different fish meHg concentrations found that concentrations of 2.0 ppm or higher can be associated with maternal hair concentrations elevated above the RfD level for days to weeks during gestation. A single-meal fish concentration cutoff of {ge} 2.0 ppm is an important consideration, especially because this single high exposure event might be in addition to a baseline meHg body burden from other types of fish consumption. This type of single-meal advisory requires that fish sampling programs provide data for individual rather than composited fish, and take into account seasonal differences that may exist in fish concentrations.

  11. The Effect of Fish Consumption on Blood Mercury Levels of Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Euy Hyuk; Kwon, Ja Young; Kim, Sang Wun; Park, Yong Won

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the relationship between average fish consumption, as well as the type of fish consumed and levels of mercury in the blood of pregnant women. We also performed follow-up studies to determine if blood mercury levels were decreased after counseling and prenatal education. To examine these potential relationships, pregnant women were divided into two groups: a study group was educated to restrict fish intake, whereas a control group did not receive any prenatal education regarding fish consumption. We measured blood mercury level and performed follow-up studies during the third trimester to examine any differences between the two groups. Out of the 63 pregnant women who participated in our study, we performed follow-up studies with 19 pregnant women from the study group and 12 pregnant women from control group. The average initial blood mercury level of both groups was 2.94 µg/L, with a range of 0.14 to 10.75 µg/L. Blood mercury level in the group who ate fish more than four times per month was significantly higher than that of the group who did not consume fish (p = 0.02). In follow-up studies, blood mercury levels were decreased in the study group but slightly increased in the control group (p = 0.014). The maternal blood mercury level in late pregnancy was positively correlated with mercury levels of cord blood (r = 0.58, p = 0.047), which was almost twice the level found in maternal blood. Pregnant women who consume a large amount of fish may have high blood mercury levels. Further, cord blood mercury levels were much higher than that of maternal blood. Because the level of fish intake appears to influence blood mercury level, preconceptual education might be necessary in order decrease fish consumption. PMID:17066506

  12. Hair mercury levels in pregnant women in Mahshahr, Iran: fish consumption as a determinant of exposure.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Zohreh; Esmaili-Sari, Abbas

    2010-09-15

    MeHg is a well-documented neurotoxicant even at low levels of exposure. Developing brain, in particular, is vulnerable to that. Through bioaccumulating to differing degrees in various fish species, it can have serious adverse effects on the development and functioning of the human central nervous system, especially during prenatal exposure. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate mercury concentration in hair samples of pregnant women living in Mahshahr located in Khuzestan province, Iran. It assessed the association between fish consumption and specific characteristics that can influence exposure. From April to June 2008, 149 pregnant women were invited to participate in this study. An interview administered questionnaire was used to collect information about age, body weight, height, fish (fresh, canned and shrimp) consumption, pregnancy stage, residence duration, education level, family income and number of dental amalgam fillings. The obtained results showed that the geometric mean and range for hair total Hg concentration was 3.52 microg/g (0.44-53.56 microg/g). About 5.4% of mothers had hair total Hg levels in excess of 10 microg/g. Maternal hair mercury level was less than threshold level of WHO (5 microg/g). As expected, there was a clear increase in hair Hg with reported fresh marine fish consumption (p=0.04). The highest mean for hair mercury level in a group who consumed fish several times per week, was 4.93 microg/g. Moreover, a significant effect of age and residential time on Hg concentration in the hair of the women was found. Pregnant women in Mahshahr consumed large amounts of fish; consequently, most of their offspring were prenatally exposed to moderately high levels of mercury. The results found suggest that pregnant women should decrease their fish consumption. PMID:20655095

  13. Consumption dynamics of the adult piscivorous fish community in Spirit Lake, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liao, H.; Pierce, C.L.; Larscheid, J.G.

    2004-01-01

    At Spirit Lake, one of Iowa's most important fisheries, walleye Sander vitreus (formerly Stizostedion vitreum) is one of the most popular species with anglers. Despite a century of walleye stocking and management in Spirit Lake, walleye growth rate, size structure, and angler harvest continue to decline. Our purpose was to determine the magnitude and dynamics of walleye population consumption relative to those of other piscivorous species in Spirit Lake, which would allow managers to judge the feasibility of increasing the abundance, growth rate, and size structure of the walleye population. We quantified food consumption by the adult piscivorous fish community in Spirit Lake over a 3-year period. Data on population dynamics, diet, energy density, and water temperature from 1995 to 1997 were used in bioenergetics models to estimate total consumption by walleye, yellow perch Perca flavescens, smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, and northern pike Esox lucius. Estimated annual consumption by the piscivorous community varied roughly fourfold, ranging from 154,752 kg in 1995 to 662,776 kg in 1997. Walleyes dominated total consumption, accounting for 68, 73, and 90% (1995-1997, respectively) of total food consumption. Walleyes were also the dominant consumers of fish, accounting for 76, 86, and 97% of piscivorous consumption; yellow perch followed, accounting for 16% of piscivorous consumption in 1995 and 12% in 1996. Yellow perch were the predominant fish prey species in all 3 years, accounting for 68, 52, and 36% of the total prey consumed. Natural reproduction is weak, so high walleye densities are maintained by intensive stocking. Walleye stocking drives piscivorous consumption in Spirit Lake, and yearly variation in the cannibalism of stocked walleye fry may be an important determinant of walleye year-class strength and angler success. Reducing walleye stocking intensity, varying stocking

  14. Hair mercury (signature of fish consumption) and cardiovascular risk in Munduruku and Kayabi Indians of Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Dórea, José G; de Souza, Jurandir R; Rodrigues, Patricia; Ferrari, Iris; Barbosa, Antonio C

    2005-02-01

    Fish is an important natural resource in the diet of inhabitants of the Amazon rain forest and a marker of its consumption (hair Hg) was used to compare selected cardiovascular risk parameters between tribes of Eastern Amazonia. Three Munduruku (Terra Preta, Kaburua, Cururu) villages and one Kayabi village at the banks of head rivers (Tapajos, Tropas, Kabitutu, Cururu, Curuzinho, Teles Pires) of the Tapajos Basin were studied in relation to fish Hg concentrations, mercury in hair (fish consumption) and erythrocytes, body mass index (height/weight, kg/cm2), and blood pressure. The mean fish Hg concentrations were higher in predatory (578.6 ng/g) than in nonpredatory species (52.8 ng/g). Overall only 26% of fish Hg concentrations were above 500 ng/g, and only 11% were above 1000 ng/g. There was no systematic trend in fish Hg concentrations from rivers with a history of gold-mining activities. The biomarker of fish consumption (hair Hg) was significantly associated with erythrocyte-Hg (r=0.5181; P=0.0001) and was significantly higher in Kayabi (12.7 microg/g) than in the Munduruku (3.4 microg/g). Biomarker-assessed fish consumption rate was higher in the Kayabi (110 g/day) than in the Munduruku villages (30 g/day). Although no significant differences in body mass index (BMI) were observed between tribes, there was a trend of lower increase in blood pressure with age among the higher fish consumers (Kayabi). Summary clinical evaluation did not detect neurologic complaints compatible with Hg intoxication (paraparesis, numbness, tremor, balancing failure), but endemic tropical diseases such as clinical history of malaria showed a high prevalence (55.4%). Fish is an abundant natural resource, important in the Indian diet, that has been historically consumed without perceived problems and can easily be traced through hair Hg. The exposure to freshwater fish monomethyl mercury is less of an issue than endemic infectious diseases such as malaria and lack of basic medical

  15. Environmental Health Risk Communication: Assessing Levels of Fish-Consumption Literacy among Selected Southeast Asians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratnapradipa, Dhitinut; Getz, Thomas D.; Zarcadoolas, Christina; Panzara, Anthony D.; Esposito, Valerie; Wodika, Alicia B.; Caron, Colleen; Migliore, Beverly; Quilliam, Daniela N.

    2010-01-01

    Limited resources have led to a lack of comprehensive state outreach strategies that are geared for non-English speaking constituencies. The investigators worked with Southeast Asian communities in Rhode Island to determine perceptions and levels of trust with various health authorities providing health messaging about fish-consumption practices.…

  16. LAKE MICHIGAN FISH CONSUMPTION AS A SOURCE OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS IN HUMAN CORD SERUM, MATERNAL SERUM, AND MILK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reported consumption of Lake Michigan sport fish was examined in relation to the levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in biological samples provided by a sample of maternity patients. Fish consumption was correlated with PCB levels in maternal serum and milk but not in cord...

  17. Planktivory in the changing Lake Huron zooplankton community: Bythotrephes consumption exceeds that of Mysis and fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, D.B.; Davis, B.M.; Warner, D.M.; Chriscinske, M.A.; Roseman, E.F.

    2011-01-01

    Oligotrophic lakes are generally dominated by calanoid copepods because of their competitive advantage over cladocerans at low prey densities. Planktivory also can alter zooplankton community structure. We sought to understand the role of planktivory in driving recent changes to the zooplankton community of Lake Huron, a large oligotrophic lake on the border of Canada and the United States. We tested the hypothesis that excessive predation by fish (rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, bloater Coregonus hoyi) and invertebrates (Mysis relicta, Bythotrephes longimanus) had driven observed declines in cladoceran and cyclopoid copepod biomass between 2002 and 2007. We used a field sampling and bioenergetics modelling approach to generate estimates of daily consumption by planktivores at two 91-m depth sites in northern Lake Huron, U.S.A., for each month, May-October 2007. Daily consumption was compared to daily zooplankton production. Bythotrephes was the dominant planktivore and estimated to have eaten 78% of all zooplankton consumed. Bythotrephes consumption exceeded total zooplankton production between July and October. Mysis consumed 19% of all the zooplankton consumed and exceeded zooplankton production in October. Consumption by fish was relatively unimportant - eating only 3% of all zooplankton consumed. Because Bythotrephes was so important, we explored other consumption estimation methods that predict lower Bythotrephes consumption. Under this scenario, Mysis was the most important planktivore, and Bythotrephes consumption exceeded zooplankton production only in August. Our results provide no support for the hypothesis that excessive fish consumption directly contributed to the decline of cladocerans and cyclopoid copepods in Lake Huron. Rather, they highlight the importance of invertebrate planktivores in structuring zooplankton communities, especially for those foods webs that have both Bythotrephes and Mysis. Together, these species occupy the epi-, meta- and

  18. Methylmercury concentrations in broiler's meat and hen's meat and eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Kambamanoli-Dimou, A. ); Kilikidis, S.; Kamarianos, A. )

    1989-05-01

    The concentration of mercury in food has been considered to present the greatest toxicological danger to the average citizen. The presence of mercury in foods has been reported in several studies. Much of the research has been carried out on total mercury concentration in foods and not on methylmercury concentration and as it is known methylmercury is the most dangerous form of mercury. Methylmercury, which is highly resistant to biodegradation, can be synthesized from any other form of mercury in the aquatic biosphere, can be bioconcentrated in the aquatic food chain and through fish-meals can be transported and concentrated in animals and their products. Such food chains, together with the various terrestrial food chains would represent a serious risk for man. This study was undertaken to determine the methylmercury levels in broiler's meat, hen's meat and eggs.

  19. Exploratory assessment of fish consumption among Asian-origin sportfishers on the St. Lawrence River in the Montreal region

    SciTech Connect

    Shatenstein, B. |; Kosatsky, T.; Tapia, M.; Nadon, S.; Leclerc, B.S.

    1999-02-01

    An exploratory survey was undertaken in the fall 1995 open-water fishing seasons with nine Bangladeshi and nine Vietnamese-origin sportfishers. A 70-item instrument assessing sportfishing practices and fish consumption habits was administered by dietitians in participants` homes. Two 24-h diet recalls and a fish consumption calendar permitted the assessment of fish intake in the overall dietary context. Annually, Bangladeshi fishers consumed 46.8 {+-} 25.6 sportfish meals, and Vietnamese fishers ate 40.7 {+-} 35.1 meals. Consumption of sportfish taken from the St. Lawrence River has the potential both for dietary benefit and for hazardous chemical exposure.

  20. Fish consumption and hair mercury levels in women of childbearing age, Martin County, Florida.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anil; Jordan, Melissa; Watkins, Sharon; Washam, Robert; DuClos, Chris; Jones, Serena; Palcic, Jason; Pawlowicz, Marek; Blackmore, Carina

    2014-12-01

    The health effects of mercury in humans are mostly on the developing nervous system. Pregnant women and women who are breastfeeding must be targeted in order to decrease mercury exposure to the populations at highest risk-infants, unborn fetuses, and young children. This purpose of this study is to understand the demographics of fish-consumption patterns among women of childbearing age (including pregnant women) in Martin County, Florida, and to analyze the associations of mercury levels in participants' hair with socio-demographic variables in order to better design prevention messages and campaigns. Mercury concentrations in hair samples of 408 women ages 18-49 were assessed. Data on demographic factors, pregnancy status, fish consumption, and awareness of fish advisories were collected during personal interviews. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. The geometric and arithmetic means of hair mercury concentration were 0.371 and 0.676 µg/g of hair. One-fourth of the respondents had a concentration ≥1 µg/g of hair. Consuming a higher number of fish meals per month, consumption of commercially purchased or locally caught fish higher in mercury, White race and income ≥$75,000 were positively associated with the likelihood of having higher hair mercury levels. This study confirms the existence of a higher overall mean hair mercury level and a higher percentage of women with ≥1 µg/g hair mercury level than those reported at the national level and in other regional studies. This suggests the need for region-specific fish consumption advisories to minimize mercury exposure in humans. PMID:24807406

  1. Assessing sources of human methylmercury exposure using stable mercury isotopes.

    PubMed

    Li, Miling; Sherman, Laura S; Blum, Joel D; Grandjean, Philippe; Mikkelsen, Bjarni; Weihe, Pál; Sunderland, Elsie M; Shine, James P

    2014-01-01

    Seafood consumption is the primary route of methylmercury (MeHg) exposure for most populations. Inherent uncertainties in dietary survey data point to the need for an empirical tool to confirm exposure sources. We therefore explore the utility of Hg stable isotope ratios in human hair as a new method for discerning MeHg exposure sources. We characterized Hg isotope fractionation between humans and their diets using hair samples from Faroese whalers exposed to MeHg predominantly from pilot whales. We observed an increase of 1.75‰ in δ(202)Hg values between pilot whale muscle tissue and Faroese whalers' hair but no mass-independent fractionation. We found a similar offset in δ(202)Hg between consumed seafood and hair samples from Gulf of Mexico recreational anglers who are exposed to lower levels of MeHg from a variety of seafood sources. An isotope mixing model was used to estimate individual MeHg exposure sources and confirmed that both Δ(199)Hg and δ(202)Hg values in human hair can help identify dietary MeHg sources. Variability in isotopic signatures among coastal fish consumers in the Gulf of Mexico likely reflects both differences in environmental sources of MeHg to coastal fish and uncertainty in dietary recall data. Additional data are needed to fully refine this approach for individuals with complex seafood consumption patterns. PMID:24967674

  2. Perceptions of the risks and benefits of fish consumption: Individual choices to reduce risk and increase health benefits

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Studies of fish consumption often focus on awareness of and adherence to advisories, how much fish people eat, and contaminant levels in those fish. This paper examines knowledge and accuracy of risks and benefits of fish consumption among fishers and other recreationists in the New York Bight, indicative of whether they could make sound dietary decisions. While most respondents knew about health risks (70%) and benefits (94%) of consuming fish, far fewer could name specific risks and benefits. Less than 25% of respondents mentioned mercury and less than 15% mentioned that pregnant women and children were at risk. Far fewer people mentioned polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Nearly 70% said it was healthy to eat fish, and 45% were aware that fish were rich in healthful oils. Despite the lack of details about what specific risks and benefits of fish, well over a third did not feel they needed more information. Other respondents had basic questions, but did not pose specific questions about the fish they caught or ate that would have clarified their individual risk-balancing decisions. Knowledge of which fish were high in contaminants did not match the mercury or PCB levels in those fish. There was a disconnect between the information base about specific risks and benefits of fish consumption, levels of mercury and PCBs in fish, and the respondent’s desire for more information. These data indicate that respondents did not have enough accurate information about contaminants in fish to make informed risk-balancing decisions. PMID:19193369

  3. Consumption of rainbow smelt by walleye and salmonine fishes in eastern Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Einhouse, D.W.; Bur, M.T.; Cornelius, F.C.; Kenyon, R.; Madenjian, C.P.; Rand, P.S.; Sztramko, K.L.; Witzel, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    At present, rainbow smelt appear to represent a key component of the eastern Lake Erie fish community as they are the dominant prey for virtually every open water predator, and are harvested directly by an important Ontario commercial fishery. In response to concern over the status of rainbow smelt in eastern Lake Erie, our objective was to quantify some primary top down forces of rainbow smelt mortality that include walleyes (Stizostedion vitreum), five stocked salmonine fishes, and the commercial fishery. This objective was to satisfy a need to understand whether consumption by the major fish predators was significant relative to the measured commercial harvest of rainbow smelt. Achieving this knowledge may provide fisheries managers with an improved basis for managing the rainbow smelt resource through adjustments to stocking policies and/or commercial fishing quotas.

  4. Methylmercury monitoring study in Karakuwacho peninsula area in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junxia; Inoue, Kayoko; Asakawa, Akihiro; Harada, Kouji H; Watanabe, Takao; Hachiya, Noriyuki; Koizumi, Akio

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a worldwide concern owing to its adverse health effects. To explore MeHg exposure burdens and the potential contributing factors in different subpopulations in a peninsula area (Karakuwacho) in Japan, a cross-sectional survey was performed. This study included 189 individuals from 102 families. The geometric means of total hair mercury (THg) were 5.74, 3.78 and 2.37 μg/g for adult males, females and children, respectively, of which 56.5 %, 30.9 % and 12.9 % had hair THg exceeding 5 μg/g, respectively. Tuna and mackerel were the common fish species that were positively correlated with hair THg levels in different subpopulations (standardized coefficient ranged from 0.20 to 0.58, p < 0.05). Frequent consumption of these fish species and a large amount of fish intake are likely major contributors of MeHg exposure in this area. Local-scale risk evaluation and risk communication should be highlighted in future studies. PMID:24599146

  5. Fish consumption and colorectal cancer: a case-reference study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yang, C-X; Takezaki, T; Hirose, K; Inoue, M; Huang, X-E; Tajima, K

    2003-04-01

    Several clinical studies have suggested that supplementation with fish oils can suppress the proliferation of colorectal mucosa and therefore inhibit the development of colorectal cancer. However, epidemiological evidence concerning fish consumption and risk is inconsistent and limited. To clarify the association between intake of fish and the likelihood of developing colorectal cancer, we conducted a large sample size case-reference study with 928 cases of colon cancer, 622 of rectal cancer and 46886 cancer-free outpatient references aged 40-79 years. The data showed frequent raw/cooked fish intake to be associated with decreased odds ratio (OR) 0.68 with 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47-0.99 for male colon cancer, especially for males aged over 60 years, smokers and frequent meat eaters. A marginal decrease in the OR (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.31-1.07) was also detected for female rectal cancer, especially in the regular physical exercise subgroup. However, frequent dried/salted fish intake was found to be associated with increased OR in females younger than 60 years old and alcohol drinkers. Although there is some possible bias in epidemiological studies, the results suggest that frequent raw/cooked fish intake may decrease the risk while dried/salted fish, in contrast, may exert a detrimental effect. PMID:12671534

  6. Seasonal consumption of Hemimysis anomala by fish in southeastern Lake Ontario, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, B.F.; Gumtow, C.F.; Walsh, M.G.; Weidel, B.C.; Boscarino, B.T.; Rudstam, L. G.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the seasonal occurrence of Hemimysis anomala in the diets of fish that prey on macroinvertebrates at two sites with established Hemimysis populations east of Oswego, NY, during 2009-2010. In 2009, we examined 320 stomachs from 10 species and found Hemimysis only in alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), rockbass (Ambloplites rupestris), and yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Of those species, alewife consumed Hemimysis most frequently and it represented a greater proportion of their diets. During 2009, the dry weight composition of Hemimysis in alewife diets varied seasonally between <1% in June, 5% in July, 98.5% in August, and 18.8% in September. In contrast, we examined 667 stomachs from 15 species in 2010 and observed Hemimysis in only one alewife and two rockbass stomachs. For alewife from September 2009, we found no relationship between predator size and the number of Hemimysis consumed, or between the presence of Hemimysis in fish diets and the presence of other diet taxa or diet diversity. Fish diets collected as bycatch from other assessments revealed large numbers of Hemimysis in fishes that had not previously been observed consuming Hemimysis in Lake Ontario, including cisco (Coregonus artedi) and white perch (Morone americana). Our results indicate Hemimysis consumption by nearshore fish can be high, but that it is variable across seasons and years, and may be most prevalent in fish that feed up in the water column, at or near dark, and have the ability to consume swift moving prey like Mysis diluviana or small fish.

  7. Monitoring methylmercury during pregnancy: maternal hair predicts fetal brain exposure.

    PubMed

    Cernichiari, E; Brewer, R; Myers, G J; Marsh, D O; Lapham, L W; Cox, C; Shamlaye, C F; Berlin, M; Davidson, P W; Clarkson, T W

    1995-01-01

    Autopsy brains were obtained from infants dying from a variety of causes within a few days of birth in a population exposed to methylmercury in fish. Infant and maternal blood and hair samples were also obtained. The concentration of total mercury in 6 major brain regions were highly correlated with maternal hair levels. This correlation was confirmed by a sequence of comparisons of maternal hair to maternal blood to infant blood and finally to infant brain. The results lend support to the use of maternal hair in assessing fetal exposure to methylmercury in fish-eating populations. PMID:8714874

  8. Mercury in fish tissue of Idaho lakes vs. those of the Northeastern United States as it relates to the moderating effects of selenium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary methyl-mercury (MeHg) exposure mode to wildlife and humans is through the consumption of aquatic organisms, particulary fish. Selenium has been demonstrated to moderate the toxicity of MeHg in every test animal type examined to date. A molar ratio of Se:Hg >1 appear...

  9. Effects of Great Lakes fish consumption on brain PCB pattern, concentration, and progressive-ratio performance

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.; Pagano, J.; Sargent, D.; Darvill, T.; Lonky, E.; Reihman, J.

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of consumption of Great Lakes fish on progressive ratio performance, and on the pattern and concentrations of brain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE), and mirex in the rat. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a 30% diet of either Lake Ontario salmon (LAKE), Pacific Ocean salmon, or lab chow control for 20 or 65 days. Following the treatment regimen, half the rats from each group were sacrificed immediately for gas chromatographic analysis of organochlorine contaminants, and the other half were tested on a multiple fixed-ratio-progressive-ratio reinforcement schedule and then sacrificed for analysis. Consumption of Lake Ontario fish resulted in significantly higher levels of brain PCBs, DDE, and mirex relative to controls, but still well within human exposure ranges. Consumption of Lake Ontario fish for 20 or 65 days produced an average brain PCB concentration of 457 and 934 ng/g fat, respectively. Consumption of laboratory rat chow or Pacific Ocean salmon for 20 or 65 days produced an average brain PCB concentration of 240, 464, and 441 ng/g fat, respectively. Moreover, both LAKE-fed groups showed a much more heavily chlorinated pattern of brain PCBs than all control groups, as evidenced by both significant increases in the most heavily chlorinated PCB congeners and significant increases in the average chlorine biphenyl.

  10. Fishing, fish consumption, and awareness about warnings in a university community in central New Jersey in 2007, and comparisons with 2004.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna

    2008-09-01

    Fish are a healthy source of protein, but the risks from consuming fish have become a national concern. Over the past 7 years, there have been a number of national advisories regarding saltwater fish. Fish consumption patterns and public knowledge about advisories and warnings have been examined for at-risk populations, but there is little information about the latter for a general population, or of temporal trends in such information acquisition. Information about the benefits and health risks of consuming fish, health warnings from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the Food and Drug Administration, belief in these warnings, and trust in different sources of information were examined in a sample of 460 people within a university community in central New Jersey in 2007. The null hypothesis of no differences in fishing, consumption, and knowledge about advisories as a function of age, gender, ethnicity, and education was tested. In 2007, only 30% of the study population fished, and 83% of the study population ate fish, either commercial or self-caught. There were differences in fishing behavior, consumption patterns, and awareness of advisories as a function of gender, ethnicity, age, and education. Most notably, nearly twice as many men as women fished, Whites fished more and Blacks and Indian/Pakistanis fished less than other ethnic groups, and people aged 23-35 fished more than did others. About 8% of fish meals were from self-caught fish, 32% were eaten in restaurants, and 60% were of fish bought in stores and cooked at home. Men ate more meals of self-caught fish than did females, and Asians ate more meals of fish in restaurants, and Blacks ate more meals of store-bought fish than other ethnic groups. The total number of fish meals consumed per month increased significantly with age. Overall, more people had heard about the benefits (92%) than the risks (78%) of fish consumption. When asked whom they trust for information about health

  11. CREATION OF A GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM TO IDENTIFY AT-RISK POPULATIONS IN NEW JERSEY AND NEW YORK FOR CONSUMPTION OF CONTAMINATED FISH AND SEAFOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Project Objective: To identify at-risk populations, particularly women of child bearing years and young children, for consumption of contaminated fish and seafood via the use of geographically and demographically defined seafood consumption patterns and fish/seafood contaminatio...

  12. Rapid extraction and reverse phase-liquid chromatographic separation of mercury(II) and methylmercury in fish samples with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection applying oxygen addition into plasma.

    PubMed

    Döker, Serhat; Boşgelmez, İffet İpek

    2015-10-01

    A simple and sensitive procedure was developed for extraction and speciation of mercury in fish. Species separation was accomplished with reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Oxygen addition into plasma allowed use of organic-rich mobile phase, achieving species separation in 4 min. Mercury species extraction was achieved by microwave exposure for 2 min at mild conditions (60°C, pH 2.0), avoiding necessity of neutralizing sample prior to injection in HPLC, and reducing number of sample preparation steps, analytical source of errors and inter conversion of species. Limit of detection for entire procedure was found to be 0.2 and 0.1 ng g(-1) for mercuric ion and methylmercury, respectively. The method was applied to certified reference materials (TORT-2 and DORM-2) and commercialized fish samples (Mullus barbatus, Sparus aurata, Trachurus mediterraneus, Mugil soiuy, Dicentrarchus labrax, and Pomatomus saltatrix) from Black Sea. PMID:25872437

  13. Fish oil consumption prevents glucose intolerance and hypercorticosteronemy in footshock-stressed rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Environmental stress plays an important role in the development of glucose intolerance influencing lipid and glucose metabolism through sympathetic nervous system, cytokines and hormones such as glucocorticoids, catecholamines and glucagon. Otherwise, fish oil prevents glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Although the mechanisms involved are not fully understood, it is known that sympathetic and HPA responses are blunted and catecholamines and glucocorticoids concentrations can be modulated by fish consumption. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether fish oil, on a normal lipidic diet: 1) could prevent the effect of footshock-stress on the development of glucose intolerance; 2) modified adiponectin receptor and serum concentration; and 3) also modified TNF-α, IL-6 and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels in adipose tissue and liver. The study was performed in thirty day-old male Wistar randomly assigned into four groups: no stressed (C) and stressed (CS) rats fed with control diet, and no stressed (F) and stressed (FS) rats fed with a fish oil rich diet. The stress was performed as a three daily footshock stress sessions. Results Body weight, carcass fat and protein content were not different among groups. FS presented a reduction on the relative weight of RET. Basal serum glucose levels were higher in CS and FS but 15 min after glucose load just CS remained with higher levels than other groups. Serum corticosterone concentration was increased in CS, this effect was inhibited in FS. However, 15 min after footshock-stress, corticosterone levels were similar among groups. IL-6 was increased in EPI of CS but fish oil consumption prevented IL-6 increase in FS. Similar levels of TNF-α and IL-10 in RET, EPI, and liver were observed among groups. Adipo R1 protein concentration was not different among groups. Footshock-stress did not modify AdipoR2 concentration, but fish oil diet increases AdipoR2 protein concentration. Conclusions Footshock

  14. Trophic ecology and food consumption of fishes in a hypersaline tropical lagoon.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Silva, P H; Tubino, R A; Zambrano, L C; Hunder, D A; Garritano, S R; Monteiro-Neto, C

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the trophic ecology (diet composition, trophic strategy, similarities and overlap between species, feeding period and food consumption) of six benthivorous fish species in Araruama Lagoon, the largest hypersaline tropical lagoon on the east coast of South America, with an area of 210 km(2) and an average salinity of 52. The burrfish Chilomycterus spinosus fed on Anomalocardia flexuosa shell deposits, ingesting associated fauna. The caitipa mojarra Diapterus rhombeus differed from all other species, having not only the highest proportions of algae and Nematoda, but also feeding on polychaete tentacles. The two mojarras Eucinostomus spp. showed similar trophic strategies, feeding mostly on Polychaeta. The corocoro grunt Orthopristis ruber also fed mainly on Polychaeta, but differed from Eucinostomus spp. in secondary items. The whitemouth croacker Micropogonias furnieri fed mainly on small Crustacea at night, showing a high number of secondary prey items with low frequencies and high prey-specific abundance. The daily food consumption (g food g(-1) fish mass) for Eucinostomus argenteus was 0·012 and was 0·031 and 0·027 for M. furnieri in two different sampling events. The diet similarities between Araruama Lagoon and other brackish and marine environments indicate that hypersalinity is not a predominant factor shaping the trophic ecology of fishes in this lagoon. The stability of hypersaline conditions, without a pronounced gradient, may explain the presence of several euryhaline fishes and invertebrates well adapted to this condition, resulting in a complex food web. PMID:26033293

  15. Methylmercury (MeHg)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methylmercury ( MeHg ) ; CASRN 22967 - 92 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarci

  16. Mercury and methylmercury concentrations in Mediterranean seafood and surface sediments, intake evaluation and risk for consumers.

    PubMed

    Spada, Lucia; Annicchiarico, Cristina; Cardellicchio, Nicola; Giandomenico, Santina; Di Leo, Antonella

    2012-04-01

    Total mercury and methylmercury concentrations were measured in sediments and marine organisms from the Taranto Gulf to understand their distribution and partitioning. Sediment concentrations ranged from 0.036 to 7.730 mg/kg (mean: 2.777 mg/kg d.w.) and from 1 to 40 μg/kg (mean: 11 μg/kg d.w.) for total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (Me-Hg), respectively. In mollusks THg ranged from n.d. to 1870 μg/kg d.w. while in fish from 324 to 1740 μg/kg d.w. Me-Hg concentrations in fish ranged from 190 to 1040 μg/kg d.w. and from n.d. to 1321 μg/kg d.w. in mollusks. THg exceeded the maximum level fixed by the European Commission (0.5 mg/kg w.w.) only in gastropod Hexaplex t. The calculated weekly intake was in many cases over the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake established by EFSA for all edible species. These results seem to indicate that dietary consumption of this seafood implicates an appreciable risk for human health. PMID:21968333

  17. Mercury and other trace elements in Ohio River fish collected near coal-fired power plants: Interspecific patterns and consideration of consumption risks.

    PubMed

    Reash, Robin J; Brown, Lauren; Merritt, Karen

    2015-07-01

    Many coal-fired electric generating facilities in the United States are discharging higher loads of Hg, Se, and other chemicals to receiving streams due to the installation of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) air pollution control units. There are regulatory concerns about the potential increased uptake of these bioaccumulative trace elements into food webs. We evaluated the concentrations of As, total Hg (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), and Se in Ohio River fish collected proximal to coal-fired power plants, of which 75% operate FGD systems. Fillet samples (n = 50) from 6 fish species representing 3 trophic levels were analyzed. Geometric mean fillet concentrations of THg (wet wt), MeHg (wet wt), and Se (dry wt) in 3 species were 0.136, 0.1181, and 3.19 mg/kg (sauger); 0.123, 0.1013, and 1.56 mg/kg (channel catfish); and 0.127, 0.0914, and 3.30 mg/kg (hybrid striped bass). For all species analyzed, only 3 fillet samples (6% of total) had MeHg concentrations that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) human health criterion (0.3 mg/kg wet wt); all of these were freshwater drum aged ≥ 19 y. None of the samples analyzed exceeded the USEPA proposed muscle and whole body Se thresholds for protection against reproductive effects in freshwater fish. All but 8 fillet samples had a total As concentration less than 1.0 mg/kg dry wt. Mean Se health benefit values (HBVSe ) for all species were ≥ 4, indicating that potential Hg-related health risks associated with consumption of Ohio River fish are likely to be offset by adequate Se concentrations. Overall, we observed no measurable evidence of enhanced trace element bioaccumulation associated with proximity to power plant FGD facilities, however, some enhanced bioaccumulation could have occurred in the wastewater mixing zones. Furthermore, available evidence indicates that, due to hydraulic and physical factors, the main stem Ohio River appears to have low net Hg methylation potential. PMID:25586716

  18. Influence of bioaccessibility of total mercury, methyl-mercury and selenium on the risk/benefit associated to the consumption of raw and cooked blue shark (Prionace glauca).

    PubMed

    Matos, J; Lourenço, H M; Brito, P; Maulvault, A L; Martins, L L; Afonso, C

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to identify the benefit and risk associated with raw and cooked blue shark consumption taking into account the bioaccessibility of Se, Hg and MeHg, by using in vitro digestion method. Selenium, Hg and MeHg levels were higher in cooked samples, particularly in grilled blue shark. Whereas Se bioaccessibility was above 83% in grilled samples, Hg and MeHg bioaccessibility was lower in grilled samples with values near 50%. In addition, all Se-Health Beneficial Values were negative and the molar MeHg:Se ratios were higher than one. The risk-benefit assessment yielded a maximum consumption of one yearly meal for raw or cooked blue shark, thus emphasizing the need to recommend the consumption of a wider variety of seafood species in a balanced and healthy diet. PMID:26409850

  19. Estimating Consumption to Biomass Ratio in Non-Stationary Harvested Fish Populations.

    PubMed

    Wiff, Rodrigo; Roa-Ureta, Ruben H; Borchers, David L; Milessi, Andrés C; Barrientos, Mauricio A

    2015-01-01

    The food consumption to biomass ratio (C) is one of the most important population parameters in ecosystem modelling because its quantifies the interactions between predator and prey. Existing models for estimating C in fish populations are per-recruit cohort models or empirical models, valid only for stationary populations. Moreover, empirical models lack theoretical support. Here we develop a theory and derive a general modelling framework to estimate C in fish populations, based on length frequency data and the generalised von Bertalanffy growth function, in which models for stationary populations with a stable-age distributions are special cases. Estimates using our method are compared with estimates from per-recruit cohort models for C using simulated harvested fish populations of different lifespans. The models proposed here are also applied to three fish populations that are targets of commercial fisheries in southern Chile. Uncertainty in the estimation of C was evaluated using a resampling approach. Simulations showed that stationary and non-stationary population models produce different estimates for C and those differences depend on the lifespan, fishing mortality and recruitment variations. Estimates of C using the new model exhibited smoother inter-annual variation in comparison with a per-recruit model estimates and they were also smaller than C predicted by the empirical equations in all population assessed. PMID:26528721

  20. Estimating Consumption to Biomass Ratio in Non-Stationary Harvested Fish Populations

    PubMed Central

    Wiff, Rodrigo; Roa-Ureta, Ruben H.; Borchers, David L.; Milessi, Andrés C.; Barrientos, Mauricio A.

    2015-01-01

    The food consumption to biomass ratio (C) is one of the most important population parameters in ecosystem modelling because its quantifies the interactions between predator and prey. Existing models for estimating C in fish populations are per-recruit cohort models or empirical models, valid only for stationary populations. Moreover, empirical models lack theoretical support. Here we develop a theory and derive a general modelling framework to estimate C in fish populations, based on length frequency data and the generalised von Bertalanffy growth function, in which models for stationary populations with a stable-age distributions are special cases. Estimates using our method are compared with estimates from per-recruit cohort models for C using simulated harvested fish populations of different lifespans. The models proposed here are also applied to three fish populations that are targets of commercial fisheries in southern Chile. Uncertainty in the estimation of C was evaluated using a resampling approach. Simulations showed that stationary and non-stationary population models produce different estimates for C and those differences depend on the lifespan, fishing mortality and recruitment variations. Estimates of C using the new model exhibited smoother inter-annual variation in comparison with a per-recruit model estimates and they were also smaller than C predicted by the empirical equations in all population assessed. PMID:26528721

  1. Methylmercury production in estuarine sediments: role of organic matter

    PubMed Central

    Schartup, Amina T.; Mason, Robert P.; Balcom, Prentiss H.; Hollweg, Terill A.; Chen, Celia Y.

    2013-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) affects wildlife and human health mainly through marine fish consumption. In marine systems, MeHg is formed from inorganic mercury (HgII) species primarily in sediments then accumulates and biomagnifies in the food web. Most of the fish consumed in the US are from estuarine and marine systems highlighting the importance of understanding MeHg formation in these productive regions. Sediment organic matter has been shown to limit mercury methylation in estuarine ecosystems, as a result it is often described as the primary control over MeHg production. In this paper, we explore the role of organic matter by looking at the effects of its changing sediment concentrations on the methylation rates across multiple estuaries. We measured sedimentary MeHg production at eleven estuarine sites that were selected for their contrasting biogeochemical characteristics, mercury (Hg) content, and location in the Northeastern US (ME, NH, CT, NY, and NJ). Sedimentary total Hg concentrations ranged across five orders of magnitude, increasing in concentration from the pristine, sandy sediments of Wells (ME), to industrially contaminated areas like Portsmouth (NH) and Hackensack (NJ). We find that methylation rates are the highest at locations with high Hg content (relative to carbon), and that organic matter does not hinder mercury methylation in estuaries. PMID:23194318

  2. Total mercury, methylmercury, and selected elements in soils of the Fishing Brook watershed, Hamilton County, New York, and the McTier Creek watershed, Aiken County, South Carolina, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Cannon, William F.; Knightes, Christopher D.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Bradley, Paul M.; Burns, Douglas A.; Brigham, Mark E.; Lowery, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is an element of on-going concern for human and aquatic health. Mercury sequestered in upland and wetland soils represents a source that may contribute to mercury contamination in sensitive ecosystems. An improved understanding of mercury cycling in stream ecosystems requires identification and quantification of mercury speciation and transport dynamics in upland and wetland soils within a watershed. This report presents data for soils collected in 2008 from two small watersheds in New York and South Carolina. In New York, 163 samples were taken from multiple depths or soil horizons at 70 separate locations near Fishing Brook, located in Hamilton County. At McTier Creek, in Aiken County, South Carolina, 81 samples from various soil horizons or soil depths were collected from 24 locations. Sample locations within each watershed were selected to characterize soil geochemistry in distinct land-cover compartments. Soils were analyzed for total mercury, selenium, total and carbonate carbon, and 42 other elements. A subset of the samples was also analyzed for methylmercury.

  3. Local Understanding of Fish Consumption Advisory Risks in Michigan's Upper Peninsula: The Role of Structure, Culture, and Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habron, Geoffrey; Barbier, Melanie; Kinnunen, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Fish consumption advisories fail to adequately help communities address the benefits and risks of eating potentially contaminated fish. We engaged community members and relevant institutions in identifying and implementing more effective risk communication in Michigan's rural Upper Peninsula. In 2004-2005, we collected data in four Michigan…

  4. [Microcosm Simulation Study and Methylmercury Forming Mechanism at Landscape Water of City].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Si, You-bin; Guo, Zi-wei; Du, Cheng-zhu; Zhu, Cong-cong

    2016-04-15

    Mercury is harmful to the environment, which has gradually become one of the research hotspots. Sediments, as a main repository of pollutants, have an important impact on water quality and the internal organisms, which deserves our research. In this paper, we focused on Hefei landscape water sediment and tried to investigate the status of inorganic mercury and methylmercury pollutions in the sediment. To study the conversion process from inorganic mercury to methylmercury and their enrichment levels and mechanism, we established the ecological chain of "sediment-water-grass-fish" through analog microcosm examination. The results were as follows: from ten water and sediment samples in Hefei landscape water sediment, we found that the contents of inorganic mercury and methylmercury ranged 11.74-13.12 µg · kg⁻¹ and 0.37-2.23 µg · kg⁻¹, respectively. The microcosm examination showed that: with increasing culture time, inorganic mercury in sediments gradually decreased. There was a phenomenon that the content of methylmercury increased at first and then decreased to reach the balance later. Both the inorganic mercury and methylmercury in water change showed an increasing trend. The enrichment contents of inorganic mercury in Egeria densa Planch, and golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner) were low while their enrichment of methylmercury could he great. In addition, we found that both the bioaccumulation ability and the enrichment coefficient of methylmercury in the body of golden mandarin fish were the maximum during the same period. PMID:27548953

  5. Contamination of fish in UK fresh water systems: risk assessment for human consumption.

    PubMed

    Rose, Martin; Fernandes, Alwyn; Mortimer, David; Baskaran, Christina

    2015-03-01

    There is growing evidence that more people in the UK are consuming fish taken from inland waterways. This may be partly due to the increased numbers of migrants from Eastern Europe where this is part of traditional culture and partly because of a desire to try new foods encouraged by celebrity chefs. Fish can bioaccumulate environmental contaminants and so could contribute a significant amount to dietary exposure to these chemicals. This study examined the changing habits of anglers and consumers and characterised a range of existing and emerging contaminants in freshwater fish species with a view to determining current levels of occurrence and possible risk from consumption. The project was conducted in two stages. The first stage included (a) a study that identified freshwater systems that are contaminated either by anthropogenic activity or as a result of the geology of the area; and (b) socioeconomic research to assess the consumption habits of the public, particularly anglers, with respect to fish and shellfish from unmanaged inland waterways. Based on the outcome from the first stage, specific rivers and other inland waterways were chosen for investigation, along with the range of contaminants to be included in the analytical programme. Predicted contamination levels and prevalence of anglers were among the factors taken into consideration. The second stage of the project involved sampling and analysis of fish taken from selected locations on the chosen waterways. A range of fish species from a variety of inland water habitats were obtained. These were analysed for the following contaminants: heavy metals, chlorinated dioxins (PCDD/Fs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated dioxins (PBDD/Fs), polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), OC pesticides, organotin compounds and organo-fluorine compounds. Legal limits for contaminants apply only to food traded commercially, but some samples

  6. Re-evaluation of the reference dose for methylmercury and assessment of current exposure levels

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, A.H. )

    1993-06-01

    Methylmercury (Me-Hg) is widely distributed through freshwater and saltwater food chains and human consumption of fish and shellfish has lead to widespread exposure. Both the US EPA Reference Dose (0.3 [mu]g/kg/day) and the FAO/WHO Permissible Tolerable Weekly Intake (3.3 [mu]g/kg/week) are currently based on the prevention of paraesthesia in adult and older children. However, Me-Hg exposure in utero is known to result in a range of developmental neurologic effects including clinical CNS symptoms and delayed onset of walking. Based on a critical review of development toxicity data from human and animal studies, it is concluded that current guidelines for the prevention of paraesthesia are not adequate to address developmental effects. A dose of 0.07 [mu]g/kg/day is suggested as the best estimate of a potential reference dose for developmental effects. Data on nationwide fish consumption rates and Me-Hg levels in fish/seafood weighted by proportion of the catch intended for human consumption are analyzed in a Monte Carlo simulation to derive a probability distribution of background Me-Hg exposure. While various uncertainties in the toxicologic and exposure data limit the precision with which health risk can be estimated, this analysis suggests that at current levels of Me-Hg exposure, a significant fraction of women of childbearing age have exposures above this suggested reference dose.

