Science.gov

Sample records for fission track detector

  1. The fission track detector revisited: application to individual neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Prêtre, S; Aroua, A; Boschung, M; Grecescu, M; Valley, J F; Wernli, C

    1996-08-01

    A system based on fission fragment tracks had previously been developed for individual neutron dosimetry. The dosimeter detects both fast neutrons by means of the 232Th(n,f) reaction, and thermal and albedo neutrons by means of the 235U(n,f) reaction. The fission tracks produced in a plastic foil are chemically etched and counted by spark discharges. The response of the dosimeter has recently been re-investigated in 36 different neutron fields: monoenergetic beams, reference fields near isotopic sources, and radiation fields encountered in a variety of situations inside nuclear power plants. The results obtained have been compared to those computed by convolution of the neutron spectra with the energy response functions of the dosimeters. In practical situations, it is essential to know the shape of the neutron spectrum, approximately at least, in order to perform an acceptably accurate dose evaluation. For that purpose, the neutron fields encountered inside nuclear power plants have been grouped into four categories, for which algorithms for dose evaluation have been developed. Concerning the neutron equivalent dose, the error associated with this approach does not exceed a factor of 2, a performance which is comparable to other detection systems used in the field of individual neutron dosimetry. PMID:8690594

  2. Whole-rock uranium analysis by fission track activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J. R.; Haines, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    We report a whole-rock uranium method in which the polished sample and track detector are separated in a vacuum chamber. Irradiation with thermal neutrons induces uranium fission in the sample, and the detector records the integrated fission track density. Detection efficiency and geometric factors are calculated and compared with calibration experiments.

  3. Etching fission tracks in zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.

    1969-01-01

    A new technique has been developed whereby fission tracks can be etched in zircon with a solution of sodium hydroxide at 220??C. Etching time varied between 15 minutes and 5 hours. Colored zircon required less etching time than the colorless varieties.

  4. Results of interlaboratory comparison of fission track ages for 1992 fission track workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.S.; Crowley, K.D.; Dokka, R.K.; Galbraith, R.F.; Kowallis, B.J.; Naeser, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    Two apatites and one sphene were made available to the fission track research community for analysis prior to the 1992 Fission Track Workshop held in Philadelphia, U.S.A., 13-17 July. Eighteen laboratories throughout the world received aliquots of apatite and sphene. To date, analyses by 33 different scientists have been representing 15 different laboratories. With respect to the previous two interlaboratory comparisons, there is a noticeable improvement in the accuracy of the age results (Naeser and Cebula, 1978; Naeser et al., 1981; Miller et al., 1985;Miller et al.1990). Ninety-four percent of the analysis used the external detector method (EDM) combined with the zeta technique while the remaining individuals used the population method (POP). Track length measurements (requested for the first time in the interlaboratory comparison studies) were in relatively good agreement. ?? 1993.

  5. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  6. Hollow fission fragment tracks in fluorapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weixing

    Spontaneous fission of uranium in minerals creates a damaged "track" along the trajectory of the fission fragments. Fission tracks in fluorapatite, enlarged by chemical etching, are widely used in geologic age-dating and the reconstruction of the thermal history of Earth's crust. However, despite this wide spread application, there have been no systematic studies of the internal structure of unetched fission tracks or the atomic-scale process of track annealing. In this research, fission tracks in fluorapatite are demonstrated to be nano-channels instead of amorphous cores as had been assumed. The formation of hollow tracks is ascribed to the highly ionizing energy deposition of fission fragments inducing radiolytic decomposition of fluorapatite accompanied by the loss of volatile elements. The mechanism for thermal annealing of hollow tracks in fluorapatite is shown to be entirely different from that of amorphous tracks in zircon. The discontinuity of fission tracks, in addition to the shrinkage, prevents chemicals from entering into the hollow tracks for further etching, and then significantly reduces the etched length. The shrinkage of hollow fission tracks results from thermo-emission of vacancies or gaseous species from the cavities to surrounding solids instead of atomic-scale recovery of the amorphous core. The high diffusivity of atoms on the surface of hollow tracks causes the discontinuity of tracks either by Rayleigh instability, by Brownian motion, or by preferential motion of track segments. The preferential motion of atoms along c-axis causes more rapid annealing of fission tracks perpendicular to the c-axis. Under the electron beam, the hollow tracks segment into droplets and the track segments randomly move at room temperature or preferentially move along c-axis at high temperatures. The radiolytic annealing results from beam-enhanced diffusion, which is similar to thermally enhanced diffusion. The similarity in the morphology of fission tracks and

  7. Porous fission fragment tracks in fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Li Weixing; Ewing, Rodney C.; Wang Lumin; Sun Kai; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina

    2010-10-01

    Fission tracks caused by the spontaneous fission of {sup 238}U in minerals, as revealed by chemical etching, are extensively used to determine the age and thermal history of Earth's crust. Details of the structure and annealing of tracks at the atomic scale have remained elusive, as the original track is destroyed during chemical etching. By combining transmission electron microscopy with in situ heating, we demonstrate that fission tracks in fluorapatite are actually porous tubes, instead of having an amorphous core, as generally assumed. Direct observation shows thermally induced track fragmentation in fluoapatite, in clear contrast to the amorphous tracks in zircon, which gradually ''fade'' without fragmentation. Rayleigh instability and the thermal emission of vacancies control the annealing of porous fission tracks in fluorapatite.

  8. Fission track dating of kimberlitic zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggerty, S.E.; Raber, E.; Naeser, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The only reliable method for dating kimberlites at present is the lengthy and specialized hydrothermal procedure that extracts 206Pb and 238U from low-uranium zircons. This paper describes a second successful method by fission track dating of large single-crystal zircons, 1.0-1.5 cm in dimension. The use of large crystals overcomes the limitations imposed in conventional fission track analysis which utilizes crushed fragments. Low track densities, optical track dispersion, and the random orientation of polished surfaces in the etch and irradiation cycle are effectively overcome. Fission track ages of zircons from five African kimberlites are reported, from the Kimberley Pool (90.3 ?? 6.5 m.y.), Orapa (87.4 ?? 5.7 and 92.4 ?? 6.1 m.y.), Nzega (51.1 ?? 3.8 m.y.), Koffiefontein (90.0 ?? 8.2 m.y.), and Val do Queve (133.4 ?? 11.5 m.y.). In addition we report the first radiometric ages (707.9 ?? 59.6 and 705.5 ?? 61.0 m.y.) of crustal zircons from kimberlites in northwest Liberia. The fission track ages agree well with earlier age estimates. Most of the zircons examined in this study are zoned with respect to uranium but linear correlations are established (by regression analysis) between zones of variable uranium content, and within zones of constant uranium content (by analysis of variance). Concordance between the fission track method and the U/Pb technique is established and we concluded that track fading from thermal annealing has not taken place. Kimberlitic zircons dated in this study, therefore, record the time of eruption. ?? 1983.

  9. Frequency-Tracking-Error Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    Frequency-tracking-error detector compares average period of output signal from band-pass tracking filter with average period of signal of frequency 100 f(sub 0) that controls center frequency f(sub 0) of tracking filter. Measures difference between f(sub 0) and frequency of one of periodic components in output of bearing sensor. Bearing sensor is accelerometer, strain gauge, or deflectometer mounted on bearing housing. Detector part of system of electronic equipment used to measure vibrations in bearings in rotating machinery.

  10. Simulated fissioning of uranium and testing of the fission-track dating method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, V.E.; Johnson, N.M.; Naeser, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program (FTD-SIM) faithfully simulates the fissioning of 238U with time and 235U with neutron dose. The simulation is based on first principles of physics where the fissioning of 238U with the flux of time is described by Ns = ??f 238Ut and the fissioning of 235U with the fluence of neutrons is described by Ni = ??235U??. The Poisson law is used to set the stochastic variation of fissioning within the uranium population. The life history of a given crystal can thus be traced under an infinite variety of age and irradiation conditions. A single dating attempt or up to 500 dating attempts on a given crystal population can be simulated by specifying the age of the crystal population, the size and variation in the areas to be counted, the amount and distribution of uranium, the neutron dose to be used and its variation, and the desired ratio of 238U to 235U. A variety of probability distributions can be applied to uranium and counting-area. The Price and Walker age equation is used to estimate age. The output of FTD-SIM includes the tabulated results of each individual dating attempt (sample) on demand and/or the summary statistics and histograms for multiple dating attempts (samples) including the sampling age. An analysis of the results from FTD-SIM shows that: (1) The external detector method is intrinsically more precise than the population method. (2) For the external detector method a correlation between spontaneous track count, Ns, and induced track count, Ni, results when the population of grains has a stochastic uranium content and/or when the counting areas between grains are stochastic. For the population method no correlation can exist. (3) In the external detector method the sampling distribution of age is independent of the number of grains counted. In the population method the sampling distribution of age is highly dependent on the number of grains counted. (4) Grains with zero-track counts, either in Ns or Ni, are in integral part of

  11. On particle track detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Gruhn, T. A.; Andrus, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    Aqueous sodium hydroxide is widely used to develop charged particle tracks in polycarbonate film, particularly Lexan. The chemical nature of the etching process for this system has been determined. A method employing ultra-violet absorbance was developed for monitoring the concentration of the etch products in solution. Using this method it was possible to study the formation of the etching solution saturated in etch products. It was found that the system super-saturates to a significant extent before precipitation occurs. It was also learned that the system approaches its equilibrium state rather slowly. It is felt that both these phenomena may be due to the presence of surfactant in the solution. In light of these findings, suggestions are given regarding the preparation and maintenance of the saturated etch solution. Two additional research projects, involving automated techniques for particle track analysis and particle identification using AgCl crystals, are briefly summarized.

  12. Fission-track ages from the Precambrian of Shropshire.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; Toghill, P.; Ross, R.J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Four samples of Longmyndian and Uriconian strata from S of Shrewsbury, England have been processed for apatite and/or zircon fission-track ages. The resultant ages illustrate how depth of burial may affect fission-track ages. The analytical procedures followed were as described in Naeser (1979).-from Authors

  13. Results of interlaboratory comparison of fission-track age standards: Fission-track workshop-1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.S.; Duddy, I.R.; Green, P.F.; Hurford, A.J.; Naeser, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    Five samples were made available as standards for the 1984 Fission Track Workshop held in the summer of 1984 (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York). Two zircons, two apatites and a sphene were distributed prior to the meeting to 40 different laboratories. To date, 24 different analysts have reported results. The isotopic ages of the standards ranged from 16.8 to 98.7 Myr. Only the statement that the age of each sample was less than 200 Myr was provided with the set of standards distributed. Consequently, each laboratory was required to use their laboratory's accepted treatment (irradiation level, etching conditions, counting conditions, etc.) for these samples. The results show that some workers have serious problems in achieving accurate age determinations. This emphasizes the need to calibrate experimental techniques and counting procedures against age standards before unknown ages are determined. Any fission-track age determination published or submitted for publication can only be considered reliable if it is supported by evidence of consistent determinations on age standards. Only this can provide the scientific community with the background to build up confidence concerning the validity of the fission-track method. ?? 1985.

  14. Geochemical Investigations for Uranium in Some Areas of Jharkhand State Using Fission Track Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Pandit, B.; Bhardwaj, V. N.

    Human population is always exposed to ionizing radiations from natural sources present in the earth crust. Hence the analysis of uranium in soil sample has great significance due to health hazards to human beings. For the purpose, some different soil samples collected from some area of Jharkhand have been analysed for trace uranium concentration using the fission track technique. Lexan polycarbonate was used as detector for recording fission tracks. As reactor neutron spectra is associated with both thermal and fast neutron fluxes; correction to the present uranium data due to fast neutron fission of 232Th was also applied. The uranium contents were estimated by comparing the track densities detectors immersed in the sample and the standard uranium solutions, irradiated along with the samples under the same irradiation conditions. The uranium in the soil samples were found to vary from 209 ng/g to 991 ng/g.

  15. New fission-fragment detector for experiments at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Roman, A. R.; Daum, J. K.; Springs, R. K.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-10-01

    A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films has been built to serve as a veto/trigger detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4 π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillation events caused by the fission fragment interactions in the films are registered with silicon photomultipliers. Design of the detector and test measurements are described. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Nuclear Physics under the Early Career Award No. LANL20135009.

  16. The fission track record of Apennine Front KREEP basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    1975-01-01

    Whitlockite grains in two Apennine Front KREEP soil fragments contain extremely high densities of fission tracks. A new method is described in which particle tracks are examined in an actinide-poor phase bordering an actinide-rich whitlockite phase. This method clearly distinguishes the fission track contributions from other track sources; e.g., Fe-group cosmic rays, spallation recoils, and dislocations. Observed track excesses, when corrected for U- and Th-related fission sources, are 4-20 times greater than the contribution from spontaneous fission of U-238 (based on an age of 4 b.y.), and probably represent a large and variable contribution from the fission of Pu-244. These fragments may have pre-Imbrium ages, underscoring the importance of KREEP as a constituent of the pre-mare lunar crust. Track excesses are not correlated with the U or Th contents of the whitlockite grains. This behavior suggests that Pu fractionates differently from U and Th in lunar igneous KREEP.

  17. Fission-track dating applied to mineral exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.

    1984-01-01

    The partial to total resetting of fission-track ages of minerals in country rock near a mineralized area can be used to (1) locate a thermal anomaly, and (2) date the mineralizing event. Two mining districts in Colorado have been studied - Rico and Gilman. Rico is a precious- and base-metal mining district. Initial fission-track dating of a sill located about 6 km from the center of the district gave ages of 20 Myr and 65 Myr for apatite and zircon, respectively. The Eagle Mine in the Gilman District is the largest producer of zinc in the state of Colorado. Fission-track dating of zircon from a 70 Myr-old sill shows partial resetting of the zircon (45 Myr). The thermal anomaly identified by fission-track dating is seen in both districts far outside the area affected by obvious alteration. Based on the results of these two pilot studies, fission-track dating can be a useful exploration method for thermal anomalies associated with buried or otherwise poorly expressed mineral deposits.

  18. A fission fragment detector for correlated fission output studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, S.; Tovesson, F.; Couture, A.; Duke, D. L.; Kleinrath, V.; Meharchand, R.; Meierbachtol, K.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Perdue, B.; Richman, D.; Shields, D.

    2014-09-01

    A digital data acquisition system has been combined with a double Frisch gridded ionization chamber for use at both moderated and unmoderated neutron sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science (LANSCE) facility. The high efficiency of the instrument combined with intense LANSCE beams and new acquisition system permits fission output measurements across 11 orders of magnitude incident neutron energy. The acquisition and analysis system is presented along with the first in-beam performance tests of the setup.

  19. Fission track estimation of uranium concentrations in drinking water from Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Akram, M; Khattak, N U; Qureshi, A A; Iqbal, A; Tufail, M; Qureshi, I E

    2004-03-01

    The analysis of uranium in water samples can be very helpful for providing guidelines to the general public regarding necessary remedial measures. A fission-track technique has been applied for the estimation of the uranium concentration in drinking water collected from natural springs of Muzaffarabad and hilly areas of Reshian, Azad Kashmir. The technique involved simultaneous irradiation with thermal neutrons of a sample and a standard in contact with a track detector, and the counting of the fission tracks in the detector from the (n, f) nuclear reaction. Uranium concentrations of the samples were determined by comparing fission-track density with that of a standard of known uranium concentration. Uranium concentration in water samples from the Muzaffarabad and Reshian area varied from 0.03 +/- 0.01 microgL(-1) to 6.67 +/- 0.14 microgL(-1) with an average of 1.36 +/- 0.05 microgL(-1). The observed concentrations of uranium in drinking water were found to be less than the Maximum Acceptable Concentration levels of 9-30 microgL(-1). Thus, the observed values are within safe limits as far as uranium related health hazards are concerned. PMID:14982230

  20. Apatite fission-track thermochronology of the Pennsylvania Appalachian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Mary K.; Miller, Donald S.

    1989-09-01

    Thirty-four apatite fission-track apparent ages and twenty-four track length distributions for ash bed samples from the Valley and Ridge Province and Upper Devonian to Upper Pennsylvania sedimentary samples from the Allegheny Front and Allegheny Plateau of Pennsylvania suggest that these regions represent different thermal (uplift) regimes as well as different structural provinces. The Valley and Ridge Province Tioga and Kalkberg ash bed samples yield apatite fission-track apparent ages and track length distributions that indicate early post-Alleghanian (285-270 Ma) cooling and unroofing that began at ˜250 Ma. Assuming a geothermal gradient of 25°C km -1, a burial depth of at least 3.4 km can be estimated for all the Pennsylvania samples. At the Allegheny structural front and on the western Allegheny Plateau, the apatite fission-track apparent ages (<150 Ma) and track length measurements indicate a Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous thermal event for these samples possibly resulting from a higher geothermal gradient coinciding with kimberlite intrusion at this time along the Greene-Potter Fault Zone. In northeast Pennsylvania on the Allegheny Plateau, the Upper Paleozoic sedimentary samples yield apatite fission-track apparent ages ≤180 Ma. Narrow track length distributions with long mean lengths (13-14 μm) and small standard deviations (1.3 μm) suggest rapid cooling from temperatures >110°C during the Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous for this part of Pennsylvania. This is consistent with the suggested uplift history of the Catskill Mountain region in adjacent New York State.

  1. Low-mass fission detector for the fission neutron spectrum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Haight, R C; Lee, H Y

    2010-10-20

    For the fission neutron spectrum measurement, the neutron energy is determined in a time-of-flight experiment by the time difference between the fission event and detection of the neutron. Therefore, the neutron energy resolution is directly determined by the time resolution of both neutron and fission detectors. For the fission detection, the detector needs not only a good timing response but also the tolerance of radiation damage and high {alpha}-decay rate. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to particles, which is important for experiments with - emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. In the following sections, the description will be given for the design and performance of a new low-mass PPAC for the fission-neutron spectrum measurements at LANL.

  2. Tracking with the LHCb spectrometer: Detector performance and track reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuning, N.; LHCb Collaboration

    2007-10-01

    The LHCb experiment aims to measure CP violation and rare B-decays. For this, a tracking system is constructed consisting of a silicon micro-strip vertex locator close to the interaction point, and tracking detectors around a dipole magnet. The resulting tracking performance is estimated from simulation to yield 95% efficiency. The momentum and impact parameter resolutions vary between 0.35% and 0.5%, and 20 and 160 μm, respectively.

  3. Probing the secret lives of rocks - the next 25 years of fission track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleadow, A. J.; Kohn, B. P.

    2011-12-01

    Much has been achieved over ~40 years to realize the dream of using the annealing record of fission tracks in minerals to reconstruct the thermal histories of rocks. The technology of fission track analysis stabilised about 25 years ago based on neutron-irradiation, the external detector method (EDM) for uranium estimation, zeta calibration against independently-dated age standards, measurement of horizontal confined track lengths, and estimation of compositionally-controlled kinetic parameters. This approach has produced consistent data sets useful for thermal history modeling with increasingly sophisticated fission track annealing algorithms. Among the major limitations of this conventional approach, however, are the labour-intensive character of analysis, which limits data quality and quantity, individual-specific calibrations, and very long sample turn-around times. Important technical innovations now underway, however, are likely to transform the technology of fission track analysis over the next few years. The first is substitution of Laser Ablation ICP-MS for the EDM to estimate sample U [1]. This approach is still limited to a small number of laboratories, but is likely to accelerate with the proliferation of suitable instruments. The advantages for fission track analysis are rapid sample turnaround times and probably, improved analytical precision. The second is the emergence of new methods for autonomous image capture and automatic image analysis of fission tracks based on a new generation of high-precision, motorised microscopes, coupled with new software systems [2]. This approach can work with the conventional EDM, but particularly lends itself to automated LA-ICP-MS analysis. In minerals, such as apatite, automated recognition and counting of fission tracks dramatically reduces microscope time compared to manual measurements. This has the potential to improve counting statistics, data quality and calibration. Track length measurements are no longer

  4. The KTB apatite fission-track profiles: Building on a firm foundation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauschkuhn, B.; Jonckheere, R.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2015-10-01

    Deep boreholes serve as natural laboratories for testing thermochronometers under geological conditions. The Kontinentale Tiefbohrung (KTB) is an interesting candidate because the geological evidence suggests that approximate isothermal holding since the last documented exhumation in the Late Cretaceous to Palaeocene is a reasonable assumption for the thermal histories of the KTB samples. We report 30 new apatite fission-track ages and 50 new mean confined track lengths determined on cores from the 4 km deep pilot hole. The ϕ- and ζ-external detector ages are consistent with the population ages from earlier studies and together define a clear age profile. The mean track lengths from this and earlier studies reveal the effects of experimental factors. The measured age and length profiles are compared with the predictions of 24 annealing models for isothermal holding. There are clear discrepancies between the measured and calculated profiles. Down to 1.5 km depth, the measured mean track lengths are shorter than the predicted. The balance of methodological evidence indicates that this is due to seasoning, i.e., a shortening of the fossil confined tracks without attendant age reduction. From 2.5 to 4.0 km depth, the mean track lengths are longer than the predictions. This suggests that the bias model that weights the probabilities of observing tracks of different length and which is based on experiments relating surface track densities to mean track lengths is not appropriate for confined tracks. Experimental and methodological factors are sometimes difficult to disentangle, but present a sufficient margin for there to be no need to go against the independent geological evidence. Unknown geological events cannot be ruled out but their existence cannot be inferred from the fission-track data alone, much less can the nature or magnitude of such events be specified.

  5. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Burgett, Eric A; May, Iain; Muenchausen, Ross E; Taw, Felicia; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  6. Radiometric dating of sediments using fission tracks in conodonts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sachs, H.M.; Denkinger, M.; Bennett, C.L.; Harris, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    Conodonts are microfossils which are commonly found in marine rocks of Cambrian to Triassic age. Although their biological affinities are difficult to assess, conodonts are valuable stratigraphical indices for much of their geological range1. Recent work has also established that conodont colour alteration indices (CAI) are useful guides to diagenetic temperatures and hence burial depth2. Fission tracks3 in conodonts allow measurement of uranium concentrations and estimates of 'age' to be made using isotopic methods4. We report here that fission tracks counted in irradiated, thermally unaltered (as indicated by CAI) middle Palaeozoic conodonts indicate typical uranium concentrations of ???1 part in 10 9, with some samples higher. A single specimen of Siphonodella from the Lower Mississippian yielded an age estimate of 380??140 Myr consistent with conventional interpolations. This method may also allow the unroofing of deeply buried sediments to be dated. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  7. Dating thermal events at Cerro Prieto using fission track annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, S.J.; Elders, W..

    1981-01-01

    Data from laboratory experiments and geologic fading studies were compiled from published sources to produce lines of iso-annealing for apatite in time-temperature space. Fission track ages were calculated for samples from two wells at Cerro Prieto, one with an apparently simple and one with an apparently complex thermal history. Temperatures were estimated by empirical vitrinite reflectance geothermometry, fluid inclusion homogenization and oxygen isotope equilibrium. These estimates were compared with logs of measured borehole temperatures.

  8. Fission track thermochronology: Methods and applications in tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    Time, temperature and the kinetics of reactions are the basic ingredients in this study of thermal history analysis. Unraveling the timing of geological events using absolute dating systems based on radioactive decay is not a trivial task, ages given by most radiometric dating techniques (e.g. fission track analysis) are apparent ages, related to cooling through some characteristic temperature range. Regional thermal history is fundamentally linked with tectonic history. The Dora Maira massif in the Western Alps provides an example of a pressure-temperature-time history well constrained by metamorphic petrology and radiometric dating. Simple models of conductive cooling and erosion are used to successfully model the thermal history of these ultra-high pressure rocks and shed light on possible tectonic scenarios for their origin. Numerical modeling suggests that continued refrigeration of the Dora Maira rocks by subducting lithosphere is not required to produce the observed metamorphic mineral assemblages. Fission track analysis, synthesis of results from other dating techniques, thermal modeling and metamorphic petrology are used to constrain the magnitude of cooling during extension in the Mojave Desert, California. Cooling paths constructed using fission track ages on apatite, zircon and sphene and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages on biotite, hornblende and phlogopite reveal the contrast in modes of cooling between upper and lower plate rocks. Upper plate rocks show no evidence for the rapid cooling that affected lower plate rocks during the Miocene extension in the region.

  9. Characterisation of a track structure imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, M; Bashkirov, V A; Hurley, R F; Schulte, R W

    2015-09-01

    The spatial distribution of radiation-induced ionisations in sub-cellular structures plays an important role in the initial formation of radiation damage to biological tissues. Using the nanodosimetry approach, physical characteristics of the track structure can be measured and correlated to DNA damage. In this work, a novel nanodosimeter is presented, which detects positive ions produced by radiation interacting with a gas-sensitive volume in order to obtain a high resolution image of the radiation track structure. The characterisation of the detector prototype was performed and different configurations of the device were tested by varying the detector cathode material and the working gas. Preliminary results show that the ionisation cluster size distribution can be obtained with this approach. Further work is planned to improve the detector efficiency in order to register the complete three-dimensional track structure of ionising radiation. PMID:25877534

  10. SAPhIR: a fission-fragment detector

    SciTech Connect

    Theisen, Ch.; Gautherin, C.; Houry, M.; Korten, W.; Le Coz, Y.; Lucas, R.

    1998-10-26

    SAPhIR is the acronym for S{sub a}clay A{sub q}uitaine P{sub ho}tovoltaic cells for I{sub s}omer R{sub e}search. It consists of solar cells, used for fission-fragment detection. It is a collaboration between 3 laboratories: CEA Saclay, CENBG Bordeaux and CEA Bruyeres le Chatel. The coupling of a highly efficient fission-fragment detector like SAPhIR with EUROBALL will provide new insights in the study of very deformed nuclear matter and in the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei.

  11. Monopole track characteristics in plastic detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlen, S. P.

    1975-01-01

    Total and restricted energy loss rates were calculated for magnetic monopoles of charge g = 137 e in Lexan polycarbonate. Range-energy curves are also presented. The restricted energy loss model is used to estimate the appearance of a monopole track in plastic detectors. These results should be useful for the design and analysis of monopole experiments.

  12. Divergence detectors for multitarget tracking algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    Single-target tracking filters will typically diverge when their internal measurement or motion models deviate too much from the actual models. Niu, Varshney, Alford, Bubalo, Jones, and Scalzo have proposed a metric-- the normalized innovation squared (NIS)--that recursively estimates the degree of nonlinearity in a single-target tracking problem by detecting filter divergence. This paper establishes the following: (1) NIS can be extended to generalized NIS (GNIS), which addresses more general nonlinearities; (2) NIS and GNIS are actually anomaly detectors, rather than filter-divergence detectors; (3) NIS can be heuristically generalized to a multitarget NIS (MNIS) metric; (4) GNIS also can be rigorously extended to multitarget problems via the multitarget GNIS (MGNIS); (5) explicit, computationally tractable formulas for MGNIS can be derived for use with CPHD and PHD filters; and thus (6) these formulas can be employed as anomaly detectors for use with these filters.

  13. Fission track ages and ages of deposition of deep-sea microtektites.

    PubMed

    Gentner, W; Glass, B P; Storzer, D; Wagner, G A

    1970-04-17

    The Australasian and Ivory Coast deep-sea microtektites have fission track ages of 0.71 and 1.09 million years, respectively. These ages are in good agreement with the ages of deposition of the microtektites determined from paleomagnetic data. Both the fission track ages and ages of deposition of the microtektites agree with the potassium/ argon and fission track ages of tektites from the respective tektite strewn fields. PMID:17809131

  14. Fission track studies of xenolithic chondrites - Implications regarding brecciation and metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kothari, B. K.; Rajan, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Fission tracks in phosphates from one gas-poor chondrite and three gas-rich ones are studied to determine their thermal history and brecciation time scales. Model fission track ages are calculated for given track densities due to Pu-244 and U-238; track densities and uranium measurements for whitlockite are shown, and possible sources of the tracks are mentioned. Details of track density and uranium measurements are discussed for each meteorite separately. Whitlockites from all the meteorites give model fission track ages of 4.4 Gyr assuming a Pu/U ratio at 4.55 Gyr of 0.045. The final brecciation event definitely did not reset the track clock in phosphates of one meteor and probably not in another two. It is concluded that the observed fission track ages date the end of metamorphic cooling in the meteorite parent bodies and support the planetesimal model for the formation of xenolithic chondrites.

  15. Tracking the NOvA Detectors' Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psihas, Fernanda; NOvA Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The NOvA experiment measures long baseline νμ -->νe oscillations in Fermilab's NuMI beam. We employ two detectors equipped with over 10 thousand sets of data-taking electronics; avalanche photo diodes and front end boards which collect and process the scintillation signal from particle interactions within the detectors. These sets of electronics -as well as the systems which power and cool them- must be monitored and maintained at precise working conditions to ensure maximal data-taking uptime, good data quality and a lasting life for our detectors. This poster describes the automated systems used on NOvA to simultaneously monitor our data quality, diagnose hardware issues, track our performance and coordinate maintenance for the detectors.

  16. Experimental studies of annealing of etched fission tracks in fluorapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, K. d.; Cameron, M.; Schaefer, R. l.

    1991-05-01

    Annealing of etchable fission-track damage in fluorapatite (Ca 4.96Fe 0.01Na 0.02Sr 0.01REE 0.01) 5.01-(P 2.98Si 0.02) 3.00O 12(F 1.00Cl 0.02) 1.02 and Sr fluorapatite (Ca 4.68Na 0.04Sr 0.02REE 0.03) 4.97(P 2.98Si 0.03) 3.01O 12F 1.03was investigated in laboratory heating experiments at 1, 10, 100, and 1000 h at temperatures ranging from 40 to 360°C. For each of the approximately 105 heating experiments, annealing was characterized by measuring the lengths of confined tracks in mineral sections oriented parallel to the c axis and the acute angles between azimuths of the tracks and the c axis. Annealing is characterized by the monotonic decrease in etched track length with increasing temperature or heating time. Track shortening is anisotropic at all stages of fading: tracks parallel to c are most resistant to shortening, tracks perpendicular to c are at least resistant to shortening, and tracks at intermediate angles have intermediate annealing resistances. The relationship between mean track length and track length parallel or perpendicular to c is approximately linear. The decrease in normalized mean track length ( r) with increasing temperature ( T) or heating time ( t) for the fluorapatite and Sr fluorapatite data presented here, as well as the annealing data of GREEN et al. (1986) from Durango apatite, is best described by the equation g(r; α, β) = C 0 + [C 1 ln t + C 2] /[( {1/T} ) - C 3] , where g( r; α, β) is a power transform of r, and α, β, C0, C1, C2, and C3 are parameters. On the Arrhenius diagram, the fading contours (contours of constant r) for this model equation plot as a series of straight lines that intersect at a single point termed the "crossover point." For the fluorapatite and Sr-fluorapatite data presented here, the crossover points occur within the interval 523° C ≤ T≤957° C, 10 -5≤ t ≤ 10 -2s. This point is interpreted to represent the limit of stability of tracks in apatite. Activation energies, which are proportional to

  17. Nuclear Track Detectors for Particle Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoor, S.; Balestra, S.; Cozzi, M.; Errico, M.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.; Kumar, A.; Margiotta, A.; Medinaceli, E.; Patrizii, L.; Popa, V.; Qureshi, I. E.; Togo, V.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we report a search for intermediate mass magnetic monopoles and nuclearites using CR39 and Makrofol Nuclear Track Detectors (NTDs) of the SLIM large area experiment, 440 m 2 exposed at the high altitude laboratory of Chacaltaya (Bolivia) and about 100 m 2 at Koksil, Himalaya (Pakistan). We discuss the new chemical etching and improved analysis of the SLIM CR39 sheets. Preliminary limits are based on 316 m 2 of CR39 NTDs exposed for 3.9 y.

  18. Experimental evidence regarding the pressure dependence of fission track annealing in apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. S.; Lelarge, M. L. M. V.; Conceicao, R. V.; Balzaretti, N. M.

    2014-03-01

    The main purposes of fission track thermochronology are unravelling the thermal histories of sedimentary basins, determining uplift and denudation rates, identifying the structural evolution of orogenic belts, determining sedimentary provenance, and dating volcanic rocks. The effect of temperature on fission tracks is well known and is used to determine the thermal history; however, the effect of pressure on the stability of tracks is still under debate. The present work aims to understand the role of pressure on the annealing kinetics of apatite fission tracks. The samples of Durango apatite used in our experiments were chosen for their international recognition as a calibration standard for geological dating. Neutron irradiation of the samples, after total annealing of their spontaneous tracks, produced induced tracks with homogeneous densities and lengths. The effect of pressure associated with temperature on fission track annealing was verified by experimental procedures using a hydraulic press of 1000 t with a toroidal chamber profile. The experiments consisted of a combination of applying 2 and 4 GPa with 20,150,190,235, and 290 °C for 1 and 10 h. The annealing rate was analysed by measuring the lengths of the fission tracks after each experiment using optical microscopy. The results demonstrate that the annealing of apatite fission tracks has a pressure dependence for samples subjected to 2 and 4 GPa. However, when extrapolated to pressures of ⩽150 MPa, compatible with the normal geological context in which apatite fission track methodology is broadly used, this dependence becomes insignificant compared to the temperature effect.

  19. SONTRAC: A solar neutron track chamber detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, G. M., Jr.; Jenkins, T. L.; Owens, A.

