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Sample records for fissured formations

  1. SURFACE FISSURE FORMATION ABOVE UNDERGROUND COALSEAM FIRES: DIMENSIONLESS RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SURFACE FISSURES AND SUBSURFACE SUBSIDENCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, T. S.; Pollard, D. D.; Orr, F. M.

    2009-12-01

    Coalbed fires are uncontrolled subsurface fires that occur around the world. These fires are believed to be significant contributors to annual CO2 emissions. Although many of these fires have been burning for decades, researchers have only recently begun to investigate physical mechanisms that control fire behavior. One aspect that is poorly characterized is the relationship between subsurface combustion and surface fissures. At the surface above many fires, long, wide fissures are observed. At a coalbed fire near Durango, Colorado, these fissures form systematic orthogonal patterns that align with regional joints in the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation. Understanding the mechanisms that form and widen these fissures is important, as the fissures are believed to play vital roles in sustaining the combustion in the subsurface by acting as chimneys for the escaping gases and conduits for incoming oxygen. In some of the coalbed fire simulation models available today, these fissures are treated as fixed boundary conditions, but we argue, using field observations and simulation results, that there exists a relationship between the location and magnitude of subsidence caused by the fire and the opening of fissures. Four distinct types of fissures are observed over the coalbed fire near Durango, CO. These fissures are termed ‘molehill’, ‘plateau’, ‘gaping’, and ‘narrow’ based on their surface appearances. Molehill fissures are marked by surface depressions on either side, causing the strata around the opening to form an apex towards the center of the fissure. Plateau fissures show a steep vertical offset on only one side with minimal horizontal displacement. Gaping fissures and narrow fissures are predominantly opening with little evidence for vertical displacements. Gaping fissures are defined as fissures with wide apertures (0.3 ~ 1.5m), while narrow fissures have apertures on the order of centimeters. A boundary element method code was used to show

  2. Giant desiccation fissures filled with calcareous eolian sand, Hermosa Formation (Pennsylvanian), southeastern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, David B.; Haverland, Zsolt E.

    1988-04-01

    At two stratigraphic intervals within the upper member of the Upper Pennsylvanian Hermosa Formation, calcareous eolian sand fills downward-tapering fissures that are as much as 18 cm wide and 5.7 m deep. Fissure fillings define orthogonal polygons 10 m or more in diameter. One of the host beds is primarily composed of subtidally deposited limestone, the other is a thinly laminated, nonmarine red siltstone. Both systems of fissure fillings are directly overlain and underlain by large-scale cross-stratified, calcareous eolianites. The limestone host bed contains chert pseudomorphs after gypsum. Compaction of host rocks contorted fissure fillings and caused doming of eolian strata over each fissure. Platy mineral grains in fissure fillings are aligned subparallel to bedding in the host rocks, supporting the view that the fissures were passively filled rather than forcefully injected. These ancient fissure systems are similar in scale and pattern to those that define giant desiccation polygons in numerous Great Basin playas. The Pennsylvanian fissures, like their Holocene counterparts, probably formed when groundwater tables dropped from shallow levels within fine-grained, impermeable deposits into underlying aquifers, greatly decreasing the extent of the capillary fringe. Our study of the fissures and host rocks supports the hypothesis that carbonate grains within the eolianites were deflated from uncemented marine sediments that were broadly exposed during regressive intervals.

  3. Effect of Local Crystallographic Texture on the Fissure Formation During Charpy Impact Testing of Low-Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Patra, Sudipta; Chatterjee, Arya; Chakrabarti, Debalay

    2016-06-01

    The severity of the formation of fissures (also known as splitting or delamination) on the fracture surface of Charpy impact-tested samples of a low-carbon steel has been found to increase with the decrease in finish rolling temperature [1093 K to 923 K (820 °C to 650 °C)]. Combined scanning electron microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction study revealed that crystallographic texture was the prime factor responsible for the fissure formation. Through-thickness texture band composed of cube [Normal Direction (ND)║<001>] and gamma [ND║<111>] orientations developed during the inter-critical rolling treatment. Strain incompatibility between these two texture bands causes fissure cracking on the main fracture plane. A new approach based on the angle between {001} planes of neighboring crystals has been employed in order to estimate the `effective grain size,' which is used to determine the cleavage fracture stress on different planes of a sample. The severity of fissure formation was found to be directly related to the difference in cleavage fracture stress between the `main fracture plane' and `fissure plane.' Clustering of ferrite grains having cube texture promoted the fissure crack propagation along the transverse `fissure plane,' by increasing the `effective grain size' and decreasing the cleavage fracture stress on that plane.

  4. Anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Amanda M

    2002-12-01

    Anal fissure is a common condition with a characteristic presentation. Despite increased pharmaceutical options in the medical management of anal fissures, surgical therapy is not in danger of becoming obsolete. Lateral internal sphincterotomy remains an attractive option for many patients suffering from this painful condition. PMID:12516855

  5. Anal fissure

    PubMed Central

    Schlichtemeier, Steven; Engel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY An anal fissure is a common, mostly benign, condition that can be acute or chronic. The diagnosis is usually made on history and physical examination, but further investigations are sometimes necessary. Primary fissures are usually benign and located in the posterior or anterior position. Secondary fissures are lateral or multiple and often indicate a more serious underlying pathology. The management of primary anal fissures is generally non-operative and includes increased dietary fibre, sitz baths, topical ointments and botulinum toxin injections. If these treatments are ineffective the patient will need a surgical referral. Secondary anal fissures require further investigation. Multidisciplinary management is preferable and is essential in the case of malignancy. PMID:27041801

  6. Anal fissure

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain interferes with normal bowel movements Petroleum jelly Zinc oxide, 1% hydrocortisone cream, Preparation H, and other ... anal muscle Prescription creams such as nitrates or calcium channel blockers, applied over the fissure to help ...

  7. Anal fissure - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum through which passes stool during defecation. The anal sphincter is a critical mechanism for control of ... Anal fissures are tears in the skin overlying the anal sphincter, usually due to increased tone of ...

  8. Anal fissure - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100154.htm Anal fissure - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... rectum through which passes stool during defecation. The anal sphincter is a critical mechanism for control of ...

  9. Numerical simulation of earth fissures due to groundwater withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, J.; Yu, J.; Gong, X.

    2015-11-01

    Excessive groundwater withdrawal can cause land subsidence and earth fissures. The initiation and propagation of earth fissures are related to tensile failure and crack propagation in soils. Based on fracture mechanics, the crack band model (CBM), one of the smear crack models which is relatively easy to construct and convenient to be integrated into standard finite element codes is used in this paper. The calculated results of CBM are less dependent on the sizes of finite elements. The model was applied to simulate the formation and propagation of earth fissures in the hydrostratigraphic units with a bedrock ridge. The simulated positions and patterns of earth fissures coincide with field observations, suggesting that the modeling approach is adept to simulate the initiation and propagation of earth fissures due to groundwater withdrawal.

  10. Formation of clastogenic lava flows during fissure eruption and scoria cone collapse: the 1986 eruption of Izu-Oshima Volcano, eastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, Janet M.

    The 1986 eruption of B fissure at Izu-Oshima Volcano, Japan, produced, among other products, one andesite and two basaltic andesite lava flows. Locally the three flows resemble vent-effused holocrystalline blocky or aa lava; however, remnant clast outlines can be identified at most localities, indicating that the flows were spatter fed or clastogenic. The basaltic andesite flows are interpreted to have formed by two main processes: (a) reconstitution of fountain-generated spatter around vent areas by syn-depositional agglutination and coalescence, followed by extensional non-particulate flow, and (b) syn-eruptive collapse of a rapidly built spatter and scoria cone by rotational slip and extensional sliding. These processes produced two morphologically distinct lobes in both flows by: (a) earlier non-particulate flow of agglutinate and coalesced spatter, which formed a thin lobe of rubbly aa lava (ca. 5 m thick) with characteristic open extension cracks revealing a homogeneous, holocrystalline interior, and (b) later scoria-cone collapse, which created a larger lobe of irregular thickness (<20 m) made of large detached blocks of scoria cone interpreted to have been rafted along on a flow of coalesced spatter. The source regions of these lava flows are characterized by horseshoe-shaped scarps (<30 m high), with meso-blocks (ca. 30 m in diameter) of bedded scoria at the base. One lava flow has a secondary lateral collapse zone with lower (ca. 7 m) scarps. Backward-tilted meso-blocks are interpreted to be the product of rotational slip, and forward-tilted blocks the result of simple toppling. Squeeze-ups of coalesced spatter along the leading edge of the meso-blocks indicate that coalescence occurred in the basal part of the scoria cone. This low-viscosity, coalesced spatter acted as a lubricating layer along which basal failure of the scoria cone occurred. Rotational sliding gave way to extensional translational sliding as the slide mass spread out onto the present

  11. Study of the deformation mechanism of the Gaoliying ground fissure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, G.; Wang, H.; Luo, Y.; Guo, H.

    2015-11-01

    The Gaoliying ground fissure in Beijing has caused building cracking and road damage, and has seriously influenced city construction. Based on investigations and trenching, the influences of the fault and the variation of groundwater levels on the formation mechanism of the Gaoliying ground fissure were investigated by using FLAC3D. The results indicated that (1) the surface location of Gaoliying fissure is controlled by the underlying normal fault activity, and over pumping further exacerbates development of the ground fissure; (2) when the groundwater level declines, obvious differential settlement occurs at both sides of the ground fissure, in which greater settlement occurs in the vicinity of the hanging wall, the greater the distance from the hanging wall, the smaller the ground subsidence, however smaller ground subsidence occurs in the vicinity of the footwall, the greater the distance from the footwall, the greater the ground subsidence; (3) the vertical velocity of the ground fissure triggered by the fault activity and groundwater decline ranges from 15.5 to 18.3 mm a-1, which is basically in line with the monitoring data. The fault activity contributes about 28-39 %, and the groundwater contributes about 61-72 % to the deformation of the ground fissure, respectively.

  12. Growing Hemorrhagic Choroidal Fissure Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Gelal, Fazıl; Gurkan, Gokhan; Feran, Hamit

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal fissure cysts are often incidentally discovered. They are usually asymptomatic. The authors report a case of growing and hemorrhagic choroidal fissure cyst which was treated surgically. A 22-year-old female presented with headache. Cranial MRI showed a left-sided choroidal fissure cyst. Follow-up MRI showed that the size of the cyst had increased gradually. Twenty months later, the patient was admitted to our emergency department with severe headache. MRI and CT showed an intracystic hematoma. Although such cysts usually have a benign course without symptoms and progression, they may rarely present with intracystic hemorrhage, enlargement of the cyst and increasing symptomatology. PMID:26962426

  13. Shallow Subsurface Structures of Volcanic Fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcheta, C. E.; Nash, J.; Mitchell, K. L.; Parness, A.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic fissure vents are a difficult geologic feature to quantify. They are often too thin to document in detail with seismology or remote geophysical methods. Additionally, lava flows, lava drain back, or collapsed rampart blocks typically conceal a fissure's surface expression. For exposed fissures, quantifying the surface (let along sub0surface) geometric expression can become an overwhelming and time-consuming task given the non-uniform distribution of wall irregularities, drain back textures, and the larger scale sinuosity of the whole fissure system. We developed (and previously presented) VolcanoBot to acquire robust characteristic data of fissure geometries by going inside accessible fissures after an eruption ends and the fissure cools off to <50 C. Data from VolcanoBot documents the fissure conduit geometry with a near-IR structured light sensor, and reproduces the 3d structures to cm-scale accuracy. Here we present a comparison of shallow subsurface structures (<30 m depth) within the Mauna Ulu fissure system and their counterpart features at the vent-to-ground-surface interface. While we have not mapped enough length of the fissure to document sinuosity at depth, we see a self-similar pattern of irregularities on the fissure walls throughout the entire shallow subsurface, implying a fracture mechanical origin similar to faults. These irregularities are, on average, 1 m across and protrude 30 cm into the drained fissure. This is significantly larger than the 10% wall roughness addressed in the engineering literature on fluid dynamics, and implies that magma fluid dynamics during fissure eruptions are probably not as passive nor as simple as previously thought. In some locations, it is possible to match piercing points across the fissure walls, where the dike broke the wall rock in order to propagate upwards, yet in other locations there are erosional cavities, again, implying complex fluid dynamics in the shallow sub-surface during fissure eruptions.

  14. Fluoride release from fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Godoy, F; Abarzua, I; De Goes, M F; Chan, D C

    1997-01-01

    This 30-day study, compared the amounts and patterns of fluoride release from 5 commercially available fluoride-containing pit and fissure sealants: FluroShield, Helioseal-F, Ultraseal XT, Baritone L3, and Teethmate-F; Delton without fluoride, was used as control. Disc-shaped samples of each sealant were immersed in distilled water and the fluoride release was measured periodically until day 30. All the fluoridated sealants tested released measurable fluoride throughout the test period in a similar pattern: the greatest amount of fluoride was released in the first 24 hours after mixing, fell sharply on the second day and decreased slowly for the last days. On day one, Baritone L3 released significantly more fluoride than all other materials. Teethmate-F released the highest amount of fluoride during all the other time intervals from day 2, until day 30. PMID:9643204

  15. Modeling of earth fissures caused by land subsidence due to groundwater withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, B. B.; Rucker, M. L.; Fergason, K. C.

    2015-11-01

    Land subsidence and earth fissures are phenomena related to groundwater withdrawal in a sedimentary basin. If the rock basement or basin lithology is irregular, both vertical and horizontal displacements can be induced due to differential settlement and tensile stresses appearing in the soil mass. If the differential settlement is of sufficient magnitude, earth fissuring can occur within tensile zones. The magnitudes of compaction and fissure geometry are closely related to the thickness and skeletal compressibility of fine-grained sediments within the aquifer system. Land subsidence and earth fissuring were modeled by employing a two-dimensional (2-D) coupled seepage and stress-strain finite element analysis. The basin bedrock geometry, lithological variation, measurements of surface displacements, and changes in hydraulic head were the critical input parameter for the subsidence modeling. Simulation results indicate that strain had exceeded the approximate threshold for fissure formation of 0.02 to 0.06 % in the area of the identified fissures. The numerical model was used to predict future subsidence and potential earth fissures for flood control structures within the metro Phoenix area.

  16. Anorectal conditions: anal fissure and anorectal fistula.

    PubMed

    Fox, Audralan; Tietze, Pamela H; Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan

    2014-04-01

    Anal fissures are linear splits in the anal mucosa. Acute fissures typically resolve within a few weeks; chronic fissures persist longer than 8 to 12 weeks. Most fissures are posterior and midline and are related to constipation or anal trauma. Painful defecation and rectal bleeding are common symptoms. The diagnosis typically is clinical. High-fiber diet, stool softeners, and medicated ointments relieve symptoms and speed healing of acute fissures but offer limited benefit in chronic fissures. Lateral internal sphincterotomy is the surgical management of choice for chronic and refractory acute fissures. Anorectal fistula is an abnormal tract connecting the anorectal mucosa to the exterior skin. Fistulas typically develop after rupture or drainage of a perianal abscess. Fistulas are classified as simple or complex; low or high; and intersphincteric, transsphincteric, suprasphincteric, or extrasphincteric. Inspection of the perianal area identifies the skin opening, and anoscopy visualizes internal openings. The goal of management is to obliterate the tract and openings with negligible sphincter disruption to minimize incontinence. Fistulotomy is effective for simple fistulas; patients with complex fistulas may require fistulectomy. Other procedures that are used include injection of fibrin glue or insertion of a bioprosthetic plug into the fistula opening. PMID:24742084

  17. Narrow Vertical Caves: Mapping Volcanic Fissure Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcheta, C.; Nash, J.; Parness, A.; Mitchell, K. L.; Pavlov, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    Volcanic conduits are difficult to quantify, but their geometry fundamentally influences how eruptions occur. We robotically map old fissure conduits - elongated narrow cracks in the ground that transported magma to the surface during an eruption.

  18. Robust pulmonary lobe segmentation against incomplete fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Suicheng; Zheng, Qingfeng; Siegfried, Jill; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-03-01

    As important anatomical landmarks of the human lung, accurate lobe segmentation may be useful for characterizing specific lung diseases (e.g., inflammatory, granulomatous, and neoplastic diseases). A number of investigations showed that pulmonary fissures were often incomplete in image depiction, thereby leading to the computerized identification of individual lobes a challenging task. Our purpose is to develop a fully automated algorithm for accurate identification of individual lobes regardless of the integrity of pulmonary fissures. The underlying idea of the developed lobe segmentation scheme is to use piecewise planes to approximate the detected fissures. After a rotation and a global smoothing, a number of small planes were fitted using local fissures points. The local surfaces are finally combined for lobe segmentation using a quadratic B-spline weighting strategy to assure that the segmentation is smooth. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed by comparing with a manually created reference standard on a dataset of 30 lung CT examinations. These examinations covered a number of lung diseases and were selected from a large chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) dataset. The results indicate that our scheme of lobe segmentation is efficient and accurate against incomplete fissures.

  19. Outpatient treatment of fissure-in-ano.

    PubMed

    Badejo, O A

    1984-12-01

    A review of 86 cases of fissure-in-ano as seen in Ife is presented. The method of management is described and compared with other conservative methods of treatment. The results show a complete healing of the condition within two weeks as compared with four to six weeks recorded in other series. Healing was confirmed by a complete resolution of symptoms together with re-epithelisation of the fissure on inspection at proctoscopy. It is suggested that the described surgical management is simple, fast, cost reducing and time saving in the treatment of fissure-in-ano. It is further envisaged that this procedure may also serve as a means of relief to our already congested hospitals. PMID:6528355

  20. Effect of surface fissure on apparent resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailhac, P.; Gance, J.; Malet, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fissures are features of interest, prone to create preferential flow path, modifying locally the soil hydrogeological behavior. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is a suitable tool to monitor such preferential flow path. However, this technique is not efficient in the presence of surface fissure, due to a bad resistivity recovering around the fissure vicinity during the inversion process. Therefore, we propose a description of fissure effect on raw apparent resistivity on three resistivity arrays. The purposes of the study are multiple. First, we aim at making ERT users aware of surface fissure effect, and propose a first help to interpret basically resistivity pseudo sections. Second, we propose to ERT users to automatically conduct a surface fissure survey on the studied profile, in order to consider each fissure in a forward DC model and to suppress their effect. Finally, this study is only a first step toward 2D fissure shape inversion, and time-lapse monitoring of fissure drying and filling. In this study, we create a fissure model based on different geomorphological descriptors. After describing the FEM-DC forward modeling strategy, we investigate the fissure effect on pseudo section of apparent resistivity for a Wenner-Schlumberger (WS), a dipole-dipole (DD) and a gradient (GRAD) array. We determine a fissure detectability threshold for each array and perform a sensitivity analysis on the different fissure parameters (position, width, depth, dip angles...). The crack filling or drying effect is also investigated. The possibility to remove fissure effect and to propose a first interpretation of time-lapse data is illustrated on real data. This study show again the higher sensitivity of the DD array compared to the GRAD and WS arrays. Not only the maximal amplitude in the pseudo section is higher for the DD array, but also the anomaly pattern created by the fissure is much larger for this acquisition geometry. The minimal depth detectable for the DD

  1. Thoracoscopic sympathetic clamping in a patient with an azygos fissure.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seok Whan; Yoon, Jeong Sub; Jo, Keon Hyeon; Wang, Young Pil; Park, Hyeon Jin

    2005-04-01

    We believe that an azygos fissure may predispose to bleeding during thoracoscopic surgery. An azygos fissure causes important morphologic changes in the superior mediastinum and thereby poses a risk of massive bleeding during thoracoscopic procedures. We report on a successful thoracoscopic procedure conducted in a patient with palmar hyperhidrosis and an azygos fissure and emphasize that the course of the thoracic sympathetic chain runs laterally along the base of the azygos fissure. PMID:15821627

  2. Double-porosity models for a fissured groundwater reservoir with fracture skin.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    Theories of flow to a well in a double-porosity groundwater reservoir are modified to incorporate effects of a thin layer of low-permeability material or fracture skin that may be present at fracture-block interfaces as a result of mineral deposition or alteration. The commonly used theory for flow in double-porosity formations that is based upon the assumption of pseudo-steady state block-to-fissure flow is shown to be a special case of the theory presented in this paper. The latter is based on the assumption of transient block-to-fissure flow with fracture skin.-from Author

  3. Tensions and Fissures: The Politics of Standardised Testing and Accountability in Ontario, 1995-2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Laura Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    While Ontario has received international accolades for its enactment of province-wide standardised testing upon the formation of the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO), a closer look at provincial assessments over a 20-year span reveals successes as well as systemic tensions and fissures. The purpose of this paper is twofold.…

  4. From fissure to fault: A model of fault growth in the Krafla Fissure System, NE Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramham, Emma; Paton, Douglas; Wright, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Current models of fault growth examine the relationship of fault length (L) to vertical displacement (D) where the faults exhibit the classic fault shape of gradually increasing vertical displacement from zero at the fault tips to a maximum displacement (Dmax) at the middle of the fault. These models cannot adequately explain displacement-length observations at the Krafla fissure swarm, in Iceland's northern volcanic zone, where we observe that many of the faults with significant vertical displacements still retain fissure-like features, with no vertical displacement, along portions of their lengths. We have created a high resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Krafla region using airborne LiDAR and measured the displacement/length profiles of 775 faults, with lengths ranging from 10s to 1000s of metres. We have categorised the faults based on the proportion of the profile that was still fissure-like. Fully-developed faults (no fissure-like regions) were further grouped into those with profiles that had a flat-top geometry (i.e. significant proportion of fault length with constant throw), those with a bell-shaped throw profile and those that show regions of fault linkage. We suggest that a fault can most easily accommodate stress by displacing regions that are still fissure-like, and that a fault would be more likely to accommodate stress by linkage once it has reached the maximum displacement for its fault length. Our results demonstrate that there is a pattern of growth from fissure to fault in the Dmax/L ratio of the categorised faults and propose a model for this growth. These data better constrain our understanding of how fissures develop into faults but also provide insights into the discrepancy in D/L profiles from a typical bell-shaped distribution.

  5. Influence of matrix diffusion and exchange reactions on radiocarbon ages in fissured carbonate aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Maloszewski, P. ); Zuber, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The parallel fissure model coupled with the equation of diffusion into the matrix and with exchange reaction equations has been used to derive a simple formula for estimating the influence of matrix porosity and reaction parameters on the determination of radiocarbon ages in fissured carbonate rocks. Examples of evidently too great radiocarbon ages in carbonate formations, which are not explainable by models for the initial {sup 14}C corrections, can easily be explained by this formula. Parameters obtained for a chalk formation from a known multitracer experiment combined with a pumping test suggest a possibility of {sup 14}C ages more than three orders of magnitude greater than the ages which would be observed if the radiocarbon transport took place only in the mobile water in the fissures. It is shown that contrary to the solute movement on a small scale and with a variable input, the large-scale movement, characteristic for the {sup 14}C dating, does not necessarily require the knowledge of kinetic parameters, because they may be replaced by the distribution coefficient. Discordant tritium and {sup 14}C concentrations are commonly interpreted as a proof of mixing either in the aquifer or at the discharge site. For fissured carbonate formations, however, an alternative explanation is given by the derived model showing a considerable delay of {sup 14}C with respect to nonsorbable tracers.

  6. Anatomy and approaches along the cerebellar-brainstem fissures.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ken; Yagmurlu, Kaan; Kohno, Michihiro; Rhoton, Albert L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Fissure dissection is routinely used in the supratentorial region to access deeply situated pathology while minimizing division of neural tissue. Use of fissure dissection is also practical in the posterior fossa. In this study, the microsurgical anatomy of the 3 cerebellar-brainstem fissures (cerebellomesencephalic, cerebellopontine, and cerebellomedullary) and the various procedures exposing these fissures in brainstem surgery were examined. METHODS Seven cadaveric heads were examined with a microsurgical technique and 3 with fiber dissection to clarify the anatomy of the cerebellar-brainstem and adjacent cerebellar fissures, in which the major vessels and neural structures are located. Several approaches directed along the cerebellar surfaces and fissures, including the supracerebellar infratentorial, occipital transtentorial, retrosigmoid, and midline suboccipital approaches, were examined. The 3 heads examined using fiber dissection defined the anatomy of the cerebellar peduncles coursing in the depths of these fissures. RESULTS Dissections directed along the cerebellar-brainstem and cerebellar fissures provided access to the posterior and posterolateral midbrain and upper pons, lateral pons, floor and lateral wall of the fourth ventricle, and dorsal and lateral medulla. CONCLUSIONS Opening the cerebellar-brainstem and adjacent cerebellar fissures provided access to the brainstem surface hidden by the cerebellum, while minimizing division of neural tissue. Most of the major cerebellar arteries, veins, and vital neural structures are located in or near these fissures and can be accessed through them. PMID:26274986

  7. Visualization of three dimensional earth fissures in geological structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Yu, J.; Liu, Y.; Gong, H.; Chen, Y.; Chen, B.

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a new method for visualizing the earth fissures of geological structure in three dimensional (3-D) domains on the basis of the seismic data and features information of earth fissures. The seismic data were interpreted for obtaining the stratagraphic data with various lithological information and the depth of the earth fissures. The spatial distribution of the ground fissures including the dip, strike and width were digitalized on an ArcGIS platform. Firstly, the 3-D geological structure was rebuilt using the Generalized Tri-Prism (GTP) method which is a real solid method for displaying geological structures. The GTP method can reflect the inner material of the strata and can simulate complicated geological structures such as faults and stratagraphic pinch outs. The upper and lower surfaces of each stratum consist of Triangle Irregular Networks (TIN). The inner solid between the two surfaces are a series of triangular prisms. Secondly, since the width of the ground fissure gradually decreases with depth, multiple edge lines of the earth fissures on the bottom stratum surface are deduced on the basis of the fissure characteristics. Then, the model of the earth fissures consisting of a series of triangular pyramids can be constructed using these points and the edge lines. A cutting operation was carried out on the 3-D geological structure using this ground fissures model. If the surfaces of the ground fissures model intersects with the GTPs in the geological structure model, new GTPs were generated within the local regions. During this process, the topological relations between TIN, triangular prism and lines were reconstructed so that the visualization of ground fissures in the geological structure model is realized. This method can facilitate the mechanism for studying fissures and avoid the gaps between the fissure solid and the geological structure to accurately reflect their 3-D characteristics.

  8. [Fissures in biliary calculi. Personal contribution (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nano, M; Potenzoni, F; Camandona, M; Casalegno, P A

    1979-04-01

    In a series of 70 patients suffering from biliary lithiasis, the roentgenologic findings of fissures in the calculi was observed in 5 cases examined by means of cholecystography and in 7 cases who underwent cholangiocholecystography. Fissures were demonstrated 11 times in calculi after surgery. The "Mercedes-Benz" sign was never observed at the abdominal examination without contrast medium. The presence of fissures may be an additional sign in the radiologic diagnosis of biliary calculi, but its value is not determinant. PMID:550199

  9. [Sylvius (1614-1672) and his fissure].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2010-01-01

    Franciscus dele Boë, or Sylvius, was born into a family of French Huguenots who had moved to the province of Hessen. He studied medicine in Sedan, Leiden and Basle. He was a private teacher in anatomy in Leiden for some years, and while teaching he drew the attention of his students to the long fissure on either side of the cerebral surface. He practised successfully as a physician in Amsterdam from 1641 onwards, until he was recalled to the chair of medicine in Leiden in 1658. He emphasized the role of chemical processes in the human body (iatrochemistry). PMID:20699035

  10. Corrections of surface fissure effect on apparent resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gance, J.; Sailhac, P.; Malet, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a useful tool to detect and track water flow paths in the subsoil. However, measurements are strongly affected by subsurface heterogeneities such as fissures of different sizes and genesis (shrinking-swelling, macropores and deformation). In this work, we focus on surface fissures characterized by dimensions lower than the interelectrode spacing and correct their effect on apparent resistivity pseudo-sections by incorporating fissure geometry in the topography. We show that fissures with depths greater than 0.10 times the interelectrode spacing for a dipole-dipole array and equal to 0.16 for the gradient array and the Wenner-Schlumberger arrays create significant anomalies (greater than 5 per cent) in the pseudo-section. Surface fissure widths and dip angles have little effect with respect to the fissure depths which can increase the apparent resistivity up to 200 per cent. The clogging of the fissures with water or soil material decreases the anomaly effect linearly with the percentage of filling. The correction of apparent resistivity values is possible for relatively simple fissure geometries and only requires a manual survey of the surface fissures. It allows to improve the quality of the inverted resistivity section by mitigating the inversion artefacts and therefore a better interpretation.

  11. A Geophysical Study of Fissures in Pahrump, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, A. C.; McEwan, M. J.; Howley, R. A.; Mehling, J. B.; Snelson, C. M.; Drohan, P.

    2004-12-01

    Earth fissures are surface expressions of deep fracturing subsidence systems caused by groundwater withdrawl greater than aquifer recharge. This type of subsidence is most common in arid environments of the south western U.S. such as, Las Vegas, NV, Phoenix, AZ, and areas in New Mexico. In addition, fissures have recently been identified in the Pahrump Valley in southwestern Nevada just west of Las Vegas. The city of Pahrump has experienced an increase in population and economic growth. This growth has lead to a higher demand in the use of the areas natural resources. One major concern is groundwater pumping and over-watering of the land surface. Pahrump has experienced significant differential subsidence within the valley causing significant structural damage to infrastructure. This differential subsidence is most readily identified by its surface expression as fissures. Earth fissures are not only shallow surface features but can be 10's of meters deep and 100's of meters long. These ground failures can be exacerbated by faults at depth, shallow bedrock, and/or differential compaction. However, the most significant cause is from groundwater withdrawl. Several geophysical methods were performed on the fissures to better understand their subsurface expression, trend, and ultimately their affect on the city of Pahrump. Seismic refraction, reflection, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and gravity measurements were performed on the fissures and surrounding area including local faults. Our initial studies show the fissures propagating for long distances, in a variety of shapes, and trending in a north-south direction. Initial GPR studies show high fissure reflections at approximately 1 and 1.5 meters along with general slumping features below these reflections. Fissures are an unmitigatable problem. Our results will help identify fissures in the area that do not have a surface expression as well as mapping the current fissures and their extent. These results can be used

  12. Fine Mapping and Introgressing a Fissure Resistance Locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) kernel fissuring is a major concern of both rice producers and millers. Fissures are small cracks in rice kernels that increase breakage among kernels when transported or milled, which decrease the value of processed rice. This study employed molecular gene tagging methods to ...

  13. Pearl in interhemispheric fissure: A rare phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vivek; Vijayan, Abhishek; Velho, Vernon; Mally, Rahul

    2012-10-01

    Epidermoid cysts (Keratin pearls) are benign congenital lesions, found commonly in cerebello-pontine angle, suprasellar cistern, sylvian cistern, pineal region, but they are very rare in interhemispheric fissure. Approaching these lesions are challenging to neurosurgeons because of narrow and deep fissure with surrounding vital structures. The present study constitutes an analysis of interhemispheric epidermoid managed at our hospital in last 10 years (Jan 2001-Dec 2010). Total 187 cases of intracranial epidermoid operated in our institute; eight of them were interhemispheric epidermoid making about 4.27% of all epidermoids. The patients were presented with seizures (50%), headache (37%), and weakness (25%). On examination, the common findings were decreased Mini mental score (MMSE) in 50%, motor deficit in 25%, and decreased visual acuity in 25% of cases. All patients underwent craniotomy across the midline as per the location of the lesions. In seven patients, tumors were resected by interhemispheric approach but in one by transcortical. Lesion were excised with microscope and endoscopic assistance with measures to prevent spillage of epidermoid tissue while excision. Post excision tumor bed was irrigated with hydrocortisone diluted saline. All patients except one improved after surgery and non-developed chemical meningitis. One patient of parietal interhemispheric epidermoid with transcortical approach developed weakness in immediate post-operative period. Patients were followed for average 6.8 year without any recurrence. Interhemispheric epidermoids are rare tumors. Achieving safe complete excision without spillage is surgical goal to prevent chemical meningitis and recurrence. Endoscope assists in achieving complete excision so decrease incidence of chemical meningitis and recurrence. PMID:23559996

  14. King's Bowl Pit Crater, Lava Field and Eruptive Fissure, Idaho - A Multipurpose Volcanic Planetary Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, S. S.; Garry, B.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Sears, D. W. G.; Borg, C.; Elphic, R. C.; Haberle, C. W.; Kobayashi, L.; Lim, D. S. S.; Sears, H.; Skok, J. R.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    King's Bowl (KB) and its associated eruptive fissure and lava field on the eastern Snake River Plain, is being investigated by the NASA SSERVI FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team as a planetary analog to similar pits on the Moon, Mars and Vesta. The 2,220 ± 100 BP basaltic eruption in Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve represents early stages of low shield growth, which was aborted when magma supply was cut off. Compared to mature shields, KB is miniscule, with ~0.02 km3 of lava over ~3 km2, yet the ~6 km long series of fissures, cracks and pits are well-preserved for analog studies of volcanic processes. The termination of eruption was likely related to proximity of the 2,270 ± 50 BP eruption of the much larger Wapi lava field (~5.5 km3 over 325 km2 area) on the same rift. Our investigation extends early work by R. Greeley and colleagues, focusing on imagery, compositional variations, ejecta distribution, dGPS profiles and LiDAR scans of features related to: (1) fissure eruptions - spatter ramparts, cones, feeder dikes, extension cracks; (2) lava lake formation - surface morphology, squeeze-ups, slab pahoehoe lava mounds, lava drain-back, flow lobe overlaps; and (3) phreatic steam blasts - explosion pits, ejecta blankets of ash and blocks. Preliminary results indicate multiple fissure eruptions and growth of a basin-filled lava lake up to ~ 10 m thick with outflow sheet lava flows. Remnant mounds of original lake crust reveal an early high lava lake level, which subsided as much as 5 m as the molten interior drained back into the fissure system. Rapid loss of magma supply led to the collapse of fissure walls allowing groundwater influx that triggered multiple steam blasts along at least 500 m. Early blasts occurred while lake magma pressure was still high enough to produce squeeze-ups when penetrated by ejecta blocks. The King's Bowl pit crater exemplifies processes of a small, but highly energetic

  15. Calcified gallstone fissures: the reversed Mercedes Benz sign.

    PubMed

    Strijk, S P

    1987-01-01

    This article describes the occurrence of an unusual radiating pattern of calcification in the center of large radiolucent gallstones. The radiographic findings are attributed to calcium deposition within the fissures of biliary calculi. PMID:3556975

  16. Differential compaction mechanism for earth fissures near Casa Grande, Arizona.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachens, R.C.; Holzer, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Precise gravity measurements indicate that earth fissures or tension cracks caused by ground-water withdrawal within a 10km2 area SE of Casa Grande are associated with relief on the buried interface between the alluvial aquifer and underlying bedrock. These relations suggest that the fissures are forming in response to localized differential compaction caused by localized variations of aquifer-system thickness. -from Authors

  17. Implications of ground-deformation measurements across earth fissures in subsidence areas in the southwestern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Ground deformation was monitored at earth fissures in areas of land subsidence induced by groundwater extraction in the southwestern United States. The ground deformation is consistent with the mechanism that fissures are caused by horizontal strains generated by bending of overburden in response to localized differential compaction. Subsidence profiles indicated that localized differential subsidence occurred across the fissures and that maximum convex-upward curvature was at the fissure. The overall shape of the profile stayed similar with time, and maximum curvature remained stationary at the fissure. Horizontal displacements were largest near the fissure, and generally were small to negligible away from the fissure. Maximum tensile horizontal strains were at the fissure and coincided with maximum curvature in the subsidence profiles. Horizontal tensile strain continued to accumulate at fissures after they formed with rates of opening ranging from 30 to 120 microstrain/year at fissures in Arizona.