  7. Ranking the contributions of commercial fish and shellfish varieties to mercury exposure in the United States: implications for risk communication.

    PubMed

    Groth, Edward

    2010-04-01

    Fish and shellfish have important nutritional benefits, and US per capita seafood consumption has increased substantially since 2002. Recent research has reinforced concerns about adverse effects of methylmercury exposure, suggesting that methylmercury doses associated with typical US rates of fish consumption may pose measurable risks, with no threshold. These converging trends create a need to improve risk communication about fish consumption and mercury. The analysis performed here identifies the relative importance of different fish and shellfish as sources of mercury in the US seafood supply and proposes improved consumer advice, so that the public can benefit from fish consumption while minimizing mercury exposure. I have quantified contributions to total mercury in the US seafood supply by 51 different varieties of fish and shellfish, then ranked and sorted the 51 varieties in terms of relative impact. Except for swordfish, most fish with the highest mercury levels are relatively minor contributors to total inputs. Tuna (canned light, canned albacore and fresh/frozen varieties) accounts for 37.4 percent of total mercury inputs, while two-thirds of the seafood supply and nine of the 11 most heavily consumed fish and shellfish are low or very low in mercury. Substantial improvement in risk communication about mercury in fish and seafood is needed; in particular, several population subsets need better guidance to base their seafood choices more explicitly on mercury content. I have sorted the 51 seafood varieties into six categories based on mercury levels, as a framework for improving risk communication in this regard. PMID:20116785

  8. Negative Confounding by Essential Fatty Acids in Methylmercury Neurotoxicity Associations

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Anna L; Mogensen, Ulla B.; Bjerve, Kristian S.; Debes, Frodi; Weihe, Pal; Grandjean, Philippe; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2014-01-01

    Background Methylmercury, a worldwide contaminant of fish and seafood, can cause adverse effects on the developing nervous system. However, long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in seafood provide beneficial effects on brain development. Negative confounding will likely result in underestimation of both mercury toxicity and nutrient benefits unless mutual adjustment is included in the analysis. Methods We examined these associations in 176 Faroese children, in whom prenatal methylmercury exposure was assessed from mercury concentrations in cord blood and maternal hair. The relative concentrations of fatty acids were determined in cord serum phospholipids. Neuropsychological performance in verbal, motor, attention, spatial, and memory functions was assessed at 7 years of age. Multiple regression and structural equation models (SEMs) were carried out to determine the confounder-adjusted associations with methylmercury exposure. Results A short delay recall (in percent change) in the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) was associated with a doubling of cord blood methylmercury (−18.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = −36.3, −1.51). The association became stronger after the inclusion of fatty acid concentrations in the analysis (−22.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = −39.4, −4.62). In structural equation models, poorer memory function (corresponding to a lower score in the learning trials and short delay recall in CVLT) was associated with a doubling of prenatal exposure to methylmercury after the inclusion of fatty acid concentrations in the analysis (−1.94, 95% CI = −3.39, −0.49). Conclusions Associations between prenatal exposure to methylmercury and neurobehavioral deficits in memory function at school age were strengthened after fatty acid adjustment, thus suggesting that n-3 fatty acids need to be included in analysis of similar studies to avoid underestimation of the associations with methylmercury exposure. PMID:24561639

  9. Fish consumption as a driver of risk-management decisions and human health-based water quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Judd, Nancy; Lowney, Yvette; Anderson, Paul; Baird, Suzanne; Bay, Steven M; Breidt, Jay; Buonanduci, Michele; Dong, Zhao; Essig, Don; Garry, Michael R; Jim, Rebecca C; Kirkwood, Gemma; Moore, Shelly; Niemi, Cheryl; O'Rourke, Rory; Ruffle, Betsy; Schaider, Laurel A; Vidal-Dorsch, Doris E

    2015-11-01

    The use and interpretation of fish consumption surveys and interviews, the application of fish consumption rates for sediment evaluation and cleanup, and the development of human health water quality criteria (HH WQC) are complex and interrelated issues. The present article focuses on these issues using examples from the United States, although the issues may be relevant for other countries. Some key considerations include the fact that there are many types of fish consumption surveys (e.g., 24-h recall surveys, food frequency questionnaires, creel surveys), and these surveys have different advantages and limitations. Identification of target populations for protection, identification of the species and quantities of fish consumed, and determination of bioaccumulation assumptions are important factors when developing water quality and sediment screening levels and standards. Accounting for the cultural importance of fish consumption for some populations is an even more complex element. Discussions about HH WQC often focus only on the fish consumption rate and may not have broad public input. Some states are trying to change this through extensive public participation efforts and use of probabilistic approaches to derive HH WQC. Finally, there are limits to what WQC can achieve. Solutions beyond the establishment of WQC that target toxics reduction from other sources may provide the greatest improvements to water quality and reductions in human health risks in the future. PMID:26496131

  10. Human milk as a source of methylmercury exposure in infants

    SciTech Connect

    Grandjean, P. ); Jorgensen, P.J. ); Weihe, P. )

    1994-01-01

    As methylmercury is excreted in human milk and infants are particularly susceptible to toxicity due to this compound, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible transfer of methylmercury to infants via breast-feeding. In a community with a high intake of seafood, 583 children from a birth cohort were followed. The duration of nursing was recorded, and hair samples were obtained for mercury analysis at approximately 12 months of age. The hair mercury concentrations increased with the length of the nursing period, and those nursed throughout the first year showed the highest geometric mean (9.0 nmol/g or 1.8 [mu]g/g). Human milk therefore seems to be an important source of methylmercury exposure in infants. As increasing time interval from weaning to hair sample collection was not associated with any detectable decrease in mercury concentrations. A slow or absent elimination of methylmercury during the first year after birth could explain this finding. In certain fishing communities, infants nursed for long periods may be at increased risk of developing methylmercury toxicity. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Fruit, vegetable, and fish consumption and heart rate variability: the Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study123

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Katherine L; O'Neill, Marie S; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel S; Hu, Howard; Schwartz, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Background: Higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and dark fish may prevent sudden cardiac death and arrhythmias, but the exact mechanisms are not fully understood. Objective: We examined whether high consumption of fruit, vegetables, and dark fish would be associated with beneficial changes in heart rate variability (HRV). Design: HRV variables were measured among 586 older men with 928 total observations from November 2000 to June 2007 in the Normative Aging Study, a community-based longitudinal study of aging. Dietary intake was evaluated with a self-administered semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire and categorized into quartiles. Results: After controlling for potential confounders, intake of green leafy vegetables was positively associated with normalized high-frequency power and inversely associated with normalized low-frequency power (P for trend < 0.05). These significant associations were retained after further adjustment for healthy lifestyle factors, such as physical activity and use of multivitamins. No significant association was seen between HRV measures and intakes of other fruit and vegetables, vitamin C, carotenoids, tuna and dark-meat fish, or n–3 (omega-3) fatty acids. An effect modification of intake of noncitrus fruit by obesity and of total vegetables and cruciferous vegetables by cigarette smoking was seen, which warrants further investigation. Conclusion: These findings suggest that higher intake of green leafy vegetables may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease through favorable changes in cardiac autonomic function. PMID:19158214

  12. Characterisation of Aeromonas spp. isolated from frozen fish intended for human consumption in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Castro-Escarpulli, G; Figueras, M J; Aguilera-Arreola, G; Soler, L; Fernández-Rendón, E; Aparicio, G O; Guarro, J; Chacón, M R

    2003-07-15

    A total of 82 strains of presumptive Aeromonas spp. were identified biochemically and genetically (16S rDNA-RFLP). The strains were isolated from 250 samples of frozen fish (Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus niloticus) purchased in local markets in Mexico City. In the present study, we detected the presence of several genes encoding for putative virulence factors and phenotypic activities that may play an important role in bacterial infection. In addition, we studied the antimicrobial patterns of those strains. Molecular identification demonstrated that the prevalent species in frozen fish were Aeromonas salmonicida (67.5%) and Aeromonas bestiarum (20.9%), accounting for 88.3% of the isolates, while the other strains belonged to the species Aeromonas veronii (5.2%), Aeromonas encheleia (3.9%) and Aeromonas hydrophila (2.6%). Detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of genes encoding putative virulence factors common in Aeromonas, such as aerolysin/hemolysin, lipases including the glycerophospholipid-cholesterol acyltransferase (GCAT), serine protease and DNases, revealed that they were all common in these strains. Our results showed that first generation quinolones and second and third generation cephalosporins were the drugs with the best antimicrobial effect against Aeromonas spp. In Mexico, there have been few studies on Aeromonas and its putative virulence factors. The present work therefore highlights an important incidence of Aeromonas spp., with virulence potential and antimicrobial resistance, isolated from frozen fish intended for human consumption in Mexico City. PMID:12781953

  13. Higher oily fish consumption in late pregnancy is associated with reduced aortic stiffness in the child at age 9 years

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jennifer; Hanson, Mark; Peebles, Charles; Davies, Lucy; Inskip, Hazel; Robinson, Sian; Calder, Philip C.; Cooper, Cyrus; Godfrey, Keith M.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Higher pulse wave velocity (PWV) reflects increased arterial stiffness and is an established cardiovascular risk marker associated with lower long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake in adults. Experimentally, maternal fatty acid intake in pregnancy has lasting effects on offspring arterial stiffness. Objective To examine the association between maternal consumption of oily fish, a source of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, in pregnancy and child's aortic stiffness age 9 years. Methods and Results In a mother-offspring study (Southampton Women's Survey) the child's descending aorta PWV was measured at age 9 years using velocity-encoded phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging and related to maternal oily fish consumption assessed prospectively during pregnancy. Higher oily fish consumption in late pregnancy was associated with lower childhood aortic PWV (sex-adjusted β=-0.084 m/s/ portion/week, [95% CI -0.137 to -0.031], p=0.002, n=226). Mother’s educational attainment was independently associated with child’s PWV. PWV was not associated with the child’s current oily fish consumption. Conclusions Level of maternal oily fish consumption in pregnancy may influence child’s large artery development, with potential long-term consequences for later cardiovascular risk. PMID:25700036

  14. Oxygen consumption rate v. rate of energy utilization of fishes: a comparison and brief history of the two measurements.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J A

    2016-01-01

    Accounting for energy use by fishes has been taking place for over 200 years. The original, and continuing gold standard for measuring energy use in terrestrial animals, is to account for the waste heat produced by all reactions of metabolism, a process referred to as direct calorimetry. Direct calorimetry is not easy or convenient in terrestrial animals and is extremely difficult in aquatic animals. Thus, the original and most subsequent measurements of metabolic activity in fishes have been measured via indirect calorimetry. Indirect calorimetry takes advantage of the fact that oxygen is consumed and carbon dioxide is produced during the catabolic conversion of foodstuffs or energy reserves to useful ATP energy. As measuring [CO2 ] in water is more challenging than measuring [O2 ], most indirect calorimetric studies on fishes have used the rate of O2 consumption. To relate measurements of O2 consumption back to actual energy usage requires knowledge of the substrate being oxidized. Many contemporary studies of O2 consumption by fishes do not attempt to relate this measurement back to actual energy usage. Thus, the rate of oxygen consumption (M˙O2 ) has become a measurement in its own right that is not necessarily synonymous with metabolic rate. Because all extant fishes are obligate aerobes (many fishes engage in substantial net anaerobiosis, but all require oxygen to complete their life cycle), this discrepancy does not appear to be of great concern to the fish biology community, and reports of fish oxygen consumption, without being related to energy, have proliferated. Unfortunately, under some circumstances, these measures can be quite different from one another. A review of the methodological history of the two measurements and a look towards the future are included. PMID:26768970

  15. Developmental neurotoxicity: methylmercury and prenatal exposure protection in the context of the Minamata Convention.

    PubMed

    Boischio, Ana

    2015-09-01

    Mercury is a global pollutant of public environmental health concern due to its long-range atmospheric distribution, environmental distribution, and neurotoxic effects. Following biological methylation, methylmercury (MeHg) can be un-evenly bioaccumulated within aquatic food chains. Fish consumption can be a significant route of human exposure to MeHg. MeHg exposure in the prenatal stage, at relatively low levels, has recently been established as harmful during neurological development, potentially leading to intellectual disability. The Minamata Convention on Mercury is a global agreement, currently under ratification, to protect human health and the environment from anthropogenic emissions and releases of mercury and mercury compounds. The resolution regarding the role of the World Health Organization and ministries of health in the implementation of the Convention includes protection of human health from critical exposures to MeHg. Riverside populations living in areas with artisanal small-scale gold mining, and relying heavily on fish consumption, have been identified as the most vulnerable population in terms of MeHg exposure and developmental neurotoxicity. This article focuses on the proper design and dissemination of fish advisories within the context of implementation of the Convention. PMID:26758003

  16. Anthropogenic debris in seafood: Plastic debris and fibers from textiles in fish and bivalves sold for human consumption

    PubMed Central

    Rochman, Chelsea M.; Tahir, Akbar; Williams, Susan L.; Baxa, Dolores V.; Lam, Rosalyn; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Teh, Foo-Ching; Werorilangi, Shinta; Teh, Swee J.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity of anthropogenic debris in hundreds of species of wildlife and the toxicity of chemicals associated with it has begun to raise concerns regarding the presence of anthropogenic debris in seafood. We assessed the presence of anthropogenic debris in fishes and shellfish on sale for human consumption. We sampled from markets in Makassar, Indonesia, and from California, USA. All fish and shellfish were identified to species where possible. Anthropogenic debris was extracted from the digestive tracts of fish and whole shellfish using a 10% KOH solution and quantified under a dissecting microscope. In Indonesia, anthropogenic debris was found in 28% of individual fish and in 55% of all species. Similarly, in the USA, anthropogenic debris was found in 25% of individual fish and in 67% of all species. Anthropogenic debris was also found in 33% of individual shellfish sampled. All of the anthropogenic debris recovered from fish in Indonesia was plastic, whereas anthropogenic debris recovered from fish in the USA was primarily fibers. Variations in debris types likely reflect different sources and waste management strategies between countries. We report some of the first findings of plastic debris in fishes directly sold for human consumption raising concerns regarding human health. PMID:26399762

  17. Anthropogenic debris in seafood: Plastic debris and fibers from textiles in fish and bivalves sold for human consumption.

    PubMed

    Rochman, Chelsea M; Tahir, Akbar; Williams, Susan L; Baxa, Dolores V; Lam, Rosalyn; Miller, Jeffrey T; Teh, Foo-Ching; Werorilangi, Shinta; Teh, Swee J

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity of anthropogenic debris in hundreds of species of wildlife and the toxicity of chemicals associated with it has begun to raise concerns regarding the presence of anthropogenic debris in seafood. We assessed the presence of anthropogenic debris in fishes and shellfish on sale for human consumption. We sampled from markets in Makassar, Indonesia, and from California, USA. All fish and shellfish were identified to species where possible. Anthropogenic debris was extracted from the digestive tracts of fish and whole shellfish using a 10% KOH solution and quantified under a dissecting microscope. In Indonesia, anthropogenic debris was found in 28% of individual fish and in 55% of all species. Similarly, in the USA, anthropogenic debris was found in 25% of individual fish and in 67% of all species. Anthropogenic debris was also found in 33% of individual shellfish sampled. All of the anthropogenic debris recovered from fish in Indonesia was plastic, whereas anthropogenic debris recovered from fish in the USA was primarily fibers. Variations in debris types likely reflect different sources and waste management strategies between countries. We report some of the first findings of plastic debris in fishes directly sold for human consumption raising concerns regarding human health. PMID:26399762

  18. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Fish Consumption Advisories: Modeling Prenatal, Postnatal, and Childhood Exposures to Persistent Organic Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Binnington, Matthew J.; Quinn, Cristina L.; McLachlan, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Because human exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) occurs mainly through ingestion of contaminated food, regulatory bodies issue dietary consumption advisories to describe safe intake levels for food items of concern, particularly fish. Objectives: Our study goal was to estimate the effectiveness of fish consumption advisories in reducing exposure of infants and children to POPs. Methods: We used the time-variant mechanistic model CoZMoMAN to estimate and compare prenatal, postnatal, and childhood exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl congener PCB-153 under different scenarios of maternal guideline adherence for both hypothetical constant and realistic time-variant chemical emissions. The scenarios differed in terms of length of compliance (1 vs. 5 years), extent of fish substitution (all vs. half), and replacement diet (uncontaminated produce vs. beef). We also estimated potential exposure reductions for a range of theoretical chemicals to explore how guideline effectiveness varies with a chemical’s partitioning and degradation properties. Results: When assuming realistic time periods of advisory compliance, our findings suggest that temporarily eliminating or reducing maternal fish consumption is largely ineffective in reducing pre- and postnatal exposure to substances with long elimination half-lives in humans, especially during periods of decreasing environmental emissions. Substituting fish with beef may actually result in higher exposure to certain groups of environmental contaminants. On the other hand, advisories may be highly effective in reducing exposure to substances with elimination half-lives in humans shorter than the length of compliance. Conclusions: Our model estimates suggest that fish consumption advisories are unlikely to be effective in reducing prenatal, postnatal, and childhood exposures to compounds with long elimination half-lives in humans. Citation: Binnington MJ, Quinn CL, McLachlan MS, Wania F. 2014. Evaluating

  19. Mercury speciation in piscivorous fish from mining-impacted reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, James S; Arai, Yuji; Topping, Brent R; Pickering, Ingrid J; George, Graham N

    2007-04-15

    Guadalupe Reservoir (GUA), California, and Lahontan Reservoir (LAH), Nevada, U.S. are both affected either directly or indirectly by the legacy of gold and silver mining in the Sierra Nevada during the nineteenth century. Analysis of total mercury in fish from these lentic systems consistently indicate elevated concentrations (>1 microg x g(-1) wet weight; hereinafter, all concentrations are reported as wet weight unless indicated otherwise) well above the U.S. Environmenal Protection Agency's human consumption advisory level for fish (<0.3 microg x g(-1)). Replicate X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses on largemouth bass and hybrid striped bass from GUA and LAH were performed to determine predominant chemical species of mercury accumulated by these high-trophic-level piscivores that are exposed to elevated mercury through trophic transfer in mining-impacted lentic systems. Despite distinct differences in mercury source, the proximity of the source, and concentrations of complexing ligands, results of XANES analysis clearly indicated that mercury accumulated in these individual fish from the two reservoirs were dominated by methylmercury cysteine complexes. These findings are consistent with results from commercial fish species inhabiting marine environments which are presumed to include differing mercury sources (e.g., atmospheric, hydrothermal, or benthic). The dominance of methylmercury cysteine complexes in muscle tissues of fish obtained from such contrasting environments and exposure conditions suggests that a generic toxicological model for the consumption of fish could be applicable over a wide range of ecologic settings. PMID:17533833

  20. Mercury speciation in piscivorous fish from mining-impacted reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.; Arai, Y.; Topping, B.R.; Pickering, I.J.; George, G.N.

    2007-01-01

    Guadalupe Reservoir (GUA), California, and Lahontan Reservoir (LAH), Nevada, U.S. are both affected either directly or indirectly by the legacy of gold and silver mining in the Sierra Nevada during the nineteenth century. Analysis of total mercury in fish from these lentic systems consistently indicate elevated concentrations (>1 ??g??g-1 wet weight; hereinafter, all concentrations are reported as wet weight unless indicated otherwise) well above the U.S. Environmenal Protection Agency's human consumption advisory level for fish (<0.3 ??g??g-1). Replicate X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses on largemouth bass and hybrid striped bass from GUA and LAH were performed to determine predominant chemical species of mercury accumulated by these high-trophic-level piscivores that are exposed to elevated mercury through trophic transfer in mining-impacted lentic systems. Despite distinct differences in mercury source, the proximity of the source, and concentrations of complexing ligands, results of XANES analysis clearly indicated that mercury accumulated in these individual fish from the two reservoirs were dominated by methylmercury cysteine complexes. These findings are consistent with results from commercial fish species inhabiting marine environments which are presumed to include differing mercury sources (e.g., atmospheric, hydrothermal, or benthic). The dominance of methylmercury cysteine complexes in muscle tissues of fish obtained from such contrasting environments and exposure conditions suggests that a generic toxicological model for the consumption of fish could be applicable over a wide range of ecologic settings. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  1. [Effect of a nutrition education intervention on consumption of fruits, vegetables and fish in families of prescholers and scholers].

    PubMed

    Fretes, Gabriela; Salinas, Judith; Vio, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of a nutrition education intervention on fruits, vegetables and fish consumption in pre-school and school age children families, through a three months education intervention with a pre-post evaluation in 27 intervened families and 32 controls from public schools in Santiago, Chile. A food-frequency questionnaire on fruits, vegetables and fish, and a survey on food and nutrition knowledge, attitudes and practices were applied to children and their parents. The intervention consisted in six 90 minutes cooking workshops, including the utilization of videos and photovoice for those who cooked in the families. Results showed a significant more consumption of fruits, vegetables and fish in the intervened than in the control group (test de Kolmogorov-Smirnov, test de Wilcoxon, p < 0.05). Comparing pre-post consumption by group, significance differences were for the intervened group in all cases. (test de Wilcoxon for paired samples, p < 0.05). In parents, fruit consumption increased 135.8 g, vegetables 19.5 g, and fish 10,2 g per day. In children, the increase in fruits was 92.1 g, vegetables 65.9, and fish 5.2 g per day. All the intervened families (n = 22) introduced a significant healthy food improvement at home. Results showed that it is possible to change food habits in families with the implementation of a nutrition education intervention including cooking workshops, videos and photovoice. PMID:24167956

  2. Zooplankton mortality in 3D ecosystem modelling considering variable spatial-temporal fish consumptions in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maar, Marie; Rindorf, Anna; Møller, Eva Friis; Christensen, Asbjørn; Madsen, Kristine S.; van Deurs, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    We tested the feasibility of imposing mesozooplankton mortality into a 3D model based on estimated consumption rates of the dominant planktivorous fish in the North Sea-Kattegat area. The spatial biomass distribution of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus), Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus), sandeel (Ammodytidae) and European sprat (Sprattus sprattus) was derived from quarterly scientific trawl surveys and Danish commercial catches. Spatio-temporal indices of mortality were created based on the estimated biomasses and ingestion rates from the literature. The fish larvae grazing pressure was obtained from a spatial, size-based larval community model. In this model, larvae, herring and sandeel were the most important fish predators on mesozooplankton, but these groups had different spatial and temporal (seasonal) distributions. Fish larvae were particularly dominant in the eastern and southern areas in early summer. Herring and sandeel had the highest consumption in the central and north-western areas and were more important in late summer. The fish index changed the perceived annual, seasonal and spatial patterns in modelled mesozooplankton biomass, production and mortality. In the present study, the index was kept relatively simple and can be further developed with respect to the description of fish as well carnivorous zooplankton ingestion rates. The data input required to create the fish index is (i) planktivorous fish stock biomasses and (ii) relative fish spawning distribution information and (iii) physics (ocean currents and temperatures) for the region and situation of interest. The fish index seems promising as a realistic mortality term for lower trophic levels in 3D ecosystem models in areas with available data on fish stocks to improve management of marine resources.

  3. Assessing exposure risks for freshwater tilapia species posed by mercury and methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Hsien; Lin, Yi-Jun; You, Shu-Han; Yang, Ying-Fei; How, Chun Ming; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liao, Chung-Min

    2016-08-01

    Waterborne and dietborne exposures of freshwater fish to mercury (Hg) in the forms of inorganic (Hg(II)) and organic (methylmercury or MeHg) affect their growth, development, and reproduction. However, an integrated mechanistic risk model framework to predict the impact of Hg(II)/MeHg on freshwater fish is lacking. Here, we integrated biokinetic, physiological and biogeographic data to calibrate and then establish key risk indices-hazardous quotient and exceedance risk-for freshwater tilapia species across geographic ranges of several major rivers in Taiwan. We found that Hg(II) burden was highest in kidney followed by gill, intestine, liver, blood, and muscle. Our results showed that Hg was less likely to pose mortality risk (mortality rate less than 5 %) for freshwater tilapia species. However, Hg is likely to pose the potential hazard to aquatic environments constrained by safety levels for aquatic organisms. Sensitivity analysis showed that amount of Hg accumulated in tilapia was most influenced by sediment uptake rate. Our approach opens up new possibilities for predicting future fish population health with the impacts of continued Hg exposure to provide information on which fish are deemed safe for human consumption. PMID:27207496

  4. Accumulation of dietary methylmercury in the testes of the adult brown norway rat: Impaired testicular and epididymal function

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, A.S.; Chen, H.; Zirkin, B.R.; Rabuck, L.D.

    1998-05-01

    The widespread consumption of fish containing elevated concentrations of methylmercury has prompted concern over the health effects of such a diet. Previous studies with rodents have indicated that exposure to dietary mercury (Hg) impairs male reproductive health. However, adverse effects were observed following doses in the range of milligrams per kilogram of body weight, whereas typical human consumption in the United States is in the range of micrograms per kilogram of body weight. This study examined the effects of dietary Hg on male rats using levels of the metal that are more similar to those typically consumed by humans. For 19 weeks, adult male Brown Norway rats were administered methylmercury twice weekly at 0.8, 8.0, or 80 {micro}g/kg. Intratesticular testosterone levels in the high-dose group were reduced by 44$, suggesting that steroidogenesis in these animals was dramatically impaired. Although sperm production was not significantly affected, numbers of sperm in the cauda epididymides of the high-dose group were reduced by 17%. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between fertility and testicular Hg content. These results raise the possibility that exposure to Hg at levels consumed by humans may result in steroidogenic impairment, reduced sperm counts, and fertility problems.

  5. Selenium and mercury molar ratios in saltwater fish from New Jersey: Individual and species variability complicate use in human health fish consumption advisories☆

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Balancing risk versus benefits to humans and other organisms from consuming fish is a national concern in the USA, as well as in many other parts of the world. Protecting public health is both a federal and state responsibility, and states respond by issuing fish consumption advisories, particularly for mercury. Recently it has been emphasized that the protective role of selenium against mercury toxicity depends on their molar ratios, which should be evaluated as an indication of selenium’s protective capacity, and incorporated in risk assessments for fish consumption. However, there is no single “protective” ratio agreed upon. In this paper we examine the selenium:mercury (Se:Hg) molar ratios in a wide range of saltwater fish caught and eaten by recreational fishers along the New Jersey coast. We were particularly interested in interspecific and intraspecific variability, and whether the molar ratios were consistent within a species, allowing for its use in managing risk. The selenium–mercury molar ratio showed significant variation among and within fish species. The molar ratio decreased with the size of the fish species, decreased with the mercury levels, and within a fish species, the selenium:mercury ratio decreased with fish size. As an essential element, selenium undergoes some homeostatic regulation, but it is also highly toxic. Within species, mercury level tends to increase with size, accounting for the negative relationship between size and ratio. This variability may make it difficult to use the selenium:mercury molar ratio in risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication at this time, and more information is needed on how mercury and selenium actually interact and on the relationship between the molar ratios and health outcomes. PMID:22405995

  6. GLIA AND METHYLMERCURY NEUROTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Mingwei; Li, Xin; Rocha, João B. T.; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a global environmental pollutant with significant adverse effects on human health. As the major target of MeHg, the central nervous system (CNS) exhibits the most recognizable poisoning symptoms. The role of the two major nonneuronal cell types, astrocytes and microglia, in response to MeHg exposure was recently compared. These two cell types share several common features in MeHg toxicity, but interestingly, these cells types also exhibit distinct response kinetics, indicating a cell-specific role in mediating MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. The aim of this study was to review the most recent literature and summarize key features of glial responses to this organometal. PMID:22852858

  7. The influence of external subsidies on diet, growth and Hg concentrations of freshwater sport fish: implications for management and fish consumption advisories.

    PubMed

    Lepak, Jesse M; Hooten, Mevin B; Johnson, Brett M

    2012-10-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination in sport fish is a global problem. In freshwater systems, food web structure, sport fish sex, size, diet and growth rates influence Hg bioaccumulation. Fish stocking is a common management practice worldwide that can introduce external energy and contaminants into freshwater systems. Thus, stocking can alter many of the factors that influence Hg concentrations in sport fish. Here we evaluated the influence of external subsidies, in the form of hatchery-raised rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss on walleye Sander vitreus diet, growth and Hg concentrations in two freshwater systems. Stocking differentially influenced male and female walleye diets and growth, producing a counterintuitive size-contamination relationship. Modeling indicated that walleye growth rate and diet were important explanatory variables when predicting Hg concentrations. Thus, hatchery contributions to freshwater systems in the form of energy and contaminants can influence diet, growth and Hg concentrations in sport fish. Given the extensive scale of fish stocking, and the known health risks associated with Hg contamination, this represents a significant issue for managers monitoring and manipulating freshwater food web structures, and policy makers attempting to develop fish consumption advisories to protect human health in stocked systems. PMID:22699411

  8. The influence of external subsidies on diet, growth and Hg concentrations of freshwater sport fish: implications for management and fish consumption advisories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lepak, J.M.; Hooten, M.B.; Johnson, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination in sport fish is a global problem. In freshwater systems, food web structure, sport fish sex, size, diet and growth rates influence Hg bioaccumulation. Fish stocking is a common management practice worldwide that can introduce external energy and contaminants into freshwater systems. Thus, stocking can alter many of the factors that influence Hg concentrations in sport fish. Here we evaluated the influence of external subsidies, in the form of hatchery-raised rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss on walleye Sander vitreus diet, growth and Hg concentrations in two freshwater systems. Stocking differentially influenced male and female walleye diets and growth, producing a counterintuitive size-contamination relationship. Modeling indicated that walleye growth rate and diet were important explanatory variables when predicting Hg concentrations. Thus, hatchery contributions to freshwater systems in the form of energy and contaminants can influence diet, growth and Hg concentrations in sport fish. Given the extensive scale of fish stocking, and the known health risks associated with Hg contamination, this represents a significant issue for managers monitoring and manipulating freshwater food web structures, and policy makers attempting to develop fish consumption advisories to protect human health in stocked systems.

  9. Healthy Eating and Barriers Related to Social Class. The case of vegetable and fish consumption in Norway.

    PubMed

    Skuland, Silje Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    The article examines the constraints on healthy eating by exploring whether barriers such as taste, competence, time, price, quality and limited selection reduce consumption of vegetables and fish among Norwegians. In order to understand the socio-economic gradient of healthy diets, the study examines how these barriers are related to specific class positions. Regular consumption of both fish and vegetables are recommended by health authorities, and they are broadly perceived as healthy foods by Norwegians. Nevertheless, more than half of the population consumes vegetables less frequently than daily, and the average consumption of fish is far below the recommended two to three dinner portions of fish on a weekly basis. Informed by Bourdieu's theories of social class, this article argues for two overarching barriers related to food consumption, food knowledge and perceived food quality by consumers, and it finds that barriers are tied to scarcity of cultural, economic and social capital. A survey of 2000 respondents subjected to multiple linear regression analysis and factor analysis (PCA) provides the evidence for this study. PMID:25982927

  10. Concomitant consumption of lycopene and fish oil inhibits tumor growth and progression in a mouse xenograft model of colon cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our previous report showed that concomitant supplementation of lycopene and eicosa-pentaenoic acid synergistically inhibited the proliferation of human colon cancer HT-29 cells in vitro. To validate our findings, the present study investigated whether consumption of lycopene and fish oil would help ...

  11. Changes in fish consumption in midlife and the risk of coronary heart disease in men and women.

    PubMed

    Lajous, Martin; Willett, Walter C; Robins, James; Young, Jessica G; Rimm, Eric; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Hernán, Miguel A

    2013-08-01

    Without data from randomized trials, the long-term effects of fish consumption on coronary heart disease (CHD) need to be inferred from observational studies. We estimated CHD risk under different hypothetical interventions on fish consumption during mid- and later life in 2 prospective US cohorts of 25,797 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and 53,772 women in the Nurses' Health Study. Participants provided information on risk factors and disease every 2 years and on diet every 4 years. We adjusted for baseline and time-varying risk factors for CHD by using the parametric g-formula (where g stands for "generalized"). We observed 1,865 incident CHD cases among men (in 1990-2008) and 1,891 CHD cases among women (in 1986-2008). The risk ratios for CHD when comparing the risk if everyone had consumed at least 2 servings of fish per week with the risk if no one consumed fish during the follow-up periods were 1.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.90, 1.15) for men and 0.87 (95% confidence interval: 0.76, 0.98) for women. Our results suggest that increasing fish consumption to at least 2 servings per week in mid- or later life may lower CHD risk in women but not in men. Our analytical approach allowed us to explicitly specify hypothetical interventions and to assess the effectiveness of dietary changes in midlife. PMID:23813701

  12. Changes in Fish Consumption in Midlife and the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Lajous, Martin; Willett, Walter C.; Robins, James; Young, Jessica G.; Rimm, Eric; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Hernán, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Without data from randomized trials, the long-term effects of fish consumption on coronary heart disease (CHD) need to be inferred from observational studies. We estimated CHD risk under different hypothetical interventions on fish consumption during mid- and later life in 2 prospective US cohorts of 25,797 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and 53,772 women in the Nurses’ Health Study. Participants provided information on risk factors and disease every 2 years and on diet every 4 years. We adjusted for baseline and time-varying risk factors for CHD by using the parametric g-formula (where g stands for “generalized”). We observed 1,865 incident CHD cases among men (in 1990–2008) and 1,891 CHD cases among women (in 1986–2008). The risk ratios for CHD when comparing the risk if everyone had consumed at least 2 servings of fish per week with the risk if no one consumed fish during the follow-up periods were 1.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.90, 1.15) for men and 0.87 (95% confidence interval: 0.76, 0.98) for women. Our results suggest that increasing fish consumption to at least 2 servings per week in mid- or later life may lower CHD risk in women but not in men. Our analytical approach allowed us to explicitly specify hypothetical interventions and to assess the effectiveness of dietary changes in midlife. PMID:23813701

  13. Mercury concentrations and omega-3 fatty acids in fish and shrimp: Preferential consumption for maximum health benefits.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katrina L; Guentzel, Jane L

    2010-09-01

    The consumption of fish and shrimp containing omega-3 fatty acids can result in protective health effects including a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes. These protective effects may be decreased by the presence of mercury in the muscle tissue of fish and shellfish. Mercury can increase the risk of cardiovascular problems and impede neurological development. The objective of this project was to determine appropriate consumption amounts of selected fish species and shrimp based on mercury levels and recommended intake levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Species that are high in omega-3s and low in mercury include salmon, trout, and shrimp. Species with both high levels of mercury and omega-3 fatty acids include tuna, shark, and halibut, swordfish, and sea bass. PMID:20633905

  14. The Transtheoretical model for fruit, vegetable and fish consumption: associations between intakes, stages of change and stage transition determinants

    PubMed Central

    De Vet, Emely; de Nooijer, Jascha; de Vries, Nanne K; Brug, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases are caused by multiple behavioral factors, including different dietary factors. We examined to what extent fruit, vegetable and fish consumption are related, and whether behavioral determinants vary across these dietary behaviors from a Transtheoretical model perspective. Methods Data were collected among 1142 participants (T0; response rate 46%) selected from an Internet panel, who were followed-up one-week later (T1; N = 1055, response rate 92%). Mean age was 35.4 (SD = 11.9) years, 35% was male, and most respondents were of Dutch origin (90%). Of the respondents, 13%, 44% and 43% had a low, medium or high level of education, respectively. Electronic questionnaires assessed fruit, vegetable and fish intake (food frequency questionnaires), stages of change, decisional balance and self-efficacy, for each of these three behaviors. Results Stages of change and (changes in) fruit, vegetable and fish intake were only weakly associated; decisional balance and self-efficacy were more strongly associated. Some presumed predictors of stage transitions were similar for fruit, vegetable, and fish intake, i.e., strong pros predicted progress out of precontemplators and low self-efficacy predicted relapse from action/maintenance for all behaviors. However, progress out of contemplation and out of preparation showed different patterns for fruit, vegetable and fish intake. Conclusion The weak associations between intakes and potential determinants for fruit, vegetable, and fish consumption do not warrant an integrated dietary change approach targeting the same determinants for each behavior. PMID:16784520

  15. Potential human health risk assessment of trace metals via the consumption of marine fish in Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Naji, Abolfazl; Khan, Farhan R; Hashemi, Seyed Hassan

    2016-08-15

    This study was carried out to evaluate the concentration of trace metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the muscle of four fish species from the Persian Gulf. Trace metals were analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy and consumption rates advisory for minimizing chronic systemic effects in children and adults were estimated. The metals concentrations in analyzed fish samples were lower than legal limits. Cadmium target hazard quotient values suggested that the threshold to avoid the potential risk for children health is an exposure level lower than 3 meals per week. Hazard index values based on four metals (not including Pb) for the child age class were higher than those of the adult age class, suggesting that children may suffer from a higher health risk. This study provides information about the consumption limits of certain metals, in particular Cd, necessary for minimizing potential health risks resulting from human consumption. PMID:27193506

  16. Association between Fish Consumption and Prefrontal Function during a Cognitive Task in Male Japanese Workers: A Multi-Channel Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Takeshi; Matsumura, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Katsutoshi; Kaneko, Koichi; Kurosawa, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between fish consumption and prefrontal function during a cognitive task in male Japanese workers. The study included 208 male workers who underwent medical health examinations 3 months after a change in their work assignment. We measured the hemoglobin concentration changes in the prefrontal region during working memory tasks using 52-channel near-infrared spectroscopy. The frequency of fish consumption was calculated on the basis of the subjects’ self-reported customary intake frequency over the previous 3 months. A significant positive relationship was observed between fish consumption and left dorsolateral prefrontal function during a working memory task. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report an association between fish consumption and functional cortical activity with an ample sample size, suggesting that fish consumption modulates functional activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. PMID:25919586

  17. Evaluating risk communication about fish consumption advisories: efficacy of a brochure versus a classroom lesson in Spanish and English.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; McDermott, Melanie Hughes; Chess, Caron; Bochenek, Eleanor; Perez-Lugo, Marla; Pflugh, Kerry Kirk

    2003-08-01

    Presentation format can influence the way target audiences understand risk-related information. Brochures or fish fact sheets are the methods traditionally used by state agencies to inform the public about fish consumption advisories and the risks from consuming fish. This study examines the efficacy of presenting information about the risks from consuming contaminated fish and shellfish in two different formats: a brochure and classroom presentation. The two instruments were developed and tested in Spanish and English, reflecting the local ethnic composition in the Newark Bay Complex. The instruments were tested on women of child-bearing age at the Women, Infants, and Children Center in Elizabeth, New Jersey. Detailed diagrams were used in both presentations, including contaminated fish species, fish preparation methods, and food chain bioaccumulation and transmission to the fetus. There were few language-related differences in the efficacy of the classroom lesson, and the main ideas were understood by both groups. Where there were significant differences in understanding about the risks from consuming fish or crabs from the contaminated waters of Newark Bay, in all cases the women exposed to the classroom lesson had a better understanding than those who read the brochure. Ninety-six percent of the women who heard the lesson understood that it was unsafe to eat fish from the port, compared to 72% of those reading the brochure. Both formats succeeded in imparting information to most women about the area under advisories, the fish species under advisories, and transmission of toxins to the fetus. Information on fish preparation was recalled less clearly, partly because women were asked to relate methods to reduce the risk from consuming fish from 11 presented, and most recalled only two or three of the list. The advantages and disadvantages of conducting short classes to women of child-bearing age are discussed. PMID:12926571

  18. Elevated prenatal methylmercury exposure in Nigeria: evidence from maternal and cord blood.

    PubMed

    Obi, Ejeatuluchukwu; Okafor, Charles; Igwebe, Anthony; Ebenebe, Joy; Afonne, Onyenmechi Johnson; Ifediata, Francis; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere; Nriagu, Jerome O; Basu, Niladri

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is a neurodevelopmental toxicant that is globally distributed though little is known about prenatal exposures in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of the current study was to measure total mercury levels in cord blood and maternal blood from 95 mother-newborn pairs recruited from hospitals in Nnewi, Nigeria. The secondary aims of the study were to explore if demographic and dietary factors were associated with blood mercury levels, and to explore if mercury levels were associated with any self-reported health outcome and childbirth outcome. Maternal blood mercury levels averaged 3.6 μg L(-1) and ranged from 1.1 μg L(-1) to 9.5 μg L(-1). Cord blood mercury averaged 5.1 μg L(-1) and ranged from 1.2 μg L(-1) to 10.6 μg L(-1). The mean ratio of mercury in paired cord blood to maternal blood was 1.5 and it ranged from 0.4 to 3.2. Mercury in maternal and cord blood were significantly correlated (r=0.471). More than one-third of mothers reported eating fish at least once per day, and a weak (p=0.08) fish consumption-related increase in blood mercury was found. Cord blood mercury was positively and significantly associated with birth weight and length, and head and chest circumference. Mercury levels in 36% of the participants exceeded the biomonitoring guideline associated with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) reference dose for mercury. The study shows that pregnant women and their newborns are exposed to methylmercury and that their exposures are higher compared to general populations sampled from other regions of the world. PMID:25112573

  19. Meeting Report: Methylmercury in Marine Ecosystems—From Sources to Seafood Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Celia Y.; Serrell, Nancy; Evers, David C.; Fleishman, Bethany J.; Lambert, Kathleen F.; Weiss, Jeri; Mason, Robert P.; Bank, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    Mercury and other contaminants in coastal and open-ocean ecosystems are an issue of great concern globally and in the United States, where consumption of marine fish and shellfish is a major route of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg). A recent National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences–Superfund Basic Research Program workshop titled “Fate and Bioavailability of Mercury in Aquatic Ecosystems and Effects on Human Exposure,” convened by the Dartmouth Toxic Metals Research Program on 15–16 November 2006 in Durham, New Hampshire, brought together human health experts, marine scientists, and ecotoxicologists to encourage cross-disciplinary discussion between ecosystem and human health scientists and to articulate research and monitoring priorities to better understand how marine food webs have become contaminated with MeHg. Although human health effects of Hg contamination were a major theme, the workshop also explored effects on marine biota. The workgroup focused on three major topics: a) the biogeochemical cycling of Hg in marine ecosystems, b) the trophic transfer and bioaccumulation of MeHg in marine food webs, and c) human exposure to Hg from marine fish and shellfish consumption. The group concluded that current understanding of Hg in marine ecosystems across a range of habitats, chemical conditions, and ocean basins is severely data limited. An integrated research and monitoring program is needed to link the processes and mechanisms of MeHg production, bioaccumulation, and transfer with MeHg exposure in humans. PMID:19079724

  20. Meeting report: Methylmercury in marine ecosystems--from sources to seafood consumers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Celia Y; Serrell, Nancy; Evers, David C; Fleishman, Bethany J; Lambert, Kathleen F; Weiss, Jeri; Mason, Robert P; Bank, Michael S

    2008-12-01

    Mercury and other contaminants in coastal and open-ocean ecosystems are an issue of great concern globally and in the United States, where consumption of marine fish and shellfish is a major route of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg). A recent National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences-Superfund Basic Research Program workshop titled "Fate and Bioavailability of Mercury in Aquatic Ecosystems and Effects on Human Exposure," convened by the Dartmouth Toxic Metals Research Program on 15-16 November 2006 in Durham, New Hampshire, brought together human health experts, marine scientists, and ecotoxicologists to encourage cross-disciplinary discussion between ecosystem and human health scientists and to articulate research and monitoring priorities to better understand how marine food webs have become contaminated with MeHg. Although human health effects of Hg contamination were a major theme, the workshop also explored effects on marine biota. The workgroup focused on three major topics: a) the biogeochemical cycling of Hg in marine ecosystems, b) the trophic transfer and bioaccumulation of MeHg in marine food webs, and c) human exposure to Hg from marine fish and shellfish consumption. The group concluded that current understanding of Hg in marine ecosystems across a range of habitats, chemical conditions, and ocean basins is severely data limited. An integrated research and monitoring program is needed to link the processes and mechanisms of MeHg production, bioaccumulation, and transfer with MeHg exposure in humans. PMID:19079724

  1. Metabolism, food consumption and growth of plaice ( Pleuronectes platessa) and flounder ( Platichthys flesus) in relation to fish size and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonds, M.; Cronie, R.; Vethaak, A. D.; Van Der Puyl, P.