    1985-01-01

    The recent detection on the solar maximum mission (SMM) satellite of high energy neutrons emitted during large solar flares has provided renewed incentive to design a neutron detector which has the sensitivity, energy resolution, and time resolution to measure the neutron time and energy spectra with sufficient precision to improve our understanding of the basic flare processes. Over the past two decades a variety of neutron detectors has been flown to measure the atmospheric neutron intensity above 10 MeV and to search for solar neutrons. The SONTRAC (Solar Neutron Track Chamber) detector, a new type of neutron detector which utilizes n-p scattering and has a sensitivity 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than previous instruments in the 20-200 MeV range is described. The energy resolution is 1% for neutron kinetic energy, T sub n 50 MeV. When used with a coded aperture mask at 50 m (as would be possible on the space station) an angular resolution of approx. 4 arc sec could be achieved, thereby locating the sites of high energy nuclear interactions with an angular precision comparable to the existing x-ray experiments on SMM. The scintillation chamber is investigated as a track chamber for high energy physics, either by using arrays of scintillating optical fibers or by optical imaging of particle trajectories in a block of scintillator.

  20. Effect of α-damage on fission-track annealing in zircon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasuya, Masao; Naeser, Charles W.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal stability of confined fission-track lengths in four zircon samples having different spontaneous track densities (i.e., different amounts of ??-damage) has been studied by one-hour isochronal annealing experiments. The thermal stability of spontaneous track lengths is independent of initial spontaneous track density. The thermal stability of induced track lengths in pre-annealed zircon, however, is significantly higher than that of spontaneous track lengths. The results indicate that the presence of ??-damage lowers the thermal stability of fission-tracks in zircon.

  1. The effect of α-damage on fission-track annealing in zircon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kasuya, M.; Naeser, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal stability of confined fission-track lengths in four zircon samples having different spontaneous track densities (i.e. different amounts of ??-damage) has been studied by one hour isochronal annealing experiments. The thermal stability of spontaneous track lengths is independent of initial spontaneous track density. The thermal stability of induced track lengths in pre-annealed zircon, however, is significantly higher than that of spontaneous track lengths. The results indicate that the presence of ??-damage lowers the thermal stability of fission-tracks in zircon. ?? 1988.

  2. Preliminary Apatite Fission Track Thermochronology of Wrangel Island, Arctic Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, T. A.; Miller, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Wrangel Island is part of a regional structural high that forms the continuation of the offshore Herald Arch and Chukchi Platform of Alaska. It is flanked on the north by the deep North Chukchi Basin, which in addition to Paleozoic strata, is inferred to contain up to 12 km of Beaufortian and Brookian (Late Jurassic to Tertiary) sediments (Dinkelman et al., 2008). To the south, ~E-W trending faults bound the Longa Basin that separates Wrangel from mainland Chukotka. This basin lies along strike of the early Tertiary Hope Basin in the Alaskan offshore. Wrangel Island itself exposes a broad, doubly-plunging anticlinorium-like structure cored by Neoproterozoic basement and flanked by Paleozoic shelf successions and a thick section of Triassic turbidites, representing about 5-7 km of structural section. The structural geology of Wrangel Island has been interpreted to represent a north-vergent Mesozoic fold and thrust belt linked by seismic reflection to the Herald Arch and then to the Lisburne Hills and the Brooks Range foreland fold and thrust belt (e.g. Kos’ko et al., 1993). However, deformation differs considerably from typical foreland fold-thrust structures of the Brooks Range as it is penetrative, involves large strains, and occurred under greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. Parts of the sequence exhibit mylonitic fabrics. Apatite fission track thermochronology of rocks from Wrangel Island can establishes the age of cooling to temperatures below ~ 100° C, providing temporal constraints on the uplift and erosional history of rocks that form this regional structural high. We analyzed seven fission track samples from a 9-km long N-S transect along the Kishchnikov River, from Triassic strata on the southern flank of the anticlinal structure to Devonian(?)-Mississippian feldspathic grits, conglomerates, and underlying Neoproterozoic igneous basement rocks in its core. All samples yielded statistically indistinguishable fission track ages averaging about 95

  3. Analysis of tracks in the stacked film track detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoe, M.; Hasegawa, H.

    1984-12-01

    A method to analyze the experimental data of a plastic track detector is presented. The charge distribution obtained for the cosmic ray heavy charged particles is shown, and it is used to criticize theories which have been proposed until now to explain the rate of chemical etching along ion tracks. The primary ionization J and the restricted energy loss REL are evaluated and compared at the same etching velocity for various charges. REL fits the etching rate well only for light elements Z < 15, and J is suitable either for Z < 15 or Z > 15, while overall fitting is not possible for either theory. The fine structures of the curves, REL, J, and (Z*/β)2 vs Z, serve as a measure to estimate the real mean atomic mass of each element in cosmic rays.

  4. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector -- FY 2012 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; Douglas McGregor; Philip Ugorowski; Michael Reichenberger

    2012-09-01

    A research program has been initiated by the NEET program for developing and testing compact miniature fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When implemented, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Materials Test Reactors (MTRs).Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, high performance reactors and commercial nuclear power plants. Deployment of Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) in US DOE-NE program irradiation tests will address several challenges: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe, MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different then current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions in typical high performance MTR irradiation tests. New high-fidelity reactor physics codes will need a small, accurate, multipurpose in-core sensor to validate the codes without perturbing the validation experiment; MPFDs fill this requirement. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs; allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be simultaneously deployed; obtaining data required to visualize the reactor flux and temperature profiles. This report summarizes the research progress for year 1 of this 3 year project. An updated design of the MPFD has been developed, materials and tools to support the new design have been procured, construction methods to support the new design have been initiated at INL’s HTTL and KSU’s SMART Laboratory, plating methods are being updated at KSU, new

  5. A novel room temperature-induced chemical etching (RTCE) technique for the enlargement of fission tracks in Lexan polycarbonate SSNTD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, Vivek; Kalsi, P. C.; Manchanda, V. K.

    2011-02-01

    The chemical or electrochemical etching is an essential step to enlarge the ion-induced latent tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). In these methods, above ambient temperatures (˜60 °C) and moderately high concentrations of alkali are required for about 1-2 h to enlarge the latent tracks. Microwave induced chemical etching method is reported to reduce the etching time for alpha tracks from 3 to 4 h to 25 min for CR-39 detector. In the present work, a room temperature-induced chemical etching employing ethanolamine as a new etchant has been investigated for the first time to enlarge the fission tracks in Lexan polycarbonate SSNTD. The tracks developed in the Lexan detectors etched at room temperature using ethanolamine are compared with those etched with routinely used chemical etching (CE) technique in 6 N NaOH at 60 °C. The bulk etch and track etch rates are also reported. The detection efficiency of RTCE method is determined and compared with that of CE method. The RTCE technique is found to be simple, fast and convenient.

  6. Fission-fragment detector for DANCE based on thin scintillating films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Roman, A. R.; Daum, J. K.; Springs, R. K.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing 4 π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillation photons were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U (n , f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described.

  7. Fission-track dating of volcanically derived sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kowallis, B.J.; Heaton, J.S.; Bringhurst, K.

    1986-01-01

    Depositional ages of sedimentary rocks can be determined using fission-track single grain ages on zircons from layers of volcanic ash or bentonite, even when the layers have been contaminated by older grains. This is done by compiling an age probability distribution or age spectrum for a sample from individual grain ages. An age spectrum is a simple and unambiguous way of testing for contamination and extracting useful age information. The youngest peak in the age spectrum approximates the time of deposition. In most contaminated samples, 30 or more grains should be counted to produce a reliable spectrum. However, useful, reproducible ages can be obtained by counting less than 10 grains in samples where most of the older, contaminating grains can be removed. The few older grains that remain after removing the obviously abraded ones may then be eliminated by examining the age spectrum. Although ages determined in this way are probably not precise enough for use in defining stratigraphic boundaries, they still provide a means of obtaining an isotopic age in sediments that cannot be dated by other radiometric methods. 18 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  8. A study of commercially-available polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate as nuclear track detector materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I.; Vazquez-Lopez, C.; Trejo, R.; Lopez, K.; Rickards, J.

    2014-07-01

    In the study of the sensitivity of materials to be used as nuclear track detectors, it was found that commercial polyethylene terephthalate (PET) from Ciel® water bottles, commercial roof cover polycarbonate, and recycled packaging strips (recycled PET), can be used as nuclear track detectors. These three commercial materials present nuclear tracks when bombarded by 2.27 MeV nitrogen ions produced in a Pelletron particle accelerator, and by fission fragments from a 252Cf source (79.4 and 103.8 MeV), after a chemical etching with a 6.25M KOH solution, or with a 6.25M KOH solution with 20% methanol, both solutions at 60±1°C. As an example, the nitrogen ions deposit approximately 1 keV/nm in the form of ionization and excitation at the surface of PET, as calculated using the SRIM code. The fission fragments deposit up to 9 keV/nm at the surface, in both cases generating sufficient free radicals to initiate the track formation process. However, 5 MeV alpha particles, typical of radon (222Rn) emissions, deposit only 0.12 keV/nm, do not present tracks after the chemical etching process. This valuable information could be very useful for further studies of new materials in nuclear track methodology.

  9. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector. Final Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, T.; Rempe, Joy; McGregor, Douglas; Ugorowski, Philip; Reichenberger, Michael; Ito, Takashi; Villard, J.-F.

    2014-09-01

    A collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), is funded by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program to develop and test Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When deployed, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, and high performance reactors, allowing several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs to obtain higher accuracy/higher resolution data from irradiation tests of candidate new fuels and materials. Specifically, deployment of MPFDs will address several challenges faced in irradiations performed at MTRs: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe; MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different than current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions encountered in-core of high performance MTRs. The higher accuracy, high fidelity data available from the compact MPFD will significantly enhance efforts to validate new high-fidelity reactor physics codes and new multi-scale, multi-physics codes. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs, allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be deployed, offering the potential to accurately

  10. Spacecraft Doppler Tracking as a Xylophone Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo

    1996-01-01

    We discuss spacecraft Doppler tracking in which Doppler data recorded on the ground are linearly combined with Doppler measurements made on board a spacecraft. By using the four-link radio system first proposed by Vessot and Levine, we derive a new method for removing from the combined data the frequency fluctuations due to the Earth troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the antenna on the ground. Our method provides also for reducing by several orders of magnitude, at selected Fourier components, the frequency fluctuations due to other noise sources, such as the clock on board the spacecraft or the antenna and buffeting of the probe by non-gravitational forces. In this respect spacecraft Doppler tracking can be regarded as a xylophone detector. Estimates of the sensitivities achievable by this xylophone are presented for two tests of Einstein's theory of relativity: searches for gravitational waves and measurements of the gravitational red shift. This experimental technique could be extended to other tests of the theory of relativity, and to radio science experiments that rely on high-precision Doppler measurements.

  11. Combined apatite fission track and U-Pb dating by LA-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, D. M.; Donelick, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Apatite is a common accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic and clastic sedimentary rocks. It is a nearly ubiquitous accessory phase in igneous rocks, is common in metamorphic rocks of pelitic, carbonate, basaltic, and ultramafic composition and is virtually ubiquitous in clastic sedimentary rocks. In contrast to the polycyclic behavior of the stable heavy mineral zircon, apatite is unstable in acidic groundwaters and has limited mechanical stability in sedimentary transport systems. Apatite has many potential applications in provenance studies, particularly as it likely represents first-cycle detritus. Fission track and U-Pb dating are very powerful techniques in apatite provenance studies. They yield complementary information, with the apatite fission-track system yielding low-temperature exhumation ages and the U-Pb system yielding high-temperature cooling ages which constrain the timing of apatite crystallization. This study focuses on integrating apatite fission track and U-Pb dating by the LA-ICPMS method. Our approach is intentionally broad in scope, and is applicable to any quadrupole or rapid-scanning magnetic-sector LA-ICPMS system. Calculating uranium concentrations in fission-track dating by LA-ICPMS increases the speed of analysis and sample throughput compared to the conventional external detector method and avoids the need for neutron irradiation (Hasebe et al., 2004). LA-ICPMS-based uranium measurements in apatite are measured relative to an internal concentration standard (typically 43Ca). Ca in apatite is not always stochiometric as minor cations (Mn2+, Sr2+, Ba2+ and Fe2+) and REE can substitute with Ca2+. These substitutions must be quantified by multi-elemental LA-ICPMS analyses. Such data are also useful for discriminating between different apatite populations in sedimentary or volcaniclastic rocks based on their trace-element chemistry. Low U, Th and radiogenic Pb concentrations, elevated common Pb / radiogenic Pb ratios and U-Pb elemental

  12. Plutonium-244 fission tracks - Evidence in a lunar rock 3.95 billion years old.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheon, I. D.; Price, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Tracks attributed to the spontaneous fission of plutonium-244 and of uranium-238 were detected in a large whitlockite crystal in the lunar breccia 14321 from the Fra Mauro formation. For a track-retention age of 3.95 b.y., the number of plutonium tracks relative to the number of uranium tracks is 0.51 plus or minus 0.15, provided that the rock was not heavily neutron-irradiated 3.95 b.y. ago.

  13. Development of a thin scintillation films fission-fragment detector and a novel neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Daum, J. K.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Roman, A. R.; Springs, R. K.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    Investigation of prompt fission and neutron-capture Υ rays from fissile actinide samples at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) requires use of a fission-fragment detector to provide a trigger or a veto signal. A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillations were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U(n,f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described. A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the same type of scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements with it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  14. Identifying and quantifying short-lived fission products from thermal fission of HEU using portable HPGe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, Bruce D.; Finn, Erin C.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kephart, Rosara F.; Metz, Lori A.

    2013-03-01

    Due to the emerging potential for trafficking of special nuclear material, research programs are investigating current capabilities of commercially available portable gamma ray detection systems. Presented in this paper are the results of three different portable high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors used to identify short-lived fission products generated from thermal neutron interrogation of small samples of highly enriched uranium. Samples were irradiated at the Washington State University (WSU) Nuclear Radiation Center’s 1MW TRIGA reactor. The three portable, HPGe detectors used were the ORTEC MicroDetective, the ORTEC Detective, and the Canberra Falcon. Canberra’s GENIE-2000 software was used to analyze the spectral data collected from each detector. Ultimately, these three portable detectors were able to identify a large range of fission products showing potential for material discrimination.

  15. Novel calibration for LA-ICP-MS-based fission-track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, C. J.; Guedes, S.; Hadler, J. C.; Mertz-Kraus, R.; Zack, T.; Iunes, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel age-equation calibration for fission-track age determinations by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This new calibration incorporates the efficiency factor of an internal surface, [ ηq]is, which is obtained by measuring the projected fission-track length, allowing the determination of FT ages directly using the recommended spontaneous fission decay constant. Also, the uranium concentrations in apatite samples are determined using a Durango (Dur-2, 7.44 μg/g U) crystal and a Mud Tank (MT-7, 6.88 μg/g U) crystal as uranium reference materials. The use of matrix-matched reference materials allows a reduction in the uncertainty of the uranium measurements to those related to counting statistics, which are ca. 1 % taking into account that no extra source of uncertainty has to be considered. The equations as well as the matrix-matched reference materials are evaluated using well-dated samples from Durango, Fish Canyon Tuff, and Limberg as unknown samples. The results compare well with their respective published ages determined through other dating methods. Additionally, the results agree with traditional fission-track ages using both the zeta approach and the absolute approach, suggesting that the calibration presented in this work can be robustly applied in geological context. Furthermore, considering that fission-track ages can be determined without an age standard sample, the fission-track thermochronology approach presented here is assumed to be a valuable dating tool.

  16. Fission track analysis, rift shoulder uplift, and tectonic modeling of the Norwegian Continental Margin

    SciTech Connect

    Andriessen, P.; Van Der Beek, P.; Cloetingh, S.; Rohrman, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Apatite fission track analysis from southern Norway and Sweden, across the Permian Carboniferous Oslo rift, are presented and discussed in relation to different rifting scenarios. Vertical and horizontal apatite fission tack profiles in middle and southern Norway unravel the post-Carboniferous history of the Fennoscandian shield. Fission track apatite ages range from 240 Ma in the south to 160 Ma in the north, and according to spontaneous fission track length measurements, they must be interpreted as mixed ages, indicating minor amounts of Paleozoic-Mesozoic sedimentary cover. Apatite fission track length and age modeling suggest rapid cooling and uplift in the Tertiary for the southernmost part of Norway, suggesting a differential uplift of the basement. the obtained data are important for the reconstruction of burial and thermal histories of Cenozoic sedimentary basins of the Norwegian continental margin in the northern North Sea, where diverse rifting events, intraplate stress regimes, and inversion tectonics are involved. Fission track analysis puts constraints on tectonic modeling of uplift of rift flanks and the Norwegian continental margin and yields information for these assessment of hydrocarbon potentials of the sedimentary basins.

  17. Fission measurements with PPAC detectors using a coincidence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Paradela, C.; Duran, I.; Tarrio, D.; Audouin, L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Stephan, C.

    2011-07-01

    A fission detection setup based on Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC) has been constructed and used at the CERN n-TOF facility. The setup takes advantage of the coincidence detection of both fission fragments to discriminate the background reactions produced by high energy neutrons and it allows obtaining neutron-induced fission cross section up to 1 GeV. (authors)

  18. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD) For Fuel Assembly Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Michael Reichenberger; Phillip Ugorowski

    2013-09-01

    Neutron sensors capable of real-time measurement of thermal flux, fast flux, and temperature in a single miniaturized probe are needed in irradiation tests required to demonstrate the performance of candidate new fuels, and cladding materials. In-core ceramic-based miniature neutron detectors or “Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors” (MPFDs) have been studied at Kansas State University (KSU). The first MPFD prototypes were tested in various neutron fields at the KSU TRIGA research reactor with successful results. Currently, a United States Department of Energy-sponsored joint KSU/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) effort is underway to develop a high-temperature, high-pressure version of the MPFD using radiation-resistant, high temperature materials, which would be capable of withstanding irradiation test conditions in high performance material and test reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, this more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, existing and advanced reactor designs, high performance MTRs, and transient test reactors has the potential to lead to higher accuracy and resolution data from irradiation testing, more detailed core flux measurements and enhanced fuel assembly processing. Prior evaluations by KSU indicate that these sensors could also be used to monitor burn-up of nuclear fuel. If integrated into nuclear fuel assemblies, MPFDs offer several advantages to current spent fuel management systems.

  19. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  20. Novel Electron-Bubble Tracking Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, William J.

    2008-08-08

    Our Columbia group, in collaboration with Brookhaven and SMU, has been carrying out R&D on tracking detectors in cryogenic liquids, including neon and helium. A cryostat purchased by this Grant capable of working temperatures down to 1 K and pressures above the critical point of neon and helium has been operated with a variety of noble fluids. Gaseous Electron Multipliers (GEM) with hydrogen additives have been operated with tracks of radioactive sources read out both by electrical charge detecting electronics, and an optical camera purchased by this Grant, measuring mobility, charge yield, transitions through phase boundaries, gain limitations, and other properties. The goal is very high resolution in large volumes. The scope of the project is the provision of a high performance camera and its installation in a cryogenic facility providing pressure up to 40 atmospheres and a temperature from ambient down to about 1 K. In this section we will address the goals and results having to do with this project and particularly the performance of the camera, and provide a summary of the status of the detector project. The technical development of digital cameras has been dominated for the last forty years by the Charge-Coupled Device technology (CCD). This allows photon recording on very small pixels on silicon planes that provide high quantum efficiency in the visible spectrum, recording the charge generated by a single photon stored on one pixel with an area of order ten microns square. The area can be up to several centimeters squared, containing a million pixels or more. The stores charge is usually read out by manipulating voltage biases to shift the charge in each pixel over to the next, and eventually out of the array and sent to an external processor and memory. Mass production has brought the cost per channel down to very small values and allowed cameras to be integrated to many consumer products. Thermal noise becomes larger than one photon on a single pixel at

  1. Track analysis of laser-illuminated etched track detectors using an opto-digital imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghan, Moses J.; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Oppon, Osborne C.

    2007-11-01

    An opto-digital imaging system for counting and analysing tracks on a LR-115 detector is described. One batch of LR-115 track detectors was irradiated with Am-241 for a determined period and distance for linearity test and another batch was exposed to radon gas. The laser-illuminated etched track detector area was imaged, digitized and analysed by the system. The tracks that were counted on the opto-digital system with the aid of media cybernetics software as well as spark gap counter showed comparable track density results ranging between 1500 and 2750 tracks cm-2 and 65 tracks cm-2 in the two different batch detector samples with 0.5% and 1% track counts, respectively. Track sizes of the incident alpha particles from the radon gas on the LR-115 detector demonstrating different track energies are statistically and graphically represented. The opto-digital imaging system counts and measures other track parameters at an average process time of 3-5 s.

  2. Fission-track age (400,000 yr) of the Rockland tephra, based on inclusion of zirco grains lacking fossil fission tracks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, C.E.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Hillhouse, J.W.; Woodward, M.J.; Slate, J.L.; Sorg, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    A zircon fission-track age of about 400,000 yr B.P. has been determined for the Rockland tephra, a widespread pyroclastic layer in northern California and western Nevada. New ages of zircon separates from both proximal and distal exposures of this layer range from 370,000 to 460,000 yr; ages of the best material provide a narrower range, from 370,000 yr for unwelded ash-flow tuff to 420,000 yr for distal air-fall ash that appears to be uncontaminated by clastic detritus or xenocrysts. Detrital or xenocrystic grains in the ash-flow tuff may have been annealed during emplacement and cooling of the tuff. Detrital and xenocrystic zircons are identified on the basis of their physical characteristics and distinctly older ages. Independent stratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic data constrain the age of the Rockland tephra between 300,000 and 600,000 yr, a range that is compatible with the fission-track age. Zircon grains containing no spontaneous (fossil) tracks are regarded as part of the normal population of comagmatic grains because maximum ages calculated for these grains form a population that mimics the distribution of ages of individual zircon grains that contain fossil tracks; modal ages of both groups fall between 250,000 and 500,000 yr. Induced fission tracks from grains that lack fossil tracks are included in the age calculations, resulting in significantly younger and more coherent dates than would result if these tracks had been omitted, especially those of the finer-grained distal samples. ?? 1991.

  3. A practical method of estimating standard error of age in the fission track dating method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, N.M.; McGee, V.E.; Naeser, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    A first-order approximation formula for the propagation of error in the fission track age equation is given by PA = C[P2s+P2i+P2??-2rPsPi] 1 2, where PA, Ps, Pi and P?? are the percentage error of age, of spontaneous track density, of induced track density, and of neutron dose, respectively, and C is a constant. The correlation, r, between spontaneous are induced track densities is a crucial element in the error analysis, acting generally to improve the standard error of age. In addition, the correlation parameter r is instrumental is specifying the level of neutron dose, a controlled variable, which will minimize the standard error of age. The results from the approximation equation agree closely with the results from an independent statistical model for the propagation of errors in the fission-track dating method. ?? 1979.

  4. Tracking Detectors in the STAR Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, Howard

    2015-04-01

    The STAR experiment at RHIC is designed to measure and identify the thousands of particles produced in 200 Gev/nucleon Au on Au collisions. This talk will focus on the design and construction of two of the main tracking detectors in the experiment, the TPC and the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) pixel detector. The TPC is a solenoidal gas filled detector 4 meters in diameter and 4.2 meters long. It provides precise, continuous tracking and rate of energy loss in the gas (dE/dx) for particles at + - 1 units of pseudo rapidity. The tracking in a half Tesla magnetic field measures momentum and dE/dX provides particle ID. To detect short lived particles tracking close to the point of interaction is required. The HFT pixel detector is a two-layered, high resolution vertex detector located at a few centimeters radius from the collision point. It determines origins of the tracks to a few tens of microns for the purpose of extracting displaced vertices, allowing the identification of D mesons and other short-lived particles. The HFT pixel detector uses detector chips developed by the IPHC group at Strasbourg that are based on standard IC Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. This is the first time that CMOS pixel chips have been incorporated in a collider application.

  5. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  6. 3D visualisation and analysis of single and coalescing tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, David; Gillmore, Gavin; Brown, Louise; Petford, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Exposure to radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionising decay products can cause lung cancer in humans (1). Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) can be used to monitor radon concentrations (2). Radon particles form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable 2D surface image analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (3). The aim of the study was to further investigate track angles and patterns in SSNTDs. A 'LEXT' confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 3D image datasets of five CR-39 plastic SSNTD's. The resultant 3D visualisations were analysed by eye and inclination angles assessed on selected tracks. From visual assessment, single isolated tracks as well as coalescing tracks were observed on the etched detectors. In addition varying track inclination angles were observed. Several different patterns of track formation were seen such as single isolated and double coalescing tracks. The observed track angles of inclination may help to assess the angle at which alpha particles hit the detector. Darby, S et al. Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer : collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 European case-control studies. British Medical Journal 2005; 330, 223-226. Phillips, P.S., Denman, A.R., Crockett, R.G.M., Gillmore, G., Groves-Kirkby, C.J., Woolridge, A., Comparative Analysis of Weekly vs. Three monthly radon measurements in dwellings. DEFRA Report No., DEFRA/RAS/03.006. (2004). Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. Journal of Microscopy 2010; 237: 1-6.

  7. Determination of nuclear tracks parameters on sequentially etched PADC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwacik, Tomasz; Bilski, Pawel; Koerner, Christine; Facius, Rainer; Berger, Thomas; Nowak, Tomasz; Reitz, Guenther; Olko, Pawel

    Polyallyl Diglycol Carbonate (PADC) detectors find many applications in radiation protection. One of them is the cosmic radiation dosimetry, where PADC detectors measure the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles (from protons to heavy ions), supplementing TLD detectors in the role of passive dosemeter. Calibration exposures to ions of known LET are required to establish a relation between parameters of track observed on the detector and LET of particle creating this track. PADC TASTRAK nuclear track detectors were exposed to 12 C and 56 Fe ions of LET in H2 O between 10 and 544 keV/µm. The exposures took place at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan in the frame of the HIMAC research project "Space Radiation Dosimetry-Ground Based Verification of the MATROSHKA Facility" (20P-240). Detectors were etched in water solution of NaOH with three different temperatures and for various etching times to observe the appearance of etched tracks, the evolution of their parameters and the stability of the etching process. The applied etching times (and the solution's concentrations and temperatures) were: 48, 72, 96, 120 hours (6.25 N NaOH, 50 O C), 20, 40, 60, 80 hours (6.25 N NaOH, 60 O C) and 8, 12, 16, 20 hours (7N NaOH, 70 O C). The analysis of the detectors involved planimetric (2D) measurements of tracks' entrance ellipses and mechanical measurements of bulk layer thickness. Further track parameters, like angle of incidence, track length and etch rate ratio were then calculated. For certain tracks, results of planimetric measurements and calculations were also compared with results of optical track profile (3D) measurements, where not only the track's entrance ellipse but also the location of the track's tip could be directly measured. All these measurements have been performed with the 2D/3D measurement system at DLR. The collected data allow to create sets of V(LET in H2 O) calibration curves suitable for short, intermediate and

  8. Dating thermal events at Cerro Prieto using fission-track annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, S.J.; Elders, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    The duration of heating in the Cerro Prieto reservoir was estimated by relating the fading of spontaneous fission tracks in detrital apatite to observed temperatures. The rate of fading is a function of both time and temperature. The apparent fission track age of the detrital apatites then, is a function of both their source age and their time-temperature history. Data from laboratory experiments and geologic fading studies were compiled from published sources to produce lines of iso-annealing for apatite in time-temperature space. Fission track ages were calculated for samples from two wells at Cerro Prieto, one with an apparently simple and one with an apparently complex thermal history. Temperatures were estimated by empirical vitrinite reflectance geothermometry, fluid inclusion homogenization and oxygen isotope equilibrium. These estimates were compared with logs of measured borehole temperatures. The temperature in well T-366, where complete annealing first occurs, was estimated to be between 160 and 180{sup 0}C. Complete annealing at these temperatures requires 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 3} years, respectively. Well M-94 has an apparently complex thermal history. Geothermometers in this well indicate temperatures some 50 to 100{sup 0}C higher than those measured directly in the borehole. Fission tracks are partially preserved in M-94 where paleotemperatures were as high as 200{sup 0}C and are erased where geothermometers indicate temperatures of 250{sup 0}C. This implies a thermal event less than 10{sup 1} years and greater than 10{sup 0} years in duration.

  9. Thermal history determined by fission-track dating for three sedimentary basins in California and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, Nancy D.

    1984-01-01

    The use of fission-tracks is demonstrated in studies of time-temperature relationships in three sedimentary basins in the western United States; in the Tejon Oil Field area of the southern San Joaquin Valley, California; in the northeastern Green River basin, Wyoming, and in drill holes in the southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming.

  10. Diffraction pattern by rotated conical tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevanovic, N.; Markovic, V. M.

    2016-06-01

    The method for determination of diffraction pattern for irregular 3D objects with application on rotated conical tracks in solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) wasdescribed in this paper. The model can be applied for different types of the diffraction (Fresnel, Fraunhofer) and arbitrary shapes of the obstacle. By applying the developed model on conical tracks it was fond that diffraction pattern strongly depends from radius, length and rotation angle of the conical tracks. These dependences were investigated in this paper and results can be applied for determination of inner tracks structure via diffraction pattern.

  11. Centroid tracking with area array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    A computer program (ALGEVAL) has been developed to simulate the position estimating behavior of a centroid estimator algorithm using data typical of optical point spread function data recorded by an area array detector. Typical results are shown of varying detector properties and optical point spread function types. The detector parameters currently available for study include read noise mean value, dark current mean value and spatial variation, charge transfer efficiency and point spread function location, saturation level, signal level and pixel size. The program is capable of calculating any order centroid using an array size from 2 x 2 to 15 x 15 pixels. The output of the program is either a performance map, histogram data or tabluar data. A number of further developments are recommended.

  12. Fission track astrology of three Apollo 14 gas-rich breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, H.; Shirck, J.; Sun, S.; Walker, R.

    1973-01-01

    The three Apollo 14 breccias 14301, 14313, and 14318 all show fission xenon due to the decay of Pu-244. To investigate possible in situ production of the fission gas, an analysis was made of the U-distribution in these three breccias. The major amount of the U lies in glass clasts and in matrix material and no more than 25% occurs in distinct high-U minerals. The U-distribution of each breccia is discussed in detail. Whitlockite grains in breccias 14301 and 14318 found with the U-mapping were etched and analyzed for fission tracks. The excess track densities are much smaller than indicated by the Xe-excess. Because of a preirradiation history documented by very high track densities in feldspar grains, however, it is impossible to attribute the excess tracks to the decay of Pu-244. A modified track method has been developed for measuring average U-concentrations in samples containing a heterogeneous distribution of U in the form of small high-U minerals. The method is briefly discussed, and results for the rocks 14301, 14313, 14318, 68815, 15595, and the soil 64421 are given.

  13. Fission-track ages of late Cenozoic distal tephra beds in the Yukon Territory and Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, N.D.; Westgate, J.A.; Hughes, O.L.; Pewe, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Six distal tephra beds from the Yukon Territory and Alaska were dated by the fission-track method. Assuming that no track fading has occurred in the glass, Old Crow and Dawson tephra beds are <120 000 and <52 000 yr old, respectively. Mosquito Gulch tephra is 1.22 m.y. old, Fort Selkirk tephra is approx 1 m.y. old, the Ester ash bed is 0.45 m.y. old, and the best estimate of the age of Lost Chicken tephra is in the range 1.7-2.6 m.y. It is concluded that application of the fission-track method to distal tephra, in conjunction with detailed characterization studies, offers great potential for elucidation of the Late Cainozoic geological history of Alaska and the Yukon Territory. -P.Br.

  14. A new method for internal calibration of nuclear track detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oda, K.; Csige, I.; Henke, R. P.; Benton, E. V.

    1992-01-01

    A new technique is proposed for an internal calibration of a two-layer detector assembly. Spatially coincident pairs of conical tracks on one surface and overetched tracks on the adjacent surface are selected for measurement. Both the etch rate ratio and the particle range can be obtained from the minor and major diameters of the elliptical track and the radii of the circular tracks for two etching steps. This technique was applied to CR-39 detectors exposed to fast neutrons and those flown on a high altitude balloon in order to evaluate the proton response. An improvement by using multi-step etching was also carried out. It was found that not only a single set of the etch rate ratio and the range but also the response curve could be estimated in an extended region by analyzing combined growth curves.

  15. Research on application of several tracking detectors in APT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi

    2005-01-01

    APT system is the key technology in free space optical communication system, and acquisition and tracking detector is the key component in PAT system. There are several candidate detectors that can be used in PAT system, such as CCD, QAPD and CMOS Imager etc. The characteristics of these detectors are quite different, i.e., the structures and the working schemes. This paper gives thoroughly compare of the usage and working principle of CCD and CMOS imager, and discusses the key parameters like tracking error, noise analyses, power analyses etc. Conclusion is given at the end of this paper that CMOS imager is a good candidate detector for PAT system in free space optical communication system.

  16. Fission-track dating of apatite and zircon: An interlaboratory comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; Zimmermann, R.A.; Cebula, G.T.

    1981-01-01

    Apatite and zircon separates from the Fish Canyon Tuff (K-Ar age, 27.9??0.7 Myr), San Juan Mtns., Colorado, have been given to over 50 laboratories for fission-track dating. Nineteen laboratories have reported fission-track ages that they have determined for apatites. Nine laboratories have reported their analysis of the zircons. The principal difference between the results reported by the laboratories reflects their choice of the decay constant. The laboratories which use a value of ??f ??? 7.0 ?? 10-17 yr-1 for the spontaneous-fission decay constant of 238U, report an average age for the apatite of 28.5??0.7 Myr, and those using ??f ??? = 8.4 ?? 10-17 yr-1 report an average age of 23.6??1.0 Myr. The average fission-track age for the zircons is 28.4??0.7 Myr. Only laboratories which use ??f ??? 7.0 ?? 10-17 yr-1 reported zircon data. ?? 1981.