  18. Predominant cultivable microflora of human dental fissure plaque.

    PubMed Central

    Theilade, E; Fejerskov, O; Karring, T; Theilade, J

    1982-01-01

    Plaque developed in 10 occlusal fissures from unerupted third molars during implantation for 200 to 270 days in lower molars of dental students was studied. To characterize the predominant cultivable flora, 592 isolates (51 to 67 from each fissure) were subcultured from anaerobic roll tubes. Twenty-eight of the isolates were lost. Streptococci constituted 8 to 86% (median, 45%) of the isolates, Streptococcus mutans constituted 0 to 86% (median, 25%) and S. sanguis constituted 0 to 15% (median, 1%). A few isolates of "S. mitior" and "S. milleri" were found, but no S. salivarius. Staphylococci made up 0 to 23% (median, 9%). Gram-positive rods constituted 6 to 59% (median, 35%). Of these, 0 to 46% (median, 18%) were Actinomyces naeslundii and A. viscosus, but no anaerobic actinomyces were isolated. Arachnia and propionibacteria made up small proportions, lactobacilli were isolated from two fissures, constituting 10 and 29%, and eubacteria were isolated from one fissure (27%). Gram-negative cocci made up 0 to 46% (media, 4%). Only two isolates of gram-negative rods were found, both facultative anaerobes. Although 8 of the 10 fissures had large proportions of S. mutans, lactobacilli, or both, no caries was found even with microradiography. The large individual variation probably reflects differences in initial colonization from saliva and in growth conditions in each fissure. PMID:7095858

  19. Potential for aquifer compaction, land subsidence, and earth fissures in the Tucson basin, Pima County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    In 1979 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Tucson, began an investigation of aquifer compaction and its effects in the Tucson basin, including the potential hazards of aquifer compaction and subsequent damage to engineered structures, roads, water supply systems, gaslines, and sewage systems. Groundwater is the main source of water for irrigation, public supply, and industry. Pumping has exceeded recharge for several decades, and declines in groundwater levels have occurred in parts of the basin. In places, water level declines have resulted in small amounts of aquifer compaction and land subsidence. Further water level declines in parts of the Tucson basin may result in large amounts of aquifer compaction and land subsidence. Differential land subsidence may, in places, be accompanied by the formation of earth fissures. Aquifer compaction, land subsidence, and earth fissures can damage or affect the functional capability of manmade features. Specifically, aquifer compaction may damage wells, fissures may damage engineered structures, and differential land subsidence may affect structures such as sewers and water-supply systems that are dependent on gravity for their operation. (USGS)

  20. Pulmonary Fissure Integrity and Collateral Ventilation in COPD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiantao; Wang, Zhimin; Gu, Suicheng; Fuhrman, Carl; Leader, Joseph K.; Meng, Xin; Tedrow, John; Sciurba, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether the integrity (completeness) of pulmonary fissures affects pulmonary function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Materials and Methods A dataset consisting of 573 CT exams acquired on different subjects was collected from a COPD study. According to the global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) criteria, these subjects (examinations) were classified into five different subgroups, namely non-COPD (222 subjects), GOLD-I (83 subjects), GOLD-II (141 subjects), GOLD-III (63 subjects), and GOLD-IV (64 subjects), in terms of disease severity. An available computer tool was used to aid in an objective and efficient quantification of fissure integrity. The correlations between fissure integrity, and pulmonary functions (e.g., FEV1, and FEV1/FVC) and COPD severity were assessed using Pearson and Spearman's correlation coefficients, respectively. Results For the five sub-groups ranging from non-COPD to GOLD-IV, the average integrities of the right oblique fissure (ROF) were 81.8%, 82.4%, 81.8%, 82.8%, and 80.2%, respectively; the average integrities of the right horizontal fissure (RHF) were 62.6%, 61.8%, 62.1%, 62.2%, and 62.3%, respectively; the average integrities of the left oblique fissure (LOF) were 82.0%, 83.2%, 81.7%, 82.0%, and 78.4%, respectively; and the average integrities of all fissures in the entire lung were 78.0%, 78.6%, 78.1%, 78.5%, and 76.4%, respectively. Their Pearson correlation coefficients with FEV1 and FE1/FVC range from 0.027 to 0.248 with p values larger than 0.05. Their Spearman correlation coefficients with COPD severity except GOLD-IV range from −0.013 to −0.073 with p values larger than 0.08. Conclusion There is no significant difference in fissure integrity for patients with different levels of disease severity, suggesting that the development of COPD does not change the completeness of pulmonary fissures and incomplete fissures alone may not contribute to the

  1. Open Fissure Folds record coseismic loading and postseismic stress relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüchter, Jens-Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Open Fissure Folds hosted by high pressure/low temperature metamorphic rocks of south Evia (Greece) are introduced, their structural and microstructural record is analysed, and a mechanical model is proposed. Open Fissure Folds are preserved as at least two parallel folded quartz-feldspar veins separated by narrow buckled rock columns. The veins originated as tensile cracks that propagated in the middle crust driven by high differential stress. Features diagnostic for Open Fissure Folds indicate that the rock columns represented the layers of high viscosity, and not the veins as consistently reported in many previous studies on folded veins. This record is taken to indicate that buckling of the rock columns initiated after arrest of the fractures and terminated prior to complete vein sealing. Accordingly, mechanical decoupling by open fissures allowed for buckling of the rock columns in response to episodic creep of the host rocks according to stress relaxation, as expected for postseismic deformation in the earthquake cycle. I propose that the parental fractures propagated in response to quasi-instantaneous coseismic loading of the middle crust. Buckling was attributed to transient postseismic creep and stress relaxation. Complete sealing of the veins occurred when stresses were largely relaxed. Each Open Fissure Fold records the stress and strain history of a single earthquake.

  2. Research on positioning of Xi'an ground fissures with InSAR quality map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li; Zhao, Chao-ying

    2011-02-01

    Xi'an ground fissure is a typical geo-hazard with nearly half a century history, which have been caused serious damages to roads, building and other civil facilities. Based on the theory of deformation de-correlation of the active ground fissures, this manuscript mainly investigated the positioning method of active ground fissures by analyzing the pseudo-coherence map of adaptively filtered differential interferogram. We took two ERS1 SAR data during 1992-1993 as an example to investigate the active fissures position during this period. Consequently, high consistency between newly detected fissures and the ground fissure map from engineering geological investigation can be achieved.

  3. Cost considerations in the treatment of anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Bianco, Giuseppe; Silvestrini, Nicola; Maria, Giorgio

    2014-08-01

    Anal fissure is a split in the lining of the distal anal canal. Lateral internal sphincterotomy remains the gold standard for treatment of anal fissure. Although technique is simple and effective, a drawback of this surgical procedure is its potential to cause minor but some times permanent alteration in rectal continence. Conservative approaches (such as topical application of ointment or botulinum toxin injections) have been proposed in order to treat this condition without any risk of permanent injury of the internal anal sphincter. These treatments are effective in a large number of patients. Furthermore, with the ready availability of medical therapies to induce healing of anal fissure, the risk of a first-line surgical approach is difficult to justify. The conservative treatments have a lower cost than surgery. Moreover, evaluation of the actual costs of each therapeutic option is important especially in times of economic crisis and downsizing of health spending. PMID:24867398

  4. Perioperative Identification of an Accessory Fissure of the Right Lung

    PubMed Central

    Taverne, Yannick; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; de Rooij, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Anatomical variations of lungs are common in clinical practice; however, they are sometimes overlooked in routine imaging. Surgical anatomy of the lung is complex and many variations are known to occur. A defective pulmonary development gives rise to variations in lobes and fissures. Morphological presentation is of clinical importance and profound knowledge of the organogenesis and functional anatomy is imperative for the interpretation and evaluation of lung pathophysiology and subsequent surgical intervention. However, appreciating them on radiographs and CT scans is difficult and they are therefore often either not identified or completely misinterpreted. As presented in this case report, an accessory fissure separating the superior segment of the right lower lobe from its native lobe was seen perioperatively and could only retrospectively be defined on X-rays and CT scan. It is imperative to keep in mind that accessory fissures can be missed on imaging studies and thus can make the surgical procedure more challenging. PMID:26185701

  5. Marginal Microleakage of Conventional Fissure Sealants and Self-Adhering Flowable Composite as Fissure Sealant in Permanent Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Rahimian-Imam, Sara; Fayazi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Application of sealants is a safe and effective way to prevent occlusal caries in the posterior teeth. A successful sealant therapy depends on good isolation. Decreased steps of adhesive application may enable proper isolation and use of self-adhering flowable composites for sealant therapy. This study sought to compare the marginal microleakage of fissure sealants and self-adhering flowable composites in permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: This in vitro, experimental study was conducted on 60 extracted human premolar teeth. The teeth were divided randomly into two groups of 30. In the first group, fissure sealant (Clinpro, 3M ESPE, USA) was placed on the teeth. In the second group, self-adhering flowable composite (Vertise Flow, Kerr, USA) was applied as the sealant. Then, both groups were immersed in 0.5% fuchsin dye solution for 24 hours. Sectioned samples were observed with a stereomicroscope for the extent of dye penetration. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21 and the Mann-Whitney test (P<0.05). Results: Microleakage in the fissure sealant group was significantly higher than that in the self-adhering flowable composite group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Microleakage was less using self-adhering flowable composite compared to conventional fissure sealant; therefore, self-adhering flowable composite can be used as a suitable fissure sealant in permanent teeth. PMID:26884777

  6. Pit and fissure sealant: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    For this literature review of pit and fissure sealant, 1,465 references were selected by a search for "sealants" on PubMed. References were limited to dental journals and papers in the English language. The search comprised papers from 1971 to October 2001. Additional papers of historical significance prior to 1971 were added from memory and from reference lists published in early papers. This paper reviewed the literature on pit and fissure sealants under the following subheadings: (1) laboratory studies, (2) clinical technique and tooth preparation, (3) etching time, (4) auxiliary application of pit and fissure sealant, (5) retention and caries prevention, (6) fluoride used with sealants and fluoride-containing sealant, (7) glass ionomer materials as sealants, (8) options in sealant: filled vs unfilled; colored vs clear; autocure vs light-initiated, (9) sealant placed over caries in a therapeutic manner, (10) cost effectiveness of sealant application, (11) underuse of pit and fissure sealant, (12) the estrogenicity issue, (13) use of an intermediate bonding layer to improve retention, (14) new developments and projections, and (15) summary and conclusions. From a careful and thorough review of peer-reviewed publications on pit and fissure sealant, it is clear that sealants are safe, effective and underused (at least underused in the United States). Pit and fissure sealant is best applied to high-risk populations by trained auxiliaries using sealant that incorporates the benefit of an intermediate bonding layer, applied under the rubber dam or with some alternative short-term, but effective, isolation technique, onto an enamel surface that has been cleaned with an air polishing technique and etched with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. The dental profession awaits with enthusiasm, and some impatience, the incorporation of dentin-bonding technology into the development of a modern, more durable, resin-based sealant. PMID:12412954

  7. An opening magmatic fissure: structural pattern of its termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenin, Egor A.; Kozhurin, Andrey I.; Pinegina, Tatiana K.; Mikhaylyukova, Polina G.

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic zones of Kamchatka bear two types of active faults and fractures. Faults of the first type are tectonic, so they are long-living with net offset growing with time by repeating movement. Faults of the second type could be termed volcano-tectonic as they couple with or are caused by eruptions and thus move just once. Authors have explored and described a NE-SW-striking fissure on the SW side of Gorely plateau in the South Kamchatka volcanic zone, which conducted magma 200 years ago (Selyangin, Ponomareva, 1999). The fissure depression is filled with basaltic-andesite lava. The 900 meters long southern terminus of the fissure is situated on the hill slope and therefore not overlapped with lava. The fissure ending is an asymmetric graben, deeper at its west side, up to 300 m wide and bounded by two nearly parallel normal faults. The graben floor is gradually deepening to the north, away from the terminus, down to 9-10 m. Bounding faults are perfectly expressed in topography, thus providing a rare opportunity for determination of fissure parameters. Both faults dip at 80-85°, that gives approximately up to 3 m of perpendicular extension and the same thickness of the dyke beneath. Vertical movements on the western and eastern bounding faults were accompanied by horizontal components, left-lateral and right-lateral, respectively. There are also several transverse north-facing scarps breaking the graben floor and not extending beyond its limits. The observed deformations altogether suggests simultaneous sinking of the graben floor and northward compensating movement of masses into the graben. Tectonic landforms we studied illustrate how strain could be compensated at the end of an opening fissure and provide some insight into similar settings at a regional and even global scale.

  8. Engineering a robotic approach to mapping exposed volcanic fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcheta, C. E.; Parness, A.; Mitchell, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Field geology provides a framework for advanced computer models and theoretical calculations of volcanic systems. Some field terrains, though, are poorly preserved or accessible, making documentation, quantification, and investigation impossible. Over 200 volcanologists at the 2012 Kona Chapman Conference on volcanology agreed that and important step forward in the field over the next 100 years should address the realistic size and shape of volcanic conduits. The 1969 Mauna Ulu eruption of Kīlauea provides a unique opportunity to document volcanic fissure conduits, thus, we have an ideal location to begin addressing this topic and provide data on these geometries. Exposed fissures can be mapped with robotics using machine vision. In order to test the hypothesis that fissures have irregularities with depth that will influence their fluid dynamical behavior, we must first map the fissure vents and shallow conduit to deci- or centimeter scale. We have designed, constructed, and field-tested the first version of a robotic device that will image an exposed volcanic fissure in three dimensions. The design phase included three steps: 1) create the payload harness and protective shell to prevent damage to the electronics and robot, 2) construct a circuit board to have the electronics communicate with a surface-based computer, and 3) prototype wheel shapes that can handle a variety of volcanic rock textures. The robot's mechanical parts were built using 3d printing, milling, casting and laser cutting techniques, and the electronics were assembled from off the shelf components. The testing phase took place at Mauna Ulu, Kīlauea, Hawai'i, from May 5 - 9, 2014. Many valuable design lessons were learned during the week, and the first ever 3D map from inside a volcanic fissure were successfully collected. Three vents had between 25% and 95% of their internal surfaces imaged. A fourth location, a non-eruptive crack (possibly a fault line) had two transects imaging the textures

  9. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    D'Ugo, S; Stasi, E; Gaspari, A L; Sileri, P

    2015-12-01

    Perianal disease is a common complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It includes different conditions from more severe and potentially disabling ones, such as abscesses and fistulas, to more benign conditions such as hemorrhoids, skin tags and fissures. Most literature has been focused on anal sepsis and fistulae, as they carry the majority of disease burden and often alter the natural course of the disease. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with IBD have been overlooked, although they can represent a challenging problem. The management of hemorrhoids and fissures in IBD patients may be difficult and may significantly differ compared to the non-affected population. Historically surgery was firmly obstructed, and hemorrhoidectomy or sphincterotomy in patients with associated diagnosis of IBD was considered harmful, although literature data is scant and based on small series. Various authors reported an incidence of postoperative complications higher in IBD than in the general populations, with potential severe events. Considering that a spontaneous healing is possible, the first line management should be a medical therapy. In patients non-responding to conservative measures it is possible a judicious choice of surgical options on a highly selective basis; this can lead to acceptable results, but the risk of possible complications needs to be considered. In this review it is analyzed the current literature on the incidence, symptoms and treatment options of hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:26446683

  10. Dental Pit and Fissure Sealants: Implications for School Health Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack-Brown, K. R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    To promote good personal hygiene practices in students, school health personnel must be informed about dental pit and fissure sealants and related programs. Adoption and maintenance of such programs may depend on the success of school health personnel in educating administrators and policymakers. (SM)

  11. Selection for fissure resistance now made possible in early breeding generations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice kernel fissuring is one of the leading causes of milling yield losses. Any reduction in fissuring can result in direct increases in yield and profit for both producers and millers. While most U.S. rice varieties yield around 55% head rice, the fissure-resistant varieties ‘Cypress’, ‘Saber’ an...

  12. Numerical modeling of the evolution of two-phase zone under fissured caprock

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Y.; Ishido, T.

    1993-01-28

    A vapor-dominated two-phase zone would be formed in a geothermal reservoir under fissured caprock, if the permeability of the fissure is much smaller than a critical permeability which is estimated by an energy balance. If the permeability of the fissure is large, then the rule of minimum mass input would be applied.

  13. New method opens opportunity to proactively select for fissure resistance in early breeding generations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    WANTED: New rice varieties improved for resistance to kernel fissuring. Rice kernel fissuring is one of the leading causes of reduced milling yield. Any reduction in fissuring can result in direct increases in yield and profit for both producers and millers. While most U.S. rice varieties yield a...

  14. Double-Porosity Models for a Fissured Groundwater Reservoir With Fracture Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Allen F.

    1984-07-01

    Theories of flow to a well in a double-porosity groundwater reservoir are modified to incorporate effects of a thin layer of low-permeability material or fracture skin that may be present at fracture-block interfaces as a result of mineral deposition or alteration. The commonly used theory for flow in double- porosity formations that is based upon the assumption of pseudo-steady state block-to-fissure flow is shown to be a special case of the theory presented in this paper. The latter is based on the assumption of transient block-to-fissure flow with fracture skin. Under conditions where fracture skin has a hydraulic conductivity that is less than that of the matrix rock, it may be assumed to impede the interchange of fluid between the fissures and blocks. Resistance to flow at fracture-block interfaces tends to reduce spatial variation of hydraulic head gradients within the blocks. This provides theoretical justification for neglecting the divergence of flow in the blocks as required by the pseudo-steady state flow model. Coupled boundary value problems for flow to a well discharging at a constant rate were solved in the Laplace domain. Both slab-shaped and sphere-shaped blocks were considered, as were effects of well bore storage and well bore skin. Results obtained by numerical inversion were used to construct dimensionless-type curves that were applied to well test data, for a pumped well and for an observation well, from the fractured volcanic rock terrane of the Nevada Test Site.

  15. A Computational Geometry Approach to Automated Pulmonary Fissure Segmentation in CT Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiantao; Leader, Joseph K; Zheng, Bin; Knollmann, Friedrich; Fuhrman, Carl; Sciurba, Frank C; Gur, David

    2010-01-01

    Identification of pulmonary fissures, which form the boundaries between the lobes in the lungs, may be useful during clinical interpretation of CT examinations to assess the early presence and characterization of manifestation of several lung diseases. Motivated by the unique nature of the surface shape of pulmonary fissures in three-dimensional space, we developed a new automated scheme using computational geometry methods to detect and segment fissures depicted on CT images. After a geometric modeling of the lung volume using the Marching Cube Algorithm, Laplacian smoothing is applied iteratively to enhance pulmonary fissures by depressing non-fissure structures while smoothing the surfaces of lung fissures. Next, an Extended Gaussian Image based procedure is used to locate the fissures in a statistical manner that approximates the fissures using a set of plane “patches.” This approach has several advantages such as independence of anatomic knowledge of the lung structure except the surface shape of fissures, limited sensitivity to other lung structures, and ease of implementation. The scheme performance was evaluated by two experienced thoracic radiologists using a set of 100 images (slices) randomly selected from 10 screening CT examinations. In this preliminary evaluation 98.7% and 94.9% of scheme segmented fissure voxels are within 2 mm of the fissures marked independently by two radiologists in the testing image dataset. Using the scheme detected fissures as reference, 89.4% and 90.1% of manually marked fissure points have distance ≤ 2 mm to the reference suggesting a possible under-segmentation of the scheme. The case-based RMS (root-mean-square) distances (“errors”) between our scheme and the radiologist ranged from 1.48±0.92 to 2.04±3.88 mm. The discrepancy of fissure detection results between the automated scheme and either radiologist is smaller in this dataset than the inter-reader variability. PMID:19272987

  16. The effect of vegetation on infiltration in shallow soils underlain by fissured bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothoff, S. A.; Or, D.; Groeneveld, D. P.; Jones, S. B.

    1999-05-01

    Mean annual infiltration above the high-level waste repository proposed to be sited at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has a large impact on assessments of repository performance. Ongoing investigations of infiltration processes have identified the relatively horizontal caprock environment above portions of the repository as a potentially large source of infiltrating waters, due to shallow, permeable soils above a moderately welded tuff with large soil-filled fissures. The combination of shallow soils and fissured bedrock allows rapid penetration of wetting pulses to below the rooting zone. Plant uptake can strongly reduce net infiltration in arid environments with high water storage capacity, and, despite the low water storage capacity, there is a relatively high vegetation density in this environment. The apparent discrepancy between high vegetation density and low water storage motivates the study of plant-hydrologic interactions in this semiarid environment. Field observations were coupled with plant- and landscape-scale models to provide insight into plant-hydrologic interactions. Several lines of evidence, including: (i) linear plant growth features observed on aerial photographs; (ii) comparisons of plant cover within the fissured environment and comparable environments lacking fissures; and (iii) direct excavations, all suggest that the widely spaced soil-filled fissures are conducive to plant growth even when fissures are buried at soil depths exceeding 30 cm. Results from a mechanistic simulation model for root growth into fissures suggest that the additional (sheltered) plant-available soil water within fissures provides a competitive advantage for plant establishment. Therefore, plants that germinate above a fissure are more likely to survive, in turn developing linear features above fissures. Having established that plants preferentially root within soil-filled fissures in the caprock environment, a set of simulations were performed to examine the hydrologic

  17. Short communication: sclerosing meningioma in the deep sylvian fissure.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Shintaro; Narita, Yoshitaka; Yonezawa, Motoki; Ohno, Makoto; Arita, Hideyuki; Miyakita, Yasuji; Ichimura, Koichi; Yoshida, Akihiko; Shibui, Soichiro

    2014-10-01

    Sclerosing meningioma is a rare type of meningeal tumor with extensive collagen depositions. Deep sylvian meningioma, a tumor that is unattached to the dura mater, is also unusual. The biological activity of both is controversial, as are therapeutic strategies. A heterogeneous contrast-enhanced mass in the right sylvian fissure of a 10-year-old boy with a 3-year history of epilepsy was identified via magnetic resonance imaging. The patient underwent partial surgical resection because the tumor was hard and contained numerous perforators arising from the right middle cerebral artery. The tumor was histologically diagnosed as sclerosing meningioma. Twelve months after surgery, the patient was asymptomatic and did not require any additional therapies. This case is the first report of a sclerosing meningioma arising in the deep sylvian fissure. We discuss the therapeutic dilemma of this case with respect to the current literature. PMID:24141724

  18. [Aortic intramural hematoma fissuration: atypical presentation in an aircraft pilot].

    PubMed

    Fozzato, Francesca; Prioli, Maria Antonia; Santini, Francesco; Menini, Fabio; Pavan, Michela; Guarise, Paola; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2010-02-01

    Aortic intramural hematoma is a life-threatening thoracic aortic pathology. In this report we describe a case of fissuration of an aortic intramural hematoma with atypical clinical presentation, which occurred in an aircraft pilot. The patient was admitted to our emergency room with transient chest pain developed during a flight landing, followed only by persistent abdominal pain. The ECG and cardiac enzymes were normal. A portable two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiogram showed aortic root dilation and pericardial effusion. Transesophageal echocardiography showed aortic intramural hematoma with fissuration into the pericardial space. The angio-computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis. Two hours after admission the patient, with signs of cardiac tamponade, underwent Bentall surgical intervention without complications. PMID:20408481

  19. Fissuration en relaxation des aciers inoxydables austénitiques au voisinage des soudures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzoux, Q.; Allais, L.; Gourgues, A. F.; Pineau, A.

    2003-03-01

    Des fissures intergranulaires peuvent se développer au voisinage des soudures des aciers inoxydables austénitiques lorsqu'ils sont réchauffés dans le domaine de température compris entre 500^{circ}C et 700^{circ}C. A ces températures, les contraintes résiduelles post-soudage se relaxent par déformation viscoplastique. Il peut arriver que ces zones proches de la soudure soient tellement fragiles, qu'elles ne puissent accommoder cette faible déformation. Afin de préciser quelles peuvent être les modifications microstructurales qui conduisent à une telle fragilisation, on a examiné les microstructures de ces zones et révélé ainsi un écrouissage résiduel, responsable d'une forte élévation de la dureté. On a pu reproduire par hypertrempe puis laminage entre 400^{circ}C et 600^{circ}C une microstructure similaire. Des essais mécaniques (traction, fluage, relaxation, sur éprouvettes lisses et pré-fissurées) ont été réalisés à 550^{circ}C et à 600^{circ}C sur ces zones affectées simulées et sur un état de référence hypertrempé. Ils ont montré que l'écrouissage diminuait la ductilité dans le domaine de rupture intergranulaire, sans modifier qualitativement le mécanisme d'endommagement. Pendant la pré-déformation les incompatibilités de déformation entre grains conduiraient à l'existence de contraintes locales élevées qui favoriseraient la germination des cavités intergranulaires.

  20. Interaction between central volcanoes and fissure swarms along divergent plate boundaries: an example from Askja Volcano, Northern Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippanera, Daniele; Ruch, Joel; Acocella, Valerio; Urbani, Stefano; Thordarson, Thor

    2016-04-01

    Central volcanoes located along divergent plate boundaries are typically part of a larger volcanic system that consists of a central edifice and a fissure swarm through which magma propagates and spreads plates apart. Regional normal faults and graben structures develop within the volcanic system, also dissecting portions of the central volcano with ring-faults faults and eruptive fissures related to the caldera structure. Both the fissure swarm and the caldera structure influence the pathway of the ascending magma, however, the influences of the structures on magma propagation and vice versa are not well defined and understood. Here we aim to understand the relationship between the activity of the central volcano structures (e.g. caldera ring faults, radial dykes and cone sheets) and those of the fissure swarm (e.g. regional normal faults, regional dikes). We focus on Askja volcano, located in the Northern Volcanic Zone of Iceland. It is comprised of three nested calderas, largely filled in with subaerial basaltic lava flows and surrounded by a massive hyaloclastite mountain on the Eastern side. Formation of the youngest, the Öskjuvatn caldera, was initiated during the 1874-1876 rifting episode on the Askja system. This major event was followed by several localized radial and circumferential magmatic intrusions taking place along the new-formed caldera ring fault, as well as intruding in the fissure swarm related to the regional tectonics. In order to characterize the influence of the caldera structure on the regional tectonics, we analysed the structural framework of the caldera and direct surroundings using remote sensing (optical imagery and high resolution DEM from TanDEM-X data). Then we made detailed field measurements (500 data) by analysing azimuth, dip, and opening of eruptive fissures, dikes, faults and extension fractures. Both remote sensing and field measurements have been then integrated producing a detailed structural map of Askja. Our results show

  1. Modeling plaque fissuring and dissection during balloon angioplasty intervention.

    PubMed

    Gasser, T Christian; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2007-05-01

    Balloon angioplasty intervention is traumatic to arterial tissue. Fracture mechanisms such as plaque fissuring and/or dissection occur and constitute major contributions to the lumen enlargement. However, these types of mechanically-based traumatization of arterial tissue are also contributing factors to both acute procedural complications and chronic restenosis of the treatment site. We propose physical and finite element models, which are generally useable to trace fissuring and/or dissection in atherosclerotic plaques during balloon angioplasty interventions. The arterial wall is described as an anisotropic, heterogeneous, highly deformable, nearly incompressible body, whereas tissue failure is captured by a strong discontinuity kinematics and a novel cohesive zone model. The numerical implementation is based on the partition of unity finite element method and the interface element method. The later is used to link together meshes of the different tissue components. The balloon angioplasty-based failure mechanisms are numerically studied in 3D by means of an atherosclerotic-prone human external iliac artery, with a type V lesion. Image-based 3D geometry is generated and tissue-specific material properties are considered. Numerical results show that in a primary phase the plaque fissures at both shoulders of the fibrous cap and stops at the lamina elastica interna. In a secondary phase, local dissections between the intima and the media develop at the fibrous cap location with the smallest thickness. The predicted results indicate that plaque fissuring and dissection cause localized mechanical trauma, but prevent the main portion of the stenosis from high stress, and hence from continuous tissue damage. PMID:17385047

  2. Delayed Superior Orbital Fissure Syndrome After Reconstruction of Blowout Fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Joon; Choi, Woong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    The superior orbital fissure syndrome (SOFS) has been known to be a condition caused by impairment of the nerves that cross the superior orbital fissure. Traumatic SOFS is an uncommon complication which occurs usually within 48 hours after a facial injury. A 25-year-old male sustained facial trauma following an altercation. Clinical findings on presentation included swelling, ecchymosis, hyphema, subretinal hemorrhage, and mild extraocular movement limitation upon lateral gaze on his right eyelids. Facial computed tomography scan confirmed fractures of the medial walls of the right orbit and herniation of orbital soft tissue without the incarceration of medial rectus muscle. Ten days after the trauma, the operation was performed. On postoperative day 16, the patient showed ptosis of the right upper eyelid with a fixed pupil, and there was a hypoesthesia over the distribution of the right supraorbital and supratrochlear nerves. The authors diagnosed as a delayed SOFS and prescribed 4 mg of methylprednisolone q.i.d. for 30 days. After steroid therapy, extraocular movement limitations improved progressively. After 8 months, movement was completely restored. The authors experienced delayed SOFS on posttrauma day 27, and it was treated by steroid therapy. Surgical intervention is required when there is an evident etiology such as underlying hematoma or plate migration. If the reason is not clear like our case, steroid therapy can be considered as one of the options. Particularly, the authors should give special attention to the patient who has congenitally narrow superior orbital fissure, like Fujiwara et al suggested. PMID:26674904

  3. The architecture and shallow conduits of Laki-type pyroclastic cones: insights into a basaltic fissure eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, P.; Brown, R. J.; Thordarson, T.; Llewellin, E. W.

    2016-05-01

    Pyroclastic cones built along basaltic fissures provide important volcanological information, but it is often difficult to examine the early-erupted products due to burial by later products. Furthermore, it is rare to see the link between the feeder dyke and overlying cone fully exposed. In this study, we detail the architecture of a hybrid spatter cone, scoria half-cone and feeder dyke that has been dissected to below the pre-eruption surface by glacial floods. The cones were constructed during the 6-8 ka Rauðuborgir-Kvensöðul fissure eruption in North Iceland during Hawaiian- and Strombolian-style activities. Widening of their feeder dyke in the shallow sub-surface to produce an upward flaring morphology was accommodated by country rock removal and elastic host rock deformation. Ballistic calculations and stratigraphic relationships indicate that the scoria half-cone was constructed early in the eruption from the deposits of a lava fountain ~100 m high. A decline in fountain height and the generation of abundant welded deposits resulted in the formation of a nested spatter cone within the scoria half-cone. The cones are similar in structure and size to the hybrid scoria and spatter cones produced during the 15-km3 1783 Laki eruption and serve as a valuable window into the construction of pyroclastic edifices during basaltic fissure eruptions.