    Daily rates of oxygen consumption, food consumption and growth of plaice ( Pleuronectes platessa) and flounder ( Platichthys flesus) have been measured in the laboratory at various constant temperatures. Oxygen consumption was related to body weight of the fish as a power function, with a weight exponent of between 0.71 and 0.85. No significant effects of temperature or feeding on this exponent were found. Flounder showed a significantly higher metabolic rate and a higher temperature coefficient for metabolism than plaice. Maximum daily rates of food consumption and the weight increment of fish fed with excess rations of fresh mussel meat could also be related to fish weights by means of power functions. For plaice these exponents decreased from about 0.9 at low temperatures (2-6 C°) to about 0.7 at high temperatures (18-22°C). Such a temperature effect on the weight exponent indicates that small juvenile fish eat more and grow faster at higher temperatures than do large older fish, and that large fish do better at low temperatures. After scaling of daily food consumption and growth in proportion to metabolic weights of the fish (W 0.78), feeding and growth at different fish sizes and temperatures can be compared and temperature-growth rate models can be used for investigations of feeding in natural populations. Compared to plaice, young flounder ate more and grew faster at higher temperatures (> 14°C). This may partly explain the preference of flounder for the shallower parts of coastal areas and estuaries, where summer temperatures and food densities are higher. Energy budgets of young plaice and flounder fed with excess rations of mussel meat indicate that at least 29% of the food energy is used for metabolism while about 37% of the food energy is converted into growth. The net conversion efficiency was estimated at 0.45 for food and growth in units of ash-free dry weight, and at 0.53 for food and growth in energy units. Analysis of the energy budget showed

  2. Deposition and cycling of sulfur controls mercury accumulation in Isle Royale fish

    SciTech Connect

    Paul E. Drevnick; Donald E. Canfield; Patrick R. Gorski

    2007-11-01

    Mercury contamination of fish is a global problem. Consumption of contaminated fish is the primary route of methylmercury exposure in humans and is detrimental to health. Newly mandated reductions in anthropogenic mercury emissions aim to reduce atmospheric mercury deposition and thus mercury concentrations in fish. However, factors other than mercury deposition are important for mercury bioaccumulation in fish. In the lakes of Isle Royale, U.S.A., reduced rates of sulfate deposition since the Clean Air Act of 1970 have caused mercury concentrations in fish to decline to levels that are safe for human consumption, even without a discernible decrease in mercury deposition. Therefore, reductions in anthropogenic sulfur emissions may provide a synergistic solution to the mercury problem in sulfate-limited freshwaters. 71 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Double-crested cormorant studies at Little Galloo Island, Lake Ontario in 2008: Diet composition, fish consumption and the efficacy of management activities in reducing fish predation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; McCullough, Russell D.; Farquhar, James F.

    2008-01-01

    The year 2008 marked the seventeenth consecutive year of study of the food habits and fish consumption of LGI cormorants, and represented the tenth consecutive year evaluating the efficacy of management activities to control the reproductive success of cormorants nesting at LGI. The program consists mainly of spraying cormorant eggs with oil as well as the culling of adult and immature birds.This paper reports the findings of work carried outin 2008 at LGI.

  4. Higher Fish Consumption in Pregnancy May Confer Protection against the Harmful Effect of Prenatal Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Perera, Frederica; Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Flak, Elzbieta; Mroz, Elzbieta; Sochacka-Tatara, Elzbieta; Jacek, Ryszard; Kaim, Irena; Skolicki, Zbigniew; Spengler, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim The objective of this study was to assess a hypothesized beneficial effect of fish consumption during the last trimester of pregnancy on adverse birth outcomes resulting from prenatal exposure to fine air particulate matter. Methods The cohort consisted of 481 nonsmoking women with singleton pregnancies, of 18–35 years of age, who gave birth at term. All recruited women were asked about their usual diet over the period of pregnancy. Measurements of particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in size (PM2.5) were carried out by personal air monitoring over 48 h during the second trimester of pregnancy. The effect of PM2.5 and fish intake during gestation on the birth weight of the babies was estimated from multivariable linear regression models, which beside the main independent variables considered a set of potential confounding factors such as the size of the mother (height, prepregnancy weight), maternal education, parity, the gender of the child, gestational age and the season of birth. Results The study showed that the adjusted birth weight was significantly lower in newborns whose mothers were exposed to particulate matter greater than 46.3 μg/m3 (β coefficient = −97.02, p = 0.032). Regression analysis stratified by the level of maternal fish consumption (in tertiles) showed that the deficit in birth weight amounted to 133.26 g (p = 0.052) in newborns whose mothers reported low fish intake (<91 g/week). The birth weight deficit in newborns whose mothers reported medium (91–205 g/week) or higher fish intake (>205 g/week) was insignificant. The interaction term between PM2.5 and fish intake levels was also insignificant (β = −107,35, p = 0.215). Neither gestational age nor birth weight correlated with maternal fish consumption. Conclusions The results suggest that a higher consumption of fish by women during pregnancy may reduce the risk of adverse effects of prenatal exposure to toxicants and highlight the fact that a full assessment of

  5. Freshwater discharges drive high levels of methylmercury in Arctic marine biota.

    PubMed

    Schartup, Amina T; Balcom, Prentiss H; Soerensen, Anne L; Gosnell, Kathleen J; Calder, Ryan S D; Mason, Robert P; Sunderland, Elsie M

    2015-09-22

    Elevated levels of neurotoxic methylmercury in Arctic food-webs pose health risks for indigenous populations that consume large quantities of marine mammals and fish. Estuaries provide critical hunting and fishing territory for these populations, and, until recently, benthic sediment was thought to be the main methylmercury source for coastal fish. New hydroelectric developments are being proposed in many northern ecosystems, and the ecological impacts of this industry relative to accelerating climate changes are poorly characterized. Here we evaluate the competing impacts of climate-driven changes in northern ecosystems and reservoir flooding on methylmercury production and bioaccumulation through a case study of a stratified sub-Arctic estuarine fjord in Labrador, Canada. Methylmercury bioaccumulation in zooplankton is higher than in midlatitude ecosystems. Direct measurements and modeling show that currently the largest methylmercury source is production in oxic surface seawater. Water-column methylation is highest in stratified surface waters near the river mouth because of the stimulating effects of terrestrial organic matter on methylating microbes. We attribute enhanced biomagnification in plankton to a thin layer of marine snow widely observed in stratified systems that concentrates microbial methylation and multiple trophic levels of zooplankton in a vertically restricted zone. Large freshwater inputs and the extensive Arctic Ocean continental shelf mean these processes are likely widespread and will be enhanced by future increases in water-column stratification, exacerbating high biological methylmercury concentrations. Soil flooding experiments indicate that near-term changes expected from reservoir creation will increase methylmercury inputs to the estuary by 25-200%, overwhelming climate-driven changes over the next decade. PMID:26351688

  6. Freshwater discharges drive high levels of methylmercury in Arctic marine biota

    PubMed Central

    Schartup, Amina T.; Balcom, Prentiss H.; Soerensen, Anne L.; Gosnell, Kathleen J.; Calder, Ryan S. D.; Mason, Robert P.; Sunderland, Elsie M.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of neurotoxic methylmercury in Arctic food-webs pose health risks for indigenous populations that consume large quantities of marine mammals and fish. Estuaries provide critical hunting and fishing territory for these populations, and, until recently, benthic sediment was thought to be the main methylmercury source for coastal fish. New hydroelectric developments are being proposed in many northern ecosystems, and the ecological impacts of this industry relative to accelerating climate changes are poorly characterized. Here we evaluate the competing impacts of climate-driven changes in northern ecosystems and reservoir flooding on methylmercury production and bioaccumulation through a case study of a stratified sub-Arctic estuarine fjord in Labrador, Canada. Methylmercury bioaccumulation in zooplankton is higher than in midlatitude ecosystems. Direct measurements and modeling show that currently the largest methylmercury source is production in oxic surface seawater. Water-column methylation is highest in stratified surface waters near the river mouth because of the stimulating effects of terrestrial organic matter on methylating microbes. We attribute enhanced biomagnification in plankton to a thin layer of marine snow widely observed in stratified systems that concentrates microbial methylation and multiple trophic levels of zooplankton in a vertically restricted zone. Large freshwater inputs and the extensive Arctic Ocean continental shelf mean these processes are likely widespread and will be enhanced by future increases in water-column stratification, exacerbating high biological methylmercury concentrations. Soil flooding experiments indicate that near-term changes expected from reservoir creation will increase methylmercury inputs to the estuary by 25–200%, overwhelming climate-driven changes over the next decade. PMID:26351688

  7. Relationship of human levels of lead and cadmium to the consumption of fish caught in and around Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.S.; Rondinelli, R.

    1989-09-01

    A pilot exposure study was conducted to determine whether the consumption of fish captured in Lake Coeur d'Alene (LCD), the Coeur d'Alene River, and the adjacent Chain Lakes, could substantially increase lead and cadmium levels in human blood and urine. The goals of the study were: to characterize fish and duck consumption patterns of people living around LCD; and to determine the association between fish and duck consumption and lead/cadmium levels. The lead and cadmium levels among participants living near LCD were within the expected range and are not of any known clinical importance. After adjusting for age and smoking, it was found that persons eating fish or duck were more likely to have higher than the median levels of cadmium in their urine. There were no statistically significant associations between fish or duck consumption and blood levels of lead or cadmium or urine levels of cadmium when adjusted for creatinine.

  8. Mercury speciation in fish muscles from major Czech rivers and assessment of health risks.

    PubMed

    Sedláčková, Lenka; Kružíková, Kamila; Svobodová, Zdeňka

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the mercury and methylmercury content in muscle tissue of chub (Leuciscus cephalus L.), to assess the health risks of eating the fish and to determine the number of fish meat servings that are suitable for weekly consumption. Total mercury concentrations were determined using a single-purpose atomic absorption spectrophotometer AMA 254. Methylmercury concentrations were determined by gas chromatography. The location where the highest total mercury concentrations in fish muscle tissues were found was the Vltava - Vraňany (0.236±0.1001mg/kg(-1)), and the highest methylmercury concentration was found at the Labe - Obříství (0.231±0.1056mg/kg(-1)). The conclusion based on the data ascertained is that the locations from which the lowest number of fish meat servings can be eaten are the Vltava - Vraňany and the Labe - Obříství. The results of this study helped evaluate contamination levels of rivers that flow out of the Czech Republic. PMID:24360463

  9. Consumption of Lean Fish Reduces the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Prospective Population Based Cohort Study of Norwegian Women

    PubMed Central

    Rylander, Charlotta; Sandanger, Torkjel M.; Engeset, Dagrun; Lund, Eiliv

    2014-01-01

    Background The effects of fish consumption and n-3 fatty acids on type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have recently been debated. Objective We explored the risk of T2DM in relation to consumption of lean fish, fatty fish, fish products and total fish as well as cod liver oil supplements in a representative sample of Norwegian women. Design This was a prospective population based cohort study in 33740 women free of T2DM, stroke, angina or heart attack and with detailed information on important co-variates and dietary intake at baseline. Risk ratios and corresponding 95% CI were estimated using Poisson regression with log-person time as offset. Results Lean fish consumption was inversely associated with T2DM compared to zero intake. Risk ratios and 95% CI for intake of 75 and 100 g lean fish per day were 0.71 (0.51, 0.98) and 0.67 (0.46, 0.98), respectively. There was no effect of intake of fatty fish, fish products, total fish or use of cod liver oil supplements on the risk of T2DM. Conclusion Lean fish consumption of 75–100 g/d had a beneficial effect on T2DM. It remains unclear whether lean fish in itself has a protective effect on T2DM or that lean fish consumers have a protective life-style that we were not able to take into account in this study. Unfavorable effects of fatty fish consumption or use of cod liver oil supplements on T2DM were not observed. PMID:24587071

  10. Adult Women’s Blood Mercury Concentrations Vary Regionally in the United States: Association with Patterns of Fish Consumption (NHANES 1999–2004)

    PubMed Central

    Mahaffey, Kathryn R.; Clickner, Robert P.; Jeffries, Rebecca A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The current, continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) has included blood mercury (BHg) and fish/shellfish consumption since it began in 1999. NHANES 1999–2004 data form the basis for these analyses. Objectives This study was designed to determine BHg distributions within U.S. Census regions and within coastal and noncoastal areas among women of childbearing age, their association with patterns of fish consumption, and changes from 1999 through 2004. Methods We performed univariate and bivariate analyses to determine the distribution of BHg and fish consumption in the population and to investigate differences by geography, race/ethnicity, and income. We used multivariate analysis (regression) to determine the strongest predictors of BHg among geography, demographic factors, and fish consumption. Results Elevated BHg occurred more commonly among women of childbearing age living in coastal areas of the United States (approximately one in six women). Regionally, exposures differ across the United States: Northeast > South and West > Midwest. Asian women and women with higher income ate more fish and had higher BHg. Time-trend analyses identified reduced BHg and reduced intake of Hg in the upper percentiles without an overall reduction of fish consumption. Conclusions BHg is associated with income, ethnicity, residence (census region and coastal proximity). From 1999 through 2004, BHg decreased without a concomitant decrease in fish consumption. Data are consistent with a shift over this time period in fish species in women’s diets. PMID:19165386

  11. Gnathostoma infection in fish caught for local consumption in Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand I. Prevalence and fish species.

    PubMed

    Rojekittikhun, Wichit; Chaiyasith, Tossapon; Nuamtanong, Supaporn; Komalamisra, Chalit

    2004-09-01

    Between August 2000 and August 2001, 12,216 fish of 73 species were purchased from several local markets in Nakhon Nayok Province, Thailand, and examined for the presence of Gnathostoma larvae. Almost all species were fresh-water fish that had grown naturally, rather than raised commercially. Eight species were found to be infected with gnathostome larvae. The overall prevalence was 5.1% (626/12,216) and a total of 5,969 larvae was recovered. The highest rate of infection (30.1 %) was found in Monopterus albus (swamp eel). The rates in the remaining infected fish were as follows: Anabas testudineus (climbing perch) 7.7%, Channa striata (striped snake-head fish) 7.4%, Clarius macrocephalus (Gunther's walking catfish) 6.7%, Channa micropeltes (giant snake-head fish) 5.1%, Channa lucius (blotched snake-head fish) 4.0%, Clarius batrachus (Batrachian walking catfish) 1.4%, and Ompok krattensis (butter sheatfish) 0.6%. The mean number of larvae/fish was highest in swamp eels (10.0 larvae/eel), and the maximum number of 698 larvae was recovered from one eel. The body sizes of the recovered G. spinigerum advanced third-stage larvae were 2.70-5.10 mm in length (average, 3.97+/-0.50 mm) and 0.29-0.60 mm in width (average, 0.40+/-0.04 mm). The average number of cephalic hooklets of the larvae from rows 1 to 4 were 41.8+/-0.5 (range, 40-43), 43.6+/-0.6 (range, 42-45), 46.1+/-0.9 (range, 44-48) and 49.3+/-0.7 (range, 48-51), respectively. PMID:15689060

  12. Heavy metals and arsenic concentrations in ten fish species from the Šalek lakes (Slovenia): assessment of potential human health risk due to fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Al Sayegh Petkovšek, Samar; Mazej Grudnik, Zdenka; Pokorny, Boštjan

    2012-05-01

    The study, which measured the concentrations of Hg, Pb, Cd, Zn and As in various fish tissues (muscle, gill and liver) of 10 fish species (Abramis brama danubii, Alburnus alburnus alburnus, Barbus meridionalis petenyi, Carassius auratius gibelio, Cyprinus carpio, Lepomis gibossus, Leuciscius cephalus cephalus, Perca fluviatilis fluviatilis, Rutilus rutilus, Scardinus erythrophtlalmus erythrophtlalmus) collected in the Šalek lakes, is the first survey regarding metal concentrations in fish species with samples originating from Slovene lakes, while only a limited number of such studies have been carried out in southeastern Europe. Since these lakes are situated in the close vicinity of the largest Slovene thermal power plant, the study provides an insight into the potential impact of increased levels of metals in the environment as well as an estimate of the contamination of fish tissues with metals. Furthermore, it was possible to compare the results obtained with those from other studies regarding metal levels in freshwater fish species. The mean metal concentrations of different tissues irrespective of species varied in the following ranges: Zn 4.31-199 mg/kg ww, Pb 0.01-0.48 mg/kg ww, As 0.02-0.44 mg/kg ww, Hg <0.01-0.31 mg/kg ww, Cd < 0.01-0.19 mg/kg ww. In general, higher contents of Hg were found in muscles and livers than in gills and higher contents of As in gills and livers than in muscles, respectively. The accumulation of Pb and Zn was most pronounced in gills. The result obtained regarding metal concentrations in fish revealed that the ecosystems of the Šalek lakes are not polluted with Hg and Pb, slightly loaded with As and Cd and moderately polluted with Zn. In addition, the potential human health risk due to fish consumption was assessed. This showed that the estimated weekly intakes for all metals were far below provisional permissible tolerable weekly intakes determined by WHO/FAO. The consumption of fish from the Šalek lakes, therefore

  13. Estimating fish consumption and targeting high risk consumer populations in NJ and NY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An estimated 16.4% of US females of reproductive age (15 to 45 years) eat fish at least once per day. While fish is a good source of protein, with some species high in the omega-3 fatty acids that are associated with cardiovascular health, studies also indicate some fish and she...

  14. Temperature effect on behaviour, oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion and tolerance limit of the fish fingerlings of Alepes djidaba.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, R; Syed Mohamed, H E; Shahul Hameed, P

    2008-07-01

    The present study has been carried out to determine the effect of temperature on behaviour, oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion and tolerance limit of the fish fingerlings of Alepes djidaba, which were collected at Kalpakkam. The fish fingerlings were placed at different temperatures, based on the thermal tolerance limit of fish and thermal outfall of the Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS). The thermal tolerance experiments were conducted in two ways: in direct exposure and in gradually increasing temperature for duration of 48 hr. The upper and lower lethal temperatures for the fish fingerlings of Alepes djidaba were 38.5 degrees C and 14 degrees C respectively. During tolerance experiment, no mortality was observed at 33 degrees C and 35 degrees C. But at 38 degrees C with gradual increase in temperature, 100% loss of equilibrium was observed at 37.7 degrees C in 36 min and mortality was observed at 38 degrees C in 55 min. On the contrary, when the fish fingerlings A. djidaba were directly exposed to 38 degrees C, almost 100% loss of equilibrium and mortality were recorded in 15 min and 31 min respectively. At 40 degrees C with gradual increase in temperature, 100% loss of equilibrium was recorded at 38.5 degrees C in 46 min and mortality was recorded at 39 degrees C in 50 min. On the other hand, when the fish fingerlings of Alepes djidaba were directly exposed to 40 degrees C, 100% mortality occurred immediately within one minute. These behavioral responses include an elevated temperature of deltaT 10 degrees C, surfacing, dashing against glass wall, jumping out of the water, etc. In general, the rate of oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion was found to enhance with increasing temperature. The oxygen consumption was found to increase from 0.97 mg O2/g/hr at 30 degrees C to 2.2 mg O2/g/hr at 35 degrees C. Similarly, the excretion of ammonia also increased from 3.18 microg/g/hr at 30 degrees C to 5.91 microg/g/hr at 35 degrees C. In the present study, it was

  15. Absence of nonresponse bias in a study of sport-caught Great Lakes fish consumption and conception failure

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, A.D.; Tay, E.; Courval, J.M.

    1999-04-01

    The authors have reported that men`s lifetime sport-caught Great Lakes fish consumption was associated with lifetime prevalence of conception delay or failure. Those cross-sectional data were based on responses to a postal questionnaire. The present study was conducted to evaluate whether nonresponse bias could explain the cross-sectional findings. The authors conducted telephone interviews with 230 men and 38 women who did not respond to the original responders with respect to key demographic, behavioral, and reproductive characteristics. Nonresponders were approximately 1.5 years older at interview, were more likely to be Caucasian, and reported higher incomes than responders. Among men, nonresponders had fished fewer days in the past year. Almost one half of nonresponders reported no fish consumption in the past year, compared to one quarter of responders. Nonresponders were more likely than responders to have ever conceived a live-born child, had more children, and were less likely to intend to have additional children in the next 5 years. Among both responders and nonresponders there was an increased prevalence of a period of conception failure among men who reported consuming greater quantities of sport-caught Great Lakes fish. The study provides support for the cross-sectional analyses presented previously, insofar as nonresponse bias is unlikely to have a major role in the observed association.

  16. Bioenergetics assessment of fish and crayfish consumption by river otter (Lontra canadensis): integrating prey availability, diet, and field metabolic rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dekar, Matthew P.; Magoulick, Daniel D.; Beringer, J.

    2010-01-01

    River otters (Lontra canadensis) are important predators in aquatic ecosystems, but few studies quantify their prey consumption. We trapped crayfish monthly as an index of availability and collected otter scat for diet analysis in the Ozark Mountains of northwestern Arkansas, USA. We measured otter daily energy expenditure (DEE) with the doubly labeled water method to develop a bioenergetics model for estimating monthly prey consumption. Meek's crayfish (Orconectes meeki) catch-per-unit-effort was positively related to stream temperature, indicating that crayfish were more available during warmer months. The percentage frequency of occurrence for crayfish in scat samples peaked at 85.0% in summer and was lowest (42.3%) in winter. In contrast, the percentage occurrence of fish was 13.3% in summer and 57.7% in winter. Estimates of DEE averaged 4738 kJ·day-1 for an otter with a body mass of 7842 g. Total biomass consumption ranged from 35 079 to 52 653 g·month-1 (wet mass), corresponding to a high proportion of fish and crayfish in the diet, respectively. Otter consumption represents a large fraction of prey production, indicating potentially strong effects of otters on trophic dynamics in stream ecosystems.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTER ASSISTED PERSONAL INTERVIEW SOFTWARE SYSTEM FOR COLLECTION OF TRIBAL FISH CONSUMPTION DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Native Americans who consume seafood often have higher seafood consumption rates and consequently greater exposures to contaminants in seafood than the general U.S. population. Defensible and quantifiable tribal seafood consumption rates are needed for development of ...

  18. Country-specific estimates of the incidence of intellectual disability associated with prenatal exposure to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, David C; O'Leary, Keri; Rainis, Holly; Gibb, Herman J

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes country-specific estimates of the incidence of intellectual disability in children associated with prenatal exposure to methylmercury. A systematic review was undertaken to identify country-specific data on hair mercury concentrations in women of reproductive age. A variety of approaches were used to estimate biomarker concentrations for countries lacking such data. A dose-effect relationship derived on the basis of the data from three large prospective studies relating prenatal methylmercury exposure to IQ in children was used to estimate the country-specific incidences of mild, moderate, severe, and profound intellectual disability in children as a result of prenatal methylmercury exposure. The incidence of methylmercury-associated mild intellectual disability (IQ scores 50-70) varied nearly 40-fold across countries, with the greatest incidences generally in countries that are islands or that are coastal. Countries with high birth rates and greater consumption of foods that contribute most to methylmercury intake in humans (seafood, rice) can be expected to make the largest contributions to the worldwide burden of disease associated with methylmercury. The assumptions and limitations of the estimates are discussed. PMID:26874048

  19. Mercury contamination in fish and human hair from Hainan Island, South China Sea: Implication for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Ling; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Yu, Shen; Cheng, Hefa; Peng, Jia-Xi; Hong, Yi-Guo; Feng, Xin-Bin

    2014-11-01

    Hair has long been recognized as a good biomarker for human exposure to Hg. The mercury concentrations in 14 species of marine fish and hair samples from 177 coastal residents in Hainan, South China Sea were investigated to assess the status of mercury exposure associated with marine fish consumption. Concentrations of total Hg (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in the fish muscles were 0.094 ± 0.008 and 0.066 ± 0.006 μg/gww, respectively, which were far below the limit considered safe for consumption (0.5 μg/g). The average THg concentrations in hair of adults (1.02 ± 0.92 μg/g) were lower than the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) level of 2.2 μg/g. However, 23.7% of children had a hair THg level exceeding the RfD level of 1μg/g, indicating a great risk of Hg exposure to children via fish consumption. The concentration of THg in hair was significantly correlated with fish consumption but not with gender-specific fish intake. With higher fish consumption frequency, the fishermen had significantly elevated hair Hg levels compared to the students and the other general public, who had similar hair THg levels but different fish consumption patterns, indicating the existence of other sources of Hg exposure to the residents of Hainan Island. PMID:25262073

  20. Embryotoxicity of maternally transferred methylmercury to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Bridges, Kristin N; Soulen, Brianne K; Overturf, Carmen L; Drevnick, Paul E; Roberts, Aaron P

    2016-06-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and potent neurotoxin. In aquatic environments, Hg can be transformed into methylmercury (MeHg), which bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs, including fish. Methylmercury has been shown to transfer from female fish to developing eggs; however, relatively little is known regarding the effects of maternally transferred MeHg on fish embryos. The present study evaluated the effects of maternally transferred MeHg on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) embryos. Embryos were collected from adult fatheads exposed for 30 d to 1 of 3 diets spiked with MeHg: a control diet (0.02 ppm Hg dry wt), a low diet (0.87 ppm Hg dry wt), or a high diet (5.5 ppm Hg dry wt). No effects on spawning frequency, clutch size, or total egg output were observed. In embryos, Hg concentration was a function of female diet and the duration (number of days) of female exposure. Compared with controls, embryos from the low-diet treatment displayed altered embryonic movement patterns (hyperactivity) and decreased time to hatch. Embryos from the high-diet treatment had delayed hatching and increased mortality compared with the other treatments. Collectively, these results suggest that maternally transferred Hg may impact survival, behavior, and developmental milestones of the embryo-larval stages of fish. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1436-1441. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26471903

  1. Mental retardation and prenatal methylmercury toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Trasande, L.; Schechter, C.B.; Haynes, K.A.; Landrigan, P.J.

    2006-03-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a developmental neurotoxicant; exposure results principally from consumption of seafood contaminated by mercury (Hg). In this analysis, the burden of mental retardation (MR) associated with methylmercury exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort is estimated, and the portion of this burden attributable to mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants is identified. The aggregate loss in cognition associated with MeHg exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort was estimated using two previously published dose-response models that relate increases in cord blood Hg concentrations with decrements in IQ. MeHg exposure was assumed not to be correlated with native cognitive ability. Previously published estimates were used to estimate economic costs of MR caused by MeHg. Downward shifts in IQ resulting from prenatal exposure to MeHg of anthropogenic origin are associated with 1,566 excess cases of MR annually (range: 376-14,293). This represents 3.2% of MR cases in the US (range: 0.8%-29.2%). The MR costs associated with decreases in IQ in these children amount to $2.0 billion/year (range: $0.5-17.9 billion). Hg from American power plants accounts for 231 of the excess MR cases year (range: 28-2,109), or 0.5% (range: 0.06%-4.3%) of all MR. These cases cost $289 million (range: $35 million-2.6 billion). Toxic injury to the fetal brain caused by Hg emitted from coal-fired power plants exacts a significant human and economic toll on American children.

  2. A population assessment of mercury exposure from two cities of Pakistan with respect to freshwater and marine fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Shah, Abdul Qadir; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Mohammad Balal

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we aimed to estimate the level of mercury (Hg) in scalp hair samples of human subjects and its association with consumption of sea- and freshwater fish species. The scalp hairs were collected from both genders (male and female) aged between 15 and 50 years (n = 200), living in coastal areas of Karachi, who mostly consumed sea fish species, referred to as exposed subjects. For comparison purposes, scalp hair samples of both genders (n = 160) were collected from the inhabitants of Karachi and Hyderabad cities who consumed freshwater fish species termed as referent subjects. The frequently consumed fresh and marine fish species were also collected. The level of Hg was determined in fish and scalp hair samples by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, prior to ultrasonic-assisted acid digestion in a mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The validity of methodology was checked by certified reference material (CRM) BCR 397 (human hair) and DORM-2. The concentrations of Hg in sea- and freshwater fish were found in the range of 1.47-2.09 and 0.402-0.676 μg/g, respectively. The exposed subjects had significantly elevated levels of Hg in scalp hair samples (1.8-4.3 μg/g) as compared to referent subjects (0.87-1.95 μg/g) (p < 0.001). A significant positive correlation was obtained between the concentration of Hg in hair and age of study population. Exposed and referent female subjects had higher levels of Hg in scalp hair than that in males of both study groups (p = 0.02-0.031). PMID:25147303

  3. Does methylmercury have a role in causing developmental disabilities in children?

    PubMed Central

    Myers, G J; Davidson, P W

    2000-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin that in high exposures can cause mental retardation, cerebral palsy, and seizures. The developing brain appears particularly sensitive to MeHg. Exposure levels in pregnant experimental animals that do not result in detectable signs or symptoms in the mother can adversely affect the offspring's development. Studies of human poisonings suggest this may also occur in humans. Human exposure to MeHg is primarily dietary through the consumption of fish: MeHg is present in all fresh and saltwater fish. Populations that depend on fish as a major source of dietary protein may achieve MeHg exposure levels hypothesized to adversely affect brain development. Increasing mercury levels in the environment have heightened concerns about dietary exposure and a possible role for MeHg in developmental disabilities. Follow-up studies of an outbreak of MeHg poisoning in Iraq revealed a dose-response relationship for prenatal MeHg exposure. That relationship suggested that prenatal exposure as low as 10 ppm (measured in maternal hair growing during pregnancy) could adversely affect fetal brain development. However, using the same end points as were used in the Iraq study, no associations have been reported in fish-eating populations. Using a more extensive range of developmental end points, some studies of populations consuming seafood have reported associations with prenatal MeHg exposure, whereas others have found none. This paper reviews the data presently available associating MeHg exposure with development and poses some of the unanswered questions in this field. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10852838

  4. Little Galloo Island, Lake Ontario: A review of nine years of double-crested cormorant diet and fish consumption information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Ross, Robert M.; McCullough, Russ D.

    2002-01-01

    The diet of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) on Little Galloo Island (LGI) in the eastern basin of Lake Ontario has been quantified since 1992. Over the past nine years considerable information has been generated on cormorant feeding ecology through the examination of approximately 12,000 pellets collected on LGI, where three distinct cormorant feeding periods, pre-chick, chick, and post-chick, are delineated by differences in diet composition and daily fish consumption. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were the major prey during pre-chick and post-chick feeding periods. Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), which move inshore to spawn in mid-June, dominated (>60%) cormorant diets during the chick feeding period. Mean daily fish consumption (14.6) during the pre-chick feeding period was significantly greater than during the chick feeding (9.3) or post-chick feeding (8.0) periods. The proportion of smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) in the diet increased over the season (0.8% to 7.2%), while the size of bass consumed declined (214 mm to 143 mm). Forage fish (mainly alewife, three-spine sticklebacks [Gasterosteus aculeatus] and minnows) comprised 58% of the diet of LGI cormorants, followed by panfish (37%) (yellow perch, pumpkinseed [Lepomis gibbosus], rock bass [Ambloplites rupestris]) and gamefish (5%) (mostly smallmouth bass). On the average LGI cormorants consumed about 32.8 million fish annually, weighing about 1.4 million kilograms. Cormorants from LGI consumed more biomass of smallmouth bass and yellow perch annually than is taken by sport (bass and yellow perch) and commercial (perch) fishermen.

  5. Spontaneous fetal death among multigravid fertile women in relation to sport fish consumption and PCB exposure, New York State Angler Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mendola, P.

    1994-01-01

    Spontaneous fetal death, a sentinel event for environmental reproductive toxicity, has been observed among various mammalian species following polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure. This exposure-based cohort study assessed the relationship between PCB exposure due to consumption of contaminated Lake Ontario sport fish and spontaneous fetal death. Using 1,820 women from the 1990-1991 New York State Angler Study, fish consumption data were obtained from food frequency questionnaires and reproductive histories from live birth certificates. A reliability study demonstrated an excellent level of agreement between the exact number of spontaneous fetal deaths recorded on the birth certificate compared with telephone interview data (kappa = 0.83). Women who had never eaten Lake Ontario sport fish were unexposed (n = 979) and 841 women reported various levels of exposure. Analyses were stratified by maternal gravidity and controlled for smoking status and maternal age. No significant increases in risk for spontaneous fetal death were seen for any estimate of PCB exposure including lifetime estimate of PCB exposure based on species-specific PCB levels, years of fish consumption, and kilograms of fish consumed, either in the 1990-1991 season or in a lifetime estimate. The only significant finding was a slight risk reduction for women of gravidity three or more with years of fish consumption (odds ratio = 0.97; p = 0.03; 95% confidence interval = 0.94-0.99). These findings suggest that PCB exposure from contaminated sport fish does not increase the risk of spontaneous fetal death.

  6. Seasonal variation of Sarpa salpa fish toxicity, as related to phytoplankton consumption, accumulation of heavy metals, lipids peroxidation level in fish tissues and toxicity upon mice.

    PubMed

    Bellassoued, Khaled; Hamza, Asma; van Pelt, Jos; Elfeki, Abdelfatteh

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate for Sarpa salpa the seasonal trend in the food sources, heavy metals bioaccumulation and the oxidative stress in the organs. In addition, the toxicity was assessed by mouse bioassay of extract of the fish's organs collected in autumn, the peak of occurrence of hallucinatory syndrome. The toxicity was further studied for compounds present in epiphyte collected from the sea at the end of spring and in summer that are digested by the S. salpa in these seasons. We observed a higher lipid peroxydation in different tissues of S. salpa compared to the control fish Diplodus annularis. Furthermore, heavy metals accumulation in organs of these fish showed a significant variation between the two species (P < 0.05). The lethal dose (LD50%) determined for crude ciguatoxin (neurotoxins) extracts of viscera, liver, brain and muscle of S. salpa were as follows: 1.217, 2.195, 14.395, 18.645 g/kg mouse, respectively. We noticed a significant correlation (P < 0.05) between the total amount of toxic dinoflagellates and the level of TBARS in the liver, the brain and the muscle, this for all seasons and all sizes. Moreover, the cytotoxic effect observed for epiphytes extract confirms the transfer of toxins originating from toxic dinoflagellates, which live as epiphytes on P. oceanica leaves, to the fish by grazing. Our work indicates that, toxic phytoplanktons and heavy metals accumulation are responsible for the increase of oxidative stress in the organs of S. salpa. Hence, the edible part of S. salpa, especially the viscera and liver, can cause a threat to human health, and consumption should, for this reason, be dissuaded. PMID:22535366

  7. Fish consumption and its motives in households with versus without self-reported medical history of CVD: A consumer survey from five European countries

    PubMed Central

    Pieniak, Zuzanna; Verbeke, Wim; Perez-Cueto, Federico; Brunsø, Karen; De Henauw, Stefaan

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the cross-cultural differences in the frequency of fish intake and in motivations for fish consumption between people from households with (CVD+) or without (CVD-) medical history of cardiovascular disease, using data obtained in five European countries. Methods A cross-sectional consumer survey was carried out in November-December 2004 with representative household samples from Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Poland and Spain. The sample consisted of 4,786 respondents, aged 18–84 and who were responsible for food purchasing and cooking in the household. Results Individuals from households in the CVD+ group consumed fish more frequently in Belgium and in Denmark as compared to those in the CVD- group. The consumption of fatty fish, which is the main sources of omega-3 PUFA associated with prevention of cardiovascular diseases, was on the same level for the two CVD groups in the majority of the countries, except in Belgium where CVD+ subjects reported to eat fatty fish significantly more frequently than CVD- subjects. All respondents perceived fish as a very healthy and nutritious food product. Only Danish consumers reported a higher subjective and objective knowledge related to nutrition issues about fish. In the other countries, objective knowledge about fish was on a low level, similar for CVD+ as for CVD- subjects, despite a higher claimed use of medical information sources about fish among CVD+ subjects. Conclusion Although a number of differences between CVD- and CVD+ subjects with respect to their frequency of fish intake are uncovered, the findings suggest that fish consumption traditions and habits – rather than a medical history of CVD – account for large differences between the countries, particularly in fatty fish consumption. This study exemplifies the need for nutrition education and more effective communication about fish, not only to the people facing chronic diseases, but also to the

  8. Potential exposure to PCBs, DDT, and PBDEs from sport-caught fish consumption in relation to breast cancer risk in Wisconsin.

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Jane A; Kanarek, Marty S; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Robert, Stephanie A; Hampton, John M; Newcomb, Polly A; Anderson, Henry A; Remington, Patrick L

    2004-01-01

    In Wisconsin, consumption of Great Lakes fish is an important source of exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and other halogenated hydrocarbons, all of which may act as potential risk factors for breast cancer. We examined the association between sport-caught fish consumption and breast cancer incidence as part of an ongoing population-based case-control study. We identified breast cancer cases 20-69 years of age who were diagnosed in 1998-2000 (n = 1,481) from the Wisconsin Cancer Reporting System. Female controls of similar age were randomly selected from population lists (n = 1,301). Information about all sport-caught (Great Lakes and other lakes) fish consumption and breast cancer risk factors was obtained through telephone interviews. After adjustment for known and suspected risk factors, the relative risk of breast cancer for women who had recently consumed sport-caught fish was similar to women who had never eaten sport-caught fish [relative risk (RR) = 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.86-1.17]. Frequency of consumption and location of sport-caught fish were not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Recent consumption of Great Lakes fish was not associated with postmenopausal breast cancer (RR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.57-1.07), whereas risk associated with premenopausal breast cancer was elevated (RR = 1.70; 95% CI, 1.16-2.50). In this study we found no overall association between recent consumption of sport-caught fish and breast cancer, although there may be an increased breast cancer risk for subgroups of women who are young and/or premenopausal. PMID:14754569

  9. Study to determine the possible hazard of methylmercury in seafood to the fetus in utero. Final report, 1980-1985

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, D.O.; Turner, M.D.; Smith, J.C.

    1985-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the possible hazards of methylmercury (MeHg) in seafood to the fetus in utero. Hair and blood samples of pregnant women in New Bedford, MA, Manta, Ecuador, and Mancora, Peru (all areas of high seafood consumption) were examined. These samples were collected and studied at various stages of gestation and during pre- and post-natal periods. In some cases, blood and hair samples of some of the infants born to these women were also examined. The women of Manta and Mancora showed higher levels of MeHg than the women in New Bedford. However, no health hazards could be linked to any of the infants from the ingestion of MeHg in marine fish. Although no human data exist, experimental evidence suggests marine fish may contain elements that reduce the toxicity of MeHg and it's possible that selenium contributes to the protective effect of fish vs. grain diets. Tables of MeHg levels in the study groups are attached to the report.

  10. Eggshell thickness in mallards fed methylmercury

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, G.H.

    1980-09-01

    Eggshell thinning has been linked to impaired reproduction in many wild birds. Previous work of my own and others led me to believe that methylmercury may cause some eggshell thinning in birds. The present study was designed to determine whether methylmercury in the diet of mallards would thin their eggshells and whether it would add to eggshell thinning caused by DDE.

  11. [Comparison of platelet activity, fibrinolysis and environmental factors in 50 Africans and 50 Europeans. Role of fish consumption].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Cloitre, B; Ticolat, R; Darracq, R; Rain, S F

    1987-01-01

    The authors have studied 50 Ivorians and 50 Europeans people, all living in Abidjan for at least 10 years. Platelet aggregability with increasing ADP concentration (0.6, 1.2, 2.4 mumoles/l), collagen (0.4 mg/l), or ristocetin (1 g/l) was examined. Fibrinolysis and the euglobulin test were also studied before and after anoxia. Other blood parameters measured were: hematocrit, hemoglobin level, platelet count, bleeding time, Howell coagulation test, cephalin tests, prothrombin activity ratio, fibrinogen level. Metabolic tests included: glycemia, cholesterolemia, triglyceridemia, uricemia, A1 and B apoproteins, protidemia, gamma globulinemia. Environmental factors such as physical activity, alcohol and smoking habits, fish consumption, chloroquine prophylaxis were evaluated. The most evident result was lower platelet aggregability in Ivorian people as compared to Europeans. A more precocious and important fibrinolysis activity, either spontaneous or after anoxia was noted in the Ivorian group. Lower platelet number, fibrinogen level, and prothrombin activity were present in the Ivorian group as compared to the European people. The authors eliminated the influence of age, and considered environmental factors as predominant in the genesis of such difference, i.e., hypocholesterolemia, lower smoking and drinking levels. They emphasized the higher fish consumption in Ivorian people. PMID:2827101

  12. Human exposure to lead, cadmium and mercury through fish and seafood product consumption in Italy: a pilot evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pastorelli, A A; Baldini, M; Stacchini, P; Baldini, G; Morelli, S; Sagratella, E; Zaza, S; Ciardullo, S

    2012-01-01

    The presence of selected toxic heavy metals, such as cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg), was investigated in fish and seafood products, namely, blue mussel, carpet shell clam, European squid, veined squid, deep-water rose shrimp, red mullet, European seabass, gilthead seabream, Atlantic cod, European hake, Atlantic bluefin tuna and swordfish so as to assess their human exposure through diet. Metals were detected by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Q-ICP-MS) and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (Hg-AAS). Measurements of Cd, Pb and Hg were performed by means of analytical methods validated in compliance with UNI CEI EN ISO/IEC 17025 [2005. General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories. Milano (Italy): UNI Ente Nazionale Italiano di Unificazione]. The exposure assessment was undertaken matching the levels of Cd, Pb and total Hg with consumption data related to fish and seafood products selected for this purpose. In order to establish human health implications, the estimated weekly intakes (EWIs) for Cd, Pb and Hg were compared with the standard tolerable weekly intakes (TWI) for Cd and provisional tolerable weekly intakes (PTWIs) for Pb and Hg stipulated by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). The found metal concentrations were largely below the maximum levels (MLs) established at the European Union level with the exception of Cd. This metal exceeded the MLs in squid, red mullet, European hake and Atlantic cod. Squid and blue mussel showed the highest Pb concentrations which accounted for 60% and 10% of the MLs, respectively. Highest Hg levels were found in predatory fish. The concentrations of Hg in swordfish, Atlantic bluefin tuna and red mullet accounted for 50%, 30% and 30% of the MLs, respectively. The EWIs for Cd, Pb and Hg related to the consumption

  13. Iron status as a covariate in methylmercury-associated neurotoxicity risk.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Márlon de Freitas; De Souza Hacon, Sandra; Grandjean, Philippe; Choi, Anna Lai; Bastos, Wanderley Rodrigues

    2014-04-01

    Intrauterine methylmercury exposure and prenatal iron deficiency negatively affect offspring's brain development. Since fish is a major source of both methylmercury and iron, occurrence of negative confounding may affect the interpretation of studies concerning cognition. We assessed relationships between methylmercury exposure and iron-status in childbearing females from a population naturally exposed to methylmercury through fish intake (Amazon). We concluded a census (refuse <20%) collecting samples from 274 healthy females (12-49 years) for hair-mercury determination and assessed iron-status through red cell tests and determination of serum ferritin and iron. Reactive C protein and thyroid hormones was used for excluding inflammation and severe thyroid dysfunctions that could affect results. We assessed the association between iron-status and hair-mercury by bivariate correlation analysis and also by different multivariate models: linear regression (to check trends); hierarchical agglomerative clustering method (groups of variables correlated with each other); and factor analysis (to examine redundancy or duplication from a set of correlated variables). Hair-mercury correlated weakly with mean corpuscular volume (r=.141; P=.020) and corpuscular hemoglobin (r=.132; .029), but not with the best biomarker of iron-status, ferritin (r=.037; P=.545). In the linear regression analysis, methylmercury exposure showed weak association with age-adjusted ferritin; age had a significant coefficient (Beta=.015; 95% CI: .003-.027; P=.016) but ferritin did not (Beta=.034; 95% CI: -.147 to .216; P=.711). In the hierarchical agglomerative clustering method, hair-mercury and iron-status showed the smallest similarities. Regarding factor analysis, iron-status and hair-mercury loaded different uncorrelated components. We concluded that iron-status and methylmercury exposure probably occur in an independent way. PMID:24411835

  14. Diet and lung cancer risk from a 14-year population-based prospective study in Japan: with special reference to fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Takezaki, Toshiro; Inoue, Manami; Kataoka, Hiroki; Ikeda, Syuhei; Yoshida, Miyako; Ohashi, Yoko; Tajima, Kazuo; Tominaga, Suketami

    2003-01-01

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oil exhibit a variety of health benefits, and there is evidence that they can inhibit the development of human lung mucoepidermoid and other carcinomas. To examine the hypothesis that fish consumption reduces the risk of lung cancer, we conducted a population-based prospective study, following 5,885 residents for 14 yr. Person-years were used to calculate the relative risk (RR) by the Cox proportional hazards model, with adjustment for potential confounding factors. A total of 51 incident lung cancer cases were observed, and we found linearly decreasing RRs for lung cancer with increased frequency of consumption of fish and shellfish (RRs = 1.00, 0.99, and 0.32, P for trend = 0.003) but not with intake of dried/salted fish. Decreased RRs were apparent with both broiling and boiling cooking methods, but reduction with raw and deep-fried fish consumption was not statistically significant. We conclude that frequent fresh fish consumption, irrespective of the cooking method, may reduce the risk of lung cancer. PMID:12881009

  15. Fruit, vegetable, and fish consumption and heart rate variability: the VA Normative Aging Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Higher intakes of antioxidants (vitamins C and E, carotenoids) found in fruit and vegetables, and omega-3 fatty acids from fish, may prevent cardiovascular disease. We examined whether higher intake of such antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids reduced effects of particles less than 2.5 µm in aerodyn...