  17. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Tracking and Vertexing (2/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Efficient and precise determination of the flavour of partons in multi-hadron final states is essential to the anticipated LC physics program. This makes tracking in the vicinity of the interaction region of great importance. Tracking extrapolation and momentum resolution are specified by precise physics requirements. The R&D; towards detectors able to meet these specifications will be discussed, together with some of their application beyond particle physics.

  18. Registration of alpha particles in Makrofol-E nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammah, Y. S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Ashraf, O.; Ashry, A. H.

    2016-06-01

    Fast detection of alpha particles in the range from 1 to 5 MeV in Makrofol-E polycarbonate nuclear track detectors (PCTDs) using a new chemical etchant was investigated. 252Cf and 241Am-thin open sources were used for irradiating Makrofol-E detectors with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal pressure and temperature (NPT). A chain of experimental work has been carried out using new etchants to register alpha particle in short time in Makrofol-E polycarbonate detectors. The etching efficiency were exhibited a clear dependence on the amount of methanol in the etching solution and etching time. The optimized chemical condition obtained at this stage of development for 200 μm Makrofol-E detectors are (8 ml of 10 N NaOH + 2 ml CH3OH) etching solutions at 60 °C for 3 h. In this study; it is possible to observe energy detection windows for Makrofol-E detectors according to applied etching duration. Makrofol-E introduced the characteristic Bragg peak, which indicates the advantages of this detector as alpha spectrometer. Consequently, the suggested new etchant can be developed for heavy ions detection and monitoring radon levels and its daughters.

  19. Effects of etching time on alpha tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Crust, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas is thought to be the cause of about 1100 lung cancer related deaths each year in the UK (1). Radon concentrations can be monitored using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) as the natural decay of radon results in alpha particles which form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable microscopic analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (2, 3). The aim of the study was to examine the effect of etching time on the appearance of alpha tracks in SSNTDs. Six SSNTDs were placed in a chamber with a luminous dial watch for a fixed period. The detectors were etched for between 30 minutes and 4.5 hours using 6M NaOH at a temperature of 90oC. A 'LEXT' OLS4000 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 2D and 3D image datasets of CR-39 plastic SSNTDs. Confocal microscope 3D images were acquired using a x50 or x100 objective lens. Data were saved as images and also spreadsheet files with height measurements. Software was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks Inc., USA) to analyse the height data. Comparing the 30 minute and 4 hour etching time detectors, we observed that there were marked differences in track area; the lower the etching time the smaller the track area. The degree to which etching may prevent visualising adjacent tracks also requires further study as it is possible that etching could result in some tracks being subsumed in other tracks. On the other hand if there is too little etching, track sizes would be reduced and hence could be more difficult to image; thus there is a balance required to obtain suitable measurement accuracy. (1) Gray A, Read S, McGale P and Darby S. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them. BMJ 2009; 338: a3110. (2) Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in

  20. A re-evaluation of geological timescale benchmarks and temperature sensitivity of fission-track annealing in apatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luijendijk, Elco; Andriessen, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Current models of the temperature sensitivity of fission track annealing in apatites have been calibrated using fission track data from boreholes, with the assumption that these samples are currently at maximum burial depth and temperatures. The most detailed data-set comes from boreholes located in the Otway basin, Australia. However, several lines of evidence suggest that these samples are not at their maximum burial depth and temperature and consequently the cooling temperature of the apatite fission track thermochronometer would then be higher than previously assumed. Significant late Cenozoic exhumation in the Otway Basin was suggested by earlier studies that document a major late-Miocene erosional unconformity, folding and trusting of underlying sediments and elevated strandlines along the coast. In addition, anomalously young apatite (U-Th)/He ages in several boreholes in the basin suggest that the basin's sediments have been exhumed and cooled in the late Cenozoic. We explore the effects of late Cenozoic exhumation on fission track data in the Otway basin using a 1D model of burial and thermal history. We show that simulating several 100s of meters of exhumation in the basin results in significant misfit between current annealing models and observed fission track data. The additional exhumation reconciles the Otway basin data with a second detailed fission track dataset from boreholes in Southern Texas with a well-constrained thermal and burial history. We combine vitrinite reflectance data and U-Th/He data from the Otway basin to recalibrate the burial history of the Otway basin. Subsequently we combine the new thermal history of the Otway basin with the Southern Texas dataset to recalibrate the fission track annealing algorithm. The results suggest that fission-track annealing in apatites is underestimated by approximately 20°C by current annealing models, with significant implications for studies that use apatite fission track thermochronology to

  1. Engineering cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The lack of sensitive biocompatible particle track detectors has so far limited parallel detection of physical energy deposition and biological response. Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3:C,Mg single crystals combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution limited by light diffraction. Here we report the development of next generation cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods The biocompatibility of FNTDs was tested using six different cell lines, i.e. human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549), glioblastoma (U87), androgen independent prostate cancer (PC3), epidermoid cancer (A431) and murine (VmDk) glioma SMA-560. To evaluate cell adherence, viability and conformal coverage of the crystals different seeding densities and alternative coating with extracellular matrix (fibronectin) was tested. Carbon irradiation was performed in Bragg peak (initial 270.55 MeV u−1). A series of cell compartment specific fluorescence stains including nuclear (HOECHST), membrane (Glut-1), cytoplasm (Calcein AM, CM-DiI) were tested on Cell-Fit-HDs and a single CLSM was employed to co-detect the physical (crystal) as well as the biological (cell layer) information. Results The FNTD provides a biocompatible surface. Among the cells tested, A549 cells formed the most uniform, viable, tightly packed epithelial like monolayer. The ion track information was not compromised in Cell-Fit-HD as compared to the FNTD alone. Neither cell coating and culturing, nor additional staining procedures affected the properties of the FNTD surface to detect ion tracks. Standard immunofluorescence and live staining procedures could be employed to co-register cell biology and ion track information. Conclusions The Cell-Fit-Hybrid Detector system is a promising platform for a multitude of studies linking biological response to energy deposition at high level of optical microscopy

  2. Track Reconstruction in a Time Projection Chamber Designed to Make High Precision Fission Cross Section Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sarvagya

    2010-10-01

    The TPC (Time Projection Chamber), being constructed by the NIFFTE (Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment) collaboration will be used for high-precision fission cross-section measurements. These measurements will aid in the design of future generations of nuclear power plants. The NIFFTE track reconstruction effort has developed two approaches consisting of a variety of statistical estimators. The first, consists of traditional cluster and hit finding algorithms that are performed on 2D planes. A least squares is performed on the hits to produce a track in the TPC. The alternate approach uses the Hough Transform, a brute force attempt at finding tracks that isolates features in the TPC volume through data binning. To determine fit parameters, a Kalman Filter has been implemented that accounts for multiple scattering and kinks in the track. Comparing simulated and reconstructed tracks have shown the validity of these methods. The software uses open source packages to ensure re-usability for future TPC projects. In my talk, I will describe these methods in detail.

  3. Particle tracking with a Timepix based triple GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, S. P.; Murtas, F.; Alozy, J.; Curioni, A.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Silari, M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper details the response of a triple GEM detector with a 55 μmetre pitch pixelated ASIC for readout. The detector is operated as a micro TPC with 9.5 cm3 sensitive volume and characterized with a mixed beam of 120 GeV protons and positive pions. A process for reconstruction of incident particle tracks from individual ionization clusters is described and scans of the gain and drift fields are performed. The angular resolution of the measured tracks is characterized. Also, the readout was operated in a mixed mode where some pixels measure drift time and others charge. This was used to measure the energy deposition in the detector and the charge cloud size as a function of interaction depth. The future uses of the device, including in microdosimetry are discussed.

  4. Provenance studies by fission-track dating of zircon-etching and counting procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, N.D.; Zeitler, P.K.; Naeser, C.W.; Cerveny, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    In sedimentary rocks that have not been heated to high enough temperatures to anneal fission tracks in zircon (greater than ≈ 160°C), fission-track ages of individual detrital zircon grains provide valuable information about the source rocks eroded to form the sediments. The success of such studies depends, however, on the degree to which the ages determined from the detrital suite accurately portray the range of grain ages that are present in the suite. This in turn depends to a large extent on using counting and, in particular, etching procedures that permit proper sampling of grains with a wide range of age and uranium concentrations. Results are reported here of an experimental study of a ‘detrital’ zircon suite manufactured from several zircon populations of known age. This study suggests that multiple etches are required when a complete spectrum of ages in a zircon suite is desired.

  5. Provenance studies by fission-track dating of zircon-etching and counting procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, Nancy D.; Zeitler, Peter K.; Naeser, Charles W.; Cerveny, Philip F.

    1987-01-01

    In sedimentary rocks that have not been heated to high enough temperatures to anneal fission tracks in zircon (greater than approximately equals 160 degree C), fission-track ages of individual detrital zircon grains provide valuable information about the source rocks eroded to form the sediments. The success of such studies depends, however, on the degree to which the ages determined from the detrital suite accurately portray the range of grain ages that are present in the suite. This in turn depends to a large extent on using counting and, in particular, etching procedures that permit proper sampling of grains with a wide range of age and uranium concentrations. Results are reported here of an experimental study of a 'detrital' zircon suite manufactured from several zircon populations of known age. This study suggests that multiple etches are required when a complete spectrum of ages in a zircon suite is desired.

  6. Tracing sediment pathways by zircon fission track analysis: Oligocene marine connections in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, Cornelia; Kuhlemann, Joachim; Frisch, Wolfgang

    2007-04-01

    In this study, we use contrasting zircon fission track age signatures of Alpine detritus and detritus derived from the Variscan realm to trace sediment pathways in Central Europe. Our data show that the Molasse Basin was connected with the Rhine Graben Sea during the Mid-Oligocene, thus joining the North Sea to the Paratethys. Within the Rhine Graben Sea, fairly strong south-north directed currents existed, transporting sand-sized Alpine detritus nearly 300 km towards the north. A connection between the Rhône-Bresse Graben and the Rhine Graben and/or the French Molasse Basin and the Swiss Molasse Basin, by contrast, is not supported by the fission track data. This may be explained by the existence of submarine rises that hampered the transport of sand-sized sediment towards the north/northeast.

  7. Thermal history of rocks in southern San Joaquin Valley, California: evidence from fission-track analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, N.D.; Naeser, C.W.; McCulloh, T.H.

    1990-01-01

    Fission-track analysis has been used to study the thermal and depositional history of the subsurface Tertiary sedimentary rocks on both sides of the active White Wolf reverse fault in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The distinctly different thermal histories of the rocks in the two structural blocks are clearly reflected in the apatite fission-track data, which suggest that rocks in the rapidly subsiding basin northwest of the fault have been near their present temperature for only about 1 m.y. compared with about 10 m.y. for rocks southeast of the fault. These estimates of heating time agree with previous estimates for these rocks. Zircon fission-track data indicate that the Tertiary sediments were derived from parent rocks of more than one age. However, from at least the Eocene to late Miocene or Pliocene, the major sediment source was rocks related to the youngest Sierra Nevada Mesozoic intrusive complexes, which are presently exposed east and south of the southern San Joaquin Valley. -from Authors

  8. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy characterizations of fission track method datable zircon grains.

    PubMed

    Resende, Rosana Silveira; Sáenz, Carlos Alberto Tello; Curvo, Eduardo Augusto Campos; Constantino, Carlos José Leopoldo; Aroca, Ricardo F; Nakasuga, Wagner Massayuki

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic and morphological studies, designed to improve our understanding of the physicochemical phenomena that occur during zircon crystallization, are presented. The zircon fission track method (ZFTM) is used routinely in various laboratories around the world; however, there are some methodological difficulties needing attention. Depending on the surface fission track density observed under an optical microscope, the zircon grain surfaces are classified as homogeneous, heterogeneous, hybrid, or anomalous. In this study, zircon grain surfaces are characterized using complementary techniques such as optical microscopy (OM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), both before and after chemical etching. Our results suggest that anomalous grains have subfamilies and that etching anisotropy related to heterogeneous grains is due to different crystallographic faces within the same polished surface that cannot be observed under an optical microscope. The improved methodology was used to determine the zircon fission track ages of samples collected from the Bauru Group located in the north of Paraná Basin, Brazil. A total of 514 zircon grains were analyzed, consisting of 10% homogeneous, about 10% heterogeneous, about 20% hybrid, and 60% anomalous grains. These results show that the age distributions obtained for homogeneous, heterogeneous, and hybrid grains are both statistically and geologically compatible. PMID:25014598

  9. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J. M. Kelley, R. P.; Jordan, K. A.; Murer, D.

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure {sup 4}He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the {sup 4}He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  10. Combining apatite fission track and He thermochronology to constrain thermal histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persano, C.; Stuart, F.; Bishop, P.

    2003-04-01

    Apatite fission track thermochronometry (AFTT) has proved an invaluable tool for determining the cooling histories of rocks in the shallow crust. Quantitative models for the time and temperature dependence of the fission track annealing process in apatite demostrate that the combination of fission track apparent age and track length distribution provides a continuous record of the thermal history of the samples from 120 to 60^oC, and possibly, to lower temperatures. However the sensitivity of the technique is poorly constrained below 70-80^oC because annealing rates are slow. The apatite (U-Th)/He system is sensitive to temperatures between 80 and 40^oC irrespective of apatite chemistry, and presents a way to test the ability of AFTT to determine thermal histories below 80^oC. Here we present a novel way of combining apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He data that narrows the number of possible thermal histories and provides better constraints on the landscape evolution of a particular region. We use as an example the southeastern Australia passive margin in NSW, an area where post break-up landscape evolution is poorly resolved despite an extensive fission track database. Fission track and (U-Th)/He ages have been measured on 16 apatite samples from two coast perpendicular traverses across the coastal plain, up the escarpment onto the plateau. The fission track data are modelled using AFTSolve and the individual thermal histories which fit the data are used as parameters for forward modelling the apatite He ages. Only the thermal histories that produce the measured He age, within uncertainty, are considered. For each sample, the choosen time-temperature paths show the same peculiar characteristics, narrowing considerably the number of possible cooling scenarios. This combination shows that the AFT/derived thermal histories for temperatures between 60 to 40^oC may be inconsistent with the (U-Th)/He ages, suggesting that the annealing process at this temperatures

  11. Measurement of Absolute Fission Yields in the Fast Neutron-Induced Fission of Actinides: {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm by Track-Etch-cum-Gamma Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, R.H.; Naik, H.; Pandey, A.K.; Kalsi, P.C.; Singh, R.J.; Ramaswami, A.; Nair, A.G.C.

    2000-07-15

    The absolute fission yields of 46 fission products in {sup 238}U (99.9997 at.%), 46 fission products in {sup 237}Np, 27 fission products in {sup 238}Pu (99.21 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 240}Pu (99.48 at.%), 30 fission products in {sup 243}Am (99.998 at.%), and 32 fission products in {sup 244}Cm (99.43 at.%) induced by fast neutrons were determined using a fission track-etch-cum-gamma spectrometric technique. In the case of highly alpha-active and sparingly available actinides - e.g., {sup 238}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 243}Am, and {sup 244}Cm - a novel recoil catcher technique to collect the fission products on a Lexan polycarbonate foil followed by gamma-ray spectrometry was developed during the course of this work. This completely removed interferences from (a) gamma rays of daughter products in secular equilibrium with the target nuclide (e.g., {sup 243}Am-{sup 239}Np), (b) activation products of the catcher foil [e.g., {sup 24}Na from Al(n,{alpha})], and (c) activation products of the target [e.g., {sup 238}Np from {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) and {sup 239}Np from {sup 238}U(n,{gamma})] reactions, making the gamma spectrometric analysis very simple and accurate. The high-yield asymmetric fission products were analyzed by direct gamma spectrometry, whereas the low-yield symmetric products (e.g., Ag, Cd, and Sb) as well as some of the asymmetric fission products (e.g., Br) and rare earths (in the case of {sup 238}U and {sup 237}Np) were radiochemically separated and then analyzed by gamma-ray spectrometry. The neutron spectra in the irradiation positions of the reactors were measured and delineated in the thermal to 10-MeV region using threshold activation detectors. The present data were compared with the ENDF/VI and UKFY2 evaluated data files. From the measured cumulative yields, the mass-chain yields have been deduced using charge distribution systematics. The mass yields, along with similar data for other fast neutron-induced fissioning systems, show several

  12. Apatite fission-track thermochronology of the central and southern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    Samples were collected in west to east transects across the Appalachian Basin of Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. These samples locations were chosen to test the concept of increasing paleotemperature due to increasing burial from west to east across the Appalachian Basin and to detect any thermal anomalies that exist. Calculated time-temperature (tT) paths based on apatite fission-track apparent ages and confined track length distributions for samples from this study indicate that both the Pennsylvania and southern Appalachian had complex uplift and cooling histories. In Pennsylvania, the Tioga and Kalkberg ash bed samples from central Pennsylvania yield modelled tT paths that indicate early post-Alleghanian (285-270 Ma) cooling with uplift estimated at beginning at {approx}251 {plus minus} 25 Ma. Samples from the western Allegheny Plateau and Allegheny Front contain apatites which have reset to give fission-track ages and track lengths consistent with tT histories beginning at <200 Ma. In northeastern Pennsylvania on the Allegheny Plateau, the modelled tT paths show rapid cooling from temperatures in the range of 110{degree}-120{degree} C at 170-160 Ma. In the southern Appalachian Basin, calculated tT paths indicate that uplift in the northern section was immediately post-Alleghanian folding with uplift beginning first in the northwestern section on the Cumberland Plateau at {approx}226 {plus minus} 23 Ma and progressing to the eastern Valley and Ridge Province of Virginia at {approx}119 {plus minus} 12 Ma. The samples from southwestern Virginia yield a mean apatite fission-track apparent age of 175 {plus minus} 11 Ma which may be the result of a higher heat flow, higher paleogeothermal gradient during the Upper Jurassic-Early Cretaceous extension along the Atlantic Coast.

  13. Computer program TRACK_VISION for simulating optical appearance of etched tracks in CR-39 nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikezic, D.; Yu, K. N.

    2008-04-01

    A computer program called TRACK_VISION for determining the optical appearances of tracks in nuclear track materials resulted from light-ion irradiation and subsequent chemical etching was described. A previously published software, TRACK_TEST, was the starting point for the present software TRACK_VISION, which contained TRACK_TEST as its subset. The programming steps were outlined. Descriptions of the program were given, including the built-in V functions for the commonly employed nuclear track material commercially known as CR-39 (polyallyldiglycol carbonate) irradiated by alpha particles. Program summaryProgram title: TRACK_VISION Catalogue identifier: AEAF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4084 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 117 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90 Computer: Pentium PC Operating system: Windows 95+ RAM: 256 MB Classification: 17.5, 18 External routines: The entire code must be linked with the MSFLIB library. MSFLib is a collection of C and C++ modules which provides a general framework for processing IBM's AFP datastream. MSFLIB is specific to Visual Fortran (Digital, Compaq or Intel flavors). Nature of problem: Nuclear track detectors are commonly used for radon measurements through studying the tracks generated by the incident alpha particles. Optical microscopes are often used for this purpose but the process is relatively tedious and time consuming. Several automatic and semi-automatic systems have been developed in order to facilitate determination of track densities. In all these automatic systems, the optical appearance of the tracks is important. However, not much has been done so far to obtaining the

  14. Wire bond vibration of forward pixel tracking detector of CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M.; Gobbi, B.; Kwan, S.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Spencer, E.; Sellberg, G.; Pavlicek, V.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    Wire bonds of the Forward Pixel (FPix) tracking detectors are oriented in the direction that maximizes Lorentz Forces relative to the 4 Tesla field of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Detector's magnet. The CMS Experiment is under construction at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. We were concerned about Lorentz Force oscillating the wires at their fundamental frequencies and possibly fracturing or breaking them at their heels, as happened with the CDF wire bonds. This paper reports a study to understand what conditions break such bonds.

  15. Improved zircon fission-track annealing model based on reevaluation of annealing data

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, S.; Moreira, Pedro; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.; Hadler, J. C.

    2012-11-10

    The thermal recovery (annealing) of mineral structure modified by the passage of fission fragments has long been studied by the etching technique. In minerals like apatite and zircon, the annealing kinetics are fairly well constrained from the hour to the million-year timescale and have been described by empirical and semi-empirical equations. On the other hand, laboratory experiments, in which ion beams interact with minerals and synthetic ceramics, have shown that there is a threshold temperature beyond which thermal recovery impedes ion-induced amorphization. In this work, it is assumed that this behavior can be extended to the annealing of fission tracks in minerals. It is proposed that there is a threshold temperature, T 0, beyond which fission tracks are erased within a time t 0, which is independent of the current state of lattice deformation. This implies that iso-annealing curves should converge to a fanning point in the Arrhenius pseudo-space (ln t vs. 1/T). Based on the proposed hypothesis, and laboratory and geological data, annealing equations are reevaluated. The geological timescale estimations of a model arising from this study are discussed through the calculation of partial annealing zone and closure temperature, and comparison with geological sample constraints found in literature. It is shown that the predictions given by this model are closer to field data on closure temperature and partial annealing zone than predictions given by previous models.

  16. Improved zircon fission-track annealing model based on reevaluation of annealing data

    SciTech Connect

    Guedes, Sandro; Moreira, Pedro A.F.P.; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J; Hadler, Julio C

    2013-01-01

    The thermal recovery (annealing) of mineral structure modified by the passage of fission fragments has long been studied by the etching technique. In minerals like apatite and zircon, the annealing kinetics are fairly well constrained from the hour to the million-year timescale and have been described by empirical and semi-empirical equations. On the other hand, laboratory experiments, in which ion beams interact with minerals and synthetic ceramics, have shown that there is a threshold temperature beyond which thermal recovery impedes ion-induced amorphization. In this work, it is assumed that this behavior can be extended to the annealing of fission tracks in minerals. It is proposed that there is a threshold temperature, T0, beyond which fission tracks are erased within a time t0, which is independent of the current state of lattice deformation. This implies that iso-annealing curves should converge to a fanning point in the Arrhenius pseudo-space (ln t vs. 1/T). Based on the proposed hypothesis, and laboratory and geological data, annealing equations are reevaluated. The geological timescale estimations of a model arising from this study are discussed through the calculation of partial annealing zone and closure temperature, and comparison with geological sample constraints found in literature. It is shown that the predictions given by this model are closer to field data on closure temperature and partial annealing zone than predictions given by previous models.

  17. Search for anomalons using plastic nuclear track detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drechsel, H.; Heinrich, W.; Brechtmann, C.; Dreute, J.

    1985-01-01

    A stack of CR39 track detectors containing Ag foils was exposed to 1.7 GeV/nucleon Fe-56 beam and the anomalous mean free path effect investigated. Neither the whole set of 7517 nor a subset of 2542 interacting fragments produced probably in the Ag target show an effect. By combining the data of this and an earlier experiment we can also exclude an effect for 3219 interacting fragments produced in delta Z=1 collisions.

  18. Data acqusition for the Zeus central tracking detector

    SciTech Connect

    Quinton, S.

    1989-04-01

    The Zeus experiment is being installed on the Hera electron-proton collider being built at the Desy laboratory in Hamburg. The high beam crossover rate of the Hera machine will provide experience in data acquisition and triggering relevant to the SSC environment. This paper describes the Transputer based data acquisition for the Zeus Central Tracking Detector, and outlines some proposed development work on the use of parallel processing techniques in this field.

  19. Ion track reconstruction in 3D using alumina-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Niklas, M; Bartz, J A; Akselrod, M S; Abollahi, A; Jäkel, O; Greilich, S

    2013-09-21

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3: C, Mg single crystal combined with confocal microscopy provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution only limited by light diffraction. FNTDs are also ideal substrates to be coated with cells to engineer cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). This radiobiological tool enables a novel platform linking cell responses to physical dose deposition on a sub-cellular level in proton and heavy ion therapies. To achieve spatial correlation between single ion hits in the cell coating and its biological response the ion traversals have to be reconstructed in 3D using the depth information gained by the FNTD read-out. FNTDs were coated with a confluent human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cell layer. Carbon ion irradiation of the hybrid detector was performed perpendicular and angular to the detector surface. In situ imaging of the fluorescently labeled cell layer and the FNTD was performed in a sequential read-out. Making use of the trajectory information provided by the FNTD the accuracy of 3D track reconstruction of single particles traversing the hybrid detector was studied. The accuracy is strongly influenced by the irradiation angle and therefore by complexity of the FNTD signal. Perpendicular irradiation results in highest accuracy with error of smaller than 0.10°. The ability of FNTD technology to provide accurate 3D ion track reconstruction makes it a powerful tool for radiobiological investigations in clinical ion beams, either being used as a substrate to be coated with living tissue or being implanted in vivo. PMID:23965401

  20. Ion track reconstruction in 3D using alumina-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklas, M.; Bartz, J. A.; Akselrod, M. S.; Abollahi, A.; Jäkel, O.; Greilich, S.

    2013-09-01

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3: C, Mg single crystal combined with confocal microscopy provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution only limited by light diffraction. FNTDs are also ideal substrates to be coated with cells to engineer cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). This radiobiological tool enables a novel platform linking cell responses to physical dose deposition on a sub-cellular level in proton and heavy ion therapies. To achieve spatial correlation between single ion hits in the cell coating and its biological response the ion traversals have to be reconstructed in 3D using the depth information gained by the FNTD read-out. FNTDs were coated with a confluent human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cell layer. Carbon ion irradiation of the hybrid detector was performed perpendicular and angular to the detector surface. In situ imaging of the fluorescently labeled cell layer and the FNTD was performed in a sequential read-out. Making use of the trajectory information provided by the FNTD the accuracy of 3D track reconstruction of single particles traversing the hybrid detector was studied. The accuracy is strongly influenced by the irradiation angle and therefore by complexity of the FNTD signal. Perpendicular irradiation results in highest accuracy with error of smaller than 0.10°. The ability of FNTD technology to provide accurate 3D ion track reconstruction makes it a powerful tool for radiobiological investigations in clinical ion beams, either being used as a substrate to be coated with living tissue or being implanted in vivo.

  1. Precision tracking with a single gaseous pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridas, S.; van Bakel, N.; Bilevych, Y.; Gromov, V.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N. P.; de Jong, P.; Kluit, R.

    2015-09-01

    The importance of micro-pattern gaseous detectors has grown over the past few years after successful usage in a large number of applications in physics experiments and medicine. We develop gaseous pixel detectors using micromegas-based amplification structures on top of CMOS pixel readout chips. Using wafer post-processing we add a spark-protection layer and a grid to create an amplification region above the chip, allowing individual electrons released above the grid by the passage of ionising radiation to be recorded. The electron creation point is measured in 3D, using the pixel position for (x, y) and the drift time for z. The track can be reconstructed by fitting a straight line to these points. In this work we have used a pixel-readout-chip which is a small-scale prototype of Timepix3 chip (designed for both silicon and gaseous detection media). This prototype chip has several advantages over the existing Timepix chip, including a faster front-end (pre-amplifier and discriminator) and a faster TDC which reduce timewalk's contribution to the z position error. Although the chip is very small (sensitive area of 0.88 × 0.88mm2), we have built it into a detector with a short drift gap (1.3 mm), and measured its tracking performance in an electron beam at DESY. We present the results obtained, which lead to a significant improvement for the resolutions with respect to Timepix-based detectors.

  2. A Bayesian approach to calibrating apatite fission track annealing models for laboratory and geological timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, John; Gallagher, Kerry; Holmes, Chris

    2006-10-01

    We present a new approach for modelling annealing of fission tracks in apatite, aiming to address various problems with existing models. We cast the model in a fully Bayesian context, which allows us explicitly to deal with data and parameter uncertainties and correlations, and also to deal with the predictive uncertainties. We focus on a well-known annealing algorithm [Laslett, G.M., Green, P.F., Duddy, I.R., Gleadow. A.J.W., 1987. Thermal annealing of fission tracks in apatite. 2. A quantitative-analysis. Chem. Geol., 65 (1), 1-13], and build a hierachical Bayesian model to incorporate both laboratory and geological timescale data as direct constraints. Relative to the original model calibration, we find a better (in terms of likelihood) model conditioned just on the reported laboratory data. We then include the uncertainty on the temperatures recorded during the laboratory annealing experiments. We again find a better model, but the predictive uncertainty when extrapolated to geological timescales is increased due to the uncertainty on the laboratory temperatures. Finally, we explictly include a data set [Vrolijk, P., Donelick, R.A., Quenq, J., Cloos. M., 1992. Testing models of fission track annealing in apatite in a simple thermal setting: site 800, leg 129. In: Larson, R., Lancelet, Y. (Eds.), Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, vol. 129, pp. 169-176] which provides low-temperature geological timescale constraints for the model calibration. When combined with the laboratory data, we find a model which satisfies both the low-temperature and high-temperature geological timescale benchmarks, although the fit to the original laboratory data is degraded. However, when extrapolated to geological timescales, this combined model significantly reduces the well-known rapid recent cooling artifact found in many published thermal models for geological samples.

  3. Re-collection of Fish Canyon Tuff for fission-track standardization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; Cebula, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    The PURPOSE of this note is to announce the availability of apatite and zircon from a third collection of the Oligocene Fish Canyon Tuff (FC-3). Apatite and zircon separated from the Fish Canyon Tuff have prove to be a useful standard for fission-track dating, both for interlaboratory comparisons and for checking procedures within a laboratory. In May 1981, about 540 kg of Fish Canyon Tuff were collected for mineral separation. Approximately 7. 5 g of apatite, 6. 5 g of zircon, and 89 g of sphene were recovered from this collection. This new material is now ready for distribution.

  4. Fission-track age of the Mangaroa ash and tectonic implications at Wellington, New Zealand.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; Nishimura, S.; Te Punga, M.T.

    1980-01-01

    Three samples of zircon from the Mangaroa Ash, an important marker bed in the late Pleistocene deposits of the Wellington area, have been dated by fission-track analysis. The average age of the 3 zircon samples is 380 000 years. Since this tephra fell, vertical uplift at Tinakori Hill on the northwest side of the Wellington Fault has been about 266 m, at a rate of about 69 cm per 1000 years; at the Whakatiki Terraces the minimum rate of uplift on the northwest side of this fault has been about 21 cm per 1000 years. -Authors

  5. Feasibility studies for a wireless 60 GHz tracking detector readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmeier, S.; Schöning, A.; Soltveit, H. K.; Wiedner, D.

    2016-09-01

    The amount of data produced by highly granular silicon tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments poses a major challenge to readout systems. At high collision rates, e.g. at LHC experiments, only a small fraction of data can be read out with currently used technologies. To cope with the requirements of future or upgraded experiments new data transfer techniques are required which offer high data rates at low power and low material budget. Wireless technologies operating in the 60 GHz band or at higher frequencies offer high data rates and are thus a promising upcoming alternative to conventional data transmission via electrical cables or optical fibers. Using wireless technology, the amount of cables and connectors in detectors can be significantly reduced. Tracking detectors profit most from a reduced material budget as fewer secondary particle interactions (multiple Coulomb scattering, energy loss, etc.) improve the tracking performance in general. We present feasibility studies regarding the integration of the wireless technology at 60 GHz into a silicon tracking detector. We use spare silicon strip modules of the ATLAS experiment as test samples which are measured to be opaque in the 60 GHz range. The reduction of cross talk between links and the attenuation of reflections is studied. An estimate of the maximum achievable link density is given. It is shown that wireless links can be placed as close as 2 cm next to each other for a layer distance of 10 cm by exploiting one or several of the following measures: highly directive antennas, absorbers like graphite foam, linear polarization and frequency channeling. Combining these measures, a data rate area density of up to 11 Tb/(s·m2) seems feasible. In addition, two types of silicon sensors are tested under mm-wave irradiation in order to determine the influence of 60 GHz data transmission on the detector performance: an ATLAS silicon strip sensor module and an HV-MAPS prototype for the Mu3e

  6. Fission track-secondary ion mass spectrometry as a tool for detecting the isotopic signature of individual uranium containing particles.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Lee, Chi-Gyu; Magara, Masaaki; Kimura, Takaumi

    2012-04-01

    A fission track technique was used as a sample preparation method for subsequent isotope abundance ratio analysis of individual uranium containing particles with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to measure the particles with higher enriched uranium efficiently. A polycarbonate film containing particles was irradiated with thermal neutrons and etched with 6M NaOH solution. Each uranium containing particle was then identified by observing fission tracks created and a portion of the film having a uranium containing particle was cut out and put onto a glassy carbon planchet. The polycarbonate film, which gave the increases of background signals on the uranium mass region in SIMS analysis, was removed by plasma ashing with 200 W for 20 min. In the analysis of swipe samples having particles containing natural (NBL CRM 950a) or low enriched uranium (NBL CRM U100) with the fission track-SIMS method, uranium isotope abundance ratios were successfully determined. This method was then applied to the analysis of a real inspection swipe sample taken at a nuclear facility. As a consequence, the range of (235)U/(238)U isotope abundance ratio between 0.0276 and 0.0438 was obtained, which was higher than that measured by SIMS without using a fission track technique (0.0225 and 0.0341). This indicates that the fission track-SIMS method is a powerful tool to identify the particle with higher enriched uranium in environmental samples efficiently. PMID:22405310

  7. Evidence for Differential Unroofing in the Adirondack Mountains, New York State, Determined by Apatite Fission-Track Thermochronology.