  4. The fissure: interlobar collateral ventilation and implications for endoscopic therapy in emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Koster, Theodoor David; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2016-01-01

    In patients with severe emphysema, bronchoscopic lung volume reduction using one-way valves is a promising therapeutic option to improve lung function and quality of life. The goal of this treatment is to achieve a complete lobar atelectasis. In a significant proportion of patients, this atelectasis cannot be achieved due to interlobar collateral ventilation. This collateral ventilation is generated through incomplete lobar fissures. Therefore, only patients with complete fissures and no collateral ventilation can be selected for endobronchial therapy with one-way valves. Incomplete fissures are very common and exhibit a great variation in anatomy. The reported prevalence is 17%–85% for the right major fissure, 19%–74% for the left major fissure, and 20%–90% for the minor fissure. There are several methods of measuring or predicting the presence of collateral ventilation, with computed tomography (CT)-fissure analysis and the Chartis measurement being the most important. CT-fissure analysis is an indirect method to measure the completeness of fissures as a surrogate for collateral ventilation. The Chartis system is an endobronchial method to directly measure the presence of collateral ventilation. Both methods have unique value, and the combination of both can accurately predict the treatment response to the bronchoscopic placement of endobronchial valves. This review provides an in-depth view of lung fissure and collateral ventilation to help understand its importance in selecting the appropriate patients for new emphysema treatments and thus avoid useless treatment in unsuitable patients. PMID:27110109

  5. A Review of Cyanoacrylate Liquid Skin Protectant and Its Efficacy on Pedal Fissures

    PubMed Central

    Vlahovic, Tracey C.; Hinton, Elizabeth A.; Chakravarthy, Debashish; Fleck, Cynthia Ann

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Skin fissures are a common dermatologic condition caused by excessive dry skin, numerous systemic diseases, and backless shoe gear. They are defects in skin that fall into the category of damaged, partial-thickness skin wounds, as opposed to full-thickness wounds. Patients with heel fissures are at an increased risk for developing infection, which could cause more severe issues, especially in patients with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. Methods Five patients from Temple Foot and Ankle Institute, Philadelphia, PA, with a total of 8 heel fissures and 2 hallux fissures, were studied. Patients were dispensed 9 vials of a cyanoacrylate liquid skin protectant (Marathon™, Medline Industries, Inc, Mundelein, IL) to be applied to the fissure every 3 days. Patients returned every 2 weeks for follow-up in clinic. Results The hallux fissures and 4 of the heel fissures went to complete closure after 2 weeks. There was an average decrease of 1.16 cm in length of the heel fissure dimensions after 2 weeks and an average decrease of 1.1 cm in length of the hallux fissures. Conclusion This novel skin protectant proved to be a comfortable, easy, and effective tool in aiding the resolution of pedal skin fissures. PMID:24527155

  6. Enamel fusion using a carbon dioxide laser: A technique for sealing pits and fissures

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, L.J.; Perham, S.J. )

    1991-05-01

    The well-established enhanced resistance of lased enamel to demineralization is the basis for clinical application of the carbon dioxide laser to caries prevention. This in vitro study examined the effect of focused infrared laser radiation on sound enamel and early pit and fissure caries. Low power levels (2-5 W) induced localized melting and resolidification of enamel with little surface destruction. For sound fissures, fusion of enamel from the lateral walls of the fissure eliminated the fissure space, providing a sealant effect; while in carious fissures, carious enamel was vaporized and adjacent sound enamel fused to partially eliminate the defect. The technique for enamel fusion using CO2 lasers has potential application for sealing pits and fissures and producing physicochemical alterations in enamel which may have preventive benefits.

  7. Phimosis with Preputial Fissures as a Predictor of Undiagnosed Type 2 Diabetes in Adults.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Chen, Chih-Shou; Shindel, Alan W; Wu, Ching-Fang; Lin, Jian-Hui; Chiu, Kuo-Hsiung; Yang, Tzu-Hsin; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes is usually asymptomatic in its early stage. Early diagnosis may improve outcomes by enabling initiation of treatment before end organ damage has progressed. The aim of this study was to determine whether the clinical sign of phimosis with preputial fissures is predictive of type 2 diabetes in patients not previously diagnosed with diabetes. Twenty-eight patients with acquired phimosis and preputial fissures were collected prospectively. Twenty-eight controls with acquired phimosis without preputial fissures were selected. Statistically significant differences were found in body mass index, random plasma glucose, glucosuria and glycosylated haemoglobin levels, but not in age, family history of diabetes, hypertension and classical hyperglycaemic symptoms. Diabetes was confirmed in all 28 patients in the preputial fissures group, but only 2 (7.1%) patients in the non-preputial fissures group (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, phimosis with preputial fissures may be a specific sign of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. PMID:26349852

  8. Joints, fissures, and voids in rhyolite welded ash-flow tuff at Teton damsite, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prostka, Harold J.

    1977-01-01

    Several kinds of joints, fissures, and voids are present in densely welded rhyolite ash-flow tuff at Teton damsite. Older fissures and voids probably were formed in the ash-flow sheet during secondary flowage, which probably was caused by differential compaction or settling over irregular topography. The younger, more abundant fissures are mostly steep cooling joints that probably have been opened farther by horizontal tectonic extension and gravitational creep, perhaps aided by lateral stress relief.

  9. Caries-preventive effect of fissure sealants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mejàre, Ingegerd; Lingström, Peter; Petersson, Lars G; Holm, Anna-Karin; Twetman, Svante; Källestål, Carina; Nordenram, Gunilla; Lagerlöf, Folke; Söder, Birgitta; Norlund, Anders; Axelsson, Susanna; Dahlgren, Helena

    2003-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate systematically the evidence of the caries-preventive effect of fissure sealing of occlusal tooth surfaces and to examine factors potentially modifying the effect. The search strategies included electronic databases, reference lists of articles, and selected textbooks. Inclusion criteria were randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials or controlled clinical trials comparing fissure sealing with no treatment or another preventive treatment in children up to 14 years of age at the start; the outcome measure was caries increment; the diagnostic criteria had been described; and the follow-up time was at least 2 years. Inclusion decisions were taken and grading of the studies was done independently by two of the authors. The main measure of effect was relative risk reduction. Thirteen studies using resin-based or glass ionomer sealant materials were included in the final analysis. The results showed that most studies were performed during the 1970s and a single application had been utilized. The relative caries risk reduction pooled estimate of resin-based sealants on permanent 1st molars was 33% (relative risk = 0.67; CI = 0.55-0.83). The effect depended on retention of the sealant. In conclusion, the review suggests limited evidence that fissure sealing of 1st permanent molars with resin-based materials has a caries-preventive effect. The evidence is incomplete for permanent 2nd molars, premolars and primary molars and for glass ionomer cements. Overall, there remains a need for further trials of high quality, particularly in child populations with a low and a high caries risk, respectively. PMID:14960003

  10. Bonding Agents in Pit and Fissure Sealants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Das, Usha Mohan; G, Suma

    2009-01-01

    Dental adhesive systems used for bonding dental resins to enamel and dentin have evolved through several "generations," with changes in chemistry, mechanism, number of bottles, application technique, and clinical effectiveness. The trend in the latest generation of dental bonding systems is to reduce the number of components and clinical placement steps. The introduction of i bond, a single-bottle dental adhesive system, is the latest of the new generation materials, and combines etchant, adhesive, and desensitizer in one component. This paper describes different dentin bonding agents, its evolution, mechanism of action and different commercially available dentin bonding agents and their role in the retention of pit and fissure sealant. PMID:25206115

  11. Sylvian fissure epidermoid cyst presenting with intention tremor

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Abhidha; Makkiyah, Feda; Goel, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Epidermoid tumors are benign tumors which contain keratin, cellular debris, and cholesterol, and are lined with stratified squamous epithelium. They grow in discreet silence sustained over a multitude of years. The tumors most commonly present with headache and seizures. We report the case of a 24-year-old male with a large sylvian fissure epidermoid tumor who presented with intention tremor. The patient was operated, and a near-total excision of the tumor was performed with a resolution of the tremor. PMID:27057232

  12. Fluoride release and uptake abilities of different fissure sealants

    PubMed Central

    Andenna, Gianluigi; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Cucca, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Background The long-term capability of resin sealants and glass ionomer cements to release fluoride is associated to a reduction in pit and fissure caries. The regular use of fluoride varnishes/toothpastes can result in the absorption of fluoride into the sealant. The objective of the present study was to assess the fluoride release/uptake capacities of different fissure sealants. Material and Methods Three different fissure sealants (Fuji Triage/GC, Fissurit FX/Voco and Grandio Seal/Voco) were examined. Ten discs of each material were prepared. Each disc was incubated with distilled water and then the solution analyzed for diluted for fluoride concentration, using a combination of fluoride electrode (OrionGP 1 S/N 13824, Orion Research Inc, Boston, MA, USA) connected to an expandable ion analyzer (Orion 720A, Orion Research Inc, Boston, MA, USA). Standard curves between 1 and 100 ppm F- were used to calibrate the electrode. Cumulative fluoride release was measured on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 21, 35 and 49, then two different fluoride varnishes/pastes (Profluorid Varnish/Voco, MI Paste Plus/GC), were applied to the sealants tested, and fluoride release (after reuptake) was measured on days 56, 70 and 84. Results Kruskal Wallis test confirmed significant differences in fluoride release between Fuji Triage/GC and Fissurit FX/Voco and Grandio Seal/Voco from day 1 (P < 0.001). The application of fluoride varnish Profluorid Varnish enhanced the fluoride release for all sealants (P < 0.05). MI Paste Plus enhanced the fluoride release for all sealants except for Fuji Triage/GC (P > 0.05). Conclusions The GIC-based sealant (Fuji Triage/GC) released significantly more fluoride than the resin sealants tested. The exposure to the fluoridated varnish (Profluorid Varnish) significantly recharged the sealants tested more than the CPP-ACPF toothpaste (MI Paste Plus). Key words:Fissure sealants, fluoride release, fluoride uptake, glass ionomer cements. PMID:27398179

  13. Research of features related to land subsidence and ground fissure disasters in the Beijing Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Luo, Y.; Liu, M.; Wang, R.; Wang, H.

    2015-11-01

    This study overviews the development history, current situation, impact, and hazards of land subsidence and ground fissure disasters in the Beijing Plain (BP) and focuses on the disaster distribution and features of disaster-causing mechanisms. Currently, the BP is still in a rapid developmental stage of land subsidence. The development and distribution of land subsidence are affected by various factors including the thickness of Quaternary compressible clay, groundwater overexploitation, and the rapid development of urban construction. The causes of ground fissures in the BP are complex and diverse, with evidence of structure fissures, non-structure fissures, and mixed genesis fissures. Investigations of the Gaoliying ground fissure have shown that this fissure has evidence of fracture activity, with vertical deformation that is more significant than horizontal deformation. Furthermore, this ground fissure has characteristics of inter-annual periodicity and annual jumping. The land subsidence and ground fissures are all under structural control and impact each other, and more severe hazards may be induced under the superimposition of these two types of disasters. Effective measures and suggestions for disaster prevention and control are recommended on the basis of this study.

  14. Fissure sealants: Knowledge and practice of Yemeni dental practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Al-Jamaei, Aisha Ahmed; Halboub, Esam Saleh; Al-Soneidar, Walid Ahmed; Tarakji, Bassel; Alsalhani, Anas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate Yemeni dental practitioners' knowledge and practices concerning fissure sealants. Materials and Methods: A modified questionnaire consisted of 25-items was distributed to 500 dentists working in Sana'a City. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square/Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analyses. Results: The response rate was 74%. Most of the respondents were male (61.3%), general practitioners (84.2%), and had <5 years of clinical experience (48.3%). The respondents showed a reasonable level of knowledge about sealants, with the majority (88%) believed that there is strong scientific evidence about fissure sealants effectiveness and around 90% showed a good understanding of sealant placement instructions. On the other hand, respondents showed insufficient knowledge about sealants clinical practice. Conclusion: Although a high proportion of dental practitioners showed adequate knowledge about dental sealant, following guidelines and standardized procedures in clinical practice is lacking. These emphasize the need for regular continuing education courses for dental professional. PMID:27095903

  15. Fracture mechanical behavior of red sandstone containing a single fissure and two parallel fissures after exposure to different high temperature treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Jing, Hong-Wen; Huang, Yan-Hua; Ranjith, P. G.; Jiao, Yu-Yong

    2014-12-01

    A detailed understanding of the brittle deformation behavior of sandstone containing pre-existing flaws at elevated temperatures is a key concern in underground engineering. In this research, uniaxial compression tests were performed to evaluate the effect of high temperature treatments (300, 600 or 900 °C) on the strength, deformability and fracture coalescence behavior of a sandstone containing either a single fissure or two parallel fissures. All experiments focused on rectangular prismatic (80 × 160 × 30 mm) specimens of red sandstone. Constant strain rate experiments were performed on either: (1) specimens that contained a single 2 mm-wide fissure or (2) specimens that contained two 2 mm-wide parallel fissures. The specimens containing either one or two fissures were either left at room temperature (i.e., no heat treatment), or heat treated to 300, 600 or 900 °C prior to experimentation. The results demonstrated that, in all cases, the strength and stiffness of red sandstone was increased at 300 °C, before decreasing up to our maximum temperature of 900 °C. However, the peak strain at failure always showed an increase when the temperature was increased. The crack initiation, propagation and coalescence process were monitored during the deformation using both photographic monitoring and acoustic emission (AE) monitoring techniques. The monitoring results showed that the cracking process depended on both the fissure geometry and the heat treatment temperature. The potential mechanisms causing the differences in the mechanical behavior observed with increasing temperature are discussed, as is the influence of the single fissure and the two parallel fissures on the crack evolution process. These results are important and valuable to understand the fracture mechanism of rock engineering in deep underground mining excavations and nuclear waste depositories.

  16. Holocene intracontinental deformation of the northern North China Plain: Evidence of tectonic ground fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liqing; Li, Sanzhong; Cao, Xianzhi; Somerville, I. D.; Suo, Yanhui; Liu, Xin; Dai, Liming; Zhao, Shujuan; Guo, Lingli; Wang, Pengcheng; Cao, Huahua

    2016-04-01

    Following the collecting and analyzing of field data on the geometry and kinematics characteristics of ground fissures in the northern North China Plain (NNCP), this paper shows that en échelon ground fissures or tectonic ground fissures with a length of several meters to tens of kilometers extending along active faults are possibly controlled by underlying active faults. There are two groups of tectonic ground fissures developed in the NNCP. One group consists of ENE-trending "right-stepping" ground fissures, some of which have a component of sinistral motion. The other group is NNE-trending "left-stepping" ground fissures with dextral motion. A large amount of data from trenches, boreholes and seismic exploration reflect that they are active-faulting-related. The NNW-trending regional extensional stress field and the reactivation of pre-existing faults are the major factors controlling ground fissures. Data from the Quaternary sedimentary records, deep incised valleys, the distribution of earthquakes and ground fissures, and our field work show that the Holocene intracontinental deformation of the NNCP is characterized by intense faulting and northwestward tilting, which may be related to a NNW-SSE-oriented tensional stress field in the shallow crust and asthenospheric upwelling in the mantle.

  17. Response to early generation selection for resistance to rice kernel fissuring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The value of milled rice (Oryza sativa L.) depends on the percent whole versus broken kernels after milling. Kernel fissures caused by pre- or post-harvest stresses are the leading cause of breakage upon milling. ‘Cypress’ is known to be more fissure resistant (FR) than most cultivars, but breeding ...

  18. Early screening of recombinant inbred lines for fissure resistance in non-semidwarf rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) kernel fissuring poses a major problem for both rice farmers and millers. It results in the decreased value of milled rice because of the increase in the percentage of broken kernels associated with fissuring. This study employs the use of fine mapping to increase the genetic ...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3765 - Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner. 872.3765 Section 872.3765 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3765 Pit and fissure sealant...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3765 - Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner. 872.3765 Section 872.3765 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3765 Pit and fissure sealant...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3765 - Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner. 872.3765 Section 872.3765 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3765 Pit and fissure sealant...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3765 - Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner. 872.3765 Section 872.3765 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3765 Pit and fissure sealant...

  3. Preserving rice quality: fine mapping and introgressing a fissure resistance locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) kernel fissuring is a major concern of both rice producers and millers. Fissures are small cracks in the rice kernels that increase the percentage of breakage among the kernels when they are transported and milled, which decreases the value of processed rice. This study employ...

  4. Video monitoring analysis of the dynamics at fissure eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Tanja; Walter, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    At basaltic eruption often lava fountains occur. The fountains mainly develop at erupting fissures, underlain by a magma-filled dike transporting the magma horizontally and vertically. Understanding of the dynamics of the deep dike and fracture mechanisms are mainly based on geophysical data as well as observations from seismic or geodetic networks. At the surface, however, new methods are needed to allow detailed interpretation on the eruption velocities, interactions between vents and complexities in the magma paths. With video cameras we collected imaging data from different erupting fissures. We find that lava fountaining is often correlated at distinct vents. From the frames of the videos we calculated the height and velocities of fountains as a function of time. Lava fountains often show a pulsating regime, that may change over time. Comparing the fountain height as a function of time of different vents by an time-dependent cross-correlation, we find a time lag between the pulses at adjacent vents. From this we derive an apparent velocity of temporal separation between vents, associated with the fountaining activity based on the calculated time lag and the vent distances. Although the correlation system can change episodically and sporadically, both the frequency of the fountains and eruption and the rest time between single fountains remain remarkably similar for adjacent lava fountains imply a controlling process in the magma feeder system itself. We present and compare our method for the Kamoamoa eruption 2011 (Hawaii) and the Holuhraun eruption 2014/2015 (Iceland). Both sites show a significant time shift between the single pulses of adjacent vents. We compare our velocities determined by this time shift to the assumed magma flow velocity in the dike as determined by independent models. Therefore we conjecture that the time shift of venting activity may allow to estimate the dynamics of magma and fluid migration at depth, as well as to identify the

  5. Groundwater-Mining-Induced Subsidence and Earth Fissures in Cedar Valley, Southwestern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, T. R.; Inkenbrandt, P.; Lund, W. R.; Lowe, M.; Bowman, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater pumping in excess of recharge (groundwater mining) has lowered the potentiometric surface in Cedar Valley, southwestern Utah, by as much as 114 feet since 1939. Lowering the potentiometric surface (head decline) has caused permanent compaction of fine-grained sediments of the Cedar Valley aquifer. Recently acquired interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery shows that land subsidence is occurring over an ~100 square-mile area, including two pronounced subsidence bowls in the northeastern (Enoch graben) and southwestern (Quichapa Lake area) parts of the valley. A lack of accurate historical benchmark elevation data over much of the valley prevents detailed long-term quantification of subsidence. In response to the land subsidence, earth fissures have formed along the margins of the Enoch graben and north and west of Quichapa Lake. Our initial inventory of Cedar Valley fissures, which relied on aerial-photography analysis, identified 3.9 miles of fissures in 2009. With newly acquired light detection and ranging (LiDAR) coverage in 2011, we more than doubled the total length of mapped fissures to 8.3 miles. Fissures on the west side of the Enoch graben exhibit ongoing vertical surface displacement with rates as high as 1.7 inches/year. The largest Enoch-graben-west fissure has displaced street surfaces, curb and gutter, and sidewalks, and has reversed the flow direction of a sewer line in a partially developed subdivision. Several Cedar Valley fissures are closely associated with, and in some places coincident with, mapped Quaternary faults. While the majority of Cedar Valley fissures are mapped in agricultural areas, continued groundwater mining and resultant subsidence will likely cause existing fissures to lengthen and new fissures to form that may eventually impact other developed areas of the valley.

  6. Evidence not practised: the underutilisation of preventive fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, D L

    2014-04-01

    International and UK professional organisations, Cochrane systematic reviews, and international and UK guidance documents all support the application of preventive fissure sealants (PFSs) as an effective treatment for reducing caries. However, PFSs are well known to be underutilised in primary care. This paper collates data from PFS-relevant studies in Scotland, which has a large population of children at caries risk, to identify the beliefs and factors dentists perceive as influencing their decision not to provide this treatment. This information provides a platform to suggest how to increase the application of PFSs in this region (a standardised audit incorporating evidence-based behaviour change techniques, supplemental guidance on how to implement gold-standard recommendations in practice, training). This may also be relevant outside of Scotland, as well as to the implementation of other evidence-based behaviours in practice. PMID:24722094

  7. Pleistocene microvertebrates from fissure-fillings in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Suteethorn, Varavudh

    Microvertebrates (and among them specially, rodents) have contributed to the elaboration of precise biochronological time scales and to the reconstitution of Pleistocene paleoenvironments in several parts of the world (North America, Africa, Europe and Japan). They have been demonstrated to be highly sensitive to climatic changes since they are very sensitive to vegetation changes. Up to now, no data is available for Southeast Asia and very few information is available concerning the nature of climatic changes which affected that part of the tropical world during the Pleistocene. In the past few years, we have discovered several fissure fillings in Thailand yielding numerous remains of microvertebrates which have been extracted by dissolution in acetic acid solution. These deposits are the result of the feeding activity of predators, like owls or diurnal raptors, whose pellets are accumulated in caves or fissures. Eleven localities, located in Central (2), Eastern (1), Western (2) and Peninsular Thailand (6) have been investigated so far. Several rodent species, belonging to 9 genera of Murinae (rats and mice) and 9 genera of Sciuridae (squirrels) have been identified in these localities. The most important differences with the extant representatives often concern the size of the teeth of these fossil species. The meaning of these size differences is not yet clearly understood since they can be attributed either to significant time differences between localities (microevolution) or as the result of size variations related to climatic changes (clinical variations). More data will have to be collected to calibrate the temporal frame. Already, important modification of the geographic distribution of some species have been discovered which testify that during the Pleistocene, significative climatic changes have affected Southeast Asia. For example, Exilisciurus, a squirrel which is presently restricted to Borneo has been recognized in Peninsular Thailand. Also, Iomys

  8. Discrete element modeling on the crack evolution behavior of brittle sandstone containing three fissures under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Huang, Yan-Hua; Ranjith, P. G.; Jiao, Yu-Yong; Ji, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Based on experimental results of brittle, intact sandstone under uniaxial compression, the micro-parameters were firstly confirmed by adopting particle flow code (PFC^{2D}). Then, the validation of the simulated models were cross checked with the experimental results of brittle sandstone containing three parallel fissures under uniaxial compression. The simulated results agreed very well with the experimental results, including the peak strength, peak axial strain, and ultimate failure mode. Using the same micro-parameters, the numerical models containing a new geometry of three fissures are constructed to investigate the fissure angle on the fracture mechanical behavior of brittle sandstone under uniaxial compression. The strength and deformation parameters of brittle sandstone containing new three fissures are dependent to the fissure angle. With the increase of the fissure angle, the elastic modulus, the crack damage threshold, and the peak strength of brittle sandstone containing three fissures firstly increase and secondly decrease. But the peak axial strain is nonlinearly related to the fissure angle. In the entire process of deformation, the crack initiation and propagation behavior of brittle sandstone containing three fissures under uniaxial compression are investigated with respect to the fissure angle. Six different crack coalescence modes are identified for brittle sandstone containing three fissures under uniaxial compression. The influence of the fissure angle on the length of crack propagation and crack coalescence stress is evaluated. These investigated conclusions are very important for ensuring the stability and safety of rock engineering with intermittent structures.

  9. Infrasound from the 2007 fissure eruptions of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fee, D.; Garces, M.; Orr, T.; Poland, M.

    2011-01-01

    Varied acoustic signals were recorded at Kīlauea Volcano in mid-2007, coincident with dramatic changes in the volcano's activity. Prior to this time period, Pu'u 'Ō'ō crater produced near-continuous infrasonic tremor and was the primary source of degassing and lava effusion at Kīlauea. Collapse and draining of Pu'u 'Ō'ō crater in mid-June produced impulsive infrasonic signals and fluctuations in infrasonic tremor. Fissure eruptions on 19 June and 21 July were clearly located spatially and temporally using infrasound arrays. The 19 June eruption from a fissure approximately mid-way between Kīlauea's summit and Pu'u 'O'o produced infrasound for ~30 minutes-the only observed geophysical signal associated with the fissure opening. The infrasound signal from the 21 July eruption just east of Pu'u 'Ō'ō shows a clear azimuthal progression over time, indicative of fissure propagation over 12.9 hours. The total fissure propagation rate is relatively slow at 164 m/hr, although the fissure system ruptured discontinuously. Individual fissure rupture times are estimated using the acoustic data combined with visual observations.

  10. Preferential flow in fissured sediments in desert soils related to radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, B.R.; Raney, J.A. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Unsaturated flow in fissured sediments in the Chihuahuan Desert of Texas was examined to determine if these features act as preferred pathways for water and solute transport. Fissures are surface features, or gulleys, that are underlain by fractures filled with sediment derived from surrounding areas. Hydraulic and chemical approaches were used to investigate unsaturated flow processes beneath and adjacent to fissures, and the results were compared with data from surrounding geomorphic systems such as arroyos, ephemeral streams, and interstreams. Typically, high water potentials in surficial sediments result from infiltration of recent precipitation. Below this surficial zone of high water potentials lies a zone of low water potentials that is much thinner beneath the fissure than in adjacent sediments or in sediments beneath ephemeral streams and interstreams. Maximum chloride concentrations in profiles in the near-surface fissured sediments were much lower than those measured in all other geomorphic systems. The corresponding moisture velocities in the fissured sediments ranged from 10 to 70 mm/yr. A tracer experiment demonstrated higher downward water and solute transport in the fracture fill beneath the fissure relative to adjacent sediments. Numerical simulations of the tracer experiment with the computer code TRACR3D reproduced the overall shape of the tracer plume. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that the tracer plume is most sensitive to spatial variability in soil texture and the corresponding hydraulic parameters. The results from this study suggest that sediments in the fissured area act as preferred pathways in the shallow subsurface because surface runoff is concentrated in the fissures and because underlying fractures and cavities provide avenues for moisture and solute transport.

  11. Mechanical benefits of conservative restoration for dental fissure caries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Zheng, Keke; Li, Eric; Li, Wei; Li, Qing; Swain, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    The principle of minimal intervention dentistry (MID) is to limit removal of carious tooth tissue while maximizing its repair and survival potential. The objective of this study is to explore the fracture resistance of a permanent molar tooth with a fissure carious lesion along with three clinical restoration procedures, namely one traditional and two conservative approaches, based upon MID. The traditional restoration employs extensive surgical removal of enamel and dentine about the cavity to eliminate potential risk of further caries development, while conservative method #1 removes significantly less enamel and infected dentine, and conservative method #2 only restores the overhanging enamel above the cavity and leaves the infected and affected dentine as it was. An extended finite element method (XFEM) is adopted here to analyze the fracture behaviors of both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of these four different scenarios. It was found that the two conservative methods exhibited better fracture resistance than the traditional restorative method. Although conservative method #2 has less fracture resistance than method #1, it had significantly superior fracture resistance compared to other restorations. More important, after cavity sealing it may potentially enhance the opportunity for remineralization and improved loading bearing capacity and fracture resistance. PMID:26298801

  12. Land subsidence and earth fissures due to groundwater withdrawal in the Southern Yangtse Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Xue, Yu-Qun; Wu, Ji-Chun; Yu, Jun; Wei, Zi-Xin; Li, Qin-Fen

    2008-08-01

    Excessive extraction of groundwater has caused severe land subsidence and earth fissures in the Southern Yangtse Delta, China. Based on field data, the temporal and spatial distribution of land subsidence is investigated and the causes for earth fissures are analyzed. The areal distribution of the land subsidence is closely related to the cones of depression in the main exploited aquifers. The compaction of a hydrostratigraphic unit depends on its mechanical behavior, thickness, compressibility, and the piezometric level changing. The primary subsidence layers in Shanghai have been the first aquitard before 1990 and the third confined aquifer since then. But the second aquitard unit was the primary subsidence layer in Changzhou. Earth fissures, trending in several directions, occurred in the Husu tectonic zone. They were mainly caused by differential subsidence and horizontal displacement that resulted from tensile stress and shear stress in units. The majority of fissures in the study area are tensile.

  13. Use of CO2 laser in pit and fissure caries prevention: clinical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Rosso, Naomi; Duarte, Danilo; Guedes Pinto, Antonio C.; Genovese, Walter J.

    1997-05-01

    In this four-year follow up in vivo controlled study, 112 human permanent first molars, from children between the ages of 6 and 11 years old were used to investigate the viability of the CO2 laser in promoting carie-free occlusal surfaces in permanent molars, as an isolated form of treatment or associated with conventional fissure sealants. The findings suggest that occlusal caries prevention only by means of CO2 laser irradiation is not effective; that the utilization of photo-activated sealants, as well as its association with CO2 laser, applied over the occlusal fissures, are effective means of preventing occlusal caries and that the application of CO2 laser over occlusal fissures, prior to the application of a photo-activated fissure sealant, improves the retention of the sealant.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3765 - Pit and fissure sealant and conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3765 Pit and fissure sealant and... depressions (faults in the enamel) in the biting surfaces of teeth to prevent cavities. (b)...

  15. Painless Ulcers and Fissures of Toes: Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy, Not Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Angoori Gnaneshwar

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN) are rare genetically determined neuropathies. They often manifest as painless injuries in children. We present HSN in a 5-year-old boy who presented with recurrent fissuring and ulceration involving both great toes. PMID:26955138

  16. Putative fissure-resistance QTLs mapped to chromosomes 1 and 8 based on allelic frequency differences observed between fissure-resistant and fissure-susceptible progeny from two segregating populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole rice kernels have two to three times more market value than broken, which means that any reduction in milling yield results in financial losses for both rice producers and millers. One of the primary causes of rice breakage during milling is fissuring of the rice before it even enters the mil...

  17. Fluorine mapping in sound and carious fissures of human teeth using PIGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Nomachi, M.; Yasuda, K.; Iwami, Y.; Ebisu, S.; Sakai, T.; Fukuda, M.

    2005-04-01

    By using the PIGE technique at JAERI Takasaki, we measured fluorine (F) distribution in a micro area of occlusal fissures in the enamel of human teeth. The fissures were classified into three groups: Group I, no caries; Group II, incipient caries; Group III, advanced caries. The extracted teeth were embedded in epoxy resin and cut along the longitudinal axis through the fissures. The F concentration in the fissure at the cut surface was measured. A 1.7 MeV proton beam accelerated by the TIARA single-ended accelerator was delivered to a micro-beam apparatus. The beam spot size was about 1 μm with a beam current of about 100 pA. A nuclear reaction, 19F (p,αγ)16O, was used to measure the F concentration and gamma-rays from this reaction were detected with a 4″ NaI(Tl) detector. X-rays induced by proton were detected with a Ge detector to measure calcium concentration and the beam intensity was monitored with the X-ray yield from a copper foil for quantitative analysis. The obtained results were shown as two-dimensional mapping. In all specimens, an F concentration was observed around the fissure. The F concentration varied depending on the location of the fissure and decreased towards the inner part of the tooth. The maximum F concentration values in the measured area ranged from 3500-11700 ppm (mean = 6000 ppm) in Group I, 2400-10700 ppm (mean = 6300 ppm) in Group II, and 5200-16900 ppm (mean = 9300 ppm) in Group III. Although high F concentrations tended to be measured in the carious fissures, high values were also recognized in the sound fissures. More studies are necessary to clarify the relationship between F and carious lesions.

  18. Adaptive Management of Land Subsidence and Ground Fissuring in the Chino Groundwater Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, A.; Rolfe, T.; Wildermuth, M.; Kavounas, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Chino Basin, located in southern California, is a large alluvial groundwater basin with storage in excess of five million acre-feet. The basin has a long history of groundwater development for various uses dating back to the early 1900s. As a result, piezometric heads declined basin-wide during the past century - in some areas by more than 200 feet. Declines of this magnitude typically cause irreversible aquifer-system compaction, which in turn results in subsidence at the ground surface. In portions of Chino Basin, land subsidence has been differential and accompanied by ground fissuring, which damaged existing infrastructure and poses concerns for new and existing development.Chino Basin Watermaster, the agency responsible for groundwater basin management, has recognized that land subsidence and ground fissuring should be minimized to the extent possible. At the same time, Watermaster is implementing aggressive groundwater-supply programs that include controlled overdraft and the possibility of causing head declines in areas prone to subsidence and fissuring. The groundwater-supply programs must also address the subsidence and fissuring phenomena.From 2001 to 2005, Watermaster conducted a technical investigation to characterize the extent, rate, and mechanisms of subsidence and fissuring. The investigation employed InSAR and ground-level surveying of benchmarks to monitor ground-surface deformation, and borehole extensometers and piezometric monitoring to establish the relationships between groundwater production, piezometric levels, and aquifer-system deformation. Based on the results of the investigation, Watermaster developed: (i) subsidence-management criteria for the areas experiencing acute subsidence and fissuring, and (ii) an adaptive management program to minimize the potential for future subsidence and fissuring across the entire Chino Basin. The science-based program includes ongoing monitoring, which now includes sophisticated fissure

  19. Radar Observations of Fissure-fed Basaltic Lava Flows, Craters of the Moon, Idaho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martel, L.; Greeley, R.

    1985-01-01

    Changes in surface roughness of lava flows, estimated from dual polarization, synthetic aperture, X and L band side-looking airborne radar images, were tested as a means of locating fissure vent areas. If lava textures proess from smooth, near-vent shelly pahoehoe to hummocky pahoehoe to aa with distance from fissure vents, then radr images of the lava flows would show a progression from dark to brighter tones due to the flows' increasing radar back-scatter.

  20. Radar observations of fissure-fed basaltic lava flows, Craters of the Moon, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L.; Greeley, R.

    1985-04-01

    Changes in surface roughness of lava flows, estimated from dual polarization, synthetic aperture, X and L band side-looking airborne radar images, were tested as a means of locating fissure vent areas. If lava textures proess from smooth, near-vent shelly pahoehoe to hummocky pahoehoe to aa with distance from fissure vents, then radr images of the lava flows would show a progression from dark to brighter tones due to the flows' increasing radar back-scatter.

  1. Monitoring on Xi'an ground fissures deformation with TerraSAR-X data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, C.; Zhang, Q.; Zhu, W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the fine resolution of TerraSAR-X data provided since 2007, this paper applied 6 TerraSAR data (strip mode) during 3rd Dec. 2009 to 23rd Mar. 2010 to detect and monitor the active fissures over Xi'an region. Three themes have been designed for high precision detection and monitoring of Xi'an-Chang'an fissures, as small baseline subsets (SBAS) to test the atmospheric effects of differential interferograms pair stepwise, 2-pass differential interferogram with very short baseline perpendicular to generate the whole deformation map with 44 days interval, and finally, corner reflector (CR) technique was used to closely monitor the relative deformation time series between two CRs settled crossing two ground fissures. Results showed that TerraSAR data are a good choice for small-scale ground fissures detection and monitoring, while special considerations should be taken for their great temporal and baseline decorrelation. Secondly, ground fissures in Xi'an were mostly detected at the joint section of stable and deformable regions. Lastly, CR-InSAR had potential ability to monitor relative deformation crossing fissures with millimeter precision.