  16. The Association between the Consumption of Fish/Shellfish and the Risk of Osteoporosis in Men and Postmenopausal Women Aged 50 Years or Older

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eunjin; Park, Youngsoon

    2016-01-01

    Fish rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been suggested to have a favorable effect on bone health, but previous epidemiologic studies have shown inconsistent results. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the hypothesis that the consumption of fish and shellfish is positively associated with bone mass and negatively associated with the risk of osteoporosis in Koreans and Americans. Men and postmenopausal women ≥50 years old from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008–2011 (n = 7154) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2010 (n = 2658) were included. There was a positive correlation between the consumption of fish and shellfish and bone mineral density (BMD) of the total femur, femoral neck, and lumbar spine in Koreans. Consistently, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between intake of fish and shellfish and the risk of osteoporosis in Koreans but not in Americans. Consumption of fish and shellfish was 4–5 times higher in Koreans than Americans in the present study. In conclusion, intake of fish and shellfish was associated with BMD and the risk of osteoporosis in Koreans but not in Americans, suggesting that a minimum intake level of fish and shellfish might be recommended to protect against bone loss and osteoporosis. PMID:26927165

  17. Distribution of trace elements in the aquatic ecosystem of the Thigithe river and the fish Labeo victorianus in Tanzania and possible risks for human consumption.

    PubMed

    Mataba, Gordian Rocky; Verhaert, Vera; Blust, Ronny; Bervoets, Lieven

    2016-03-15

    The aim of the present study was to assess the distribution of trace elements in the aquatic ecosystem of the Thigithe river. Samples of surface water, sediment and fish were collected up- and downstream of the North Mara Gold Mine (Tanzania) and following trace elements were analysed: As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn. Trace element concentrations in surface water were below or near the detection limit. Regarding the sediments, relative high concentrations of arsenic at all sites and high levels of mercury at a site downstream of the mine where artisanal mining is performed were observed. Trace element concentrations in Ningu fish tissues (Labeo victorianus) were comparable to slightly higher than levels in fishes from unpolluted environments. For none of the measured human health risk by consumption of fish from the Thigithe river is expected when the Tanzanian average amount of 17 g/day is consumed. However, for Hg and As the advised maximum daily consumption of Ningu fish was lower than 100g. As a result fishermen and people living along the shores of the river consuming more fish than the average Tanzanian fish consumption set by the FAO (2005) are possibly at risk. PMID:26780131

  18. Mercury levels assessment in hair of riverside inhabitants of the Tapajós River, Pará State, Amazon, Brazil: fish consumption as a possible route of exposure.

    PubMed

    Faial, Kleber; Deus, Ricardo; Deus, Simonny; Neves, Ramiro; Jesus, Iracina; Santos, Elisabeth; Alves, Cláudio Nahum; Brasil, Davi

    2015-04-01

    The study present evaluated the levels of mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in hair samples of people from Barreiras community, riverside inhabitants of the Tapajós River (Pará, Brazil), an area impacted by clandestine gold mining, as well as we analyzed the levels of Hg and Se (selenium) in nine fish species (carnivores and non-carnivorous) from the Tapajós River, which stand out as the main species consumed by riverside inhabitants, to evaluate a relationship between frequency of fish consumption and Hg concentration, and also to evaluate possible mechanisms of fish protection (or non-protection) to Hg exposure by Se. Furthermore we analyze the water quality to evaluate the environmental trophic state, fact responsible by creating conditions that can potentiate the effects of toxic mercury. Concentrations of Hg and MeHg were analyzed in hair samples of 141 volunteers in different age band. Of those, 84.40% of samples present values above the threshold for biological tolerance, which is 6.00μgg(-1) of total Hg in hair. Total Hg, in men there was a variation of 2.07-24.93μgg(-1), while for women the variation was 4.84-27.02μgg(-1). Consequently, the level of MeHg in men presented a variation of 1.49-19.57μgg(-1), with an average of 11.68μgg(-1), while with women the variation was from 3.73 to 22.35μgg(-1), with an average of 10.38μgg(-1). In fish species, Hg concentrations in carnivorous species had an average of 0.66μgg(-1), higher than that permitted by current legislation, ranging from 0.30 to 0.98μgg(-1), while the non-carnivorous species have values below the recommended by the legislation averaging 0.09μgg(-1), ranging between 0.02 and 0.44μgg(-1). For Se in fish, show that among carnivores, the contents of Se ranged between 0.18 and 0.54μgg(-1) with a mean of 0.34μgg(-1), while for non-carnivores these values were of the order of 0.16-0.56μgg(-1), with an average of 0.32μgg(-1). In surface water quality variables at the sampling points

  19. Consumption of fish and meats and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    PubMed Central

    Fedirko, V.; Trichopolou, A.; Bamia, C.; Duarte-Salles, T.; Trepo, E.; Aleksandrova, K.; Nöthlings, U.; Lukanova, A.; Lagiou, P.; Boffetta, P.; Trichopoulos, D.; Katzke, V. A.; Overvad, K.; Tjønneland, A.; Hansen, L.; Boutron-Ruault, M. C.; Fagherazzi, G.; Bastide, N.; Panico, S.; Grioni, S.; Vineis, P.; Palli, D.; Tumino, R.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Peeters, P. H.; Skeie, G.; Engeset, D.; Parr, C. L.; Jakszyn, P.; Sánchez, M. J.; Barricarte, A.; Amiano, P.; Chirlaque, M.; Quirós, J. R.; Sund, M.; Werner, M.; Sonestedt, E.; Ericson, U.; Key, T. J.; Khaw, K. T.; Ferrari, P.; Romieu, I.; Riboli, E.; Jenab, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background While higher intake of fish and lower consumption of red/processed meats have been suggested to play a protective role in the etiology of several cancers, prospective evidence for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is limited, particularly in Western European populations. Methods The associations of fish and meats with HCC risk were analyzed in the EPIC cohort. Between 1992 and 2010, 191 incident HCC were identified among 477 206 participants. Baseline diet was assessed using validated dietary questionnaires. A single 24-h diet recall from a cohort subsample was used for calibration. Multivariable proportional hazard regression was utilized to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). In a nested case–control subset (HCC = 122), HBV/HCV status and liver function biomarkers were measured. Results HCC risk was inversely associated with intake of total fish (per 20 g/day increase, HR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.74–0.95 and HR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.69–0.97 before and after calibration, respectively). This inverse association was also suggested after adjusting for HBV/HCV status and liver function score (per 20-g/day increase, RR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.66–1.11 and RR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.50–1.09, respectively) in a nested case–control subset. Intakes of total meats or subgroups of red/processed meats, and poultry were not associated with HCC risk. Conclusions In this large European cohort, total fish intake is associated with lower HCC risk. PMID:23670094

  20. Benthic and pelagic pathways of methylmercury bioaccumulation in estuarine food webs of the northeast United States.

    PubMed

    Chen, Celia Y; Borsuk, Mark E; Bugge, Deenie M; Hollweg, Terill; Balcom, Prentiss H; Ward, Darren M; Williams, Jason; Mason, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a contaminant of global concern that bioaccumulates and bioamagnifies in marine food webs. Lower trophic level fauna are important conduits of MeHg from sediment and water to estuarine and coastal fish harvested for human consumption. However, the sources and pathways of MeHg to these coastal fisheries are poorly known particularly the potential for transfer of MeHg from the sediment to biotic compartments. Across a broad gradient of human land impacts, we analyzed MeHg concentrations in food webs at ten estuarine sites in the Northeast US (from the Hackensack Meadowlands, NJ to the Gulf of Maine). MeHg concentrations in water column particulate material, but not in sediments, were predictive of MeHg concentrations in fish (killifish and Atlantic silversides). Moreover, MeHg concentrations were higher in pelagic fauna than in benthic-feeding fauna suggesting that MeHg delivery to the water column from methylation sites from within or outside of the estuary may be an important driver of MeHg bioaccumulation in estuarine pelagic food webs. In contrast, bulk sediment MeHg concentrations were only predictive of concentrations of MeHg in the infaunal worms. Our results across a broad gradient of sites demonstrate that the pathways of MeHg to lower trophic level estuarine organisms are distinctly different between benthic deposit feeders and forage fish. Thus, even in systems with contaminated sediments, transfer of MeHg into estuarine food webs maybe driven more by the efficiency of processes that determine MeHg input and bioavailability in the water column. PMID:24558491

  1. Benthic and Pelagic Pathways of Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Estuarine Food Webs of the Northeast United States

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Celia Y.; Borsuk, Mark E.; Bugge, Deenie M.; Hollweg, Terill; Balcom, Prentiss H.; Ward, Darren M.; Williams, Jason; Mason, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a contaminant of global concern that bioaccumulates and bioamagnifies in marine food webs. Lower trophic level fauna are important conduits of MeHg from sediment and water to estuarine and coastal fish harvested for human consumption. However, the sources and pathways of MeHg to these coastal fisheries are poorly known particularly the potential for transfer of MeHg from the sediment to biotic compartments. Across a broad gradient of human land impacts, we analyzed MeHg concentrations in food webs at ten estuarine sites in the Northeast US (from the Hackensack Meadowlands, NJ to the Gulf of Maine). MeHg concentrations in water column particulate material, but not in sediments, were predictive of MeHg concentrations in fish (killifish and Atlantic silversides). Moreover, MeHg concentrations were higher in pelagic fauna than in benthic-feeding fauna suggesting that MeHg delivery to the water column from methylation sites from within or outside of the estuary may be an important driver of MeHg bioaccumulation in estuarine pelagic food webs. In contrast, bulk sediment MeHg concentrations were only predictive of concentrations of MeHg in the infaunal worms. Our results across a broad gradient of sites demonstrate that the pathways of MeHg to lower trophic level estuarine organisms are distinctly different between benthic deposit feeders and forage fish. Thus, even in systems with contaminated sediments, transfer of MeHg into estuarine food webs maybe driven more by the efficiency of processes that determine MeHg input and bioavailability in the water column. PMID:24558491

  2. Tetrodotoxin poisoning caused by Goby fish consumption in southeast China: a retrospective case series analysis

    PubMed Central

    You, Jie; Yue, YaJun; Xing, Feng; Xia, Wei; Lai, ShaoYang; Zhang, FengLei

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate an unusual outbreak of tetrodotoxin poisoning in Leizhou, southeast China, a case series analysis was conducted to identify the source of illness. METHODS: A total of 22 individuals experienced symptoms of poisoning, including tongue numbness, dizziness, nausea and limb numbness and weakness. Two toxic species, Amoya caninus and Yongeichthys nebulosus, were morphologically identified from the batches of gobies consumed by the patients. Tetrodotoxin levels in the blood and Goby fish samples were detected using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The tetrodotoxin levels in the remaining cooked Goby fish were determined to be 2090.12 µg/kg. For Amoya caninus, the toxicity levels were 1858.29 µg/kg in the muscle and 1997.19 µg/kg in the viscera and for Yongeichthys nebulosus, they were 2783.00 µg/kg in the muscle and 2966.21 µg/kg in the viscera. CONCLUSION: This outbreak demonstrates an underestimation of the risk of Goby fish poisoning. Furthermore, the relationships among the toxic species, climates and marine algae present should be clarified in the future. PMID:25672425

  3. Mercury and Methylmercury in Water and Bottom Sediments of Wetlands at Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota, 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Lundgren, Robert F.; Emerson, Douglas G.

    2007-01-01

    Certain ecosystem types, particularly wetlands, have environmental characteristics that can make them particularly sensitive to mercury inputs and that can result in large mercury concentrations in fish or other aquatic biota. To provide information needed to make effective management decisions to decrease human and wildlife exposure to methylmercury in northern prairie pothole wetlands, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the North Dakota Department of Health, conducted a study to assess mercury and methylmercury concentrations in wetlands at the Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge (the Refuge) in northwest North Dakota. In April 2003 and 2004, water and bottom-sediment samples were collected from 44 individual wetlands that were classified as one of four wetland types. Many factors that may affect methylmercury production were considered in the study. The prairie pothole wetlands at the Refuge had large ranges in major environmental characteristics. Hydrologic differences, most notably semiannual wetting and drying cycles, that are intrinsic to prairie pothole wetlands affected methylmercury concentrations. This likely resulted from the stimulation of anaerobic microbial activity following reflooding of soils, particularly soils containing substantial organic carbon. Among the four wetland types considered for this study, seasonal and semipermanent wetlands generally had the largest methylmercury concentrations. Regardless of wetland type, however, methylmercury concentrations at the Refuge are large in relation to reported concentrations for natural aquatic systems.

  4. Source Identification of Florida Bay's Methylmercury Problem: Mainland Runoff Versus Atmospheric Deposition and In situ Production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rumbold, D.G.; Evans, D.W.; Niemczyk, S.; Fink, L.E.; Laine, K.A.; Howard, N.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Zucker, M.

    2011-01-01

    The first advisory to limit consumption of Florida Bay fish due to mercury was issued in 1995. Studies done by others in the late 1990s found elevated water column concentrations of both total Hg (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in creeks discharging from the Everglades, which had its own recognized mercury problem. To investigate the significance of allochthonous MeHg discharging from the upstream freshwater Everglades, we collected surface water and sediment along two transects from 2000 to 2002. Concentrations of THg and MeHg, ranging from 0.36 ng THg/L to 5.98 ng THg/L and from <0.02 ng MeHg/L to 1.79 ng MeHg/L, were elevated in the mangrove transition zone when compared both to upstream canals and the open waters of Florida Bay. Sediment concentrations ranged from 5.8 ng THg/g to 145.6 ng THg/g and from 0.05 ng MeHg/g to 5.4 ng MeHg/g, with MeHg as a percentage of THg occasionally elevated in the open bay. Methylation assays indicated that sediments from Florida Bay have the potential to methylate Hg. Assessment of mass loading suggests that canals delivering stormwater from the northern Everglades are not as large a source as direct atmospheric deposition and in situ methylation, especially within the mangrove transition zone. ?? 2010 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation.

  5. Methylmercury degradation by Pseudomonas putida V1.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Lucélia; Yu, Ri-Qing; Crane, Sharron; Giovanella, Patricia; Barkay, Tamar; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2016-08-01

    Environmental contamination of mercury (Hg) has caused public health concerns with focuses on the neurotoxic substance methylmercury, due to its bioaccumulation and biomagnification in food chains. The goals of the present study were to examine: (i) the transformation of methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercuric acetate and mercuric chloride by cultures of Pseudomonas putida V1, (ii) the presence of the genes merA and merB in P. putida V1, and (iii) the degradation pathways of methylmercury by P. putida V1. Strain V1 cultures readily degraded methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercury acetate, and reduced mercuric chloride into gaseous Hg(0). However, the Hg transformation in LB broth by P. putida V1 was influenced by the type of Hg compounds. The merA gene was detected in P. putida V1, on the other hand, the merB gene was not detected. The sequencing of this gene, showed high similarity (100%) to the mercuric reductase gene of other Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, tests using radioactive (14)C-methylmercury indicated an uncommon release of (14)CO2 concomitant with the production of Hg(0). The results of the present work suggest that P. putida V1 has the potential to remove methylmercury from contaminated sites. More studies are warranted to determine the mechanism of removal of methylmercury by P. putida V1. PMID:27062344

  6. Exposure assessment and initial intervention regarding fish consumption of tribal members of the Upper Great Lakes Region in the United States.

    PubMed

    Dellinger, John A

    2004-07-01

    The Ojibwe Health Study (OHS) has concluded 10 years of data collection and exposure assessment. Eight hundred and twenty-two participants from tribes in the states of Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota (USA) completed fish consumption and environmental risk perception questionnaires. Many participants provided hair and blood samples for mercury and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) residue analyses as body burden indicators of these persistent environmental pollutants. Fish were collected by the tribal organizations and contaminants were analyzed for numerous tribal reports and professional environmental journal articles, these data were used by the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission to produce tribal-specific geographic information systems maps as part of a public health intervention strategy. These maps are currently available at for six Wisconsin tribes that regularly harvest walleye. To determine the health impacts (if any) of pollutants on cancer, diabetes, and reproduction, it was necessary to know the recent trends in key indicators such as cancer mortality ratios and birth gender ratios. The Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council provided the OHS and each participating tribe in Wisconsin and Michigan with a health profile. Total fish consumption (estimated by recall) for 720 tribal participants was self-reported as 60 g/day, but the highest actual consumption was measured as 11.2 g/day in one of the tribal groups. The highest blood concentrations in tribal participants were 18.6 ppb total serum PCBs and 11.8 ppb total blood mercury. Ninety percent of the participants had less than 3.8 ppb total serum PCBs and 2.6 ppb total blood mercury. Compared to other studies of subsistence fishing populations, these exposures were only moderately elevated and not high enough to warrant widespread restrictions on diets. Furthermore, the benefits of eating a fish diet must be continually emphasized. However, sport fishermen and their families who consume larger and

  7. From yellow perch to round goby: A review of double-crested cormorant diet and fish consumption at three St. Lawrence River colonies, 1999–2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Farquhar, James F; Klindt, Rodger M; Mazzocchi, Irene; Mathers, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    The number of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in the upper St. Lawrence River has increased markedly since the early 1990s. In 1999, a binational study was initiated to examine the annual diet composition and fish consumption of cormorants at colonies in the upper river. Since 1999, 14,032 cormorant pellets, collected from May through September each year, have been examined from St. Lawrence River colonies to estimate fish consumption and determine temporal and spatial variation in diet. Seasonal variation in diet composition within a colony was low. Prior to 2006 yellow perch was the primary fish consumed by cormorants in the upper St. Lawrence River. Round goby were first observed in cormorant diets in 2003 and by 2006 were the main fish consumed at two of the three colonies. The time interval it took from the first appearance of round goby in the diet at a colony to when goby were the dominant prey species varied by island, ranging from two to five years. Daily fish consumption at each cormorant colony increased significantly from the pre-round goby to post-round goby period. The mean annual biomass of yellow perch consumed decreased significantly during the post-round goby period at the three colonies. Reduced consumption of yellow perch by cormorants may alleviate suspected localized impacts on perch near some of the larger river colonies.

  8. Secular trends of salted fish consumption and nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a multi-jurisdiction ecological study in 8 regions from 3 continents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite salted fish being a classical risk factor of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC), whether secular trends in salted fish consumption worldwide accounted for changes in NPC rates were unknown. The relationship between vegetable and cigarette consumption to NPC risk worldwide were also largely uncertain. We investigated the longitudinal trends in standardised NPC incidence/mortality rates across 8 regions and their associations with secular trends in salted fish, vegetable and tobacco consumptions. Methods Age standardised mortality rate (ASMR) and age standardised incidence rate (ASIR) of NPC were obtained from the WHO cancer mortality database and Hong Kong Cancer Registry. Per capita consumption of salted fish, tobacco and vegetables in Hong Kong and 7 countries (China, Finland, Japan, Portugal, Singapore, United Kingdom and United States) were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nation (FAO) and Hong Kong Trade and Census Statistics. Pearson correlation and multivariate analysis were performed to examine both crude and adjusted associations. Results There were markedly decreasing trends of NPC ASIR and ASMR in Hong Kong over the past three decades, which were correlated with corresponding secular changes in salted fish consumption per capita (Pearson r for 10 cumulative years : ASIR = 0.729 (male), 0.674 (female); ASMR = 0.943 (male), 0.622 (female), all p < 0.05 except for female ASMR). However such associations no longer correlated with adjustments for decreasing tobacco and increasing vegetable consumption per capita (Pearson r for 10 cumulative years: ASIR = 2.007 (male), 0.339 (female), ASMR = 0.289 (male), 1.992 (female), all p > 0.05). However, there were no clear or consistent patterns in relations between NPC ASIR and ASMR with salted fish consumption across 7 regions in 3 continents. Conclusions Our results do not support the notion that changes in salted fish consumption had played an

  9. Fish consumption and concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the serum of older residents of upper Hudson River communities.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Edward F; Fletcher, Barbara A; Belanger, Erin; Tao, Lin; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Hwang, Syni-an

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) among 144 men and women 55 to 74 years residing along the Hudson River. The results indicated a median serum PBDE concentration of 23.9 ng/g lipid wt. This value is similar to those of other New York State studies of populations that are younger and proportionately more likely to be male, suggesting that pathways do not differ by age or sex. Individual congeners were highly correlated, but they were not associated with concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Persons with a body mass index (BMI) > 30 had a geometric mean ΣPBDE concentration of 46.7 versus 25.2 ng/g lipid wt for persons with a BMI ≤ 30 (p = .006). Fresh water fish consumption was not associated with serum PBDE concentrations in this population. PMID:21186423

  10. Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Rice and Wetland Biota: employing integrated indices of processes that drive methylmercury risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagles-Smith, C.; Ackerman, J.; Windham-Myers, L.; Fleck, J.

    2013-12-01

    Wetlands often are associated with elevated methylmercury (MeHg) production and food web bioaccumulation, making them potentially important sources of Hg to surrounding waters and to wetland-dependent fish and wildlife. However, the cycling of MeHg through wetlands can vary markedly with wetland type. Agricultural wetlands such as rice fields can exhibit particularly pronounced MeHg concentrations and bioaccumulation because their biogeochemical, hydrological, and ecological characteristics facilitate the conversion of inorganic mercury (Hg) to MeHg. Rice fields are characterized by a series of seasonal extreme wetting and drying cycles, sulfate-containing fertilizers, and high levels of labile organic carbon, all of which are key processes in the Hg cycle. Rice fields comprise approximately 20% of freshwater habitats and 11% of cultivated land area globally, providing critical wildlife habitat while offering substantial economic, human health, and ecosystem benefits. Thus, there is strong impetus to better understand the drivers of Hg cycling in rice fields and to develop useful management approaches for minimizing Hg risk associated with rice agriculture without compromising rice production. We examined the role of rice wetlands on MeHg bioaccumulation through foodwebs by employing biosentinel caged fish as integrators of MeHg cycling processes. With experimental field studies in California's Central Valley, we placed biosentinel fishes into nine rice wetlands that were subjected to three different harvest strategies, and into nine managed wetlands that encompassed three different hydrological regimes. We simultaneously measured a suite of biogeochemical processes in surface water, sediment, and pore water in order to link the response in fish Hg bioaccumulation with within-field processes that regulate MeHg cycling. Our preliminary results indicate that fish Hg concentrations were 1.6 times higher in rice wetlands than in managed wetlands. Additionally, fish Hg

  11. Association of fish consumption and dietary intake of marine n-3 PUFA with myocardial infarction in a prospective Danish cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gammelmark, Anders; Nielsen, Michael S; Bork, Christian S; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Schmidt, Erik B

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have investigated the potential benefits of marine n-3 PUFA in CVD, generally suggesting a lower risk of CHD. However, recent trials have questioned these results. This study investigated the association of fish consumption with dietary intake of marine n-3 PUFA with incident myocardial infarction (MI). In a Danish cohort study, 57 053 subjects between 50 and 64 years of age were enrolled from 1993 to 1997. From national registries, we identified all cases of incident MI. Dietary fish consumption was assessed using a semi-quantitative food questionnaire, including twenty-six questions regarding fish intake. In addition, we calculated the intake of total and individual marine n-3 PUFA. During a median follow-up of 17·0 years, we identified 3089 cases of incident MI. For both men and women, a high intake of fatty fish was inversely related to incident MI. Thus, when comparing the highest and the lowest quintile of fatty fish intake, we found a 12 % lower relative risk of MI in men (hazard ratio (HR) 0·88; 95 % CI 0·77, 1·00) and a 22 % lower relative risk in women (HR 0·78; 95 % CI 0·63, 0·96) after adjustments. For women, similar associations were observed for individual and total marine n-3 PUFA. In contrast, intake of lean fish was not associated with MI. In conclusion, incident MI was inversely related to a high intake of fatty fish, but not lean fish. However, test for trends across quintiles was not statistically significant. In general, this study supports the view that consumption of fatty fish may protect against MI. PMID:27189437

  12. Tissue distribution of HCH and DDT congeners and human health risk associated with consumption of fish collected from Kabul River, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Aamir, Muhammad; Khan, Sardar; Nawab, Javed; Qamar, Zahir; Khan, Anwarzeb

    2016-03-01

    Distribution of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) congeners in tissues of four different fish species and their associated potential health risks to local consumers are presented in this paper. The average ∑(HCHs+DDTs) concentration in Glyptothorax punjabensis (214ngg(-1) wet weight (ww)) (carnivores) was found higher than Tor putitora (155ngg(-1) ww) (herbivores). The distribution of ∑(HCHs+DDTs) in all fish tissues was found in order of liver>muscle>stomach>gills. The profile of congeners (β-HCH/∑HCH from 0.29-0.47) indicated that all selected fish species were contaminated with HCH because of its recent usage in the study area. Furthermore, DDT profile ((DDE+DDD)/∑DDT from 0.61-0.78) showed that fish contamination with DDT originated from past usage and long-time degradation mechanism. The average estimated daily dietary intake of ∑HCHs (15.0ngkg(-1) day(-1)) was higher than ∑DDTs (12.5ngkg(-1) day(-1)) by the local consumers via fish consumption. On the basis of both 50th and 95th percentile exposure levels, the carcinogenic hazard ratios for DDT and its congeners were exceeded one (safe limit) for all fish species, indicating a great potential cancer risk for local consumers with life time consumption of contaminated fish collected from Kabul River. PMID:26685785

  13. Reliability and relative validity of fish consumption data obtained in an exposure assessment study among Montreal-area sportfishers

    SciTech Connect

    Shatenstein, B. |; Kosatsky, T.; Nadon, S.; Lussier-Cacan, S.; Weber, J.P.

    1999-02-01

    A two-season exercise was undertaken in 29 high-level sportfish consumers to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of study instruments. Fishers were invited to participate after completing the main study interview (Time 1) in fall 1995 or winter 1996. Over a 4-week period, they provided a nonconsecutive 7-day weighed food record, kept a fish consumption calendar, and responded to a shortened version of the Time 1 instrument at the end of this period (Time 2). A second blood sample (at Time 2) was analyzed for whole blood mercury (Hg) and the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in plasma and erythrocytes. Identical questions were compared in the Time 1 and Time 2 instruments. Reported sportfish consumption assessed by the different instruments was subjected to nutrient analysis. Three estimates of exposure to the target substances were derived from the dietary intake estimates and correlated with their respective Time 2 plasma (EPA, DHA) or blood (Hg) values, and with a kinetically derived interval-specific plasma/blood uptake value. Remarkable similarities were observed for the data derived from like questions in the Time 1 and 2 questionnaires in both seasons. However, frank discrepancies between some portion size estimates and measured values may signal cause for concern.

  14. Varying coefficient function models to explore interactions between maternal nutritional status and prenatal methylmercury toxicity in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Miranda L.; Huang, Li-Shan; Cox, Christopher; Strain, J.J.; Myers, Gary J.; Bonham, Maxine P.; Shamlaye, Conrad F.; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Wallace, Julie M.W.; Duffy, Emeir M.; Clarkson, Thomas W.; Davidson, Philip W.

    2011-01-15

    Maternal consumption of fish during the gestational period exposes the fetus to both nutrients, especially the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), believed to be beneficial for fetal brain development, as well as to the neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHg). We recently reported that nutrients present in fish may modify MeHg neurotoxicity. Understanding the apparent interaction of MeHg exposure and nutrients present in fish is complicated by the limitations of modeling methods. In this study we fit varying coefficient function models to data from the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study (SCDNS) cohort to assess the association of dietary nutrients and children's development. This cohort of mother-child pairs in the Republic of Seychelles had fish consumption averaging 9 meals per week. Maternal nutritional status was assessed for five different nutritional components known to be present in fish (n-3 LCPUFA, n-6 LCPUFA, iron status, iodine status, and choline) and associated with children's neurological development. We also included prenatal MeHg exposure (measured in maternal hair). We examined two child neurodevelopmental outcomes (Bayley Scales Infant Development-II (BSID-II) Mental Developmental Index (MDI) and Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI)), each administered at 9 and at 30 months. The varying coefficient models allow the possible interactions between each nutritional component and MeHg to be modeled as a smoothly varying function of MeHg as an effect modifier. Iron, iodine, choline, and n-6 LCPUFA had little or no observable modulation at different MeHg exposures. In contrast the n-3 LCPUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) had beneficial effects on the BSID-II PDI that were reduced or absent at higher MeHg exposures. This study presents a useful modeling method that can be brought to bear on questions involving interactions between covariates, and illustrates the continuing importance of viewing fish consumption during pregnancy as a case

  15. The risk of mercury exposure to the people consuming fish from Lake Phewa, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Devna Singh; Sharma, Chhatra Mani; Kang, Shichang; Sillanpää, Mika

    2014-07-01

    The risk of mercury exposure through consumption of fish from Lake Phewa, Nepal was investigated. A total of 170 people were surveyed to know their fish consumption levels. The weekly mercury (Hg) intake in the form of methylmercury (MeHg) through fish was calculated by using the data on average MeHg concentrations in fish, the average consumption of fish per week, and an average body weight of the people. Hotel owners were consuming significantly high amounts of fish, followed by fishermen, in comparison to the government staff, army/police, locals and others (visitors). Some individuals exceeded the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) of 1.6 µg per kg body weight of MeHg (FAO/WHO). The minimum intake of MeHg (0.05 µg/kg/week) was found in the visitors (others) category, whereas the hotel owners had the maximum intake (3.71 µg/kg/week). In general, it was found that a person of 60 kg can consume at least 2 kg of fish per week without exceeding PTWI such that it does not pose any health risk associated with Hg poisoning at the present contamination level. Hg based PTWI values for Nepal has not been proposed yet in fishery resources so as to reduce health risk of the people. PMID:24978881

  16. Neurotoxicity of lead, methylmercury, and PCBs in relation to the Great Lakes.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, D C

    1995-01-01

    There is ample evidence identifying lead, methylmercury, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as neurotoxic agents. A large body of data on the neurotoxicity of lead, based on both epidemiologic studies in children and animal models of developmental exposure, reveals that body burdens of lead typical of people in industrialized environments produce behavioral impairment. Methylmercury was identified as a neurotoxicant in both adults and the developing organism based on episodes of human poisoning: these effects have been replicated and extended in animals. High-dose PCB exposure was recognized as a developmental toxicant as a result of several episodes of contamination of cooking oil. The threshold for PCB neurotoxicity in humans is less clear, although research in animals suggests that relatively low-level exposure produces behavioral impairment and other toxic effects. Tissue levels in fish below which human health would not be adversely affected were estimated for methylmercury and PCBs based on calculated reference doses (RfDs) and estimated fish intake. Present levels in fish tissue in the Great Lakes exceed these levels for both neurotoxicants. Great Lakes fish and water do not pose a particular hazard for increased lead intake. However, the fact that the present human body burden is in a range at which functional deficits are probable suggests that efforts should be made to eliminate point sources of lead contamination in the Great Lakes basin. PMID:8635443

  17. Evidence on the Human Health Effects of Low-Level Methylmercury Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Anna L.; Oken, Emily; Horvat, Milena; Schoeny, Rita; Kamai, Elizabeth; Cowell, Whitney; Grandjean, Philippe; Korrick, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Methylmercury (MeHg) is a known neuro-toxicant. Emerging evidence indicates it may have adverse effects on the neuro-logic and other body systems at common low levels of exposure. Impacts of MeHg exposure could vary by individual susceptibility or be confounded by bene-ficial nutrients in fish containing MeHg. Despite its global relevance, synthesis of the available literature on low-level MeHg exposure has been limited. Objectives: We undertook a synthesis of the current knowledge on the human health effects of low-level MeHg exposure to provide a basis for future research efforts, risk assessment, and exposure remediation policies worldwide. Data sources and extraction: We reviewed the published literature for original human epidemio-logic research articles that reported a direct biomarker of mercury exposure. To focus on high-quality studies and those specifically on low mercury exposure, we excluded case series, as well as studies of populations with unusually high fish consumption (e.g., the Seychelles), marine mammal consumption (e.g., the Faroe Islands, circumpolar, and other indigenous populations), or consumption of highly contaminated fish (e.g., gold-mining regions in the Amazon). Data synthesis: Recent evidence raises the possibility of effects of low-level MeHg exposure on fetal growth among susceptible subgroups and on infant growth in the first 2 years of life. Low-level effects of MeHg on neuro-logic outcomes may differ by age, sex, and timing of exposure. No clear pattern has been observed for cardio-vascular disease (CVD) risk across populations or for specific CVD end points. For the few studies evaluating immunologic effects associated with MeHg, results have been inconsistent. Conclusions: Studies targeted at identifying potential mechanisms of low-level MeHg effects and characterizing individual susceptibility, sexual dimorphism, and non-linearity in dose response would help guide future prevention, policy, and regulatory efforts

  18. Total mercury concentrations in human hair from 13 countries in relation to fish consumption and location.

    PubMed

    Airey, D

    1983-11-01

    Five hundred and fifty nine samples of human head hair from 32 locations in 13 countries were analysed for mercury. Tests of different techniques for cleaning and storing samples showed that at ambient air mercury concentrations contamination of samples is undetectable. Arithmetic mean mercury concentrations for people who ate fish 1-4 times each month were: Australia, 2.5 ppm; Canada, 1.2 ppm; China, 0.9 ppm; West Germany, 0.5 ppm; Hong Kong, 3.0 ppm; Italy, 1.5 ppm; Japan, 3.9 ppm; Monaco, 1.7 ppm; New Zealand, 1.3 ppm; Papua New Guinea, 1.8 ppm; South Africa, 1.9 ppm; U.K., 1.6 ppm and USA, 2.4 ppm. The differences are believed to be due to diet and environment. Mean hair mercury concentrations were significantly different for the group that ate fish once or less a month (1.4 ppm) once a fortnight (1.9 ppm) once a week (2.5 ppm) and once or more a day (11.6 ppm). Simplified models of mercury pathways in the environment and man are presented. Hair mercury concentrations measured here and those reported in the literature suggested that the weighted mean hair mercury concentration of people living in both northern and southern hemispheres at latitudes greater than 40 degrees had hair mercury concentrations which were significantly lower than at other latitudes, even in industrialized countries. It is suggested that lower soil temperatures could retard mercury volatilization and inhibits its movement into pathways which get back to man. PMID:6658448

  19. Evaluation of human health risks posed by carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic multiple contaminants associated with consumption of fish from Taihu Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yingxin; Wang, Xinxin; Yang, Dan; Lei, Bingli; Zhang, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xinyu

    2014-07-01

    The present study estimated the human daily intake and uptake of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and toxic trace elements [mercury (Hg), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As)] due to consumption of fish from Taihu Lake, China, and the associated potential health risks posed by these contaminants. The health risks posed by the contaminants were assessed using a risk quotient of the fish consumption rate to the maximum allowable fish consumption rate considering the contaminants for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effect endpoints. The results showed that fish consumption would not pose non-cancer risks. However, some species would cause a cancer risk. Relative risks of the contaminants were calculated to investigate the contaminant which posed the highest risk to humans. As a result, in view of the contaminants for carcinogenic effects, As was the contaminant which posed the highest risk to humans. However, when non-carcinogenic effects of the contaminants were considered, Hg posed the highest risk. The risk caused by PBDEs was negligible. The results demonstrated that traditional contaminants, such as As, Hg, DDTs (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites), and PCBs, require more attention in Taihu Lake than the other target contaminants. PMID:24727049

  20. Little Galloo Island, Lake Ontario: Two decades of studies on the diet, fish consumption, and management of double-crested cormorants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; McCullough, Russell D.; Farquhar, James F.; Mazzocchi, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) colony at Little Galloo Island, Lake Ontario has been a Great Lakes focal point of controversy regarding cormorant–fish interactions for over two decades. We examined cormorant diet and fish consumption at the colony from 1992 to 2013. During this time period, two events, management actions and round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) invasion, occurred that affected the number of fish consumed by cormorants and their diet composition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of round goby on the feeding ecology of cormorants and evaluate the efficacy of management actions on meeting cormorant population targets at the colony. Round goby first appeared in the diet in 2004 (0.8%) and within one year were the primary prey (29.3%). The presence of round goby in the diet of cormorants: (1) eliminated seasonal variability in diet composition, (2) reversed seasonal trends in the number of fish consumed daily, (3) increased daily fish consumption, and (4) significantly reduced the consumption of other species including yellow perch and smallmouth bass. Management actions, such as egg oiling and culling, were also effective in reducing nesting activity and the number of cormorant feeding days at the Little Galloo Island colony. There is evidence that the combination of management actions and round goby may have allowed some population recovery of yellow perch and smallmouth bass in eastern Lake Ontario.

  1. Effects of dietary methylmercury on reproduction of fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammerschmidt, C.R.; Sandheinrich, M.B.; Wiener, J.G.; Rada, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    We examined effects of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) on reproduction of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Juvenile fish were fed one of four diets until sexual maturity (phase 1): a control diet (0.06 μg Hg g-1 dry weight) and three diets contaminated with MeHg at 0.88 (low), 4.11 (medium), and 8.46 μg Hg g-1 dry weight (high). At sexual maturity, male and female fish were paired, again fed one of the four diets, and allowed to reproduce (phase 2). To assess effects of MeHg during gametogenesis, some fish were fed diets during phase 2 that differed from those during phase 1. Spawning success of pairs fed the same diet during phases 1 and 2 was 75% for controls and 46%, 50%, and 36% for the low-, medium-, and high-MeHg treatments, respectively. Spawning success of pairs fed a contaminated diet during phase 1 and a control diet during phase 2 was 63%, 40%, and 14% for the low-, medium-, and high-MeHg treatments, respectively, whereas exposure to dietary MeHg only during phase 2 did not reduce spawning success. Dietary MeHg delayed spawning, and days to spawning was positively correlated with concentration of total mercury in the carcasses of test fish. MeHg reduced the instantaneous rate of reproduction of fish fed the same diets during phases 1 and 2. Both the gonadosomatic index and reproductive effort of female fish were inversely correlated with mercury in carcasses, whereas developmental and hatching success of embryos, 7-d survival, and 7-d growth of larvae were unrelated to mercury concentrations in parental fish or their diets. MeHg decreased reproduction of adult fathead minnows at dietary concentrations encountered by predatory fishes in aquatic systems with MeHg-contaminated food webs, implying that exposed fish populations could be adversely affected by this widespread contaminant.

  2. Methylmercury and nutrition: adult effects of fetal exposure in experimental models.

    PubMed

    Newland, M Christopher; Paletz, Elliott M; Reed, Miranda N

    2008-09-01

    Human exposure to the life-span developmental neurotoxicant, methylmercury (MeHg), is primarily via the consumption of fish or marine mammals. Fish are also excellent sources of important nutrients, including selenium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Laboratory models of developmental MeHg exposure can be employed to assess the roles of nutrients and MeHg and to identify potential mechanisms of action if the appropriate exposure measures are used. When maternal exposure is protracted, relationships between daily intake and brain mercury are consistent and orderly across species, even when large differences in blood:brain ratios exist. It is well established that low-level developmental MeHg produces sensory deficits. Recent studies also show that perseveration in reversal-learning tasks occurs after gestational exposures that produce low micromolar concentrations in the brain. A no-effect level has not been identified for this effect. These exposures do not affect the acquisition or performance of discrimination learning, set shifting (extradimensional shift), or memory. Reversal-learning deficits may be related to enhanced impact of reinforcers as measured using progressive ratio reinforcement schedules, an effect that could result in perseveration. Also reported is enhanced sensitivity to dopamine reuptake inhibitors and diminished sensitivity to pentobarbital, a GABA(A) agonist. Diets rich in PUFAs or selenium do not protect against MeHg's effects on reversal learning but, by themselves, may diminish variability in performance, enhance attention or psychomotor function and may confer some protection against age-related deficits in these areas. It is hypothesized that altered reward processing, dopamine and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems, and cortical regions associated with choice and perseveration are especially sensitive to developmental MeHg at low exposure levels. Human testing for MeHg's neurotoxicity

  3. METHYLMERCURY AND NUTRITION: ADULT EFFECTS OF FETAL EXPOSURE IN EXPERIMENTAL MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Paletz, Elliott M.; Reed, Miranda N.