    PubMed

    Roden-Tice; Tice; Schofield

    2000-03-01

    Apatite fission-track ages of 168-83 Ma for 39 samples of Proterozoic crystalline rocks, three samples of Cambrian Potsdam sandstone, and one Cretaceous lamprophyre dike from the Adirondack Mountains in New York State indicate that unroofing in this region occurred from Late Jurassic through Early Cretaceous. Samples from the High Peaks section of the Adirondack massif yielded the oldest apatite fission-track ages (168-135 Ma), indicating that it was exhumed first. Unroofing along the northern, northwestern, and southwestern margins of the Adirondacks began slightly later, as shown by younger apatite fission-track ages (146-114 Ma) determined for these rocks. This delay in exhumation may have resulted from burial of the peripheral regions by sediment shed from the High Peaks. Apatite fission-track ages for samples from the southeastern Adirondacks are distinctly younger (112-83 Ma) than those determined for the rest of the Adirondack region. These younger apatite fission-track ages are from a section of the Adirondacks dissected by shear zones and post-Ordovician north-northeast-trending normal faults. Differential unroofing may have been accommodated by reactivation of the faults in a reverse sense of motion with maximum compressive stress, sigma1, oriented west-northwest. A change in the orientation of the post-Early Cretaceous paleostress field is supported by a change in the trend of Cretaceous lamprophyre dikes from east-west to west-northwest. PMID:10736267

  8. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2012-07-10

    Abstract: The response of 3-He neutron detectors is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the 3-He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the 3-He. In applications for portal or border monitors where 3He detectors are used to interdict illicit Importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around 3-He tubesmore » is a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of 3-He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a 252-Cf source placed in the center of spheres of water of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding are explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that benefits are limited if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the 3He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 5-6 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0-1 cm. A two-tube box with a moderator thickness of 5 cm in front of the first tube and a thickness of 1 cm in front of the second tube is proposed to improve the detector's sensitivity to lower-energy neutrons.« less

  9. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2012-07-10

    Abstract: The response of 3-He neutron detectors is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the 3-He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the 3-He. In applications for portal or border monitors where 3He detectors are used to interdict illicit Importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around 3-He tubes is a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of 3-He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a 252-Cf source placed in the center of spheres of water of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding are explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that benefits are limited if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the 3He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 5-6 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0-1 cm. A two-tube box with a moderator thickness of 5 cm in front of the first tube and a thickness of 1 cm in front of the second tube is proposed to improve the detector's sensitivity to lower-energy neutrons.

  10. Identification of prompt fission γ-rays with lanthanum-chloride scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Billnert, R.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Karlsson, J.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the employment of LaCl3:Ce scintillation detectors for the identification of prompt fission γ-rays from γ-radiation in contrast to other reactions. We present the properties of cylindrical 1.5 in.×1.5 in. detectors in terms of intrinsic activity, energy resolution, intrinsic full peak efficiency and intrinsic timing resolution. In addition, we show results from the measurement of γ-rays emitted in coincidence with the spontaneous fission of 252Cf, which lead us to the conclusion that the properties of the detectors used in this work, in particular the good timing resolution and a reasonably good energy resolution, are more than just sufficient for the assessment of prompt γ-heat in future nuclear reactors as requested by the OECD. Hence, in our opinion, LaCl3:Ce detectors, compared to those made out of LaBr3:Ce crystals, represent an appropriate and quasi low-cost choice for the above mentioned applications.

  11. 3D imaging of particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionizing decay products is known to cause lung cancer in human. In the U.K., it has been suggested that 3 to 5 % of total lung cancer deaths can be linked to elevated radon concentrations in the home and/or workplace. Radon monitoring in buildings is therefore routinely undertaken in areas of known risk. Indeed, some organisations such as the Radon Council in the UK and the Environmental Protection Agency in the USA, advocate a ‘to test is best' policy. Radon gas occurs naturally, emanating from the decay of 238U in rock and soils. Its concentration can be measured using CR?39 plastic detectors which conventionally are assessed by 2D image analysis of the surface; however there can be some variation in outcomes / readings even in closely spaced detectors. A number of radon measurement methods are currently in use (for examples, activated carbon and electrets) but the most widely used are CR?39 solid state nuclear track?etch detectors (SSNTDs). In this technique, heavily ionizing alpha particles leave tracks in the form of radiation damage (via interaction between alpha particles and the atoms making up the CR?39 polymer). 3D imaging of the tracks has the potential to provide information relating to angle and energy of alpha particles but this could be time consuming. Here we describe a new method for rapid high resolution 3D imaging of SSNTDs. A ‘LEXT' OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope was used in confocal mode to successfully obtain 3D image data on four CR?39 plastic detectors. 3D visualisation and image analysis enabled characterisation of track features. This method may provide a means of rapid and detailed 3D analysis of SSNTDs. Keywords: Radon; SSNTDs; confocal laser scanning microscope; 3D imaging; LEXT

  12. A parameterization of nuclear track profiles in CR-39 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azooz, A. A.; Al-Nia'emi, S. H.; Al-Jubbori, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the empirical parameterization describing the alpha particles’ track depth in CR-39 detectors is extended to describe longitudinal track profiles against etching time for protons and alpha particles. MATLAB based software is developed for this purpose. The software calculates and plots the depth, diameter, range, residual range, saturation time, and etch rate versus etching time. The software predictions are compared with other experimental data and with results of calculations using the original software, TRACK_TEST, developed for alpha track calculations. The software related to this work is freely downloadable and performs calculations for protons in addition to alpha particles. Program summary Program title: CR39 Catalog identifier: AENA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Copyright (c) 2011, Aasim Azooz Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met • Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. • Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution This software is provided by the copyright holders and contributors “as is” and any express or implied warranties, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose are disclaimed. In no event shall the copyright owner or contributors be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential damages (including, but not limited to, procurement of substitute goods or services; loss of use, data, or profits; or business interruption) however caused and

  13. Proton shadow camera using CR-39 track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G.F.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1983-09-01

    We have developed a capability for imaging proton sources of moderate energy (6 MeV), with moderate spatial resolution (approx. = 9 ..mu..m), as a diagnostic for laser fusion research. Our technique involves the use of Fresnel zone plate coded imaging coupled with nuclear track detectors (CR-39). We report on a series of test experiments in which a zone plate shadow camera successfully produced images of a proton source distribution. The zone plate shadow patterns were optically reconstructed in higher order producing diffraction-limited point response images with FWHM values of approx. = 9 ..mu..m for a 6 MeV proton source.

  14. Recent rapid uplift in the Bolivian Andes: evidence from fission-track dating

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, M.T.; Johnson, N.M.; Naeser, C.W.

    1987-07-01

    Apatite and zircon fission-track cooling ages constrain the Tertiary cooling and uplift history of the eastern Cordillera and Altiplano of Bolivia. Fission-track data are from two Triassic plutons and surrounding Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks in the eastern Andes north of La Paz. Zircon cooling ages indicate that the roof of the Huayna Potosi pluton was emplaced in the zircon partial annealing zone and that the Zongo pluton was emplaced entirely in the zircon total annealing zone. Apatite cooling ages for both plutons record uplift in the past 5-15 m.y., and zircon cooling ages from the Zongo pluton reflect uplift in the past 25-45 m.y. Uplift rates calculated by these apatite and zircon cooling ages suggest that uplift rates were 0.1-0.2 mm/yr between 20 and 40 Ma and increased significantly between 10 and 15 Ma. By 3 Ma, uplift rates may have been as high as 0.7 mm/yr.

  15. Zircon fission-track ages from the Gasherbrum Diorite, Karakoram Range, northern Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Cerveny, P.F. ); Naeser, C.W. ); Kelemen, P.B. ); Lieberman, J.E. ); Zeitler, P.K. )

    1989-11-01

    The Gasherbrum Peaks, in the Himalaya of Pakistan, reach elevations of >8000 m. The relief between the peaks and the adjacent valley (Baltoro Glacier) is in excess of 3000 m. Eight samples of the Early Cretaceous Gasherbrum Diorite at elevations between 4880 and 7165 m on Gasherbrum IV were collected for fission-track dating. Zircon fission-track ages from the Gasherbrum Diorite vary from Early Cretaceous to middle Tertiary in age. There is no consistent pattern between age and elevation. The Cretaceous ages indicate that these rocks were never deeply buried, i.e., heated to temperatures in excess of 175 C, to reset the zircons during Cenozoic time. These results also indicate that the uplift of this part of the Himalaya has been either very rapid and recent, or very slow since Early Cretaceous time. This latter possibility is not consistent with the high relief at Gasherbrum and what is known about regional tectonics. Gasherbrum IV zircons, currently at {approximately}4880 m, have never been at depths greater than 6 km, and less than 3 km of material has been removed from the top of the range by erosion since the Early Cretaceous. Rapid uplift has occurred very recently, and erosion rates have not been able to keep pace with this uplift.

  16. Tectonic significance of precambrian apatite fission-track ages from the midcontinent United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, K.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Babel, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Apparent apatite fission-track ages from drill core penetrating basement on the flank of the Transcontinental Arch in northwestern Iowa range from 934 ?? 86 to 641 ?? 90 Ma. These ages, the oldest reported in North America, record at least two thermal events. The 934 Ma age, which is synchronous with KAr ages in the Grenville Province and many KAr whole-rock and RbSr isochron ages from the Lake Superior region, may document basement cooling caused by regional uplift and erosion of the crust. The remaining fission-track ages are products of a more recent thermal event, relative to the age of the samples, which raised temperatures into the zone of partial annealing. Heating may have occurred between the Middle Ordovician and Middle Cretaceous by burial of the basement with additional sediment. It is estimated that burial raised temperatures in the part of the basement sampled by the core to between 50 and 75??C. These temperature estimates imply paleogeothermal gradients of about 20??C/km, approximately two and one-half times present-day values, and burial of the basement by an additional 2-3 km of sediment. ?? 1986.

  17. Apatite fission-track thermochronology of the Appalachian foreland basin from the Virginia Piedmont to eastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, M.K. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science); Cerveny, P.F.; Bergman, S.C. . Research and Technical Services)

    1992-01-01

    Apatite fission-track ages have been determined for 29 samples from two transects in the southern Appalachians. The northern transect extends from the VA Piedmont northwest through the Valley and Ridge Province, Cumberland Plateau, and into the Appalachian foreland of southeastern OH. An additional transect was collected from the Pine Mountain thrust in southeastern KY extending northwest to the Cincinnati Arch. Precambrian gneisses and granites from the VA Piedmont yield reset apatite fission-track ages ranging from 103 [+-] 6 to 138 [+-] 11 Ma. Ordovician through Mississippian sedimentary rocks from the Valley and Ridge Province of VA-WV also yield reset apatite fission-track ages ranging from 120 [+-] 8 to 144 [+-] 20 Ma. The cooling histories for the Piedmont and Valley and Ridge rocks of VA and WV thus appear similar, having cooled rapidly between about 103 and 144 Ma. Pennsylvanian samples from the Cumberland Plateau of WV yield rest apatite fission-track ages of 112 [+-] 7 to 169 [+-] 13 MA in the southeast which grade into partially reset (mixed ages) northwest of Charlestown (133 [+-] 13 to 156 [+-] 10 Ma). The Permian Dunkard Formation from the OH-WV border yielded a mixed age of 197 [+-] 13 Ma, suggesting that the Permian has not been subjected to temperatures > 100 C for times greater than 1 Ma, since it was deposited. Mississippian--Pennsylvanian samples from eastern KY yield reset apatite fission-track ages which decrease from the Pine Mt. Thrust (186 [+-] 16 Ma) to Mozelle, KY (136 [+-] 12 Ma), then increase toward the Cincinnati Arch (166 [+-] 18 [minus] 186 [+-] 21 Ma). This is consistent with older apatite fission-track ages (200 Ma) from Ordovician K-bentonites in the vicinity of the Cincinnati Arch.

  18. Databank of proton tracks in polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) solid-state nuclear track detector for neutron energy spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikezic, D.; Milenkovic, B.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    A computer program for studying etched proton tracks in the polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) solid-state nuclear track detector was prepared. The program provided visualization of track appearance as seen under the optical microscope in the transmission mode. Measurable track parameters were also determined and displayed and written in a data file. Three-dimensional representation of tracks was also enabled. Application of this software in neutron dosimetry for energy up to 11 MeV was demonstrated through the creation of a databank with a large number of tracks, which would be used to compare real-life tracks obtained in the PADC detector upon neutron irradiation. One problem was identified, viz., very similar tracks were obtained from protons with very different energies and incident angles, and strategies to solve this were proposed.

  19. Radon Emanation from Zircon as a Function of Grain Size, Temperature and Fission Track Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, M.; Barbero, L.; Brownlee, S. J.; Baskaran, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    Radon emanation from rocks and minerals is ubiquitous. Quantification of radon emanation rates from zircon is critical to assess the reliability of U-Pb ages of zircon bearing rocks. The 238U decay chain includes 222Rn, a noble gas, which can readily escape the crystal structure if sufficient escape pathways in lattice structure exist, ultimately leading to a deficiency of 206Pb in the parent crystal. Few studies have directly investigated the link between track density and 222Rn emanation rates, and none have done this for zircon. In order to evaluate the factors affecting radon emanation from the mineral zircon under different conditions, a series of experiments were performed on a large, crushed Mud Tank zircon crystal. Five different grain sizes (500 μm, 250-500 μm, 125-250 μm, 63 - 125 μm, and < 63 μm) were separated and sealed in closed glass jars and radon emanation rates were measured at 25 C. These aliquots are then subjected to a range of temperatures (100 C, 200 C, 400 C, and 600 C) for six hours and the radon emanation rates are measured after each heating step. Fission track densities are measured after the same annealing temperature steps allowing quantification of 222Rn emanation rate as a function of fission track density. The concentration of 210Pb, 234Th, 212Pb, 226Ra and 228Ra in these fractions are also measured using gamma spectroscopy. The results of these experiments will have implications for U-Pb dating (i.e., explanation of discordant ages), and noble gas escape systematics in zircon (i.e., volume diffusion or fast pathway escape). The possibility also exists for using 222Rn, or other noble gasses, as a measure of defect density within crystals.

  20. A parameterization of nuclear track profiles in CR-39 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azooz, A. A.; Al-Nia'emi, S. H.; Al-Jubbori, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the empirical parameterization describing the alpha particles’ track depth in CR-39 detectors is extended to describe longitudinal track profiles against etching time for protons and alpha particles. MATLAB based software is developed for this purpose. The software calculates and plots the depth, diameter, range, residual range, saturation time, and etch rate versus etching time. The software predictions are compared with other experimental data and with results of calculations using the original software, TRACK_TEST, developed for alpha track calculations. The software related to this work is freely downloadable and performs calculations for protons in addition to alpha particles. Program summary Program title: CR39 Catalog identifier: AENA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Copyright (c) 2011, Aasim Azooz Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met • Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. • Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution This software is provided by the copyright holders and contributors “as is” and any express or implied warranties, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose are disclaimed. In no event shall the copyright owner or contributors be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential damages (including, but not limited to, procurement of substitute goods or services; loss of use, data, or profits; or business interruption) however caused and

  1. Development of a cylindrical tracking detector with multichannel scintillation fibers and pixelated photon detector readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akazawa, Y.; Miwa, K.; Honda, R.; Shiozaki, T.; Chiga, N.

    2015-07-01

    We are developing a cylindrical tracking detector for a Σp scattering experiment in J-PARC with scintillation fibers and the Pixelated Photon Detector (PPD) readout, which is called as cylindrical fiber tracker (CFT), in order to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles emitted inside CFT. CFT works not only as a tracking detector but also a particle identification detector from energy deposits. A prototype CFT consisting of two straight layers and one spiral layer was constructed. About 1100 scintillation fibers with a diameter of 0.75 mm (Kuraray SCSF-78 M) were used. Each fiber signal was read by Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC, HPK S10362-11-050P, 1×1 mm2, 400 pixels) fiber by fiber. MPPCs were handled with Extended Analogue Silicon Photomultipliers Integrated ReadOut Chip (EASIROC) boards, which were developed for the readout of a large number of MPPCs. The energy resolution of one layer was 28% for a 70 MeV proton where the energy deposit in fibers was 0.7 MeV.

  2. Fast-neutron spectroscopy studies using induced-proton tracks in PADC track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sersy, A. R.; Eman, S. A.

    2010-06-01

    In this work, a simple and adequate method for fast-neutron spectroscopy is proposed. This method was performed by free-in-air fast-neutron irradiation of CR-39 Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) using an Am-Be source. Detectors were then chemically etched to remove few layers up to a thickness of 6.25 μm. By using an automatic image analyzer system for studying the registration of the induced-proton tracks in the NTD, the obtained data were analyzed via two tracks shapes. In the first one, the elliptical tracks were eliminated from the calculation and only the circular ones were considered in developing the response function. In the second method all registered tracks were considered and the corresponding response function was obtained. The rate of energy loss of the protons as a function of V[(d E/d X) - V] was calculated using the Monte Carlo simulation. The induced-proton energy was extracted from the corresponding d E/d X in NTD using a computer program based on the Bethe-Bloch function. The energy of the incident particles was up to few hundred MeV/nucleon. The energy of the interacting neutrons was then estimated by means of the extracted induced-proton energies and the scattering angle. It was found that the present resulting energy distribution of the fast-neutron spectrum from the Am-Be source was similar to that given in the literature where an average neutron energy of 4.6MeV was obtained.

  3. HIBRA: A computer code for heavy ion binary reaction analysis employing ion track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Khalid; Ahmad, Siraj-ul-Islam; Manzoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Collisions of heavy ions many times result in production of only two reaction products. Study of heavy ions using ion track detectors allows experimentalists to observe the track length in the plane of the detector, depth of the tracks in the volume of the detector and angles between the tracks on the detector surface, all known as track parameters. How to convert these into useful physics parameters such as masses, energies, momenta of the reaction products and the Q-values of the reaction? This paper describes the (a) model used to analyze binary reactions in terms of measured etched track parameters of the reaction products recorded in ion track detectors, and (b) the code developed for computing useful physics parameters for fast and accurate analysis of a large number of binary events. A computer code, HIBRA (Heavy Ion Binary Reaction Analysis) has been developed both in C++ and FORTRAN programming languages. It has been tested on the binary reactions from 12.5 MeV/u 84Kr ions incident upon U (natural) target deposited on mica ion track detector. The HIBRA code can be employed with any ion track detector for which range-velocity relation is available including the widely used CR-39 ion track detectors. This paper provides the source code of HIBRA in C++ language along with input and output data to test the program.

  4. High-Resolution Compton-Suppressed CZT Detector for Fission Products Identification

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aryaeinejd; J. K. Hartwell; Wade W. Scates

    2004-10-01

    Room temperature semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors are currently limited to total detector volumes of 1-2 cm3, which is dictated by the poor charge transport characteristics. Because of this size limitation one of the problems in accurately determining isotope identification is the enormous background from the Compton scattering events. Eliminating this background will not only increase the sensitivity and accuracy of measurements but also help us to resolve peaks buried under the background and peaks in close vicinity of others. We are currently developing a fission products detection system based on the Compton-suppressed CZT detector. In this application, the detection system is required to operate in high radiation fields. Therefore, a small 10x10x5 mm3 CZT detector is placed inside the center of a well-shielded 3" in diameter by 3" long Nal detector. So far we have been able to successfully reduce the Compton background by a factor of 5.4 for a 137Cs spectrum. This reduction of background will definitely enhance the quality of the gamma-ray spectrum in the information-rich energy range below 1 MeV, which consequently increases the detection sensitivity. In this work, we will discuss the performance of this detection system as well as its applications.

  5. Search for {beta}-delayed fission of {sup 228}Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yanbing; Ding Huajie; Yuan Shuanggui; Yang Weifan; Niu Yanning; Li Yingjun; Xiao Yonghou; Zhang Shengdong; Lu Xiting

    2006-10-15

    Radium was radiochemically separated from natural thorium. Thin {sup 228}Ra{yields}{beta}{sup -228}Ac sources were prepared and exposed to mica fission track detectors, and measured by an HPGe {gamma}-ray detector. The {beta}-delayed fission events of {sup 228}Ac were observed and its {beta}-delayed fission probability was found to be (5{+-}2)x10{sup -12}.

  6. Aspects of cordilleran geothermal history from fission-track analysis in the Lewis and Coleman overthrust plates, southwestern Alberta and southeastern British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Osadetz, K.G. ); Kohn, B.P.; Feinstein, S. ); Price, R.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Apatite fission-track data from pre-Tertiary rocks in the southern Canadian Front Range and Foothills are younger than their stratigraphic ages, indicating thermal setting. Limited confined track-length distribution data indicate rapid cooling from the total annealing zone at about the age recorded. There appears to be a consistent difference between apatite ages of the Lewis plate (64-80 Ma) and the underlying Coleman plate (46-59 Ma). Zircon single-grain fission-track age distributions in both overthrust plates show a long tail of scattered ages but with a distinctive signal, indicating thermal resetting during the Cretaceous or Tertiary. The age of the thermal zircon fission-track resetting signal overlaps or is only slightly older than corrected apatite fission-track ages, in their respective thrust plates. Between 70 and 80 Ma, Lewis plate samples experienced temperatures higher than those required for total apatite annealing and were subsequently cooled vary rapidly through apatite fission-track annealing to apatite fission-track stability temperatures. The Coleman plate data suggest an analogous thermal history but occurring 15-20 Ma later, during the early Tertiary. Oligocene sediments in the Flathead graben have apatite fission-track ages and track lengths like that of the Lewis plate, the known source of these sediments, indicating no significant postorogenic thermal events.

  7. Paleotemperature regime studies of the Barents Sea sediments through spontaneous fission-track analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Il`chenko, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    The results obtained are compared to earlier data on vitrinite reflectance and the catagenetic alteration grade of disseminated organic matter studied in samples from the same boreholes and stratigraphic intervals. Accessory apatite from terricrenous sediments is usable as a geothermometer of higher sensitivity than that based on epigenetic alterations of organic matter. The fission-track analysis data on the paleothermal history of terrigenous sediments from the South Barents Depression are presented. Apatite from six offshore boreholes in the South Barents shelf (Severo-Guliaev, Kurentsov, Murman, Severo-Kil`din, Shtokman, and Ludlov fields) is studied. Paleotemperature values lying within or beyond the upper limit of the oil-productive thermal interval are considered important factors stimulating the generation of hydrocarbons.

  8. Fission-track dating of pumice from the KBS Tuff, East Rudolf, Kenya

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurford, A.J.; Gleadow, A.J.W.; Naeser, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    Fission-track dating of zircon separated from two pumice samples from the KBS Tuff in the Koobi Fora Formation, in Area 131, East Rudolf, Kenya, gives an age of 2.44??0.08 Myr for the eruption of the pumice. This result is compatible with the previously published K-Ar and 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectrum estimate of 2.61??0.26 Myr for the KBS Tuff in Area 105, but differs from the more recently published K-Ar date of 1.82??0.04 Myr for the KBS Tuff in Area 131. This study does not support the suggestion that pumice cobbles of different ages occur in the KBS Tuff. ?? 1976 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. Measurement of fallout {sup 239}Pu levels in urine samples by fission track analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moorthy, A.R.; Doty, R.M.

    1996-11-01

    A Fission Track Analysis (FTA) method for assessing 239Pu in urine samples was first developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 1988; it then had a detection limit of 100 aCi (3.7 {micro}Bq). Since that time, several steps were introduced that increased chemical recovery and lowered the detection limit to less than 1O aCi per sample. These improvements include a process of micro-column separation of plutonium in the final stages. The improved FTA method was applied to 22 urine samples from male staff at BNL. The results showed that 239Pu from fallout excreted in urine was 33 +/- 11 aCi (1.2 {micro}Bq) per day.

  10. Determination of U in Japanese human tissues by the fission track method

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Y.; Yamakawa, A.; Seki, R.; Ikeda, N.

    1985-11-01

    Uranium in several human tissues (lung, liver, kidney, muscle, spleen, heart, cerebrum and bones) from Japanese in the Tokyo area was determined by the fission track method. The average U content was the highest in lung with 1.70 ppb wet, and decreased in the order of lung greater than bones greater than heart and muscle greater than kidney greater than liver and spleen, showing markedly different tendencies from the description in the 1982 UNSCEAR Report (UNSCEAR82). Correlations were observed between U content in lung and in other tissues. These data suggest that the contribution of inhalation of U to its total intake is not negligible. The total body burden of U for the ICRP Reference Man (ICRP74) was estimated to be about 40 micrograms, which is rather small compared with the average normal burden of 90 micrograms currently accepted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP79).

  11. A crystal detector for measuring beta and internal conversion electrons in flowing air containing fission gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schell, W. R.; Vives-Batlle, J.; Yoon, S. R.; Tobin, M. J.

    1999-02-01

    Low levels of radioactive gases are released from nuclear electric power generation, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, nuclear weapons tests and from diagnostic medical uses of radioactive gas tracers. A prototype model of an inorganic scintillator - Crystal Gas Electron Detector (CGED) - was built for measurements of xenon isotopes in-line by detecting the beta and internal conversion (IC) electrons present in atmospheric samples. The detection and quantification of the radionuclide spectra are accomplished, during air flow, without complete purification of the fission gases. Initial operational tests and calibrations made permit the integration of the CGED into a portable Gas Analysis, Separation and Purification (GASP) system [1-3]. The CGED detector, Pulse Shaping and Timing (PSA) electronics, and mathematical treatment of the accumulated spectra are used to resolve the K and LMNO-IC electrons and beta continuum. These data are used, in-line, for dating the age of an air parcel containing fission gases released from nuclear reactors and/or from nuclear weapons tests, as part of the monitoring equipment required to enforce the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, CTBT. This report is one of a series of papers providing the design features, operational methods, calibration, and applications of radioactive gas analysis system to the International CTBT.

  12. Thermal history of the Maramureş area (Northern Romania) constrained by zircon fission track analysis: Cretaceous metamorphism and Late Cretaceous to Paleocene exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, Heike R.; Tischler, Matthias; Fügenschuh, Bernhard; Schmid, Stefan M.

    2013-10-01

    This study presents zircon fission track data from the Bucovinian nappe stack (northern part of the Inner Eastern Carpathians, Rodna Mountains) and a neighbouring part of the Biharia nappe system (Preluca massif) in order to unravel the thermal history of the area and its structural evolution by integrating the fission track data with published data on the tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the area. The increase of metamorphic temperatures towards the SW detected by the zircon fission track data suggests SW-wards increasing tectonic overburden (up to at least 15 km) and hence top NE thrusting. Sub-greenschist facies conditions during the Alpine metamorphic overprint only caused partial annealing of fission tracks in zircon in the external main chain of the Central Eastern Carpathians. Full annealing of zircon points to at least 300 °C in the more internal elements (Rodna Mountains and Preluca massif). The zircon fission track central and single grain ages largely reflect Late Cretaceous cooling and exhumation. A combination of fission track data and stratigraphic constraints points to predominantly tectonic differential exhumation by some 7-11 km, connected to massive Late Cretaceous extension not yet detected in the area. Later events such as the latest Cretaceous ("Laramian") juxtaposition of the nappe pile with the internal Moldavides, causing exhumation by erosion, re-burial by sedimentation and tectonic loading during the Cenozoic had no impact on the zircon fission track data; unfortunately it prevented a study of the low temperature part of the Late Cretaceous exhumation history.

  13. Determination of Nuclear Charge Distributions of Fission Fragments from ^{235}U (n_th, f) with Calorimetric Low Temperature Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabitz, P.; Andrianov, V.; Bishop, S.; Blanc, A.; Dubey, S.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Faust, H.; Gönnenwein, F.; Gomez-Guzman, J. M.; Köster, U.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Mutterer, M.; Scholz, P.; Stolte, S.

    2016-08-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors (CLTD's) for heavy-ion detection have been combined with the LOHENGRIN recoil separator at the ILL Grenoble for the determination of nuclear charge distributions of fission fragments produced by thermal neutron-induced fission of ^{235}U. The LOHENGRIN spectrometer separates fission fragments according to their mass-to-ionic-charge ratio and their kinetic energy, but has no selectivity with respect to nuclear charges Z. For the separation of the nuclear charges, one can exploit the nuclear charge-dependent energy loss of the fragments passing through an energy degrader foil (absorber method). This separation requires detector systems with high energy resolution and negligible pulse height defect, as well as degrader foils which are optimized with respect to thickness, homogeneity, and energy loss straggling. In the present, contribution results of test measurements at the Maier Leibnitz tandem accelerator facility in Munich with ^{109}Ag and ^{127}I beams with the aim to determine the most suitable degrader material, as well as measurements at the Institut Laue-Langevin will be presented. These include a systematic study of the quality of Z-separation of fission fragments in the mass range 82le A le 132 and a systematic measurement of ^{92}Rb fission yields, as well as investigations of fission yields toward the symmetry region.

  14. Determination of Nuclear Charge Distributions of Fission Fragments from ^{235} U (n_th , f) with Calorimetric Low Temperature Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabitz, P.; Andrianov, V.; Bishop, S.; Blanc, A.; Dubey, S.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Faust, H.; Gönnenwein, F.; Gomez-Guzman, J. M.; Köster, U.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Mutterer, M.; Scholz, P.; Stolte, S.

    2016-03-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors (CLTD's) for heavy-ion detection have been combined with the LOHENGRIN recoil separator at the ILL Grenoble for the determination of nuclear charge distributions of fission fragments produced by thermal neutron-induced fission of ^{235} U. The LOHENGRIN spectrometer separates fission fragments according to their mass-to-ionic-charge ratio and their kinetic energy, but has no selectivity with respect to nuclear charges Z. For the separation of the nuclear charges, one can exploit the nuclear charge-dependent energy loss of the fragments passing through an energy degrader foil (absorber method). This separation requires detector systems with high energy resolution and negligible pulse height defect, as well as degrader foils which are optimized with respect to thickness, homogeneity, and energy loss straggling. In the present, contribution results of test measurements at the Maier Leibnitz tandem accelerator facility in Munich with ^{109} Ag and ^{127} I beams with the aim to determine the most suitable degrader material, as well as measurements at the Institut Laue-Langevin will be presented. These include a systematic study of the quality of Z-separation of fission fragments in the mass range 82≤ A ≤ 132 and a systematic measurement of ^{92} Rb fission yields, as well as investigations of fission yields toward the symmetry region.

  15. Evaluation of the spectrometric and dose characteristics of neutron fields inside the Russian segment of the ISS by fission detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurshakov, V. A.; Vorob'ev, I. B.; Nikolaev, V. A.; Lyagushin, V. I.; Akatov, Yu. A.; Kushin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring the dose and the energy spectrum of neutrons inside the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) from March 21 until November 10, 2002 are presented. Statistically reliable results of measurement are obtained by using thorium- and uranium-based fission detectors with cadmium and boron filters. The kits of the detectors with filters have been arranged in three compartments within assembled passive detectors in the BRADOS space experiment. The ambient dose rate H* = 139 μSv day and an energy spectrum of neutrons in the range of 10-2-104 MeV is obtained as average for the ISS compartments and is compared with the measurements carried out inside the compartments of the MIR space station. Recommendations on how to improve the procedure for using the fission detectors to measure the characteristics of neutron fields inside the compartments of space stations are formulated.

  16. NEET Enhanced Micro Pocket Fission Detector for High Temperature Reactors - FY15 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, Troy; McGregor, Douglas; Ugorowski, Phil; Reichenberger, Michael; Ito, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    A new project, that is a collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Atomic Energy Agency, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), has been initiated by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) program for developing and testing High Temperature Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (HT MPFD), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package for temperatures up to 800 °C. The MPFD technology utilizes a small, multi-purpose, robust, in-core parallel plate fission chamber and thermocouple. As discussed within this report, the small size, variable sensitivity, and increased accuracy of the MPFD technology represent a revolutionary improvement over current methods used to support irradiations in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Previous research conducted through NEET ASI1-3 has shown that the MPFD technology could be made robust and was successfully tested in a reactor core. This new project will further the MPFD technology for higher temperature regimes and other reactor applications by developing a HT MPFD suitable for temperatures up to 800 °C. This report summarizes the research progress for year one of this three year project. Highlights from research accomplishments include: A joint collaboration was initiated between INL, KSU, and CEA. Note that CEA is participating at their own expense because of interest in this unique new sensor. An updated HT MPFD design was developed. New high temperature-compatible materials for HT MPFD construction were procured. Construction methods to support the new design were evaluated at INL. Laboratory evaluations of HT MPFD were initiated. Electrical contact and fissile material plating has been performed at KSU. Updated detector electronics are undergoing evaluations at KSU. A project

  17. Fission track ages and Exhumation mechanisms of the Tauern Window, Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Audrey; Rosenberg, Claudio; Garcia, Sebastian

    2010-05-01

    The Tauern Window (TW) is a thermal and structural dome which exposes Penninic basement, its cover units as well as parts of the overlying Austroalpine basement in the central part of the Eastern Alps. The peak of metamorphism was attained approximately at 30Ma (Selverstone et .al, 1992), followed by cooling and exhumation throughout Miocene time. Most of the tertiary exhumation of the Eastern Alps was localized in the TW, from Early Oligocene to late Miocene time. A current debate centers on the exhumation mechanisms of Penninic rocks in the core of the TW, namely to assess whether orogen-parallel extension (e.g., Selverstone, 1988) or a combination of folding and erosion (eg., Rosenberg et al., 2004) with subordinate extension were the controlling processes. E-W extension is well documented at the western (Brenner Fault) and eastern (Katschberg Fault) margins of the window (e.g., Behrmann, 1988; Selverstone, 1988; Genser and Neubauer, 1989). In contrast, upright folding dominates the internal structure of the dome, and in particular along its western part, where fold amplitudes, mostly eroded during folding, attained up to 10 km. This study attempts to assess the relative importance of folding and erosion and of orogen-parallel extension during exhumation by analyzing the spatial and temporal cooling patterns of apatite and zircon fission track ages. The compilation of published apatite and zircon fission track ages indicates a concentric younging of both the apatite and zircon ages toward the core of the TW. The concentric isochrones follow the map trace of the axial planes of the upright folds of the western and eastern TW. This cooling pattern is in contrast to the one expected by a process of extensional unroofing, which in map view would results in isochrons parallel to the extensional faults and progressively younging towards them (e.g., Foster et al., 2001). We therefore propose that folding and erosion were primarily responsible for exhuming the Penninic

  18. Unroofing history of a suture zone in the Himalaya of Pakistan by means of fission-track annealing ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeitler, P.K.; Tahirkheli, R.A.K.; Naeser, C.W.; Johnson, N.M.