  2. Fracturing and earthquake activity within the Prestahnúkur fissure swarm in the Western Volcanic Rift Zone of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjartardóttir, Ásta Rut; Hjaltadóttir, Sigurlaug; Einarsson, Páll; Vogfjörd, Kristín.; Muñoz-Cobo Belart, Joaquín.

    2015-12-01

    The Prestahnúkur fissure swarm is located within the ultraslowly spreading Western Volcanic Zone in Iceland. The fissure swarm is characterized by normal faults, open fractures, and evidence of subglacial fissure eruptions (tindars). In this study, fractures and faults within the Prestahnúkur fissure swarm were mapped in detail from aerial photographs to determine the extent and activity of the fissure swarm. Earthquakes during the last ~23 years were relocated to map the subsurface fault planes that they delineate. The Prestahnúkur fissure swarm is 40-80 km long and up to ~20 km wide. Most of the areas of the fissure swarm have been glacially eroded, although a part of it is covered by postglacial lava flows. The fissure swarm includes numerous faults with tens of meters vertical offset within the older glacially eroded part, whereas open fractures are found within postglacial lava flows. Comparison of relocated earthquakes and surface fractures indicates that some of the surface fractures have been activated at depth during the last ~23 years, although no dike intrusions have been ongoing. The existence of tindars nevertheless indicates that dike intrusions and rifting events do occur within the Prestahnúkur fissure swarm. The low-fracture density within postglacial lava flows and low density of postglacial eruptive fissures indicate that rifting episodes occur less often than in the faster spreading Northern Volcanic Zone.

  3. Comparison of Various Concentrations of Tricalcium Phosphate Nanoparticles on Mechanical Properties and Remineralization of Fissure Sealants

    PubMed Central

    Tavassoli-Hojjati, Sara; Atai, Mohammad; Haghgoo, Roza; Rahimian-Imam, Sara; Kameli, Somayeh; Ahmaian-Babaki, Fatemeh; Hamzeh, Faezeh; Ahmadyar, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical properties (flexural strength, micro-shear bond strength) and remineralizing potential of fissure sealants by adding various concentrations of β-tricalcium phosphate nanoparticles. Materials and Methods: This in-vitro study consisted of five experimental groups containing prepared nano-fisssure sealants (1–5 wt.% β-TCP nanoparticles) and two control groups containing a prepared and a commercial fissure sealant. Flexural/micro-shear bond strength values were measured using Zwick test machine. Cavities on sixty healthy premolar teeth were filled with the fissure sealants containing 0–5 wt.% of nano β-TCP. The samples were assessed for remineralization under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDAX. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s Post Hoc analysis/HSD were used to analyze the data. Results: There was no significant difference between the flexural strengths/elastic modulus of the 0–5 wt.% nano β-TCP groups (p>0.05). The average flexural strength/elastic modulus of the prepared fissure sealant group (0%) was significantly higher than the commercial fissure sealant group (Clinpro) (p<0.05). There was no significant difference between micro-shear bond strengths of the experimental groups (1–5 wt.%), and between the commercial and the prepared (0%) fissure sealant groups (p>0.05). Examining the samples under SEM showed a significant increase in thickness of the intermediate layer with increasing concentrations of β-TCP nanoparticles (p<0.05). Conclusion: Addition of 1–5 wt.% β-TCP nanoparticles to the fissure sealants significantly increased the remineralization potential without affecting the mechanical properties. PMID:25584048

  4. Retention of resin-based filled and unfilled pit and fissure sealants: A comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V. Rajashekar; Chowdhary, Nagalakshmi; Mukunda, K. S.; Kiran, N. K.; Kavyarani, B. S.; Pradeep, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The most caries-susceptible period of a permanent first molar tooth is the eruption phase, during which the enamel is not fully matured and it is usually difficult for the child to clean the erupting tooth surfaces. Sealing occlusal pits and fissures with resin-based pit and fissure sealants is a proven method to prevent occlusal caries. The difference in the viscosity of the sealants differs in the penetration into pit and fissures and abrasive wear resistance property due to the addition of filler particles. The present study was conducted to evaluate and compare the retention of the resin-based filled (Helioseal F, Ivoclar Vivadent) and unfilled (Clinpro, 3M ESPE) pit and fissure sealants, which is important for their effectiveness. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six children between the age group of 6 and 9 years, with all four newly erupted permanent first molars were selected. Sealants were applied randomly using split mouth design technique on permanent first molars. Evaluation of sealant retention was performed at regular intervals over 12 months, using Simonsen's criteria at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th and 12th month. The results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: At the end of our study period (12th month), 53.57% showed complete retention, 37.50% showed partial retention, and 8.83% showed complete missing of resin-based filled (Helioseal F) pit and fissure sealant. And, 64.29% showed complete retention, 32.14% showed partial retention, and 3.57% showed complete missing of resin-based unfilled (Clinpro) pit and fissure sealant. This difference in retention rates between filled and unfilled pit and fissure sealants was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The difference in retention rates between Helioseal F and Clinpro was not statistically significant, but Clinpro (unfilled) sealant showed slightly higher retention rates and clinically better performance than Helioseal F (filled). PMID:25821368

  5. Automatic recognition of lung lobes and fissures from multislice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kiryu, Takuji; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2004-05-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) has been expected to help radiologists to improve the accuracy of abnormality detection and reduce the burden during CT image interpretations. In order to realize such functions, automated segmentations of the target organ regions are always required by CAD systems. This paper describes a fully automatic processing procedure, which is designed to identify inter-lobe fissures and divide lung into five lobe regions. The lung fissures are disappeared very fuzzy and indefinite in CT images, so that it is very difficult to extract fissures directly based on its CT values. We propose a method to solve this problem using the anatomy knowledge of human lung. We extract lung region firstly and then recognize the structures of lung vessels and bronchus. Based on anatomy knowledge, we classify the vessels and bronchus on a lobe-by-lobe basis and estimate the boundary of each lobe region as the initial fissure locations. Within those locations, we extract lung fissures precisely based on an edge detection method and divide lung regions into five lung lobes lastly. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated using 9 patient cases of high-resolution multi-slice chest CT images; the improvement has been confirmed with the reliable recognition results.

  6. In Vitro Comparison of Microleakage of Two Materials Used as Pit and Fissure Sealants

    PubMed Central

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Soleymani, Aliasghar; Heydari, Zahra

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Marginal seal of the material is extremely important in fissure sealant therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate microleakage of flowable composite resins and conventional fissure sealants with or without dentin bonding agent. Materials and methods The occlusal surface of 60 intact extracted human premolars, divided into four groups, were cleaned with pumice/slurry, etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds, rinsed and dried. Groups were treated differ-ently: Excite bonding agent followed by Helioseal F fissure sealant in group1; Helioseal F alone in group 2; Excite bonding agent followed by Tetric Flow in group 3; and Tetric Flow alone in group 4. Light-curing was done after each application. After thermocycling, the whole surface of each specimen was coated with nail varnish except for one millimeter around the fissure sealant. The teeth were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin for 24 hours and then sectioned buccolingually. The sections were analyzed for leakage under a stereomicroscope. Data was analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests at asignificance level of P < 0.05. Results There were no statistically significant differencesbetween the study groups in terms of the mean microleakage scores (P > 0.05), except for groups 2 and 4 (P = 0.002) and groups 3 and 4 (P = 0.033). Conclusion Use of a flowable composite with bonding agent is a good alternative for sealing pits and fissures; however, further in vitro and in vivo studies are necessary. PMID:22991611

  7. An experimental study on fracture mechanical behavior of rock-like materials containing two unparallel fissures under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan-Hua; Yang, Sheng-Qi; Tian, Wen-Ling; Zeng, Wei; Yu, Li-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Strength and deformability characteristics of rock with pre-existing fissures are governed by cracking behavior. To further research the effects of pre-existing fissures on the mechanical properties and crack coalescence process, a series of uniaxial compression tests were carried out for rock-like material with two unparallel fissures. In the present study, cement, quartz sand, and water were used to fabricate a kind of brittle rock-like material cylindrical model specimen. The mechanical properties of rock-like material specimen used in this research were all in good agreement with the brittle rock materials. Two unparallel fissures (a horizontal fissure and an inclined fissure) were created by inserting steel during molding the model specimen. Then all the pre-fissured rock-like specimens were tested under uniaxial compression by a rock mechanics servo-controlled testing system. The peak strength and Young's modulus of pre-fissured specimen all first decreased and then increased when the fissure angle increased from 0° to 75°. In order to investigate the crack initiation, propagation and coalescence process, photographic monitoring was adopted to capture images during the entire deformation process. Moreover, acoustic emission (AE) monitoring technique was also used to obtain the AE evolution characteristic of pre-fissured specimen. The relationship between axial stress, AE events, and the crack coalescence process was set up: when a new crack was initiated or a crack coalescence occurred, the corresponding axial stress dropped in the axial stress-time curve and a big AE event could be observed simultaneously. Finally, the mechanism of crack propagation under microscopic observation was discussed. These experimental results are expected to increase the understanding of the strength failure behavior and the cracking mechanism of rock containing unparallel fissures.

  8. Pulmonary Fissure Detection in CT Images Using a Derivative of Stick Filter.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changyan; Stoel, Berend C; Bakker, M Els; Peng, Yuanyuan; Stolk, Jan; Staring, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary fissures are important landmarks for recognition of lung anatomy. In CT images, automatic detection of fissures is complicated by factors like intensity variability, pathological deformation and imaging noise. To circumvent this problem, we propose a derivative of stick (DoS) filter for fissure enhancement and a post-processing pipeline for subsequent segmentation. Considering a typical thin curvilinear shape of fissure profiles inside 2D cross-sections, the DoS filter is presented by first defining nonlinear derivatives along a triple stick kernel in varying directions. Then, to accommodate pathological abnormality and orientational deviation, a [Formula: see text] cascading and multiple plane integration scheme is adopted to form a shape-tuned likelihood for 3D surface patches discrimination. During the post-processing stage, our main contribution is to isolate the fissure patches from adhering clutters by introducing a branch-point removal algorithm, and a multi-threshold merging framework is employed to compensate for local intensity inhomogeneity. The performance of our method was validated in experiments with two clinical CT data sets including 55 publicly available LOLA11 scans as well as separate left and right lung images from 23 GLUCOLD scans of COPD patients. Compared with manually delineating interlobar boundary references, our method obtained a high segmentation accuracy with median F1-scores of 0.833, 0.885, and 0.856 for the LOLA11, left and right lung images respectively, whereas the corresponding indices for a conventional Wiemker filtering method were 0.687, 0.853, and 0.841. The good performance of our proposed method was also verified by visual inspection and demonstration on abnormal and pathological cases, where typical deformations were robustly detected together with normal fissures. PMID:26766371

  9. The effect of CT technical factors on quantification of lung fissure integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, D.; Brown, M. S.; Ochs, R.; Abtin, F.; Brown, M.; Ordookhani, A.; Shaw, G.; Kim, H. J.; Gjertson, D.; Goldin, J. G.

    2009-02-01

    A new emphysema treatment uses endobronchial valves to perform lobar volume reduction. The degree of fissure completeness may predict treatment efficacy. This study investigated the behavior of a semiautomated algorithm for quantifying lung fissure integrity in CT with respect to reconstruction kernel and dose. Raw CT data was obtained for six asymptomatic patients from a high-risk population for lung cancer. The patients were scanned on either a Siemens Sensation 16 or 64, using a low-dose protocol of 120 kVp, 25 mAs. Images were reconstructed using kernels ranging from smooth to sharp (B10f, B30f, B50f, B70f). Research software was used to simulate an even lower-dose acquisition of 15 mAs, and images were generated at the same kernels resulting in 8 series per patient. The left major fissure was manually contoured axially at regular intervals, yielding 37 contours across all patients. These contours were read into an image analysis and pattern classification system which computed a Fissure Integrity Score (FIS) for each kernel and dose. FIS values were analyzed using a mixed-effects model with kernel and dose as fixed effects and patient as random effect to test for difference due to kernel and dose. Analysis revealed no difference in FIS between the smooth kernels (B10f, B30f) nor between sharp kernels (B50f, B70f), but there was a significant difference between the sharp and smooth groups (p = 0.020). There was no significant difference in FIS between the two low-dose reconstructions (p = 0.882). Using a cutoff of 90%, the number of incomplete fissures increased from 5 to 10 when the imaging protocol changed from B50f to B30f. Reconstruction kernel has a significant effect on quantification of fissure integrity in CT. This has potential implications when selecting patients for endobronchial valve therapy.

  10. A robotic approach to mapping post-eruptive volcanic fissure conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcheta, Carolyn E.; Pavlov, Catherine A.; Wiltsie, Nicholas; Carpenter, Kalind C.; Nash, Jeremy; Parness, Aaron; Mitchell, Karl L.

    2016-06-01

    VolcanoBot was developed to map volcanic vents and their underlying conduit systems, which are rarely preserved and generally inaccessible to human exploration. It uses a PrimeSense Carmine 1.09 sensor for mapping and carries an IR temperature sensor, analog distance sensor, and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) inside a protective shell. The first field test succeeded in collecting valuable scientific data but revealed several needed improvements, including more rugged cable connections and mechanical couplers, increased ground clearance, and higher-torque motors for uphill mobility. The second field test significantly improved on all of these aspects but it traded electrical ruggedness for reduced data collection speed. Data collected by the VolcanoBots, while intermittent, yield the first insights into the cm-scale geometry of volcanic fissures at depths of up to 25 m. VolcanoBot was deployed at the 1969 Mauna Ulu fissure system on Kīlauea volcano in Hawai'i. It collected first-of-its-kind data from inside the fissure system. We hypothesized that 1) fissure sinuosity should decrease with depth, 2) irregularity should be persistent with depth, 3) any blockages in the conduit should occur at the narrowest points, and 4) the fissure should narrow with depth until it is too narrow for VolcanoBot to pass or is plugged with solidified lava. Our field campaigns did not span enough lateral or vertical area to test sinuosity. The preliminary data indicate that 1) there were many irregularities along fissures at depth, 2) blockages occurred, but not at obviously narrow locations, and 3) the conduit width remained a consistent 0.4-0.5 m for most of the upper 10 m that we analyzed.

  11. A novel method of anal fissure laser surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Mehran Nasr; Madani, Golnoush; Madhkhan, Sepideh

    2015-08-01

    Anal fissure is a common painful problem, affecting all age groups. Its pathophysiology is based on high sphincter pressures and reduced blood supplying and treatments which means that it generally reduces anal pressures and increases anodermal blood flow. Since each of the anal fissure's routine therapies has some limitations such as definite risk of permanent fecal incontinence and high recurrence rate, we tried to find a more effective and less invasive procedure. In this pilot study which was implemented on 25 male and female patients aged 20-75 years, diagnosed clinically with chronic anal fissure, the Carbon Dioxide Laser Fractional was used to treat patients. In order to first remove fibrotic and granulation tissues, the base and the edges of the fissure were laser beamed. Eight spots were made on the sphincter by the laser on its continuous mode; somehow, they were passed through the full thickness of sphincter without interrupting its continuance. Afterwards, the area around the fissure ulcer was irradiated by deep fractional mode of the laser to stimulate the submucosa to regenerate and rejuvenate. After going through this procedure, patients were followed up within 6 months to 1 year. Pain, bleeding, and constipation were significantly improved. None of the patients had recurrence after a 1-year follow-up, and none of them had fecal incontinence and/or inability to control the passage of gas too. This study revealed that this new laser-based surgery is a simple, safe, and effective procedure to treat the anal fissure that can be performed with local anesthesia in an outpatient clinic with minimal postoperative morbidity. PMID:26067925

  12. Ice-Confined Basaltic Eruptive Fissure Complexes in Iceland: Accessible Analogs for Understanding Shallow Submarine Ridge Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, I. P.; Mercurio, E.; Cameron, B. I.

    2009-12-01

    In southwest Iceland, the onshore Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Reykjanes Ridge) forms a series of fissure and central vent (“shield”) volcanic complexes, known as the Western Volcanic Zone (WVZ). Sveifluháls is one of the longest fissure-fed complexes in the WVZ, and was erupted in an ice-confined environment during the Last Glacial Maximum. There are more than 1000 similar such glaciovolcanic ridges in Iceland, but there are few detailed studies of their construction. The complexes are both an important record of North Atlantic terrestrial ice presence and thicknesses in the Pleistocene, and are accessible analogs for submarine basaltic ridge volcanism in water less than a few hundred metres deep. This study focuses on the volcanic and sedimentary processes, products and depositional environments at Sveifluháls. Sveifluháls is a complex of closely spaced, sub-parallel, and multiple vent ridges. Ridges are constructed of numerous, regularly-spaced to overlapping and steep-sided topographic highs (point-source vents or tuff cones) and short, lower, intervening ridge segments (fissure vents or “tuff ridges”). Both tuff cones and tuff ridges consist dominantly of basal subaqueous lavas draped by phreatomagmatic tephra. Point-source vents have an average spacing of 0.7 km. Up to nine sub-parallel fissures/ridges occur, spaced 0.03-0.5 km apart. Ridges range from a few hundred metres to 21.5km in length. The majority of the phreatomagmatic has been rotated, slumped or slid. An upper sequence of inward and outward-dipping, over-steepened (rotated) “soft-margined” domains and angular blocks of bedded, subaqueously-deposited “Surtseyan” lapilli tuff, overlies more widespread aprons of very similar, but mostly slumped massive tephra. Important results to date include the observation that 1-2m wide dikes, emplaced into formerly wet unconsolidated tephra, form a volumetrically important part of the complex. The host tephra commonly shows evidence of deformation and

  13. Effects of anterior cingulate fissurization on cognitive control during stroop interference.

    PubMed

    Huster, Rene J; Wolters, Carsten; Wollbrink, Andreas; Schweiger, Elisabeth; Wittling, Werner; Pantev, Christo; Junghofer, Markus

    2009-04-01

    The midcingulate cortex, as part of the more anteriorly located cingulate regions, is thought to play a major role in cognitive processes like conflict monitoring or response selection. Regarding midcingulate fissurization, the occurrence of a second or paracingulate sulcus is more common in the left than in the right hemisphere and has been shown to be associated with an advantageous performance on tests of executive functions. However, the cognitive mechanisms underlying such behavioral differences are completely unknown. The current study addressed this issue by comparing subjects with a low and a high degree of left hemispheric midcingulate fissurization while collecting behavioral as well as electrophysiological correlates of Stroop interference. A high degree of fissurization was associated with decreased behavioral Stroop interference accompanied by a stronger and prolonged frontal negative potential to incongruent trials starting around 320 ms. This increased frontal negativity is assumed to reflect an enhanced activity of a conflict monitoring system located in the midcingulate cortex. In contrast and starting around 400 ms, subjects with low fissurization revealed an increased positivity over parieto-occipital regions suggesting a compensatory need for enhanced effortful cognitive control in this group. These results contribute to the understanding of the neuronal implementation of individual differences regarding attentional mechanisms. PMID:18570202

  14. Identification of genetic loci underlying the kernel fissure-resistance exhibited by 'cypress' and 'saber'

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The economic value of broken rice is about half that of whole milled rice, so one goal of producers, millers, and rice breeders is to reduce broken grains that result from the dehusking and milling processes One of the primary causes of rice breakage is fissuring, or cracking, of the rice before it ...

  15. Giant desiccation fissures on the Black Rock and Smoke Creek Deserts, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willden, R.; Mabey, D.R.

    1961-01-01

    Open fissures, from 100 to several hundred feet apart, that have produced polygonal patterns on the Black Rock Desert, Nevada, are believed to be giant desiccation cracks resulting from a secular trend toward aridity in the last few decades. Similar features on the Smoke Creek Desert probably have the same origin.

  16. Study of Operated Patients of Lateral Internal Anal Sphincterotomy for Chronic Anal Fissure

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harshad Shankarlal; Chavda, Jagdish; Parikh, Jayesh; Naik, Nehal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Anal fissure causes significant morbidity in the population. It is proposed that elevated sphincter pressures may cause ischaemia of the anal lining and this may be responsible for the pain of anal fissures and their failure to heal. When pharmacologic therapy fails or fissures recur frequently, lateral internal sphincterotomy is the surgical treatment of choice. Material and Methods: Retrospective analysis was done of admitted and operated patients of anal fissure by lateral anal internal sphincterotomy either by open or closed technique between April 2010 and November 2011 in Gujarat Medical Education & Research Society Medical College, Sola, Ahmedabad, India. The follow-up data of all patients was evaluated for pain relief, recurrence, wound infection, incontinence to flatus or stool or both for a period of up to 6 months. Results: Wound infection rate was 10.3% in open method and 4.2% in closed method. Incontinence to flatus was 8.3% in closed method and 3.4% in open method. This was temporary and controlled within a 1 week. Incontinence to stool was 3.4% in open method which was temporary and controlled within 2 weeks while none in closed method. None of the patients in either group had come with recurrence within 6 months follow-up. Conclusion: Lateral anal internal sphincterotomy is safe regarding long term incontinence and effective regarding recurrence. PMID:24551659

  17. Mapping the fissure potential zones based on microtremor measurement in Denpasar City, Bali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabowo, U. N.; Marjiyono; Sismanto

    2016-01-01

    Denpasar City and its vicinity considered as the areas with excessive ground water exploitation and high earthquake intensity. These conditions will cause these area potential with land subsidence which is triggering ground fissures. This research aims are to mapping the fissures potential areas based on microtremor measurement in Denpasar City and its vicinity. Ground fissures will happen if the land subsidence occurs in the areas which have different bedrock height beneath its sedimentary layer. The height of bedrock is determined by reducing surface elevation with the sedimentary layer thickness. This sedimentary layer thickness obtained from microtremor measurement using HVSR method, and Shear wave velocity (VS) obtained from microtremor array measurement which is analyzed by Spatial Auto Correlation (SPAC) method. The result from HVSR method as well as Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) value are then analyzed to get ground shear strain value, which is the soil surface strain and its effect when earthquake occurs. Based on the bedrock map, it can be estimated that the bedrock layer forms structure in the southern part of the research areas and the potential fissuring area due to the massive ground water exploitation is in the west Denpasar Subdistrict. In addition, based on the bedrock map and ground shear strain value which combined with Simple Additive Weight (SAW) method, there are two areas having Assuring potential, i.e west and south Denpasar Subdistricts.

  18. Radiating graben-fissure systems in the Ulfrun Regio area, Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studd, D.; Ernst, R. E.; Samson, C.

    2011-09-01

    Radiating graben-fissure systems are common on Venus. Most are thought to be underlain by mafic dykes, fed by centrally-located magmatic centres. From previous work it has been shown that these magmatic plumbing systems can extend out up to 2000 km or more and that interaction between neighbouring systems can provide insight into the relative chronology of their magmatic centres. Systematic mapping of graben-fissure systems has potential as a tool for regional magmatic chronology and correlation on Venus. This methodology is applied to the Ulfrun Regio area (200-240°E, 0-25°N) where we mapped 47,000 graben and fissures. From these, 66 radiating systems comprised of 13,000 individual graben and fissures, and having radii of up to 2000 km have been identified, and are interpreted to be underlain by dyke swarms focussed on magmatic centres. Cross-cutting relationships among these systems and with the Hecate Chasma rift zone have been examined to provide a relative chronology for the magmatic centres. Two trends emerged: (a) an apparent younging from the southwest to northeast of the study area and (b) a cluster of older ages in the southwest, linked to the Atla Regio mantle plume.

  19. Methods for monitoring land subsidence and earth fissures in the Western USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergason, K. C.; Rucker, M. L.; Panda, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    Depletion of groundwater resources in many deep alluvial basin aquifers in the Western USA is causing land subsidence, as it does in many regions worldwide. Land subsidence can severely and adversely impact infrastructure by changing the ground elevation, ground slope (grade) and through the development of ground cracks known as earth fissures that can erode into large gullies. Earth fissures have the potential to compromise the foundations of dams, levees, and other infrastructure and cause failure. Subsequent to an evaluation of the overall subsidence experienced in the vicinity of subsidence-impacted infrastructure, a detailed investigation to search for earth fissures, and design and/or mitigation of potentially effected infrastructure, a focused monitoring system should be designed and implemented. Its purpose is to provide data, and ultimately knowledge, to reduce the potential adverse impacts of land subsidence and earth fissure development to the pertinent infrastructure. This risk reduction is realized by quantifying the rate and distribution of ground deformation, and to detect ground rupture if it occurs, in the vicinity of the infrastructure. The authors have successfully designed and implemented monitoring systems capable of quantifying rates and distributions of ground subsidence and detection of ground rupture at multiple locations throughout the Western USA for several types of infrastructure including dams, levees, channels, basins, roadways, and mining facilities. Effective subsidence and earth fissure monitoring requires understanding and quantification of historic subsidence, estimation of potential future subsidence, delineation of the risk for earth fissures that could impact infrastructure, and motivation and resources to continue monitoring through time. A successful monitoring system provides the means to measure ground deformation, grade changes, displacement, and anticipate and assess the potential for earth fissuring. Employing multiple

  20. Effects of menthol essence and breast milk on the improvement of nipple fissures in breastfeeding women

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Sedigheh Amir Ali; Alamolhoda, Seideh Hanieh; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh; Mirabi, Parvaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nipple fissure is a common disorder during breastfeeding. With high prevalence of nipple fissures and its impacts on breastfeeding, as well as the existence of evidence in favor of the application of peppermint as an antiinflammatory and antiinfection herb, the purpose of this study is to determine the effect of Menthol essence on improving nipple fissures in the primiparous breastfeeding women. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted using a clinical trial method. Samples were divided randomly into two groups of 55 women. The women in the peppermint group applied four drops of Menthol essence on their nipple and areola after each feeding. The control group applied four drops of their own milk on the nipple and areola after each feeding. Then, the two groups were studied on days 10 and 14 postpartum. For intensity of pain, the visual analog scale (0-10 cm) and to measure the severity of damage, Amir scale (1-10 cm) were applied and the existence or lack of nipple discharge was also recorded. The data were analyzed using SPSS 17 software. Results: The mean intensity of pain and nipple fissure before treatment (8.55 ± 1.74) and day 10 after delivery (4.26 ± 1.57) and before treatment and day 14 after delivery in the case group (1.32 ± 1.02) had a significant difference (P < 0.001). Nipple discharge between the two groups, before treatment (%75.2) and day 10 after delivery (%31.6) and before treatment and day 14 after delivery (%15.7), the case group had a significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Menthol essence can improve nipple fissures in the primiparous breastfeeding women. PMID:25364362

  1. Soil gas composition from the 2001-2002 fissure in the Lakki Plain (Nisyros Island, Greece): evidences for shallow hydrothermal fluid circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, Stefania; Tassi, Franco; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Vaselli, Orlando; Caponi, Chiara; Ricci, Andrea; Raspanti, Alessio; Gallorini, Andrea; Cabassi, Jacopo; Vougioukalakis, Georges

    2016-04-01

    Nisyros volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece) is currently classified in the "Very High Threat" category (Kinvig et al., 2010). Although the last volcanic activity, consisting of phreatic eruptions, occurred in the 19th century, Nisyros experienced an intense seismic activity during 1996-1998 accompanied by ground deformation and changes in the chemistry of fumarolic gases (Chiodini et al., 2002), pointing to a renewed unrest. Between November 2001 and December 2002, a NNE-oriented 600 m long fissure opened in the vegetated central part of the Lakki Plain. The fissure, 1-5 m wide and up to 15-20 m deep, showed neither vertical displacements nor gas release. No changes in the seismic and volcanic activity were observed during or after this event, which was interpreted as related to collapse of the upper caldera floor fine sediment cover (<50 m thick) induced by hydrothermal fluid circulation (Vougioukalakis and Fytikas, 2005). In June 2015, diffuse CO2 flux measurements, in combination with sampling and chemical analysis of the interstitial soil gases, were performed in (i) the fissure bottom, (ii) the adjacent vegetated areas in the Lakki Plain, (iii) the near hydrothermal craters (Stefanos, Kaminakia, Lofos domes), and (iv) sites located outside the caldera (blank values). The fissure showed neither temperature (<30 °C) nor CO2 fluxes (<10 gm-2d-1) anomalies with respect to the blank sites and the Lakki Plain, with values strikingly lower than those measured in the hydrothermal craters (up to 98 °C and 208 gm-2d-1, respectively). Contrarily, the CO2 concentrations in the interstitial soil gases from the fissure (up to 513 mmol/mol) were markedly higher than the background values and comparable with those measured in the craters (up to 841 mmol/mol). Relatively high H2S, H2 and CH4 contents in soil gases from the fissure confirm the hydrothermal origin of these soil gases. However, their CH4/CO2 ratio were lower than those measured in the soil gases from the craters

  2. Enamel Surface with Pit and Fissure Sealant Containing 45S5 Bioactive Glass.

    PubMed

    Yang, S-Y; Kwon, J-S; Kim, K-N; Kim, K-M

    2016-05-01

    Enamel demineralization adjacent to pit and fissure sealants leads to the formation of marginal caries, which can necessitate the replacement of existing sealants. Dental materials with bioactive glass, which releases ions that inhibit dental caries, have been studied. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enamel surface adjacent to sealants containing 45S5 bioactive glass (BAG) under simulated microleakage between the material and the tooth in a cariogenic environment. Sealants containing 45S5BAG filler were prepared as follows: 0% 45S5BAG + 50.0% glass (BAG0 group), 12.5% 45S5BAG + 37.5% glass (BAG12.5 group), 25.0% 45S5BAG + 25.0% glass (BAG25.0 group), 37.5% 45S5BAG + 12.5% glass (BAG37.5 group), and 50.0% 45S5BAG + 0% glass (BAG50.0 group). A cured sealant disk was placed over a flat bovine enamel disk, separated by a 60-µm gap, and immersed in lactic acid solution (pH 4.0) at 37 °C for 15, 30, and 45 d. After the storage period, each enamel disk was separated from the cured sealant disk, and the enamel surface was examined with optical 3-dimensional surface profilometer, microhardness tester, and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed a significant increase in roughness and a decrease in microhardness of the enamel surface as the proportion of 45S5BAG decreased (P< 0.05). In the scanning electron microscopy images, enamel surfaces with BAG50.0 showed a smooth surface, similar to those in the control group with distilled water, even after prolonged acid storage. Additionally, an etched pattern was observed on the surface of the demineralized enamel with a decreasing proportion of 45S5BAG. Increasing the 45S5BAG filler contents of the sealants had a significant impact in preventing the demineralization of the enamel surface within microgaps between the material and the tooth when exposed to a cariogenic environment. Therefore, despite some marginal leakage, these novel sealants may be effective preventive dental materials for inhibiting

  3. Prevalence of Dental Caries and Fissure Sealants in a Portuguese Sample of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Veiga, Nélio J.; Pereira, Carlos M.; Ferreira, Paula C.; Correia, Ilidio J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of dental caries and the DMFT index, as well as the distribution pattern of pit and fissure sealants on permanent teeth in a Portuguese sample of adolescents, and to assess whether the existing usage of sealants and socio-demographic factors are correlated to caries prevalence on the examined sample. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was designed with a sample of 447 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years old, attending a public school in Sátão, Portugal. A self-administered questionnaire with questions about oral health behaviours and socio-economic status was answered by adolescents in the classroom. Clinical examination of oral health status and assessment of fissure sealants were accomplished by only one trained member of the research team. Results We obtained a DMFT index of 3.32 (2.92), which indicates a moderate level of prevalence of dental caries. When considering a DMFT = 0, we found significant statistical differences between the parents´ level of education (≤ 4th grade = 26.3 vs 5th–12th grade = 18.8 vs <12th grade = 43.3, p = 0.001), gender (male = 27.3 vs female = 19.6, p = 0.04), age (≤15 years = 27.1 vs <15 years = 18.5, p = 0.02), presence of fissure sealants (yes = 30.6 vs no = 13.5, p = 0.001) and experience of dental pain (no = 25.4 vs yes = 16.8, p = 0.02). When analyzing the prevalence of fissure sealants, we verified that 58.8% of adolescents had at least one fissure sealant applied. Significant statistical differences were found when analyzing the presence of fissure sealants related with parents´educational level (<9th grade, OR = 1.56 CI95% = 1.05–2.54), gender (female, OR = 1.86 CI95% = 1.19–2.98), experience of dental pain (yes, OR = 0.62 CI95% = 0.39–0.97) and presence of dental caries (yes, OR = 0.35 CI95% = 0.19–0.65). Conclusions The moderate level of caries prevalence reveals the need of improvement of primary prevention interventions among

  4. Construction and Evolution of an Ice-Confined Basaltic Eruptive Fissure Complex: Sveifluhals, SW Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercurio, E. C.; Skilling, I. P.; Cameron, B.