    2008-01-01

    Human exposure to the life-span developmental neurotoxicant, methylmercury (MeHg), is primarily via the consumption of fish or marine mammals. Fish are also excellent sources of important nutrients, including selenium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Laboratory models of developmental MeHg exposure can be employed to assess the roles of nutrients and MeHg and to identify potential mechanisms of action if the appropriate exposure measures are used. In describing chronic exposures, relationships between daily intake and brain mercury are consistent and orderly across species, even when large differences in blood:brain ratios exist. It is well-established that low level developmental MeHg produces sensory deficits. Recent studies also show that perseveration in reversal-learning tasks occurs after gestational exposures that produce low micromolar concentrations in the brain. A no-effect level has not been identified for this effect. These exposures do not affect the acquisition or performance of discrimination learning, set shifting (extra-dimensional shift), or memory. Reversal learning deficits may be related to enhanced impact of reinforcers as measured using progressive ratio reinforcement schedules, an effect that could result in perseveration. Also reported is enhanced sensitivity to dopamine reuptake inhibitors and diminished sensitivity to pentobarbital, a GABAA agonist. Diets rich in PUFAs or selenium do not protect against MeHg's effects on reversal learning but, by themselves, may diminish variability in performance, enhance attention or psychomotor function and may confer some protection against age-related deficits in these areas. It is hypothesized that altered reward processing, dopamine and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems, and cortical regions associated with choice and perseveration are especially sensitive to developmental MeHg at low exposure levels. Human testing for MeHg's neurotoxicity should

  4. The fatty acid profile of rainbow trout liver cells modulates their tolerance to methylmercury and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Ferain, Aline; Bonnineau, Chloé; Neefs, Ineke; Rees, Jean François; Larondelle, Yvan; Schamphelaere, Karel A C De; Debier, Cathy

    2016-08-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition of fish tissues, which generally reflects that of the diet, affects various cellular properties such as membrane structure and fluidity, energy metabolism and susceptibility to oxidative stress. Since these cellular parameters can play an important role in the cellular response to organic and inorganic pollutants, a variation of the PUFA supply might modify the toxicity induced by such xenobiotics. In this work, we investigated whether the cellular fatty acid profile has an impact on the in vitro cell sensitivity to two environmental pollutants: methylmercury and cadmium. Firstly, the fatty acid composition of the rainbow trout liver cell line RTL-W1 was modified by enriching the growth medium with either alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) or docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5n-6). These modified cells and their control (no PUFA enrichment) were then challenged for 24h with increasing concentrations of methylmercury or cadmium. We observed that (i) the phospholipid composition of the RTL-W1 cells was profoundly modulated by changing the PUFA content of the growth medium: major modifications were a high incorporation of the supplemented PUFA in the cellular phospholipids, the appearance of direct elongation and desaturation metabolites in the cellular phospholipids as well as a change in the gross phospholipid composition (PUFA and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) levels and n-3/n-6 ratio); (ii) ALA, EPA and DPA enrichment significantly protected the RTL-W1 cells against both methylmercury and cadmium; (iv) DHA enrichment significantly protected the cells against cadmium but not methylmercury; (v) AA and LA enrichment had no impact on the cell tolerance to both methylmercury and cadmium; (vi) the abundance of 20:3n-6, a metabolite of the n-6 biotransformation pathway, in

  5. Evolution of our understanding of methylmercury as a health threat.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, C; Satoh, H

    1996-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is recognized as one of the most hazardous environmental pollutants, primarily due to endemic disasters that have occurred repeatedly. A review of the earlier literature on the Minamata outbreak shows how large-scale poisoning occurred and why it could not be prevented. With the repeated occurrences of MeHg poisoning, it gradually became clear that the fetus is much more susceptible to the toxicity of this compound than the adult. Thus, recent epidemiologic studies in several fish-eating populations have focused on the effects of in utero exposure to MeHg. Also, there have been many studies on neurobehavioral effects of in utero exposure to methylmercury in rodents and nonhuman primates. The results of these studies revealed that the effects encompass a wide range of behavioral categories without clear identification of the functional categories distinctively susceptible to MeHg. The overall neurotoxicity of MeHg in humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents appears to have similarities. However, several gaps exist between the human and animal studies. By using the large body of neurotoxicologic data obtained in human populations and filling in such gaps, we can use MeHg as a model agent for developing a specific battery of tests of animal behavior to predict human risks resulting from in utero exposure to other chemicals with unknown neurotoxicity. Approaches developing such a battery are also discussed. PMID:9182044

  6. Hair methylmercury levels of mummies of the Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Egeland, G.M. Ponce, Rafael Bloom, Nicolas S. Knecht, Rick Loring, Stephen Middaugh, John P.

    2009-04-15

    Ancient human hair specimens can shed light on the extent of pre-historic exposures to methylmercury and provide valuable comparison data with current-day exposures, particularly for Indigenous Peoples who continue to rely upon local traditional food resources. Human hair from ancient Aleutian Island Native remains were tested for total and methylmercury (Hg, MeHg) and were radiocarbon dated. The remains were approximately 500 years old (1450 A.D.). For four adults, the mean and median total hair mercury concentration was 5.8 ppm (SD=0.9). In contrast, MeHg concentrations were lower with a mean of 1.2 ppm (SD=1.8) and a median of 0.54 ppm (0.12-3.86). For the five infants, the mean and median MeHg level was 1.2 ppm (SD=1.8) and 0.20 ppm (0.007-4.61), respectively. Segmental analyses showed variations in MeHg concentrations in 1-cm segments, consistent with fluctuations in naturally occurring exposure to mercury through dietary sources. The levels are comparable to or lower than those found in fish and marine mammal-eating populations today who rely far less on subsistence food than pre-historic humans. The findings are, therefore, compatible with increased anthropogenic release of trace metals during the past several centuries.

  7. Docosahexaenoic acid-enriched fish oil consumption modulates immunoglobulin responses to and clearance of enteric reovirus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Beli, Eleni; Li, Maoxiang; Cuff, Christopher; Pestka, James J

    2008-04-01

    We hypothesized that consumption of the (n-3) PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), modulates the mucosal immune response to enteric infection with respiratory enteric orphan virus (reovirus), a model intestinal pathogen. Mice were fed either AIN-93G control diet, containing 10 g/kg corn oil and 60 g/kg high oleic acid safflower oil, or AIN-93G, containing 10 g/kg corn oil and 60 g/kg DHA-enriched fish oil, for 4 wk and then orally gavaged with reovirus strain Type 1 Lang, (T1/L). Reovirus-specific IgA antibody was first detectable in the feces of mice fed a control diet at 6 d postinfection (PI) and was further elevated at 8 and 10 d PI. IgA responses in DHA-fed mice were similar at 6 and 8 d PI but greater at 10 d PI (P < 0.05). Both reovirus-specific serum IgA and IgG(2a) were comparably induced in mice fed control or DHA diets. Reovirus-specific IgA and IgG(2a) secretion by ex vivo Peyer's patch, lamina propria, and spleen cultures derived from control and DHA groups were comparable. Although both groups carried similar numbers of reovirus plaque forming units per intestine, DHA-fed mice shed nearly 10 times more viral RNA in feces than control mice at 2, 4, and 6 d PI (P < 0.05). However, viral RNA was not detectable in either group at 8 and 10 d. Taken together, these data suggest that DHA consumption did not markedly alter mucosal or systemic Ig responses to reovirus but delayed clearance of the virus from the intestinal tract. PMID:18356340

  8. [Mercury in fish and its importance in health].

    PubMed

    Raimann, Ximena; Rodríguez O, Lorena; Chávez, Paulina; Torrejón, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    The contamination of fish with methylmercury (MeHg) could hamper the health promoting properties of fish. Currently, there is strong evidence about the health benefits of seafood consumption. When consumed by the mother before and during pregnancy it improves neurodevelopment of infants and toddlers. Thereafter it reduces the risk of cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. The benefits of fish are mainly due to its content of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Other constituents, such as high biological value proteins, fat-soluble vitamins, minerals and trace elements contribute to the benefits. On the other hand, there is also convincing evidence about the adverse effects of MeHg on neurodevelopment both during gestation and in early childhood. We herein review the effects of mercury on health. Based on international evidence and new data on the mercury content in Chilean fish, we also propose a recommendation for fish consumption for our population. PMID:25517058

  9. Assessing and Managing Methylmercury Risks Associated With Power Plant Mercury Emissions in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Charnley, Gail

    2006-01-01

    Abstract and Introduction Abstract Until the Clean Air Mercury Rule was signed in March 2005, coal-fired electric utilities were the only remaining, unregulated major source of industrial mercury emissions in the United States. Proponents of coal-burning power plants assert that methylmercury is not a hazard at the current environmental levels, that current technologies for limiting emissions are unreliable, and that reducing mercury emissions from power plants in the United States will have little impact on environmental levels. Opponents of coal-burning plants assert that current methylmercury exposures from fish are damaging to the developing nervous system of infants, children, and the fetus; that current technology can significantly limit emissions; and that reducing emissions will reduce exposure and risk. One concern is that local mercury emissions from power plants may contribute to higher local exposure levels, or “hot spots.” The impact of the Mercury Rule on potential hot spots is uncertain due to the highly site-specific nature of the relationship between plant emissions and local fish methylmercury levels. The impact on the primary source of exposure in the United States, ocean fish, is likely to be negligible due to the contribution of natural sources and industrial sources outside the United States. Another debate centers on the toxic potency of methylmercury, with the scientific basis of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) recommended exposure limit questioned by some and defended by others. It is likely that the EPA's exposure limit may be appropriate for combined exposure to methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), but may be lower than the available data suggest is necessary to protect children from methylmercury alone. Mercury emissions from power plants are a global problem. Without a global approach to developing and implementing clean coal technologies, limiting US power plant emissions alone will have little

  10. Benefits and risks of fish consumption Part II. RIBEPEIX, a computer program to optimize the balance between the intake of omega-3 fatty acids and chemical contaminants.

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L; Bocio, Ana; Martí-Cid, Roser; Llobet, Juan M

    2007-02-12

    In recent years, and based on the importance of fish as a part of a healthy diet, there has been a notable promotion of fish and seafood consumption. However, a number of recent studies have shown that fish may be a potential source of exposure to chemical pollutants, some of them with well known adverse effects on human health. Recently, we determined in 14 edible marine species the concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosohexaenoic acid (DHA), as well as those of a number of chemical contaminants: Cd, Hg, Pb, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans, polychlorinated biphenyls, hexachlorobenzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated naphthalenes, polybrominated diphenylethers and polychlorinated diphenylethers. To quantitative establish the intake of these pollutants (risks) versus that of EPA+DHA (benefits), we designed a simple computer program, RIBEPEIX. The concentrations of EPA, DHA, and the chemical pollutants were introduced into the program. We here present how RIBEPEIX may be used as an easy tool to optimize fish consumption: most suitable species, frequency of consumption, and size of meals. RIBEPEIX can be useful not only for professionals (cardiologists, general physicians, nutritionists, toxicologists, etc.), but also for the general population. It is available at: . PMID:17178182

  11. Concentration, distribution, and translocation of mercury and methylmercury in mine-waste, sediment, soil, water, and fish collected near the Abbadia San Salvatore mercury mine, Monte Amiata district, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rimondi, V.; Gray, J.E.; Costagliola, P.; Vaselli, O.; Lattanzi, P.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and translocation of mercury (Hg) was studied in the Paglia River ecosystem, located downstream from the inactive Abbadia San Salvatore mine (ASSM). The ASSM is part of the Monte Amiata Hg district, Southern Tuscany, Italy, which was one of the world’s largest Hg districts. Concentrations of Hg and methyl-Hg were determined in mine-waste calcine (retorted ore), sediment, water, soil, and freshwater fish collected from the ASSM and the downstream Paglia River. Concentrations of Hg in calcine samples ranged from 25 to 1500 μg/g, all of which exceeded the industrial soil contamination level for Hg of 5 μg/g used in Italy. Stream and lake sediment samples collected downstream from the ASSM ranged in Hg concentration from 0.26 to 15 μg/g, of which more than 50% exceeded the probable effect concentration for Hg of 1.06 μg/g, the concentration above which harmful effects are likely to be observed in sediment-dwelling organisms. Stream and lake sediment methyl-Hg concentrations showed a significant correlation with TOC indicating considerable methylation and potential bioavailability of Hg. Stream water contained Hg as high as 1400 ng/L, but only one water sample exceeded the 1000 ng/L drinking water Hg standard used in Italy. Concentrations of Hg were elevated in freshwater fish muscle samples and ranged from 0.16 to 1.2 μg/g (wet weight), averaged 0.84 μg/g, and 96% of these exceeded the 0.3 μg/g (methyl-Hg, wet weight) USEPA fish muscle standard recommended to protect human health. Analysis of fish muscle for methyl-Hg confirmed that > 90% of the Hg in these fish is methyl-Hg. Such highly elevated Hg concentrations in fish indicated active methylation, significant bioavailability, and uptake of Hg by fish in the Paglia River ecosystem. Methyl-Hg is highly toxic and the high Hg concentrations in these fish represent a potential pathway of Hg to the human food chain.

  12. Varying coefficient function models to explore interactions between maternal nutritional status and prenatal methylmercury toxicity in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Miranda L; Huang, Li-Shan; Cox, Christopher; Strain, J J; Myers, Gary J; Bonham, Maxine P; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Wallace, Julie M W; Duffy, Emeir M; Clarkson, Thomas W; Davidson, Philip W

    2011-01-01

    Maternal consumption of fish during the gestational period exposes the fetus to both nutrients, especially the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), believed to be beneficial for fetal brain development, as well as to the neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHg). We recently reported that nutrients present in fish may modify MeHg neurotoxicity. Understanding the apparent interaction of MeHg exposure and nutrients present in fish is complicated by the limitations of modeling methods. In this study we fit varying coefficient function models to data from the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study (SCDNS) cohort to assess the association of dietary nutrients and children's development. This cohort of mother-child pairs in the Republic of Seychelles had fish consumption averaging 9 meals per week. Maternal nutritional status was assessed for five different nutritional components known to be present in fish (n-3 LCPUFA, n-6 LCPUFA, iron status, iodine status, and choline) and associated with children's neurological development. We also included prenatal MeHg exposure (measured in maternal hair). We examined two child neurodevelopmental outcomes (Bayley Scales Infant Development-II (BSID-II) Mental Developmental Index (MDI) and Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI)), each administered at 9 and at 30 months. The varying coefficient models allow the possible interactions between each nutritional component and MeHg to be modeled as a smoothly varying function of MeHg as an effect modifier. Iron, iodine, choline, and n-6 LCPUFA had little or no observable modulation at different MeHg exposures. In contrast the n-3 LCPUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) had beneficial effects on the BSID-II PDI that were reduced or absent at higher MeHg exposures. This study presents a useful modeling method that can be brought to bear on questions involving interactions between covariates, and illustrates the continuing importance of viewing fish consumption during pregnancy as a case

  13. Varying coefficient function models to explore interactions between maternal nutritional status and prenatal methylmercury toxicity in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Miranda L.; Huang, Li-Shan; Cox, Christopher; Strain, J.J.; Myers, Gary J.; Bonham, Maxine P.; Shamlaye, Conrad F.; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Wallace, Julie M.W.; Duffy, Emeir M.; Clarkson, Thomas W.; Davidson, Philip W.

    2010-01-01

    Maternal consumption of fish during the gestational period exposes the fetus to both nutrients, especially the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), believed to be beneficial for fetal brain development, as well as to the neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHg). We recently reported that nutrients present in fish may modify MeHg neurotoxicity. Understanding the apparent interaction of MeHg exposure and nutrients present in fish is complicated by the limitations of modeling methods. In this study we fit varying coefficient function models to data from the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study (SCDNS) cohort to assess the association of dietary nutrients and children’s development. This cohort of mother-child pairs in the Republic of Seychelles had fish consumption averaging 9 meals per week. Maternal nutritional status was assessed for five different nutritional components known to be present in fish (n-3 LCPUFA, n-6 LCPUFA, iron status, iodine status, and choline) and associated with children’s neurological development. We also included prenatal MeHg exposure (measured in maternal hair). We examined two child neurodevelopmental outcomes (Bayley Scales Infant Development-II (BSID-II) Mental Developmental Index (MDI) and Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI)), each administered at 9 and at 30 months. The varying coefficient models allow the possible interactions between each nutritional component and MeHg to be modeled as a smoothly varying function of MeHg as an effect modifier. Iron, iodine, choline, and n-6 LCPUFA had little or no observable modulation at different MeHg exposures. In contrast the n-3 LCPUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) had beneficial effects on the BSID-II PDI that were reduced or absent at higher MeHg exposures. This study presents a useful modeling method that can be brought to bear on questions involving interactions between covariates, and illustrates the continuing importance of viewing fish consumption during pregnancy as a

  14. Sulfur and Methylmercury in the Florida Everglades - the Biogeochemical Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orem, W. H.; Gilmour, C. C.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Aiken, G.

    2011-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a serious environmental problem in aquatic ecosystems worldwide because of its toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate. The Everglades receives some of the highest levels of atmospheric mercury deposition and has some of the highest levels of MeHg in fish in the USA, posing a threat to pisciverous wildlife and people through fish consumption. USGS studies show that a combination of biogeochemical factors make the Everglades especially susceptible to MeHg production and bioaccumulation: (1) vast wetland area with anoxic soils supporting anaerobic microbial activity, (2) high rates of atmospheric mercury deposition, (3) high levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that complexes and stabilizes mercury in solution for transport to sites of methylation, and (4) high sulfate loading in surface water that drives microbial sulfate reduction and mercury methylation. The high levels of sulfate in the Everglades represent an unnatural condition. Background sulfate levels are estimated to be <1 mg/L, but about 60% of the Everglades has surface water sulfate concentrations exceeding background. Highly sulfate-enriched marshes in the northern Everglades have average sulfate levels of 60 mg/L. Sulfate loading to the Everglades is principally a result of land and water management in south Florida. The highest concentrations of sulfate, averaging 60-70 mg/L, are in canal water in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA). Geochemical data and a preliminary sulfur mass balance for the EAA are consistent with sulfur currently used in agriculture, and sulfur released by oxidation of organic EAA soils (including legacy agricultural applications and natural sulfur) as the primary sources of sulfate enrichment to the canals and ecosystem. Sulfate loading increases microbial sulfate reduction and MeHg production in soils. The relationship between sulfate loading and MeHg production, however, is complex. Sulfate levels up to about 20-30 mg/L increase mercury

  15. Concentration and exposure assessment of mercury in commercial fish and other seafood marketed in Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Mughairi, Sabra; Yesudhason, Poulose; Al-Busaidi, Moza; Al-Waili, Aaliah; Al-Rahbi, Waleed A K; Al-Mazrooei, Nashwa; Al-Habsi, Saoud H

    2013-07-01

    The results of this study present analytical data of the mercury levels in several fish and shellfish species to create awareness among individuals of the risks associated with consuming fish contaminated with mercury. Mercury concentrations varied from a mean of 0.02 mg/kg in Indian mackerel to 0.19 mg/kg in shark in both fresh and frozen fish, from 0.02 mg/kg in sardines to 0.18 mg/kg in skipjack tuna in canned fish, and from 0.02 mg/kg in Indian mackerel to 0.79 mg/kg in shark in dried fish. Shellfish contained a slightly higher amount of mercury than fresh or frozen fish with a mean of 0.09 mg/kg. Trophic position, followed by habitat, was the most important factors for variability in mercury concentrations in fish and shellfish. The maximum safe weekly intake (MSWI) values of mercury were significantly higher for herbivores than for carnivores. The MSWI value for total mercury in the case of consuming most (72%) fish species was more than 5 kg; however, the MSWI value was never more than 5 kg in most (66%) shellfish species. Risks were identified upon consumption of 120 g of dried shark when exceeding the provisional tolerable weekly intake threshold (1.6 μg/kg) for methylmercury. Therefore, fish-eating populations should reduce the quantity of dried shark to efficiently diminish the exposure to mercury. PMID:23701530

  16. Comment on Urban et al. "Assessment of human health risks posed by consumption of fish from the Lower Passaic River (LPR), New Jersey" (2009, doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2009.03.004).

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Gary A; Hayton, Anne G; Macgregor, Janine

    2010-03-15

    Urban et al. (2009) presented a human health risk assessment for the Lower Passaic River that very narrowly defines fish consumption, ignores crab consumption, and is not consistent with current NJ or EPA risk assessment procedures and guidance. The restrictively defined consumption then leads to inappropriate conclusions on the risk of eating fish from this highly contaminated estuarine river. The paper underestimates angler exposure to contaminated fish, does not evaluate exposure to contaminated crab, and underestimates the cancer risks and non-cancer health hazards associated with these exposure pathways. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection along with the NJ Department of Health and Senior Services issues fish and crab consumption advisories for all state waters; these advisories should be followed for the Passaic River and surrounding waters: http://www.state.nj.us/dep/dsr/FishSmartEatSmartNJ.org. PMID:20149414

  17. Health risks from increases in methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Mottet, N K; Shaw, C M; Burbacher, T M

    1985-01-01

    Our present knowledge of the human health effects of methylmercury exposure is derived from study of major outbreaks of human poisonings in Japan and Iraq and experimental studies on primates. Methylmercury readily passes through such physiological barriers as the blood-brain barrier, blood-testes barrier, and the placenta. Its major pathological effects are on the nervous and reproductive systems and the developing embryo/fetus. The neurotoxicity of methylmercury is well established in both humans and non-human primates. Lesions in the cerebral and cerebellar gray matter consist of necrosis and lysis of neurons, phagocytosis and gliosis. The changes are most prominent in the deep sulci and may have a vascular component. A late effect is cerebral atrophy. At high dose levels the liver, kidneys, and other organs may also have degenerative changes. Although not yet described in humans, a major effect of exposure of female primates is an adverse effect on pregnancy. Maternal female M. fascicularis blood mercury levels above 1 ppm are associated with a decreased pregnancy rate and increased abortion rate. To date our experimental data lack sufficient numbers to detect infrequent pregnancy effects below 1 ppm. Preliminary studies also reveal that methylmercury may also decrease the number and function (swim speed) of sperm. Both human and primate studies demonstrate deleterious effects of methylmercury on the developing embryo/fetus. Autopsies on human and primate infants reveal retarded brain development and the occurrence of a cerebral palsy-like behavior in the newborns, whereas the mother may be free of signs and symptoms of methylmercury toxicity. The fetal blood level of mercury is higher than the maternal level.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 5. PMID:3908085

  18. Evaluating mercury biomagnification in fish from a tropical marine environment using stable isotopes (delta13C and delta15N).

    PubMed

    Al-Reasi, Hassan A; Ababneh, Fuad A; Lean, David R

    2007-08-01

    Concentrations of total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) were measured in zooplankton and 13 fish species from a coastal food web of the Gulf of Oman, an arm of the Arabian Sea between Oman and Iran. Stable isotope ratios (delta13C and delta15N) also were determined to track mercury biomagnification. The average concentration of T-Hg in zooplankton was 21 +/- 8.0 ng g(-1) with MeHg accounting 10% of T-Hg. Total mercury levels in fish species ranged from 3.0 ng g(-1) (Sardinella longiceps) to 760 ng g(-1) (Rhizoprionodon acutus) with relatively lower fraction of MeHg (72%) than that found in other studies. The average trophic difference (Deltadelta13C) between zooplankton and planktivorous fish (Selar crumenopthalmus, Rastrelliger kanagurta, and S. longiceps) was higher (3.4 per thousandth) than expected, suggesting that zooplankton may not be the main diet or direct carbon source for these fish species. However, further sampling would be required to compensate for temporal changes in zooplankton and the influence of their lipid content. Trophic position inferred by delta15N and and slopes of the regression equations (log10[T-Hg] = 0.13[delta15N] - 3.57 and log10[MeHg] = 0.14[delta15N] - 3.90) as estimates of biomagnification indicate that biomagnification of T-Hg and MeHg was lower in this tropical ocean compared to what has been observed in arctic and temperate ecosystems and tropical African lakes. The calculated daily intake of methylmercury in the diet of local people through fish consumption was well below the established World Health Organization (WHO) tolerable daily intake threshold for most of the fish species except Euthynnus affinis, Epinephelus epistictus, R. acutus, and Thunnus tonggol, illustrating safe consumption of the commonly consumed fish species. PMID:17702328

  19. NATIONAL SURVEY OF MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:Regulatory and scientific focus on mercury in the aquatic ecosystem has been largely motivated by the health risks of consuming contaminated fish, primarily because human exposure to methylmercury is almost wholly due to fish. Understanding of the methylme...

  20. Accumulation of heavy metals and human health risk assessment via the consumption of freshwater fish Mastacembelus armatus inhabiting, thermal power plant effluent loaded canal.

    PubMed

    Javed, Mehjbeen; Usmani, Nazura

    2016-01-01

    Bioaccumulation of six heavy metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) in the muscle of highly consumed fish species (Mastacembelus armatus) were measured using atomic absorption spectrometer. Fe (213.29 mg/kg dry weight) concentration was the most, followed by Zn (186.19 mg/kg dry weight), Ni (58.98 mg/kg dry weight), Cu (41.36 mg/kg dry weight), Co (9.06 mg/kg dry weight) and Mn (9.03 mg/kg dry weight). Estimated daily intake of heavy metals was calculated by mean fish consumption rate 19.5 × 10(-3) kg/day, on the basis of a calculation of the amount of fish consumed by adult individuals (male and female). The studied fish species pose non carcinogenic risk for Co and Ni [target hazard quotient (THQ) > 1] only. Hazard index (HI) was high. Carcinogenic risk (TR) posed by this fish for male and female was 3.43 × 10(-3) and 3.91 × 10(-3), respectively for Ni (the carcinogenic potency slope factor was available for Ni only). The study is an alert indicating that inhabitants who consume these fishes (particularly females) were at risk of Co and Ni toxicity. In India recommended guidelines have yet not been established for these heavy metals, which is essential for setting of toxicological standards. PMID:27386262

  1. MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS IN SKELETAL MUSCLE OF FISH FROM LAKE MEAD, USA, RELATED TO FISH SIZE, CONDITION, TROPHIC LEVEL, LOCATION, AND CONSUMPTION RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this first large-scale study of mercury (Hg) in Lake Mead, USA, the nation's largest man-
    made reservoir, total-Hg concentrations were determined in the skeletal muscle of 339 fish collected during the Fall of 1998 and the Spring of 1999. Five species of fish representing ...

  2. Effects of chronic, low concentrations of dietary methylmercury on the behavior of juvenile great egrets

    SciTech Connect

    Bouton, S.N.; Frederick, P.C.; Spalding, M.G.; McGill, H.

    1999-09-01

    The authors measured the behavioral effects of methylmercury on 16 great egret chicks (Ardea albus) in a captive dosing experiment. Birds were randomly divided into a control group and groups that received 0.5 or 5 mg methylmercury chloride per kilogram of food at between 12 and 105 d of age. They recorded activity levels, maintenance behavior, and foraging efficiency and determined that mercury affected activity and maintenance behavior. Birds dosed with 5 mg/kg became severely ataxic and were euthanized by 12 weeks of age. The authors found that, during the postfledging period, there were no differences between low-dose and placebo birds in time required to capture live fish in pools or in efficiency of capture. They did find that low-dose birds were less likely to hunt fish. Their results suggest that, at the 0.5 mg/kg concentration in food, there are significant effects of methylmercury on activity, tendency to seek shade, and motivation to hunt prey.

  3. Liver mercury and methylmercury concentrations in New England common loons (Gavia immer)

    SciTech Connect

    Pokras, M.A.; Hanley, C.; Gordon, Z.

    1998-02-01

    Loons are of special interest to environmental scientists, who see them as a sentinel species for environmental health. This bird is a top predator in both fresh- and saltwater environments. A number of studies have been published regarding contaminant-related loon pathology, and they have repeatedly found Hg contamination and ingestion of lead fishing gear to be of particular concern. Since 1989 the authors have been studying regional patterns of loon mortality and have examined more than 400 birds. One segment of this study has been to document contaminants found in loons and to attempt to associate health effects with these contaminants. This article details some of their work on Hg in loons. Liver samples collected from common loons found dead were analyzed for mercury and methylmercury concentrations. Statistical analyses demonstrated no correlation between total mercury and methylmercury levels.

  4. The good, the bad, and the ugly: weighing the risks and benefits of seafood consumption.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Michael T

    2006-01-01

    The health benefits that long chain omega-3 fatty acids contribute in the reduction of coronary heart disease are well established through a number of scientific publications. A number of studies are also examining their potential role in mitigating other diseases and health conditions such as Alzheimer's and mental disorders. Some of the latest research have shown the importance of omega-3 fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid in cognitive development in infants. Extensive scientific research and recommendations to consume fish regularly from professional societies, health organizations, and government agencies consistently support dietary guidance to consume fish regularly. Nevertheless, increasingly consumers are being warned to eliminate or minimize their consumption of certain species. The warnings, which have been issued due to risks associated with chemical contaminates such as mercury, PCB, and dioxin in fish, have received extensive coverage in news articles and stories in popular magazines. There have been a series of mixed messages to the consumer about the benefits or risks in eating seafood. In some cases, the warnings have been issued by government agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration and Environmental Protection Agency's Joint Fish Advisory on methylmercury. In other cases, the warnings have come from advocacy groups and others. Unfortunately, the advice is often miscommunicated and misunderstood by consumers. The emerging news about the benefits and risks of fish consumption will be discussed in the context of their impacts on consumer's health and well-being. PMID:16859182

  5. Determination of methylmercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ hydride generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Sandra; Fragueiro, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for preconcentration and matrix separation of methylmercury prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Generation of methylmercury hydride (MeHgH) from a 5-ml solution is carried out in a closed vial and trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3-μl volume) containing Pd(II) or Pt(IV) (50 and 10 mg/l, respectively). The hydrogen evolved in the headspace (HS) after decomposition of sodium tetrahydroborate (III) injected for hydride generation caused the formation of finely dispersed Pd(0) or Pt(0) in the drop, which in turn, were responsible for the sequestration of MeHgH. A preconcentration factor of ca. 40 is achieved with both noble metals used as trapping agents. The limit of detection of methylmercury was 5 and 4 ng/ml (as Hg) with Pd(II) or Pt(IV) as trapping agents, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The preconcentration system was fully characterised through optimisation of the following variables: Pd(II) or Pt(IV) concentration in the drop, extraction time, pH of the medium, temperatures of both sample solution and drop, concentration of salt in the sample solution, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) concentration in the drop and stirring rate. The method has been successfully validated against two fish certified reference materials (CRM 464 tuna fish and CRM DORM-2 dogfish muscle) following selective extraction of methylmercury in 2 mol/l HCl medium.

  6. Whole-lake nitrate addition for control of methylmercury in mercury-contaminated Onondaga Lake, NY.

    PubMed

    Matthews, David A; Babcock, David B; Nolan, John G; Prestigiacomo, Anthony R; Effler, Steven W; Driscoll, Charles T; Todorova, Svetoslava G; Kuhr, Kenneth M

    2013-08-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) strongly bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs resulting in exposure to humans and wildlife through consumption of fish. Production of MeHg is promoted by anaerobic conditions and the supply of inorganic Hg (Hg(2+)), sulfate (SO4(2-)), and labile organic carbon. The anaerobic sediments of stratified lakes are particularly active zones for methylation of Hg(2+) and can be an important source of MeHg to the water column during summer anoxia and fall turnover. Nitrate (NO3(-)) addition has recently been proposed as a novel approach for the control of MeHg accumulation in the hypolimnia of Hg-contaminated lakes. In 2011, a whole-lake NO3(-) addition pilot test was conducted in Hg-contaminated Onondaga Lake, NY with the objective of limiting release of MeHg from the pelagic sediments to the hypolimnion through maintenance of NO3(-)-N concentrations >1mgN/L. A liquid calcium-nitrate solution was added to the hypolimnion as a neutrally buoyant plume approximately three times per week during the summer stratification interval. Maximum hypolimnetic concentrations of MeHg and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) decreased 94% and 95% from 2009 levels, suggesting increased sorption to Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides in surficial sediments as the regulating mechanism. Increased MeHg concentrations in the upper waters during fall turnover, which had been a generally recurring pattern, did not occur in 2011, resulting in decreased exposure of aquatic organisms to MeHg. Over the 1992-2011 interval, the hypolimnetic NO3(-) supply explained 85% and 95% of the interannual variations in hypolimnetic accumulations of SRP and MeHg, respectively. PMID:23683521

  7. REFERENCE DOSE FOR METHYLMERCURY (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1997, U.S. EPA issued the Mercury Study Report to Congress (MSRC). Among the assessments in the MSRC was a state-of-the-science evaluation of the health effects of methylmercury. There has been considerable discussion within the scientific community regarding the level of e...

  8. Association between fish consumption, long chain omega 3 fatty acids, and risk of cerebrovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rajiv; Stevens, Sarah; Gorman, Donal; Pan, An; Warnakula, Samantha; Chowdhury, Susmita; Ward, Heather; Johnson, Laura; Crowe, Francesca; Hu, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    Objective To clarify associations of fish consumption and long chain omega 3 fatty acids with risk of cerebrovascular disease for primary and secondary prevention. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Studies published before September 2012 identified through electronic searches using Medline, Embase, BIOSIS, and Science Citation Index databases. Eligibility criteria Prospective cohort studies and randomised controlled trials reporting on associations of fish consumption and long chain omega 3 fatty acids (based on dietary self report), omega 3 fatty acids biomarkers, or supplementations with cerebrovascular disease (defined as any fatal or non-fatal ischaemic stroke, haemorrhagic stroke, cerebrovascular accident, or transient ischaemic attack). Both primary and secondary prevention studies (comprising participants with or without cardiovascular disease at baseline) were eligible. Results 26 prospective cohort studies and 12 randomised controlled trials with aggregate data on 794 000 non-overlapping people and 34 817 cerebrovascular outcomes were included. In cohort studies comparing categories of fish intake the pooled relative risk for cerebrovascular disease for 2-4 servings a week versus ≤1 servings a week was 0.94 (95% confidence intervals 0.90 to 0.98) and for ≥5 servings a week versus 1 serving a week was 0.88 (0.81 to 0.96). The relative risk for cerebrovascular disease comparing the top thirds of baseline long chain omega 3 fatty acids with the bottom thirds for circulating biomarkers was 1.04 (0.90 to 1.20) and for dietary exposures was 0.90 (0.80 to 1.01). In the randomised controlled trials the relative risk for cerebrovascular disease in the long chain omega 3 supplement compared with the control group in primary prevention trials was 0.98 (0.89 to 1.08) and in secondary prevention trials was 1.17 (0.99 to 1.38). For fish or omega 3 fatty acids the estimates for ischaemic and haemorrhagic cerebrovascular events were broadly

  9. Exploratory multivariate analysis of the effect of fatty fish consumption and medicinal use on heart rate and heart rate variability data

    PubMed Central

    Grung, Bjørn; Hansen, Anita L.; Berg, Mari; Møen-Knudseth, Maria P.; Olson, Gina; Thornton, David; Dahl, Lisbeth; Thayer, Julian F.

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between medicinal use and fatty fish consumption on heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate (HR) in a group of forensic inpatients on a variety of medications. A total of 49 forensic inpatients, randomly assigned to a fish group (n = 27) or a control group (n = 22) were included in the present study. Before and by the end of the food intervention period HR and HRV were measured during an experimental test procedure. An additional aim of this paper is to show how multivariate data analysis can highlight differences and similarities between the groups, thus being a valuable addition to traditional statistical hypothesis testing. The results indicate that fish consumption may have a positive effect on both HR and HRV regardless of medication, but that the influence of medication is strong enough to mask the true effect of fish consumption. Without correcting for medication, the fish group and control group become indistinguishable (p = 0.0794, Cohen’s d = 0.60). The effect of medication is demonstrated by establishing a multivariate regression model that estimates HR and HRV in a recovery phase based on HR and HRV data recorded during psychological tests. The model performance is excellent for HR data, but yields poor results for HRV when employed on participants undergoing the more severe medical treatments. This indicates that the HRV behavior of this group is very different from that of the participants on no or lower level of medication. When focusing on the participants on a constant medication regime, a substantial improvement in HRV and HR for the fish group compared to the control group is indicated by a principal component analysis and t-tests (p = 0.00029, Cohen’s d = 2.72). In a group of psychiatric inpatients characterized by severe mental health problems consuming different kinds of medication, the fish diet improved HR and HRV, indices of both emotional regulation and physical

  10. Assessment of prenatal exposure to PCBs from maternal consumption of Great Lakes fish: An analysis of PCB pattern and concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.; Darvill, T.; Lonky, E.; Reihman, J.; Pagano, J.; Bush, B.

    1999-02-01

    The current study was designed to assess the pattern and concentration of prenatal PCB exposure in the newborns of women who consumed Great Lakes fish. The authors compared the pattern and concentration of umbilical cord blood PCBs of 145 women who reported never having consumed Great Lakes fish to 134 women who reported consuming at least 40 PCB-equivalent fish lbs of Great Lakes fish in their lifetime. Although the average levels of total PCBs in cord blood were exceedingly low (approximately 1.0 ppb), the data clearly indicated that both the proportion and the absolute concentration of the most heavily chlorinated and persistent PCB homologues (homologues C17-C19) were markedly elevated in the cord blood of fish eaters. This effect grew markedly as a function of the total PCBs detected in the sample. Moreover, the concentration of the most heavily chlorinated PCB homologues was significantly dependent on how recently the fish were consumed relative to pregnancy.

  11. Atmospherically deposited PBDEs, pesticides, PCBs, and PAHs in western U.S. National Park fish: concentrations and consumption guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Luke K; Schwindt, Adam R; Simonich, Staci L Massey; Koch, Dan C; Blett, Tamara F; Schreck, Carl B; Kent, Michael L; Landers, Dixon H

    2008-04-01

    Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in 136 fish from 14 remote lakes in 8 western U.S. National Parks/Preserves between 2003 and 2005 and compared to human and wildlife contaminant health thresholds. A sensitive (median detection limit--18 pg/g wet weight), efficient (61% recovery at 8 ng/g), reproducible (4.1% relative standard deviation (RSD)), and accurate (7% deviation from standard reference material (SRM)) analytical method was developed and validated for these analyses. Concentrations of PCBs, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexanes, DDTs, and chlordanes in western U.S. fish were comparable to or lower than mountain fish recently collected from Europe, Canada, and Asia. Dieldrin and PBDE concentrations were higher than recent measurements in mountain fish and Pacific Ocean salmon. Concentrations of most contaminants in western U.S. fish were 1-6 orders of magnitude below calculated recreational fishing contaminant health thresholds. However, lake average contaminant concentrations in fish exceeded subsistence fishing cancer thresholds in 8 of 14 lakes and wildlife contaminant health thresholds for piscivorous birds in 1 of 14 lakes. These results indicate that atmospherically deposited organic contaminants can accumulate in high elevation fish, reaching concentrations relevant to human and wildlife health. PMID:18504962

  12. Atmospherically Deposited PBDEs, Pesticides, PCBs, and PAHs in Western US National Park Fish: Concentrations and Consumption Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Luke K.; Schwindt, Adam R.; Simonich, Staci L.; Koch, Dan C.; Blett, Tamara F.; Schreck, Carl B.; Kent, Michael L.; Landers, Dixon H.

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in 136 fish from 14 remote lakes in 8 western US National Parks/Preserves between 2003 and 2005 and compared to human and wildlife contaminant health thresholds. A sensitive (median detection limit −18 pg/g wet weight), efficient (61% recovery at 8 ng/g), reproducible (4.1 %RSD), and accurate (7 % deviation from SRM) analytical method was developed and validated for these analyses. Concentrations of PCBs, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexanes, DDTs and chlordanes in western US fish were comparable to or lower than mountain fish recently collected from Europe, Canada, and Asia. Dieldrin and PBDE concentrations were higher than recent measurements in mountain fish and Pacific Ocean salmon. Concentrations of most contaminants in western US fish were 1–6 orders of magnitude below calculated recreational fishing contaminant health thresholds. However, contaminant concentrations exceeded subsistence fishing cancer screening values in 8 of 14 lakes. Average contaminant concentrations in fish exceeded wildlife contaminant health thresholds for piscivorous mammals in 5 lakes, and piscivorous birds in all 14 lakes. These results indicate that atmospherically deposited organic contaminants can accumulate in high elevation fish, reaching concentrations relevant to human and wildlife health. PMID:18504962

  13. Atmospherically deposited PBDEs, pesticides, PCBs, and PAHs in western U.S. National Park fish: Concentrations and consumption guidelines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, L.K.; Schwindt, A.R.; Simonich, S.L.M.; Koch, D.C.; Blett, T.F.; Schreck, C.B.; Kent, M.L.; Landers, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in 136 fish from 14 remote lakes in 8 western U.S. National Parks/Preserves between 2003 and 2005 and compared to human and wildlife contaminant health thresholds. A sensitive (median detection limit, -18 pg/g wet weight), efficient (61% recovery at 8 ng/g), reproducible (4.1% relative standard deviation (RSD)), and accurate (7% deviation from standard reference material (SRM)) analytical method was developed and validated for these analyses. Concentrations of PCBs, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexanes, DDTs, and chlordanes in western U.S. fish were comparable to or lower than mountain fish recently collected from Europe, Canada, and Asia. Dieldrin and PBDE concentrations were higher than recent measurements in mountain fish and Pacific Ocean salmon. Concentrations of most contaminants in western U.S. fish were 1-6 orders of magnitude below calculated recreational fishing contaminant health thresholds. However, lake average contaminant concentrations in fish exceeded subsistence fishing cancer thresholds in 8 of 14 lakes and wildlife contaminant health thresholds for piscivorous birds in 1of 14 lakes. These results indicate that atmospherically deposited organic contaminants can accumulate in high elevation fish, reaching concentrations relevant to human and wildlife health. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  14. Selenomethionine reduces visual deficits due to developmental methylmercury exposures

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Daniel N.; Connaughton, Victoria P.; Dellinger, John A.; Klemer, David; Udvadia, Ava; Carvan, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Developmental exposures to methylmercury (MeHg) have life-long behavioral effects. Many micronutrients, including selenium, are involved in cellular defenses against oxidative stress and may reduce the severity of MeHg-induced deficits. Zebrafish embryos (<4 hours post fertilization, hpf) were exposed to combinations of 0.0-0.30 μM MeHg and/or selenomethionine (SeMet) until 24 hpf then placed in clean medium. Fish were tested as adults under low light conditions (~60 μW/m2) for visual responses to a rotating black bar. Dose-dependent responses to MeHg exposure were evident (ANOVA, P<0.001) as evidenced by reduced responsiveness, whereas SeMet did not induce deficits except at 0.3 μM,. Ratios of SeMet:MeHg of 1:1 or 1:3 resulted in responses that were indistinguishable from controls (ANOVA, P<0.001). No gross histopathologies were observed (H&E stain) in the retina or optic tectum at any MeHg concentration. Whole-cell, voltage-gated, depolarization-elicited outward K+ currents of bipolar cells in intact retina of slices adult zebrafish were recorded and outward K+ current amplitude was larger in bipolar cells of MeHg-treated fish. This was due to the intense response of cells expressing the delayed rectifying IK current; cells expressing the transient IA current displayed a slight trend for smaller amplitude among MeHg-treated fish. Developmental co-exposure to SeMet reduced but did not eliminate the increase in the MeHg-induced IK response, however, IA responses increased significantly over MeHg-treated fish to match control levels. Electrophysiological deficits parallel behavioral patterns in MeHg-treated fish, i.e., initial reactions to the rotating bar were followed by periods of inactivity and then a resumption of responses. PMID:17905328

  15. A new approach to understand methylmercury (CH3Hg) sources and transformation pathways: Compound-specific carbon stable isotope analysis by GC-C-IRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baya, P. A.; Point, D.; Amouroux, D. P.; Lebreton, B.; Guillou, G.

    2015-12-01

    Methylmercury (CH3Hg) is a potent neurotoxin which is readily assimilated by organisms and bio-accumulates in aquatic food webs. In humans, consumption of CH3Hg contaminated marine fish is the major route of mercury exposure. However, our understanding of CH3Hg transformation pathways is still incomplete. To close this knowledge gap, we propose to explore the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of the methyl group of CH3Hg for a better understanding of its sources and transformation mechanisms. The method developed for the determination of the δ13C value of CH3Hg in biological samples involves (i) CH3Hg selective extraction, (ii) derivatization, and (iii) separation by gas chromatography (GC) prior to analysis by combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (C-IRMS). We present the figures of merit of this novel method and the first δ13C signatures for certified materials (ERM-CE464, BCR414) and biological samples at different marine trophic levels (i.e., tuna fish, zooplankton). The implications of this new approach to trace the pathways associated with Hg methylation and the mechanisms involved will be discussed.