    1982-01-01

    The uplift history of the Swat Valley and Hazara region of northwestern Pakistan has been established using 22 fission-track dates on apatite, zircon and sphene. A major fault, the Main Mantle Thrust (MMT) strikes east-west across the Swat Valley, separates regions of markedly differing fission-track age regimesm, and may be a suture zone separating an extinct island arc terrane on the north from the Indian plate to the south. Fission-track ages ranging from about 55 to 58 m.y. for sphene, 18 to 53 m.y. for zircon, and 9 to 17 m.y. for apatite were obtained from the region north of the MMT. To the south the fission-track age ranges are 20 to 25 m.y. for sphene, 17 to 26 m.y. for zircon, and 16 to 23 m.y. for apatite. Disparate zircon and sphene ages on each side of the MMT imply different cooling histories for each side of the fault prior to 15 m.y. Similar apatite ages on both sides of the fault imply similar cooling histories during the past 15 m.y. This may indicate that faulting ceased by 15 m.y. Mean uplift rates have been derived from the fission-track data using mainly the mineral-pair method. Uplift rates in the region north of the MMT increased from 0.07 to 0.20 mm/yr during the period 55 to 15 m.y. South of the fault, uplift rates averaged in excess of 0.70 mm/yr for the period 25 to 15 m.y. During the past 15 m.y. uplift across the MMT in the Swat Valley showsno discontinuities, ranging from 0.16 mm/yr in the south to 0.39 mm/yr in the north. A plausible interpretation for the fission-track uplift data has the MMT verging to the south with overthrusting taking place at a depth between 3.5 and 6.0 km, juxtaposing two terranes that were originally separated by a substantial, but unknown distance. In this model, regional uplift followed cessation of faulting just prior to 15 m.y. ?? 1982.

  19. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors--I: Track Characteristics and Formation Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lal, Nand

    1991-01-01

    Heavily ionizing charged particles produce radiation damage tracks in a wide variety of insulating materials. The experimental properties of these tracks and track recorders are described. The mechanisms by which the tracks are produced are discussed. (Author/KR)

  20. The occurrence and fission-track ages of late neogene and quaternary volcanic sediments, Siwalik group, Northern Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, G.D.; Zeitler, P.; Naeser, C.W.; Johnson, N.M.; Summers, D.M.; Frost, C.D.; Opdyke, N.D.; Tahirkheli, R.A.K.

    1982-01-01

    Volcanic sediments, now mostly bentonites and bentonitic mudstones, occur throughout the Late Neogene and Quaternary Siwalik Group of northern Pakistan. A number of these deposits have been dated by the fission-track method, utilizing zircon phenocrysts from these deposits, and provide the chronometric constraints upon which a paleomagnetic stratigraphy is developed for the Siwalik Group. Notable in the occurrence of these altered tuff horizons is an apparent mode in their stratigraphic development from approximately 3.0 to 1.5 m.y. B.P. which coincides with the period of activity of the Dacht-e-Nawar volcanic complex of east-central Afghanistan. Fission-track ages of certain tuffs for critical areas of northern Pakistan are reported herein. ?? 1982.

  1. Thermal history of Michigan Basin and southern Canadian Shield from apatite fission track analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, K.D. )

    1991-01-10

    Apatite fission track ages and confined-length distributions were collected from 38 basement outcrop and 5 basement drillcore samples in order to reconstruct the Phanerozoic thermal history of the Michigan Basin and southern Canadian Shield. The apatite data indicate two periods of thermal activity in the region: Triassic heating/cooling that affected the basin and adjacent shield and Cretaceous or post-Cretaceous heating/cooling that primarily affected the basin. The magnitude, timing, and cause of Cretaceous thermal activity cannot be identified with the present data. Model calculations suggest that some of the shield samples and probably all of the basin samples were heated to temperatures of at least 90C just prior to relatively rapid cooling in the Triassic. Available stratigraphic and geochemical constraints suggest that these elevated temperatures were the result of burial by an additional 2-5 km of late Paleozoic (probably Pennsylvanian and Permian) sediments. It is likely that the basin was buried during the Alleghenian Orogeny as observed for the adjacent Appalachian Basin.

  2. Tertiary fission-track ages from the Bagua syncline (northern Peru): Stratigraphic and tectonic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; Crochet, J.-Y.; Jaillard, E.; Laubacher, G.; Mourier, T.; Sige, B.

    1991-01-01

    The results of five zircon fission-track ages of volcanic tuffs intercalated within the continental deposits of the Bagua syncline (northern Peru) are reported. These 2500-meter-thick deposits overlie mid-Campanian to lower Maastrichtian fine-grained red beds (Fundo El Triunfo Formation). The disconformable fluvial conglomerates of the Rentema Formation are associated with a 54 Ma tuff (upper Paleocene-lower Eocene?) and would reflect the Inca-1 tectonic phase. The Sambimera Formation (Eocene to mid-Miocene) is a coarsening-upward sequence (from lacustrine to fluvial) that contains three volcanic tuffs of 31, 29, and 12 Ma, respectively. A probable stratigraphic gap, upper Eocene-lower Oligocene, would be related to the late Eocene Inca-2 phase. Neither deformation nor sedimentary discontinuity has been recognized so far. However, the lacustrine to fluvial transition could relate to the late Oligocene Aymara tectonic phase. The unconformable fanglomerates and fluvial deposits of the San Antonio Formation contain in their upper part a 9 Ma tuff (mid-to upper Miocene), and thier base records a major tectonic event (Quechua-2 phase?). The unconformable fanglomerates of the Tambopara Formation date the folding of the Bagua syncline, which could be ascribed to the latest Miocene Quechua-3 tectonics. These formations are correlative with comparable deposits in the sub-Andean basins, suggesting that these eastern areas underwent strong tectonic subsidence of the foreland basin type since mid-Miocene times. ?? 1991.

  3. Cenozoic pulsed deformation history of northeastern Tibetan Plateau reconstructed from fission-track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuxi; Song, Chunhui; Zattin, Massimiliano; He, Pengju; Song, Ai; Li, Jijun; Wang, Qiangqiang

    2016-03-01

    The synorogenic basin deposits and bedrocks of their source terranes within and along the Tibetan Plateau contain fundamental information regarding the spatiotemporal evolution of the largest orogenic plateau on Earth. The Guide-Xining region is located on the northeastern portion of the Tibet and its Eocene-early Pleistocene basin succession is well preserved. By integrating apatite fission-track thermochronology from sedimentary and basement samples, with heavy minerals and paleocurrent data, we decipher an almost complete sequence of exhumation and depositional events during the Cenozoic. Our data indicates that the initial deformation along the Guide-Xining region occurred since the Eocene, with the reorganization of the regional tectonomorphology and the formation of a broad basin. Thereafter, this single large basin was disrupted by multiple episodes of exhumation and deformation. Our study illuminate that the multiple-stage active processes (occurred at 49-42, 36-32, 23-19, 16-13 and 8-4 Ma) work together to produce the current NE Tibetan Plateau.

  4. Fission-track dating of the tectonic development of the San Juan Islands, Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Naeser, C.W.; Whetten, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Previous geological studies have indicated that the major thrusting event in the San Juan Islands was of late-early to late Cretaceous age. Geochronological data are consistent with these prior inferences and confirm that thrusting occurred between approx 105 and 75 m.y. Reset zircon fission-track dates indicate the possible presence of a reversed geothermal gradient in the Decatur terrain, the uppermost preserved thrust plate. If present, this gradient was probably produced by conductive heating, and possibly by shear heating associated with a now-eroded overlying thrust plate and thrust fault. Thrusting in the southern San Juan Islands was accompanied by uplift and resetting of apatite dates. The Haro formation, the Spieden group, and their basement (probably the Wrangellia terrain) did not experience this uplift and probably acted as a 'backstop' to thrusting. Uplift of the southern San Juan Islands was, therefore, probably mainly accommodated on the Haro fault. The Nanaimo basin formed in the foreland of this advancing thrust system, probably as a response to thrust-related loading. Eastern exposures of the Nanaimo group were uplifted prior to deposition of the Middle and Upper Eocene Padden member of the Chucknaut formation, perhaps along a reactivated Haro fault system. -J.M.H.

  5. Fission-track evidence for Quaternary uplift of the Nanga Parbat region, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeitler, P.K.; Johnson, N.M.; Naeser, C.W.; Tahirkheli, R.A.K.

    1982-01-01

    The north-striking Nanga Parbat-Haramosh Massif protrudes into the northwestern Himalaya along the axis of a great syntaxis1,2 (Fig. 1), where the Hindu Kush, Karakorum, and Himalayan ranges converge. As the Indus Suture Zone3 enters this region from the east it bifurcates into two branches, encircling what may be a docked island-arc terrane4. The southern branch (the Main Mantle Thrust) crops out on both flanks of the Nanga Parbat massif, forming a tight structural loop5. This massif and the adjacent terrane contain some of the highest peaks in the Himalaya; Nanga Parbat and the Indus River (located just 20km away) define the world's greatest continental relief (6,930 m). We report here the discovery of unexpectedly young sphene, zircon and apatite fission-track dates from the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh Massif. These dates (as low as 1.3 Myr for zircon and 0.4 Myr for apatite) imply that during the Pleistocene the Nanga Parbat region was uplifted and eroded at nearly 1 cm yr-1. ?? 1982 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonics of the northern edge of the Tibetan plateau: fission-track constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, M.; Brunel, M.; Seward, D.; Xu, Z.; Yang, J.; Roger, F.; Tapponnier, P.; Malavieille, J.; Arnaud, N.; Wu, C.

    2001-12-01

    Fission-track analysis on zircons and apatites yields new information about the timing of deformation of the northern Tibetan plateau. Ages on zircons, ranging from 221±22 to 96±4 Ma are indicative of a general late Triassic-early Jurassic cooling probably driven by the collision between the Qiantang and Kunlun blocks. Mid-Jurassic slow cooling is recorded also in the apatites in regions not affected by later Cenozoic deformation. This Jurassic denudation was followed by a period of sedimentation during the Cretaceous, except along the Altyn Tagh fault (ATF) zone, and in some restricted areas of the western and eastern Qilian Shan. This long and relatively quiet period ended at about 40±10 Ma along the major Altyn Tagh and Kunlun strike-slip fault zones, which were activated by the India-Asia collision. This first movement along lithospheric faults resulted in the eastward extrusion of the Tibet plateau, which was followed, in late Oligocene-Miocene times, by a major compression event, initiating the formation of the high relief of north Tibet. A final compressional event took place at 9-5 Ma and is well correlated with high sedimentation rates in the basins of this region. This compression induced continental subduction in the Kunlun ranges, the Altun Shan belt, and possibly the Qilian Shan belt.

  7. Evidence of post-Gondwana breakup in Southern Brazilian Shield: Insights from apatite and zircon fission track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Christie Helouise Engelmann de; Jelinek, Andréa Ritter; Chemale, Farid; Bernet, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Apatite and zircon fission track thermochronology studies are applied to basement and sedimentary rocks from the Sul-Rio-Grandense Shield to unravel the tectonic history of the onshore southernmost Brazilian margin. The Sul-Rio-Grandense Shield is a major geotectonic feature of southernmost Brazil that includes Paleoproterozoic basement areas and Neoproterozoic fold belts linked to the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogeny. Crustal reworking and juvenile accretion events related to this cycle were dated in the region between 900 and 500 Ma and were responsible for the assembly of southwestern Gondwana in southeastern South America. Apatite fission track (AFT) ages range from 340 ± 33 to 77 ± 6 Ma and zircon fission track (ZFT) ages range from ca. 386 to 210 Ma. Based on thermal history modeling, the most part of the samples record an early cooling event during the Carboniferous, which reflect the main tectonic activity of the final stages of the Gondwanides at the Pacific margin of West Gondwana. Subsequently, the Permo-Triassic cooling event is related to the last stages of the Gondwanides, with convergence along the southern border of Western Gondwana and consequent reactivation of N-S and NE-SW trending basement structures. The onset of initial breakup of southwestern Gondwana with opening of the South Atlantic Ocean is mostly recorded in the eastern terrain and ZFT ages show that the temperature during this period was high enough for total or at least partial resetting of fission tracks in zircon. The last cooling event of the Sul-Rio-Grandense Shield records the final breakup between South America and Africa, which began during the Late Cretaceous. However, the Cenozoic rapid cooling episode probably is a result of plate adjustment after breakup and neotectonic reactivation of faults associated with South Atlantic rift evolution.

  8. Bias in detrital fission track grain-age populations: Implications for reconstructing changing erosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Mark; Sinclair, Hugh D.; Bernet, Matthias; van der Beek, Peter; Kirstein, Linda A.

    2015-07-01

    The sedimentary record is our principal archive of mass transfer across the Earth's surface in response to tectonic and climatic changes in the geologic past. The thermochronology of individual sediment grains (detrital thermochronology) has emerged as a critical tool to infer erosion rates and track mountain belt evolution. Such inferences are reliant upon the statistical inversion of detrital grain ages to unbiasedly approximate the cooling history of the source areas from which the sediment originated. However, it is challenging to critique the reliability and consistency of modelled ages. These arise both from fundamental measurement uncertainties and the assumptions we employ in inverting the data. For detrital fission track modelling of young detrital samples, this problem is particularly acute since the uncertainty on the track counts produces uncertainty in the age estimates. We apply Monte-Carlo modelling to generate synthetic detrital data conditioned on known closure age models, and then invert the grain data to assess the reliability of different inversion schemes. The results clearly demonstrate that existing practice can be subject to large uncertainty, to systematic bias and to non-uniqueness of interpretation. We then show how to map such regions of systematic bias in the population modelling as a function of the true closure ages, and how this bias propagates through into the lag-time modelling. Applying the method to real data from the Siwalik group sediments in western Nepal, we find no evidence for a change in the underlying climate or tectonic processes, since the apparent change in lag coincides with a thresholded change in the resolution of the population modelling. This paper shows how to map regions of systematic bias in the population modelling as a function of the true closure ages, and how this bias propagates through into the lag-time modelling and can be applied retrospectively to existing studies. However, it is equally applicable to

  9. A new fission-fragment detector to complement the CACTUS-SiRi setup at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornyi, T. G.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Csige, L.

    2014-02-01

    An array of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC) for the detection of heavy ions has been developed. The new device, NIFF (Nuclear Instrument for Fission Fragments), consists of four individual detectors and covers 60% of 2π. It was designed to be used in conjunction with the SiRi array of ΔE-E silicon telescopes for light charged particles and fits into the CACTUS array of 28 large-volume NaI scintillation detectors at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. The low-pressure gas-filled PPACs are sensitive for the detection of fission fragments, but are insensitive to scattered beam particles of light ions or light-ion ejectiles. The PPAC detectors of NIFF have good time resolution and can be used either to select or to veto fission events in in-beam experiments with light-ion beams and actinide targets. The powerful combination of SiRi, CACTUS, and NIFF provides new research opportunities for the study of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions in the actinide region. The new setup is particularly well suited to study the competition of fission and γ decay as a function of excitation energy.

  10. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  11. Image processing analysis of nuclear track parameters for CR-39 detector irradiated by thermal neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jobouri, Hussain A.; Rajab, Mustafa Y.

    2016-03-01

    CR-39 detector which covered with boric acid (H3Bo3) pellet was irradiated by thermal neutrons from (241Am - 9Be) source with activity 12Ci and neutron flux 105 n. cm-2. s-1. The irradiation times -TD for detector were 4h, 8h, 16h and 24h. Chemical etching solution for detector was sodium hydroxide NaOH, 6.25N with 45 min etching time and 60 C˚ temperature. Images of CR-39 detector after chemical etching were taken from digital camera which connected from optical microscope. MATLAB software version 7.0 was used to image processing. The outputs of image processing of MATLAB software were analyzed and found the following relationships: (a) The irradiation time -TD has behavior linear relationships with following nuclear track parameters: i) total track number - NT ii) maximum track number - MRD (relative to track diameter - DT) at response region range 2.5 µm to 4 µm iii) maximum track number - MD (without depending on track diameter - DT). (b) The irradiation time -TD has behavior logarithmic relationship with maximum track number - MA (without depending on track area - AT). The image processing technique principally track diameter - DT can be take into account to classification of α-particle emitters, In addition to the contribution of these technique in preparation of nano- filters and nano-membrane in nanotechnology fields.

  12. Possible secondary apatite fission track age standard from altered volcanic ash beds in the middle Jurassic Carmel Formation, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowallis, B.J.; Christiansen, E.H.; Everett, B.H.; Crowley, K.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Miller, D.S.; Deino, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary age standards are valuable in intra- and interlaboratory calibration. At present very few such standards are available for fission track dating that is older than Tertiary. Several altered volcanic ash beds occur in the Middle Jurassic Carmel Formation in southwestern Utah. The formation was deposited in a shallow marine/sabhka environment. Near Gunlock, Utah, eight ash beds have been identified. Sanidines from one of the ash beds (GUN-F) give a single-crystal laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar age of 166.3??0.8 Ma (2??). Apatite and zircon fission track ages range from 152-185 Ma with typically 15-20 Ma errors (2??). Track densities in zircons are high and most grains are not countable. Apatites are fairly common in most of the ash beds and have reasonable track densities ranging between 1.2-1.5 ?? 106 tracks/cm2. Track length distributions in apatites are unimodal, have standard deviations <1??m, and mean track lengths of about 14-14.5 ??m. High Cl apatites (F:Cl:OH ratio of 39:33:28) are particularly abundant and large in ash GUN-F, and are fairly easy to concentrate, but the concentrates contain some siderite, most of which can be removed by sieving. GUN-F shows evidence of some reworking and detriaal contamination based on older single grain 40Ar/39Ar analyses and some rounding of grains, but the apatite population appears to be largely uncontaminated. At present BJK has approximately 12 of apatite separate from GUN-F. ?? 1993.

  13. Evolution Of The Coastal Margin Of Central Peru Through Fission-Track and (U-Th/He) Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wipf, M.; Harrison, D.; Seward, D.; Schlunegger, F.

    2003-12-01

    The Coastal Batholith of Peru comprises granitoid bodies which range in age from 100-60 Ma and 50-20 Ma. It forms a well defined linear feature along the coastal margin. Low temperature geochronological methods such as fission-track and (U-Th)/He are best suited to reconstruct the later exhumation of the coastal margin. Factors such as variability in climate and in rock type are constrained reducing the number of parameters that might have an effect on erosion rates. The Coastal Batholith has been analyzed at several locations between Lima (Lat. 12° S) and Chala (Lat. 16° S) using fission-track (zircon and apatite) and (U-Th)/He dating methods. Modeling of the preliminary fission-track data set shows an almost identical thermal history for all locations North of San Juan (Lat. 15.30° S). Rapid exhumation in Late Eocene was followed by heating and renewed cooling during Oligocene time. The heating phase is interpreted as burial by Tertiary sediments, and the cooling, erosion of this sediment cover and the granite itself. An Early Miocene age (zircon fission-track age) of an ignimbrite stratigraphically just above the granites from the Nazca area (Lat. 15° S) shows that significant erosion of Eocene and Oligocene sediments had taken place in the coastal margin of central Peru, prior to the Early Miocene. Modeling further suggests that South of San Juan no significant amounts of sediment were deposited or eroded since the early Eocene. This southern region has been undergoing only simple long-term exhumation since as far back as Late Cretaceous. To explain these changes in age, which occur south of the leading edge of the subducting Nazca Ridge the geomorphology of the coastal area of central Peru was analyzed. Topographic cross sections perpendicular to the coast suggest an effect, caused by the collision with the ridge in the immediate on-land coastal areas. Over the area of the presently subducting ridge, a coast-parallel cross section shows an increase in

  14. Thermo-tectonic history of Taranaki Basin (New Zealand) using Apatite Fission Track Analysis (AFTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Kamp, P.J.J.; Hegarty, K.A.; Green, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Taranaki basin, which extends offshore between the north and south island of New Zealand, contains several large gas fields (e.g., Maui field) and smaller oil fields. The Taranaki basin is New Zealand's only productive hydrocarbon basin. The basin trends north-south, is asymmetrical in cross section, and is faulted with up to 7 km of displacement along parts of its eastern margin. Preliminary results from Apatite Fission Track Analysis (AFTA) reveal the timing and magnitude of basin inversion. Four well cross sections from the southern part of the basin have been used. Initially, basin tectonics and sedimentation were associated with extension and the formation of half-grabens that began in the Late Cretaceous with the breakup of Gondwana. However, most of the observed subsidence and sedimentation resulted from mid-Cenozoic rifting throughout western New Zealand. Following the formation of the modern Australia-Pacific plate boundary during the early Miocene, the southern part of the basin, which lies 60 km from the Alpine fault in places, was partially inverted. AFTA parameters (apparent age and length) downhold at the Fresne-1 well show a distinct break in slope at 1,100 m depth (currently at 30/sup 0/C) where the apparent age is 15 Ma for the Late Cretaceous Parkawau Coal Measures. The data indicate that basin inversion began about 15 Ma and was accompanied by the removal of 2-3 km of section. Sedimentation began again in the Taranaki basin during the mid-Pliocene. The source of the gas and gas condensate in the basin is probably the Eocene coal measures. The maturation history of these beds and the overlying reservoirs was modeled using the constraints from AFTA data. Discrepancies exist between estimates of maximum paleotemperature from AFTA results and from vitrinite reflectance.

  15. Nuclear Track Detector Characterization via Alpha-Spectrometry for Radioprotection Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, D.; Immè, G.; Aranzulla, M.; Tazzer, A. L. Rosselli; Catalano, R.; Mangano, G.

    2011-12-01

    Solid Nuclear Track Detectors (SNTDs), CR-39 type, are usually adopted to monitor radon gas concentrations. In order to characterize the detectors according to track geometrical parameters, detectors were irradiated inside a vacuum chamber by alpha particles at twelve energy values, obtained by different Mylar foils in front of a 241Am source. The alpha energy values were verified using a Si detector. After the exposure to the alpha particles, the detectors were chemically etched to enlarge the tracks, which were then analyzed by means of a semiautomatic system composed of an optical microscope equipped with a CCD camera connected to a personal computer to store images. A suitable routine analyzed the track parameters: major and minor axis length and mean grey level, allowing us to differentiate tracks according to the incident alpha energy and then to individuate the discrimination factors for radon alpha tracks. The combined use of geometrical and optical parameters allows one to overcome the ambiguity in the alpha energy determination due to the non-monotonicity of each parameter versus energy. After track parameter determination, a calibration procedure was performed by means of a radon chamber. The calibration was verified through an inter-comparing survey.

  16. Nuclear Track Detector Characterization via Alpha-Spectrometry for Radioprotection Use

    SciTech Connect

    Morelli, D.; Imme, G.; Catalano, R.; Aranzulla, M.; Tazzer, A. L. Rosselli; Mangano, G.

    2011-12-13

    Solid Nuclear Track Detectors (SNTDs), CR-39 type, are usually adopted to monitor radon gas concentrations. In order to characterize the detectors according to track geometrical parameters, detectors were irradiated inside a vacuum chamber by alpha particles at twelve energy values, obtained by different Mylar foils in front of a {sup 241}Am source. The alpha energy values were verified using a Si detector. After the exposure to the alpha particles, the detectors were chemically etched to enlarge the tracks, which were then analyzed by means of a semiautomatic system composed of an optical microscope equipped with a CCD camera connected to a personal computer to store images. A suitable routine analyzed the track parameters: major and minor axis length and mean grey level, allowing us to differentiate tracks according to the incident alpha energy and then to individuate the discrimination factors for radon alpha tracks. The combined use of geometrical and optical parameters allows one to overcome the ambiguity in the alpha energy determination due to the non-monotonicity of each parameter versus energy. After track parameter determination, a calibration procedure was performed by means of a radon chamber. The calibration was verified through an inter-comparing survey.

  17. Tracking performance of the scintillating fiber detector in the K2K experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. J.; Iwashita, T.; Ishida, T.; Jeon, E. J.; Yokoyama, H.; Aoki, S.; Berns, H. G.; Bhang, H. C.; Boyd, S.; Fujii, K.; Hara, T.; Hayato, Y.; Hill, J.; Ishii, T.; Ishino, H.; Jung, C. K.; Kearns, E.; Kim, H. I.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, S. B.; Kobayashi, T.; Kume, G.; Matsuno, S.; Mine, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Onchi, M.; Otaki, T.; Oyama, Y.; Park, H.; Sakuda, M.; Sato, K.; Scholberg, K.; Sharkey, E.; Stone, J. L.; Suzuki, A.; Takenaka, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, Y.; Takatsuki, M.; Walter, C. W.; Wilkes, J.; Yoo, J.; Yoshida, M.

    2003-02-01

    The K2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment uses a Scintillating Fiber Detector (SciFi) to reconstruct charged particles produced in neutrino interactions in the near detector. We describe the track reconstruction algorithm and the performance of the SciFi after 3 years of operation.

  18. Design, construction, and operation of SciFi tracking detector for K2K experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Park, H.; Aoki, S.; Echigo, S.; Fujii, K.; Hara, T.; Iwashita, T.; Kitamura, M.; Kohama, M.; Kume, G.; Onchi, M.; Otaki, T.; Sato, K.; Takatsuki, M.; Takenaka, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Tashiro, K.; Inagaki, T.; Kato, I.; Mukai, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nishikawa, K.; Sasao, N.; Shima, A.; Yokoyama, H.; Chikamatsu, T.; Hayato, Y.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ishino, H.; Jeon, E. J.; Kobayashi, T.; Lee, S. B.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakai, A.; Sakuda, M.; Tumakov, V.; Fukuda, S.; Fukuda, Y.; Ishizuka, M.; Itow, Y.; Kajita, T.; Kameda, J.; Kaneyuki, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Koshio, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Obayashi, Y.; Okada, A.; Sakurai, N.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeuchi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Totsuka, Y.; Toshito, T.; Yamada, S.; Miyano, K.; Nakamura, M.; Tamura, N.; Nakano, I.; Yoshida, M.; Kadowaki, T.; Kishi, S.; Yokoyama, H.; Maruyama, T.; Etoh, M.; Nishijima, K.; Bhang, H. C.; Khang, B. H.; Kim, B. J.; Kim, H. I.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. B.; So, H.; Yoo, J. H.; Choi, J. H.; Jang, H. I.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Kearns, E.; Scholberg, K.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Walter, C. W.; Casper, D.; Gajewski, W.; Kropp, W.; Mine, S.; Sobel, H.; Vagins, M.; Matsuno, S.; Hill, J.; Jung, C. K.; Martens, K.; Mauger, C.; McGrew, C.; Sharkey, E.; Yanagisawa, C.; Berns, H.; Boyd, S.; Wilkes, J.; Kielczewska, D.; Golebiewska, U.; K2K Collaboration

    2000-10-01

    We describe the construction and performance of a scintillating fiber detector used in the near detector for the K2K (KEK to Kamioka, KEK E362) long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The detector uses 3.7 m long and 0.692 mm diameter scintillating fiber coupled to image-intensifier tubes (IIT), and a CCD camera readout system. Fiber sheet production and detector construction began in 1997, and the detector was commissioned in March 1999. Results from the first K2K runs confirm good initial performance: position resolution is estimated to be about 0.8 mm, and track finding efficiency is 98±2% for long tracks (i.e., those which intersect more than 5 fiber planes). The hit efficiency was estimated to be 92±2% using cosmic-ray muons, after noise reduction at the offline stage. The possibility of using the detector for particle identification is also discussed.

  19. Supervised nuclear track detection of CR-39 detectors by cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahkandi Nejad, Hadi; Khayat, Omid; Mohammadi, Kheirollah; Tavakoli, Saeed

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, cellular automata are used to detect the nuclear tracks in the track images captured from the surface of CR-39 detectors. Parameters of the automaton as the states, neighborhood, rules and quality parameters are defined optimally for the track image data set under analysis. The presented method is a supervised computational algorithm which comprises a rule definition phase as the learning procedure. Parameter optimization is also performed to adapt the algorithm to the data set used.

  20. Development of micro-pocket fission detectors (MPFD) for near-core and in-core neutron flux monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmes, Martin F.; McGregor, Douglas S.; Shultis, J. Kenneth; Whaley, P. Michael; Ahmed, A. S. M. Sabbir; Bolinger, Clayton C.; Pinsent, Tracy C.

    2004-01-01

    Miniaturized Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD) are under investigation as real-time neutron flux monitors. The devices are capable of performing near-core and in-core reactor power measurements. The basic design utilizes neutron reactive material confined within a miniaturized gas pocket, similar to that of a fission chamber. Device size ranges from 500 microns to a few millimeters thick, thereby allowing them to be inserted directly between fuel elements of a reactor core. Fabricated from inexpensive ceramic materials, the detectors can be fashioned into a linear array to facilitate 3-D mapping of a reactor core neutron flux profile in "real-time". Initial tests have shown these devices to be extremely radiation hard and potentially capable of operating in a neutron fluence exceeding 1016 n cm-2 without noticeable degradation.

  1. Tracking the Oman Ophiolite to the surface - New fission track and (U-Th)/He data from the Aswad and Khor Fakkan Blocks, United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Joachim; Thomas, Robert J.; Ksienzyk, Anna K.; Dunkl, István

    2015-03-01

    The Oman Ophiolite in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) was formed in a supra-subduction zone environment at about 95 Ma and was almost immediately obducted onto the eastern margin of Arabia. The timing of obduction is well constrained, but the post-obduction tectonic, uplift and exhumation history of the ophiolite and associated rocks are less well understood. We present twenty-one new fission track and (U-Th)/He analyses of apatite and zircon from the Hajar Mountains. The data show that the Oman Ophiolite had a complex exhumation history to present exposure levels in the Khor Fakkan and Aswad Blocks, resulting from at least three distinct exhumation events: 1) initial ophiolite obduction between ca. 93 and 83 Ma is characterised by tectonic exhumation and rapid cooling, as revealed by zircon (U-Th)/He and apatite fission-track data, but it is not associated with major erosional exhumation; 2) data from the lower part of the ophiolite and the metamorphic sole document a second exhumation event at ca. 45-35 Ma, interpreted to represent an early phase of the Zagros orogeny that led to reactivation of pre-existing structures and the differential exhumation of the Khor Fakkan Block along the Wadi Ham Shear Zone. This event led to significant erosional exhumation and deposition of a thick sedimentary succession in the Ras Al Khaimah foreland basin; and 3) Neogene exhumation is recorded by ca. 20-15 Ma apatite (U-Th)/He data and a single apatite fission track date from the lowermost part of the metamorphic sole. This event can be linked to the main phase of the Zagros orogeny, which is manifested in large fans with ophiolite-derived debris (Barzaman Formation conglomerates). During this period, the metamorphic sole of the Masafi window stayed at temperatures in excess of ca. 120 °C, corresponding to ca. 4 km of overburden, only later to be eroded to present day levels.

  2. High temperature annealing of fission tracks in fluorapatite, Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, Nancy D.; Crowley, Kevin D.; McCulloh, Thane H.; Reaves, Chris M.

    1990-01-01

    Annealing of fission tracks is a kinetic process dependent primarily on temperature and to a laser extent on time. Several kinetic models of apatite annealing have been proposed. The predictive capabilities of these models for long-term geologic annealing have been limited to qualitative or semiquantitative at best, because of uncertainties associated with (1) the extrapolation of laboratory observations to geologic conditions, (2) the thermal histories of field samples, and (3) to some extent, the effect of apatite composition on reported annealing temperatures. Thermal history in the Santa Fe Springs oil field, Los Angeles Basin, California, is constrained by an exceptionally well known burial history and present-day temperature gradient. Sediment burial histories are continuous and tightly constrained from about 9 Ma to present, with an important tie at 3.4 Ma. No surface erosion and virtually no uplift were recorded during or since deposition of these sediments, so the burial history is simple and uniquely defined. Temperature gradient (???40??C km-1) is well established from oil-field operations. Fission-track data from the Santa Fe Springs area should thus provide one critical field test of kinetic annealing models for apatite. Fission-track analysis has been performed on apatites from sandstones of Pliocene to Miocene age from a deep drill hole at Santa Fe Springs. Apatite composition, determined by electron microprobe, is fluorapatite [average composition (F1.78Cl0.01OH0.21)] with very low chlorine content [less than Durango apatite; sample means range from 0.0 to 0.04 Cl atoms, calculated on the basis of 26(O, F, Cl, OH)], suggesting that the apatite is not unusually resistant to annealing. Fission tracks are preserved in these apatites at exceptionally high present-day temperatures. Track loss is not complete until temperatures reach the extreme of 167-178??C (at 3795-4090 m depth). The temperature-time annealing relationships indicated by the new data

  3. Cosmic ray positron research and silicon track detector development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. Vernon; Wefel, John P.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to conduct research on: (1) position sensing detector systems, particularly those based upon silicon detectors, for use in future balloon and satellite experiments; and (2) positrons, electrons, proton, anti-protons, and helium particles as measured by the NASA NMSU Balloon Magnet Facility.