    2009-05-01

    Ice-confined fissure-fed basaltic eruptions were common in Iceland during the Pleistocene. Most of these generated complexes consisting of closely spaced, sub-parallel, multi-vent ridges. Individual ridges are constructed mostly of numerous linked steep-sided mounds (point-source vents) and short ridges (fissure vents) of subaqueous lavas, most of which are draped by phreatomagmatic tephra. There are more than 1000 such ridges in Iceland and they represent an important, largely untapped, database on North Atlantic terrestrial ice conditions. Some of these complexes were of comparable length to the famous Laki fissure eruptions of 1783-1785. Sveifluhals is a 21.5-km long formerly ice-confined fissure complex of unknown age, but similar nearby centers have been dated at about 47ka. Ice-thickness estimates, based on volatile analysis of pillow rind glass vary from 70-400m. This is the first detailed study of such a complex, which focuses on how it was constructed in space and time, how it differs from published studies of simple single short fissure ice-confined centers, and how it interacted with the overlying ice. Initial results have identified vents with an average spacing of 0.7km on at least nine sub-parallel fissures, which are spaced about 0.1-0.5km apart. The vents are dominated by inward and outward-dipping rotated (oversteepened) blocks of bedded tephra, which overlies mostly slumped massive tephra. The tephra drapes subaqueous lava mounds that display marginal steep- ridges of subaqueous lavas, that may have been emplaced in short sub-ice tunnels. We have also identified several now dry lakes that formed in some inter-ridge areas, but whose age relationship to ridge construction is as yet uncertain. We present here our preliminary data on vent locations and estimates of product volumes, volumes of ice melted, and location of possible meltwater pathways. We discuss the most important differences of the processes and products of such ridge complexes compared

  5. Ground fissures in the area of Mavropigi Village (N. Greece): Seismotectonics or mining activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogirou, Eleni; Tsapanos, Theodoros; Karakostas, Vassilios; Marinos, Vassilios; Chatzipetros, Alexandros

    2014-12-01

    In the beginning of July 2010, a ground fissure was observed in the field near the village of Mavropigi (Northern Greece) and specifically in its NW side. Later on (early September), a second ground fissure was perceived, close and almost parallel to the first one and very close to the limits of the lignite exploitation mine (by the Public Power Corporation, PPC). It was observed that the village of Mavropigi slides away slowly towards the PPC lignite mine. Geological, seismological, as well as geotechnical survey in the field indicated that the phenomenon is related to the coal mining exploitation in the near vicinity of the village rather than to any seismotectonic activity in the surrounding area.

  6. Artificial recharge through a well in fissured carbonate rock, west St. Paul, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeder, Harold O.; Wood, Warren W.; Ehrlich, G.G.; Sun, Ren Jen

    1976-01-01

    The injection test demonstrated that it is hydrologically feasible to recharge the Prairie du Chien Group and the Jordan Sandstone artificially through wells completed in the Prairie du Chien Group. The fissures in the Prairie du Chien Group act as conduits through which water spreads. The water passes into the Jordan Sandstone from the Prairie du Chien over a larger area than it would if it were injected directly into the Jordan.

  7. Dynamics of the 2014 Holuhraun fissure eruption analysed by video monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Tanja; Walter, Thomas R.

    2015-04-01

    Events on the volcanic system within the axial volcanic zones are linked to plate movements. The spreading and subsequent rifting of the crust take place at the plate boundary and occurs in distinct rifting episodes. These rifting episodes are characterized by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions within the central volcano or along fissures. For the subsurface structure of a volcanic system and the behavior of the magma plumbing system during major rifting episodes two contrasting models exists, (i) vertical feeding by a deep magma source or (ii) lateral feeding through a shallow magma chamber under the central volcano. The ongoing 2014 Holuhraun eruption is providing a unique opportunity to rigorously test the feeding paths of an active fissure eruption. Here we employ video images to analyse the height and velocity variation of the lava fountains at the Holuhraun eruption fissure. On the first day of the eruption we could set up in total five high resolution video cameras. With algorithms of photogrammetry and correlation analysis we interpret the behavior of the lava fountains. Results suggest a significal lateral propagation path of the dynamics of the active vents, and a lateral migration of the peaks and lows of distinct lava fountains. Although the correlation system can change episodically and sporadically, both the frequency of the lava fountains and the eruption and rest time between single fountains remain similar for adjacent lava fountains imply a controlling process in the magma feeder system itself. We interpret the results by a lateral magma and gas flow underlying and feeding the eruption fissure. Systematic recording and analysis of video data hence help to decide which magma plumbing system is more reliable. Additionally, the dataset allows us to compare the eruption behavior to seismic datasets.

  8. Quality Assessment of Information About Pit and Fissure Sealants in Persian Websites in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite the increasing use of Internet, there is no supervision over the accuracy and quality of the information provided in the web. To deal with this problem, health specialists should take part in planning, publishing and supervision of online health-related information. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of information related to pit and fissure sealants in Persian websites. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, Persian websites providing information about fissure sealants were found using Google search engine. The searched keywords according to the MeSH database were “patient education” and “fissure sealant”. After applying the exclusion criteria, 37 websites out of 500 initial links remained in the study. These websites were evaluated based on a researcher-made checklist. The validity and reliability of the checklist were evaluated and confirmed. Descriptive analysis was applied to report the results of our study using SPSS version 11.5. Results: The average score for the quality of information was 22.46 out of 38. The minimum scores were 16 and 30 and belonged to Pezeshkanemrooz.com and Asa85.blogfa.com , respectively. The results showed that 62.2% of the answers were scored 2–4 and 37.8% were scored 1; therefore, the overall quality of the published content was rated to be moderate for 62.2% and low for 37.8% of the websites. Conclusions: Overall, the quality of information related to fissure sealant provided in Persian websites was good; however, the information given was mostly incomplete and could be improved. The main problems were doubtful credibility and outdated information.

  9. Arteries and Veins of the Sylvian Fissure and Insula: Microsurgical Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Delion, Matthieu; Mercier, Philippe; Brassier, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    We present a vascular anatomical study of the arteries and veins of the sylvian fissure and insula.A good knowledge of the sylvian fissure, the insula, and their vascular relationship would seem mandatory before performing surgery in this area, whatever the type of surgery (aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, insular tumors).We start with the sylvian fissure and insula morphology, followed by the MCA description and its perforators, with special attention paid to the insular perforators. We demonstrate that the long insular perforators penetrating in the superior part of the posterior short gyrus and long gyri vascularize, respectively, the corticonuclear and corticospinal fasciculi. We particularly insist too on three anatomical constants regarding the vascularization of the insula, already described in the literature: The superior periinsular sulcus is the only sulcus on the lateral surface of the brain without an artery along its axis; the superior branch of the MCA supplies the anterior insular pole and both the anterior and middle short gyri in 100 % of cases; in at least 90 % of cases, the artery that supplied the central insular sulcus continued on to become the central artery.We end with the anatomical study of the veins and cisterns. PMID:26508410

  10. Resin infiltration of fissure caries with various techniques of pretreatment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lausch, Julian; Paris, Sebastian; Selje, Timo; Dörfer, Christof E; Meyer-Lueckel, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    The resin infiltration technique might be used for occlusal caries lesions in order to arrest their progression. This in vitro study evaluated the influence of various modifications of the infiltration technique on the penetration abilities of the infiltrant into occlusal lesions. Extracted human molars and premolars (n = 140) with non-cavitated white spot lesions were randomly allocated to 7 groups. As control, specimens were etched with 15% hydrochloric acid (HCl) gel for 120 s and resin infiltrated for 180 s (Icon; DMG). As modification HCl gel reduced in surface tension and viscosity with and without abrasives was applied using 3 different types of brushes either to oscillate or rub the HCl gel onto the enamel surface. The median maximum lesion depth was 1,232 µm (interquartile range 882-1,513). Compared with the control procedure [23% (16/50)] a higher percentage penetration was observed if the HCl gel was mixed with a small amount of abrasives were rubbed into the fissures using a modified brush with stiff bristles that were adjusted to the fissure relief for either 120 s [100% (64/100)] or 30 s [98% (61/100); p < 0.05; Mann-Whitney test]. All other experimental treatments resulted in penetration results in-between. It can be concluded that the use of an abrasive HCl gel in conjunction with a modified brush mostly enhances resin infiltration into fissure caries lesions. PMID:25427531

  11. Organogenesis of mild ocular coloboma in FLS mice: failure of basement membrane disintegration at optic fissure margins.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Naho; Kita, Katsutoshi; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Narama, Isao; Matsuura, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    Fatty Liver Shionogi (FLS) mice have been shown to develop a hereditary disorder characterized by localized retinochoroidal defects of the ventral fundus very similar to human typical ocular coloboma without microphthalmia. The objective of this study was to determine when and how the failure of the optic fissure closure occurs, and to clarify the disturbed mechanism of basement membrane disintegration during embryonal stage in FLS mice. Fetuses at day 11.5-15.5 of gestation were obtained from dams of FLS and BALB/c strain of mice. Coronal serial sections through the eye were examined by light and electron microscopy. The sections were followed by observation of the basement membrane using reaction with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent and immunohistochemical staining with anti-Laminin and anti-Type IV collagen antibodies. Both optic fissure margins closely approached each other up to GD 11.5 in all FLS and BALB/c embryos. The inner and outer layers of the optic cup did not normally fuse at midlenticular levels of the optic fissure in almost 70% of FLS fetuses by GD 15.5, whereas both margins were completely fused in all BALB/c fetuses of the same gestational day. In the FLS fetuses at GD 12.5, rolling on one side of fissure margins and consequent asymmetry were observed at the ventral optic fissure. The basement membrane persisted after the close contact of both sides of the fissure margins during GD 11.5 and 15.5. Ultrastructurally, the basal lamina was not disintegrated and mesenchymal cells intervened between the two neuroepithelial layers, resulting in complete separation of both fissure margins at GD 13.0. It is highly probable that the disturbed basement membrane disintegration right before optic fissure closure causes mild ocular coloboma without microphthalmia in FLS mice. PMID:22182670

  12. An Experimental and Numerical Study on Cracking Behavior of Brittle Sandstone Containing Two Non-coplanar Fissures Under Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Tian, Wen-Ling; Huang, Yan-Hua; Ranjith, P. G.; Ju, Yang

    2016-04-01

    To understand the fracture mechanism in all kinds of rock engineering, it is important to investigate the fracture evolution behavior of pre-fissured rock. In this research, we conducted uniaxial compression experiments to evaluate the influence of ligament angle on the strength, deformability, and fracture coalescence behavior of rectangular prismatic specimens (80 × 160 × 30 mm) of brittle sandstone containing two non-coplanar fissures. The experimental results show that the peak strength of sandstone containing two non-coplanar fissures depends on the ligament angle, but the elastic modulus is not closely related to the ligament angle. With the increase of ligament angle, the peak strength decreased at a ligament angle of 60°, before increasing up to our maximum ligament angle of 120°. Crack initiation, propagation, and coalescence were all observed and characterized from the inner and outer tips of pre-existing non-coplanar fissures using photographic monitoring. Based on the results, the sequence of crack evolution in sandstone containing two non-coplanar fissures was analyzed in detail. In order to fully understand the crack evolution mechanism of brittle sandstone, numerical simulations using PFC2D were performed for specimens containing two non-coplanar fissures under uniaxial compression. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results. By analyzing the stress field, the crack evolution mechanism in brittle sandstone containing two non-coplanar fissures under uniaxial compression is revealed. These experimental and numerical results are expected to improve the understanding of the unstable fracture mechanism of fissured rock engineering structures.

  13. Fracturing and Seismicity at the Prestahnúkur Fissure Swarm in the Ultra-Slowly Spreading Western Volcanic Zone, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjartardottir, A. R.; Hjaltadottir, S.; Einarsson, P.; Vogfjord, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Extension across the mid-Atlantic plate boundary in south Iceland is taken up by two parallel zones, the Western and the Eastern Volcanic Zones. Spreading across the western zone is of the order of 1-7 mm/year, qualifying it as an ultra-slow rift. The Prestahnúkur fissure swarm in the Western Volcanic Zone offers an opportunity to study magma-tectonic interaction in an ultra-slow spreading setting. In this study, fractures and faults were mapped in detail from aerial photographs to determine the extent of the fissure swarm. The fissure swarm is about 60 km long and 10 km wide, although its extent to the south is uncertain due to its linkage with the adjacent Hengill fissure swarm. The fissure swarm has both open fractures, indicating postglacial activation, and normal faults with up to 45 m vertical offset. Hyaloclastite ridges („tindars"), produced by subglacial fissure eruptions during the Pleistocene, are found within the fissure swarm, as well as postglacial lava flows. Intermittent seismicity occurs in the area. Earthquakes during the last ~24 years were relocated to study their relation with the surface fractures. Relocation of these events indicate that some of the fractures seen on surface have been activated during these years. The small cumulative seismic moment and slow spreading measured by geodetic methods nevertheless show that no dike intrusions have occurred during this period. Pleistocene tindars and Holocene lavas are clear indications of magmatism, however. We therefore suggest that the Prestahnúkur fissure swarm is mainly formed by diking and rifting during rifting episodes, whereas small scale fracture movements can occur during inter-rifting periods. The present small-scale fracture movements may indicate lack of magma to drive dike intrusions.

  14. Distributed Computing for Seismic Data Retrieval using FISSURES DHI Client FMI Implimented from MatSeis 1.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, D. M.; Li, Q.; Creager, K. C.; Ning, R.; Crotwell, H. P.; Zuzlewski, S.; Hellman, S. B.; Schoch, K. S.; Laughbon, C. J.; Stromme, S. R.

    2004-12-01

    Three software development efforts have recently combined to allow a seamless method for obtaining data from the IRIS DMC over the Internet and analyzing it in MATLAB. During the past few years IRIS has constructed the initial framework and definitions for FISSURES servers and Data Handling Interface (DHI) clients. FISSURES uses the distributed computing language Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), which allows software systems to work across the Internet in a platform independent and computer-language neutral manner. Starting from the FISSURES object model three seismic services have been defined: event, network and seismogram. From these three object types a DHI client is used to access information through FISSURES services. Using the University of Washington developed FISSURES-Matlab-Interface (FMI) DHI client, all three FISSURES objects can be accessed via the Internet and downloaded into local MATLAB objects, allowing access to earthquake event catalogs, seismograms, network and instrument information. The DHI client FMI can be implemented from MatSeis. MatSeis, developed at Sandia National Laboratory, is a MATLAB based, Graphical User Interface (GUI) controlled software package with seismic data visualization, signal processing, and database importing and exporting capabilities, to list just a few. In this poster, we will discuss the seismic data retrieval currently prototyped for the IRIS DMC, as well as the planned connections to the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC), Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC), and South Carolina Earth Physics Project (SCEPP) data center.

  15. Method for laser drilling subterranean earth formations

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1976-08-31

    Laser drilling of subterranean earth formations is efficiently accomplished by directing a collimated laser beam into a bore hole in registry with the earth formation and transversely directing the laser beam into the earth formation with a suitable reflector. In accordance with the present invention, the bore hole is highly pressurized with a gas so that as the laser beam penetrates the earth formation the high pressure gas forces the fluids resulting from the drilling operation into fissures and pores surrounding the laser-drilled bore so as to inhibit deleterious occlusion of the laser beam. Also, the laser beam may be dynamically programmed with some time dependent wave form, e.g., pulsed, to thermally shock the earth formation for forming or enlarging fluid-receiving fissures in the bore.

  16. Seismic processes and migration of magma during the Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption of 1975-1976 and Tolbachik Fissure Eruption of 2012-2013, Kamchatka Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, S. A.; Slavina, L. B.; Senyukov, S. L.; Kuchay, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic and volcanic processes in the area of the northern group of volcanoes (NGV) in Kamchatka Peninsula that accompanied the Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (GTFE) of 1975-1976 and the Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (TFE, or "50 let IViS" due to anniversary of the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences) of 2012-2013 and the seismic activity between these events are considered. The features of evolution of seismic processes of the major NGV volcanoes (Ploskii Tolbachik, Klyuchevskoy, Bezymannyi, and Shiveluch) are revealed. The distribution of earthquakes along depth, their spatial and temporal migration, and the relation of seismic and volcanic activity are discussed. The major features of seismic activity during the GTFE preparation and evolution and a development of earthquake series preceding the origin of the northern and southern breaks are described. The character of seismic activity between the GTFE and TFE is shown. The major peculiarities of evolution of seismic activity preceding and accompanying the TFE are described. The major magma sources and conduits of the NGV volcanoes are identified, as is the existence of a main conduit in the mantle and a common intermediate source for the entire NGV, the depth of which is 25-35 km according to seismic data. The depth of a neutral buoyancy layer below the NGV is 15-20 km and the source of areal volcanism of magnesian basalts northeast of the Klyuchevskoy volcano is located at depth of ~20 km. These data support the major properties of a 2010 geophysical model of magmatic feeding system of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes. The present paper covers a wider NGV area and is based on the real experimental observations.

  17. Land subsidence and earth fissures in south-central and southern Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Brian D.

    2016-05-01

    Land subsidence due to groundwater overdraft has been an ongoing problem in south-central and southern Arizona (USA) since the 1940s. The first earth fissure attributed to excessive groundwater withdrawal was discovered in the early 1950s near Picacho. In some areas of the state, groundwater-level declines of more than 150 m have resulted in extensive land subsidence and earth fissuring. Land subsidence in excess of 5.7 m has been documented in both western metropolitan Phoenix and Eloy. The Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR) has been monitoring land subsidence since 2002 using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and since 1998 using a global navigation satellite system (GNSS). The ADWR InSAR program has identified more than 25 individual land subsidence features that cover an area of more than 7,300 km2. Using InSAR data in conjunction with groundwater-level datasets, ADWR is able to monitor land subsidence areas as well as identify areas that may require additional monitoring. One area of particular concern is the Willcox groundwater basin in southeastern Arizona, which is the focus of this paper. The area is experiencing rapid groundwater declines, as much as 32.1 m during 2005-2014 (the largest land subsidence rate in Arizona State—up to 12 cm/year), and a large number of earth fissures. The declining groundwater levels in Arizona are a challenge for both future groundwater availability and mitigating land subsidence associated with these declines. ADWR's InSAR program will continue to be a critical tool for monitoring land subsidence due to excessive groundwater withdrawal.

  18. Ability of Pit and Fissure Sealant-containing Amorphous Calcium Phosphate to inhibit Enamel Demineralization

    PubMed Central

    Owais, Arwa I; Kawaja, Wasan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To evaluate the effect of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)-containing pit and fissure sealant on inhibition of enamel demineralization in vitro. Materials and methods: Enamel specimens (n = 75) were prepared using freshly extracted noncarious human third molars. Box-shaped cavities (8 × 2 × 2 mm) on the buccal or lingual surfaces were prepared and restored with resin-based sealant (Concise™), ACP-containing sealant (Aegis®) or fluoride-containing sealant (Conseal-F™). The samples were acid challenged in a demineralizing solution of 50 mmol/l lactic acid at pH 5.0 for 4 days. The change in enamel microhardness (ASuH) was calculated. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post hoc test. Results: The mean SuH0 (±SD) (in Vicker’s unit) prior to the acid challenge was: Concise™ (318.83 ± 33.86), Aegis® (331.03 ± 21.52), Conseal-F™ (310.12 ± 34.31). Following the acid challenge, the values dropped in all groups and ASuH (±SD) values were 269.17 ± 47.49, 151.39 ± 23.96 and 175.79 ± 32.39 respectively. Conclusion: The ACP-containing pit and fissure sealant has the potential to inhibit enamel demineralization. How to cite this article: Zawaideh FI, Owais AI, Kawaja W. Ability of pit and fissure sealant-containing amorphous calcium phosphate to inhibit enamel demineralization. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):10-14. PMID:27274148

  19. Fissure distribution at Mauna Loa (Hawaii) as an example to understand shallow magma transfer at volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Marra, Daniele; Acocella, Valerio; Trusdell, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Mauna Loa (Hawaii) is the largest active shield volcano on the Island of Hawai'i, covering more than half of it and rising to 4,169 meters above sea level. The volcano hosts the Moku'aweoweo summit caldera, from which two elongated rift zones depart: the Northeast Rift Zone (NERZ) and the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ). Most of Mauna Loa's eruptions begin with lava fountains from a series of fissure vents in the summit region and then often migrate to vents down either rift zone. Mauna Loa volcano shows a distinctive feature, being characterized by minor radial eruptive fissures (not related to the two main rifts) on the NW flank only. This study tries to explain such a selective distribution of vents, and thus of shallow magma transfer. To this aim, we run numerical models with different amount of opening of the two rift zones of Mauna Loa, as well as different amount of slip on its SE flank. Our results suggest that the selective occurrence of the radial fissures may be explained by the competition between two processes: a) rift intrusion (especially along the NERZ), promoting the development of radial dikes along the NW flank; b) flank slip, inhibiting the development of the radial dikes on the SE flank. The opening of the two non-parallel main rift zones of Mauna Loa promotes the local extension necessary to develop the radial dikes on the NW flank. A general model for the development of a third branch of radial rift, which may be also applied to Mt. Etna and some volcanoes on the Canary Islands, is proposed.

  20. Reconstructing recent basaltic fissure eruptions in the Afar Depression, Ethiopia, using satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnie, T. D.; Ferguson, D. J.; Oppenheimer, C.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2005, there have been numerous dike intrusions in the Manda-Hararo rift segment in central Afar, Ethiopia, as part of an on-going rifting event similar to that which occurred at Krafla, Iceland between 1975 and 1984. Two of the dikes have been associated with basaltic fissure eruptions, in August 2007 and in June 2009. A large fissure eruption also occurred in the Erta ‘Ale volcanic range in northern Afar in November 2008, which may be related to the activity further south. These eruptions took place in remote areas and lasted only a few days, making field observation almost impossible. We must therefore rely on the geomorphology and geochemistry of the erupted deposits, and syn-eruption satellite observations of thermally emitted radiance and gas emissions to reconstruct the evolution of these eruptions. Reconstruction of the eruptions is important for i) understanding the relationship between dike intrusion and fissure eruption dynamics ii) understanding the relationship between eruption dynamics and the resulting deposits, iii) interpreting the deposits of pre-historic eruptions from previous rifting events, and iv) estimating the hazard posed to the local population by further activity. In this study we use pre- and post-eruption high resolution ASTER and ALI images to map the morphology of the erupted material, and SEVIRI and MODIS time series of the eruptions to track evolution of the vent dynamics and lava flows. These datasets are augmented by oblique aerial and ground based photographic and FLIR surveys of the cooling lava flows and tephra. ASTER and ALI images are also used to map older erupted materials, which allow us to compare this rifting event with previous events to anticipate future activity.

  1. Anal fissure

    MedlinePlus

    ... cream, if pain interferes with normal bowel movements Petroleum jelly Zinc oxide, 1% hydrocortisone cream, Preparation H, ... is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation ...

  2. Anal Fissure

    MedlinePlus

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  3. Fissured Tongue

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  4. Treating pit-and-fissure caries: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Jäger, A M; Paris, S; Hsu, L Y; Tu, Y K

    2015-04-01

    For shallow or moderately deep pit-and-fissure lesions, various treatment options are available: (1) noninvasive treatments (e.g., fluoride application, antibacterial treatments, oral hygiene advice) avoid any dental hard tissue removal; (2) microinvasive treatments (e.g., sealing) remove only a few micrometers of hard tissues by etching; and minimally invasive methods (e.g., "preventive" resin/sealant restoration) remove carious dentin but avoid sacrificing sound tissues. We aimed at systematically reviewing and comparing these strategies for treating pit-and-fissure lesions in permanent teeth using network meta-analysis. Randomized or nonrandomized clinical trials investigating shallow or moderately deep primary caries lesions in fissured or pitted surfaces were included. We compared the risk of requiring invasive treatments or any retreatments in noninvasive, microinvasive, and minimally invasive treated lesions; untreated lesions were used as controls. Five electronic databases were systematically screened up to September 2013 and cross-referencing performed. Pairwise and network meta-analyses were performed and odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) calculated. Certainty of estimates was evaluated via GRADE criteria. From a total of 2,214 identified records, 14 studies representing 1,440 patients with 3,551 treated lesions were included. Pairwise meta-analysis found microinvasive and minimally invasive treated lesions to require less invasive retreatments than control lesions (odds ratios [95% confidence intervals]: 0.13 [0.07 to 0.26], 0.13 [0.03 to 0.50], respectively), whereas the estimate for noninvasively treated lesions remained nonsignificant (0.64 [0.39 to 1.06]). These findings were reflected in the strategy ranking stemming from network meta-analysis (first, minimally invasive; second, microinvasive; third, noninvasive). However, microinvasive treatment required significantly more total retreatments (including resealing) than minimally or

  5. [Endotracheal hemorrhage caused by fissuration of the innominate artery during prolonged intubation. Surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Couraud, L; Hafez, A; Velly, J F

    1984-11-24

    We present our surgical procedure for the control of tracheal haemorrhages due to fissuration of the innominate artery in patients with prolonged tracheal intubation or tracheostomy. Temporary haemostasis and protection of the airways against flooding are ensured by downward advancement of the tube, overinflation of the cuffs and digital pressure if required. The fistula is then located and surgical haemostasis is obtained by resection of the innominate artery away from the infected area. The arterial stumps are covered up for protection against secondary infection. Re-establishment of blood flow is not systematic. Cervicosternotomy is regarded as the incision of choice. No complication was encountered in patients treated by this method. PMID:6239257

  6. A prospective randomized trial comparing stapler and laser techniques for interlobar fissure completion during pulmonary lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Marulli, Giuseppe; Droghetti, Andrea; Di Chiara, Francesco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rebusso, Alessandro; Perissinotto, Egle; Muriana, Giovanni; Rea, Federico

    2013-02-01

    Alveolar air leaks, often resulting from lung tissue traumatization during dissection of fissures, still remain a challenging problem in lung surgery. Several tools and techniques have been used to reduce air leakage, but none was judged ideal. This prospective, randomized trial was designed to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of completion of fissures during pulmonary lobectomy by using a laser system. A standard stapler technique was used for comparison; the primary goal was to reach at least a comparable result. Forty-four patients were enrolled, 22 were treated with standard technique by using staplers (S) and 22 underwent laser (L) dissection. Randomization to one of the two groups was intraoperative after evaluating the presence of incomplete fissure (grade 3-4 following Craig's classification). A Thulium laser 2010 nm (Cyber TM, Quanta System, Italy) was used at power of 40 W. Outcome primary measures were the evaluation and duration of intra- and postoperative air leaks, the rate of complications, and the hospital stay. Air leaks (2.1 ± 4.2 vs 3.6 ± 7.2 days; p = 0.98) and chest tube duration (6.4 ± 4.2 vs 7.5 ± 6.3 days, p = 0.44) were lower in L compared with S group even if these were not statistically significant. Complications (36.4 vs 77.3 %; p = 0.006), hospital stay (6.9 ± 3.8 vs 9.9 ± 6.9 days; p = 0.03), hospitalization costs (5,650 vs 8,147 euros; p = 0.01), and procedure costs (77 % of difference; p < 0.0001) were significantly lower for L group, while operative time was longer (197 ± 34 vs 158 ± 41 min; p = 0.004). The use of laser dissection to prevent postoperative air leaks is effective and comparable with stapler technique. Aero-haemostatic laser properties (by sealing of small blood vessels and checking air leaks) allow a safe application during pulmonary lobectomy in interlobar fissure completion avoiding stapler use. PMID:22526973

  7. A Stress-Induced Permeability Evolution Model for Fissured Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianjun; Wang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    A unified permeability evolution model is proposed to capture the evolution of permeability induced by stress. This model is formulated within a conventional permeability-porosity power function, with special attentions being paid to the effects of shear deformation-induced tortuosity and compaction-induced closure of fissures through a permeability resistance parameter. This model contains a small amount number of parameters, which can be calibrated based on conventional experiments. The proposed model is validated through comparison between model simulation and experimental results for sandstones under a wide range of confining pressures. Good performance demonstrates the capability of the proposed permeability evolution model.

  8. Continuous monitoring of an earth fissure in Chino, California, USA - a management tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, M. C.

    2015-11-01

    Continuous measurements of deformation have been made in Chino, California across an earth fissure and nearby unfissured soil since 2011 in two buried, horizontal, 150 mm pipes, 51 m long, which are connected by sealed boxes enclosing vertical posts at mostly 6 m intervals. Horizontal displacements and normal strain are measured in one line using nine end-to-end quartz tubes that are attached to posts and span fissured or unfissured soil. The free ends of the tubes are supported by slings and move relative to the attachment post of the next quartz tube. Linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) sensors measure the relative movements. Five biaxial tilt sensors were also attached to selected posts in that line. Relative vertical movement was measured at nine locations along the line in the second pipe using low-level differential pressure sensors. The second pipe is half full of water giving a free water surface along its length. Data are recorded on a Campbell CR10 using multiplexers. The quartz-tube horizontal extensometers have exhibited more than 3 mm of predominantly elastic opening and closing in response to about 32 m of seasonal drawdown and recovery, respectively, in an observation well 0.8 km to the south. The nearest production well is 1.6 km to the west. The horizontal strain was 5.9 × 10-5 or 30 % of the lowest estimate of strain-at-failure for alluvium. Maximum relative vertical movement was 4.8 mm. Maximum tilt in the fissure zone was 0.09 arcdeg while tilt at a separate sensor 100 m to the east was 0.86 arcdeg, indicating a wider zone of deformation than is spanned by the instrumentation. High correlation of horizontal displacements during drawdown, and especially recovery, with change in effective stress supports differential compaction as the mechanism for earth-fissure movement. The continuous measurements of horizontal strain coupled with water-level fluctuations and vertical borehole extensometry can provide a real-time adaptive management

  9. Tectonics and magma chambers of the recent Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (Kamchatka Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, V. A.; Gontovaya, L. I.; Senyukov, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Structural-geological, petrological, seismotectonic, and seismotomographic data received in regions of areal volcanism of the south-southwest sector of the Plosky Tolbachik volcano area are considered. The fissure eruption occurring here from November 2012 to the middle of September 2013 was called 50 years of IVS after the 50th anniversary of the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. A joint analysis of new and retrospective data allows us to suggest a model for the recent eruption and formulate some problems for future studies and eruption forecasting.

  10. Different scale land subsidence and ground fissure monitoring with multiple InSAR techniques over Fenwei basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, C.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, W.; Qu, F.; Liu, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Fenwei basin, China, composed by several sub-basins, has been suffering severe geo-hazards in last 60 years, including large scale land subsidence and small scale ground fissure, which caused serious infrastructure damages and property losses. In this paper, we apply different InSAR techniques with different SAR data to monitor these hazards. Firstly, combined small baseline subset (SBAS) InSAR method and persistent scatterers (PS) InSAR method is used to multi-track Envisat ASAR data to retrieve the large scale land subsidence covering entire Fenwei basin, from which different land subsidence magnitudes are analyzed of different sub-basins. Secondly, PS-InSAR method is used to monitor the small scale ground fissure deformation in Yuncheng basin, where different spatial deformation gradient can be clearly discovered. Lastly, different track SAR data are contributed to retrieve two-dimensional deformation in both land subsidence and ground fissure region, Xi'an, China, which can be benefitial to explain the occurrence of ground fissure and the correlation between land subsidence and ground fissure.

  11. Understanding the link between circumferential dikes and eruptive fissures around calderas based on numerical and analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbi, Fabio; Rivalta, Eleonora; Pinel, Virginie; Maccaferri, Francesco; Acocella, Valerio

    2016-06-01

    Active calderas are seldom associated with circumferential eruptive fissures, but eroded magmatic complexes reveal widespread circumferential dikes. This suggests that, while the conditions to emplace circumferential dikes are easily met, mechanisms must prevent them from reaching the surface. We explain this discrepancy with experiments of air injection into gelatin shaped as a volcano with caldera. Analog dikes show variable deflection, depending on the competition between overpressure, Pe, and topographic unloading, Pl; when Pl/Pe = 4.8-5.3, the dikes propagate orthogonal to the least compressive stress. Due to the unloading, they become circumferential and stall below the caldera rim; buoyancy is fundamental for the further rise and circumferential fissure development. Numerical models quantitatively constrain the stress orientation within the gelatin, explaining the observed circumferential dikes. Our results explain how dikes propagate below the rim of felsic and mafic calderas, but only in the latter they are prone to feed circumferential fissures.

  12. Detailed modeling of palpebral fissure and its influence on SAR and temperature rise in human eye under GHz exposures.

    PubMed

    Diao, Yinliang; Leung, Sai-Wing; He, Yaqing; Sun, Weinong; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Siu, Yun-Ming; Kong, Richard

    2016-05-01

    This article investigates variations in specific absorption rate and temperature rise in human eye caused by changes in palpebral fissure, the extent of opening between eyelids, under GHz plane-wave electromagnetic (EM) exposures. Detailed human head models with different palpebral fissure features were developed with a refined spatial resolution of 0.25 mm. These head models were then incorporated into both EM and bio-heat simulations, but using finite-difference time-domain method and finite-difference method, respectively. Maximum temperature rise in lens was found to be 0.8°C under EM exposure at 100 W/m(2) . Results reveal that changes in palpebral fissure would produce a 0.23°C variation in maximum temperature rise in lens. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:256-263, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27037717

  13. The link between circumferential dikes and eruptive fissures around calderas: insights from numerical and analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbi, Fabio; Rivalta, Eleonora; Pinel, Virginie; Maccaferri, Francesco; Acocella, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Active calderas are seldom associated with circumferential eruptive fissures along their rim, but eroded portions of extinct magmatic complexes reveal widespread evidence of circumferential dikes. This discrepancy suggests that, while the conditions to emplace circumferential dikes below volcanoes are easily met, mechanisms must exist to arrest the dikes before they reach the surface. Here we explain this discrepancy with laboratory experiments of air injection into a gelatin medium shaped to mimic a volcanic edifice with caldera. Our models show that the ascending dikes experience a variable degree of deflection, depending on the competition between dike overpressure, Pe, and the forcing induced by the topographic load, Pl. When Pl/Pe = 4.3 - 4.5 the analog dikes proceed almost insensitive to the stress rotation and erupt within the caldera. When Pl/Pe = 4.8 - 5.3 the analog dikes closely propagate orthogonal to the least compressive stress σ3 and stall below the caldera rim in a circumferential arrangement. Progressive buoyancy increase through repeated supply of fluid is fundamental for the occurrence of circumferential fissures. Complementary numerical models explain the observed circumferential arrangement and validate the experiments. These results contribute defining the shallow magma transfer and related hazard assessment within calderas.

  14. Monitoring an eruption fissure in 3D: video recording, particle image velocimetry and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Tanja; Walter, Thomas R.