  16. Abundance, Distribution and Estimated Consumption (kg fish) of Piscivorous Birds Along the Yakima River, Washington State; Implications for Fisheries Management, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Major, III, Walter; Grassley, James M.; Ryding, Kristen E.

    2003-05-01

    This report is divided into two chapters. The abstract for chapter one is--Understanding of the abundance and spatial and temporal distributions of piscivorous birds and their potential consumption of fish is an increasingly important aspect of fisheries management. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance and distribution and estimated the maximum consumption (kg biomass) of fish-eating birds along the length of the Yakima River in Washington State. Sixteen different species were observed during the 4-yr study, but only half of those were observed during all years. Abundance and estimated consumption of fish within the upper and middle sections of the river were dominated by common mergansers (Mergus merganser) which are known to breed in those reaches. Common mergansers accounted for 78 to 94% of the estimated total fish take for the upper river or approximately 28,383 {+-} 1,041 kg over the 4 yrs. A greater diversity of avian piscivores occurred in the lower river and potential impacts to fish populations was more evenly distributed among the species. In 1999-2000, great blue herons potentially accounted for 29 and 36% of the fish consumed, whereas in 2001-2002 American white pelicans accounted for 53 and 55%. We estimated that approximately 75,878 {+-} 6,616 kg of fish were consumed by piscivorous birds in the lower sections of the river during the study. Bird assemblages differed spatially along the river with a greater abundance of colonial nesting species within the lower sections of the river, especially during spring and the nesting season. The abundance of avian piscivores and consumption estimates are discussed within the context of salmonid supplementation efforts on the river and juvenile out-migration. The abstract for chapter two is--Consumption of fish by piscivorous birds may be a significant constraint on efforts to enhance salmonid populations within tributaries to the Columbia River in Washington State. During 1999-2002, we determined the

  17. THE USE OF LOCAL MERCURY DEPOSITION MEASUREMENTS IN MODELING THE FATE, TRANSPORT AND BIOACCUMULATION OF METHYLMERCURY ON THE CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX TRIBAL LANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Managed farm ponds on Sioux Tribal lands were monitored as a part of a two year study to address the variation in methylmercury bioaccumulation in fishes from 2003-2004. Initial tissue residue monitoring suggested that larger ponds posed less risk for human exposure to methylmer...

  18. Ecotoxicology of mercury in fish and wildlife: Recent advances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheuhammer, Anton M.; Basu, Niladri; Evers, David C.; Heinz, Gary H.; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; Bank, Michael S.; Bank, Michael S., (Edited By)

    2012-01-01

    A number of recent studies have documented subtle, yet potentially important effects of mercury on behavior, neurochemistry, and endocrine function in fish and wildlife at currently realistic levels of environmental exposure. Current levels of environmental methylmercury exposure are sufficient to cause significant biological impairment, both in individuals and in whole populations, in some ecosystems. Future toxicological studies on fish and wildlife will focus on linking biomarkers of methylmercury exposure and associated oxidative stress to effects on reproduction and population change; determining the genetic basis for mercury-related neurotoxic and other biological changes; determining the genetic basis for species differences in sensitivity to methylmercury; and linking toxic effects of methylmercury in individual animals to population-level changes.

  19. Ecotoxicology of mercury in fish and wildlife: recent advances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheuhammer, Anton M.; Basu, Niladri; Evers, David C.; Heinz, Gary; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; Bank, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    A number of recent studies have documented subtle, yet potentially important effects of mercury on behavior, neurochemistry, and endocrine function in fish and wildlife at currently realistic levels of environmental exposure. Current levels of environmental methylmercury exposure are sufficient to cause significant biological impairment, both in individuals and in whole populations, in some ecosystems. Future toxicological studies on fish and wildlife will focus on linking biomarkers of methylmercury exposure and associated oxidative stress to effects on reproduction and population change; determining the genetic basis for mercury-related neurotoxic and other biological changes; determining the genetic basis for species differences in sensitivity to methylmercury; and linking toxic effects of methylmercury in individual animals to population-level changes.

  20. Human exposure to mercury in artisanal small-scale gold mining areas of Kedougou region, Senegal, as a function of occupational activity and fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Niane, Birane; Guédron, Stéphane; Moritz, Robert; Cosio, Claudia; Ngom, Papa Malick; Deverajan, Naresh; Pfeifer, Hans Rudolf; Poté, John

    2015-05-01

    We investigated mercury (Hg) exposure of food web and humans in the region of Kedougou, Senegal, where Hg is used for gold amalgamation in artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM). For this purpose, total mercury (THg) concentration was determined in eight fish species and two shellfish species from Gambia River and in human hair from 111 volunteers of different age and sex, living in urban locations (Kedougou and Samekouta) or in ASGM areas (Tinkoto and Bantako). THg concentrations in fish samples range from 0.03 to 0.51 mg kg(-1) wet weight (ww) and 0.5 to 1.05 mg kg(-1) ww for shellfish. THg concentrations in fish are below the WHO guideline of 0.5 mg kg(-1) ww, whereas 100 % of shellfish are above this safety guideline. In the entire set of fish and shellfish samples, we documented a decrease of THg concentrations with increasing selenium to mercury (Se:Hg) ratio suggesting a protection of Se against Hg. However, local population consuming fish from the Gambia River in the two ASGM areas have higher THg concentrations (median = 1.45 and 1.5 mg kg(-1) at Bantako and Tinkoto) in hair than those from others localities (median = 0.42 and 0.32 mg kg(-1) at Kedougou town and Samekouta) who have diverse diets. At ASGM sites, about 30 % of the local population present Hg concentrations in hair exceeding 1 mg kg(-1), defined as the reference concentration of Hg in hair. We also evidence a higher exposure of women to Hg in the Tinkoto ASGM site due to the traditional distribution of daily tasks where women are more involved in the burning of amalgams. The discrepancy between the calculated moderate exposure through fish consumption and the high Hg concentrations measured in hair suggest that fish consumption is not the only source of Hg exposure and that further studies should focus on direct exposure to elemental Hg of population living at ASGM sites. PMID:25501641

  1. Transport of pyruvate into mitochondria is involved in methylmercury toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Yong; Ishida, Yosuke; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Naganuma, Akira; Hwang, Gi-Wook

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the overexpression of enzymes involved in the production of pyruvate, enolase 2 (Eno2) and D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld3) renders yeast highly sensitive to methylmercury and that the promotion of intracellular pyruvate synthesis may be involved in intensifying the toxicity of methylmercury. In the present study, we showed that the addition of pyruvate to culture media in non-toxic concentrations significantly enhanced the sensitivity of yeast and human neuroblastoma cells to methylmercury. The results also suggested that methylmercury promoted the transport of pyruvate into mitochondria and that the increased pyruvate concentrations in mitochondria were involved in intensifying the toxicity of methylmercury without pyruvate being converted to acetyl-CoA. Furthermore, in human neuroblastoma cells, methylmercury treatment alone decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the addition of pyruvate led to a further significant decrease. In addition, treatment with N-acetylcysteine (an antioxidant) significantly alleviated the toxicity of methylmercury and significantly inhibited the intensification of methylmercury toxicity by pyruvate. Based on these data, we hypothesize that methylmercury exerts its toxicity by raising the level of pyruvate in mitochondria and that mitochondrial dysfunction and increased levels of reactive oxygen species are involved in the action of pyruvate. PMID:26899208

  2. Effects of Maternally-Transferred Methylmercury on Stress Physiology in Northern Water Snake (Nerodia sipedon) Neonates.

    PubMed

    Cusaac, J Patrick W; Kremer, Victoria; Wright, Raymond; Henry, Cassandra; Otter, Ryan R; Bailey, Frank C

    2016-06-01

    Biomagnification of methylmercury in aquatic systems can cause elevated tissue mercury (Hg) and physiological stress in top predators. Mercury is known to affect stress hormone levels in mammals, birds and fish. In this study, the effects of maternally-transferred methylmercury on the stress physiology of Northern Water Snake (Nerodia sipedon) neonates were tested. Gravid females were dosed via force-fed capsules during late gestation with 0, 0.01, or 10 µg methylmercury per gram of body mass. Plasma corticosterone levels and leukocyte differentials were analyzed in baseline and confinement-stressed neonates from all dose levels. Neither Hg nor confinement stress had a significant effect on leukocyte differentials nor was Hg related to corticosterone levels. However, stress group neonates showed lower heterophil/lymphocyte ratios and this study was the first to show that neonate N. sipedon can upregulate CORT in response to stress. These results indicate that N. sipedon may be somewhat tolerant to Hg contamination. PMID:26886428

  3. Impairments of memory and learning in older adults exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls via consumption of Great Lakes fish.

    PubMed Central

    Schantz, S L; Gasior, D M; Polverejan, E; McCaffrey, R J; Sweeney, A M; Humphrey, H E; Gardiner, J C

    2001-01-01

    An association between in utero polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure and impaired childhood intellectual functioning has been reported, but the potential impact of PCB exposure during adulthood on intellectual functioning has received little attention. We assessed the impact of PCBs and other fish-borne contaminants on intellectual functioning in older adults. The subjects were 49- to 86-year-old Michigan residents recruited from an existing cohort. Fish eaters ate > 24 lb of sport-caught Lake Michigan fish per year and non-fish eaters ate < 6 lb of Lake Michigan fish per year. A battery of cognitive tests including tests of memory and learning, executive function, and visual-spatial function was administered to 180 subjects (101 fish eaters and 79 non-fish eaters). Blood samples were analyzed for PCBs and 10 other contaminants. We evaluated cognitive outcomes using multiple regression. PCBs and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (DDE) were markedly elevated in fish eaters. After controlling for potential confounders PCB, but not DDE, exposure was associated with lower scores on several measures of memory and learning. These included the Weschler Memory Scale verbal delayed recall (p = 0.001), the semantic cluster ratio (p = 0.006), and list A, trial 1 (p = 0.037), from the California Verbal Learning Test. In contrast, executive and visual-spatial function were not impaired by exposure to either PCBs or DDE. In conclusion, PCB exposure during adulthood was associated with impairments in memory and learning, whereas executive and visual-spatial function were unaffected. These results are consistent with previous research showing an association between in utero PCB exposure and impairments of memory during infancy and childhood. PMID:11445515

  4. Comparison of Methylmercury Production and Accumulation in Sediments of the Congaree and Edisto River Basins, South Carolina, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Journey, Celeste A.

    2009-01-01

    Fish-tissue mercury concentrations (approximately 2 micrograms per gram) in the Edisto River basin of South Carolina are among the highest recorded in the United States. Substantially lower mercury concentrations (approximately 0.2 microgram per gram) are reported in fish from the adjacent (about 30 kilometer) Congaree River basin and the Congaree National Park. In contrast, concentrations of total mercury were statistically higher in sediments from the Congaree River compared with those in sediments from the Edisto River. Furthermore, no statistically significant difference was observed in concentrations of methylmercury or net methylation potential in sediments collected from various Edisto and Congaree hydrologic settings. In both systems, the net methylation potential was low (0-0.17 nanogram per gram per day) for in-stream sediments exposed to continuously flowing water but substantially higher (about 1.8 nanograms per gram per day) in wetland sediments exposed to standing water. These results are not consistent with the hypothesis that differences in fish-tissue mercury between the Edisto and Congaree basins reflect fundamental differences in the potential for each system to methylate mercury. Rather, the significantly higher ratios of methylmercury to total mercury observed in the Edisto system suggest that the net accumulation and(or) preservation of methylmercury are greater in the Edisto system. The marked differences in net methylation potential observed between the wetland and in-stream settings suggest the hypothesis that methylmercury transport from zones of production (wetlands) to points of entry into the food chain (channels) may contribute to the observed differences in fish-tissue mercury concentrations between the two river systems.

  5. High levels, partitioning and fish consumption based water guidelines of perfluoroalkyl acids downstream of a former firefighting training facility in Canada.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Fowler, Craig; Day, Sarah; Petro, Steve; Gandhi, Nilima; Gewurtz, Sarah B; Hao, Chunyan; Zhao, Xiaoming; Drouillard, Ken G; Morse, Dave

    2016-09-01

    High levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), especially perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), have been observed at locations in/around/downstream of the sites where PFOS-based firefighting foam was used repeatedly for a prolonged period. In this study, we conducted a detailed investigation of PFAA contamination in the Lake Niapenco area in Ontario, Canada, where among the highest ever reported levels of PFOS were recently measured in amphipods, fish and snapping turtle plasma. Levels and distribution of PFAAs in water, sediment and fish samples collected from the area varied widely. An upstream pond beside a former firefighting training area (FFTA) was confirmed as the source of PFAAs even 20years after the last use of the foam at the FFTA. Recent PFOS concentration in water (~60ng/L) at Lake Niapenco, about 14km downstream of the pond, was still 3-7× higher than the background levels. For PFOS, Log KD ranged 1.3-2.5 (mean±SE: 1.7±0.1), Log BAFs ranged 2.4-4.7 (3.4±0.05), and Log BSAFs ranged 0.7-2.9 (1.7±0.05). Some fish species-specific differences in BAF and BSAF were observed. At Log BAF of 4.7, fish PFOS levels at Lake Niapenco could reach 15,000ng/g, 100× greater than a "do not eat" advisory benchmark, without exceeding the current drinking water guideline of 300ng/L. A fish consumption based water guideline was estimated at 1-15ng/L, which is likely applicable worldwide given that the Log BAFs observed in this study were comparable to those previously reported in the literature. It appears that PFAA in the downstream waters increased between 2011 and 2015; however, further monitoring is required to confirm this trend. PMID:27302846

  6. Rice Methylmercury Exposure and Mitigation: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Sarah E.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Creswell, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Rice cultivation practices from field preparation to post-harvest transform rice paddies into hot spots for microbial mercury methylation, converting less-toxic inorganic mercury to more-toxic methylmercury, which is likely translocated to rice grain. This review includes 51 studies reporting rice total mercury and/or methylmercury concentrations, based on rice cultivated or purchased in 15 countries. Not surprisingly, both rice total mercury and methylmercury levels were significantly higher in polluted sites compared to non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p<0.001). However, rice percent methylmercury (of total mercury) did not differ statistically between polluted and non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p=0.35), suggesting comparable mercury methylation rates in paddy soil across these sites and/or similar accumulation of mercury species for these rice cultivars. Studies characterizing the effect of rice cultivation under more aerobic conditions were reviewed to determine the mitigation potential of this practice. Rice management practices utilizing alternating wetting and drying (instead of continuous flooding) caused soil methylmercury levels to spike, resulting in a strong methylmercury pulse after fields were dried and reflooded; however, it is uncertain whether this led to increased translocation of methylmercury from paddy soil to rice grain. Due to the potential health risks, it is advisable to investigate this issue further, and to develop separate water management strategies for mercury polluted and non-polluted sites, which minimize methylmercury exposure through rice ingestion. PMID:24972509

  7. Rice methylmercury exposure and mitigation: a comprehensive review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rothenberg, Sarah E.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Creswell, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Rice cultivation practices from field preparation to post-harvest transform rice paddies into hot spots for microbial mercury methylation, converting less-toxic inorganic mercury to more-toxic methylmercury, which is likely translocated to rice grain. This review includes 51 studies reporting rice total mercury and/or methylmercury concentrations, based on rice (Orzya sativa) cultivated or purchased in 15 countries. Not surprisingly, both rice total mercury and methylmercury levels were significantly higher in polluted sites compared to non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p<0.001). However, rice percent methylmercury (of total mercury) did not differ statistically between polluted and non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p=0.35), suggesting comparable mercury methylation rates in paddy soil across these sites and/or similar accumulation of mercury species for these rice cultivars. Studies characterizing the effects of rice cultivation under more aerobic conditions were reviewed to determine the mitigation potential of this practice. Rice management practices utilizing alternating wetting and drying (instead of continuous flooding) caused soil methylmercury levels to spike, resulting in a strong methylmercury pulse after fields were dried and reflooded; however, it is uncertain whether this led to increased translocation of methylmercury from paddy soil to rice grain. Due to the potential health risks, it is advisable to investigate this issue further, and to develop separate water management strategies for mercury polluted and non-polluted sites, in order to minimize methylmercury exposure through rice ingestion.

  8. N-acetylcysteine as an antidote in methylmercury poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Ballatori, N; Lieberman, M W; Wang, W

    1998-01-01

    Methylmercury is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and potent neurotoxin. Treatment of methylmercury poisoning relies almost exclusively on the use of chelating agents to accelerate excretion of the metal. The present study demonstrates that oral administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a widely available and largely nontoxic amino acid derivative, produces a profound acceleration of urinary methylmercury excretion in mice. Mice that received NAC in the drinking water (10 mg/ml) starting at 48 hr after methylmercury administration excreted from 47 to 54% of the 203Hg in urine over the subsequent 48 hr, as compared to 4-10% excretion in control animals. When NAC-containing water was given from the time of methylmercury administration, it was even more effective at enhancing urinary methylmercury excretion and at lowering tissue mercury levels. In contrast, excretion of inorganic mercury was not affected by oral NAC administration. The ability of NAC to enhance methylmercury excretion when given orally, its relatively low toxicity, and is wide availability in the clinical setting indicate that it may be an ideal therapeutic agent for use in methylmercury poisoning. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9520359

  9. Rice methylmercury exposure and mitigation: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Sarah E; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Creswell, Joel E

    2014-08-01

    Rice cultivation practices from field preparation to post-harvest transform rice paddies into hot spots for microbial mercury methylation, converting less-toxic inorganic mercury to more-toxic methylmercury, which is likely translocated to rice grain. This review includes 51 studies reporting rice total mercury and/or methylmercury concentrations, based on rice (Orzya sativa) cultivated or purchased in 15 countries. Not surprisingly, both rice total mercury and methylmercury levels were significantly higher in polluted sites compared to non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p<0.001). However, rice percent methylmercury (of total mercury) did not differ statistically between polluted and non-polluted sites (Wilcoxon rank sum, p=0.35), suggesting comparable mercury methylation rates in paddy soil across these sites and/or similar accumulation of mercury species for these rice cultivars. Studies characterizing the effects of rice cultivation under more aerobic conditions were reviewed to determine the mitigation potential of this practice. Rice management practices utilizing alternating wetting and drying (instead of continuous flooding) caused soil methylmercury levels to spike, resulting in a strong methylmercury pulse after fields were dried and reflooded; however, it is uncertain whether this led to increased translocation of methylmercury from paddy soil to rice grain. Due to the potential health risks, it is advisable to investigate this issue further, and to develop separate water management strategies for mercury polluted and non-polluted sites, in order to minimize methylmercury exposure through rice ingestion. PMID:24972509

  10. Do scientists and fishermen collect the same size fish? Possible implications for exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Burke, Sean; Jeitner, Christian W; Jewett, Stephen; Snigaroff, Daniel; Snigaroff, Ronald; Stamm, Tim; Harper, Shawn; Hoberg, Max; Chenelot, Heloise; Patrick, Robert; Volz, Conrad D; Weston, James

    2006-05-01

    Recreational and subsistence fishing plays a major role in the lives of many people, although most Americans obtain their fish from supermarkets or other commercial sources. Fish consumption has generally increased in recent years, largely because of the nutritional benefits. Recent concerns about contaminants in fish have prompted federal and state agencies to analyze fish (especially freshwater fish targeted by recreational anglers) for contaminants, such as mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and to issue fish consumption advisories to help reduce the public health risks, where warranted. Scientists engaged in environmental sampling collect fish by a variety of means, and analyze the contaminants in those fish. Risk assessors use these levels as the basis for their advisories. Two assumptions of this methodology are that scientists collect the same size (and types) of fish that fishermen catch, and that, for some contaminants (such as methylmercury and PCBs), levels increase with the size and age of the fish. While many studies demonstrate a positive relationship between size and mercury levels in a wide range of different species of fish, the assumption that scientists collect the same size fish as fishermen has not been examined. The assumption that scientists collect the same size fish as those caught (and eaten) by recreationalists or subsistence fishermen is extremely important because contaminant levels are different in different size fish. In this article, we test the null hypothesis that there are no differences in the sizes of fish collected by Aleut fishermen, scientists (including divers), and commercial trawlers in the Bering Sea from Adak to Kiska. Aleut fishermen caught fish using rod-and-reel (fishing rods, hook, and fresh bait) from boats, as they would in their Aleutian villages. The scientists collected fish using rod-and-reel, as well as by scuba divers using spears up to 90 ft depths. A fisheries biologist collected fish from a

  11. Potential human health risk by 234,238U and 210Po due to consumption of fish from the "Luis L. Leon" reservoir (Northern Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Porres, M. Y.; Rodríguez-Villa, M. A.; Herrera-Peraza, E.; Cabral-Lares, M.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2014-07-01

    The Conchos River is one of the most important in northern Mexico and the main surface waterway in the arid state of Chihuahua. The Luis L. Leon dam produces the Luis L. Leon Reservoir, which is the last major reservoir before the Conchos River enters the Rio Grande at the Texas-Chihuahua border. Activity concentrations (AC) of 234,238U and 210Po in fillet and liver of three stocked fish species (Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus), as well as in water from the Luis L. Leon reservoir were determined. 238U and 234U ACs in fillet samples showed values of 0.007-0.014 and 0.01-0.02 Bq kg-1 wet weight (ww), respectively. Liver samples for Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus species, present 210Po AC of 1.16-3.26 0.70-1.13 and 0.93-1.37 Bqṡkg-1 ww. The elemental Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF) for fish tissues respect to their concentrations in water was determined. Lepomis cyanellus species showed the highest BAF for total uranium in fillet, with value 1.5. The annual effective dose for uranium in adults by fish consumption in this work ranged from 4.46×10-3 to 3.68×10-2 μSvṡyear-1. The difference in concentrations of uranium in fillet among the studied species is likely primarily due to their differences in diet and habitat.

  12. A COMPUTERIZED SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE TO ASSIST TRIBAL REPRESENTATIVES IN GATHERING DATA ON TRIBAL FISH CONSUMPTION FOR RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Context
    EPA Region 10, which comprises Alaska, Washington, Idaho, and Oregon, has 269 federally recognized Native American Tribes. It is has been documented that Tribal members consume much larger quantities of fish than the general population. ORD's Human Studies Division...

  13. Atmospherically deposited PBDEs, pesticides, PCBs, and PAHs in Western US National Park fish: Concentrations and consumption guidelines

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in 136 fish from 14 remote lakes in 8 western U.S. National Parks/Preserves between 2003 and 2005 and compared to human and w...

  14. Mercury in alpine fish from four rivers in the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Shao, Junjuan; Shi, Jianbo; Duo, Bu; Liu, Chengbin; Gao, Yan; Fu, Jianjie; Yang, Ruiqiang; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-01-01

    As a global pollutant, high levels of mercury (Hg) have been found in remote ecosystem due to the long range atmospheric transport. In this study, a total of 60 fish samples were collected from four rivers across the Tibetan Plateau to study the accumulation of Hg in remote and high-altitude aquatic environment. The total Hg (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in fish muscles ranged from 11 to 2097ng/g dry weight (dw) (average: 819ng/g dw) and from 14 to 1960ng/g dw (average: 756ng/g dw), respectively. Significantly positive linear relationships were observed between the THg (r=0.591, p<0.01, n=36) and MeHg concentrations (r=0.473, p<0.01, n=36) with the trophic level of fish from Lhasa River, suggesting trophic transfer and biomagnification of Hg in this aquatic ecosystem. Moreover, the THg levels in fish had significantly positive correlations with the length (r=0.316, p<0.05, n=60) and weight (r=0.271, p<0.05, n=60) of fish. The high levels of Hg were attributed to the slow growth and long lifespan of the fish under this sterile and cold environment. Risk assessment revealed that the consumption of Oxygymnocypris stewartii, Schizothorax macropogon, Schizothorax waltoni, Schizopygopsis younghusbandi and Schizothorax o'connori would lead to a high exposure to MeHg. PMID:26899640

  15. Methylmercury biomagnification in an Arctic pelagic food web.

    PubMed

    Ruus, Anders; Øverjordet, Ida B; Braaten, Hans Fredrik V; Evenset, Anita; Christensen, Guttorm; Heimstad, Eldbjørg S; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Borgå, Katrine

    2015-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that enters the biosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources, and emitted gaseous Hg enters the Arctic from lower latitudes by long-range transport. In aquatic systems, anoxic conditions favor the bacterial transformation of inorganic Hg to methylmercury (MeHg), which has a greater potential for bioaccumulation than inorganic Hg and is the most toxic form of Hg. The main objective of the present study was to quantify the biomagnification of MeHg in a marine pelagic food web, comprising species of zooplankton, fish, and seabirds, from the Kongsfjorden system (Svalbard, Norway), by use of trophic magnification factors. As expected, tissue concentrations of MeHg increased with increasing trophic level in the food web, though at greater rates than observed in several earlier studies, especially at lower latitudes. There was strong correlation between MeHg and total Hg concentrations through the food web as a whole. The concentration of MeHg in kittiwake decreased from May to October, contributing to seasonal differences in trophic magnification factors. The ecology and physiology of the species comprising the food web in question may have a large influence on the magnitude of the biomagnification. A significant linear relationship was also observed between concentrations of selenium and total Hg in birds but not in zooplankton, suggesting the importance of selenium in Hg detoxification for individuals with high Hg concentrations. PMID:26274519

  16. Production and retention of methylmercury in inundated boreal forest soils.

    PubMed

    Rolfhus, Kristofer R; Hurley, James P; Bodaly, Richard A Drew; Perrine, Gregory

    2015-03-17

    The Flooded Uplands Dynamics Experiment (FLUDEX) was an ecosystem-scale study examining the production of methylmercury (MeHg) and greenhouse gases from reservoirs constructed on an upland boreal forest landscape in order to quantify their dependence upon carbon stores. We detail the within-reservoir production and storage of MeHg before, during, and nine years after the experiment. The reservoirs were net MeHg producers during the first two years of flooding, and net demethylating systems afterward. During years 1-3, a rapid pulse of MeHg and total Hg was observed in floodwater, followed by substantial increases in MeHg in seston and sediment. Resampling of the dry reservoirs nine years after the experiment ended indicated that organic soil MeHg was still 8 to 52-fold higher than preflood conditions, and averaged 86% of the levels recorded at the end of the third flooding year. Both total Hg and MeHg retention in soil were a strong function of organic carbon content. The time scale of soil MeHg retention may help explain the decadal time lag frequently observed for the decrease of piscivorous fish Hg concentrations in new reservoirs. Predicted extreme precipitation events associated with climate change may serve to make landscapes more susceptible to this process. PMID:25668143

  17. Flood hydrology and methylmercury availability in Coastal Plain rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste A.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Lowery, Mark A.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) burdens in top-predator fish differ substantially between adjacent South Carolina Coastal Plain river basins with similar wetlands coverage. In the Congaree River, floodwaters frequently originate in the Blue Ridge and Piedmont regions, where wetlands coverage and surface water dissolved methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations are low. Piedmont-driven flood events can lead to downward hydraulic gradients in the Coastal Plain riparian wetland margins, inhibiting MeHg transport from wetland sediments, and decreasing MeHg availability in the Congaree River habitat. In the adjacent Edisto River basin, floodwaters originate only within Coastal Plain sediments, maintaining upward hydraulic gradients even during flood events, promoting MeHg transport to the water column, and enhancing MeHg availability in the Edisto River habitat. These results indicate that flood hydrodynamics contribute to the variability in Hg vulnerability between Coastal Plain rivers and that comprehensive regional assessment of the relationship between flood hydrodynamics and Hg risk in Coastal Plain streams is warranted.

  18. Fish consumption as a source of human exposure to perfluorinated alkyl substances in Italy: analysis of two edible fish from Lake Maggiore.

    PubMed

    Squadrone, S; Ciccotelli, V; Favaro, L; Scanzio, T; Prearo, M; Abete, M C

    2014-11-01

    Extensive screening analyses of perfluorooctane sulfonate and related perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in biota samples from all over the world have identified PFCs as global pollutants and have shown their bioaccumulation into higher trophic levels in the food chain. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are environmental contaminants belonging to a chemical group known as perfluorinated compounds. PFOS and PFOA are very persistent in the environment and bioaccumulate in humans. They are potential reproductive and developmental toxicants and are considered to be emerging endocrine disrupters. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) considers both compounds to be carcinogenic and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) recently pointed out that they are associated with adverse health effects. Diet is considered the main source of exposure to PFCs, which have been found more frequently in fish and other seafood, compared to other food groups. In fact, aquatic ecosystems represent the final reservoir for PFCs due to their great affinity for sedimentary and living organic matter. In these systems, measured levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) could increase along the trophic web, ultimately affecting humans that consume aquatic species. In this study, PFOS and PFOA was detected by LC-MS/MS in muscle samples of Coregonus lavaretus (European whitefish) and Perca fluviatilis (European perch) collected from Lake Maggiore, a large lake located on the south side of the Italian Alps. PFOA was not found in any of the investigated samples above the limit of quantitation of 0.50 ng g(-1) fresh weight (fw), whereas PFOS was detected in all 90 samples with concentrations of up to 46.0 ng g(-1)fw. Mean concentrations were 22.2 ng g(-1)fw in P. fluviatilis and 20.0 ng g(-1)fw in C.lavaretus. Comparison of our results with literature data on PFOS intake suggested that fish from Lake Maggiore may be a significant source of

  19. Dietary exposure of Canadians to perfluorinated carboxylates and perfluorooctane sulfonate via consumption of meat, fish, fast foods, and food items prepared in their packaging.

    PubMed

    Tittlemier, Sheryl A; Pepper, Karen; Seymour, Carol; Moisey, John; Bronson, Roni; Cao, Xu-Liang; Dabeka, Robert W

    2007-04-18

    Human exposure to perfluorinated compounds is a worldwide phenomenon; however, routes of human exposure to these compounds have not been well-characterized. Fifty-four solid food composite samples collected as part of the Canadian Total Diet Study (TDS) were analyzed for perfluorocarboxylates and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) using a methanol extraction liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method. Foods analyzed included fish and seafood, meat, poultry, frozen entrées, fast food, and microwave popcorn collected from 1992 to 2004 and prepared as for consumption. Nine composites contained detectable levels of perfluorinated compounds-four meat-containing, three fish and shellfish, one fast food, and one microwave popcorn. PFOS and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) were detected the most frequently; concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 4.5 ng/g. The average dietary intake of total perfluorocarboxylates and PFOS for Canadians was estimated to be 250 ng/day, using results from the 2004 TDS composites. A comparison with intakes of perfluorocarboxylates and PFOS via other routes (air, water, dust, treated carpeting, and apparel) suggested that diet is an important source of these compounds. There was a substantial margin of exposure between the toxicological points of reference and the magnitude of dietary intake of perfluorinated compounds for Canadians >/= 12 years old. PMID:17381114

  20. Forecasting fish biomasses, densities, productions, and bioaccumulation potentials of mid-atlantic wadeable streams.

    PubMed

    Barber, M Craig; Rashleigh, Brenda; Cyterski, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Regional fishery conditions of Mid-Atlantic wadeable streams in the eastern United States are estimated using the Bioaccumulation and Aquatic System Simulator (BASS) bioaccumulation and fish community model and data collected by the US Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). Average annual biomasses and population densities and annual productions are estimated for 352 randomly selected streams. Realized bioaccumulation factors (BAF) and biomagnification factors (BMF), which are dependent on these forecasted biomasses, population densities, and productions, are also estimated by assuming constant water exposures to methylmercury and tetra-, penta-, hexa-, and hepta-chlorinated biphenyls. Using observed biomasses, observed densities, and estimated annual productions of total fish from 3 regions assumed to support healthy fisheries as benchmarks (eastern Tennessee and Catskill Mountain trout streams and Ozark Mountains smallmouth bass streams), 58% of the region's wadeable streams are estimated to be in marginal or poor condition (i.e., not healthy). Using simulated BAFs and EMAP Hg fish concentrations, we also estimate that approximately 24% of the game fish and subsistence fishing species that are found in streams having detectable Hg concentrations would exceed an acceptable human consumption criterion of 0.185 μg/g wet wt. Importantly, such streams have been estimated to represent 78.2% to 84.4% of the Mid-Atlantic's wadeable stream lengths. Our results demonstrate how a dynamic simulation model can support regional assessment and trends analysis for fisheries. PMID:25858149

  1. Differences in methylmercury and inorganic mercury biomagnification in a tropical marine food web.

    PubMed

    Seixas, Tércia G; Moreira, Isabel; Siciliano, Salvatore; Malm, Olaf; Kehrig, Helena A

    2014-03-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg), inorganic mercury (Hginorg) and their biomagnification factors (BMF) were evaluated along a non-degraded Brazilian bay food web. Highly significant differences (p < 0.0001) were found between MeHg and Hginorg concentrations among all organisms (microplankton, shrimp, fish and dolphin). MeHg increased with increasing trophic position while Hginorg did not present the same pattern. BMF values for MeHg were higher than 1 for all trophic interactions from source to consumer, indicating that MeHg was transferred more efficiently and biomagnified over the entire web. Only one BMF exceeding one was observed for Hginorg (27) between microplankton and their consumer, planktivorous fish. BMF values for Hginorg were significantly different than those found for MeHg (20) at the base of the food web. PMID:24452478

  2. Application of sulphur isotope ratios to examine weaning patterns and freshwater fish consumption in Roman Oxfordshire, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehlich, Olaf; Fuller, Benjamin T.; Jay, Mandy; Mora, Alice; Nicholson, Rebecca A.; Smith, Colin I.; Richards, Michael P.

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates the application of sulphur isotope ratios (δ 34S) in combination with carbon (δ 13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) ratios to understand the influence of environmental sulphur on the isotopic composition of archaeological human and faunal remains from Roman era sites in Oxfordshire, UK. Humans ( n = 83), terrestrial animals ( n = 11), and freshwater fish ( n = 5) were analysed for their isotope values from four locations in the Thames River Valley, and a broad range of δ 34S values were found. The δ 34S values from the terrestrial animals were highly variable (-13.6‰ to +0.5‰), but the δ 34S values of the fish were clustered and 34S-depleted (-20.9‰ to -17.3‰). The results of the faunal remains suggest that riverine sulphur influenced the terrestrial sulphur isotopic signatures. Terrestrial animals were possibly raised on the floodplains of the River Thames, where highly 34S-depleted sulphur influenced the soil. The humans show the largest range of δ 34S values (-18.8‰ to +9.6‰) from any archaeological context to date. No differences in δ 34S values were found between the males (-7.8 ± 6.0‰) and females (-5.3 ± 6.8‰), but the females had a linear correlation ( R2 = 0.71; p < 0.0001) between their δ 15N and δ 34S compositions. These δ 34S results suggest a greater dietary variability for the inhabitants of Roman Oxfordshire than previously thought, with some individuals eating solely terrestrial protein resources and others showing a diet almost exclusively based on freshwater protein such as fish. Such large dietary variability was not visible by analysing only the carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios, and this research represents the largest and most detailed application of δ 34S analysis to examine dietary practices (including breastfeeding and weaning patterns) during the Romano-British Period.

  3. Exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances through the consumption of fish from lakes affected by aqueous film-forming foam emissions - A combined epidemiological and exposure modeling approach. The SAMINOR 2 Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Solrunn; Vestergren, Robin; Herzke, Dorte; Melhus, Marita; Evenset, Anita; Hanssen, Linda; Brustad, Magritt; Sandanger, Torkjel M

    2016-09-01

    Releases of aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs) from airport firefighting activities have been identified as important local point sources of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in nearby waterways. PFASs can be taken up by fish, and in turn by the humans that consume them. Despite the global extent of AFFF emissions, few studies exist on related impacts on humans. We aimed to investigate the associations between the consumption of fish from AFFF-affected waters and serum PFAS concentrations in humans using a combination of statistical tools, empirical data, and toxicokinetic modeling. Participants of the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Study were the basis for this study sample, which comprised 74 persons. Fifty-nine participants who reported consuming fish from AFFF-affected waters and 15 nonconsumers completed a questionnaire and gave serum samples. Participants were classified based on their consumption of trout and char: high (n=16), moderate (n=16), low (n=27), and nonconsumers (n=15); and serum samples were tested for the presence of 15 PFASs. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) was found in all participants, with the highest concentrations detected in the high consumption group (geometric means, 28ng/mL) compared to the low consumption group and nonconsumers (10 and 11ng/mL, respectively). In an analysis of variance contrast model, a significant, positive increasing trend was seen for fish consumption and PFOS, perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA). Toxicokinetic modeling allowed us to predict the median increases in serum concentrations of PFOS, PFHxS, and PFNA among high consumers within a factor of 2.2. The combination of statistical evaluation and toxicokinetic modeling clearly demonstrated a positive relationship between consumption of fish from AFFF-affected waters and serum PFAS concentrations. Further studies on dietary exposure to other PFASs present in AFFF and its consequences on human health are warranted. PMID

  4. Wetland management and rice farming strategies to decrease methylmercury bioaccumulation and loads from the Cosumnes River Preserve, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Fleck, Jacob; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; McQuillen, Harry; Heim, Wes

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated mercury (Hg) concentrations in caged fish (deployed for 30 days) and water from agricultural wetland (rice fields), managed wetland, slough, and river habitats in the Cosumnes River Preserve, California. We also implemented experimental hydrological regimes on managed wetlands and post-harvest rice straw management techniques on rice fields in order to evaluate potential Best Management Practices to decrease methylmercury bioaccumulation within wetlands and loads to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Total Hg concentrations in caged fish were twice as high in rice fields as in managed wetland, slough, or riverine habitats, including seasonal managed wetlands subjected to identical hydrological regimes. Caged fish Hg concentrations also differed among managed wetland treatments and post-harvest rice straw treatments. Specifically, Hg concentrations in caged fish decreased from inlets to outlets in seasonal managed wetlands with either a single (fall-only) or dual (fall and spring) drawdown and flood-up events, whereas Hg concentrations increased slightly from inlets to outlets in permanent managed wetlands. In rice fields, experimental post-harvest straw management did not decrease Hg concentrations in caged fish. In fact, in fields in which rice straw was chopped and either disked into the soil or baled and removed from the fields, fish Hg concentrations increased from inlets to outlets and were higher than Hg concentrations in fish from rice fields subjected to the more standard post-harvest practice of simply chopping rice straw prior to fall flood-up. Finally, aqueous methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations and export were highly variable, and seasonal trends in particular were often opposite to those of caged fish. Aqueous MeHg concentrations and loads were substantially higher in winter than in summer, whereas caged fish Hg concentrations were relatively low in winter and substantially higher in summer. Together, our results highlight the

  5. Chemical Forms of Mercury And Selenium in Fish Following Digestion With Simulated Gastric Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Singh, S.P.; Prince, R.C.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-05-18

    Fish is a major dietary source of potentially neurotoxic methylmercury compounds for humans. It is also a rich source of essential selenium. We have used in situ mercury L{sub III}-edge and selenium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy to chemically characterize the methylmercury and selenium in both fresh fish and fish digested with simulated gastric fluid. For the mercury, we confirm our earlier finding [Harris et al. (2003) Science301, 1203] that the methylmercury is coordinated by a single thiolate donor, which resembles cysteine, and for the selenium, we find a mixture of organic forms that resemble selenomethionine and an aliphatic selenenyl sulfide such as Cys-S-Se-Cys. We find that local chemical environments of mercury and selenium do not change upon digestion of the fish with simulated gastric fluid. We discuss the toxicological implications for humans consuming fish.

  6. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY: EVALUATION OF TESTING PROCEDURES WITH METHYLAZOXYMETHANOL AND METHYLMERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing procedures that allow for early, rapid and cost-effective investigation of potential developmental neurotoxicants were evaluated using two prototypical developmental neurotoxicants, methylazoxymethanol (MAM) and methylmercury (MeHg). valuation of offspring of Long-Evans r...

  7. Adverse Effects of Methylmercury: Environmental Health Research Implications

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Philippe; Satoh, Hiroshi; Murata, Katsuyuki; Eto, Komyo

    2010-01-01

    Background The scientific discoveries of health risks resulting from methylmercury exposure began in 1865 describing ataxia, dysarthria, constriction of visual fields, impaired hearing, and sensory disturbance as symptoms of fatal methylmercury poisoning. Objective Our aim was to examine how knowledge and consensus on methylmercury toxicity have developed in order to identify problems of wider concern in research. Data sources and extraction We tracked key publications that reflected new insights into human methylmercury toxicity. From this evidence, we identified possible caveats of potential significance for environmental health research in general. Synthesis At first, methylmercury research was impaired by inappropriate attention to narrow case definitions and uncertain chemical speciation. It also ignored the link between ecotoxicity and human toxicity. As a result, serious delays affected the recognition of methylmercury as a cause of serious human poisonings in Minamata, Japan. Developmental neurotoxicity was first reported in 1952, but despite accumulating evidence, the vulnerability of the developing nervous system was not taken into account in risk assessment internationally until approximately 50 years later. Imprecision in exposure assessment and other forms of uncertainty tended to cause an underestimation of methylmercury toxicity and repeatedly led to calls for more research rather than prevention. Conclusions Coupled with legal and political rigidity that demanded convincing documentation before considering prevention and compensation, types of uncertainty that are common in environmental research delayed the scientific consensus and were used as an excuse for deferring corrective action. Symptoms of methylmercury toxicity, such as tunnel vision, forgetfulness, and lack of coordination, also seemed to affect environmental health research and its interpretation. PMID:20529764

  8. Relation of Lake Ontario fish consumption, lifetime lactation, and parity to breast milk polychlorobiphenyl and pesticide concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyniak, P.J.; Stinson, C.; Hreizerstein, H.B.; Vena, J.; Buck, G.; Mendola, P.

    1999-02-01

    Lactating female members and spouses of male members of the New York State Angler Cohort who agreed to provide breast milk samples were the subjects of this study. Milk samples were analyzed for 77 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (DDE), a metabolite of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and 1,1a,2,2,3,3a,4,5,5,5a,5b,6-dodecachlorooctahydro-1,3,4-methano-1H-cyclobuta[cd]pentalene (Mirex). The percentage of samples with quantifiable levels, above the limit of detection (LOD), varied among the individual congeners from 10 to 100%. Nine PCB congeners and DDE were found in all of the 100 samples analyzed. Fish eaters had a significantly higher level of several major PCB congeners with congeners 153 and 138 being 1.36 and 1.34 times higher, respectively. PCB and DDE concentrations, expressed on a lipid basis, varied inversely with parity. The total number of months of lifetime lactation varied inversely with the total PCB concentration in breast milk.

  9. Phytoremediation of ionic and methylmercury pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Richard B

    2010-04-28

    Our long-term goal is to enable highly productive plant species to extract, resist, detoxify, and sequester the toxic elemental pollutants, like the heavy metal mercury. Our current working hypothesis is that transgenic plants controlling the transport, chemical speciation, electrochemical state. volatilization, and aboveground binding of mercury will: a) tolerate mercury and grow rapidly in mercury contaminated environments; b) prevent methylmercury from entering the food chain; c) remove mercury from polluted soil and . water; and d) hyperaccumulate mercury in aboveground tissues for later harvest. Progress toward these specific aims is reported: to increase the transport of mercury into roots and to aboveground vegetative organs; to increase biochemical sinks and storage for mercury in leaves; to increase leaf cell vacuolar storage of mercury; and to demonstrate that several stacked transgenes, when functioning in concert, enhance mercury resistance and hyperaccumulation to high levels.