  4. Calibrations for Charged Particle Tracking with the GlueX Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staib, Michael; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Two gas detectors comprise the tracking system for the GlueX experiment, the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) and the Forward Drift Chamber (FDC). The CDC is a cylindrical straw-tube detector covering polar angles between 6° and 168°, delivering spatial resolution of ~150 μm. The FDC is a Cathode Strip Chamber consisting of four packages, each with six alternating layers of anode wires and cathode strips. The FDC is designed to track forward-going charged particles with polar angles between 1° and 20° with a spatial resolution of ~200 μm. Both tracking detectors record timing information and energy loss measurements useful for particle identification. During Fall 2014 and Spring 2015, the first photon beam was delivered on target for commissioning of the GlueX detector in Hall-D at Jefferson Lab. These data are currently being used in a large effort to calibrate the individual detector subsystems to achieve design performance. Methods and results for calibrations of each of the tracking detectors are presented. Techniques for alignment of the tracking system using a combination of cosmic rays and beam data is discussed. Finally, some early results of physics measurements including charged final-state particles are presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  5. Development of High Resolution Solid-State Track Detector for Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, S.; Doke, T.; Hareyama, M.; Hasebe, N.; Ota, S.; Sakurai, K.; Sato, M.; Yasuda, N.; Nakamura, S.; Kamei, T.; Tawara, H.; Ogura, K.

    The observation of trans-iron nuclei in galactic cosmic rays (Z?30) requires a high performance cosmic ray detector telescope with a very large exposure area because of their extremely low fluxes. It is realized by the use of solid-state track detector of CR-39, which has an advantage of easy extension of exposure area. The verification of mass and nuclear charge identifications with CR-39 solid-state track detector newly developed for the observation of heavy cosmic ray particles has been made using Fe ions from NIRS-HIMAC. Mass and charge resolutions for Fe nuclei are found to be ~0.22 amu and 0.22 cu in rms, respectively. Moreover, it is necessary to raise the Z/??detection threshold in order to suppress background tracks produced by galactic cosmic rays with Z/?<30. The new track detectors of copolymers of CR-39 and DAP (diallyl phthalate) have been developed and verified their performances. From the point of view of stability for the cosmic ray exposure environment such as temperature and vacuum in space, newly BP-1 glass detector with high sensitivity is also currently under development. The combination of such solid-state track detector with the high speed scanning system enables us to realize a large-scaled observation for trans-iron galactic cosmic rays.

  6. Zircon and apatite fission-track evidence for an Early Permian thermal peak and relatively rapid Late Permian cooling in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, M.K. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science); Wintsch, R.P. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    New zircon fission-track ages compliment published apatite fission-track ages in the Appalachian Basin to narrowly constrain its thermal history. Geologic evidence can only constrain timing of the thermal peak to be younger than late Pennsylvanian sediments ([approximately] 300 Ma) and older than Mesozoic sediments in the Newark and Gettysburg Basins ([approximately] 210 Ma). Apatite fission-track ages as old as 246 Ma require the Alleghanian thermal peak to have been pre-Triassic. Preliminary data on reset zircon fission-track ages from middle Paleozoic sediments range from 255 to 290 Ma. Zircon fission-track apparent ages from samples younger and structurally higher than these are not reset. Thus, the oldest reset zircon fission-track age constraints the time of the Alleghanian thermal peak to be earliest Permian. Rates of post-Alleghanian cooling have not been well-constrained by geologic data and could be very slow. The difference between apatite and zircon fission-track ages for most of the samples range from 100--120 m.y. reflecting Permo-Triassic cooling of only 1 C/m.y. However, one sample with one of the oldest apatite ages, 245 Ma, yields one of the younger zircon ages of 255 Ma. This requires cooling rates of 10 C/m.y. and uplift rates of [approximately] 0.5 mm/yr. Collectively, these data support an early Permian thermal peak and a two-stage cooling history, consisting of > 100 C cooling (> 8 km denundation) in the Permian followed by relatively slow cooling and exhumation throughout the Mesozoic.

  7. Cenozoic thermo-tectonic evolution of the northeastern Pamir revealed by zircon and apatite fission-track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Kai; Wang, Guo-Can; van der Beek, Peter; Bernet, Matthias; Zhang, Ke-Xin

    2013-03-01

    The northeastern Pamir is a key location to explore Asian intracontinental tectonic processes during the Cenozoic. New zircon fission-track (ZFT) data show a 20- to 50-km-wide region of partially reset ages on the northeastern margin of the Pamir salient, interpreted as an exhumed and tilted partial annealing zone (PAZ). Widespread ZFT age peaks at ~ 50 Ma within the ZFT PAZ likely date early motion of the Kashgar-Yecheng transfer system (KYTS), but suggest this fault system was narrower in the Early Cenozoic than it is today. Apatite fission-track (AFT) ages of ~ 10-6 Ma, combined with field observations across the KYTS, hint at an episode of strong thrusting-related exhumational cooling, which indicates that the modern fault system probably formed at this time. To the southwest of the KYTS, the combination of new fission-track and existing thermochronology data allows establishing temperature-time trajectories that present diachronous rapid cooling from ~ 450 to 120 °C in the Sares (> 13-10 Ma), Muztagata (~ 10-7 Ma) and Kongur Shan (~ 3-1 Ma) domes. Rapid cooling in the eastern Sares and southern Muztagata massifs is driven by doming, as supported by kinematic analyses of the Shen-ti fault. Successive rapid cooling of these massifs confirms eastward propagation of doming processes, shortly postdating magma emplacement at ~ 11 Ma. We propose that the synchronicity of regional tectonism, magmatism and metamorphism implies that strong crustal thickening and contraction occurred beneath the northeastern Pamir during the Middle-Late Miocene, possibly associated with initial collision between the Pamir and Tian Shan.

  8. Ultrasensitive detection and dose reconstruction for plutonium-239 through fission track analysis of urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krahenbuhl, Melinda Pearl

    1998-12-01

    This dissertation addresses a number of deficiencies in currently used Fission Track Analysis (FTA) methodology and introduces improvements to make FTA a more reliable research tool. The refined methodology, described herein, includes a chemically-induced precipitation phase followed by anion exchange chromatography and employs a chemical tracer, Plutonium236 (Pu236). An inverse correlation between Pu recovery and sample volume has been established, and tests confirm that larger sample volumes do not result in higher accuracy or lower detection limits. Subsequently, the optimal sample volume is determined to be approximately 2 liters and the detection limit for this volume is established at 2.8 muBq/L (76 aCi/L). In comparison, the detection limits of two alternate methodologies are 2 muBq (at Brookhaven National Lab) and 3.2 muBq (at the University Hospital in Lund, Sweden). A comparative review evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of these methodologies by comparing pivotal aspects of each laboratory's process. The obvious strength of FTA is the low detection limit for fissile materials. The greatest weakness is the lack of independent confirmation for the results of the three respective methodologies. Additionally, each laboratory's unique nomenclature has made comparison and evaluation problematic and has lead to occasional misinterpretation of numeric data. Addressing the scientific and engineering community's lack of confidence in FTA will require more complete disclosure of techniques and protocols, including documentation of experimental failures. In experiments detailed in this dissertation, the refined FTA methodology was used to determine the Pu236 concentration in urine for two unique populations, radiation workers and the general population. The results of this analysis were used to predict dose according to several different interpretations of the ICRP recommendations. These predictions focused on the liver, lung and skeletal systems. Predicted

  9. Apatite Fission-Track Analysis of the Middle Jurassic Todos Santos Formation from Chiapas, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullin, Fanis; Solé, Jesús; Shchepetilnikova, Valentina; Solari, Luigi; Ortega-Obregón, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    The Sierra de Chiapas (SCH), located in the south of Mexico, is a complex geological province that can be divided on four different lithological or tectonic areas: (1) the Chiapas Massif Complex (CMC); (2) the Central Depression; (3) the Strike-slip Fault Province, and (4) the Chiapas Fold-and-thrust Belt. The CMC mostly consists of Permian granitoids and meta-granitoids, and represents the basement of the SCH. During the Jurassic period red beds and salt were deposited on this territory, related to the main pulse of rifting and opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Most of the Cretaceous stratigraphy contains limestones and dolomites deposited on a marine platform setting during the postrift stage of the Gulf of Mexico rift. During the Cenozoic Era took place the major clastic sedimentation along the SCH. According the published low-temperature geochronology data (Witt et al., 2012), SCH has three main phases of thermo-tectonic history: (1) slow exhumation between 35 and 25 Ma, that affected mainly the basement (CMC) and is probably related to the migration of the Chortís block; (2) fast exhumation during the Middle-Late Miocene caused by strike-slip deformation that affects almost all Chiapas territory; (3) period of rapid cooling from 6 to 5 Ma, that affects the Chiapas Fold-and-thrust Belt, coincident with the landward migration of the Caribbean-North America plate boundaries. The two last events were the most significant on the formation of the present-day topography of the SCH. However, the stratigraphy of the SCH shows traces of the existence of earlier tectonic events. This study presents preliminary results of apatite fission-track (AFT) dating of sandstones from the Todos Santos Formation (Middle Jurassic). The analyses are performed with in situ uranium determination using LA-ICP-MS (e.g., Hasebe et al., 2004). The AFT data indicate that this Formation has suffered high-grade diagenesis (probably over 150 ºC) and the obtained cooling ages, about 70-60 Ma

  10. The software peculiarities of pattern recognition in track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Starkov, N.

    2015-12-31

    The different kinds of nuclear track recognition algorithms are represented. Several complicated samples of use them in physical experiments are considered. The some processing methods of complicated images are described.

  11. The software peculiarities of pattern recognition in track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkov, N.

    2015-12-01

    The different kinds of nuclear track recognition algorithms are represented. Several complicated samples of use them in physical experiments are considered. The some processing methods of complicated images are described.

  12. Relation between denudation history and sediment supply from apatite fission track thermochronology in the northeast Brazilian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinek, Andrea; Chemale, Farid; Bueno, Gilmar

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a quantitative overview of Mesozoic-Cenozoic morphotectonic evolution and sediment supply to the northeast Brazilian margin. Landscape evolution and denudation histories for the northeastern Brazilian continental margin (Sergipe, Alagoas, Bahia, and Espírito Santo states) were detailed by apatite fission track thermochronology and thermal-history modeling and related with the sedimentological record of the offshore basins of the passive margin for a comparison with their denudational history. Approximately one hundred basement samples were analyzed from the coast to the inland of the Brazilian margin. The apparent fission track ages vary from 360 to 61 Ma and confined fission track lengths vary between 10 and 14.6 µm, indicating that not all of the samples recorded the same cooling events. The results of apatite fission track ages indicate that the area has been eroded regionally since the Mesozoic (< 250 Ma) and suggest that at less 4 km of overburden has been eroded regionally since the late Cretaceous (< 120 Ma) at a rate of 120 to 15 m/Ma. Two-stage of erosion process is deduced from simulated cooling histories for each sector. The Permian-Early Jurassic exhumation is restricted to the area of the Sertaneja Depression, besides the Diamantina Plateau. During this time, denudation rates are generally <20 m My-1 and record up to 1.5 km of denudation. Pre-rift sedimentation is recorded in the Camamu-Almada, Recôncavo, and Sergipe-Alagoas basins. Samples from the Conquista and Borborema Plateaus, and Mantiqueira Range record a Cretaceous-Paleogene onset of exhumation. This timing is consistent with the offshore sedimentary record, wherein a large clastic wedge started forming in the northeastern Sergipe-Alagoas basin, which suggests Sergipe-Alagoas basin records drainage reorganization and extension of the São Francisco River catchment. Interestingly, the Camamu basin, adjacent to the section of the margin does not record syn

  13. Development of a silicon micro-strip detector for tracking high intensity secondary beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, R.; Asano, H.; Hasegawa, S.; Honda, R.; Ichikawa, Y.; Imai, K.; Joo, C. W.; Nakazawa, K.; Sako, H.; Sato, S.; Shirotori, K.; Sugimura, H.; Tanida, K.; Watabe, T.

    2014-11-01

    A single-sided silicon micro-strip detector (SSD) has been developed as a tracking detector for hadron experiments at J-PARC where secondary meson beams with intensities of up to 108 Hz are available. The performance of the detector has been investigated and verified in a series of test beam experiments in the years 2009-2011. The hole mobility was deduced from the analysis of cluster events. The beam rate dependence was measured in terms of timing resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and hit efficiency. This paper describes the detector with its read-out system, details of the test experiments, and discusses the performance achieved.

  14. Increasing the energy dynamic range of solid-state nuclear track detectors using multiple surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zylstra, A B; Rinderknecht, H G; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M J; Manuel, M; Séguin, F H; Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D

    2011-08-01

    Solid-state nuclear track detectors, such as CR-39, are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. In the ICF experiments, the particles of interest, such as D(3)He-protons, have ranges of order of the detector thickness. In this case, the dynamic range of the detector can be extended by recording data on both the front and back sides of the detector. Higher energy particles which are undetectable on the front surface can then be measured on the back of the detector. Studies of track formation under the conditions on the front and back of the detector reveal significant differences. Distinct front and back energy calibrations of CR-39 are therefore necessary and are presented for protons. Utilizing multiple surfaces with additional calibrations can extend the range of detectable energies on a single piece of CR-39 by up to 7-8 MeV. The track formation process is explored with a Monte Carlo code, which shows that the track formation difference between front and back is due to the non-uniform ion energy deposition in matter. PMID:21895237

  15. Late Jurassic--Early Cretaceous cooling for Late Proterozoic through Early Devonian crystalline rocks from the Bronson Hill anticlinorium, MA--VT: Evidence from apatite fission track analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, M.K. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science)

    1993-03-01

    Ten samples of crystalline rocks from the Bronson Hill anticlinorium in north central Massachusetts--south central Vermont yield Mesozoic apatite fission track cooling ages ranging from 98 [+-] 8 to 158 [+-] 24 Ma. Compositionally, the samples include a quartz-phyric rhyolite from the Ammonoosuc Volcanics, a pegmatite from the Kempfield Anticline, a gabbro from the Prescott Intrusive Complex, the Dry Hill and Fourmile Gneisses from the Pelham Dome, Swanzey Gneiss from the Keene Dome, Pauchaug Gneiss from the Warwick Dome, and the Monson Gneiss. Published U-Pb zircon analyses for the same samples yield ages of 613 [+-] 3 Ma for the Dry Hill Gneiss; 454--442 [+-] 3 Ma for the Swanzey, Pauchaug, Monson and Fourmile Gneisses; 453 [+-] 2 Ma for the Ammonoosuc Volcanics; and 407 [+-] 3/[minus]2 Ma for the Prescott Intrusive Complex gabbro (Tucker and Robinson, 1990). Apatite fission track ages are all reset and increase in apparent age eastward from the edge of the Deerfield-Hartford Basin, consistent with published apatite fission track ages from Jurassic sedimentary units within the Deerfield and Northern Hartford Basins. Mean track lengths ranged from 13.4 to 14.4 [mu]m with moderately large standard deviations. These track length distributions suggest relatively slow cooling through the track annealing range of 70--90 C and are consistent with track length distributions for sedimentary samples within the Deerfield and Northern Hartford Basins. The trend of increasing apatite fission track apparent age eastward from the basin margin suggests several interpretations: (1) differential uplift; (2) deeper burial in the basin and adjacent areas; (3) higher heat flow along the basin margin. Zircon fission track analyses are in progress to constrain maximum burial depths and should help differentiate between these models.

  16. Investigations of protons passing through the CR-39/PM-355 type of solid state nuclear track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowska, A.; Szydłowski, A.; Jaskóła, M.; Korman, A.; Kuk, M.; Sartowska, B.; Kuehn, T.

    2013-07-15

    Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors of the CR-39/PM-355 type were irradiated with protons with energies in the range from 0.2 to 8.5 MeV. Their intensities and energies were controlled by a Si surface barrier detector located in an accelerator scattering chamber. The ranges of protons with energies of 6–7 MeV were comparable to the thickness of the PM-355 track detectors. Latent tracks in the polymeric detectors were chemically etched under standard conditions to develop the tracks. Standard optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for surface morphology characterization.

  17. WE-D-BRF-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION - Investigating Particle Track Structures Using Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors and Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdell, S; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J; Greilich, S; Zimmerman, F; Evans, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To report on the efforts funded by the AAPM seed funding grant to develop the basis for fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) based radiobiological experiments in combination with dedicated Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) on the nanometer scale. Methods: Two confocal microscopes were utilized in this study. Two FNTD samples were used to find the optimal microscope settings, one FNTD irradiated with 11.1 MeV/u Gold ions and one irradiated with 428.77 MeV/u Carbon ions. The first sample provided a brightly luminescent central track while the latter is used to test the capabilities to observe secondary electrons. MCS were performed using TOPAS beta9 version, layered on top of Geant4.9.6p02. Two sets of simulations were performed, one with the Geant4-DNA physics list and approximating the FNTDs by water, a second set using the Penelope physics list in a water-approximated FNTD and a aluminum-oxide FNTD. Results: Within the first half of the funding period, we have successfully established readout capabilities of FNTDs at our institute. Due to technical limitations, our microscope setup is significantly different from the approach implemented at the DKFZ, Germany. However, we can clearly reconstruct Carbon tracks in 3D with electron track resolution of 200 nm. A second microscope with superior readout capabilities will be tested in the second half of the funding period, we expect an improvement in signal to background ratio with the same the resolution.We have successfully simulated tracks in FNTDs. The more accurate Geant4-DNA track simulations can be used to reconstruct the track energy from the size and brightness of the observed tracks. Conclusion: We have achieved the goals set in the seed funding proposal: the setup of FNTD readout and simulation capabilities. We will work on improving the readout resolution to validate our MCS track structures down to the nanometer scales.

  18. Acquisition and tracking performance measurements for a high speed area array detector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, R. C.; Cosgrove, M.; Clark, D. L.; Martino, A.; Park, H.; Seery, B.

    1991-01-01

    A proof-of-concept (POC) demonstration system has been developed which demonstrates acquisition, tracking and point-ahead angle sensing for a space optical communications terminal utilizing a single high speed area array detector. The detector is the 128 x 128 pixel Kodak HS-40 photodiode array. It has 64 parallel readout channels and can operate at frames rates up to 40,000 frames/sec with rms readout noise of 20 photoelectrons. A windowing scheme and special purpose digital signal processing electronics are employed to implement acquisition and tracking algorithms. The system operates at greater than 1 kHz sample (frame) rates. Acquisition can be performed in as little as 30 milliseconds with less than 1 picowatt of 0.85 micron beacon power on the detector. At the same power level, the rms tracking accuracy is approximately 1/16 pixel. Results of system analysis and measurements using the POC system are presented.

  19. Operational comparison of TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detectors in fuel fabrication facilities.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, N; Takada, C; Yoshida, T; Momose, T

    2007-01-01

    The authors carried out an operational study that compared the use of TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detector in plutonium environments of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai Works. A selected group of workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX (Plutonium-Uranium mixed oxide) fuel wore both TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detectors. The TL readings were generally proportional to the counted etch-pits, and thus the dose equivalent results obtained from TLD albedo dosemeter agreed with those from solid state nuclear tracks detector within a factor of 1.5. This result indicates that, in the workplaces of the MOX fuel plants, the neutron spectrum remained almost constant in terms of time and space, and the appropriate range of field-specific correction with spectrum variations was small in albedo dosimetry. PMID:17337735

  20. Multiple cooling episodes in the Central Tarim (Northwest China) revealed by apatite fission track analysis and vitrinite reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jian; Qiu, Nansheng; Song, Xinying; Li, Huili

    2015-09-01

    Apatite fission track and vitrinite reflectance are integrated for the first time to study the cooling history in the Central Tarim, northwest China. The paleo-temperature profiles from vitrinite reflectance data of the Z1 and Z11 wells showed a linear relationship with depth, suggesting an approximately 24.8 °C/km paleo-geothermal gradient and 2700-3900 m of erosion during the Early Mesozoic. The measured apatite fission track ages from well Z2 in the Central Tarim range from 39 to 159 Ma and effectively record the Meso-Cenozoic cooling events that occurred in Central Tarim. Moreover, two cooling events at 190-140 Ma in the Early Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and 80-45 Ma in the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene revealed by measured AFT data and thermal modeling results are related to the collisions of the Qiangtang-Lhasa terranes and the Greater India Plate with the southern margin of the Eurasian Plate, respectively. This study provides new insights into the tectonic evolution of the Tarim Basin (and more broadly Central Asia) and for hydrocarbon generation and exploration in the Central Tarim.

  1. Identifying uranium particles using fission tracks and microsampling individual particles for analysis using thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Suzuki, Daisuke; Magara, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of isotope ratios in individual particles found in the environment is important to clarify the origins of the particles. In particular, the analysis of uranium particles in environmental samples from nuclear facilities is useful for detecting undeclared nuclear activities related to the production of nuclear weapons. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) combined with a fission track technique is an efficient method for determining the isotope ratios of individual uranium particles, but has a drawback called "particle-mixing". When some uranium particles are measured as a single particle and an average isotope ratio for the particles is obtained, it is called "particle mixing". This may lead to erroneous conclusions in terms of the particle sources that are identified. In the present study, microsampling using a scanning electron microscope was added to the fission track-TIMS procedure. The analysis of a mixture of SRM 950a and CRM U100 reference materials containing uranium particles indicated that particle mixing was almost completely avoided using the proposed technique. The performance of the proposed method was sufficient for obtaining reliable data for the sources of individual particles to be identified reliably. PMID:25680068

  2. Multiple cooling episodes in the Central Tarim (Northwest China) revealed by apatite fission track analysis and vitrinite reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jian; Qiu, Nansheng; Song, Xinying; Li, Huili

    2016-06-01

    Apatite fission track and vitrinite reflectance are integrated for the first time to study the cooling history in the Central Tarim, northwest China. The paleo-temperature profiles from vitrinite reflectance data of the Z1 and Z11 wells showed a linear relationship with depth, suggesting an approximately 24.8 °C/km paleo-geothermal gradient and 2700-3900 m of erosion during the Early Mesozoic. The measured apatite fission track ages from well Z2 in the Central Tarim range from 39 to 159 Ma and effectively record the Meso-Cenozoic cooling events that occurred in Central Tarim. Moreover, two cooling events at 190-140 Ma in the Early Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and 80-45 Ma in the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene revealed by measured AFT data and thermal modeling results are related to the collisions of the Qiangtang-Lhasa terranes and the Greater India Plate with the southern margin of the Eurasian Plate, respectively. This study provides new insights into the tectonic evolution of the Tarim Basin (and more broadly Central Asia) and for hydrocarbon generation and exploration in the Central Tarim.

  3. Fast neutrons detection in CR-39 and DAM-ADC nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, A. M.; Ashraf, O.; Rammah, Y. S.; Ashry, A. H.; Eisa, M.; Tsuruta, T.

    2015-03-01

    Fast detection of neutrons in CR-39 and DAM-ADC nuclear track detectors were investigated using new etching conditions. The neutron irradiation is performed using a 5 mCi Am-Be source present at the National Institute of Standards (NIS) of Egypt. Using the new etching condition, irradiated CR-39 samples were etched for 4 h and DAM-ADC samples for 80 min. Suitable analyzing software has been used to analyze experimental data.The dependence of neutrons track density on the neutrons fluence is investigated. When etched under optimum conditions, the relationship between track density and fluence is determined which is found to be linear. Detection efficiency has been represented for both SSNTDs and found to be constant with fluence, which reflects the importance of using CR-39 and DAM-ADC detectors in the field of neutron dosimetry. Linear relationship between track density and effective dose is determined.

  4. The bipolar silicon microstrip detector: A proposal for a novel precision tracking device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horisberger, R.

    1990-03-01

    It is proposed to combine the technology of fully depleted silicon microstrip detectors fabricated on n doped high resistivity silicon with the concept of the bipolar transistor. This is done by adding a n ++ doped region inside the normal p + implanted region of the reverse biased p + n diode. Teh resulting structure has amplifying properties and is referred to as bipolar pixel transistor. The simplest readout scheme of a bipolar pixel array by an aluminium strip bus leads to the bipolar microstrip detector. The bipolar pixel structure is expected to give a better signal-to-noise performance for the detection of minimum ionizing charged particle tracks than the normal silicon diode strip detector and therefore should allow in future the fabrication of thinner silicon detectors for precision tracking.

  5. Quantifying glacial erosion in the European Alps using apatite fission track dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangenheim, Cornelia; Glotzbach, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the impact of glacial erosion on landscape evolution during the Quaternary, problems may occur in choosing the best method, because many methods only reflect parts of the era. Erosion rate calculations based on cosmogenic nuclides only cover the Holocene and erosion rate calculations based on river load gauging reflect even shorter timescales (e.g. von Blanckenburg 2005). In this study we investigate the potential of thermochronological methods, especially apatite fission track dating (AFT) to quantify glacial erosion in the European Alps. The topography of the European Alps is strongly influenced by Quaternary glaciations, as it formed characteristic features like overdeepened and hanging valleys. The study area is located in the Central Alps of Switzerland, which is a high mountain area. At ~0.9 Ma glacial erosion has led to a considerable increase in valley incision rates in this area (Haeuselmann et al. 2007) and therefore it is ideally suited to study the glacial impact on landscape evolution. The advantage of using AFT dating, while studying changes in erosional processes, is that possibly arising nonsteady-state erosion will be recorded within the spatial distribution of thermochronological ages. In this study we applied AFT dating on both bedrock and sediments. The bedrock samples derive from different elevations to figure out whether or not spatial differences and elevation dependencies exist. Combined with already published data we have a relatively high sample density distributed throughout the whole study area. The detrital samples originate from stream sediments and from glacial deposits in the form of late glacial moraines and cave sediments from the last ~0.5 Ma in order to obtain possible lateral variations in erosion. The AFT ages of the bedrocks vary between ~4 Ma and ~9 Ma, resulting in an average long-term exhumation rate of ~0.5 km/Ma. Most of the ages range between 7 and 9 Ma, confirmed by prevailing ages of stream sediment

  6. Modeling of the internal tracking system of the NICA/MPD detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchenko, A. I.; Murin, Yu. A.; Kondrat'ev, V. P.; Prokof'ev, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    The internal tracking system of the NICA/MPD detector is aimed at efficiently detecting the short-lived products of nucleus-nucleus collisions. We consider various geometries of the internal tracking system based on microstrip silicon sensors and simulate its identification power in reconstructing the Λ0 hyperons formed in central Au + Au collisions at √ {{S_{NN}}} = 9GeV.

  7. TRIAC II. A MatLab code for track measurements from SSNT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiris, D. L.; Blekas, K.; Ioannides, K. G.

    2007-08-01

    A computer program named TRIAC II written in MATLAB and running with a friendly GUI has been developed for recognition and parameters measurements of particles' tracks from images of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. The program, using image analysis tools, counts the number of tracks and depending on the current working mode classifies them according to their radii (Mode I—circular tracks) or their axis (Mode II—elliptical tracks), their mean intensity value (brightness) and their orientation. Images of the detectors' surfaces are input to the code, which generates text files as output, including the number of counted tracks with the associated track parameters. Hough transform techniques are used for the estimation of the number of tracks and their parameters, providing results even in cases of overlapping tracks. Finally, it is possible for the user to obtain informative histograms as well as output files for each image and/or group of images. Program summaryTitle of program:TRIAC II Catalogue identifier:ADZC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZC_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: Pentium III, 600 MHz Installations: MATLAB 7.0 Operating system under which the program has been tested: Windows XP Programming language used:MATLAB Memory required to execute with typical data:256 MB No. of bits in a word:32 No. of processors used:one Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?:no No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:25 964 No. of bytes in distributed program including test data, etc.: 4 354 510 Distribution format:tar.gz Additional comments: This program requires the MatLab Statistical toolbox and the Image Processing Toolbox to be installed. Nature of physical problem: Following the passage of a charged particle (protons and heavier) through a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD), a damage region is created, usually named latent

  8. Readout system of the ALICE Muon tracking detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Sylvain

    2010-11-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) will be aimed at studying heavy ion collisions at the extreme energy densities accessible at the CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where the formation of the Quark Gluon Plasma is expected. The ALICE muon forward spectrometer will identify muons with momentum above 4 GeV/c, allowing the study of quarkonia and heavy flavors in the pseudorapidity range -4.0< η<-2.5 with 2 π azimuthal coverage. The muon tracking system consists of 10 Cathode Pad Chambers (CPC) with 1.1 million of pads that represent the total number of acquisition channels to manage. In this article, we will give an overview of the ALICE Muon Spectrometer. Afterward, we will focus on tracking system Front end Electronics (FEE) and readout system. We will show that the Digital Signal Processor (DSP) architecture fulfills all the requirements, including radiation hardness against neutrons. Finally, real-time performances are discussed.

  9. Mineralogy, 40Ar/ 39Ar dating and apatite fission track dating of rocks along the Castle Mountain fault, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, W. T.; Bunds, M. P.; Bruhn, R. L.; Hall, C. M.; Murphy, J. M.

    2001-07-01

    The Castle Mountain fault is a 200-km-long, right-lateral fault that forms the northern boundary of the Cook Inlet basin and Matanuska Valley, Alaska. Fault gouge and fault rock at six localities contain the clay minerals illite, smectite, chlorite, and interstratified illite/smectite. At one locality, gouge contains deformed illite/smectite with very little wall rock chlorite contamination. Fine (<0.03 μm), medium (0.03-0.2 μm), and coarse (0.2-2.0 μm) illite/smectite from this site were dated using 40Ar/ 39Ar micro-encapsulation and laser microprobe methods. Total gas ages for the three size fractions are 28.21±0.12, 32.42±0.11 and 36.24±0.08 Ma for fine to coarse sizes respectively. Argon retention ages obtained from 40Ar and 39Ar retained in the three size fractions of illite at room temperature during neutron irradiation are 37.36±0.15, 42.11±0.14 and 47.20±0.10 respectively. Apatite fission track ages were measured in arkose at a locality on the fault 60 km west of the gouge locality. Three samples of arkose were dated: one within 10 m of the fault core, one 170 m from the fault, and one 335 m from the fault. The sample nearest to the fault yielded an age of 29.3±2.8 Ma, but it only had four track lengths at 10-13 μm. Two apatite grains from the intermediate sample yielded a pooled age of 34.3±6.1 Ma. The distant sample (25 grains counted, 101 track lengths) yielded an age of 32.0±2.9 Ma. This sample has a broad distribution of track lengths and a broad distribution of individual grain ages ranging from 14.8±5.1 to 67.8±8.8 Ma. Monte Carlo modeling of the apatite age and track length data is consistent with hydrothermal mineralization at 37-39 Ma followed by rapid uplift and cooling after 10 Ma. The 40Ar/ 39Ar total gas ages (K-Ar) are minimum ages, and the argon retention ages are maximum ages. The thermal model derived from the fission track data, and the argon retention age for the finest illite fraction of ˜37 Ma date a hydrothermal

  10. Spacecraft Doppler Tracking as a Xylophone Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, M.

    1995-01-01

    Spacecraft Doppler tracking is discussed for detecting gravitational waves in which Doppler data recorded on the ground are linearly combined with Doppler measurements made on board a spacecraft. A new method is derived for removing from combined data the frequency fluctuations due to the Earth troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the antenna on the ground. The remaining non-zero gravitational wave signal could be used for detecting gravitational waves.

  11. Charged Particle Tracking for the GlueX Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Simon; GlueX Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The GlueX experiment is a new experiment under construction at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility designed to study gluonic degrees of freedom via the production of ``hybrid'' mesons with exotic quantum numbers. At full luminosity, the trigger rate is expected to be on the order of 150 kHz and the data rate to tape is expected to be on the order of 300 MB/s. In order to reduce the reconstruction time, the current GlueX analysis framework is multi-threaded such that multiple events can be analyzed in parallel on multi-core machines. The tracking code presents the largest bottleneck in the event reconstruction. By taking advantage of Single-Instruction, Multiple-Data (SIMD) instructions in the three-vector and matrix operations needed in the tracking code, the reconstruction can be sped up considerably. The current status of the tracking reconstruction for GlueX will be presented. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy contract DE-AC05-06OR23177, under which Jefferson Science Associates, LLC operates Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  12. Forward Tracking with the JLab/MEIC Detector Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Charles; JLab/MEIC Design Team

    2015-10-01

    At a future electron ion collider (EIC), the quark-gluon structure of the NN force can be probed in e . g . deeply virtual exclusive scattering on a tensor polarized Deuteron and diffractive DIS on the deuteron with tagging of the NN final state. The MEIC design includes two Interaction Points (IPs), each of which can operate simultaneously at full luminosity. The detector and beam-line optics for IP1 are designed to be nearly hermetic for all particles outside the presumed 10-sigma admittance (longitudinal and transverse) of the figure-8 accelerator lattice. The integration of the IP1 detector with the lattice extends 40 m downstream of the IP in both the electron and ion directions. The central region of the detector is a new 4 m long 3 m diameter 3 Tesla solenoid. Analysis in the forward ion direction is enhanced by the 50 mrad crossing angle at the IP, and a two-stage spectrometer integrated into the first 36 m of the accelerator lattice. In this talk I will present the optics and resolution of the forward ion spectrometer, including resolution effects of an initial beam pipe design. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Denudation history and landscape evolution of the northern East-Brazilian continental margin from apatite fission-track thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinek, A. R.; Chemale, F.; van der Beek, P. A.; Guadagnin, F.; Cupertino, J. A.; Viana, A.