    2015-04-01

    The processes during an eruption are very complex. To get a better understanding several parameters are measured. One of the measured parameters is the velocity of particles and patterns, as ash and emitted magma, and of the volcano itself. The resulting velocity field provides insights into the dynamics of a vent. Here we test our algorithm for 3 dimensional velocity fields on videos of the second fissure eruption of Bárdarbunga 2014. There we acquired videos from lava fountains of the main fissure with 2 high speed cameras with small angles between the cameras. Additionally we test the algorithm on videos from the geyser Strokkur, where we had 3 cameras and larger angles between the cameras. The velocity is calculated by a correlation in the Fourier space of contiguous images. Considering that we only have the velocity field of the surface smaller angles result in a better resolution of the existing velocity field in the near field. For general movements also larger angles can be useful, e.g. to get the direction, height and velocity of eruption clouds. In summary, it can be stated that 3D velocimetry can be used for several application and with different setup due to the application.

  15. One-year clinical evaluation of a Glass Carbomer fissure sealant, a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Gorseta, K; Glavina, D; Borzabadi-Farahani, A; Van Duinen, R N; Skrinjaric, I; Hill, R G; Lynch, E

    2014-06-01

    Glass Carbomer is a new generation of restorative material developed from glass-ionomer cements with possibility of gradual mineralization into fluorapatite. The aim of this clinical trial was to investigate the retention of Glass Carbomer fissure sealant after 12 months, in comparison to a commonly used conventional resin-based sealant. Forty-eight teeth in 24 patients [mean (SD) = 8 (2.3) years] with well-delineated fissure morphology were randomly divided into two equal groups and sealed with Bis-GMA resin-based Helioseal F (group A, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) and Glass Carbomer (group B, Glass Carbomer Sealant, Glass Carbomer Products, Leiden, Netherlands) using the split mouth design. Materials were placed and set according to the manufacturer's instructions using a polymerization unit Bluephase 16i (Vivadent, Liechtenstein). Complete sealant retentions in both groups were 100% and 75% after 6 and 12 months of clinical service, respectively. There were there were no secondary caries lesions in both groups after 6 months; two new carious lesions were detected in both groups after 12 months. The Mann-Whitney U test revealed no significant difference between the two groups at both evaluations points (P > 0.05). Glass Carbomer material showed a similar retention rate when compared with a resin-based sealant. Future studies are required to examine the long-term performance of Glass Carbomer sealants. PMID:25134364

  16. Wear of two pit and fissure sealants in contact with primary teeth

    PubMed Central

    Galo, Rodrigo; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Wear simulations may provide an indication of the clinical performance of pit-and-fissure sealants when associated with primary teeth as counterbody, restricting the involved variables. The aim of this study was to evaluate wear of dental materials used as pit-and-fissure sealants in contact with primary teeth. Materials and Methods: A resinous sealant (Fluroshield®) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer®) were selected in a post-plate design, using as counterbody primary tooth pins (4 × 4 × 2 mm) at 3 and 10 N vertical load, 1 Hz frequency, 900 wear cycles in artificial saliva (n = 15). Attrition coefficient values were obtained and the material and primary tooth volumes were analyzed. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Duncan's test (P < 0.05). Results: Fluroshield® presented the highest attrition coefficient values for the 3 N but these values decreased significantly for the 10 N load. The means for volume loss (3 mm) of the different samples after the wear test were not statistically different for the materials. The volume loss values for the primary teeth were statistically different and there was an increase in volume loss with the increase of the load applied in the wear tests. Conclusions: Differences were also observed with regard to the surface deformation characteristics. The wear rates of primary tooth enamel vary according to the type of material and the load applied during mastication. PMID:24966777

  17. Monitoring of land subsidence and ground fissures in Xian, China 2005-2006: Mapped by sar Interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, C.Y.; Zhang, Q.; Ding, X.-L.; Lu, Zhiming; Yang, C.S.; Qi, X.M.

    2009-01-01

    The City of Xian, China, has been experiencing significant land subsidence and ground fissure activities since 1960s, which have brought various severe geohazards including damages to buildings, bridges and other facilities. Monitoring of land subsidence and ground fissure activities can provide useful information for assessing the extent of, and mitigating such geohazards. In order to achieve robust Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) results, six interferometric pairs of Envisat ASAR data covering 2005-2006 are collected to analyze the InSAR processing errors firstly, such as temporal and spatial decorrelation error, external DEM error, atmospheric error and unwrapping error. Then the annual subsidence rate during 2005-2006 is calculated by weighted averaging two pairs of D-InSAR results with similar time spanning. Lastly, GPS measurements are applied to calibrate the InSAR results and centimeter precision is achieved. As for the ground fissure monitoring, five InSAR cross-sections are designed to demonstrate the relative subsidence difference across ground fissures. In conclusion, the final InSAR subsidence map during 2005-2006 shows four large subsidence zones in Xian hi-tech zones in western, eastern and southern suburbs of Xian City, among which two subsidence cones are newly detected and two ground fissures are deduced to be extended westward in Yuhuazhai subsidence cone. This study shows that the land subsidence and ground fissures are highly correlated spatially and temporally and both are correlated with hi-tech zone construction in Xian during the year of 2005-2006. ?? Springer-Verlag 2008.

  18. Three QTLs conferring resistance to kernel fissuring in rice (Oryza sativa L.) identified by selective genotyping in two tropical japonica populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kernel fissures caused by pre- or post-harvest stresses are the leading cause of breakage among milled rice, causing economic losses for producers, millers, and processors. Being an environmentally sensitive trait, it is difficult to reliably select for rice fissure resistance among breeding progen...

  19. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus presenting as orbital abscess along with superior orbital fissure syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lavaju, Poonam; Badhu, Badri Prasad; Shah, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Orbital abscess and superior orbital fissure syndrome (SOFS) are rare manifestations of herpes zoster ophthalmicus. Herein, we report a case of orbital abscess along with SOFS in a 2.5-year-old-male child secondary to herpes zoster infection. He presented with a 5-day history of proptosis and ptosis of the right eye that had been preceded by vesicular eruptions on the right forehead and scalp. Computed tomography scan of the head and orbit showed orbital abscess and right cavernous sinus thrombosis. A diagnosis of orbital abscess with SOFS secondary to herpes infection was made. The condition subsequently improved following antiviral therapy, intravenous vancomycin and amikacin, and oral corticosteroids. PMID:26632131

  20. Mapping radiating graben-fissure systems and pit crater chains on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, Sarah

    This study has mapped two types of extensional tectono-magmatic structures including radiating graben-fissure systems (RGFS) in the Idunn Mons and Mielikki Mons study areas, and pit crater chains in Idunn Mons, Themis Regio, Ulfrun Regio, and Ganiki Planitia on Venus. The areas selected to map RGFS host high emissivity anomalies focused on a single volcano and are proposed to reflect younger lava flows which might have occurred as recently as 250 ka. A relative chronology of RGFS is determined using cross-cutting relationships between interacting systems and surface geology. The Idunn Mons high emissivity anomaly is host to the youngest magmatic and volcanic activity, while the Mielikki Mons high emissivity anomaly is not the youngest. Hierarchical clusters of pit crater chains are predominantly focused on RGFS and coronae. It is hypothesized that hierarchical clustering is due to a lithology related variable as lithology may dictate how tensile stress is expressed.

  1. Enamel pretreatment with Er:YAG laser: effects on the microleakage of fissure sealant in fluorosed teeth

    PubMed Central

    Kianimanesh, Nasrin; Shayeghi, Bahareh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microleakage and penetration of fissure sealant in permanent molar teeth with fluorosis after pretreatment of the occlusal surface. Materials and Methods A total of 120 third molars with mild dental fluorosis were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 20). The tooth surfaces were sealed with an unfilled resin fissure sealant (FS) material. The experimental groups included: 1) phosphoric acid etching (AE) + FS (control); 2) AE + One-Step Plus (OS, Bisco) + FS; 3) bur + AE + FS; 4) bur + AE + OS + FS; 5) Er:YAG laser + AE + FS; and 6) Er:YAG laser + AE + OS + FS. After thermocycling, the teeth were immersed in 0.5% fuchsin and sectioned. Proportions of mircoleakage (PM) and unfilled area (PUA) were measured by digital microscope. Results Overall, there were significant differences among all groups in the PM (p = 0.00). Group 3 showed the greatest PM, and was significantly different from groups 2 to 6 (p < 0.05). Group 6 showed the lowest PM. Pretreatment with Er:YAG with or without adhesive led to less PM than bur pretreatment. There were no significant differences among groups in PUA. Conclusions Conventional acid etching provided a similar degree of occlusal seal in teeth with fluorosis compared to those pretreated with a bur or Er:YAG laser. Pretreatment of pits and fissures with Er:YAG in teeth with fluorosis may be an alternative method before fissure sealant application. PMID:25110641

  2. Stratigraphy and geochronology of pitfall accumulations in caves and fissures, Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearty, Paul J.; Olson, Storrs L.; Kaufman, Darrell S.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai

    2004-05-01

    Deep fractures ("fissures") and avens ("skylights") in limestone cave roofs create natural traps for sediments and biota. Fissures fill quickly with surface sediment and organisms soon after opening. Debris cones are formed as materials fall, wash, or drift on air through openings in cave skylights. Such deposits in Admiral's and Grand Canyon Cave, Bermuda contain distinct beds and are composed of mixtures of sediment and charcoal, together with fossils of land snails, crabs, birds, reptiles, and bats. The "pitfall" accumulations were periodically sealed over by calcite flowstone. A stratigraphic record of surface activity and fauna through both glacial and interglacial periods has been preserved. The succession also provides an ideal setting in which to compare several geochronological methods. Calibrated 14C ages on charcoal and shells provide dated horizons at 1600, 12,800, and about 35,000 14C yr BP. Thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) ages on several flowstone layers constrain the entire sequence in the Admiral's Cave sequence between 126,300±900 yr (Termination II) and historical times. A continuous relative-age record generated by amino acid epimerization (AAE) geochronology ( D-alloisoleucine/ L-isoleucine or aIle/Ile) on the pulmonate land gastropod Poecilozonites verifies the biostratigraphy, reveals a minimal degree of mixing between stratigraphic units, and establishes an independent temporal link between the subterranean and subaerial deposits of Bermuda. This convergence between stratigraphy and geochronology yields a precisely dated succession from the oceanic island of Bermuda, and thus presents a unique opportunity to assess the rates and processes of evolutionary and climate change during that interval.

  3. Exploring rock fissures: does a specialized root morphology explain endemism on granite outcrops?

    PubMed Central

    Poot, Pieter; Hopper, Stephen D.; van Diggelen, Josepha M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Worldwide, many plant species are confined to open, shallow-soil, rocky habitats. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this habitat specificity, none has been convincing. We suggest that the high level of endemism on shallow soils is related to the edaphic specialization needed to survive in these often extremely drought-prone habitats. Previous research has shown that species endemic to ironstone communities in SW Australia have a specialized root morphology that enhances their chance to access fissures in the underlying rock. Here we test the generality of these findings for species that are confined to a shallow-soil habitat that is of much greater global significance: granite outcrops. Methods We compared temporal and spatial root growth and allocation of three endemic woody perennials of SW Australian granite outcrop communities with those of congeners occurring on nearby deeper soils. Seedlings of all species were grown in 1·2 m long custom-made containers with a transparent bottom that allowed monitoring of root growth over time. Key Results The granite outcrop endemics mostly differed in a predictable way from their congeners from deeper soils. They generally invested a larger portion of their biomass in roots, distributed their roots faster and more evenly over the container and had a lower specific root length. In different species pairs the outcrop endemics achieved their apparent advantage by a different combination of the aforementioned traits. Conclusions Our results are consistent with earlier work, indicating that species restricted to different types of drought-prone shallow-soil communities have undergone similar selection pressures. Although adaptive in their own habitat in terms of obtaining access to fissures in the underlying rock, these root system traits are likely to be maladaptive in deeper soil habitats. Therefore, our results may provide an explanation for the narrow endemism of many shallow

  4. Shift from magmatic to phreatomagmatic explosion controlled by the evolution of lateral fissure eruption in Suoana Crater, Miyakejima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geshi, Nobuo; Nemeth, Karoly; Noguchi, Rina; Oikawa, Teruki

    2016-04-01

    Combined analysis of the proximal deposit and exposed feeder-diatreme structure of the Suoana Crater of Miyakejima reveals the process of magma-water interaction controlled by the evolution of lateral fissure eruption in a stratovolcanic edifice. The Suoana Crater, an oval maar with 400 x 300 m across is one of the craters of the Suoana-Kazahaya crater chain which is formed during a fissure eruption in the 7th Century. The eruption fissure extends ~3 km from the summit area (~700 m asl) to the lower-flank area (~200m asl). The eruption fissure consists of upper maar-chain (>450 m asl) and lower scora-cone chain. As the wall of the 2000 AD caldera truncated at near the center of the Suoana Crater, the vertical section of the feeder dike - diatreme - maar system of the Suoana Crater is exposed in the caldera wall (Geshi et al., 2011). The ejected materials from the Suoana crater indicate the transition of eruption style from magmatic to phreatomagmatic. The juvenile clasts in the lower half of the deposit exhibit spatter-like shape, indicating the typical deposit from a vigorous fire fountain. Contrary, the juvenile clasts in the upper half are less vesiculated and exhibit cauliflower-shape, indicating the typical phreatomagmatic activity. This transition indicates that the magma-water interaction started at the middle of the eruption. Judging from the ratio of the thickness of the lower and upper parts, the contrast of the content of juvenile clasts, and bulk density of the deposit, the total ejected volume of magma is larger in the lower part compare to the upper part. The transition from magmatic to phreatomagmatic occurred only in the upper half of the eruption fissure, including the Suoana crater, whereas the lower half of the fissure continued dry magmatic eruption throughout their activity. The limited distribution of phreatomagmatic activity can be resulted by the magma extraction from the upper feeder dike system to the lower eruption fissure as it

  5. Comparative study of Ksharasutra suturing and Lord's anal dilatation in the management of Parikartika (chronic fissure-in-ano)

    PubMed Central

    Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Baghel, Madhav Singh; Bhuyan, Chaturbhuja; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parikartika resembles fissure-in-ano which is very common among all ano-rectal disorders. In Ayurvedic texts, Parikartika is described as a complication of Vamana and Virechana as well as complication of Atisara. Ksharasutra was proved successful in the management of fistula-in-ano, piles, and there is a need to try its efficacy in fissure-in-ano. Aim: To evaluate the role of Ksharasutra suturing (KSS) in fissure bed in chronic fissure-in-ano. Materials and Methods: Total 100 patients of chronic fissure-in-ano were selected and randomly divided into two groups (50 in each group). In group-A, patients were undergone by KSS; while in patients of Group-B Lord's anal dilatation followed by KSS was done under spinal anesthesia. The KSS was done once and after slough out of Ksharasutra, the wound was treated for 4 weeks and assessment of the result was done on the basis of gradation adopted. Results: The pain relief on 14th day in Group-A was 86% while in Group-B 100% was observed. As on 7th day in Group-A, oozing was stopped in 68% patients, while in Group-B, oozing was stopped in 82% patients. On 21st day, Group-B showed more healing (85%) as compared to Group-A (69%). In this study 68% of patients were cured. Conclusion: In Group-B (KSS with Lord's anal dilatation) patients were cured early as compared to patients of Group-A (KSS alone). PMID:25558158

  6. Mechanical Behavior of Brittle Rock-Like Specimens with Pre-existing Fissures Under Uniaxial Loading: Experimental Studies and Particle Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ri-hong; Cao, Ping; Lin, Hang; Pu, Cheng-zhi; Ou, Ke

    2016-03-01

    Joints and fissures with similar orientation or characteristics are common in natural rocks; the inclination and density of the fissures affect the mechanical properties and failure mechanism of the rock mass. However, the strength, crack coalescence pattern, and failure mode of rock specimens containing multi-fissures have not been studied comprehensively. In this paper, combining similar material testing and discrete element numerical method (PFC2D), the peak strength and failure characteristics of rock-like materials with multi-fissures are explored. Rock-like specimens were made of cement and sand and pre-existing fissures created by inserting steel shims into cement mortar paste and removing them during curing. The peak strength of multi-fissure specimens depends on the fissure angle α (which is measured counterclockwise from horizontal) and fissure number ( N f). Under uniaxial compressional loading, the peak strength increased with increasing α. The material strength was lowest for α = 25°, and highest for α = 90°. The influence of N f on the peak strength depended on α. For α = 25° and 45°, N f had a strong effect on the peak strength, while for higher α values, especially for the 90° sample, there were no obvious changes in peak strength with different N f. Under uniaxial compression, the coalescence modes between the fissures can be classified into three categories: S-mode, T-mode, and M-mode. Moreover, the failure mode can be classified into four categories: mixed failure, shear failure, stepped path failure, and intact failure. The failure mode of the specimen depends on α and N f. The peak strength and failure modes in the numerically simulated and experimental results are in good agreement.

  7. Analysis of displacements and fissure structures on a slow-moving landslide through very high-resolution orthophoto mosaicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothmund, Sabrina; Joswig, Manfred; Niethammer, Uwe; Malet, Jean-Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Very high-resolution multi-temporal images with a ground resolution of a few centimeters allowed to detect and analyze displacements and fissure patterns of the Super-Sauze landslide (Southern French Alps). Images taken by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) during a flight campaign in October 2008 have been used to produce a very high-resolution orthophoto-mosaic of the landslide. In this study, a set of 59 of a total of 1486 images was selected and photogrammetrically processed using different non-parametric rectification approaches (projective transformation, piecewise affine transformation and polynomial transformations of the second and third order). The generated orthophoto-mosaic covers the entire landslide area of 0.09 km² with a ground resolution of 3 to 8 cm. The comparison of this UAV-based orthophoto-mosaic with an orthophotograph from May 2007 (ground resolution of 20 cm) allowed the characterization of the horizontal displacements of the landslide. Displacement vectors were estimated by visually inspecting the images to identify distinct features (rocks, boulders and vegetation patches) in the two orthophotographs. This approach was chosen because of the high dynamics of the landslide and the disadvantageous long period between the repeated image acquisitions. Displacements between 7.1 and 55.4 m in varying directions have been detected and areas of different dynamics could be distinguished for the period between May 2007 and October 2008. Various structures, in particular fissures of different distributions and orientations, could be resolved in the UAV-based orthophoto-mosaic. The similarity of the observed fissures with glacial crevasses is striking and suggests a similar genesis. The identified longitudinal, transverse and cross-shaped fissures are linked to abrupt changes of in-situ crest orientation in the shallow subsurface. The observed shear fissures occur at the lateral boundary of emerging in-situ crests. The fissure genesis could be traced

  8. Geochemistry of the 2012-2013 Tolbachik Fissure eruption (Kamchatka, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volynets, Anna; Melnikov, Dmitry; Belousov, Alexander; Belousova, Marina; Yakushev, Anton

    2014-05-01

    From November 27th, 2012, until the beginning of September 2013, a fissure eruption at the southern slope of Ploskiy Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, produced more than 0.52 km3 of lava (Dvigalo et al., 2014) and covered the area about 36 km2. The eruption was named as "The Institute of Volcanology and Seismology 50th Anniversary Fissure Tolbachik Eruption" (FTE-50). This is a manifestation of the ongoing high activity in Tolbachinskiy Dol (monogenetic zone around Ploskiy Tolbachik stratovolcano), which already produced in Holocene a lava field, covering more than 900 km2. FTE-50 lasted 9 months and exhibited some peculiar features, allowing us to distinguish it as a unique for Tolbachinskiy Dol: seismic activity only in the low energy class during 5 month prior to eruption (Kugaenko et al., 2013), the unusually high discharge rate at the beginning of the eruption (about 400 m3/sec), specific geochemical composition of the erupted lava. The eruption started from two vents, named after eminent Russian volcanologists as Menyailov (upper) and Naboko (lower) vents, and after three days all activity concentrated in the lower (Naboko) vent. All products of FTE-50 are richer in alkalis and TiO2 than previously studied lavas of Tolbachinskiy Dol. After the drastic change in composition at the beginning of the eruption, associated with the shift of the eruption center from the Menyailov to Naboko vent, when silica content dropped up to 2 wt.%, the composition remained practically constant until at least May 2013. Lavas of the Menyailov Vent are more acid than any of the earlier erupted rocks of the monogenetic zone (SiO2 up to 55.35 wt.%). Lavas of the Naboko Vent, at silica content close to the Southern Vent of the Great Fissure Tolbachik Eruption (1975-76) and other alumina-rich basaltic andesites of the Dol (52.5 wt.% in average in Naboko vent lavas vs. 51.8 wt.% in high-Al lavas from Tolb.Dol), have lowered concentrations of Al2O3 (16.3 wt.% vs. 17.1 wt/%), CaO (7.5 wt

  9. Overview of the 2012-13 basaltic fissure eruption of Tolbachik, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Alexander; Belousova, Marina; Edwards, Benjamin; Volynetz, Anna; Melnikov, Dmitry; Senyukov, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    On 27 November 2012 a short-lived swarm of shallow (<10 km) earthquakes marked the onset of a new eruption from the Tolbachik volcanic complex, in east-central Kamchatka, Russia. The 3.5-km-long radial eruptive fissure opened on the south flank between 1500-2000 m a.s.l. Lava fountaining from multiple small vents ceased after several days and the eruption continued from vents at the southern end of the fissure. Almost continuous lava fountains up to 200 m high issued from a small lava lake located inside the broad, open crater of the largest cinder cone. While explosive activity was rather mild, initial discharge of lava was very high (up to 400 m3/s) and by the end of December 'a'a lava flows had travelled up to 17 km from the vent. SiO2 concentrations for the plagioclase-phyric lava were 54 wt.%, but then decreased to 52 wt.%. In January 2013 lava was transported through a system of lava tubes 1 km long and up to 5 m wide. From tube exit points it propagated in the form of channelized lava streams (velocities 1-3 m/s; discharge rates 30-50 m3/s); on lower slopes of the volcano it propagated mostly as 'a'a flows. Lava channels were frequently dammed by floating clinker and accretionary lava balls, which caused flooding of proximal areas by ropy/shelly/slabby pahoehoe lavas. Locally small volumes of lava were extruded through the upper surfaces and lateral levees of 'a'a lava to form very slowly inflating entrail pahoehoe lava lobes. Starting in mid-February the average intensity of the eruption gradually declined, with sporadic bursts in February and April. By May discharge rates of lava had decreased to approximately 15 m3/s and most of lava started to flow as entrail pahoehoe. By the beginning of June the volume of erupted products (dominantly lavas) reached 0.52km3. The effusion of lava continued until the end of August, when the lava lake in the crater of the active cinder cone became inactive. Weak strombolian outbursts from 1-3 small vents on the bottom of

  10. Influence of Laser Irradiation on Pits and Fissures: An In Situ Study

    PubMed Central

    Correa–Afonso, Alessandra M; Pécora, Jesus D

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this in situ study was to analyze the influence of the Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, and CO2 lasers on the enamel acid resistance of pits and fissures. Background data: The laser tissue interaction has been studied as a method of preventing occlusal caries. Methods: Thirteen volunteers wore palatal acrylic appliances containing human occlusal enamel blocks that were divided into four groups (G1, control; G2, Er:YAG; G3, Nd:YAG; G4, CO2). Each palatal acrylic appliance was used in the four studied groups and was used for 14 consecutive days. A sucrose solution was applied to the specimens six times per day. The specimens were then sectioned in half, and a microhardness test was applied. The other halves were analyzed using polarized light microscopy to measure the caries-like lesion areas, and a morphological analysis was conducted using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: For the statistical analysis of the data obtained from the microhardness test (Knoop hardness number. [KHN]) (α=5%), Fisher's exact test was performed, and the group means were as follows: G1, 247±71; G2, 258±70; G3, 272±73; and G4, 298±56. The results demonstrated that the control group was significantly different from G3 and G4, which presented higher microhardness values. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyze the data obtained from the caries-lesion area measurements (mm2) (α=5%) (G1, 0.01±1.08; G2, 0.13±0.18; G3, 0.05±0.17; and G4, 0.09±0.22). The results no showed significant differences among the groups in this analysis. Conclusions: Based on the results from the present study, it may be concluded that the CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers increased the enamel acid resistance in pits and fissures. PMID:23336742

  11. Subsurface Gas Flow and Ice Grain Acceleration within Enceladus and Europa Fissures: 2D DSMC Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, O. J.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.

    2014-12-01

    The ejection of material from geysers is a ubiquitous occurrence on outer solar system bodies. Water vapor plumes have been observed emanating from the southern hemispheres of Enceladus and Europa (Hansen et al. 2011, Roth et al. 2014), and N2plumes carrying ice and ark particles on Triton (Soderblom et al. 2009). The gas and ice grain distributions in the Enceladus plume depend on the subsurface gas properties and the geometry of the fissures e.g., (Schmidt et al. 2008, Ingersoll et al. 2010). Of course the fissures can have complex geometries due to tidal stresses, melting, freezing etc., but directly sampled and inferred gas and grain properties for the plume (source rate, bulk velocity, terminal grain velocity) can be used to provide a basis to constrain characteristic dimensions of vent width and depth. We used a 2-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique to model venting from both axi-symmetric canyons with widths ~2 km and narrow jets with widths ~15-40 m. For all of our vent geometries, considered the water vapor source rates (1027­ - 1028 s-1) and bulk gas velocities (~330 - 670 m/s) obtained at the surface were consistent with inferred values obtained by fits of the data for the plume densities (1026 - 1028 s-1, 250 - 1000 m/s) respectively. However, when using the resulting DSMC gas distribution for the canyon geometries to integrate the trajectories of ice grains we found it insufficient to accelerate submicron ice grains to Enceladus' escape speed. On the other hand, the gas distributions in the jet like vents accelerated grains > 10 μm significantly above Enceladus' escape speed. It has been suggested that micron-sized grains are ejected from the vents with speeds comparable to the Enceladus escape speed. Here we report on these results including comparisons to results obtained from 1D models as well as discuss the implications of our plume model results. We also show preliminary results for similar considerations applied to Europa

  12. Argon laser curing of fluoride-releasing pit and fissure sealant: in vitro caries development.

    PubMed

    Westerman, G; Hicks, J; Flaitz, C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of argon laser polymerization of a visible-light-cured, fluoride-releasing pit and fissure sealant on caries development in vitro. A total of twelve caries-free premolar and molar teeth was selected, and underwent a fluoride-free prophylaxis and soft tissue debridement. Cavity preparations were placed in buccal and lingual surfaces. Lingual cavity preparations were filled with the fluoride-releasing sealant (UltraSealXTplus, Ultradent) and visible light cured per the manufacturer's recommendation. Buccal preparations were filled with the fluoride-releasing sealant and argon laser cured (231 mW, 12 J/cm2 for 10 seconds). Following sealant placement, the teeth were sectioned into buccal and lingual halves. An acid-resistant varnish was placed leaving a 1 mm rim of exposed surface enamel adjacent to the sealant. The specimens were then thermocycled in synthetic saliva (500 cycles, 5 to 50 degrees C). In vitro caries lesions were formed (2.2 mM Ca, 2.2 mM PO4, 50 mM acetic acid, 5 ppm fluoride, pH 3.95). Longitudinal sections (five sections per tooth half) were obtained and evaluated by polarized light microscopy for mean outer surface lesion depths and frequency of wall lesions. Mean primary surface (outer) lesion depth was significantly decreased (ANOVA, DMR, P < .05) for the fluoride-releasing sealant with argon laser polymerization (152 +/- 16 um) when compared with visible light curing (211 +/- 23 um). Likewise, wall lesion frequency was substantially reduced for the argon laser polymerized sealants (17 percent) when compared with that for the visible light polymerized sealants (24 percent, ANOVA, DMR, P < .05). Argon laser polymerization of a fluoride-releasing pit and fissure sealant improved caries resistance markedly in the surface enamel adjacent to the sealant material. Argon laser curing enhanced the caries protective ability of the sealant along the enamel-resin cavosurface, as noted by a decrease in wall

  13. The 'Jack Stone' or 'Mercedes Benz' sign--anew theory to explain the presence of gas within fissures in gallstones.

    PubMed

    Wright, F W

    1977-07-01

    Gas within clefts of fissures in gallstones is not a very common finding, but when it occurs is, characteristic and indicates the presence of one or more calculi. It closely resembles the appearance of a 'Jack Stone' but has previously been termed the 'Mercedes Benz' sign. Only a few cases have previously been recognised in the U.K. Most reported cases have been associated with biliary colic or cholecystitis. Various theories have been put forward to explain the presence of gas, but the author believes that the gas is released from solution by negative pressure within cholesterol stones undergoing internal fissuring due to their crystalline structure, i.e. the gas is released from solution from the small amount of fluid trapped in the calculus, in the same way that gas may be 'pulled' out of solution in a joint, a degenerate intervertebral disc or the fibro-cartilage of the symphysis pubis. PMID:872516

  14. Location of seismic events and eruptive fissures on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano using seismic amplitudes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, J.; Aki, K.

    2003-01-01

    We present a method for locating the source of seismic events on Piton de la Fournaise. The method is based on seismic amplitudes corrected for station site effects using coda site amplification factors. Once corrected, the spatial distribution of amplitudes shows smooth and simple contours for many types of events, including rockfalls, long-period events and eruption tremor. On the basis of the simplicity of these distributions we develop inversion methods for locating their origins. To achieve this, the decrease of the amplitude as a function of the distance to the source is approximated by the decay either of surface or body waves in a homogeneous medium. The method is effective for locating rockfalls, long-period events, and eruption tremor sources. The sources of eruption tremor are usually found to be located at shallow depth and close to the eruptive fissures. Because of this, our method is a useful tool for locating fissures at the beginning of eruptions.

  15. Analysis of anticaries potential of pit and fissures sealants containing amorphous calcium phosphate using synchrotron microtomography.

    PubMed

    Delben, A C B; Cannon, M; Vieira, A E M; Basso, M D; Danelon, M; Santo, M R E; Stock, S R; Xiao, X; De Carlo, F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the anticaries potential of pit and fissure sealants containing amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) by synchrotron microtomography. Bovine enamel blocks (4×4 mm; n=50) were selected through surface hardness (Knoop) analysis. Slabs were obtained through cross-sections taken 1 mm from the border of the enamel. Five indentations, spaced 100 μm apart, were made 300 μm from the border. Ten specimens were prepared for each tested material (Ultraseal XT plus TM, Aegis, Embrace, Vitremer and Experimental Sealant). The materials were randomly attached to the sectioned surfaces of the enamel blocks and fixed with sticky wax. The specimens were submitted to pH cycling. After that, the surface hardness (SH1) was determined, and the blocks were submitted to synchrotron microcomputed tomography analysis to calculate the mineral concentration (ΔgHAp cm(-3)) at different areas of the enamel. The comparison between the SH1 and ΔgHAp cm(-3) showed a correlation for all groups (r=0.840; p<0.001). The fluoride groups presented positive values of ΔgHAp cm(-3), indicating a mineral gain that was observed mainly in the outer part of the enamel. The ACP showed mineral loss in the outer enamel compared with fluoride groups, although it inhibited the demineralization in the deeper areas of enamel. The combination of two remineralizing agents (fluoride and ACP) was highly effective in preventing demineralization. PMID:25268042

  16. Chabazite in spodumene-bearing Alpine-type fissure veins from Hiddenite, North Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Michael A.

    2009-07-01

    Alpine-type fissure vein mineralization in the Hiddenite area of western North Carolina, USA consists mostly of quartz, but locally contains Cr-bearing beryl (emerald) or Cr-bearing spodumene (hiddenite). These gem minerals occur in mineral-lined cavities and may be accompanied by euhedral crystals of quartz, calcite, muscovite, rutile, albite, pyrite, siderite and dolomite. Chabazite-Ca occurs as a late stage phase in spodumene-bearing veins, but is absent in emerald-bearing veins. Chabazite-Ca occurs as simple penetrating twins of pseudocubic rhombohedra and as the lens-shaped variety, phacolite. Chabazite-Ca from Hiddenite contains minor amounts of Na, Mg, Fe and K. Phacolitic chabazite-Ca shows Fe-enriched but Mg-depleted cores relative to the rims. Chemical zoning is absent in rhombohedral chabazite. The Hiddenite chabazite apparently precipitated under low temperature (< 250°C) and low pressure (< 2 kbar) conditions during the waning stages of crystallization of an alkaline hydrothermal fluid.

  17. An Experimental Study of the Fracture Coalescence Behaviour of Brittle Sandstone Specimens Containing Three Fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. Q.; Yang, D. S.; Jing, H. W.; Li, Y. H.; Wang, S. Y.

    2012-07-01

    To analyse the fracture coalescence behaviour of rock, rectangular prismatic sandstone specimens (80 × 160 × 30 mm in size) containing three fissures were tested under uniaxial compression. The strength and deformation behaviours of the specimens are first analysed by investigating the effects of the ligament angle β2 on the peak strength, peak strain and crack initiation stress of the specimens. To confirm the sequence of crack coalescence, a photographic monitoring technique is used throughout the entire period of deformation. Based on the results, the relationship between the real-time crack coalescence process and the axial stress-strain curve of brittle sandstone specimens is also developed, and this relationship can be used to evaluate the macroscopic deformation characteristics of pre-cracked rock. The equivalent strain evolution fields of the specimen, with α = β1 = 45° and β2 = 90°, are obtained using the digital image correlation technique and show good agreement with the experimental results of pre-cracked brittle sandstone. These experimental results are expected to improve the understanding of fracture mechanisms and be used in rock engineering with intermittent structures, such as deep underground excavated tunnels.