  10. Clinical and epidemiological aspects of methylmercury poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Bakir, F.; Rustam, H.; Tikriti, S.; Al-Damluji, S. F.; Shihristani, H.

    1980-01-01

    An opportunity to study the effects of methylmercury poisoning in humans was provided by the large outbreak in Iraq in 1971-2. In adults, poisoning resulted from the ingestion of home-made bread prepared from methylmercury-treated seed grain and there was a highly significant correlation between the amount of bread ingested and blood mercury levels. Poisoning in infants resulted either from prior exposure in utero or from suckling or both. Blood mercury levels were higher in infants and children than in adults. There was no increased incidence of congenital defects. Symptoms and signs of poisoning and histopathological changes were mainly confined to the CNS. Symptoms developed, on average, 1-2 months after exposure. In children there was mental retardation with delayed onset of speech and impaired motor, sensory and autonomic function. Severely affected children were blind and deaf. In adults, the clinical picture could be classified as 1, mild (mainly of sensory symptoms) 2, moderate (sensory symptoms accompanied by cerebellar signs) and 3, severe (gross ataxia with marked visual and hearing loss which, in some cases, progressed to akinetic mutism followed by coma). Grades 1 and 2 carried a better prognosis thant grade 3. Interference with transmission at the myoneural junction was found in 14% of patients studied. There was no evidence of peripheral nerve involvement per se and sensory symptoms may be of central origin. The clinical differences between the Iraqi and Japanese outbreaks may be a result, in part at least, of the severe, prolonged and continuous exposure which occurred in the latter outbreak. Improvement was observed among the mild and moderate group. Treatment with chelating agents, thiol resin, haemodialysis and exchange transfusion lowered blood mercury concentrations but produced no convincing clinical benefit. To be effective, treatment may need to be instituted soon after exposure. PMID:7383945

  11. A simple method to reduce the risk of cadmium exposure from consumption of Iceland scallops (Chlamys islandica) fished in Greenland.

    PubMed

    Bach, Lis; Sonne, Christian; Rigét, Frank F; Dietz, Rune; Asmund, Gert

    2014-08-01

    This paper studied the levels and organ distribution of the toxic heavy metal cadmium in scallops from unpolluted Greenlandic waters. The scallops had an average cadmium concentration of 2.93 ± 0.94 μg/g wet weight in the total soft tissues and no concentration dependent effect was found for gender or size (both p>0.05). The kidney was the primary organ for cadmium accumulation with a mean of 226.2 ± 111.7 μg/g wet weight, and despite the small weight of the kidney, it appeared as the principal contributor of cadmium with 92% of the total cadmium body burden. The cadmium concentrations in the total soft tissues far exceeded the EU-limit of 1 μg/g wet weight for cadmium in bivalves. Based on this, selective evisceration of the cadmium-rich kidney and digestive gland during processing can be regarded as a reliable measure to be taken in order to reduce the cadmium content of scallops used for human consumption. PMID:24815343

  12. Developmental selenomethionine and methylmercury exposures affect zebrafish learning

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Leigh E.; Carvan, Michael J.; Dellinger, John A.; Ghorai, Jugal K.; White, Donald B.; Williams, Frederick E.; Weber, Daniel N.

    2009-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and has been shown to affect learning in vertebrates following relatively low exposures. Zebrafish were used to model long-term learning deficits after developmental MeHg exposure. Selenomethionine (SeMet) co-exposure was used to evaluate its role in neuroprotection. Embryos were exposed from 2–24 hours post fertilization to (1) MeHg without SeMet, (2) SeMet without MeHg and (3) in combination of MeHg and SeMet. In case (1), the levels of MeHg were 0.00, 0.01, 0.03, 0.06, 0.10, 0.30 µM. In case (2), the levels of SeMet were 0.00. 0.03, 0.06, 0.10, 0.30 µM. In case (3), co-exposure levels of (MeHg, SeMet) were (0.03, 0.03), (0.03, 0.06), (0.03, 0.10), (0.03, 0.30), (0.10, 0.03), (0.10, 0.06), (0.10, 0.10), (0.10, 0.30) µM. Learning functions were tested in individual adults, four months after developmental exposure using a spatial alternation paradigm with food delivery on alternating sides of the aquarium. Low levels of MeHg (<0.1 µM) exposure delayed learning in treated fish; fish exposed to higher MeHg levels were unable to learn the task; SeMet co-exposure did not prevent this deficit. These data are consistent with findings in laboratory rodents. The dorsal and lateral telencephalon are the primary brain regions in fish involved in spatial learning and memory. Adult telencephalon cell body density decreased significantly at all MeHg exposures >0.01 µM MeHg. SeMet co-exposure ameliorated but did not prevent changes in telencephalon cell body density. In summary, MeHg affected both learning and brain structure, but SeMet only partially reversed the latter. PMID:19800969

  13. Methylmercury production in a Chesapeake Bay salt marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl P. J.; Gilmour, Cynthia C.

    2008-06-01

    In a detailed study of the biogeochemical factors affecting the methylation of mercury in a Chesapeake Bay salt marsh, we examined relationships between mercury methylation and numerous variables, including sulfate reduction rates, organic carbon mineralization rates, iron and sulfur chemistry, and the character of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Our data show that salt marshes are important sites of de novo methylmercury (MeHg) production in coastal ecosystems. Some of the controls on MeHg production that have been well-described in other ecosystems also impacted MeHg production in this salt marsh, specifically the effect of sulfide accumulation on mercury bioavailability. We observed some novel biogeochemical relationships with Hg(II)-methylation and MeHg accumulation, particularly the positive association of Hg(II)-methylation with zones of microbial iron reduction. On the basis of this relationship, we suggest caution in wetland and groundwater remediation approaches involving iron additions. Aqueous phase Hg complexation appeared to be the dominant control on Hg bioavailability across the marsh sites examined, rather than Hg partitioning behavior. A detailed examination of DOM character in the marsh suggested a strong positive association between Hg(II)-methylation rate constants and increasing DOM molecular weight. Overall, our results indicate that net MeHg production is controlled by a balance between microbial activity and geochemical effects on mercury bioavailability, but that a significant zone of MeHg production can persist in near surface salt marsh soils. Production of MeHg in coastal marshes may negatively impact ecosystems via export to adjacent estuaries or through direct bioaccumulation in birds, fish and amphibians that feed in these highly productive ecosystems.

  14. A Physiologically-based Model for Methylmercury Uptake and Accumulation in Female American Kestrels

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based model was developed to describe the uptake, distribution, and elimination of methylmercury in female American Kestrels (Falco sparverius). The model was adapted from established models for methylmercury in rodents. Features unique to the model include meth...

  15. Neurotoxic effects of low-level methylmercury contamination in the Amazonian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lebel, J.; Mergler, D.; Lucotte, M.; Larribe, F.; Dolbec, J.; Branches, F.; Amorim, M.

    1998-10-01

    Many studies have demonstrated mercury contamination in the Amazonian ecosystem, particularly in fish, a dietary mainstay of populations in this region. The present study focused on potential health effects of this low-level methylmercury exposure. The study was carried out in a village on the Tapajos River, a tributary of the Amazon, on 91 adults inhabitants whose hair mercury levels were inferior to 50 {micro}/g. Performance on a neurofunctional test battery and clinical manifestations of nervous system dysfunction were examined in relation to hair mercury concentrations. Near visual contrast sensitivity and manual dexterity, adjusted for age, decreased significantly with hair mercury levels (P < 0.05), while there was a tendency for muscular fatigue to increase and muscular strength to decrease in women. For the most part, clinical examinations were normal, however, hair mercury levels were significantly higher (P < 0.05) for persons who presented disorganized movements on an alternating movement task and for persons with restricted visual fields. These results suggest dose-dependent nervous system alterations at hair mercury levels below 50 {micro}g/g, previously considered a threshold for clinical effects. The profile of dysfunction in this adult population is consistent with the current knowledge on methylmercury poisoning. The long-term implications of these findings are unknown and need to be addressed.

  16. Mercury and methylmercury stream concentrations in a Coastal Plain watershed: A multi-scale simulation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knightes, Christopher D.; Golden, Heather E.; Journey, Celeste A.; Davis, Gary M.; Conrads, Paul A.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Brigham, Mark E.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is a ubiquitous global environmental toxicant responsible for most US fish advisories. Processes governing mercury concentrations in rivers and streams are not well understood, particularly at multiple spatial scales. We investigate how insights gained from reach-scale mercury data and model simulations can be applied at broader watershed scales using a spatially and temporally explicit watershed hydrology and biogeochemical cycling model, VELMA. We simulate fate and transport using reach-scale (0.1 km2) study data and evaluate applications to multiple watershed scales. Reach-scale VELMA parameterization was applied to two nested sub-watersheds (28 km2 and 25 km2) and the encompassing watershed (79 km2). Results demonstrate that simulated flow and total mercury concentrations compare reasonably to observations at different scales, but simulated methylmercury concentrations are out-of-phase with observations. These findings suggest that intricacies of methylmercury biogeochemical cycling and transport are under-represented in VELMA and underscore the complexity of simulating mercury fate and transport.

  17. Relation of Prenatal Methylmercury Exposure from Environmental Sources to Childhood IQ

    PubMed Central

    Muckle, Gina; Ayotte, Pierre; Dewailly, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Background Although prenatal methylmercury exposure has been linked to poorer intellectual function in several studies, data from two major prospective, longitudinal studies yielded contradictory results. Associations with cognitive deficits were reported in a Faroe Islands cohort, but few were found in a study in the Seychelles Islands. It has been suggested that co-exposure to another contaminant, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), may be responsible for the positive findings in the former study and that co-exposure to nutrients in methylmercury-contaminated fish may have obscured and/or protected against adverse effects in the latter. Objectives We aimed to determine the degree to which co-exposure to PCBs may account for the adverse effects of methylmercury and the degree to which co-exposure to docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may obscure these effects in a sample of Inuit children in Arctic Québec. Methods IQ was estimated in 282 school-age children from whom umbilical cord blood samples had been obtained and analyzed for mercury and other environmental exposures. Results Prenatal mercury exposure was related to poorer estimated IQ after adjustment for potential confounding variables. The entry of DHA into the model significantly strengthened the association with mercury, supporting the hypothesis that beneficial effects from DHA intake can obscure adverse effects of mercury exposure. Children with cord mercury ≥ 7.5 μg/L were four times as likely to have an IQ score < 80, the clinical cut-off for borderline intellectual disability. Co-exposure to PCBs did not alter the association of mercury with IQ. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to document an association of prenatal mercury exposure with poorer performance on a school-age assessment of IQ, a measure whose relevance for occupational success in adulthood is well established. This association was seen at levels in the range within which many U.S. children of Asian-American background are

  18. Summary of total mercury concentrations in fillets of selected sport fishes collected during 2000-2003 from Lake Natoma, Sacramento County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Slotton, Darrell G.; May, Thomas W.; Ayers, Shaun M.; Alpers, Charles N.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes results of total mercury measurements in skinless fillets of sport fishes collected during August 2000, September?October 2002, and July 2003 from Lake Natoma, a small (8,760 acre-feet) afterbay for Folsom Dam on the lower American River. The primary objective of the study was to determine if mercury concentrations in fillets approached or exceeded guidelines for human consumption. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) human-health action level for methylmercury in commercially caught fish is 1.0 ?g/g (microgram per gram); the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) human-health criterion for methylmercury residue in fish tissue is 0.30 ?g/g. Wet weight concentrations of total mercury in skinless fillets were as high as 0.19 ?g/g in bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), 0.39 ?g/g in redear sunfish (L. microlophus), 1.02 ?g/g in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), and 1.89 ?g/g in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Maximum concentrations of mercury in other fish species varied from 0.10 ?g/g in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to 0.56 ?g/g in white catfish (A-meiurus catus). Altogether, 1 of 86 largemouth bass and 11 of 11 channel catfish exceeded the FDA human-health action level. In addition, 1 of 20 redear sunfish, 26 of 86 largemouth bass, 2 of 3 spotted bass (M. punctulatus), 1 of 1 brown bullhead (A. nebulosus), and 1 of 1 white catfish exceeded the USEPA human-health criterion. These results indicate that some fish species inhabiting Lake Natoma contain undesirably high concentrations of mercury in their skinless fillets.

  19. Estimating Mercury Exposure of Piscivorous Birds and Sport Fish Using Prey Fish Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Hartman, C Alex; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Herzog, Mark P; Davis, Jay; Ichikawa, Gary; Bonnema, Autumn

    2015-11-17

    Methylmercury is a global pollutant of aquatic ecosystems, and monitoring programs need tools to predict mercury exposure of wildlife. We developed equations to estimate methylmercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish using mercury concentrations in prey fish. We collected original data on western grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis) and Clark's grebes (Aechmophorus clarkii) and summarized the published literature to generate predictive equations specific to grebes and a general equation for piscivorous birds. We measured mercury concentrations in 354 grebes (blood averaged 1.06 ± 0.08 μg/g ww), 101 grebe eggs, 230 sport fish (predominantly largemouth bass and rainbow trout), and 505 prey fish (14 species) at 25 lakes throughout California. Mercury concentrations in grebe blood, grebe eggs, and sport fish were strongly related to mercury concentrations in prey fish among lakes. Each 1.0 μg/g dw (∼0.24 μg/g ww) increase in prey fish resulted in an increase in mercury concentrations of 103% in grebe blood, 92% in grebe eggs, and 116% in sport fish. We also found strong correlations between mercury concentrations in grebes and sport fish among lakes. Our results indicate that prey fish monitoring can be used to estimate mercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish when wildlife cannot be directly sampled. PMID:26449260

  20. Estimating mercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish using prey fish monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Hartman, C. Alex; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herzog, Mark P.; Davis, Jay; Ichikawa, Gary; Bonnema, Autumn

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is a global pollutant of aquatic ecosystems, and monitoring programs need tools to predict mercury exposure of wildlife. We developed equations to estimate methylmercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish using mercury concentrations in prey fish. We collected original data on western grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis) and Clark’s grebes (Aechmophorus clarkii) and summarized the published literature to generate predictive equations specific to grebes and a general equation for piscivorous birds. We measured mercury concentrations in 354 grebes (blood averaged 1.06 ± 0.08 μg/g ww), 101 grebe eggs, 230 sport fish (predominantly largemouth bass and rainbow trout), and 505 prey fish (14 species) at 25 lakes throughout California. Mercury concentrations in grebe blood, grebe eggs, and sport fish were strongly related to mercury concentrations in prey fish among lakes. Each 1.0 μg/g dw (∼0.24 μg/g ww) increase in prey fish resulted in an increase in mercury concentrations of 103% in grebe blood, 92% in grebe eggs, and 116% in sport fish. We also found strong correlations between mercury concentrations in grebes and sport fish among lakes. Our results indicate that prey fish monitoring can be used to estimate mercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish when wildlife cannot be directly sampled.

  1. Essential and toxic metals in nine fish species for human consumption from two coastal lagoons in the Eastern Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Ruelas-Inzunza, Jorge; Páez-Osuna, Federico

    2007-08-01

    With the aim of knowing concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn; percentage of daily mineral intake (PMI) for essential elements and percentage of weekly intake (PWI) of toxic metals in commercial fish from 2 coastal lagoons in the Eastern Gulf of California, analyses were carried out in 9 species. Highest values of Cd were detected in the liver of the sharks Sphyrna lewini and Carcharhinus leucas, Pb was mostly detected in the liver of S. lewini; Cu and Mn in the liver and gills of the mullet Mugil cephalus, respectively; Fe in the liver of the catfish Galeichthys peruvianus; and Zn in viscera of the catfish Cathorops fuerthii. From the point of view of public health and considering the edible portion, only in a few cases levels were above limits considered as safe for human consumption, such is the case of Cd in muscle of bull shark C. leucas (2.8 microg g(- 1)) and catfish G. peruvianus (1.55 microg g(- 1)), Pb in muscle of scalloped hammerhead S. lewini (5.2 microg g(- 1)), Cu in muscle of scalloped hammerhead S. lewini (20.6 microg g(- 1)) and Zn in muscle of Pacific herring Opisthonema libertate (53 microg g(-1)) and S. lewini (104 microg g(- 1)). PMID:17680479

  2. Interspecific and intraspecific variation in selenium:mercury molar ratios in saltwater fish from the Aleutians: Potential protection on mercury toxicity by selenium

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn

    2014-01-01

    A number of factors affect the consumption risk from mercury in fish, including mercury levels, seasonal patterns of mercury concentrations, human consumption patterns, and sensitive populations (e.g. pregnant women, fetuses, young children, and yet unknown genetic factors). Recently the protective effects of selenium on methylmercury toxicity have been publicized, particularly for saltwater fish. We examine levels of mercury and selenium in several species of fish and seabirds from the Aleutians (Alaska), determine selenium:mercury molar ratios, and examine species-specific and individual variation in the ratios as a means of exploring the use of the ratio in risk assessment and risk management. Variation among species was similar for mercury and selenium. There was significant inter-specific and intraspecific variation in selenium:mercury molar ratios for fish, and for birds. The mean selenium:mercury molar ratios for all fish and bird species were above 1, meaning there was an excess of selenium relative to mercury. It has been suggested that an excess of selenium confers some protective advantage for salt water fish, although the degree of excess necessary is unclear. The selenium:mercury molar ratio was significantly correlated negatively with total length for most fish species, but not for dolly varden. Some individuals of Pacific cod, yellow irish lord, rock greenling, Pacific halibut, dolly varden, and to a lesser extent, flathead sole, had selenium:mercury ratios below 1. No bird muscle had an excess of mercury (ratio below 1), and only glaucous-winged gull and pigeon guillemot had ratios between 1 and 5. There was a great deal of variation in selenium:mercury molar ratios within fish species, and within bird species, making it difficult and impractical to use these ratios in risk assessment or management, for fish advisories, or for consumers, particularly given the difficulty of interpreting the ratios. PMID:22664537

  3. Methylmercury formation in a wetland mesocosm amended with sulfate.

    PubMed

    Harmon, S M; King, J K; Gladden, J B; Chandler, G T; Newman, L A

    2004-01-15

    This study used an experimental model to evaluate methylmercury accumulation when the soil of a constructed wetland is amended with sulfate. The model was planted with Schoenoplectus californicus and designed to reduce wastestream metals and metal-related toxicity. The soil was varied during construction to provide a control and two sulfate treatments which were equally efficient at overall mercury and copper removal. After an initial stabilization period, methylmercury concentrations in porewater were up to three times higher in the sulfate-treated porewater (0.5-1.6 ng/L) than in the control (<0.02-0.5 ng/L). Mean percent methylmercury was 9.0% in the control with 18.5 and 16.6% in the low- and high-sulfate treatments, respectively. Methylmercury concentrations measured in mesocosm surface water did not reflect the differences between the control and the sulfate treatments that were noted in porewater. The mean bulk sediment methylmercury concentration in the top 6 cm of the low-sulfate treatment (2.33 ng/g) was significantly higher than other treatment means which ranged from 0.96 to 1.57 ng/g. Total mercury in sediment ranged from 20.8 to 33.4 ng/g, with no differences between treatments. Results suggest that the non-sulfate-amended control was equally effective in removing metals while keeping mercury methylation low. PMID:14750744

  4. Interrelationships of blood and hair mercury concentrations in a North American population exposed to methylmercury

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, R.W.; Clarkson, T.W.

    1980-05-01

    Samples of blood and head hair were analyzed for organic and inorganic mercury from a population which consumed large amonts of fish contaminated with methylmercury. Mercury levels in newly formed hair were found to reflect those in blood with the concentration in hair being approximately 300 times that in blood. Organic and inorganic mercury levels were linearly related in both hair and blood samples, with a mean inorganic/organic ratio of 0.05 in blood and 0.21 in hair, but individual differences were found to exist. In addition, the total mercury concentration and inorganic/organic ratio in hair remained constant with time. Thus, longitudinal analysis of hair samples can provide a simple and accurate method of monitoring continuing exposure and an estimation of peak blood levels months to years after exposure.

  5. Occurrence of methylmercury in Lake Valencia, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, R.; Cai, Y.; West-Thomas, J.

    1997-12-31

    The presence of mercury in the environment has received renewed attention during recent years. This is in part due to the known human health and ecological effects of the highly toxic organomercury compounds, and to the fact that novel and improved analytical techniques such as atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (AFS) and capillary chromatography with AFS detection, have enhanced significantly the detection of trace amounts of mercury and organo mercurials in environmental samples. Such techniques have allowed for a better understanding of the biogeochemical cycle of mercury in the aquatic environment. This paper reports on the presence of methylmercury in the water column and sediments of a hyper-eutrophic lake. Lake Valencia is a freshwater lake located in North-Central Venezuela`s Aragua Valley. The lake`s surface area covers approximately 350 km{sup 2}, with a mean depth of 19 m and a maximum depth of 41 m. Due to the discharge of waste waters from the cities of Maracay and Valencia, as well as from other smaller villages and agricultural areas in its watershed, Lake Valencia has become hyper-eutrophic. The population of phytoplankton, particularly of blue-green algae, has increased dramatically during the last two decades resulting in anoxic conditions in the lower part of the water column during most of the year. In addition, concentrations of anthropogenic chemicals, including heavy metals, have increased in the Lake during the last four decades. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Neurological and neurocognitive functions from intrauterine methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kado, Yoko; Diez, Midory Higa; Kishikawa, Toshihiro; Sanada, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    In the 1950s, large-scale food poisoning caused by methylmercury was identified in Minamata, Japan. Although severe intrauterine exposure cases (ie, congenital Minamata disease patients) are well known, possible impacts of methylmercury exposure in utero among residents, which is likely at lower levels than in congenital Minamata disease patients, are rarely explored. In 2014, the authors examined neurological and neurocognitive functions among 18 exposed participants in Minamata, focusing on fine motor, visuospatial construction, and executive functions. More than half of the participants had some fine motor and coordination difficulties. In addition, several participants had lower performance for neurocognitive function tests (the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure test and Keio version of the Wisconsin card sorting test). These deficits imply diffuse brain damage. This study suggests possible neurological and neurocognitive impacts of prenatal exposure to methylmercury among exposed residents of Minamata. PMID:26267674

  7. Mercury and methylmercury contents in mine-waste calcine, water, and sediment collected from the Palawan Quicksilver mine, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, J.E.; Greaves, I.A.; Bustos, D.M.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    The Palawan Quicksilver mine, Philippines, produced about 2,900 t of mercury during mining of cinnabar ore from 1953 to 1976. More than 2,000,000 t of mine-waste calcines (retorted ore) were produced during mining, much of which were used to construct a jetty in nearby Honda Bay. Since 1995, high Hg contents have been found in several people living near the mine, and 21 of these people were treated for mercury poisoning. Samples of mine-waste calcine contain high total Hg concentrations ranging from 43-660 ??g/g, whereas total Hg concentrations in sediment samples collected from a mine pit lake and local stream vary from 3.7-400 ??g/g. Mine water flowing through the calcines is acidic, pH 3.1-4.3, and total Hg concentrations ranging from 18-31 ??g/l in this water significantly exceed the 1.0-??g/l drinking water standard for Hg recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Total Hg contents are generally lower in water samples collected from surrounding domestic wells, the mine pit lake, Honda Bay, and the nearby stream, varying from 0.008-1.4 ??g/l. Methylmercury concentrations in water draining mine calcines range from <0.02-1.4 ng/l, but methylmercury is highest in the pit lake water, ranging from 1.7-3.1 ng/l. Mercury methylation at the Palawan mine is similar to or higher than that found in other mercury mines worldwide. Much of the methylmercury generated in Palawan mine-waste calcines and those in Honda Bay is transferred to water, and then to marine fish and seafood. A food source pathway of Hg to humans is most likely in this coastal, high fish-consuming population.

  8. Long-term consumption of dried bonito dashi (a traditional Japanese fish stock) reduces anxiety and modifies central amino acid levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Funatsu, Shoichiro; Kondoh, Takashi; Kawase, Takahiro; Ikeda, Hiromi; Nagasawa, Mao; Denbow, D Michael; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Dried bonito dashi, a traditional Japanese fish stock, enhances palatability of various dishes because of its specific flavor. Daily intake of dashi has also been shown to improve mood status such as tension-anxiety in humans. This study aimed at investigating beneficial effects of dashi ingestion on anxiety/depression-like behaviors and changes in amino acid levels in the brain and plasma in rats. Male Wistar rats were given either dried bonito dashi or water for long-term (29 days; Experiment 1) or single oral administration (Experiment 2). Anxiety and depression-like behaviors were tested using the open field and forced swimming tests, respectively. Concentrations of amino acids were measured in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, cerebellum, and jugular vein. During the long-term (29 days) consumption, rats given 2% dashi frequently entered the center zone and spent more time compared with the water controls in the open field test. However, the dashi was ineffective on depression-like behavior. In the hippocampus, concentrations of hydroxyproline, anserine, and valine were increased by dashi while those of asparagine and phenylalanine were decreased. In the hypothalamus, the methionine concentration was decreased. In a single oral administration experiment, the dashi (1%, 2% or 10%) showed no effects on behaviors. Significance was observed only in the concentrations of α-aminoadipic acid, cystathionine, and ornithine in the hippocampus. Dried bonito dashi is a functional food having anxiolytic-like effects. Daily ingestion of the dashi, even at lower concentrations found in the cuisine, reduces anxiety and alters amino acid levels in the brain. PMID:24701973

  9. Consumption bomb.

    PubMed

    Harrison, P

    1999-01-01

    This article focuses on the issue of consumption in relation to the growing world population. Over the past 25 years, world population increased by 53%, while world consumption per person increased by only 39%. If consumption continues to grow at 1.4%, the world consumption per person will rise by 100% over the next 50 years with the population increasing by only half that amount. The burden of reducing the environmental impact brought about by this increase lies on technology. Technology needs to deliver major changes in improving resource productivity, and decreasing the amount of waste created. Productivity such as global food production has kept up with demand. Malnutrition persists due to poverty, and not because of the inability of the world to produce enough food. However, the prospects are much worse for resources that are not traded on markets or subject to sustainable management such as groundwater, state forests, ocean fish, and communal waste sinks like rivers, lakes, and the global atmosphere. These resources are not under the direct control of people affected by shortage. People who want to change the way these resources are used or managed have to pass through the legal or political system. Usually, political responses are slow and there has to be a very widespread environmental damage before action is taken. PMID:12295543

  10. Mechanisms of methylmercury transport across the blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Kerper, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    Methylmercury readily enters the brain of exposed individuals, and is highly neurotoxic. The goal of this research was to determine the mechanisms of methylmercury transport across both the luminal and abluminal membranes of brain capillary endothelial cells, the cells which comprise the blood-brain barrier. The rapid carotid injection technique was used in rats to investigate the uptake of methylmercury from blood into brain endothelial cells. Uptake of ([sup 203]Hg)-methylmercury complexed with L-cysteine (CH[sub 3] [sup 203]Hg-L-Cys) was more rapid than that of ([sup 203]Hg)-methylmercury complexed with D-cysteine or bovine serum albumin. Uptake of CH[sub 3][sup 203]Hg-L-Cys was saturable, and was inhibited by substrates for the L (alanine-preferring) carrier. Brain uptake of [sup 14]C-L-methionine was inhibited by CH[sub 3]Hg-L-Cys but not by CH[sub 3]HgCl. Uptake of [sup 203]Hg administered as CH[sub 3]Hg-L-Cys-glutathione (CH[sub 3][sup 203]Hg-GSH) was comparable to CH[sub 3][sup 203]Hg-L-Cys uptake at 2 [mu]M. L-Methionine and 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) inhibited [sup 203]Hg uptake administered as CH[sub 3][sup 203]Hg-GSH, whereas acivicin had no effect. This uptake was also inhibited by S-ethylglutathione when pH of the injection solution was allowed to rise to 8.5. In later experiments performed at pH 8.2, uptake of [sup 203]Hg administered as CH[sub 3][sup 203]Hg-GSH was inhibited only by BCH. To study mechanisms of methylmercury efflux from endothelial cells, a primary culture of bovine brain capillary endothelial cells was developed. Intracellular glutathione concentration was 2.6 [+-] 0.7 mM. Incubation of CH[sub 3][sup 203]HgCl-preloaded cells with GSH depletors decreased ([sup 203]Hg)-methylmercury efflux in a dose-dependent manner which correlated with intracellular GSH concentrations. ([sup 203]Hg)-Methylmercury efflux was also inhibited by GSH-S-conjugates an GSH analogs, but not by amino acids.

  11. The 2014 FDA assessment of commercial fish: practical considerations for improved dietary guidance.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jennifer; Kaplan, Jason; Lapolla, John; Kleiner, Rima

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently released its report: A Quantitative Assessment of the Net Effects on Fetal Neurodevelopment from Eating Commercial Fish (As Measured by IQ and also by Early Age Verbal Development in Children). By evaluating the benefits and potential concerns of eating fish during pregnancy and breastfeeding, the analysis suggests that pregnant women consuming two seafood meals (8-12 oz) per week could provide their child with an additional 3.3 IQ points by age 9. Recent insights from behavioral economics research indicate that other factors, such as concerns about price and methylmercury (MeHg) exposure, appear to reduce fish consumption in many individuals.To assess the net effects of eating commercial fish during pregnancy, we compared the consumption of select fish species necessary to achieve IQ benefits with the amount necessary to have adverse developmental effects due to MeHg exposure. For the species or market types evaluated, the number of servings necessary to reach MeHg exposure to observe an adverse effect was at least twice that the amount estimated to achieve peak developmental benefit. We then reported average costs of fresh and canned or pouched fish, and calculated the cost per week for pregnant women to achieve maximum IQ benefits for their gestating child. Canned light tuna was the least expensive option at $1.83 per week to achieve maximum IQ benefit.Due to their relatively low cost, canned and pouched fish products eaten with enough regularity are likely to provide peak cognitive benefits. Because of its popularity, canned and pouched tuna could provide some of the largest cognitive benefits from fish consumption in the U.S. Future FDA consumer advice and related educational initiatives could benefit from a broader perspective that highlights the importance of affordable and accessible fish choices. These observations underscore the importance of clear public health messaging that address both health

  12. Hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of methylmercury in human hair and sludge samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongmei; Hu, Bin; Chen, Beibei; Zu, Wanqing

    2008-07-01

    Two methods, based on hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid (three phase) microextraction (HF-LLLME) and hollow fiber liquid phase (two phase) microextraction (HF-LPME), have been developed and critically compared for the determination of methylmercury content in human hair and sludge by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). In HF-LPME, methylmercury was extracted into the organic phase (toluene) prior to its determination by GFAAS, while inorganic mercury remained as a free species in the sample solution. In HF-LLLME, methylmercury was first extracted into the organic phase (toluene) and then into the acceptor phase (4% thiourea in 1 mol L - 1 HCl) prior to its determination by GFAAS, while inorganic mercury remained in the sample solution. The total mercury was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the levels of inorganic mercury in both HF-LLLME and HF-LPME were obtained by subtracting methylmercury from total mercury. The factors affecting the microextraction of methylmercury, including organic solvent, extraction time, stirring rate and ionic strength, were investigated and the optimal extraction conditions were established for both HF-LLLPME and HF-LPME. With a consumption of 3.0 mL of the sample solution, the enrichment factors were 204 and 55 for HF-LLLPME and HF-LPME, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) for methylmercury were 0.1 μg L - 1 and 0.4 μg L - 1 (as Hg) with precisions (RSDs (%), c = 5 μg L - 1 (as Hg), n = 5) of 13% and 11% for HF-LLLPME-GFAAS and HF-LPME-GFAAS, respectively. For ICP-MS determination of total mercury, a limit of detection of 39 ng L - 1 was obtained. Finally, HF-LLLME-GFAAS was applied to the determination of methylmercury content in human hair and sludge, and the recoveries for the spiked samples were in the range of 99-113%. In order to validate the method, HF-LLLME-GFAAS was also applied to the analysis of a certified reference material of NRCC DORM-2 dogfish

  13. Hormetic effect of methylmercury on Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Helmcke, Kirsten J. Aschner, Michael

    2010-10-15

    Research has demonstrated the toxic effects of methylmercury (MeHg), yet molecular mechanisms underlying its toxicity are not completely understood. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) offers a unique biological model to explore mechanisms of MeHg toxicity given many advantages associated with its ease of use and genetic power. Since our previous work indicated neurotoxic resistance of C. elegans to MeHg, the present study was designed to examine molecular mechanisms associated with this resistance. We hypothesized MeHg would induce expression of gst, hsp or mtl in vivo since glutathione (GSH), heat shock proteins (HSPs), and metallothioneins (MTs) have shown involvement in MeHg toxicity. Our studies demonstrated a modest, but significant increase in fluorescence in gst-4::GFP and mtl-1::GFP strains at an acute, low L1 MeHg exposure, whereas chronic L4 MeHg exposure induced expression of gst-4::GFP and hsp-4::GFP. Knockout gst-4 animals showed no alterations in lethality sensitivity compared to wildtype animals whereas mtl knockouts displayed increased sensitivity to MeHg exposure. GSH levels were increased by acute MeHg treatment and depleted with chronic exposure. We also demonstrate that MeHg induces hormesis, a phenotype whereby a sublethal exposure to MeHg rendered C. elegans resistant to subsequent exposure to the organometal. The involvement of gst-4, hsp-4, mtl-1, and mtl-2 in hormesis was examined. An increase in gst-4::GFP expression after a low-dose acute exposure to MeHg indicated that gst-4 may be involved in this response. Our results implicate GSH, HSPs, and MTs in protecting C. elegans from MeHg toxicity and show a potential role of gst-4 in MeHg-induced hormesis.

  14. Hormetic effect of methylmercury on Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Helmcke, Kirsten J; Aschner, Michael

    2010-10-15

    Research has demonstrated the toxic effects of methylmercury (MeHg), yet molecular mechanisms underlying its toxicity are not completely understood. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) offers a unique biological model to explore mechanisms of MeHg toxicity given many advantages associated with its ease of use and genetic power. Since our previous work indicated neurotoxic resistance of C. elegans to MeHg, the present study was designed to examine molecular mechanisms associated with this resistance. We hypothesized MeHg would induce expression of gst, hsp or mtl in vivo since glutathione (GSH), heat shock proteins (HSPs), and metallothioneins (MTs) have shown involvement in MeHg toxicity. Our studies demonstrated a modest, but significant increase in fluorescence in gst-4::GFP and mtl-1::GFP strains at an acute, low L1 MeHg exposure, whereas chronic L4 MeHg exposure induced expression of gst-4::GFP and hsp-4::GFP. Knockout gst-4 animals showed no alterations in lethality sensitivity compared to wildtype animals whereas mtl knockouts displayed increased sensitivity to MeHg exposure. GSH levels were increased by acute MeHg treatment and depleted with chronic exposure. We also demonstrate that MeHg induces hormesis, a phenotype whereby a sublethal exposure to MeHg rendered C. elegans resistant to subsequent exposure to the organometal. The involvement of gst-4, hsp-4, mtl-1, and mtl-2 in hormesis was examined. An increase in gst-4::GFP expression after a low-dose acute exposure to MeHg indicated that gst-4 may be involved in this response. Our results implicate GSH, HSPs, and MTs in protecting C. elegans from MeHg toxicity and show a potential role of gst-4 in MeHg-induced hormesis. PMID:20691719

  15. Speciation of methylmercury in market seafood by thermal degradation, amalgamation and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-de-Cenzano, Manuela; Rochina-Marco, Arancha; Cervera, M Luisa; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    Sample thermal decomposition followed by mercury amalgamation and atomic absorption has been employed for the determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in fish. The method involves HBr leaching of MeHg, extraction into toluene, and back-extraction into an aqueous l-cysteine solution. Preliminary studies were focused on the extraction efficiency, losses, contaminations, and species interconversion prevention. The limit of detection was 0.018µgg(-1) (dry weight). The intraday precision for three replicate analysis at a concentration of 4.2µgg(-1) (dry weight) was 3.5 percent, similar to the interday precision according to analysis of variance (ANOVA). The accuracy was guaranteed by the use of fortified samples involving 83-105 percent recoveries, and certified reference materials TORT-2 (lobster hepatopancreas) and DORM-3 (dogfish liver), providing 107 and 98 percent recovery of certified values. The greenness of the method was also evaluated with the analytical eco-scale being obtained a final score of 73 points which means an acceptable green analysis. The method was applied to fifty-seven market samples of different fish acquired from local markets in several sampling campaigns. The content of MeHg found varied between 0.0311 and 1.24µgg(-1) (wet weight), with values that involve 33-129 percent of the total mercury content. Some considerations about food safety were also done taking into account data about Spanish fish consume and Tolerable Weekly Intake (TWI) established for MeHg. PMID:24927385

  16. Effects of experimental thermocline and oxycline deepening on methylmercury bioaccumulation in a Canadian shield lake.

    PubMed

    Perron, Tania; Chételat, John; Gunn, John; Beisner, Beatrix E; Amyot, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Environmental disturbances like deforestation or climate change may influence lake thermal and oxic stratification, thereby modifying cycles of contaminants such as mercury (Hg). In a lake naturally separated into three basins, the thermocline and oxycline of an experimental basin were deepened by 4 and 3 m, respectively, to study the effect on the methylmercury (MeHg) accumulation. This treatment decreased hypolimnetic MeHg concentration by approximately 90%, zooplankton concentrations by 30 to 50%, and in some fish by 45%. A multiple linear regression indicated that oxycline depth significantly influenced hypolimnetic MeHg concentrations, with no significant effect of thermocline depth, anoxic water volume, interface area of oxic-anoxic water, and sediment area in contact with anoxic water. Fish MeHg decline varied, with a greater response by low oxygen-tolerant bullhead. Increased pelagic primary and secondary production likely caused zooplankton and fish MeHg decreases via algal and growth dilution. Environmental changes leading to oxycline deepening are therefore predicted to cause a decrease in MeHg bioaccumulation in similar Canadian Shield lakes. If associated ecosystem impacts related to the deepening treatment are deemed acceptable, then this experiment provides a potential remediation method for small lakes confronted with MeHg accumulation. PMID:24512142

  17. Determination of methylmercury in marine biota samples: method validation.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

    2014-05-01

    Regulatory authorities are expected to measure concentration of contaminants in foodstuffs, but the simple determination of total amount cannot be sufficient for fully judging its impact on the human health. In particular, the methylation of metals generally increases their toxicity; therefore validated analytical methods producing reliable results for the assessment of methylated species are highly needed. Nowadays, there is no legal limit for methylmercury (MeHg) in food matrices. Hence, no standardized method for the determination of MeHg exists within the international jurisdiction. Contemplating the possibility of a future legislative limit, a method for low level determination of MeHg in marine biota matrixes, based on aqueous-phase ethylation followed by purge and trap and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to pyrolysis-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (Py-AFS) detection, has been developed and validated. Five different extraction procedures, namely acid and alkaline leaching assisted by microwave and conventional oven heating, as well as enzymatic digestion, were evaluated in terms of their efficiency to extract MeHg from Scallop soft tissue IAEA-452 Certified Reference Material. Alkaline extraction with 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) with 5M HCl and enzymatic digestion with protease XIV yielded the highest extraction recoveries. Standard addition or the introduction of a dilution step were successfully applied to overcome the matrix effects observed when microwave-assisted extraction using 25% (w/w) KOH in methanol or 25% (w/v) aqueous TMAH were used. ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines were followed to perform the validation of the methodology. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration curve, linearity (0.9995), working range (1-800pg), recovery (97%), precision, traceability, limit of detection (0.45pg), limit of quantification (0.85pg) and expanded uncertainty (15.86%, k=2) were assessed with Fish protein Dorm-3 Certified

  18. A Physiologically Based Model for Methylmercury in Female American Kestrels

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model was developed to describe the uptake, distribution, and elimination of methylmercury (CH3Hg) in female American kestrels. The model consists of six tissue compartments corresponding to the brain, liver, kidney, gut, red blood cel...

  19. Transfer of methylmercury to hens' eggs after oral administration

    SciTech Connect

    Kambamanoli-Dimou, A. ); Kamarianos, A.; Kilikidis, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The present investigation was performed to elucidate the possibility of transport of methylmercury into eggs after its oral administration. Also, to determine the quantity of mercury excreted via eggs after oral administration of a certain quantity of this element once or in doses.

  20. The Engineered Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methylmercury Pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Meagher; Sarah Marshburn; Andrew Heaton; Anne Marie Zimer; Raoufa Rahman

    2003-06-24

    Our current specific objectives are to use transgenic plants to control the chemical species, electrochemical state, and above ground binding of mercury to (a) prevent methylmercury from entering the food-chain, (b) remove mercury from polluted sites, and (c) hyperaccumulate mercury in above ground tissues for later harvest.

  1. ETHYLMERCURY: FORMATION IN PLANT TISSUES AND RELATION TO METHYLMERCURY FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seedlings of the common dwarf garden pea, Pisum sativum, cv. Little Marvel, exposed to elemental mercury vapor formed both methylmercury and ethylmercury in all parts of the plant. Concentrations of both organomercury compounds fluctuated considerably over a 48-hour exposure peri...

  2. BACTERIAL METHYLMERCURY DEGRADATION IN FLORIDA EVERGLADES PEAT SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylmercury (MeHg) degradation was investigated along an eutrophication gradient in the Florida Everglades by quantifying 14CH4 and 14CO2 production after incubation of anaerobic sediments with [14C]MeHg. Degradation rate constants (k) were consistently <=0.1 d-1 and decreased ...

  3. Expression of human oxoguanine glycosylase 1 or formamidopyrimidine glycosylase in human embryonic kidney 293 cells exacerbates methylmercury toxicity in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ondovcik, Stephanie L.; Preston, Thomas J.; McCallum, Gordon P.; Wells, Peter G.

    2013-08-15

    Exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) acutely at high levels, or via chronic low-level dietary exposure from daily fish consumption, can lead to adverse neurological effects in both the adult and developing conceptus. To determine the impact of variable DNA repair capacity, and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidatively damaged DNA in the mechanism of toxicity, transgenic human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells that stably express either human oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOgg1) or its bacterial homolog, formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg), which primarily repair the oxidative lesion 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), were used to assess the in vitro effects of MeHg. Western blotting confirmed the expression of hOgg1 or Fpg in both the nuclear and mitochondrial compartments of their respective cell lines. Following acute (1–2 h) incubations with 0–10 μM MeHg, concentration-dependent decreases in clonogenic survival and cell growth accompanied concentration-dependent increases in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, ROS formation, 8-oxodG levels and apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, consistent with the onset of cytotoxicity. Paradoxically, hOgg1- and Fpg-expressing HEK 293 cells were more sensitive than wild-type cells stably transfected with the empty vector control to MeHg across all cellular and biochemical parameters, exhibiting reduced clonogenic survival and cell growth, and increased LDH release and DNA damage. Accordingly, upregulation of specific components of the base excision repair (BER) pathway may prove deleterious potentially due to the absence of compensatory enhancement of downstream processes to repair toxic intermediary abasic sites. Thus, interindividual variability in DNA repair activity may constitute an important risk factor for environmentally-initiated, oxidatively damaged DNA and its pathological consequences. - Highlights: • hOgg1 and Fpg repair oxidatively damaged DNA. • hOgg1- and Fpg-expressing cells are more

  4. Evaluation of glutathione S-transferase GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms and methylmercury metabolism in an exposed Amazon population.