    2014-10-01

    We reconstruct the history of denudation and landscape evolution of the northern East- Brazilian continental margin using apatite fission-track thermochronology and thermal history modeling. This part of the Brazilian Atlantic margin is morphologically characterized by inland and coastal plateaus surrounding a wide low-lying inland region, the Sertaneja Depression. The apatite fission track ages and mean track lengths vary from 39 ± 4 to 350 ± 57 Ma and from 10.0 ± 0.3 to 14.2 ± 0.2 μm, respectively, implying a protracted history of spatially variable denudation since the Permian at relatively low rates (<50 m My-1). The Sertaneja Depression and inland plateaus record Permian-Early Jurassic (300-180 Ma) denudation that precedes rifting of the margin by > 60 Myrs. In contrast, the coastal regions record up to 2.5 km of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous (150-120 Ma) denudation, coeval with rifting of the margin. The samples from elevated coastal regions, the Borborema Plateau and the Mantiqueira Range, record cooling from temperatures above 120 °C since the Late Cretaceous extending to the Cenozoic. We interpret this denudation as related to post-rift uplift of these parts of the margin, possibly resulting from compressional stresses transmitted from the Andes and/or magmatism at that time. Several samples from these areas also record accelerated Neogene (<30 Ma) cooling, which may record landscape response to a change from a tropical to a more erosive semi-arid climate during this time. The inferred denudation history is consistent with the offshore sedimentary record, but not with evolutionary scenarios inferred from the recognition of “planation surfaces” on the margin. The denudation history of the northeastern Brazilian margin implies a control of pre-, syn- and post-rift tectonic and climatic events on landscape evolution.

  14. Apatite fission track evidence for Miocene extensional faulting east-central Nevada, northern Basin and Range province

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.L.; Dumitru, T.A. . Geology Dept.); Gans, P.B. . Geological Sciences Dept.); Brown, R.W. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Apatite fission track ages indicates that a large component of motion along many of the present range-bounding faults occurred in the Early to Middle Miocene, tilting and uplifting rocks through the apatite annealing zone (120--60 C) between 18--13 Ma (n = 20, Deep Creeks), 18--15 Ma (northern Snake Range, n = 20), 25--17 Ma (n = 7, southern Snake Range), 24--15 Ma (Egan Range, n = 6), 23--18 Ma (Kern Mts., n = 2) and 28--16 ma (Schell Creek Range, n = 2). Long track length distributions indicate rapid cooling through the 120--60 C interval followed by residence at low, near surface temperatures. The data set also indicates that the combined Deep Creek-Kern Mountains-northern and southern Snake Range constitutes a single coherent footwall crustal block beneath a > 150 km-long system of east-dipping Miocene faults which includes at least the eastern portions of faults that have been mapped as the Snake Range decollement (NSRD). Conglomerates deposited in hanging wall basins along this fault system contain metamorphic and granitic boulders whose FT ages are coeval with footwall unroofing. The deposits themselves are now known to be younger than previously reported (Oligocene) as ages from boulders are Miocene. The thick (> 2 km) sequences of synorogenic conglomerate indicates rapid unroofing; large slide blocks attest to generation of steep, fault-controlled topography. Faults that cut this sequence are now known to be younger than 15 Ma. Thus, protracted extensional faulting affected the region, beginning in the Early Oligocene and continuing to the Recent, but a significant part of this extension, including a large component of the slip on the NSRD, was accomplished in the Early to Middle Miocene. Data from this region is compatible with a growing base of apatite fission track data from elsewhere in the northern Basin and Range, which, together with geologic relationships, suggest an important episode of Miocene extension and Basin and Range development.

  15. Enhanced trigger for the NIFFTE fissionTPC in presence of high-rate alpha backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundgaard, Jeremy; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear physics and nuclear energy communities call for new, high precision measurements to improve existing fission models and design next generation reactors. The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking experiment (NIFFTE) has developed the fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) to measure neutron induced fission with unrivaled precision. The fissionTPC is annually deployed to the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center where it operates with a neutron beam passing axially through the drift volume, irradiating heavy actinide targets to induce fission. The fissionTPC was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's TPC lab, where it measures spontaneous fission from radioactive sources to characterize detector response, improve performance, and evolve the design. To measure 244Cm, we've developed a fission trigger to reduce the data rate from alpha tracks while maintaining a high fission detection efficiency. In beam, alphas from 239Pu are a large background when detecting fission fragments; implementing the fission trigger will greatly reduce this background. The implementation of the cathode fission trigger in the fissionTPC will be presented along with a detailed study of its efficiency.

  16. A Large Tracking Detector In Vacuum Consisting Of Self-Supporting Straw Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintz, P.

    2004-02-01

    A novel technique to stretch the anode wire simply by the gas over-pressure inside straw drift tubes reduces the necessary straw weight to an absolute minimum. Our detector will consist of more than 3000 straws filling up a cylindrical tracking volume of 1m diameter and 30cm length. The projected spatial resolution is 200μm. The detector with a total mass of less than 15kg will be operated in vacuum, but will have an added wall thickness of 3mm mylar, only. The detector design, production experience and first results will be discussed.

  17. Large Silver Halide Single Crystals as Charged Particle Track Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusmiss, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The trajectory of the particle is made visible under a microscope by the accumulation of metallic silver at regions of the lattice damaged by the particle. This decoration of the particle track is accomplished by exposure of the crystal to light. The decoration of normally present lattice imperfections such as dislocations can be suppressed by the addition to the crystal of less than ten parts per million of a suitable polyvalent metal impurity. An account of some preliminary attempts to grow thin single crystals of AgCl is given also, and suggestions for a more refined technique are offered.

  18. ATLAS Tracking Detector Upgrade studies using the Fast Simulation Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calace, Noemi; Salzburger, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The successful physics program of the LHC Run-1 data taking period has put a strong emphasis on design studies for future upgrades of the existing LHC detectors. In ATLAS, testing alternative layouts through the full simulation and reconstruction chain is a work-intensive program, which can only be carried out for a few concept layouts. To facilitate layout prototyping, a novel technique based on the ATLAS reconstruction geometry and a fast simulation engine have been established that allow fast layout iterations and a realistic but fast Monte Carlo simulation. This approach is extended by a fast digitisation and reconstruction module.

  19. Spacecraft to Spacecraft Coherent Laser Tracking as a Xylophone Interferometer Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, M.

    1998-01-01

    Searches for gravitational radiation can be performed in space with two spacecraft tracking each other with coherent laser light. This experimental technique could be implemented with two spacecraft carrying an appropriate optical payload, or with the proposed broad-band, space-based laser interferometer detectors of gravitational waves operated in this non-interferometric mode.

  20. The thermal history of the Miocene Ibar Basin (Southern Serbia): new constraints from apatite and zircon fission track and vitrinite reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrić, Nevena; Fügenschuh, Bernhard; Životić, Dragana; Cvetković, Vladica

    2015-02-01

    The Ibar Basin was formed during Miocene large scale extension in the NE Dinaride segment of the Alpine- Carpathian-Dinaride system. The Miocene extension led to exhumation of deep seated core-complexes (e.g. Studenica and Kopaonik core-complex) as well as to the formation of extensional basins in the hanging wall (Ibar Basin). Sediments of the Ibar Basin were studied by apatite and zircon fission track and vitrinite reflectance in order to define thermal events during basin evolution. Vitrinite reflectance (VR) data (0.63-0.90 %Rr) indicate a bituminous stage for the organic matter that experienced maximal temperatures of around 120-130 °C. Zircon fission track (ZFT) ages indicate provenance ages. The apatite fission track (AFT) single grain ages (45-6.7 Ma) and bimodal track lengths distribution indicate partial annealing of the detrital apatites. Both vitrinite reflectance and apatite fission track data of the studied sediments imply post-depositional thermal overprint in the Ibar Basin. Thermal history models of the detritial apatites reveal a heating episode prior to cooling that began at around 10 Ma. The heating episode started around 17 Ma and lasted 10-8 Ma reaching the maximum temperatures between 100-130 °C. We correlate this event with the domal uplift of the Studenica and Kopaonik cores where heat was transferred from the rising warm footwall to the adjacent colder hanging wall. The cooling episode is related to basin inversion and erosion. The apatite fission track data indicate local thermal perturbations, detected in the SE part of the Ibar basin (Piskanja deposit) with the time frame ~7.1 Ma, which may correspond to the youngest volcanic phase in the region.

  1. A simple apparatus for quick qualitative analysis of CR39 nuclear track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, D. C.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Gaillard, S. A.; Letzring, S. A.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2008-10-15

    Quantifying the ion pits in Columbia Resin 39 (CR39) nuclear track detector from Thomson parabolas is a time consuming and tedious process using conventional microscope based techniques. A simple inventive apparatus for fast screening and qualitative analysis of CR39 detectors has been developed, enabling efficient selection of data for a more detailed analysis. The system consists simply of a green He-Ne laser and a high-resolution digital single-lens reflex camera. The laser illuminates the edge of the CR39 at grazing incidence and couples into the plastic, acting as a light pipe. Subsequently, the laser illuminates all ion tracks on the surface. A high-resolution digital camera is used to photograph the scattered light from the ion tracks, enabling one to quickly determine charge states and energies measured by the Thomson parabola.

  2. Energy spectrum of iron nuclei measured inside the MIR space craft using CR-39 track detectors.

    PubMed

    Gunther, W; Leugner, D; Becker, E; Flesch, F; Heinrich, W; Huntrup, G; Reitz, G; Rocher, H; Streibel, T

    1999-06-01

    We have exposed stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors inside the MIR space craft during the EUROMIR95 space mission for almost 6 months. Over this long period a large number of tracks of high LET events was accumulated in the detector foils. The etching and measuring conditions for this experiment were optimized to detect tracks of stopping iron nuclei. We found 185 stopping iron nuclei inside the stack and identified their trajectories through the material of the experiment. Based on the energy-range relation the energy at the surface of the stack was determined. These particles allow the determination of the low energy part of the spectrum of iron nuclei behind shielding material inside the MIR station. PMID:12025843

  3. A transition radiation detector for RHIC featuring accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H.; Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W.; Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B.; Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K.

    1991-12-31

    We describe the results of a test ran involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions which momenta greater titan 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most, efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is-better than 5 {times} 10{sup 2}. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is {approximately}230 {mu}m.

  4. Development of pixel detectors for SSC vertex tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G. . Electro-Optical and Data Systems Group); Atlas, E.L.; Augustine, F.; Barken, O.; Collins, T.; Marking, W.L.; Worley, S.; Yacoub, G.Y. ) Shapiro, S.L. ); Arens, J.F.; Jernigan, J.G. . Space Sciences Lab.); Nygren,

    1991-04-01

    A description of hybrid PIN diode arrays and a readout architecture for their use as a vertex detector in the SSC environment is presented. Test results obtained with arrays having 256 {times} 256 pixels, each 30 {mu}m square, are also presented. The development of a custom readout for the SSC will be discussed, which supports a mechanism for time stamping hit pixels, storing their xy coordinates, and storing the analog information within the pixel. The peripheral logic located on the array, permits the selection of those pixels containing interesting data and their coordinates to be selectively read out. This same logic also resolves ambiguous pixel ghost locations and controls the pixel neighbor read out necessary to achieve high spatial resolution. The thermal design of the vertex tracker and the proposed signal processing architecture will also be discussed. 5 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Study of capillary tracking detectors with position-sensitive photomultiplier readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardini, A.; Cavasinni, V.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dolinsky, S. I.; Flaminio, V.; Golovkin, S. V.; Gorin, A. M.; Medvedkov, A. M.; Pyshev, A. I.; Tyukov, V. E.; Vasilchenko, V. G.; Zymin, K. V.

    1995-02-01

    Measurements have been carried out on light yield and attenuation length in glass capillaries filled with new liquid scintillators (LS) and compared with analogous measurements made on 0.5 mm diameter plastic fibres Kuraray SCSF-38 and 3HF. It is found that, at a distance of 1 m, the light output in the capillary filled with green LS based on 1-methylnaphthalene doped with a new dye 3M15 is greater by a factor of 2 to 3 than for plastic fibres. A tracking detector consisting of a capillary bundle read out by a 100 channel position-sensitive microchannel plate photomultiplier (2MCP-100) has been built and tested in the laboratory using a cosmic ray trigger. A comparison has been made between the performance of such a detector and that of a similar one, read out by a 96 channel Philips XP1724/A photomultiplier. It was found that a bundle made of 20 μm diameter capillaries with a tapered end giving a magnification of 2.56, filled with the new IPN+3M15 liquid scintillator, read out by the 2MCP-100, provides a space resolution of σ = 170 μm, a two-track resolution of the same value and a hit density of n = 1.9/mm for tracks crossing the detector at a distance of 20 cm from the photocathode. If the same detector is read out by the Philips XP1724/A, the space resolution becomes 200 μm, the two-track resolution 600 μm and the hit density n = 1.7/mm. The worse performance in the latter case is caused by the larger crosstalk compared with that of the 2MCP-100 PSPM. The results indicate that a LS-filled capillary detector is a very promising device for fast fibre tracking.

  6. A theoretical model for the overlapping effect in solid state nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Coto, I.; Bolívar, J. P.

    2011-10-01

    Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) are commonly deployed in many scientific and technological fields due to their low cost and relatively easy handling. In general, SSNTD response is considered to be linear, with exposure and efficiency supposedly constant across the entire exposure range, but in reality this response varies at high exposure levels, and efficiency diminishes as exposure rises. In high exposure measurements, this phenomenon results in an underestimation of the exposure levels and the results obtained must be treated with caution. To explain this phenomenon, this work establishes a theoretical model based on the track overlapping. Furthermore, an algorithm based on the Monte Carlo method has been used to obtain numerical results and a set of around 40 SSNTD has been exposed to three different exposure levels to validate this model. It has been demonstrated that overlapping efficiency is a linear function of the real exposure. The slope depends on the surface of the tracks, the resolution of the counting system and the reference efficiency for low exposures. The initial offset can be associated to the track background that reduces the overlapped efficiency. The recorded exposure can be modeled as a quadratic function of the real exposure without initial offset. As a result, the experimental data have been fitted to second order polynomial functions and the detectors parameters have been obtained. If detector parameters such as reference efficiency and track radio are known, the model can reliably predict the overlapping effect and enable the correction of the solid state track detector measurements. These results could also be extended to other SSNTD applications.

  7. Study of the fission spectrum of less than 1 MeV neutrons using a Lithium-glass detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastola, Suraj; Rees, Lawrence; Bart, Czirr

    2011-10-01

    The fission spectrum of neutrons with kinetic energies less than 1 MeV is of considerable practical importance for the design of nuclear reactors. However, it is not as precisely known as that for higher energy neutrons. One of the major problems scientists have previously encountered is room return neutrons. These are neutrons that reflect from the walls, ceiling or floor of the lab. Another problem is finding a way to measure accurately the neutron time of flight. This is the time neutrons take to travel from a fission event to the detector. Time of flight is used to measure the neutron energy. To avoid the room return, I am going to perform an experiment about 45 feet above the ground in the BYU Indoor Practice Facility, so that neutrons from the source will not scatter from nearby surfaces and return to the detector. To find the time of flight to a greater accuracy, I have been using a Time to Amplitude Converter (TAC). A TAC has a capacitor that charges linearly as the voltage builds up. With a 12-bit digitizer system, we can measure the time to 0.1 nanoseconds, whereas the same digitizer can only measure time in steps of 4 nanoseconds. So, we will get a more accurate measurement of time of flight with the TAC.

  8. Low-temperature evolution of the Morondava rift basin shoulder in western Madagascar: An apatite fission track study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, JöRg; Seward, Diane; Schreurs, Guido

    2012-04-01

    The evolution of the rift shoulder and the sedimentary sequence of the Morondava basin in western Madagascar was mainly influenced by a Permo-Triassic continental failed rift (Karroo rift), and the early Jurassic separation of Madagascar from Africa. Karroo deposits are restricted to a narrow corridor along the basement-basin contact and parts of this contact feature a steep escarpment. Here, apatite fission track (AFT) analysis of a series of both basement and sediment samples across the escarpment reveals the low-temperature evolution of the exhuming Precambrian basement in the rift basin shoulder and the associated thermal evolution of the sedimentary succession. Seven basement and four Karroo sediment samples yield apparent AFT ages between ˜330 and ˜215 Ma and ˜260 and ˜95 Ma, respectively. Partially annealed fission tracks and thermal modeling indicate post-depositional thermal overprinting of both basement and Karroo sediment. Rocks presently exposed in the rift shoulder indicate temperatures of >60°C associated with this reheating whereby the westernmost sample in the sedimentary plain experienced almost complete resetting of the detrital apatite grains at temperatures of about ˜90-100°C. The younging of AFT ages westward indicates activity of faults, re-activating inherited Precambrian structures during Karroo sedimentation. Furthermore, our data suggest onset of final cooling/exhumation linked to (1) the end of Madagascar's drift southward relative to Africa during the Early Cretaceous, (2) activity of the Marion hot spot and associated Late Cretaceous break-up between Madagascar and India, and (3) the collision of India with Eurasia and subsequent re-organization of spreading systems in the Indian Ocean.

  9. Apatite fission track thermochronology of Khibina Massif (Kola Peninsula, Russia): Implications for post-Devonian Tectonics of the NE Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskiy, Roman V.; Thomson, Stuart N.; Arzamastsev, Andrey A.; Zakharov, Vladimir S.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal history of the Kola Peninsula area of NE Fennoscandia remains almost fully unknown because of the absence of any thermochronological data such as apatite and/or zircon fission track or (Usbnd Th)/He ages. In order to fill this gap and to constrain the post-Devonian erosion and exhumation history of this region, we present the results of apatite fission track (AFT) dating of eleven samples selected from the cores taken from different depths of the northern part of the Khibina intrusive massif. The Rbsbnd Sr isochron age of this alkaline magmatic complex which is located at the center of Kola Peninsula is 368 + 6 Ma (Kramm and Kogarko, 1994). Samples were analyzed from depths between + 520 and - 950 m and yielded AFT ages between 290 and 268 Ma with an age uncertainty (1σ) of between ± 19 Ma (7%) and ± 42 Ma (15%). Mean track lengths (MTL) lie between 12.5 and 14.4 μm. Inverse time-temperature modeling was conducted on the age and track length data from seven samples of the Khibina massif. Thermal histories that best predict the measured data from three samples with the most reliable data show three stages: (1) 290-250 Ma-rapid cooling from > 110 °C to 70 °C/50 °C for lower/upper sample correspondingly; (2) 250-50 Ma-a stable temperature stage; (3) 50-0 Ma-slightly increased cooling rates down to modern temperatures. We propose that the first cooling stage is related to late-Hercynian orogenesis; the second cooling stage may be associated with tectonics accompanying with opening of Arctic oceanic basin. The obtained data show that geothermal gradient at the center of Kola Peninsula has remained close to the modern value of 20 °C/km for at least the last 250 Myr. AFT data show that the Khibina massif has been exhumed not more then 5-6 km in the last 290 Myr.

  10. Phanerozoic polycyclic evolution of the southwestern Angola margin: New insights for apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venancio da Silva, Bruno; Hackspacher, Peter; Carina Siqueira Ribeiro, Marli; Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton

    2016-04-01

    The low-temperature thermochronology has been an important tool to quantify geological process in passive continental margins. In this context, the Angolan margin shows evidence of a polycyclic post-rift evolution marked by different events of uplift, basin inversion and changes in sedimentation rates to the marginal basins, which have controlled the salt tectonics and the hydrocarbon deposits (1,2,3,4). To understand the post break-up evolution of the southwestern Angola margin, it were collected outcrop samples for apatite fission track (AFT) and (U-Th)/He analysis ranging in elevation from 79 m to 1675 m from the coast toward the interior plateau in a profile between Namibe and Lubango cities. The area lies on the edge of Central and Southern Atlantic segments a few kilometers northward the Walvis ridge and encompasses the Archean and Proterozoic basement rocks of the Congo craton. The AFT ages ranging from 120.6 ± 8.9 Ma to 328.8 ± 28.5 Ma and they show a trend of increasing age toward the Great Escarpment with some exceptions. The partial mean track lengths (MTLs) vary between 11.77 ± 1.82 μm to 12.34 ± 1.13 μm with unimodal track length distributions (TDLs). The partial (U-Th)/He ages ranging from 104.85 ± 3.15 Ma to 146.95 ± 4.41 Ma and show the same trend of increasing ages landward, little younger than the AFT ages, which could be interpreted as a fast exhumation episode in Late Jurassic - Early Cretaceous times. The thermal histories modelling has been constrained with the kinetic parameters Dpar (5) and c-axis angle (6) by the software Hefty (7). Both AFT and (U-Th)/He thermal histories modelling indicate three episodes of denudation/uplift driven cooling: (a) from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, (b) a smallest one in the Late Cretaceous and (c) from Oligocene-Miocene to recent, which are compatible with geophysical data of the offshore Namibe basin that estimate the greater thickness of sediments formed in the first and third episodes

  11. Silicon strip tracking detector development and prototyping for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, S.

    2016-07-01

    In about ten years from now, the Phase-II upgrade of the LHC will be carried out. Due to increased luminosity, a severe radiation dose and high particle rates will occur for the experiments. In consequence, several detector components will have to be upgraded. In the ATLAS experiment, the current inner detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracking detector with the goal of at least delivering the present detector performance also in the harsh Phase-II LHC conditions. This report presents the current planning and results from first prototype measurements of the upgrade silicon strip tracking detector.

  12. Distinction between the Youngest Toba Tuff and Oldest Toba Tuff from northern Sumatra based on the area density of spontaneous fission tracks in their glass shards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westgate, John A.; Pearce, Nicholas J. G.; Gatti, Emma; Achyuthan, Hema

    2014-09-01

    Determination of the area density of spontaneous fission tracks (ρs) in glass shards of Toba tephra is a reliable way to distinguish between the Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT) and the Oldest Toba Tuff (OTT). The ρs values for YTT, uncorrected for partial track fading, range from 70 to 181 tracks/cm2 with a weighted mean of 108 ± 5 tracks/cm2, based on 15 samples. Corrected ρs values for YTT are in the range of 77-140 tracks/cm2 with a weighted mean of 113 ± 8 tracks/cm2, within the range of uncorrected ρs values. No significant difference in ρs exists between YTT samples collected from marine and continental depositional settings. The uncorrected ρs for OTT is 1567 tracks/cm2 so that confusion with YTT is unlikely. The ρs values of the Toba tephra at Bori, Morgaon, and Gandhigram in northwestern India indicate a YTT identity, in agreement with geochemical data on their glass shards, the presence of multiple glass populations, and a glass fission-track age determination. Therefore, the view of others that OTT is present at these sites - and thereby indicates a Lower Pleistocene age for the associated Acheulean artifacts - is incorrect.

  13. Fission track evidence for tilting of the Peninsular Ranges batholith of southern California: An alternative to long-distance northward transport

    SciTech Connect

    George, P.G.; Dokka, R.K. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Paleomagnetic directions of Mesozoic plutonic rocks from the Peninsular Ranges batholith in southern California and Baja California are discordant with the expected Cretaceous magnetic field direction. The difference between expected and observed directions suggests ca 25[degree] of clockwise tectonic rotation and ca 11[degree] northward translation of peninsular California with respect to cratonic North America. Lithologic correlations between peninsular California and Sonora, however, support only 300 [+-] 10 km of north-northwest translation along the San Andreas transform system. Southwest tilting of the batholith about an axis subparallel to its trend has been proposed in order to explain the discordant paleomagnetic directions, thereby eliminating the need for long-distance transport. The distribution of zircon and apatite fission-track ages across the western half of the batholith between Palomar Mountain and Escondido, California support this proposal. In the northeastern part of the study area apatite and zircon fission-track ages of Early Cretaceous tonalities and granodiorites range from 73.9 to 81.9 Ma and 74.8 to 79.9 Ma, respectively. The show no systematic increase or decrease with changes in elevation or distance along the ca N37E line of sampling. Towards the southwest, however, apatite and zircon fission-track ages increase progressively from 82 to 96 Ma and 83 to 93 Ma, respectively. The author interprets these results as indicating rapid, episodic uplift of the study area during Late Cretaceous time followed by regional tilting of the batholith and its fission-track age surfaces to the southwest. The amount of tilt estimated from the distribution of the fission-track ages is compatible with those based on geobarometry data and the distribution of U-Pb and K-Ar ages.

  14. Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the Arabian Nubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: evidence from fission track and paleostress data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojar, Ana-Voica; Fritz, Harald; Kargl, Sabine; Unzog, Wolfgang

    2002-05-01

    To constrain the post-Pan-African evolution of the Arabian-Nubian Shield, macro-scale tectonic studies, paleostress and fission track data were performed in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. The results provide insights into the processes driving late stage vertical motion and the timing of exhumation of a large shield area. Results of apatite, zircon and sphene fission track analyses from the Neoproterozoic basement indicate two major episodes of exhumation. Sphene and zircon fission track data range from 339 to 410 Ma and from 315 to 366 Ma, respectively. The data are interpreted to represent an intraplate thermotectonic episode during the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous. At that time, the intraplate stresses responsible for deformation, uplift and erosion, were induced by the collision of Gondwana with Laurussia which started in Late Devonian times. Apatite fission track data indicate that the second cooling phase started in Oligocene and was related to extension, flank uplift and erosion along the actual margin of the Red Sea. Structural data collected from Neoproterozoic basement, Late Cretaceous and Tertiary sedimentary cover suggest two stages of rift formation. (1) Cretaceous strike-slip tectonics with sub-horizontal σ1 (ENE/WSW) and σ3 (NNW/SSE), and sub-vertical σ2 resulted in formation of small pull-apart basins. Basin axes are parallel to the trend of Pan-African structural elements which acted as stress guides. (2) During Oligocene to Miocene the stress field changed towards horizontal NE-SW extension (σ3), and sub-vertical σ1. Relations between structures, depositional ages of sediments and apatite fission track data indicate that the initiation of rift flank uplift, erosion and plate deformation occurred nearly simultaneously.

  15. Fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion beams using single track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimpki, G.; Mescher, H.; Akselrod, M. S.; Jäkel, O.; Greilich, S.

    2016-02-01

    Due to their superior spatial resolution, small and biocompatible fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) open up the possibility of characterizing swift heavy charged particle fields on a single track level. Permanently stored spectroscopic information such as energy deposition and particle field composition is of particular importance in heavy ion radiotherapy, since radiation quality is one of the decisive predictors for clinical outcome. Findings presented within this paper aim towards single track reconstruction and fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion fields. Three-dimensional information on individual ion trajectories through the detector volume is obtained using fully automated image processing software. Angular distributions of multidirectional fields can be measured accurately within  ±2° uncertainty. This translates into less than 5% overall fluence deviation from the chosen irradiation reference. The combination of single ion tracking with an improved energy loss calibration curve based on 90 FNTD irradiations with protons as well as helium, carbon and oxygen ions enables spectroscopic analysis of a detector irradiated in Bragg peak proximity of a 270 MeV u-1 carbon ion field. Fluence-based dosimetry results agree with treatment planning software reference.

  16. Fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion beams using single track detectors.

    PubMed

    Klimpki, G; Mescher, H; Akselrod, M S; Jäkel, O; Greilich, S

    2016-02-01

    Due to their superior spatial resolution, small and biocompatible fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) open up the possibility of characterizing swift heavy charged particle fields on a single track level. Permanently stored spectroscopic information such as energy deposition and particle field composition is of particular importance in heavy ion radiotherapy, since radiation quality is one of the decisive predictors for clinical outcome. Findings presented within this paper aim towards single track reconstruction and fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion fields. Three-dimensional information on individual ion trajectories through the detector volume is obtained using fully automated image processing software. Angular distributions of multidirectional fields can be measured accurately within  ±2° uncertainty. This translates into less than 5% overall fluence deviation from the chosen irradiation reference. The combination of single ion tracking with an improved energy loss calibration curve based on 90 FNTD irradiations with protons as well as helium, carbon and oxygen ions enables spectroscopic analysis of a detector irradiated in Bragg peak proximity of a 270 MeV u(-1) carbon ion field. Fluence-based dosimetry results agree with treatment planning software reference. PMID:26757791

  17. Determination of the detection threshold for Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) Nuclear Track Detector (NTD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, R.; Dey, S.; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Maulik, A.; Raha, Sibaji; Syam, D.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we investigated the detection threshold of the polymer material Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) intended to be used as Nuclear Track Detector (NTD) in the search for rare events (e.g. strangelets) in cosmic rays. 11 MeV 12C and 2 MeV proton beams from the accelerator at the Institute of Physics (IOP), Bhubaneswar were utilized for this study. The results show that the PET detector has a much higher detection threshold (Z / β ∼ 140) compared to many other commercially available and widely used detector materials like CR-39 (Z / β ∼ 6-20) or Makrofol (Z / β ∼ 57). This makes PET a particularly suitable detector material for testing certain phenomenological models which predict the presence of strangelets as low energy, heavily ionizing particles in cosmic radiation at high mountain altitudes.

  18. The influence of electron track lengths on the γ-ray response of compound semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhostin, M.; Esmaili-Torshabi, A.

    2015-10-01

    The charge-trapping effect in compound semiconductor γ-ray detectors in the presence of a uniform electric field is commonly described by Hecht's relation. However, Hecht's relation ignores the geometrical spread of charge carriers caused by the finite range of primary and secondary electrons (δ-rays) in the detector. In this paper, a method based on the Shockley-Ramo theorem is developed to calculate γ-ray induced charge pulses by taking into account the charge-trapping effect associated with the geometrical spread of charge carriers. The method is then used to calculate the response of a planar CdTe detector to energetic γ-rays by which the influence of electron track lengths on the γ-ray response of the detectors is clearly shown.

  19. Design and performance of the SLD Vertex Detector, a 120 Mpixel tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, G.D.; Cotton, R.; Damerell, C.J.S.

    1992-03-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, and initial operation of the SLD Vertex Detector, the first device to employ charge coupled devices (CCDs) on a large scale in a high energy physics experiment. The Vertex Detector comprises 480 CCDs, with a total of 120 Mpixels. Each pixel functions as an independent particle detecting element, providing space point measurements of charged particle tracks with a typical precision of 5 {mu}m in each co-ordinate. The CCDs are arranged in four concentric cylinders just outside the beam pipe which surrounds the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collision point of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The Vertex Detector is a powerful tool for distinguishing secondary vertex tracks, produced by decay in flight of heavy flavour hadrons or tau leptons, from tracks produced at the primary event vertex. Because the colliding beam environment imposes severe constraints on the design of such a detector, a six year R&D programme was needed to develop solutions to a number of problems. The requirements include a low-mass structure (to minimise multiple scattering) both for mechanical support and to provide signal paths for the CCDS; operation at low temperature with a high degree of mechanical stability; and relatively high speed CCD readout, signal processing, and data sparsification. The lessons learned through the long R&D period should be useful for the construction of large arrays of CCDs or smart pixel devices in the future, in a number of areas of science and technology.

  20. Front-end intelligence for triggering and local track measurement in gaseous pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, V.; Hessey, N.; Vermeulen, J.

    2012-11-01

    A number of applications in high-energy physics and medicine requires three-dimensional reconstruction of the particle trajectories: for example, high momentum particles in accelerator-based experiments can be identified on the basis of the properties of their tracks, while in proton computed tomography accurate knowledge of the incoming and outgoing beam trajectory is crucial in reconstructing the most probable path of the proton traversing the patient. In this work we investigate the potential of Gaseous Pixel (GridPix) detectors for fast and efficient recognition of tracks and determination of their properties. This includes selection, without external trigger, of tracks with desired angles, for example tracks with small tilt angles corresponding to high momentum particles in a magnetic field. Being able to select these fast and without external input is of interest for the future upgrades of the LHC detectors. In this paper we present a track selection algorithm, and its physical implementation in 130 nm CMOS technology with estimates of power consumption, data rates, latency, and chip area. The Timepix3 chip, currently being designed for a wide range of applications, will also be suitable for readout of GridPix detectors. Both arrival time information (accuracy 1.6 ns) and charge deposit information will be delivered for each hit together with the coordinates of the active pixel. A short overview is presented of its architecture, which allows continuous self-triggered readout of sparsely distributed data with a rate up to 20 × 106 hits cm-2sec-1. The addition of fast track pattern recognition logic to TimePix3 in a successor chip is currently being investigated.

  1. Photon counting detector for space debris laser tracking and lunar laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, Franz

    2014-08-01

    We are reporting on a design, construction and performance of solid state photon counting detector package which has been designed for laser tracking of space debris. The detector has been optimized for top photon detection efficiency and detection delay stability. The active area of the commercially available avalanche photodiode manufactured on Si (SAP500 supplied by Laser Components, Inc.) is circular with a diameter of 500 μm. The newly designed control circuit enables to operate the detection sensor at a broad range of biases 5-50 V above its breakdown voltage of 125 V. This permits to select a right trade-off between photon detection efficiency, timing resolution and dark count rate. The photon detection efficiency exceeds 70% at the wavelength of 532 nm. This is the highest photon detection efficiency ever reported for such a device. The timing properties of the detector have been investigated in detail. The timing resolution is better than 80 ps r.m.s, the detection delay is stable within units of picoseconds over several hours of operation. The detection delay stability in a sense of time deviation of 800 fs has been achieved. The temperature change of the detection delay is 0.5 ps/K. The detector has been tested as an echo signal detector in laser tracking of space debris at the satellite laser station in Graz, Austria. Its application in lunar laser ranging is under consideration by several laser stations.

  2. Use of track detectors for the evaluation of emanating radium content of soil samples.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Nielson, K.K.