  18. Sylvian fissure and parietal anatomy in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Tracey A; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Foundas, Anne L

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by deficits in social functioning and language and communication, with restricted interests or stereotyped behaviors. Anatomical differences have been found in the parietal cortex in children with ASD, but parietal subregions and associations between Sylvian fissure (SF) and parietal anatomy have not been explored. In this study, SF length and anterior and posterior parietal volumes were measured on MRI in 30 right-handed boys with ASD and 30 right-handed typically developing boys (7-14 years), matched on age and non-verbal IQ. There was leftward SF and anterior parietal asymmetry, and rightward posterior parietal asymmetry, across groups. There were associations between SF and parietal asymmetries, with slight group differences. Typical SF asymmetry was associated with typical anterior and posterior parietal asymmetry, in both groups. In the atypical SF asymmetry group, controls had atypical parietal asymmetry, whereas in ASD there were more equal numbers of individuals with typical as atypical anterior parietal asymmetry. We did not find significant anatomical-behavioral associations. Our findings of more individuals in the ASD group having a dissociation between cortical asymmetries warrants further investigation of these subgroups and emphasizes the importance of investigating anatomical relationships in addition to group differences in individual regions. PMID:22713374

  19. Distortion of the anterior part of the interhemispheric fissure: significance and implications for prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vinurel, N; Van Nieuwenhuyse, A; Cagneaux, M; Garel, C; Quarello, E; Brasseur, M; Picone, O; Ferry, M; Gaucherand, P; des Portes, V; Guibaud, L

    2014-03-01

    In order to illustrate the significance of a new anatomical finding, distortion of the interhemispheric fissure (DIHF) associated with impacted medial borders of the frontal lobes, we report a retrospective observational study of 13 fetuses in which DIHF was identified on prenatal imaging. In 10 cases there were associated anatomical anomalies, including mainly midline anomalies (syntelencephaly (n=2), lobar holoprosencephaly (n=1), Aicardi syndrome (n=2)), but also schizencephaly (n=1), cortical dysplasia (n=1) and more complex cerebral malformations (n=3), including neural tube defect in two cases. Chromosomal anomaly was identified in two cases, including 6p deletion in a case without associated central nervous system anomalies and a complex mosaicism in one of the cases with syntelencephaly. In two cases, the finding was apparently isolated on both pre- and postnatal imaging, and the children were doing well at follow-up, aged 4 and 5 years. The presence of DIHF on prenatal imaging may help in the diagnosis of cerebral anomalies, especially those involving the midline. If DIHF is apparently isolated on prenatal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging is recommended for careful analysis of gyration and midline, especially optic and olfactory structures. Karyotyping is also recommended. PMID:23640781

  20. Caries-inhibiting effect of chlorhexidine varnish in pits and fissures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; van 't Hof, M A; Truin, G J; Bronkhorst, E M; van Palenstein Helderman, W H

    2006-05-01

    Evidence regarding the caries-inhibiting effect of chlorhexidine varnish is inconclusive. This study investigated the caries-inhibiting effect of the varnish EC40 on pits and fissures of first permanent molars. A two-year randomized controlled trial was carried out among 461 six- to seven-year-old children. In a split-mouth design, one group of molars received EC40 at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months, and another group at baseline, 3, 12, and 15 months. Control molars did not receive EC40. Adherence to the treatment protocol was good. The dropout rate was 17%. Blinded examiners performed dental examinations. The caries-inhibiting effects of the two EC40 application schemes were comparable. The prevented fraction of caries was 25% (95%CI, 1%, 49%, p = 0.04) after 2 years and 9% (95%CI, -11%, 29%, p = 0.20) one year after termination of the trial, suggesting a short-term benefit from the use of EC40. The efficiency of EC40 is questionable in low-caries-incidence child populations. PMID:16632763

  1. Effect of topical applications of a chlorhexidine/thymol-containing varnish on fissure caries assessed by laser fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Sköld-Larsson, Kerstin; Fornell, Ann-Charlott; Lussi, Adrian; Twetman, Svante

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the effect of an antibacterial varnish using the readings of a caries-detecting device (DIAGNOdent) in fissures of young permanent molars. The material consisted of 32 healthy patients with a mean age of 14.1 years undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. The inclusion criteria were presence of one homologous pair of 2nd upper or lower molars with clinically intact occlusal surfaces. A split-mouth study design was used in which the fissures were treated with either an antibacterial chlorhexidine/thymol-containing varnish or a placebo varnish every 6th week. The follow-up period was 42 weeks and laser fluorescence (LF) readings were carried out every 12th week. The mean LF values increased significantly (P < 0.05) after 24, 36, and 48 weeks compared to baseline following the placebo treatments but not after treatment with the active antibacterial varnish. During the study period, micro-cavities were diagnosed in two test-treated and five placebo-treated teeth. In conclusion, the results reinforce previous findings that frequent applications of a chlorhexidine/thymol-containing dental varnish might have a protective role in fissures of young permanent molars and that this could be monitored with a chair-side caries detecting LF device. PMID:15848978

  2. Voxelized Model of Brain Infusion That Accounts for Small Feature Fissures: Comparison With Magnetic Resonance Tracer Studies.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Astary, Garrett W; Kasinadhuni, Aditya K; Carney, Paul R; Mareci, Thomas H; Sarntinoranont, Malisa

    2016-05-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) is a promising novel technology to treat neural diseases, as it can transport macromolecular therapeutic agents greater distances through tissue by direct infusion. To minimize off-target delivery, our group has developed 3D computational transport models to predict infusion flow fields and tracer distributions based on magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion tensor imaging data sets. To improve the accuracy of our voxelized models, generalized anisotropy (GA), a scalar measure of a higher order diffusion tensor obtained from high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) was used to improve tissue segmentation within complex tissue regions of the hippocampus by capturing small feature fissures. Simulations were conducted to reveal the effect of these fissures and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) boundaries on CED tracer diversion and mistargeting. Sensitivity analysis was also conducted to determine the effect of dorsal and ventral hippocampal infusion sites and tissue transport properties on drug delivery. Predicted CED tissue concentrations from this model are then compared with experimentally measured MR concentration profiles. This allowed for more quantitative comparison between model predictions and MR measurement. Simulations were able to capture infusate diversion into fissures and other CSF spaces which is a major source of CED mistargeting. Such knowledge is important for proper surgical planning. PMID:26833078

  3. Morphologic Study of Superior Temporal Sulcus-Amygdaloid Body and Lateral Fissure-Amygdaloid Body Surgical Approach by Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volume Rendering.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuan; Ren, Bichen; Chang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jinnan; Li, Youqiong; Duan, Haobo; Cheng, Kailiang; Wang, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    In this research, 83 patients were measured by magnetic resonance imaging volume rendering technique. The authors acquired the curve length of the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure on the cerebral hemisphere, the shortest distance from the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure to the center of amygdaloid body separately, the vertical diameter, the transversal diameter, and the anteroposterior diameter of the amygdaloid body and the 2 approach angles between the median sagittal plane and the shortest segment from the superior temporal sulcus to the center of amygdaloid body and the shortest segment from lateral fissure to the center of the amygdaloid body. At the same time, we preliminarily oriented the 2 points of the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure, which are closest to the center of amygdaloid body, aimed at finding out the best entrance points of surgical approach through the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure to the amygdaloid body and reducing the damage to the nerve fibers or blood vessels during the operation. The results indicate that the point at the front side 1/4 of the superior temporal sulcus may be the ideal surgical approach entrance point and the point at the front side 1/3 of the lateral fissure. There is no difference between 2 cerebral hemispheres (P < 0.05). PMID:26674919

  4. Effect of Cervitec on mutans streptococci in plaque and on caries formation on occlusal fissures of erupting permanent molars.

    PubMed

    Araujo, A M P G; Naspitz, G M C C; Chelotti, A; Cai, S

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Cervitec on the abundance of mutans streptococci (MS) in occlusal dental plaque and on 2-year caries increment of partly erupting first permanent molars. Sixteen healthy schoolchildren aged 6-8 years, with at least 2 sound contralateral partly erupted permanent molars, received diet counselling and daily parental supervised toothbrushing with a fluoride dentifrice. Stimulated saliva samples were collected at baseline and after 1 year to evaluate MS levels. In a split-mouth design, Cervitec varnish was applied to one of the teeth at baseline and after 3 and 6 months, while the other tooth in the same jaw was a control. At the 9-month follow-up the teeth were in occlusal contact. At this time, varnish was not applied. At 3 and 6 months after the first application of varnish a significant suppression of MS was observed in plaque. Caries investigations, performed at baseline and every 3 months during the 2 years after the start of the study, showed that all the teeth treated with the varnish were free of caries after 2 years, whereas 8/16 control teeth developed incipient caries. In conclusion, our results suggest that treatment with Cervitec reduces MS in plaque on erupting permanent molars and can lead to a significant decrease in caries incidence. PMID:12399699

  5. Recrystallized Granite Surface Fissures Of The Wasatch Range, Produced Not Later Than 1/4 Billion Years Ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Keith L.

    2000-05-01

    Our studies of numerous recrystallized fissures in 4 granite plutons of Wasatch Range, namely, Mount Tuscarora-Wolverine-Millicent,^1,6,7 Bonanza Peak-Midway,^2 Little Cottonwood Canyon and Ferguson Canyon plutons, all of which formed magma chambers reaching Earth-atmosphere interface, establish that they resulted from high thermal gradients rather than passages of earthquake waves. Magma chambers formed, solidified during Permo-Caroniferous Ice Age(roughly, 1/3...1/4 billion yr ago, a time interval preceding period of extrusion of Rocky Mountains, 10^8 yr ago), and while fluid, belched lava flows^5 extending over its reservoir walls to run hundred of meters. We have shown how the magma melts, dilutes and replaces overlying metamorphic rock^7 to reach Earth's surface so that a pluton containing large amounts of dross(Fe-ores, etc.) had a short fluid lifetime. We also described how offshoots from a long-running main fissure form acute angles with that fissure.^3 Such recrystallized fissures, reaching depths of perhaps 100 m, have initial fractures near time of solidification of their uppermost portion of magma chamber while still hot(<= 1600^oF), a time when max. stresses occur near granite surface due to high thermal gradients, owing to snow coverage, cold water contacts due to rain, stream flow over granite surface, partial coverage by ocean, etc., wherever heat sinks might occur, during P-C ice age--when region of Wasatch Range existed at sea level, Salt Lake Valley being covered entirely by ocean water and region east of Wasatch Bouleuard rising gently above Pacific Ocean to elevations of possibly 500-1000 ft, say, at a distance of 10-15 mi to east. This fact is implied by Chinese Wall of white limestone on Grandeur Peak, unequivocally, and similarly another in Neff's Canyon running e. from n. ridge of 9200 ft. saddle-summit, as well as a dozen other ancient calcified stream beds emptying into ocean to w., in Salt Lake Valley. This existed prior to regional

  6. Identification of possible recent water/lava source fissures in the Cerberus Plains: stratigraphic and crater count age constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Rebecca J.

    2013-04-01

    The Cerberus plains are one of the youngest surfaces on Mars. They are thought to have been formed by lava and/or water flows, but there is considerable debate regarding the source of this material. Much of the material forming the western plains, including the Athabasca Valles outflow channels, appears to have flowed from the region of the Cerberus Fossae graben system [1,2,3] and limited areas forming the eastern plains may have been erupted by low shield volcanoes [4,5]. However, flow of material from west to east is obstructed by a ridge centred on 157°E, 7°N and, prior to this study, vents which might be the source of fluid of a low enough viscosity to form the majority of the flat eastern plains had not been identified. We studied new HiRISE (25cm/px, High Resolution Science Imaging Experiment) images of the ridge between the east and west plains and observed possible source vents for this material: the ridge is cut by a series of pits and fissures which lie at the heads of flows and channels extending towards the surrounding plains. In order to establish the stratigraphic relationships between the vents and plains, this study produced large scale geomorphological maps based on the HiRISE images. The mapping showed that both incised channels and leveed flows extend onto the plain to the south of the ridge and that these were the final phase of plains-forming activity in that region. Conversely, to the north, ridge-sourced deposits only form the plains surface close to the ridge - beyond that, they are overlain by large-scale regional flows that appear to have originated from the direction of Athabasca Valles. In the southeast, a large-scale flow which does not emanate from this ridge forms the plains surface, but there is evidence that the youngest outflow activity from the ridge was contemporaneous with emplacement of this unit. We also performed crater counts to age-date the surfaces and these indicate that plains-forming and ridge-sourced units are of a

  7. Genetic susceptibility to dental caries on pit and fissure and smooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, J R; Wang, X; Desensi, R S; Wendell, S; Weyant, R J; Cuenco, K T; Crout, R; McNeil, D W; Marazita, M L

    2012-01-01

    Carious lesions are distributed nonuniformly across tooth surfaces of the complete dentition, suggesting that the effects of risk factors may be surface-specific. Whether genes differentially affect caries risk across tooth surfaces is unknown. We investigated the role of genetics on two classes of tooth surfaces, pit and fissure surfaces (PFS) and smooth surfaces (SMS), in more than 2,600 subjects from 740 families. Participants were examined for surface-level evidence of dental caries, and caries scores for permanent and/or primary teeth were generated separately for PFS and SMS. Heritability estimates (h(2), i.e. the proportion of trait variation due to genes) of PFS and SMS caries scores were obtained using likelihood methods. The genetic correlations between PFS and SMS caries scores were calculated to assess the degree to which traits covary due to common genetic effects. Overall, the heritability of caries scores was similar for PFS (h(2) = 19-53%; p < 0.001) and SMS (h(2) = 17-42%; p < 0.001). Heritability of caries scores for both PFS and SMS in the primary dentition was greater than in the permanent dentition and total dentition. With one exception, the genetic correlation between PFS and SMS caries scores was not significantly different from 100%, indicating that (mostly) common genes are involved in the risk of caries for both surface types. Genetic correlation for the primary dentition dfs (decay + filled surfaces) was significantly less than 100% (p < 0.001), indicating that genetic factors may exert differential effects on caries risk in PFS versus SMS in the primary dentition. PMID:22286298

  8. Effects of sealant, viscosity, and bonding agents on microleakage of fissure sealants: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabkhani, Maryam; Mazhari, Fatemeh; Sadeghi, Samaneh; Ebrahimi, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of enamel or dentin bonding agent (DBA) and sealant viscosity on sealant microleakage. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolars were randomly divided into two equal groups (based on sealant viscosity) and each group was divided into three subgroups of 10 teeth. Group 1 (low viscosity sealant, Seal-Rite, Pulpdent, USA with 7.7% filler): Prophylaxis, enameloplasty, etching of occlusal surfaces with 38% of phosphoric acid gel, rinsing and drying, followed by (1) enamel bonding agent (EBA) (Margin Bond, Coltène/Whaledent AG) or (2) DBA (Excite, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Liechtenstein) or (3) no bonding (NB) prior to sealant application. In Group 2, similar procedures were performed except for applying a high viscosity sealant (Seal-Rite, Pulpdent, The USA with 34.4% filler). Specimens were thermocycled and then immersed in a 0.5% basic fuchsine solution for 24 h next, buccolingual slices of samples were scored under a stereomicroscope. The Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were used for data analysis. Results: There was no significant difference between DBA, EBA, and NB subgroups in the microleakage scores in both groups. Low viscosity sealant had a lower microleakage than the high viscosity sealant in both DBA (P = 0.002) and NB (P = 0.041) subgroups. Conclusion: The results indicated that the use of low viscosity sealant reduced the microleakage of pit and fissure sealants. However, the use of a bonding agent before sealant placement didn’t affect the microleakage. PMID:26929696

  9. Stratigraphy, paleoenvironment and emplacement mechanisms of the Koko fissure craters, O'ahu, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, I. P.; Bluth, J.; Simoneau, E.

    2011-12-01

    The Koko fissure craters are aligned and nested basanitic tuff cones and rings at the SE corner of O'ahu, Hawai'i. There are no published studies of their stratigraphy, emplacement mechanisms or depositional paleoenvironments. This study focuses on a tuff cone complex (Koko Crater) and a younger adjacent nested tuff ring (Hanauma Bay). A detailed stratigraphy with logged sections for both Koko Crater and the Hanauma Bay craters are presented and discussed. Koko Crater is dominated by wet fallout deposits on steep proximal slopes, commonly resedimented by hot (vesiculated) and cold (unvesiculated) debris flows, slumps and slides, but with an increasing percentage of wet (low temperature) low concentration PDC deposits preserved in the shallowly-dipping flanking apron deposits, and in the uppermost proximal deposits. At least two earlier cone or ring rims are preserved along its southern margin. The deposits of Hanauma Bay overlie the Koko deposits and are dominated by a mix of wet low concentration PDC, wet fallout and synchronous PDC, and fallout deposits in proximal settings, and by low concentration, probably drier, PDC deposits in more distal settings. The Hanauma Bay rings were emplaced before the Koko Crater tephra was consolidated, as steep-sided rills incised into Koko tephra are locally filled with tephra of mixed Koko and Hanauma sources. The onset of Hanauma Bay eruptions is marked by a horizon that is very rich in rounded coral sand clasts. Discontinuous horizons and lenses of coral block fallout are also very common in the Hanauma tephra. Coral sand is absent and coral blocks are much rarer in the Koko tephra. These observations, and probably also the dominance of wet fallout at Koko, imply that Koko was erupted in deeper water than the nearshore coral beach environment of the Hanauma rings. A faster rate of water recharge into the conduit in deeper open water is probably the most important factor in the generation of a cone rather than a ring at this

  10. Measurements of the gas emission from Holuhraun volcanic fissure eruption on Iceland, using Scanning DOAS instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galle, Bo; Pfeffer, Melissa; Arellano, Santiago; Bergsson, Baldur; Conde, Vladimir; Barsotti, Sara; Stefansdottir, Gerdur; Ingvarsson, Thorgils; Bergsson, Bergur; Weber, Konradin

    2016-04-01

    On 31 August 2014 a volcanic fissure eruption started at Holuhraun on Iceland. The eruption lasted for 6 months and was by far the strongest source of sulfur dioxide in Europe over the last 230 years, with sustained emission rates exceeding 100 000 ton/day. This gas emission severely affected people within Iceland. Under the scope of the EU-project FUTUREVOLC, a project with 3.5 years duration, aiming at making Iceland a supersite for volcanological research as a European contribution to GEO, a version of the Scanning DOAS instrument that is adapted to high latitudes with low UV radiation and severe meteorological conditions was developed. Since the first day of the eruption several of these novel instruments were monitoring the SO2 emission from the eruption. A lot of work was needed to sustain this operation during the winter at a very remote site and under severe field conditions. At the same time the very high concentrations in the gas plume, in combination with bad meteorological conditions has required the development of novel methods to derive reliable flux estimates. A simple approach to make a first order correction for atmospheric scattering has been applied, as well as filtering of the dataset to remove the data most affected by scattering. Substantial work has also been made to obtain realistic information on plume height and wind speed. The data from these instruments are the only sustained ground-based measurements of this important gas emission event. In this presentation we will discuss the instrumental issues and evaluation procedures and present the latest version of the emission estimates made from our measurements.

  11. Characterisation and microleakage of a new hydrophilic fissure sealant - UltraSeal XT® hydro™

    PubMed Central

    GÜÇLÜ, Zeynep A.; DÖNMEZ, Nazmiye; HURT, Andrew P.; COLEMAN, Nichola J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of this study was to characterise the new hydrophilic fissure sealant, UltraSeal XT® hydro™ (Ultradent Products, USA), and to investigate its in vitro resistance to microleakage after placement on conventionally acid etched and sequentially lased and acid etched molars. Material and Methods The sealant was characterised by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and Vickers indentation test. Occlusal surfaces of extracted human molars were either conventionally acid etched (n=10), or sequentially acid etched and laser irradiated (n=10). UltraSeal XT® hydro™ was applied to both groups of teeth which were then subjected to 2,500 thermocycles between 5 and 55°C prior to microleakage assessment by fuchsin dye penetration. Results UltraSeal XT® hydro™ is an acrylate-based sealant that achieved a degree of conversion of 50.6±2.2% and a Vickers microhardness of 24.2±1.5 under standard light curing (1,000 mWcm-2 for 20 s). Fluoride ion release is negligible within a 14-day period. SEM and EDX analyses indicated that the sealant comprises irregular submicron and nano-sized silicon-, barium-, and aluminium-bearing filler phases embedded in a ductile matrix. Laser preconditioning was found to significantly reduce microleakage (Mann-Whitney U test, p<0.001). The lased teeth presented enhanced surface roughness on a 50 to 100 μm scale that caused the segregation and concentration of the filler particles at the enamel-sealant interface. Conclusion Laser preconditioning significantly decreased microleakage and increased enamel surface roughness, which caused zoning of the filler particles at the enamel-sealant interface. PMID:27556205

  12. Earth-Fissure Movements Associated with Fluctuations in Ground-Water Levels near the Picacho Mountains, South-Central Arizona, 1980-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The Picacho earth fissure transects subsiding alluvial sediments near the east periphery of the Picacho basin in south-central Arizona. The basin has undergone land subsidence of as much as 3.8 meters since the 1930's owing to compaction of the aquifer system in response to ground-water-Ievel declines that have exceeded 100 meters. The fissure, which extends generally north-south for 15 kilometers, exhibits horizontal tensile failure and as much as 0.6 meter of normal dip-slip movement at the land surface. The west side of the fissure is down thrown. The fissure was observed as early as 1927 and is the longest earth fissure in Arizona. Vertical and horizontal displacements were monitored along a line normal to the fissure. The survey line extends from a bedrock outcrop in the Picacho Mountains on the east, past an observation well near the fissure, to a point 1,422 meters to the west. From May 1980 to May 1984, the downthrown west side of the fissure subsided 167+-1.8 millimeters and moved 18+-1.5 millimeters westward into the basin. Concurrently, the relatively upthrown east side subsided 148+-1.8 millimeters and moved 14+-1.5 millimeters westward. Dislocation modeling of deformation along the survey line near the fissure indicates that dip-slip movement has occurred along a vertical fault surface that extends from the land surface to a depth of about 300 meters. Slip was 9 millimeters from May to December 1980 and also 9 millimeters from March to November 1981. Continuous measurements were made of horizontal movement across the fissure using a buried invar-wire horizontal extensometer, while water-level fluctuations were continuously monitored in four piezometers nested in two observation wells. The range of horizontal movement was 4.620 millimeters, and the range of water-level fluctuation in the nearest piezometer in the deep alluvium was 9.05 meters. The maximum annual opening of the fissure during the study period was 3.740 millimeters from March to October

  13. Recrystallized Granite Surface Fissures of Wasatch Range Produced Not Later Than 1/4Billion Years Ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Keith

    2000-11-01

    Our studies of numerous recrystallized fissures in 4 granite plutons of Wasatch Range, i.e., Mount T-W-M, (K.L. McDonald, Bul. A.P.S., 32 (4), 1124),(37 (5), 1256-7),(38 (1), 740) Bonanza Pk.-Midway,(35 (9), 2132) Little Cottonwood and Ferguson Canyon plutons, all of which formed magma chambers reaching Earth-atm. interface, estab that they resulted from high thermal gradients and not passages of earthquake waves.(33 (9), 1982-2) Magma chambers formed, solidified during Permo- Carboniferous Ice Age (roughly 1/3...1/4 billion yr ago), a time interval preceding extrusion, pf Rocky Mts., 10^8 yr ago, and while fluid, some belched lava flows(36 (9), 2466) extending over its reservoir walls to run hundreds of m. We have shown how the magma melts, dilutes and replaces overlying metamorphic rock(38 (1), 740) to reach Earth's surface, so that a pluton containing large amounts of dross (Fe ores, etc.) had a short fluid lifetime. We also described how offshoots from a long-running main fissure form acute angles with that fissure.(33 (3), 485) Recryst. fissures, reaching depths of perhaps 100 m, had initial fractures near time of solidification of top portion of magma chamber, while still hot (<< 1600 ^oF), a time when max. stresses occur near granite surface due to high thermal gradients, owing to snow coverage, rain water, stream flow over granite surface, partial coverage by ocean, etc., during P-C ice age -- when region of Wasatch Range existed at sea level, S.L. Valley being covered entrely by ocean water and region of Wasatch Boul. rising gently above Pac. Ocean to elev. of possibly 500-1000 ft, say, at a dist. of 10-15 mi to e, as implied by Chinese Wall of limestone on Grandeur Pk, another in Neff's Canyon running e from n ridge of her 9200 ft saddle-summit, as well as a dozen other ancient calcified stream beds emptying into ocean to w., in S.L. Valley. This existed prior to regional uplift (of similar topog.) of over 4000 ft. Details of how earthquake waves form an

  14. Origins of Feeding Arteries of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Located Near the Umbilical Fissure of the Left Hepatic Lobe: Angiographic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Shibata, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Yoshida, Miki; Tsuji, Kazunobu; Toshima, Fumihito; Matsui, Osamu

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To analyze the origins of the feeding arteries of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) near the umbilical fissure of the left hepatic lobe. Methods: Twenty-eight HCCs with a mean {+-} SD tumor diameter of 3.4 {+-} 1.0 cm (range 1-4.4 cm) in contact with the right or left side of the umbilical fissure were treated by superselective transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). The origins of the tumor-feeding arteries were analyzed with arteriograms and computed tomography or cone-beam computed tomography images obtained during and 1 week after TACE.ResultsTwenty-one HCC lesions were located in segment 3 and seven were located in segment 4. Of 21 tumors in segment 3, 13 (61.9%) were supplied by the lateral inferior subsegmental artery (A3), three (14.3%) by the medial subsegmental artery (A4), three (14.3%) by both A4 and A3, one (4.8%) by a branch arising from the left lateral hepatic artery, and one (4.8%) by a branch of the right gastric artery. In particular, all tumor-feeding branches arising from A4 were the first branch of A4. Of seven tumors in segment 4, four (57.1%) were supplied by A4 and three (42.9%) by A3. In particular, all tumor-feeding branches arising from A3 were the first branch of A3. Conclusion: This study demonstrates crossover blood supply to HCC lesions located near the umbilical fissure, in addition to direct feeding from a separate branch. In particular, the first branch of the opposite subsegmental artery may feed tumors when crossover blood supply is present.

  15. Deformation precursory to the March 2011 Kamoamoa fissure eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, P.; Poland, M. P.; Miklius, A.

    2012-12-01

    We examine surface deformation of Kilauea Volcano prior to the March 5, 2011, Kamoamoa fissure eruption along the volcano's east rift zone (ERZ). The Kamoamoa eruption followed several months of magma accumulation beneath Kilauea's summit. In addition to inflation of a shallow (1.5-2 km depth) source near Halema'uma'u Crater, precursory deformation at Kilauea 's summit is attributable to sources distinct in space and time from previously identified zones of magma storage and faulting. Differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) and TerraSAR-X (TSX) satellites, combined with GPS data, show evidence for two additional sources active during the inflation prior to the Kamoamoa eruption: 1) progressive inflation of a triangular-shaped area extending from the southern edge of Kilauea Caldera and west of the ERZ, and 2) a nearly vertical extensional feature beneath the western edge of Kilauea Caldera. While the shallow Hale'mau'mau source appears to have gained in volume during the entire period, the triangular source in the south caldera became active in the final month prior to the Kamoamoa eruption. Inflation of this source reversed to deflation during the eruption. The extensional source beneath the western caldera, evident in the last quarter of 2010, also appears to have reversed its sense of motion during the eruption. To model the sources, we use a Markov chain Monte Carlo optimization. Compared to previously observed deformation due to deflation-inflation events within the caldera, the deformation preceding the Kamoamoa eruption extends farther ESE. In these preliminary models, we use a spheroidal source with a sub-horizontal long axis striking roughly E-W. The source south of the caldera is modeled as a rectangular tensile dislocation that is sub-horizontal at roughly 2 km depth, similar to the spheroidal source. The western caldera sub-vertical tensile dislocation extends from within a few hundred meters

  16. CHEMICAL TRANSPORT IN A FISSURED BOCK: VERIFICATION OF A NUMERICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmuson, A.; Narasimhan, T.N.; Neretnieks, I.

    1982-04-01

    Numerical models for simulating chemical transport in fissured rocks constitute powerful tools for evaluating the acceptability of geological nuclear waste repositories. Due to the very long-term, high toxicity of some nuclear waste products, the models are required to predict, in certain cases, the spatial and temporal distribution of chemical concentration less than 0.001% of the concentration released from the repository. Whether numerical models can provide such accuracies is a major question addressed in the present work. To this end, we have verified a numerical model, TRUMP, which solves the advective diffusion equation in general three dimensions with or without decay and source terms. The method is based on an integrated finite-difference approach. The model was verified against known analytic solution of the one-dimensional advection-diffusion problem as well as the problem of advection-diffusion in a system of parallel fractures separated by spherical particles. The studies show that as long as the magnitude of advectance is equal to or less than that of conductance for the closed surface bounding any volume element in the region (that is, numerical Peclet number <2), the numerical method can indeed match the analytic solution within errors of ±10{sup -3} % or less. The realistic input parameters used in the sample calculations suggest that such a range of Peclet numbers is indeed likely to characterize deep groundwater systems in granitic and ancient argillaceous systems. Thus TRUMP in its present form does provide a viable tool for use in nuclear waste evaluation studies. A sensitivity analysis based on the analytic solution suggests that the errors in prediction introduced due to uncertainties in input parameters is likely to be larger than the computational inaccuracies introduced by the numerical model. Currently, a disadvantage in the TRUMP model is that the iterative method of solving the set of simultaneous equations is rather slow when time

  17. Chemical Transport in a Fissured Rock: Verification of a Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmuson, A.; Narasimhan, T. N.; Neretnieks, I.

    1982-10-01

    Numerical models for simulating chemical transport in fissured rocks constitute powerful tools for evaluating the acceptability of geological nuclear waste repositories. Due to the very long-term, high toxicity of some nuclear waste products, the models are required to predict, in certain cases, the spatial and temporal distribution of chemical concentration less than 0.001% of the concentration released from the repository. Whether numerical models can provide such accuracies is a major question addressed in the present work. To this end we have verified a numerical model, TRUMP, which solves the advective diffusion equation in general three dimensions, with or without decay and source terms. The method is based on an integrated finite difference approach. The model was verified against known analytic solution of the one-dimensional advection-diffusion problem, as well as the problem of advection-diffusion in a system of parallel fractures separated by spherical particles. The studies show that as long as the magnitude of advectance is equal to or less than that of conductance for the closed surface bounding any volume element in the region (that is, numerical Peclet number <2), the numerical method can indeed match the analytic solution within errors of ±10-3% or less. The realistic input parameters used in the sample calculations suggest that such a range of Peclet numbers is indeed likely to characterize deep groundwater systems in granitic and ancient argillaceous systems. Thus TRUMP in its present form does provide a viable tool for use in nuclear waste evaluation studies. A sensitivity analysis based on the analytic solution suggests that the errors in prediction introduced due to uncertainties in input parameters are likely to be larger than the computational inaccuracies introduced by the numerical model. Currently, a disadvantage in the TRUMP model is that the iterative method of solving the set of simultaneous equations is rather slow when time

  18. Geophysical Exploration of Faults, Fissures, and Fractures at Four Sites in Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázaro-Mancilla, O.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Contreras-Corvera, A.; Stock, J. M.; Moreno-Ayala, D.; Ramirez-Hernandez, J.; Carreon-Diazconti, C.; Lopez, D. A. L.; Lopez, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted field geophysical measurements in areas in the City of Mexicali that are associated with geological faults, fissures, and fractures. The study sites are: 1) Instituto Tecnologico de Mexicali 2) The buried trace of the Michoacan de Ocampo fault in the urban zone 3) Rio Nuevo 4) A site reported by Frez (2013) with ground rupture SW of Cerro Prieto At Site 1, seismic reflection profiling used a cable with 24 geophones at 1 m spacing. The source was a 3.6 kg sledge hammer, with 3 impacts per shot point. 347 shot points at 2 m spacing provided 6 fold coverage along a straight line with minimal elevation changes. Sample rate was 2000/s, and record length 1 s; reflections were seen down to 0.3 s TWTT. Processing included: frequency filter, fk filter, predictive deconvolution, geometry, velocity analysis, NMO and stacking. Lateral changes in the seismic section are due to surface modification and/or the presence of faults.At site 2, we measured 222Radon in 36 locations along 17 profiles across the fault, using inherent alpha spectrometry with a Durridge RAD7 detector. Each site was measured at a depth of 60 cm, with 31 five-minute readings in a 3 hour period, interspersed with 10 minute of background purge and 3 five-minute background measurements. In a profile parallel to the fault, 78% of the readings were > 100 pCi/L, confirming the presence of the fault along the swath surveyed. At Site 3 we compiled observations of post-earthquake cracks, conducted reconnaissance, and measured some profiles using 100 MHz GPR. These observations showed that the cracks are associated with ground failure due to earthquake shaking. At Site 4 our new 222Radon gas measurements complemented a pre-existing profile that had high 222Radon values lacking a structural explanation. Related to this we found that this region has two NW-SE trending features: a magnetic anomaly low of 360 nT (Evans, Summer and Castillo, 1972) and a graben reported by the Mexican Geological Survey in 2003

  19. Subsurface flow behavior in thick colluvium and fissured bedrock in Kumano-daira, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, S.; Onda, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Shimamura, M.; Togari-Ohta, A.; Uchida, T.; Tsujimura, M.

    2005-12-01

    Kumanodaira catchment was hypothesized; because of the thick colluvium, long time is required to infiltrate to the soil/bedrock interface and mainly composed of larger storm water. The soil water immediately above the soil/bedrock interface would infiltrate to the large fissures of the bedrock, preserving the isotopic signal and flowing quickly to the stream.

  20. Increased anal basal pressure in chronic anal fissures may be caused by overreaction of the anal-external sphincter continence reflex.