    PubMed

    Mazzaron Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael; de Marco, Kátia Cristina; Grotto, Denise; Valentini, Juliana; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Leite Braga, Gilberto Úbila; Barbosa, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decades, the presence of methylmercury (MeHg) in the Amazon region of Brazil and its adverse human health effects have given rise to much concern. The biotransformation of MeHg occurs mainly through glutathione (GSH) in the bile mediated by conjugation with glutathione S-transferases (GST). Epidemiological evidence has shown that genetic polymorphisms may affect the metabolism of MeHg. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between GST polymorphisms, GSH, and Hg levels in blood (B-Hg) and in hair (H-Hg) of an Amazon population chronically exposed to the metal through fish consumption. Blood and hair samples were collected from 144 volunteers (71 men, 73 women). B-Hg and H-Hg levels were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and GSH levels were evaluated by a spectrophotometric method. GSTM1 and T1 genotyping evaluation were carried out by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Mean levels of B-Hg and H-Hg were 37.7 ± 24.5 μg/L and 10.4 ± 7.4 μg/g, respectively; GSH concentrations ranged from 0.52 to 2.89 μM/ml of total blood. Distributions for GSTM1/T1, GSTM1/GSTT1*0, GSTM1*0/T1, and GSTM1*0/GSTT1*0 genotypes were 35.4, 22.2, 25.0, and 17.4%, respectively. GSTT1 genotype carriers presented lower levels of B-Hg and H-Hg when compared to other genotypes carriers. In addition, GSTM1*0/GSTT1*0 individuals presented higher Hg levels in blood and hair than subjects presenting any other genotypes. There appeared to be no evidence of an effect of polymorphisms on GSH levels. Therefore, our data suggest that GST polymorphisms may be associated with MeHg detoxification. PMID:22852846

  5. Photolytic degradation of methylmercury enhanced by binding to natural organic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tong; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2010-07-01

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that accumulates in food webs and poses a significant risk to human health. In natural water bodies, methylmercury concentrations remain low due to the degradation of methylmercury into inorganic mercury by sunlight, a process known as photodecomposition. Rates of photodecomposition are relatively rapid in freshwater lakes, and slow in marine waters, but the cause of this difference is not clear. Here, we carry out incubation experiments with artificial freshwater and seawater samples to examine the mechanisms regulating methylmercury photodecomposition. We show that singlet oxygen-a highly reactive form of dissolved oxygen generated by sunlight falling on dissolved organic matter-drives photodecomposition. However, in our experiments the rate of methylmercury degradation depends on the type of methylmercury-binding ligand present in the water. Relatively fast degradation rates (similar to observations in freshwater lakes) were detected when methylmercury species were bound to sulphur-containing ligands such as glutathione and mercaptoacetate. In contrast, methylmercury-chloride complexes, which are the dominant form of methylmercury in marine systems, did not degrade as easily. Our results could help to explain why methylmercury photodecomposition rates are relatively rapid in freshwater lakes and slow in marine waters.

  6. Temporal Assessment of Methylmercury in an Endangered Pacific Seabird (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, A. E.; Bank, M. S.; Shine, J. P.; Edwards, S. V.

    2010-12-01

    Methylmercury cycling in the Pacific Ocean has garnered significant attention in recent years, especially with regard to rising mercury emissions from Asia. Uncertainty exists over the extent to which mercury accumulation in biota may have resulted from increases in anthropogenic output over time. To address this, we assessed historical and recent mercury exposure in an endangered Pacific seabird, the Black-footed Albatross (Phoebastria nigripes), using feather samples from museum specimens spanning the past 130 years. We additionally analyzed stable isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) to control for confounding factors of temporal change in trophic structure or diet. As a long-lived, wide-ranging, top marine predator and an endangered, keystone species in the North Pacific, the Black-footed Albatross comprises an ideal sentinel species for determining the effect of both global increases in mercury throughout the previous century and regional increases during the recent past on bioaccumulation and risk among avian wildlife. A significantly higher proportion of post-1940 samples contained above deleterious threshold levels (~40,000 ng/g) of methylmercury relative to pre-1940 samples, and mean concentrations were significantly higher in post-1990 than in pre-1990 samples. We also found increasingly higher amounts of (presumably curator-mediated) inorganic mercury contamination in older museum samples for the Black-footed Albatross as well as two non-pelagic comparison species, which informs future studies on bioaccumulation in museum specimens to analyze methylmercury rather than total mercury in all but recently collected specimens. Although complementary stable isotope data suggested no historic change in albatross trophic level, there was a significant change in δ13C signature over time. However, after controlling for these potential confounders, time significantly and positively associated with methylmercury exposure. Changes in methylmercury levels

  7. Parental Whole Life Cycle Exposure to Dietary Methylmercury in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Affects the Behavior of Offspring.

    PubMed

    Mora-Zamorano, Francisco X; Klingler, Rebekah; Murphy, Cheryl A; Basu, Niladri; Head, Jessica; Carvan, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an established neurotoxicant of concern to fish-eating organisms. While most studies have focused on the fish consumers, much less is known about the effects of MeHg on the fish themselves, especially following exposures to chronic and environmentally relevant scenarios. Here we evaluated the behavioral effects of developmental MeHg insult by exposing parental generations of zebrafish to an environmentally realistic MeHg dietary concentration (1 ppm) and two higher concentrations (3 and 10 ppm) throughout their whole life span. Upon reaching adulthood, their offspring were analyzed through a series of behavioral tests, including the visual-motor response (VMR) assay, analysis of spontaneous swimming and evaluation of foraging efficiency. The VMR assay identified decreased locomotor output in the 6 day postfertilization (dpf) offspring of fish exposed to 3 and 10 ppm MeHg. However, in a second test 7 dpf fish revealed an increase in locomotor activity in all MeHg exposures tested. Increases in locomotion continued to be observed until 16 dpf, which coincided with increased foraging efficiency. These results suggest an association between MeHg and hyperactivity, and imply that fish chronically exposed to MeHg in the wild may be vulnerable to predation. PMID:27023211

  8. Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds.

    PubMed

    Davis, J A; Looker, R E; Yee, D; Marvin-Di Pasquale, M; Grenier, J L; Austin, C M; McKee, L J; Greenfield, B K; Brodberg, R; Blum, J D

    2012-11-01

    San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads

  9. Reducing Methylmercury Accumulation in the Food Webs of San Francisco Bay and Its Local Watersheds

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J.A.; Looker, R.E.; Yee, D.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Grenier, J.L.; Austin, C.M.; McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K.; Brodberg, R.; Blum, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads

  10. Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.A.; Looker, R.E.; Yee, D.; Marvin-Di Pasquale, M.; Austin, C.M.; McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K.; Brodberg, R.; Blum, J.D.

    2012-11-15

    San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads

  11. Fetal and maternal immune responses to methylmercury exposure: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Nyland, Jennifer F; Wang, Susie B; Shirley, Devon L; Santos, Elisabeth O; Ventura, Ana Maria; de Souza, Jose M; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2011-05-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant with known neurodevelopmental effects. In humans, prenatal exposures primarily occur through maternal consumption of contaminated fish. In this study, we evaluated the association between prenatal exposure to MeHg and titers of total immunoglobulins (Ig) and specific autoantibodies in both mothers and fetuses by analyzing maternal and cord blood serum samples. We examined multiple immunoglobulin isotypes to determine if these biomarkers could inform as to fetal or maternal responses since IgG but not IgM can cross the placenta. Finally, we evaluated serum cytokine levels to further characterize the immune response to mercury exposure. The study was conducted using a subset of serum samples (N=61 pairs) collected from individuals enrolled in a population surveillance of MeHg exposures in the Brazilian Amazon during 2000/2001. Serum titers of antinuclear and antinucleolar autoantibodies were measured by indirect immunofluorescence. Serum immunoglobulins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and BioPlex multiplex assay. Serum cytokines were measured by BioPlex multiplex assay. In this population, the geometric mean mercury level was within the 95th percentile for US populations of women of childbearing age but the upper level of the range was significantly higher. Fetal blood mercury levels were higher (1.35 times) than those in their mothers, but highly correlated (correlation coefficient [r]=0.71; 95% CI: 0.54, 0.89). Total IgG (r=0.40; 95% CI: 0.19, 0.62) and antinuclear autoantibody (odds ratio [OR]=1.05; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.08) levels in paired maternal and fetal samples were also associated; in contrast, other immunoglobulin (IgM, IgE, and IgA) levels were not associated between pairs. Total IgG levels were significantly correlated with both maternal (r=0.60; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.96) and cord blood mercury levels (r=0.61; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.97), but individual isotypes were not. Serum

  12. Methylmercury-induced changes in gene transcription associated with neuroendocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, Catherine A.; Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Annis, Mandy L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Chasar, Lia C.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    Methyl-mercury (MeHg) is a potent neuroendocrine disruptor that impairs reproductive processes in fish. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize transcriptomic changes induced by MeHg exposure in the female largemouth bass (LMB) hypothalamus under controlled laboratory conditions, (2) investigate the health and reproductive impacts of MeHg exposure on male and female largemouth bass (LMB) in the natural environment, and (3) identify MeHg-associated gene expression patterns in whole brain of female LMB from MeHg-contaminated habitats. The laboratory experiment was a single injection of 2.5 μg MeHg/g body weight for 96 h exposure. The field survey compared river systems in Florida, USA with comparably lower concentrations of MeHg (Wekiva, Santa Fe, and St. Johns Rivers) in fish and one river system with LMB that contained elevated concentrations of MeHg (St. Marys River). Microarray analysis was used to quantify transcriptomic responses to MeHg exposure. Although fish at the high-MeHg site did not show overt health or reproductive impairment, there were MeHg-responsive genes and pathways identified in the laboratory study that were also altered in fish from the high-MeHg site relative to fish at the low-MeHg sites. Gene network analysis suggested that MeHg regulated the expression targets of neuropeptide receptor and steroid signaling, as well as structural components of the cell. Disease-associated gene networks related to MeHg exposure, based upon expression data, included cerebellum ataxia, movement disorders, and hypercalcemia. Gene responses in the CNS are consistent with the documented neurotoxicological and neuroendocrine disrupting effects of MeHg in vertebrates.

  13. Impact of dietary selenium on methylmercury toxicity in juvenile Atlantic cod: a transcriptional survey.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Amlund, Heidi; Sæle, Øystein; Ellingsen, Ståle; Skjaerven, Kaja H

    2015-02-01

    Selenium (Se) and its derivatives are known to have protective effects against mercury (Hg) toxicity in mammals. In this study we wanted to evaluate whether Se co-exposure affect the transcription of methylmercury (MeHg) toxicity-relevant genes in early life stages of fish. Juvenile Atlantic cod were exposed to regular feed (control), Se-spiked feed (3mg Se kg(-1)), MeHg-spiked feed (10mg Hg kg(-1)) or to Se- and MeHg-spiked feed (3mg Se kg(-1) and 10mg Hg kg(-1), respectively) for ten weeks. Liver tissue was harvested for transcriptional analysis when the fish were weighing 11.4 ± 3.2g. Accumulated levels of Hg in liver of the two groups of fish exposed to MeHg were 1.5mg Hg kg(-1) wet weight, or 44-fold higher than in the control group, while the Se concentrations differed with less than 2-fold between the fish groups. Selenium co-exposure had no effect on the accumulated levels of Hg in liver tissue; however, MeHg co-exposure reduced the accumulated level of Se. Dietary exposure to MeHg had no effect on fish growth. Interaction effects between Se and MeHg exposure were observed for the transcriptional levels of CAT, GPX1, GPX3, NFE2L2, UBA52, SEPP1 and DNMT1. Significant effects of MeHg exposure were seen for DNMT1 and PPARG, while effects of Se exposure were seen for GPX4B and SEPP1A, as well as for DNA methyltransferase activity. The transcriptional results suggest, by considering up-regulation as a proxy for negative impact and at the tested concentrations, a pro-oxidative effect of Se co-exposure with MeHg, rather than an antioxidative effect. PMID:25062025

  14. Abiotic production of methylmercury by solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Steven D; O'Driscoll, Nelson J; Tordon, Robert; Hill, Jonathan; Beauchamp, Stephen; Lean, David R S

    2005-02-15

    Methylmercury [MeHg(I) in the aerobic surface water of lakes is thought to be rapidly degraded, but contrary to expectations, we show that MeHg(I) concentrations often increase during sunlight hours or remain relatively constant. We hypothesized that there were water column processes that generated MeHg(I) and that these processes were linked to dissolved organic matter (DOM) and solar radiation. A 2-day diurnal pattern of MeHg(I) in surface water with corresponding bottled controls was assessed for two contrasting lakes in Kejimikujik, Nova Scotia, Canada. Following this study, a tangential ultrafiltrator was used to size-fractionate and generate a concentration gradient of DOM from four different lakes located near Lac Berthelot, Quebec, Canada. The watersheds of two of these lakes were not substantially logged whereas the other two had been extensively logged. Different size fractions of DOM as well as different concentrations of DOM were exposed to sunlight for varying periods of time. We observed that, in Keiimikujik, the concentration of MeHg(I) in surface waters peaked in the early afternoon. Furthermore, this also occurred in bottled water for one of the lakes, Puzzle, eliminating the possibility that in-lake mixing played a role in this pattern. The formation of MeHg(I) was found to be dependent on the size fraction and amount of DOM present in the water. Specifically, DOM less than 5 kDa or between 30 and 300 kDa generated MeHg(I) when exposed to sunlight, but larger fractions did not. Furthermore, although data are limited, we found that water from lakes with logged watersheds generated MeHg(I) when exposed to sunlight, whereas water from lakes with low levels of logging in the undisturbed watersheds did not. Our results demonstrate that MeHg(I) can be formed in freshwaters of certain lakes in response to solar radiation. This photoproduction of MeHg(I) is dependent on DOM concentrations and type, with the importance of water chemistry not yet clear. The

  15. Binding Strength of Methylmercury to Aquatic NOM

    SciTech Connect

    Khwaja, A.; Bloom, P; Brezonik, P

    2010-01-01

    A competitive-ligand, equilibrium-dialysis technique using bromide measured methylmercury (MeHg{sup +}) binding to Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) and NOM from a lake and a bog in Minnesota. Distribution coefficients (K{sub OC}) and stability constants (K{prime}) varied only slightly over a range of [Br{sup -}] and ratios of MeHg{sup +} to reduced sulfur, S{sub re}, the putative NOM binding site. For SRFA at pH 3.0, K{sub OC} ranged from 10{sup 7.7} to 10{sup 8.2} and K{prime} ranged from 10{sup 15.5} to 10{sup 16.0} over MeHg{sup +}:S{sub re} ratios from 1:1220 to 1:12200 (well below S{sub re} saturation). The importance of pH depends on the calculation model for binding constants. Over pH 2.98-7.62, K{sub OC} had little pH dependence (slope = 0.2; r{sup 2} = 0.4; range 10{sup 7.7}-10{sup 9.1}), but K{prime} calculated using thiol ligands with pK{sub a} = 9.96 had an inverse relationship (slope = -0.8; r{sup 2} = 0.9; range 10{sup 15.6}-10{sup 12.3}). A pH-independent model was obtained only with thiol pK{sub a} {le} 4. The mean K{prime}{sub 4} for SRFA (K{prime} with thiol pK{sub a} = 4.2) was 10{sup 9.8} (range 10{sup 9.11}-10{sup 10.27}) and small slope (0.02). Similar values were found for Spring Lake NOM; bog S2 NOM had values one-tenth as large. These constants are generally similar to published values; differences reflect variations in methods, pH, types of NOM, and calculation models.

  16. Mercury Accumulation, Structural Damages, and Antioxidant and Immune Status Changes in the Gilthead Seabream (Sparus aurata L.) Exposed to Methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Guardiola, F A; Chaves-Pozo, E; Espinosa, C; Romero, D; Meseguer, J; Cuesta, A; Esteban, M A

    2016-05-01

    In aquatic systems, mercury (Hg) is an environmental contaminant that causes acute and chronic damage to multiple organs. In fish, practically all of the organic Hg found is in the form of methylmercury (MeHg), which has been associated with animal and human health problems. This study evaluates the impact of waterborne-exposure to sublethal concentrations of MeHg (10 μg L(-1)) in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata). Hg was seen to accumulate in liver and muscle, and histopathological damage to skin and liver was detected. Fish exposed to MeHg showed a decreased biological antioxidant potential and increased levels of the reactive oxygen molecules compared with the values found in control fish (nonexposed). Increased liver antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase and catalase) were detected in 2 day-exposed fish with respect to the values of control fish. However, fish exposed to MeHg for 10 days showed liver antioxidant enzyme levels similar to those of the control fish but had increased hepato-somatic index and histopathological alterations in liver and skin. Serum complement levels were higher in fish exposed to MeHg for 30 days than in control fish. Moreover, head-kidney leukocyte activities increased, although only phagocytosis and peroxidase activities showed a significant increase after 10 and 30 days, respectively. The data show that 30 days of exposure to waterborne MeHg provokes more significant changes in fish than a short-term exposure of 2 or 10 days. PMID:26906265

  17. Determinants of polychlorinated biphenyls and methylmercury exposure in inuit women of childbearing age.

    PubMed Central

    Muckle, G; Ayotte, P; Dewailly E; Jacobson, S W; Jacobson, J L

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to to identify maternal characteristics associated with traditional food consumption and to examine food items associated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury body burden in pregnant Inuit women from Northern Québec. We interviewed women from three communities at mid-pregnancy and at 1 and 11 months postpartum. We measured PCBs, Hg, and selenium in maternal blood; Hg was also measured in maternal hair. The women reported eating significant amounts of fish, beluga muktuk/fat, seal meat, and seal fat. Although consumption of fish and seal was associated with lower socioeconomic status, consumption of beluga whale was uniform across strata. Fish and seal meat consumption was associated with increased Hg concentrations in hair. Traditional food intake during pregnancy was unrelated to PCB body burden, which is more a function of lifetime consumption. This study corroborated previous findings relating marine mammal and fish consumption to increased Hg and selenium body burden. Despite widespread knowledge regarding the presence of these contaminants in traditional foods, a large proportion of Inuit women increased their consumption of these foods during pregnancy, primarily because of pregnancy-related changes in food preferences and the belief that these foods are beneficial during pregnancy. PMID:11673127

  18. Mercury concentrations and health risk assessment for two fish species, Barbus grypus and Barbus luteus, from the Maroon River, Khuzestan Province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Asefi, Mehrnaz; Zamani-Ahmadmahmoodi, Rasool

    2015-10-01

    The purposes of this study are to investigate the concentration of mercury in edible muscle tissues of two popular edible fish species: the Shirbot (Barbus grypus) and Hemri (Barbus luteus), from the Maroon River, Khuzestan Province, Iran, and to assess the risk of their toxicity on human health. We collected 20 samples of each species from the river, and after biometry and determination of their age and sex, concentration of total mercury (assumed to be about 100% methylmercury) was measured. For B. grypus, mercury averaged 0.16 ± 0.02 μg g(-1) wet weight, and for B. luteus, it averaged 0.08 ± 0.02 μg g(-1) wet weight. Although mercury has been reported to accumulate with age, length, and trophic level in many studies, we did not find a significant correlation among age, sex, length, and mercury content in either of these omnivorous species. Mercury levels (maximum 0.37 μg g(-1) wet weight) were below international standards. Consumption of these fish would not pose a serious health hazard to Iranian consumers at the average national consumption of 17.53 g day(-1). However, high-end consumers eating more than 250 g week(-1) and pregnant women should be attentive in choosing fish low in mercury, for example, B. luteus rather than B. grypus. PMID:26419381

  19. Species differences in the sensitivity of avian embryos to methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Klimstra, J.D.; Stebbins, K.R.; Kondrad, S.L.; Erwin, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    We injected doses of methylmercury into the air cells of eggs of 26 species of birds and examined the dose-response curves of embryo survival. For 23 species we had adequate data to calculate the median lethal concentration (LC50). Based on the dose-response curves and LC50s, we ranked species according to their sensitivity to injected methylmercury. Although the previously published embryotoxic threshold of mercury in game farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) has been used as a default value to protect wild species of birds, we found that, relative to other species, mallard embryos are not very sensitive to injected methylmercury; their LC50 was 1.79 ug/g mercury on a wet-weight basis. Other species we categorized as also exhibiting relatively low sensitivity to injected methylmercury (their LC50s were 1 ug/g mercury or higher) were the hooded merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus), lesser scaup (Aythya affinis), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus), and laughing gull (Larus atricilla). Species we categorized as having medium sensitivity (their LC50s were greater than 0.25 ug/g mercury but less than 1 ug/g mercury) were the clapper rail (Rallus longirostris), sandhill crane (Grus canadensis), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), chicken (Gallus gallus), common grackle (Quiscalus quiscula), tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), herring gull (Larus argentatus), common tern (S terna hirundo), royal tern (Sterna maxima), Caspian tern (Sterna caspia), great egret (Ardea alba), brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), and anhinga (Anhinga anhinga). Species we categorized as exhibiting high sensitivity (their LC50s were less than 0.25 ug/g mercury) were the American kestrel (Falco sparverius), osprey (Pandion haliaetus), white ibis (Eudocimus albus), snowy egret (Egretta thula), and tri-colored heron (Egretta tricolor). For mallards, chickens, and ring-necked pheasants (all species for which we could compare the toxicity of our

  20. Species differences in the sensitivity of avian embryos to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Gary H; Hoffman, David J; Klimstra, Jon D; Stebbins, Katherine R; Kondrad, Shannon L; Erwin, Carol A

    2009-01-01

    We injected doses of methylmercury into the air cells of eggs of 26 species of birds and examined the dose-response curves of embryo survival. For 23 species we had adequate data to calculate the median lethal concentration (LC(50)). Based on the dose-response curves and LC(50)s, we ranked species according to their sensitivity to injected methylmercury. Although the previously published embryotoxic threshold of mercury in game farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) has been used as a default value to protect wild species of birds, we found that, relative to other species, mallard embryos are not very sensitive to injected methylmercury; their LC(50 )was 1.79 microg/g mercury on a wet-weight basis. Other species we categorized as also exhibiting relatively low sensitivity to injected methylmercury (their LC(50)s were 1 microg/g mercury or higher) were the hooded merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus), lesser scaup (Aythya affinis), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus), and laughing gull (Larus atricilla). Species we categorized as having medium sensitivity (their LC(50)s were greater than 0.25 microg/g mercury but less than 1 microg/g mercury) were the clapper rail (Rallus longirostris), sandhill crane (Grus canadensis), ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), chicken (Gallus gallus), common grackle (Quiscalus quiscula), tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), herring gull (Larus argentatus), common tern (Sterna hirundo), royal tern (Sterna maxima), Caspian tern (Sterna caspia), great egret (Ardea alba), brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), and anhinga (Anhinga anhinga). Species we categorized as exhibiting high sensitivity (their LC(50)s were less than 0.25 microg/g mercury) were the American kestrel (Falco sparverius), osprey (Pandion haliaetus), white ibis (Eudocimus albus), snowy egret (Egretta thula), and tri-colored heron (Egretta tricolor). For mallards, chickens, and ring-necked pheasants (all species for which we

  1. Radionuclides and trace elements in fish collected upstream and downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the doses to humans from the consumption of muscle and bone.

    PubMed

    Fresquez, P R; Kraig, D H; Mullen, M A; Naranjo, L

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine radionuclide and trace element concentrations in bottom-feeding fish (catfish, carp, and suckers) collected from the confluences of some of the major canyons that cross Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) lands with the Rio Grande (RG) and the potential radiological doses from the ingestion of these fish. Samples of muscle and bone (and viscera in some cases) were analyzed for 3H, 90Sr, 137Cs, totU, 238Pu, 239,240Pu, and 241Am and Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cr, Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Tl. Most radionuclides, with the exception of 90Sr, in the muscle plus bone portions of fish collected from LANL canyons/RG were not significantly (p < 0.05) higher from fish collected upstream (San Ildefonso/background) of LANL. Strontium-90 in fish muscle plus bone tissue significantly (p < 0.05) increases in concentration starting from Los Alamos Canyon, the most upstream confluence (fish contained 3.4E-02 pCi g-1 [126E-02 Bq kg-1]), to Frijoles Canyon, the most downstream confluence (fish contained 14E-02 pCi g-1 [518E-02 Bq kg-1]). The differences in 90Sr concentrations in fish collected downstream and upstream (background) of LANL, however, were very small. Based on the average concentrations (+/- 2SD) of radionuclides in fish tissue from the four LANL confluences, the committed effective dose equivalent from the ingestion of 46 lb (21 kg) (maximum ingestion rate per person per year) of fish muscle plus bone, after the subtraction of background, was 0.1 +/- 0.1 mrem y-1 (1.0 +/- 1.0 microSv y-1), and was far below the International Commission on Radiological Protection (all pathway) permissible dose limit of 100 mrem y-1 (1000 microSv y-1). Of the trace elements that were found above the limits of detection (Ba, Cu, and Hg) in fish muscle collected from the confluences of canyons that cross LANL and the RG, none were in significantly higher (p < 0.05) concentrations than in muscle of fish collected from background locations. PMID

  2. In situ production of methylmercury within a stream channel in northern California.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Martin Tsz Ki; Finlay, Jacques C; Balogh, Steven J; Nollet, Yabing H

    2010-09-15

    Natural stream ecosystems throughout the world are contaminated by methylmercury, a highly toxic compound that bioaccumulates and biomagnifies in aquatic food webs. Wetlands are widely recognized as hotspots for the production of methylmercury and are often assumed to be the main sources of this neurotoxin in downstream ecosystems. However, many streams lacking wetlands in their drainage basins (e.g., montane and semiarid regions in the western United States) have significant methylmercury contamination, and the sources of methylmercury in these streams remain largely unknown. In this study, we observed substantial production of methylmercury within a highly productive stream channel in northern California (South Fork Eel River) within a drainage basin lacking wetlands. We found that in situ methylmercury production is positively related to phosphorus removal and water temperature within the stream channel, supporting hypothesized biological mediation of in situ mercury transformation. Moreover, our data suggest that epiphytic microbial communities on a dominant filamentous alga (Cladophora glomerata) could play a role in in situ methylmercury production. Because peak in situ methylmercury production coincides with the period of the highest biological productivity during summer baseflow, methylmercury produced internally may be efficiently routed into local stream food webs. Our study provides strong evidence that stream channels, especially those associated with high primary productivity, can be important for regulating the bioavailability and toxicity of this global contaminant. PMID:20715863

  3. Gene expression changes in female zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain in response to acute exposure to methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, Catherine A.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Martyniuk, Chris; Knoebl, Iris; Pope, Marie; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxicant and endocrine disruptor that accumulates in aquatic systems. Previous studies have shown suppression of hormone levels in both male and female fish, suggesting effects on gonadotropin regulation in the brain. The gene expression profile in adult female zebrafish whole brain induced by acute (96 h) MeHg exposure was investigated. Fish were exposed by injection to 0 or 0.5(mu or u)g MeHg/g. Gene expression changes in the brain were examined using a 22,000-feature zebrafish microarray. At a significance level of p

  4. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN FEMALE ZEBRAFISH (DANIO RERIO) BRAIN IN RESPONSE TO ACUTE EXPOSURE TO METHYLMERCURY

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Catherine A.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Martyniuk, Chris; Knoebl, Iris; Pope, Marie; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxicant and endocrine disruptor that accumulates in aquatic systems. Previous studies have shown suppression of hormone levels in both male and female fish, suggesting effects on gonadotropin regulation in the brain. The gene expression profile in adult female zebrafish whole brain induced by acute (96 hr) MeHg exposure was investigated. Fish were exposed by injection to 0 or 0.5 μg MeHg/g. Gene expression changes in the brain were examined using a 22,000 feature zebrafish microarray. At a significance level of p<0.01, 79 genes were up-regulated and 76 genes were down-regulated in response to MeHg exposure. Individual genes exhibiting altered expression in response to MeHg exposure implicate effects on glutathione metabolism in the mechanism of MeHg neurotoxicity. Gene ontology (GO) terms significantly enriched among altered genes included protein folding, cell redox homeostasis, and steroid biosynthetic process. The most affected biological functions were related to the nervous system development and function, as well as lipid metabolism and molecular transport. These results support the involvement of oxidative stress and effects on protein structure in the mechanism of action of MeHg in the female brain. Future studies will compare the gene expression profile induced in response to MeHg with that induced by other toxicants and investigate responsive genes as potential biomarkers of MeHg exposure. PMID:21082716

  5. Methylmercury exposure and neurological outcomes in Taiji residents accustomed to consuming whale meat.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaaki; Hachiya, Noriyuki; Murata, Ken-ya; Nakanishi, Ichiro; Kondo, Tomoyoshi; Yasutake, Akira; Miyamoto, Ken-ichiro; Ser, Ping Han; Omi, Sanae; Furusawa, Hana; Watanabe, Chiho; Usuki, Fusako; Sakamoto, Mineshi

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a major environmental neurotoxicant that causes damage to the central nervous system. In Japan, industrial emission of MeHg has resulted in MeHg intoxication in Minamata and Niigata, the so-called Minamata disease. Humans are exposed to MeHg derived from natural sources, primarily fish and fish predators. Therefore, MeHg continues to be an environmental risk to human health, particularly in susceptible populations that frequently consume substantial amounts of fish or fish predators such as whale. This study aimed to investigate the health effects of MeHg exposure in adults. The subjects were 194 residents (117 males, 77 females; age 20-85 years) who resided in the coastal town of Taiji, the birthplace of traditional whaling in Japan. We analyzed hair for mercury content and performed detailed neurological examinations and dietary surveys. Audiometry, magnetic resonance imaging, and electromyography were performed to diagnose neurological defects. Whole blood mercury and selenium (Se) levels were measured in 23 subjects. The geometric mean of the hair mercury levels was 14.9 μg/g. Twelve subjects revealed hair mercury levels >50 μg/g (NOAEL) set by WHO. Hair mercury levels significantly correlated with daily whale meat intake. These results suggested that residents in Taiji were highly exposed to MeHg by ingesting MeHg-contaminated whale meat. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated no significant correlations between hair mercury levels and neurological outcomes, whereas some of the findings significantly correlated with age. A significantly positive correlation between whole blood mercury and Se levels was observed and the whole blood mercury/Se molar ratios of all subjects were <1. These findings suggested that sufficient Se intake might be one of causes of the absence of adverse effects of MeHg exposure in this study. PMID:24685489

  6. Tissue distribution and histopathological effects of dietary methylmercury in benthic grubby Myoxocephalus aenaeus

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, E.; Audet, C.

    1995-05-01

    There is a need to test deterministic models predicting the behavior and effects of chemicals on aquatic systems by conducting experiments with more than one trophic step at a time. This approach requires the set-up of an experimental food chain in pounds or mesocosm facilities which can be used for dietary uptake studies and assessment of sublethal stress induced by contaminated food. In the course of our current research program at the INRS marine mesocosms facilities, a model benthic food chain including inter- and sub-tidal species such as the mussel (Mytilus edulis), clam (Mya arenaria), starfish (Leptasterias polaris), polychaete (Nereis virens), amphipod (Gammarus sp.), gastropod (Buccinum undatum), and fishes (Pleuronectec americanus, Myoxocephalus aenaeus), is used for testing food uptake models and for the development of sublethal toxicity tests which could be used in the environmental assessment of coastal and estuarine waters. Among these test organisms, the grubby (M. aenaeus) is a small coastal fish (12-15 cm) characterized by a broad head. The grubby is tolerant of water temperature and salinity variations and lives on a wide variety of bottom strata at low depths. The grubby is carnivorous and consumes a wide variety of molluscs and the young of many species of fish. Because of its size, its estuarine and coastal distribution and its large spectrum of prey, this species was seen as an ideal fish to fit into our experimental food chain model. This paper reports a preliminary experiment designed to measure distribution of mercury in tissues and to test the response of various histopathological and biochemical stress indicators in grubby exposed to dietary contamination by methylmercury (MeHg) for a 20-day exposure period. MeHg was chosen because it is rapidly bioaccumulated by most living organisms and its toxicity has been studied for decades in numerous aquatic ecosystems. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Experimental and Natural Warming Elevates Mercury Concentrations in Estuarine Fish

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Jennifer A.; Buckman, Kate L.; Ward, Darren; Evans, David W.; Dionne, Michele; Chen, Celia Y.

    2013-01-01

    Marine food webs are the most important link between the global contaminant, methylmercury (MeHg), and human exposure through consumption of seafood. Warming temperatures may increase human exposure to MeHg, a potent neurotoxin, by increasing MeHg production as well as bioaccumulation and trophic transfer through marine food webs. Studies of the effects of temperature on MeHg bioaccumulation are rare and no study has specifically related temperature to MeHg fate by linking laboratory experiments with natural field manipulations in coastal ecosystems. We performed laboratory and field experiments on MeHg accumulation under varying temperature regimes using the killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus. Temperature treatments were established in salt pools on a coastal salt marsh using a natural temperature gradient where killifish fed on natural food sources. Temperatures were manipulated across a wider range in laboratory experiments with killifish exposed to MeHg enriched food. In both laboratory microcosms and field mesocosms, MeHg concentrations in killifish significantly increased at elevated temperatures. Moreover, in field experiments, other ancillary variables (salinity, MeHg in sediment, etc.) did not relate to MeHg bioaccumulation. Modeling of laboratory experimental results suggested increases in metabolic rate as a driving factor. The elevated temperatures we tested are consistent with predicted trends in climate warming, and indicate that in the absence of confounding factors, warmer sea surface temperatures could result in greater in bioaccumulation of MeHg in fish, and consequently, increased human exposure. PMID:23554891

  8. Research into Mercury Exposure and Health Education in Subsistence Fish-Eating Communities of the Amazon Basin: Potential Effects on Public Health Policy

    PubMed Central

    Dórea, José G.

    2010-01-01

    The neurotoxic effects of fish-methylmercury (meHg) consumed regularly are considered hazardous to fetuses and newborn infants; as a result fish consumption advisories are an important asset to control meHg exposure in affluent societies. These concerns are now part of health promotion programs for Amazon subsistence villagers. While urban dwellers in affluent societies can choose an alternative nutritious diet, traditional and subsistence communities are caught up in controversial issues and lifestyle changes with unintended health consequences. Traditional fish-eating populations of industrialized and non-industrialized regions may be exposed to different neurotoxic substances: man-made pollutants and environmentally occurring meHg. Additionally, in non-industrialized countries, pregnant women and infants are still being immunized with thimerosal-containing vaccines (TCVs) which degrade to ethylmercury (etHg). Therefore, the complexity involving fish-meHg associated with wild-fish choices and Hg exposure derived from TCVs is difficult to disentangle and evaluate: are villagers able to distinguish exposure to differently hazardous chemical forms of Hg (inorganic, fish-meHg, and injected etHg)? Is it possible that instead of helping to prevent a plausible (unperceived) fish-meHg associated neurocognitive delay we may inadvertently arouse panic surrounding Hg exposure and disrupt subsistence fish-eating habits (necessary for survival) and life-saving vaccination programs (required by public health authorities)? These questions characterize the incompleteness of information related on the various chemical forms of Hg exposure and the need to convey messages that do not disrupt nutritional balance and disease prevention policies directed at Amazonian subsistence communities. PMID:20948936

  9. Neurotoxic actions of methylmercury on the primate visual system

    SciTech Connect

    Merigan, W.H.; Maurissen, J.P.J.; Weiss, B.; Eskin, T.; Lapham, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    Visual system consequences of exposure to methylmercury were studied in six adult, macaque monkeys. Visual field measures, visual thresholds, and morphological examination were used to determine the nature and possible reversibility of alterations in vision. Visual field constriction (especially in the inferior-nasal field) was an early and apparently reversible indicator of methylmercury intoxication. Such a field loss was found in the absence of either visual threeshold changes or morphologic alterations in visual cortex. More severe poisoning resulted in persistent field constriction, disruption of visual thresholds, and death. A single monkey showed a permanent, bilateral concentric constriction of visual fields. The locus of visual cortex pathology in this monkey corresponded to the projection of the peripheral visual field.

  10. FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES OF PRENATAL METHYLMERCURY EXPOSURE: EFFECTS ON RENAL AND HEPATIC RESPONSES TO TROPHIC STIMULI AND ON RENAL EXCRETORY MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on the functional development of renal and hepatic response systems was examined in the developing rat. Methylmercury produced an elevation of basal activity of renal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, an enzyme involved in regulation ...

  11. PILOT STUDY: CCQM-P39.1: As, Hg, Pb, Se and methylmercury in salmon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aregbe, Y.; Taylor, P. D. P.

    2006-01-01

    CCQM-P39.1 was organized as a follow-up pilot study in parallel to the key comparison CCQM-K43 after the previous pilot study on tuna fish. CCQM-P39.1 was an activity of the Inorganic Analysis Working Group (IAWG) of CCQM and was coordinated by the Joint Research Centre-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM, Geel, Belgium) of the European Commission (EC). In CCQM-P39.1 the amount contents of As, Hg, Pb, Se and methylmercury (CH3Hg) in salmon (muscle and skin) were the measurands under investigation. Besides the national metrology institutes (NMIs) also non-IAWG members, expert laboratories for mercury and methylmercury measurements, were invited to participate in this pilot study. Results were reported by six IAWG members and six expert laboratories. During the CCQM-IAWG autumn meeting in Berlin, October 2005, it was agreed that in CCQM-K43 the KCRV is calculated as the mixture model median (MM-median) of all reported results. Therefore in CCQM-P39.1 the reported results are presented graphically with the KCRV from CCQM-K43. The reported results of the IAWG members fall within a range of +/-4% for arsenic and lead relative to the CCQM-K43 KCRV. For mercury, the spread was +/-2%, but one IAWG member reported a very large uncertainty on the measurement result. For selenium the spread of IAGW members is +/-2% deviation from the CCQM-K43 KCRV. Including the reported results from the invited expert laboratories, the spread of results increased for arsenic, lead and mercury to +/-8%. The reported results including the experts fall within a range of +/-20% for selenium and +/-30% for methylmercury. The methods applied were isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) using sector field or quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), external calibration or standard addition using ICP-MS, atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), atomic emission detection (AED) and electron capture detection (ECD

  12. Fish-allergic patients may be able to eat fish.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Ahmad A; Bahna, Sami L

    2015-03-01

    Reported fish allergy prevalence varies widely, with an estimated prevalence of 0.2% in the general population. Sensitization to fish can occur by ingestion, skin contact or inhalation. The manifestations can be IgE or non-IgE mediated. Several fish allergens have been identified, with parvalbumins being the major allergen in various species. Allergenicity varies among fish species and is affected by processing or preparation methods. Adverse reactions after eating fish are often claimed to be 'allergy' but could be a reaction to hidden food allergen, fish parasite, fish toxins or histamine in spoiled fish. Identifying such causes would allow free consumption of fish. Correct diagnosis of fish allergy, including the specific species, might provide the patient with safe alternatives. Patients have been generally advised for strict universal avoidance of fish. However, testing with various fish species or preparations might identify one or more forms that can be tolerated. PMID:25666551

  13. Teratogenic efects of injected methylmercury on avian embryos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, Gary H.; Hoffman, David J.; Klimstra, Jon D.; Stebbins, Katherine R.; Kondrad, Shannon L.; Erwin, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Controlled laboratory studies with game farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and chickens (Gallus gallus) have demonstrated that methylmercury can cause teratogenic effects in birds, but studies with wild species of birds are lacking. To address this need, doses of methylmercury chloride were injected into the eggs of 25 species of birds, and the dead embryos and hatched chicks were examined for external deformities. When data for controls were summed across all 25 species tested and across all types of deformities, 24 individuals out of a total of 1,533 (a rate of 1.57%) exhibited at least one deformity. In contrast, when data for all of the mercury treatments and all 25 species were summed, 188 deformed individuals out of a total of 2,292 (8.20%) were found. Some deformities, such as lordosis and scoliosis (twisting of the spine), misshapen heads, shortening or twisting of the neck, and deformities of the wings, were seldom observed in controls but occurred in much greater frequency in Hg-treated individuals. Only 0.59% of individual control dead embryos and hatchlings exhibited multiple deformities versus 3.18% for Hg-dosed dead embryos and hatchlings. Methylmercury seems to have a widespread teratogenic potential across many species of birds.

  14. Protective effect of selenium on methylmercury toxicity: a possible mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.W.; Suber, R.

    1982-09-01

    Young adult male Charles River rats were injected (i.p.) with 2.0 mg/kg b.w. methylmercury chloride (MeHg), with 2.0 mg/kg b.w. sodium selenite (Se), or with 2.0 mg/kg b.w. MeHg and 2.0 mg/kg b.w. Se. Erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity was determined and the rate of oxidation of NADPH with t-butyl-hydroperoxide as a substrate was followed at 340 nm and 25/sup 0/C. Toxic signs (crossing reflex of the hind limbs) were displayed by MeHg-treated animals by the 6th week of intoxication. By 8 weeks of the experiment, overt neurological signs (crossing reflex, ataxic gait, and weight loss) were observed in MeHg-treated animals. No observable toxic signs or symptoms were evident in the control animals (saline or Se-treated) and in the MeHg/Se treated rats. Results have confirmed that exposure to methyl-mercury suppresses the activity of glutathione peroxidase. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that with co-administration of selenium (sodium selenite), the inhibitory effect of MeHg on GSH-Px was totally alleviated. These findings suggest that the level of GSH-Px level is important in influencing the toxic consequences in MeHg-intoxicated animals and may be useful as a predictive indicator for methylmercury toxic conditions of the animals. (JMT)

  15. Whole-ecosystem study shows rapid fish-mercury response to changes in mercury deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.C.; Rudd, J.W.M.; Amyot, M.; Babiarz, C.L.; Beaty, K.G.; Blanchfield, P.J.; Bodaly, R.A.; Branfireun, B.A.; Gilmour, C.C.; Graydon, J.A.; Heyes, A.; Hintelmann, H.; Hurley, J.P.; Kelly, C.A.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Lindberg, S.E.; Mason, R.P.; Paterson, M.J.; Podemski, C.L.; Robinson, A.; Sandilands, K.A.; Southworthn, G.R.; St. Louis, V.L.; Tate, M.T.

    2007-01-01

    Methylmercury contamination of fisheries from centuries of industrial atmospheric emissions negatively impacts humans and wild-life worldwide. The response of fish methylmercury concentrations to changes in mercury deposition has been difficult to establish because sediments/soils contain large pools of historical contamination, and many factors in addition to deposition affect fish mercury. To test directly the response of fish contamination to changing mercury deposition, we conducted a whole-ecosystem experiment, increasing the mercury load to a lake and its watershed by the addition of enriched stable mercury isotopes. The isotopes allowed us to distinguish between experimentally applied mercury and mercury already present in the ecosystem and to examine bioaccumulation of mercury deposited to different parts of the watershed. Fish methylmercury concentrations responded rapidly to changes in mercury deposition over the first 3 years of study. Essentially all of the increase in fish methylmercury concentrations came from mercury deposited directly to the lake surface. In contrast, <1% of the mercury isotope deposited to the watershed was exported to the lake. Steady state was not reached within 3 years. Lake mercury isotope concentrations were still rising in lake biota, and watershed mercury isotope exports to the lake were increasing slowly. Therefore, we predict that mercury emissions reductions will yield rapid (years) reductions in fish methylmercury concentrations and will yield concomitant reductions in risk. However, a full response will be delayed by the gradual export of mercury stored in watersheds. The rate of response will vary among lakes depending on the relative surface areas of water and watershed. ?? 2007 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  16. Relationships among Mercury Concentration, and Stable Isotope Ratios of Carbon and Nitrogen in the Scalp Hair of Residents from Seven Countries: Effects of Marine Fish and C4 Plants Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Tetsuya; Hayasaka, Moriaki; Ogasawra, Hideki; Kimura, Osamu; Kotaki, Yuichi; Haraguchi, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the