    1987-01-01

    The emanating Ra contents of background and contaminated soils were measured using commercial alpha-track detectors sealed with samples in glass Mason jars for a 179-day period. The observed track densities were linearly correlated with independently measured emanating Ra contents using gamma assays for total Ra and Rn emanation measurements. The simple new jar test exhibits high sensitivity and requires minimal equipment and user's training. It has applications in indoor Rn and building material studies as well as geochemical exploration.-Authors

  3. Alpha particles energy estimation from track diameter development in a CR-39 detector.

    PubMed

    Azooz, Aassim A; Al-Jubbori, Mushtaq A

    2016-09-01

    The slight nonlinearity in temporal development of tracks diameter in CR-39 nuclear track detectors is examined with the aim of attempting to find if such nonlinearity can be directly related to the charged particle energy. Narrowly spaced etching time-diameter experimental data for alpha particles at five energy values and for one additional energy value etched at five different temperatures are obtained. Initial results show good indication that measuring such time-diameter relationship can form a useful energy estimation tool. Good consistency with other independent published results is obtained. PMID:27341133

  4. Incident angle dependence of proton response of CR-39 (TS-16) track detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oda, K.; Csige, I.; Yamauchi, T.; Miyake, H.; Benton, E. V.

    1993-01-01

    The proton response of the TS-16 type of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector has been studied with accelerated and fast neutron induced protons in vacuum and in air. The diameters of etched tracks were measured as a function of etching time and the etch rate ratio and the etch induction layer were determined from the growth curve of the diameter using a variable etch rate ratio model. In the case of the accelerated protons in vacuum an anomalous incident angle dependence of the response is observed.

  5. Neutron detection by a CR-39 detector and analysis of proton tracks etched in the same and opposite directions.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, B; Stevanovic, N; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D

    2014-10-01

    A program code to simulate neutron interactions with a CR-39 detector and calculate parameters describing the induced etched proton tracks in the CR-39 material was previously developed(( 1)). This code was used to understand the mechanisms involved during interactions with neutrons in the CR-39 material and the influence of the etching process, enabling an improvement in the efficiency of the CR-39 detector. Due to neutron interaction with atoms of the detector material, the created protons are emitted in different directions and their latent tracks are oriented randomly within the detector. The aim of this paper is to show differences between the number of visible tracks etched in the same and opposite directions from both sides of the detector. The efficiency of neutron detection was analysed as a function of the removed layer and neutron energy for both sides of detector. PMID:24324253

  6. Interpolating cathode pad readout in gas proportional detectors for high multiplicity particle tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B.; Radeka, V.; Smith, G.C.; O`Brien, E.

    1992-02-01

    Experiments which are planned for the Superconducting Super Collider and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider will involve interactions in which detectors will need to identify and localize hundreds or even thousands of particle tracks simultaneously. Most types of conventional position sensitive, proportional detectors with projective geometry are not able to unravel the individual tracks in these environments. We have been investigating several forms of sub-divided cathode readout to address this problem. We report here on geometric charge division using chevron shaped cathode pads which lie in rows underneath each anode wire. Investigations have quantified the non-linear effects due to avalanche angular localization, and how these become negligible with proper design of the pad. Differential nm-linearity of {plus_minus}5%, and position resolution in the region of 50{mu}m rms, have been achieved.

  7. Interpolating cathode pad readout in gas proportional detectors for high multiplicity particle tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B.; Radeka, V.; Smith, G.C.; O'Brien, E.

    1992-02-01

    Experiments which are planned for the Superconducting Super Collider and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider will involve interactions in which detectors will need to identify and localize hundreds or even thousands of particle tracks simultaneously. Most types of conventional position sensitive, proportional detectors with projective geometry are not able to unravel the individual tracks in these environments. We have been investigating several forms of sub-divided cathode readout to address this problem. We report here on geometric charge division using chevron shaped cathode pads which lie in rows underneath each anode wire. Investigations have quantified the non-linear effects due to avalanche angular localization, and how these become negligible with proper design of the pad. Differential nm-linearity of {plus minus}5%, and position resolution in the region of 50{mu}m rms, have been achieved.

  8. A many particle-tracking detector with drift planes and segmented cathode readout

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Lissauer, D.; Ludlam, T.; Makowiecki, D.; O'Brien, E.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Rogers, L.; Smith, G.C.; Stephani, D.; Yu, B. ); Greene, S.V.; Hemmick, T.K.; Mitchell, J.T.; Shivakumar, B. )

    1990-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a detector system for tracking charged particles in an environment of high track density and rates up to 1 MHz. The system operates in the forward spectrometer of the BNL Heavy Ion experiment E814 and uses principles of general interest in high rate, high multiplicity applications such as at RHIC or SSC. We require our system to perform over a large dynamic range, detecting singly charged particles as well as fully ionized relativistic {sup 28}Si. Results on gas gain saturation, {delta}-ray suppression, and overall detector performance in the presence of a 14.6 GeV/nucleon {sup 28}Si beam and a 14 GeV proton beam are presented. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Development of reprogrammable high frame-rate detector devices for laser communication pointing, acquisition and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Terita; Conner, Kenneth; Covington, Richard; Ngo, Hung; Rink, Christine

    2008-02-01

    A Two Terminal Laser Communication Test Bed has been developed at The Aerospace Corporation. This paper presents the design and preliminary results of a reprogrammable detector within the Test Bed for use in pointing, acquisition, and tracking between a Satellite-to-Satellite Laser Communication link. The detector may be commanded by an emulated spacecraft Command & Data Handling subsystem to switch between full-array scanning and "small sized" N x M pixel Field of View (FOV) for high-rate laser tracking. The approach follows a parallel path to implement the signal processing algorithm on two different hardware resources: a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The focus of this effort is to present a methodology for testing and evaluating various techniques for advanced focal plane array (FPA) hardware, as well as sensor FPA control, image processing and laser beam X & Y position algorithms.

  10. Laboratory-Scale Bismuth Phosphate Extraction Process Simulation To Track Fate of Fission Products

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. JEFFREY; Lindberg, Michael J.; Jones, Thomas E.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

    2007-02-28

    Recent field investigation that collected and characterized vadose zone sediments from beneath inactive liquid disposal facilities at the Hanford 200 Areas show lower than expected concentrations of a long-term risk driver, Tc-99. Therefore laboratory studies were performed to re-create one of the three processes that were used to separate the plutonium from spent fuel and that created most of the wastes disposed or currently stored in tanks at Hanford. The laboratory simulations were used to compare with current estimates based mainly on flow sheet estimates and spotty historical data. Three simulations of the bismuth phosphate precipitation process show that less that 1% of the Tc-99, Cs-135/137, Sr-90, I-129 carry down with the Pu product and thus these isotopes should have remained within the metals waste streams that after neutralization were sent to single shell tanks. Conversely, these isotopes should not be expected to be found in the first and subsequent cycle waste streams that went to cribs. Measurable quantities (~20 to 30%) of the lanthanides, yttrium, and trivalent actinides (Am and Cm) do precipitate with the Pu product, which is higher than the 10% estimate made for current inventory projections. Surprisingly, Se (added as selenate form) also shows about 10% association with the Pu/bismuth phosphate solids. We speculate that the incorporation of some Se into the bismuth phosphate precipitate is caused by selenate substitution into crystal lattice sites for the phosphate. The bulk of the U daughter product Th-234 and Np-237 daughter product Pa-233 also associate with the solids. We suspect that the Pa daughter products of U (Pa-234 and Pa-231) would also co-precipitate with the bismuth phosphate induced solids. No more than 1 % of the Sr-90 and Sb-125 should carry down with the Pu product that ultimately was purified. Thus the current scheme used to estimate where fission products end up being disposed overestimates by one order of magnitude the

  11. Lateral Variations of Fission-Track Cooling Ages along the Southern Peruvian Coast Reveal Coast-Parallel Extension during the Eocene and Oligocene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noury, M.; Bernet, M.; Jaillard, E.; Sempere, T.

    2014-12-01

    Proterozoic metamorphic rocks largely crop out between ~14 and ~17°S along the coast of southern Peru. Previous thermochronological studies in this belt focused on the Late Neogene cooling history and yielded Late Paleozoic to mid-Cretaceous zircon U-Th/He and fission-track ages, and Late Cretaceous to Early Paleocene apatite fission-track ages. Our study aims at extending the fission-track database in the ~300 km-long, high-grade metamorphic Atico-Mollendo Block (AMB; 15.8-17.1°S), in order to understand the lateral variations of thermochronologic ages along the Pacific coast of southern Peru. We present new apatite and zircon fission-track ages from the AMB and interpret them along with the previously published dates from this block and its surrounding areas. The apatite fission-track data show a longitudinal variation pattern with two localized shifts from younger (60 Ma) to older (~90 Ma) dates, corresponding to the northwestern and southeastern borders of the AMB. These shifts coincide in the field with two major normal fault zones that strike perpendicular to the coast and bound the AMB, and had been understated until now. Given the offsetted ages, the faults were active after 60 Ma, and tilted the AMB down to the NW. This interpretation is consistent with the fact that the metamorphic grade of the basement increases towards the SE, and with the deposition between ~55 and 30 Ma of forearc continental deposits (Lower Moquegua Group) that exhibit numerous synsedimentary extensional features. The zircon fission-track age pattern is more complicated but can be interpreted either as (i) reflecting a partial reset of the whole area due to burial during the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, or (ii) as the reactivation of an important Carboniferous detachment fault during the ~100-80 Ma interval. We suggest that this coast-parallel Eocene-Oligocene extension accommodated the counterclockwise block rotation of the southern Peruvian forearc that accompanied the

  12. Three-Dimensional Spatial Characteristics and Contents of Zircon Crystals from High Resolution Optical Imagery for the Fission Track, (U-Th-Sm)/He, and U-Th-Pb Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donelick, R.; Donelick, M. B.; O Sullivan, P. B.; McMillan, J.; Hourigan, J. K.; Juel, E.

    2013-12-01

    We will present a progress report on the use of high resolution optical images of zircon crystals for the measurement and interpretation of fission track, (U-Th-Sm)/He, and U-Th-Pb data. Each zircon crystal studied is mounted in FEP teflon (if the fission track method is to be applied) or epoxy and polished to expose an internal crystal surface. Unlike a typical external crystal surface, the typical polished internal crystal surface provides a clear window through which most of the preserved crystal volume and any inclusions within the volume may be viewed optically and through which the preserved external crystal surfaces may be viewed and precisely located in space. For the fission track method, optical imagery permits: 1) determining a session-specific zeta calibration factor; when LA-ICP-MS data are used to measure relative [U], the fission tracks ablated by the laser may be isolated and counted relative to those outside of the ablated area; 2) assigning uncertainties to each fission track counted; unlike conventional fission track statistics which assume a probability of one for counted fission tracks and a probability of zero for uncounted fission tracks, collecting, processing, and archiving of optical imagery permits each candidate fission track to be scored and assigned a relative probability; 3) calculating ages based on: a) only fission tracks within the ablated area, b) only fission tracks having a statistically equal density to those within the ablated area, c) all fission tracks, d) multiple individual domains from multiple laser ablation pits. For the (U-Th-Sm)/He method, optical imagery permits: 1) calculating the crystal volume and constructing a realistic 3D crystal model for He diffusion calculation; constructing a more realistic 3D model of [U], [Th], and [Sm] distributions using the zoning profiles from one or more laser ablation pits; 2) calculating the age using the calculated crystal volume, calculated He deficit due to laser ablation, and

  13. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1-9 MeV protons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; et al

    2011-10-28

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92-9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. The effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather thanmore » the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.« less

  14. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1-9 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-10-28

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92-9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. The effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.

  15. Automatic neutron dosimetry system based on fluorescent nuclear track detector technology.

    PubMed

    Akselrod, M S; Fomenko, V V; Bartz, J A; Haslett, T L

    2014-10-01

    For the first time, the authors are describing an automatic fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) reader for neutron dosimetry. FNTD is a luminescent integrating type of detector made of aluminium oxide crystals that does not require electronics or batteries during irradiation. Non-destructive optical readout of the detector is performed using a confocal laser scanning fluorescence imaging with near-diffraction limited resolution. The fully automatic table-top reader allows one to load up to 216 detectors on a tray, read their engraved IDs using a CCD camera and optical character recognition, scan and process simultaneously two types of images in fluorescent and reflected laser light contrast to eliminate false-positive tracks related to surface and volume crystal imperfections. The FNTD dosimetry system allows one to measure neutron doses from 0.1 mSv to 20 Sv and covers neutron energies from thermal to 20 MeV. The reader is characterised by a robust, compact optical design, fast data processing electronics and user-friendly software. PMID:24285287

  16. Development of a scintillating fiber tracking detector for the K2K neutrino oscillation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Atsumu

    1998-11-09

    We are preparing a scintillating fiber tracking detector as a part of the near fine-grained detector in the K2K long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment between KEK and Super-Kamiokande. We use Kuraray SCSF-78, 0.7 mm diameter fiber with Hamamatsu IIT-CCD camera read out system. The choice of the fiber is based on a series of measurements of the light yield and aging of the candidate fibers under various conditions. It was found that SCSF-78 has enough light yield and lifetime for our purposes. We have also checked the performance of the SCIFI sheet-IIT-CCD system by source ({sup 90}Sr) and cosmic rays. The detection efficiency was found to be more than 99%. The full SCIFI detector construction is current under way.

  17. Development of a scintillating fiber tracking detector for the K2K neutrino oscillation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsumu

    1998-11-01

    We are preparing a scintillating fiber tracking detector as a part of the near fine-grained detector in the K2K long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment between KEK and Super-Kamiokande. We use Kuraray SCSF-78, 0.7 mm diameter fiber with Hamamatsu IIT-CCD camera read out system. The choice of the fiber is based on a series of measurements of the light yield and aging of the candidate fibers under various conditions. It was found that SCSF-78 has enough light yield and lifetime for our purposes. We have also checked the performance of the SCIFI sheet-IIT-CCD system by source (90Sr) and cosmic rays. The detection efficiency was found to be more than 99%. The full SCIFI detector construction is current under way.

  18. Evaluating methods used for fission track dating of tephras: examples from the Afar Depression, Ethiopia, and the Denali fault zone, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, A. E.; Warfel, T. S.; Phillips, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although fission track geochronology has been successfully used to date volcanic glasses and tephras in several studies, a variety of approaches have been used (see Westgate et al., 2013), and no consensus for a standardized methodology has emerged. As a result, this technique is rarely employed, despite having the potential to date tephras and glasses that cannot be dated by other methods, such as K-Ar dating. We have been evaluating the various approaches used to address the technical issues in fission track dating of tephras, by applying them to standards of known ages, including Moldavite tektite, and Huckleberry and Bishop Tuffs. Some of these issues include track etching and counting protocol, and corrections for the effects of track fading at low temperatures. Track etching is generally done in 24% HF for 75 or more seconds, but the time necessary for optimal etching appears to vary according to sample composition and grain size. To correct for track fading, we are using the diameter correction technique of Sandhu and Westgate (1995). We have obtained tephra samples from two regions, the Afar Depression in Ethiopia, an area with significant early hominid fossils, and the Denali fault zone in Alaska, an area with a complicated tectonic evolution. For both of these regions, we have samples that have been dated by other methods for calibration purposes, and we will explore the application of a Zeta correction to the technique. This underutilized technique can provide powerful constraints on studies of timing in diverse geologic environments.

  19. tkLayout: a design tool for innovative silicon tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, G.

    2014-03-01

    A new CMS tracker is scheduled to become operational for the LHC Phase 2 upgrade in the early 2020's. tkLayout is a software package developed to create 3d models for the design of the CMS tracker and to evaluate its fundamental performance figures. The new tracker will have to cope with much higher luminosity conditions, resulting in increased track density, harsher radiation exposure and, especially, much higher data acquisition bandwidth, such that equipping the tracker with triggering capabilities is envisaged. The design of an innovative detector involves deciding on an architecture offering the best trade-off among many figures of merit, such as tracking resolution, power dissipation, bandwidth, cost and so on. Quantitatively evaluating these figures of merit as early as possible in the design phase is of capital importance and it is best done with the aid of software models. tkLayout is a flexible modeling tool: new performance estimates and support for different detector geometries can be quickly added, thanks to its modular structure. Besides, the software executes very quickly (about two minutes), so that many possible architectural variations can be rapidly modeled and compared, to help in the choice of a viable detector layout and then to optimize it. A tracker geometry is generated from simple configuration files, defining the module types, layout and materials. Support structures are automatically added and services routed to provide a realistic tracker description. The tracker geometries thus generated can be exported to the standard CMS simulation framework (CMSSW) for full Monte Carlo studies. tkLayout has proven essential in giving guidance to CMS in studying different detector layouts and exploring the feasibility of innovative solutions for tracking detectors, in terms of design, performance and projected costs. This tool has been one of the keys to making important design decisions for over five years now and has also enabled project engineers

  20. Fission track evidence for widespread early to Middle miocene extension in the northern Basin and Range province

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, T.; Miller, E.; Savage, C. . Geological Dept.); Gans, P. . Geological Science Dept.); Brown, R. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The northern Basin and Range province has experienced multiple periods of extension but the precise timing and relative importance of the various periods is poorly known. Geologic data in many areas suggest inception of extension was closely tied with the southward sweep in earliest magmatism, which is Eocene in southern Idaho, Oligocene in east-central Nevada, and Miocene in southern Nevada. Ar/Ar ages suggest that extension continued into the Early Miocene in areas such as the Raft River, Albion, Ruby, and Snake Range metamorphic core complexes. Youthful topography and recent faulting have been taken as indicating that faulting leading to present physiography is commonly younger than [approximately]10 Ma. New apatite fission track cooling age and track length data, supplemented by other information, point to the Early to Middle Miocene as an additional time of very significant extension-induced uplift and range formation. Many ranges in a 700-km-long north-south corridor from the Utah-Nevada-Idaho border to southernmost Nevada experience extension and major exhumation in Early to Middle Miocene time. Whether extension of Early to Middle Miocene age is restricted to this corridor or is more widespread is unclear due to the paucity of similar data to the east and west. Reconnaissance apatite ages from the Toiyabe Range and environs (NV) are [approximately]15 Ma and geologic data indicate Early to Middle Miocene extension at Yerington NV (Proffet and Dillis, 1984). Thus, it appears from the available data that the Early to Middle Miocene was an important, and previously little recognized, period of major extension over broad areas of the northern Basin and Range.

  1. Apatite fission-track evidence of widespread Eocene heating and exhumation in the Yukon-Tanana Upland, interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Murphy, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    We present an apatite fission-track (AFT) study of five plutonic rocks and seven metamorphic rocks across 310 km of the Yukon-Tanana Upland in east-central Alaska. Samples yielding ???40 Ma AFT ages and mean confined track lengths > 14 ??m with low standard deviations cooled rapidly from >120??C to 40 Ma suggest partial annealing and, therefore, lower maximum temperatures (???90-105??C). A few samples with single-grain ages of ???20 Ma apparently remained above ???50??C after initial cooling. Although the present geothermal gradient in the western Yukon-Tanana Upland is ???32??C/km, it could have been as high as 45??C/km during a widespread Eocene intraplate magmatic episode. Prior to rapid exhumation, samples with ???40 Ma AFT ages were >3.8-2.7 km deep and samples with >50 Ma AFT ages were >3.3-2.0 km deep. We calculate a 440-320 m/Ma minimum rate for exhumation of all samples during rapid cooling. Our AFT data, and data from rocks north of Fairbanks and from the Eielson deep test hole, indicate up to 3 km of post-40 Ma vertical displacement along known and inferred northeast-trending high-angle faults. The predominance of 40-50 Ma AFT ages throughout the Yukon-Tanana Upland indicates that, prior to the post-40 Ma relative uplift along some northeast-trending faults, rapid regional cooling and exhumation closely followed the Eocene extensional magmatism. We propose that Eocene magmatism and exhumation were somehow related to plate movements that produced regional-scale oroclinal rotation, northward translation of outboard terranes, major dextral strike-slip faulting, and subduction of an oceanic spreading ridge along the southern margin of Alaska.

  2. Wireless data transfer with mm-waves for future tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelikan, D.; Bingefors, N.; Brenner, R.; Dancila, D.; Gustafsson, L.

    2014-11-01

    Wireless data transfer has revolutionized the consumer market for the last decade generating many products equipped with transmitters and receivers for wireless data transfer. Wireless technology opens attractive possibilities for data transfer in future tracking detectors. The reduction of wires and connectors for data links is certainly beneficial both for the material budget and the reliability of the system. An advantage of wireless data transfer is the freedom of routing signals which today is particularly complicated when bringing the data the first 50 cm out of the tracker. With wireless links intelligence can be built into a tracker by introducing communication between tracking layers within a region of interest which would allow the construction of track primitives in real time. The wireless technology used in consumer products is however not suitable for tracker readouts. The low data transfer capacity of current 5 GHz transceivers and the relatively large feature sizes of the components is a disadvantage.Due to the requirement of high data rates in tracking detectors high bandwidth is required. The frequency band around 60 GHz turns out to be a very promising candidate for data transfer in a detector system. The high baseband frequency allows for data transfer in the order of several Gbit/s. Due to the small wavelength in the mm range only small structures are needed for the transmitting and receiving electronics. The 60 GHz frequency band is a strong candidate for future WLAN applications hence components are already starting to be available on the market.Patch antennas produced on flexible Printed Circuit Board substrate that can be used for wireless communication in future trackers are presented in this article. The antennas can be connected to transceivers for data transmission/reception or be connected by wave-guides to structures capable of bringing the 60 GHz signal behind boundaries. Results on simulation and fabrication of these antennas are

  3. Exhumation history of the NW Indian Himalaya revealed by fission track and 40Ar/39Ar ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlup, M.; Steck, A.; Carter, A.; Cosca, M.; Epard, J.-L.; Hunziker, J.

    2011-01-01

    New fission track and Ar/Ar geochronological data provide time constraints on the exhumation history of the Himalayan nappes in the Mandi (Beas valley) - Tso Morari transect of the NW Indian Himalaya. Results from this and previous studies suggest that the SW-directed North Himalayan nappes were emplaced by detachment from the underthrusted upper Indian crust by 55. Ma and metamorphosed by ca. 48-40. Ma. The nappe stack was subsequently exhumed to shallow upper crustal depths (<10. km) by 40-30. Ma in the Tso Morari dome (northern section of the transect) and by 30-20. Ma close to frontal thrusts in the Baralacha La region. From the Oligocene to the present, exhumation continued slowly.Metamorphism started in the High Himalayan nappe prior to the Late Oligocene. High temperatures and anatexis of the subducting upper Indian crust engendered the buoyancy-driven ductile detachment and extrusion of the High Himalayan nappe in the zone of continental collision. Late extrusion of the High Himalayan nappe started about 26. Ma ago, accompanied by ductile extensional shearing in the Zanskar shear zone in its roof between 22 and 19. Ma concomitant with thrusting along the basal Main Central Thrust to the south. The northern part of the nappe was then rapidly exhumed to shallow depth (<10. km) between 20 and 6. Ma, while its southern front reached this depth at 10-5. Ma. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Thermal and tectonic history of selected Taranaki basin (New Zealand) wells assessed by apatite fission track analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kamp, P.J.J. ); Green, P.F. )

    1990-09-01

    Apatite fission track analysis (AFTA) has been applied to samples from four hydrocarbon well sections to study the thermal and tectonic history and the hydrocarbon prospectivity of the southern part of the Taranaki basin (New Zealand). Data from three of the wells (1 Fresne, 1 North Tasman, 1 Surville) show that the successions were exposed to higher temperatures in the past through deeper burial. Cooling from elevated paleotemperatures was effected by late Miocene uplift and erosion of 3.0 {plus minus} 0.3 km of section in 1 Fresne, {le} 2.0 {plus minus} 0.5 km in 1 Surville, and 1.0 {plus minus} 0.3 km in 1 North Tasman. In the fourth well, 1 Kupe, formations are currently at their maximum temperatures since deposition. AFTA provides unique constraints on the timing of hydrocarbon generation in relation to trap formation. The proposed source rocks in 1 Fresne passed through the oil formation window (100-150{degree}C) and into the zone of gas production (150-220{degree}C) during the middle Miocene, prior to the formation of potential trapping structures. Those in 1 North Tasman passed into the oil formation zone about the same time, and source rocks in 1 Surville have probably never been heated enough to produce oil. AFTA indicates considerable prospectivity remains in the region of 1 Kupe, where generation would have occurred after trap formation. 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. A thermal history of the Proterozoic East Alligator River Terrain, N.T., Australia: a fission track study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koul, Sohan L.; Wilde, A. R.; Tickoo, Awtar K.

    1988-01-01

    Radiometric data indicate a major thermal event in Proterozoic rocks of the East Alligator River Terrain, at 1870 Ma. These data, together with metamorphic mineral assemblages, demonstrate peak temperatures in excess of 600 ° C, close to the melting temperature of more deeply buried rocks. A cooling rate following peak metamorphism of 3°C/Ma is suggested. Fission-track dates of peak metamorphic phases, however, reveal a thermal event (or events), after 1650 Ma, rather than the peak metamorphic event. This rise in temperature was the result of thermal blanketing of the metamorphic basement by Carpentarian sediments and anomalous radiogenic heat flow from underlying granitoid gneiss. The temperatures so generated (≥ 175 ° C) were insufficient to reset Rb-Sr and K-Ar systems, but are clearly in excess of F.T. annealing temperatures for all the phases investigated. A cooling history, extending over 1000 m.y. and reflecting gradual erosion of the sedimentary cover, is revealed. This history is consistent with the extraordinary tectonic stability of the region. The importance of F.T. studies in establishing a thermal history is underscored, particularly when maximum temperatures experienced were less than those required to reset Rb-Sr and K-Ar systems.

  6. Fission track thermochronologic constraints on the timing and nature of major Middle Tertiary extension, Ruby Mountains - East Humboldt Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dokka, R.K.; Mahaffie, M.J.; Snoke, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    Fission Track (FT) apatite, zircon, and sphene ages were determined from both mylonitic and non-mylonitic rocks of the Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range metamorphic core complex. The analyzed sample suite included various mylonitic orthogneisses as well as amphibolitic orthogneisses from the non-mylonitic infrastructural core. Porphyritic biotite granodiorite of the Oligocene Harrison Pass pluton was also dated. FT ages are concordant and range in age from 27 - 24 Ma. These dates reflect rapid cooling of the lower plate from temperatures above 250/sup 0/C to below 100/sup 0/C during the early Miocene. The general concordance of the FT dates with /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar biotite and hornblende plateau ages from the same sample suite suggest an even more pronounced cooling history. This rapid cooling history is considered to reflect large-scale tectonic denudation (intracrustal thinning), a manifestation of intense crustal extension. Mylonitic rocks that originally formed along ductile shear zones in the middle crust (10-15 km) were quickly brought near the surface and juxtaposed against brittly distended rocks deformed under upper crustal conditions. FT data firmly establish the upper age limit on the timing of mylonitization during the shear zone deformation. This rapid cooling interval also coincides with the inferred age of extensive landscape disruption and the development of an alluvial fan-lacustrine system which included the periodic emplacement of landslide deposits (megabreccias).

  7. Examining Signal Decomposition in Ge Tracking Detectors through Source-Based Coincidence Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromaz, M.; Campbell, C. M.; Clark, R. M.; Crawford, H. L.; Fallon, P.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Wiens, A.; Riley, L.; Taniuchi, R.

    2016-03-01

    The performance of a gamma-ray tracking detector, such as those used in the GRETINA spectrometer, is dependent on its ability to accurately locate multiple interaction points in the Ge crystal. Interactions are located by observing both net and induced charge as a function of time on the detector's segmented contact. As multiple interactions are likely, linear combinations of basis signals, a set of simulated signals with unit charge deposited on a grid that spans the detector volume, are fit against the observed signal yielding the interaction positions. While the location of the primary interaction point was found to be good (σpos <= 2 mm) the location of secondary, lower energy interactions appear less reliable. To investigate this issue, we carried out a series of source-based coincidence measurements. These employed a collimated source and a secondary detector by which we could select single interaction events. Given these events originate from known positions, we can take them in combination to directly test the efficacy of the signal decomposition procedure. We will present a description of the method and preliminary results with a GRETINA quad detector. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CHI1231.

  8. Fission track analysis of apatites from São Francisco craton and Mesozoic alcaline-carbonatite complexes from central and southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, G.; Born, H.; Hadler, J. C. N.; Iunes, P. J.; Kawashita, K.; Machado, D. L.; Oliveira, E. P.; Paulo, S. R.; Tello, C. A. S.

    1997-07-01

    Thermal histories on seven Brazilian apatites were obtained by fission track analysis using Monte Carlo simulations. The apatites were collected from two distinct geotectonic provinces. One group, originated from São Francisco craton, represents a typical cratonic domain with Proterozoic and Eopaleozoic rocks and yielded Permo-Triassic ages (counted since the instant when temperature was low enough so that the damage produced by fission tracks in apatite started to be preserved). The common thermal history accepted by all samples of this group is a linear cooling from ~90 to ~25 °C for the last 240 Ma, in agreement with present day thermal gradient and denudation rates. The other group, from Mesozoic alkaline-carbonatite complexes, in central and southeastern Brazil, yielded Cretaceous ages, close to those of the intrusions. For the samples of central Brazil, fission track analysis suggests a slow cooling from ~95 ° to ~85 °C between 90 and 60 Ma ago, followed by a faster cooling from ~85 ° to ~27 °C for the last 60 Ma. Otherwise, two trends exist for the samples of southeastern Brazil. The primary one is an increase in temperature from ~75 ° to ~95 °C, which occurred between 140 and 60 Ma ago. In this period, there is also another trend: a cooling from ~100 ° to ~80 °C. However, both trends are followed by a common thermal history during the last 60 Ma: a cooling from approximately ~80 ° to ~25 °C.

  9. Phanerozoic polycyclic evolution of the southwestern Angola margin: New insights for apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venancio da Silva, Bruno; Hackspacher, Peter; Carina Siqueira Ribeiro, Marli; Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton

    2016-04-01

    The low-temperature thermochronology has been an important tool to quantify geological process in passive continental margins. In this context, the Angolan margin shows evidence of a polycyclic post-rift evolution marked by different events of uplift, basin inversion and changes in sedimentation rates to the marginal basins, which have controlled the salt tectonics and the hydrocarbon deposits (1,2,3,4). To understand the post break-up evolution of the southwestern Angola margin, it were collected outcrop samples for apatite fission track (AFT) and (U-Th)/He analysis ranging in elevation from 79 m to 1675 m from the coast toward the interior plateau in a profile between Namibe and Lubango cities. The area lies on the edge of Central and Southern Atlantic segments a few kilometers northward the Walvis ridge and encompasses the Archean and Proterozoic basement rocks of the Congo craton. The AFT ages ranging from 120.6 ± 8.9 Ma to 328.8 ± 28.5 Ma and they show a trend of increasing age toward the Great Escarpment with some exceptions. The partial mean track lengths (MTLs) vary between 11.77 ± 1.82 μm to 12.34 ± 1.13 μm with unimodal track length distributions (TDLs). The partial (U-Th)/He ages ranging from 104.85 ± 3.15 Ma to 146.95 ± 4.41 Ma and show the same trend of increasing ages landward, little younger than the AFT ages, which could be interpreted as a fast exhumation episode in Late Jurassic - Early Cretaceous times. The thermal histories modelling has been constrained with the kinetic parameters Dpar (5) and c-axis angle (6) by the software Hefty (7). Both AFT and (U-Th)/He thermal histories modelling indicate three episodes of denudation/uplift driven cooling: (a) from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, (b) a smallest one in the Late Cretaceous and (c) from Oligocene-Miocene to recent, which are compatible with geophysical data of the offshore Namibe basin that estimate the greater thickness of sediments formed in the first and third episodes

  10. Thermochronologic evaluation of the Arabia-Anatolia collision: new results from Apatite (U-Th)He and Fission Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Côme; Thomson, Stuart N.; Reiners, Peter W.; Whitney, Donna L.; Teyssier, Christian

    2015-04-01

    To better understand the driving mechanisms behind the transition from collision to escape in a convergent plate tectonic setting, multiple low-temperature thermochronometers were used from the Arabia-Anatolia collisional belt. Within the accreted terranes of the Anatolian plate, Late Cretaceous and Eocene metamorphic and intrusive rocks were targeted to track regional and/or local exhumation patterns that may have occurred since collision initiated ~35-20 Ma. Forty-eight samples were collected in a ~200 km wide swath from the main Arabia-Anatolia suture, along and across three major fault zones: the East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ), the Sürgü Fault, and the Central Anatolian Fault Zone (CAFZ). We report here both Apatite (U-Th)He (AHe) and Apatite Fission Track (AFT) analyses performed on the same samples. (1) From the EAFZ, two ~1200 m high vertical transects were sampled north and south of the main fault strand within the low-grade metamorphic rocks of the Pütürge Massif. Although a majority of apatite grains had extremely low uranium contents preventing acquisition of meaningful AHe ages, results from the few uranium-rich samples indicate ages ranging from 14 to 9 Ma in the northern flank of the EAFZ while the southern flank recorded younger exhumation around 5-3 Ma suggesting differential vertical displacement along the fault since ~10 Ma. In contrast, Zircon (U-Th)He results from both sides of the fault show comparable ages around 25-18 Ma. (2) Exposed in the vicinity of the dextral Sürgü Fault, Eocene granitic bodies from the Berit Mountains were sampled within 5 km south of the fault and over 500 m elevation. AHe results yield ages between 27 and 14 Ma. (3) Along the Ecemiş segment of the CAFZ, the Late Cretaceous Niğde metamorphic complex and its deformed Paleocene-Eocene sedimentary cover show AFT and AHe ages confined between 20 and 15 Ma implying fast cooling and exhumation at this time. Further south, the Eocene Horoz pluton that intruded the