    PubMed

    van Meegdenburg, Maxime M; Trzpis, Monika; Heineman, Erik; Broens, Paul M A

    2016-09-01

    Chronic anal fissure is a painful disorder caused by linear ulcers in the distal anal mucosa. Even though it counts as one of the most common benign anorectal disorders, its precise etiology and pathophysiology remains unclear. Current thinking is that anal fissures are caused by anal trauma and pain, which leads to internal anal sphincter hypertonia. Increased anal basal pressure leads to diminished anodermal blood flow and local ischemia, which delays healing and leads to chronic anal fissure. The current treatment of choice for chronic anal fissure is either lateral internal sphincterotomy or botulinum toxin injections. In contrast to current thinking, we hypothesize that the external, rather than the internal, anal sphincter is responsible for increased anal basal pressure in patients suffering from chronic anal fissure. We think that damage to the anal mucosa leads to hypersensitivity of the contact receptors of the anal-external sphincter continence reflex, resulting in overreaction of the reflex. Overreaction causes spasm of the external anal sphincter. This in turn leads to increased anal basal pressure, diminished anodermal blood flow, and ischemia. Ischemia, finally, prevents the anal fissure from healing. Our hypothesis is supported by two findings. The first concerned a chronic anal fissure patient with increased anal basal pressure (170mmHg) who had undergone lateral sphincterotomy. Directly after the operation, while the submucosal anesthetic was still active, basal anal pressure decreased to 80mmHg. Seven hours after the operation, when the anesthetic had completely worn off, basal anal pressure increased again to 125mmHg, even though the internal anal sphincter could no longer be responsible for the increase. Second, in contrast to previous studies, recent studies demonstrated that botulinum toxin influences external anal sphincter activity and, because it is a striated muscle relaxant, it seems reasonable to presume that it affects the striated

  1. Assessment of the inhibitory effects of fissure sealants on the demineralization of primary teeth using an automatic pH-cycling system.

    PubMed

    Ushimura, Shuya; Nakamura, Koichi; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Minamikawa, Hajime; Abe, Shigeaki; Yawaka, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of fissure sealants on inhibition of demineralization of primary teeth using an automatic pHcycling system. Three fissure sealants were used: Teethmate F-1 2.0 (TM), BeautiSealant (BS), and Fuji III LC (IIILC). Using an automatic pH-cycling system, the specimens (n=12) were repeatedly demineralized and remineralized. Specimens were subjected to transverse microradiography (TMR), and changes in integrated mineral loss (IML) and lesion depth (Ld), indicated as ΔIML and ΔLd, respectively, were calculated. In addition, fluoride levels in the enamel were assessed using microparticle-induced gammaray emission/particle-induced X-ray emission (n=3). IIILC showed the lowest values for ΔIML and ΔLd, followed by BS and then TM. The highest amount of fluorine in the enamel was observed for IIILC, followed by TM and BS. All fissure sealants inhibited demineralization in primary teeth. PMID:27041023

  2. Native gold from volcanic gases at Tolbachik 1975-76 and 2012-13 Fissure Eruptions, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplygin, Ilya; Yudovskaya, Marina; Vergasova, Lidiya; Mokhov, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    Aggregates and euhedral crystals of native gold were found in sublimates formed during New Tolbachik Fissure Eruption in 2012-2013 (NTFE). Gold-bearing sublimate samples were taken from a red-hot (690 °C) degassing fracture in the roof of an active lava tunnel 1.5 km from active Naboko cinder cone in May 2013. The gas condensate collected at 690 °C in this site contains 16 ppb Au, 190 ppb Ag and 1180 ppm Cu compared to 3 ppb Au, 39 ppb Ag and 9.7 ppm Cu in the condensate of pristine magmatic gas sampled at 1030 °C. The 690 °C volcanic gas is most likely a mix of magmatic gas and local snow buried under the lava flows as indicated by oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of the condensate. The lower-temperature gas enrichment in gold, copper and chlorine is resulted from evaporation of the 690 °C condensate during forced gas pumping at sampling. Native gold was also found in fumarolic encrustations collected from caverns in basalt lava flows with temperature up to 600 °C in June 2014, in a year after eruption finished. The native gold precipitation in newly formed Cu-rich sublimates together with the well known gold occurrences in cinder cones of 1975-1976 Large Tolbachik Fissure Eruption manifest a transport capability of oxidized volcanic gas.

  3. Microtensile bond strength of a resin-based fissure sealant to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-etched primary enamel.

    PubMed

    Sungurtekin-Ekci, Elif; Oztas, Nurhan

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser pre-treatment alone, or associated with acid-etching, on the microtensile bond strength of a resin-based fissure sealant to primary enamel. Twenty-five human primary molars were randomly divided into five groups including (1) 35 % acid etching, (2) 2.5-W laser etching, (3) 3.5-W laser etching, (4) 2.5-W laser etching + acid etching, and (5) 3.5-W laser etching + acid etching. Er,Cr:YSGG laser was used at a wavelength of 2.780 nm and pulse duration of 140-200 μs with a repetition rate of 20 Hz. Following surface pre-treatment, the fissure sealant (ClinPro™, 3M Dental Products) was applied. Each tooth was sectioned and subjected to microtensile testing. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. The microtensile bond strength values of group 1 were significantly higher than those of group 2, while no statistically significant difference was detected between groups 1, 3, 4, and 5. It was concluded that 3.5-W laser etching produced results comparable to conventional acid etching technique, whereas 2.5-W laser etching was not able to yield adequate bonding performance. PMID:25847685

  4. Fissural volcanism, polygenetic volcanic fields, and crustal thickness in the Payen Volcanic Complex on the central Andes foreland (Mendoza, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarini, F.; Fornaciai, A.; Bistacchi, A.; Pasquarè, F. A.

    2008-09-01

    Shield volcanoes, caldera-bearing stratovolcanoes, and monogenetic cones compose the large fissural Payen Volcanic Complex, located in the Andes foreland between latitude 35°S and 38°S. The late Pliocene-Pleistocene and recent volcanic activity along E-W trending eruptive fissures produced basaltic lavas showing a within-plate geochemical signature. The spatial distribution of fractures and monogenetic vents is characterized by self-similar clustering with well defined power law distributions. Vents have average spacing of 1.27 km and fractal exponent D = 1.33 defined in the range 0.7-49.3 km. The fractal exponent of fractures is 1.62 in the range 1.5-48.1 km. The upper cutoffs of fractures and vent fractal distributions (about 48-49 km) scale to the crustal thickness in the area, as derived from geophysical data. This analysis determines fractured media (crust) thickness associated with basaltic retroarc eruptions. We propose that the Payen Volcanic Complex was and is still active under an E-W crustal shortening regime.

  5. Diagnosis of pit and fissure caries using frequency-domain infrared photothermal radiometry and modulated laser luminescence.

    PubMed

    Jeon, R J; Han, C; Mandelis, A; Sanchez, V; Abrams, S H

    2004-01-01

    Non-intrusive, non-contacting frequency-domain photothermal radiometry (FD-PTR or PTR) and frequency-domain luminescence (FD-LUM or LUM) have been used with 659- and 830-nm laser sources to assess the pits and fissures on the occlusal surfaces of human teeth. Fifty-two human teeth were examined with simultaneous measurements of PTR and LUM and were compared to conventional diagnostic methods including continuous (dc) luminescence (DIAGNOdent), visual inspection and radiographs. To compare each method to the others, sensitivities and specificities were calculated by using histological observations as the gold standard. With the combined criteria of four PTR and LUM signals (two amplitudes and two phases), it was found that the sensitivity of this method was much higher than any of the other methods used in this study, whereas the specificity was comparable to that of dc luminescence diagnostics. Therefore, PTR and LUM, as a combined technique, has the potential to be a reliable tool to diagnose early pit and fissure caries and could provide detailed information about deep lesions. Using the longer wavelength (830-nm) laser source, it has been shown that detection of deeper subsurface lesions than the 659-nm probe provides is possible. PMID:15528904

  6. Recrystallized Granite Surface Fissures Of Wasatch Range, Produced Not Later Than 1/4 Billion Years Ago.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, K. L.

    2002-04-01

    Our studies of numerous recrystallized fissures in 4 granite plutons of Wasatch Range, i.e., Mount T-W-M^1,6,7 Bonanza Pk.-Midway,^2 Little Cottonwood and Ferguson Canyon plutons, all of which formed magma chambers reaching Earth-atm. interface, estab. that they resulted from high thermal gradients and not passages of earthquake waves.^4 Magma chambers formed, solidified during Permo-Carboniferous Ice Age (roughly 1/3...1/4 billion yr ago), a time interval preceding extrusion of Rocky Mts., 10^8 yr ago, and while fluid, some belched lava flows^5 extending over its reservoir walls to run hundreds of m. We have shown how the magma melts, dilutes and replaces overlying metamorphic rock^7 to reach Earth's surface, so that a pluton containing large amounts of dross (Fe-ores, etc.) had a short fluid lifetime. We also described how offshoots from a long-running main fissure form acute angles with that fissure^3. Recryst. fissures, reaching depths of perhaps 100 m, had initial fractures near time of solidification of top portion of magma chamber, while still hot (<= 1600^oF), a time when max. stresses occur near granite surface due to high thermal gradients, owing to snow coverage, rain water, stream flow over granite surface, partial coverage by ocean, etc., during P-C ice age - when region of Wasatch Range existed at sea level, S. L. Valley being covered entirely by ocean water and region east of Wasatch Boul. rising gently above Pac. Ocean to elev. of possibly 500-1000 ft, say, at a distance of 10-15 mi to e, as implied by Chinese wall of limestone on Grandeur Pk, another in Neff's Canyon running e from n ridge of her 9200 ft saddle-summit, as well as a dozen other ancient calcified stream beds emptying into ocean to w, in S.L. Valley. This existed prior to regional uplift (of similar topog.) of over 4000 ft. Details of how earthquake waves form an epicenter from which propagate 2 stress fields in diam. opp. directions to open up, by a few m, surface granite to form a

  7. Comparison of Clinical Success of Applying a Kind of Fissure Sealant on the Lower Permanent Molar Teeth in Dry and Wet Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarian, Tahereh; Baghi, Saeid; Alipoor, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Fissure sealant therapy is among the most effective methods of preventing dental caries. However, it is lengthy and isolation of the teeth is difficult in this procedure especially in young children. Using new hydrophilic fissure sealant may reduce such problems. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the clinical success of a hydrophilic fissure sealant on the lower permanent molar teeth in dry and wet conditions. Materials and Method This clinical trial assessed 31 patients (mean age 8.13±1.77 years) who needed fissure sealant therapy on their first or second mandibular permanent molar. Having performed dental prophylaxis, the teeth were etched and rinsed. Then one of the two was randomly selected and sealed with smartseal & loc in isolated and dry conditions; while, the other was wetted on the etched enamel by using a saliva-contaminated micro brush, and was then sealed with the same fissure as the first tooth. Six and 12 months later, two independent observers examined the clinical success of sealant through checking the marginal integrity, marginal discoloration, and anatomical form. Data were analyzed by using SPSS software, version 16. The bivariate Chi-square and Exact Fisher tests were used to compare the clinical success of the two treatment methods. Results There was a high interpersonal reliability between the two examiners (K= 0.713). After 12 months, 90.3% clinical success was observed in dry conditions and 83.9% in wet conditions for smartseal & loc; however, the difference was not statistically significant (p= 0.0707). Conclusion According to the results of this study, it seems that using new hydrophilic fissure sealant can reduce technical sensitivities and consequently decreases the apprehensions on saliva contamination of etched enamel during treatment procedures. PMID:26331144

  8. The ‘Excess’ Emission from the Warm Surface Adjacent to Active Fissures on Enceladus from Combined VIMS and CIRS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Howell, Robert R.

    2015-11-01

    The exciting discovery of thermal emission from the tiger stripe fissures at the S. pole of Enceladus is a major highlight of the Cassini mission. Both VIMS (Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and CIRS (Composite InfraRed Spectrometer) detect the thermal ‘blackbody’ spectrum emitted from the warm fissure areas. The VIMS instrument is uniquely suited to measuring the hottest active locations because VIMS covers the 3 to 5 micron wavelength range where the rising edge of the Planck function for these T~200 K areas dominates the emission spectrum. At longer wavelengths, the spectrum is more complicated because contributions from small hot areas and larger cooler areas combine to form the broad emission spectrum that is detected by the CIRS instrument at wavelengths >6.7 microns. It is the combination of VIMS and CIRS spectra that paint a more complete portrait of the fissure heat transfer processes. Using spectra that span both the VIMS and CIRS wavelengths places a stronger constraint on the T distribution near the fissures than consideration of the spectra from either instrument alone.We show that when the best (= highest spatial resolution, 800 m/pixel and smaller) VIMS and CIRS spectra of the fissure thermal emission are considered together, there is a large (up to 400%) component of ‘excess’ emission spanning 7 to 17 microns that requires explanation. New analysis of ~2 km spatial resolution VIMS spectra of the Damascus hot spot on 8/13/2010 are similar to the highest resolution 4/14/2012 VIMS Baghdad spectra, confirming that differences in location or time between the best VIMS and CIRS spectra do not explain away the excess. The obvious interpretation is that there are processes that transfer heat from the fissure eruption to the surface within 400 m of the fissure center in addition to heat conduction through the fissure walls. Candidate heat transfer processes include fallback of large warm low velocity ice particles from the edges of the

  9. Mechanisms, Monitoring and Modeling Earth Fissure generation and Fault activation due to subsurface Fluid exploitation (M3EF3): A UNESCO-IGCP project in partnership with the UNESCO-IHP Working Group on Land Subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teatini, P.; Carreon-Freyre, D.; Galloway, D. L.; Ye, S.

    2015-12-01

    Land subsidence due to groundwater extraction was recently mentioned as one of the most urgent threats to sustainable development in the latest UNESCO IHP-VIII (2014-2020) strategic plan. Although advances have been made in understanding, monitoring, and predicting subsidence, the influence of differential vertical compaction, horizontal displacements, and hydrostratigraphic and structural features in groundwater systems on localized near-surface ground ruptures is still poorly understood. The nature of ground failure may range from fissuring, i.e., formation of an open crack, to faulting, i.e., differential offset of the opposite sides of the failure plane. Ground ruptures associated with differential subsidence have been reported from many alluvial basins in semiarid and arid regions, e.g. China, India, Iran, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Spain, and the United States. These ground ruptures strongly impact urban, industrial, and agricultural infrastructures, and affect socio-economic and cultural development. Leveraging previous collaborations, this year the UNESCO Working Group on Land Subsidence began the scientific cooperative project M3EF3 in collaboration with the UNESCO International Geosciences Programme (IGCP n.641; www.igcp641.org) to improve understanding of the processes involved in ground rupturing associated with the exploitation of subsurface fluids, and to facilitate the transfer of knowledge regarding sustainable groundwater management practices in vulnerable aquifer systems. The project is developing effective tools to help manage geologic risks associated with these types of hazards, and formulating recommendations pertaining to the sustainable use of subsurface fluid resources for urban and agricultural development in susceptible areas. The partnership between the UNESCO IHP and IGCP is ensuring that multiple scientific competencies required to optimally investigate earth fissuring and faulting caused by groundwater withdrawals are being employed.

  10. Overview of the precursors and dynamics of the 2012-13 basaltic fissure eruption of Tolbachik Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Alexander; Belousova, Marina; Edwards, Benjamin; Volynets, Anna; Melnikov, Dmitry

    2015-12-01

    We present a broad overview of the 2012-13 flank fissure eruption of Plosky Tolbachik Volcano in the central Kamchatka Peninsula. The eruption lasted more than nine months and produced approximately 0.55 km3 DRE (volume recalculated to a density of 2.8 g/cm3) of basaltic trachyandesite magma. The 2012-13 eruption of Tolbachik is one of the most voluminous historical eruptions of mafic magma at subduction related volcanoes globally, and it is the second largest at Kamchatka. The eruption was preceded by five months of elevated seismicity and ground inflation, both of which peaked a day before the eruption commenced on 27 November 2012. The batch of high-Al magma ascended from depths of 5-10 km; its apical part contained 54-55 wt.% SiO2, and the main body 52-53 wt.% SiO2. The eruption started by the opening of a 6 km-long radial fissure on the southwestern slope of the volcano that fed multi-vent phreatomagmatic and magmatic explosive activity, as well as intensive effusion of lava with an initial discharge of > 440 m3/s. After 10 days the eruption continued only at the lower part of the fissure, where explosive and effusive activity of Hawaiian-Strombolian type occurred from a lava pond in the crater of the main growing scoria cone. The discharge rate for the nine month long, effusion-dominated eruption gradually declined from 140 to 18 m3/s and formed a compound lava field with a total area of ~ 36 km2; the effusive activity evolved from high-discharge channel-fed 'a'a lavas to dominantly low-discharge tube-fed pahoehoe lavas. On 23 August, the effusion of lava ceased and the intra-crater lava pond drained. Weak Strombolian-type explosions continued for several more days on the crater bottom until the end of the eruption around 5 September 2013. Based on a broad array of new data collected during this eruption, we develop a model for the magma storage and transport system of Plosky Tolbachik that links the storage zones of the two main genetically related magma

  11. Assessing the atmospheric and climatic effects of basaltic fissure eruptions. A case study Nornahraun, North Iceland, 2014-2015.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Catherine; Burton, Kevin; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Vye-Brown, Charlotte; Brown, Richard

    2015-04-01

    A volcanic eruption's ability to release sulphur gases into the atmosphere is one of the critical factors in assessing their climatic and environmental effects, because it is directly linked to the potential H2SO4 aerosol burden produced [1]. Basaltic fissure eruptions loft large amounts of sulphur into the atmosphere because of the efficient degassing of volatiles and halogens from the magma at the vent [2-4] coupled with the high sulphur yield of basaltic magma. The common nature of this style of eruption and its products, regardless of magnitude, means that our understanding of the exact processes which influence atmospheric chemistry and environmental impact is very important. The Nornahraun fissure eruption in North Iceland that began on the 31st August 2014, has quickly become one of the best documented eruptions of its kind, through systematic monitoring and sampling by the Institute of Earth Sciences eruption team and The Icelandic Meteorological Office. As a result it is an excellent modern analogue for historic or ancient basaltic fissure eruptions, for which the amount of degassing can only be estimated through petrological and geochemical methods. It also serves as a timely testing platform for novel geochemical proxies. This study uses the exceptional sensitivity of the 187Os-187Re radiogenic system to the presence of crustal material [5], and highly siderophile stable isotopes Cu, Zn and S to indicate the chemistry and degassing of the melt carrying S to the surface. The geochemical isotopic proxies will be tested using established petrological methods and gas emission data. This study concentrates on determining the following key parameters: (1) The source of volatiles in the magma indicated though the pressure dependence of S solubility. (2) The mechanism of aerosol and gas release into the atmosphere is dictated both by the chemistry of the melt that controls the S species (H2S, SO2 or FeS2) present [6], and by the mechanism of transfer. (3) The

  12. Impact of effusive eruptions from the Eguas-Carvão fissure system, São Miguel Island, Azores Archipelago (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Cappello, Annalisa; Zanon, Vittorio; Del Negro, Ciro

    2015-01-01

    The hazard and risk posed by future effusive eruptions from the Éguas-Carvão fissure system in São Miguel Island (Azores Archipelago) are assessed. This fissure system, located ~ 13 km from the town of Ponta Delgada and its international airport, was the only site in the whole island to be characterized by recurrent basaltic eruptions over the past 5000 yr. Here we report on the stratigraphic record of these Holocene eruptions, with special mention to both areas and volumes of deposits, and eruptive styles and recurrence. These basic data then are used to constrain numerical simulations of lava flow paths using the MAGFLOW model, after which hazard zones of possible future events are proposed. The lava flow risk is evaluated by combining the hazard with the exposed value, referred to the population, infrastructures and land use. These results are shown in two distinct maps, where the areas most prone to lava flow inundation and the extent of damages in case of a future effusive eruption are identified. We find that lava flows issuing from the Éguas-Carvão fissure system may be a threat to the villages of Feteiras, Capelas and Santo Antonio. Although this study was conducted on the Éguas-Carvão fissure system, the approach used can be applied to the whole São Miguel Island.

  13. Dike Propagation Mechanisms from Seismicity Accompanying the 2014 Bárðarbunga-Holuhraun Fissure Eruption, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, J.; Ágústsdóttir, T.; Greenfield, T. S.; Green, R. G.; White, R. S.; Brandsdottir, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present data from our dense seismic network which captured in unprecedented detail the micro-seismicity associated with the 2014 dike intrusion from the subglacial Bárðarbunga volcano in central Iceland. Over 30,000 automatically located earthquakes delineate a complex 46 km dike propagation during the days preceding the onset of effusive magmatism at the Holuhraun lava field on 29 August 2014. Approximately 1.5 km3 of lava was erupted, making this the largest eruption in Iceland for over 200 years.Micro-seismicity tracks the lateral migration of the dike, with a concentration of earthquakes in the advancing tip where stresses are greatest, and trailing zones of lesser or no seismicity behind. Onset of an initial 4 hour fissure eruption was accompanied simultaneously by a backward retreat in seismic activity, followed by a gradual re-advance prior to the onset of a second, sustained fissure eruption in the same location on 31 August. Rock fracture mechanisms are determined from fault plane solutions of these seismic events. At the tip of the advancing dike, left-lateral strike-slip faulting parallel to the propagation is dominant, utilising pre-existing lineations and releasing stress accumulated in the brittle layer from rift zone extension. Behind the dike tip, both right-lateral and left-lateral strike-slip earthquakes are found, marking failure of solidifying magma plugs within the dike conduit. Contrary to many models of dike propagation, both normal faulting and failure at high angles to the dike are rare. Furthermore, a distinct lack of seismicity is observed in the 3-4 km region beneath the surface rupture. This suggests that opening is occuring aseismically, with earthquakes focused at the base of the dike near the brittle-ductile boundary.

  14. Knowledge, value, opinion and practice about usage of pit and fissure sealant among dental professionals in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Nagappan, N.; Dhamodhar, M. Dinesh; Nithin, M. G.; Kumar, E. Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Aim: A study was aimed to assess the knowledge, value, opinion, and practice regarding the use of dental sealants among private dental practitioners in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. Materials and Methods: A self-administrated questionnaire were distributed to 192 private dental practitioners in Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India by using simple random sampling. A convenience sampling technique was employed. The questionnaire consisted of 28 items, which included information about knowledge, value, opinion, and practice regarding dental sealants. The questionnaire was obtained from the study by San Martin et al. 2013 and Kailash Asawa et al. 2014. Frequency distribution was tabulated. For frequency distribution strongly, strongly agree, and agree were combined as “agree” and strongly disagree and disagree were combined as “disagree.” There were no changes in “neutral.” Results: Among the 196 study subjects 56.2% were males and 43.8% were females with their clinical experience of 52.1% for <5 years, 35.4% for 5–10 years, and 13.5% for >15 years. The mean scores for knowledge, value, opinion, and practice were 41.8 ± 3.7, 18.7 ± 2.8, 18.1 ± 1.4, and 12.9 ± 2.3, respectively. Conclusion: The results suggest that dental practitioners had satisfactory knowledge about pit and fissure sealant and had neutral attitudes about sealants being effective. Dental practitioners adequately used the pit and fissure sealants but they did not follow the standardized procedures and specific guidelines. PMID:26942116

  15. Plateau versus fissure ridge travertines from Quaternary geothermal springs of Italy and Turkey: Interactions and feedbacks between fluid discharge, paleoclimate, and tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Filippis, Luigi; Faccenna, Claudio; Billi, Andrea; Anzalone, Erlisiana; Brilli, Mauro; Soligo, Michele; Tuccimei, Paola

    2013-08-01

    Morphologically-different deposits of thermal travertines are known worldwide, but what factors controlled their morphology, volume, and growth for tens of thousands of years is only partially understood. Two main morphotypes of Quaternary thermal travertines are reconsidered here to understand the reasons for their differential growth: the fissure ridge travertines of Denizli Basin, western Turkey, and the travertine plateau of Tivoli, central Italy. For comparable longevities and average vertical deposition rates, the main differences between the studied travertines are as follows: (1) volume of the travertine plateau is about one hundred times larger than each fissure ridge; (2) despite a larger volume, the travertine plateau does not produce relief, whereas the fissure ridges produce a characteristic prominent topography; (3) the travertine plateau grew primarily through lateral progradation, whereas the fissure ridges through vertical aggradation; (4) travertine deposition occurred in different environments: principally low-energy flat or shallow environments at Tivoli and high-energy inclined environments at Denizli; (5) the growth of the Tivoli plateau occurred in a subsiding basin, whereas the fissure ridges were not influenced by significant subsidence; (6) C- and O-isotope signatures from the two studied travertines are different; (7) despite similar annual precipitations, the present water discharge in the Tivoli area is about ten times greater than that of the Denizli Basin. U-series ages from the two deposits are correlated with paleoclimate oscillations at regional and global scales. Geological field evidence together with paleoclimate correlations suggest that, in both the study cases, the main body of travertine deposits (the bedded travertine) grew preferentially when the water table was high (warm and/or humid periods). Conversely, when the water table was depressed (cold and/or dry periods), the Tivoli travertine underwent partial erosion and the

  16. Comparative evaluation of the length of resin tags, viscosity and microleakage of pit and fissure sealants – an in vitro scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, A.R.; Murthy, Sankriti A.; Sugandhan, S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: In this era of preventive dentistry, many techniques are available for prevention of caries, such as plaque control, use of systemic and local fluorides and pit and fissure sealants. The rationale of pit and fissure sealants is that, when they are applied into the caries prone fissures, they penetrate and seal them from the oral environment. This study aims to correlate the relationship between the viscosity of the sealant, resin tag length and microleakage. Materials and Methods: 30 third molars were selected for study. The teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group E: Embrace wetbond, H: Helioseal, G: Guardian seal. Teeth were cleaned with pumice prophylaxis and pretreated with acid etching and bonding agent. The respective pit and fissure sealants were applied. Teeth were placed in 1% methylene blue dye and sectioned mesio-distally into two halves. These were used to assess the microleakage using stereomicroscope and resin tag length using SEM. Viscosity was assessed using Brooke's field viscometer. Results: Viscosity was lowest for Embrace wetbond and highest for Guardian seal. Microleakage scores were highest with Guardian seal and lowest with Embrace wetbond. Resin tag lengths were longer with Embrace wetbond as compared to other groups. There is a definite negative correlation between viscosity, resin tag length and microleakage. Lower the viscosity, the longer were the resin tags and the microleakage decreased. Embrace wetbond pit and fissure sealant had lowest viscosity, longest resin tag length and lowest microleakage scores. Conclusion: Embrace wetbond appears to be compatible with residual moisture and ideal for use in children, where isolation is a problem. PMID:22346161

  17. Comparing Long and Short Term Deformation in the Krafla Fissure System, NE Iceland, using LiDAR, InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramham, E.; Wright, T. J.; Paton, D. A.; Sigmundsson, F.; Pagli, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Krafla volcanic system is situated on the divergent plate boundary separating Eurasia from North America, one of five fissure swarms (rift segments) in the Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ) of Iceland. The Krafla segment is a 5-10 km wide and 100 km long region consisting of a central volcano and fissure swarm. Dyke intrusions and fissure eruptions characterise the activity in Krafla. A rifting episode in 1975-1984 activated an 80 km long segment of the Krafla fissure swarm. The eruptive history suggests that the Krafla fissure swarm may not have been active for the whole of the last 10 ka, and that other rift segments may accommodate extension during periods of quiescence. Bjornsson (1977) estimated that the Northern Volcanic Zone has a major rifting event every ~ 100 years, each affecting only one of the five swarms. To better understand the deformation in this region we have attempted to determine whether faulting has been proceeding at a steady rate during this time period by examining both the long term (10 ka) and short term (10s of years) rates of vertical motion. To study the short-term vertical deformation during the post-rifting period in the Krafla system we have combined a series of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images, acquired by ERS and Envisat, with GPS data. The GPS data constrain the horizontal deformation - we remove the contribution of horizontal motion from the InSAR data to isolate the current vertical surface deformation rates. For the long term deformation, we have acquired high resolution LiDAR surveys over the Krafla fissure swarm in August 2007 and September 2008. We have interpolated these data to create a 1,300 km2 high resolution (~0.5 m) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the area. Using the DEM and ages of known lavas, we have estimated the average rate of vertical deformation during the post-glacial period for an area north of the main Krafla caldera, covered by a 10 ka old lava shield. Vertical deformation

  18. Oscillation of a Shallow Hydrothermal Fissure Inferred from Long-Period Seismic Events at Taal Volcano, the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Y.; Kumagai, H.; Lacson, R.; Figueroa, M. S.; Yamashina, T.

    2012-12-01

    examine H2O gas (vapor) for simplicity. We calculated far-field waveforms generated by an oscillation of a crack containing vapor, and applied the Sompi method to estimate Q and nondimensional frequency. The estimated Q of a fundamental longitudinal mode oscillation was similar to the observation. We obtained a reasonable crack size (188 m) from a comparison of the observed peak frequency (0.8 Hz) with the calculated nondimensional frequency of the mode. In the swarm period of the LP events, other anomalies such as large volcano deformation and significant increase of gas emission from the main crater were not observed. This feature and the crack model result above suggest an active and localized vapor supply from magma at depth to the LP source. Such a localized supply may be realized by a transportation of vapor through a fissure. If we assume that the estimated crack volume (10^2 m^3) corresponds to vapor supplied to the LP source for each event, the total vapor mass supplied throughout the swarm period is ~10^7 kg. If we assume that this amount of vapor was originated by degassing from the magma and transported to the LP source through the fissure, we can estimate a magma volume of ~10^6 m^3. We thus suggest that the LP events at Taal were triggered by degassing and transportation of vapor from a deep magma to a shallow depth through a fissure.

  19. Potential for aquifer compaction, land subsidence, and earth fissures in Avra Valley, Pima and Pinal counties, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    Avra Valley is a large north-trending alluvial basin about 15 mi west of Tucson in Pima and Pinal Counties, Arizona. The climate of Avra Valley is semiarid, and the average annual precipitation ranges from 8 to 12 in. Two major ephemeral streams, the Santa Cruz River and Brawley Wash, drain the area. These streams and their tributaries provide a source of recharge to an extensive alluvial aquifer that underlies the valley floor. The aquifer consists of interbedded gravel, sand, silt, and clay and contains a vast quantity of groundwater. The physiography, fertile soil, and mild climate of Avra Valley make it an ideal environment for agriculture and urban development. Although the aquifer is replenished by natural recharge and underflow, rates of recharge and underflow have not kept pace with the rate of pumping. Pumping has exceeded recharge for several decades, resulting in a lowering of groundwater levels throughout most of the valley. In places, water level declines have resulted in small amounts of aquifer compaction and land subsidence. Earth fissures, some of which may be the result of localized differential subsidence, also have been observed in the valley. Geohydrologic characteristics of Avra Valley that may contribute to potential aquifer compaction, land subsidence, and earth fissures are described. The quantitative evaluation of potential land subsidence in this report is presented as an interim land- and water-use planning tool pending acquisition and study of additional data. Because of data limitations, the evaluation is made on the assumption that future rates of compaction and subsidence in Avra Valley will be similar to those in the Eloy-Picacho area. The evaluation also assumes that water level declines in the aquifer will continue. Several factors that may reduce groundwater withdrawals, and thus the potential for compaction and subsidence in Avra Valley, were not evaluated. These factors include the enactment of the 1980 Arizona Ground

  20. Fissured Rocks and Water Reservoirs in Eastern Thessaly Mountain Range, Greece (Olympus, Ossa, Maurovouni and Pelion): The Role of Tectonic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, I.; Migiros, G.; Stamatis, G.; Yoxas, G.

    2009-04-01

    The storage capacity of fractured hard rocks is lower than porous media and karst formations, though they can yield groundwater of sufficiently good quality for drinking purposes and may host important water resources, even if they are often of low permeability. In particular, for countries like Greece, where water needs for the local population and the tourist industry are excessive and waterfall limited, these reservoirs are of strategic importance. The mountain Range in Eastern Thessaly comprises an extensive nappe of metamorphic rocks, consisting of schists, gneisses, involving partly some ophiolithic rocks and marble intercalations. The thickness of the nappe exceeds 600 m in Ossa, whereas in the area of Pelion is estimated up to 3.000 m. This nappe rests on top of the Autochthonous Olympus- Ossa unit, which forms a massive Mesozoic carbonate sequence. Extensive fieldwork data supported by the analysis of the physical and chemical properties of a large number of springs and combined by the study of the geological structure both local and regional, resulted in important outcomes regarding the fissured rocks permeability, water flow and springs distribution. Schists are characterized by heterogeneity regarding their permeability features. They are divided into hard-rocks where quartz, epidote and amphiboles prevail, displaying higher permeability and soft-rocks where clay minerals prevail, exhibiting low permeability features, because the presence of clay blocks the fissures and prevent any infiltration process. The marbles are of high permeability, but are of limited extent. A few springs are located in marbles, but the vast majority of the springs are associated to the hard-rock schists, are scattered and characterized by high seasonal discharges. In the area of Ossa in particular, the most important reservoirs exist at the bordering zones of the metamorphic and the post-alpine formations due to the enrichment of the sedimentary post-alpine formations. In the

  1. Turbulent atmospheric plumes above line sources with an application to volcanic fissure eruptions on the terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    The theory of turbulent plumes maintained above steady line sources of buoyancy is worked out in detail within the limitations of Taylor's entrainment assumption. It is applied to the structure of a pure plume injected into a stably stratified atmosphere. Volcanic basalt eruptions that develop from long, narrow vents create line source plumes, which rise well above the magmatic fire fountains playing near the ground level. The eruption of Laki in 1783 may provide an example of this style of eruption. Flood basalts are more ancient examples. Evidence of enormous fissure eruptions that occurred in the past on Mars and Venus also exists. Owing to the different properties of the atmospheres on these two planets from those on the earth, heights of line source plumes are expected to vary in the ratios 1:6:0.6 (earth:Mars:Venus). It is very unlikely that the observed increase of sulfur dioxide above the Venusian cloud deck in 1978 could have been due to a line source volcanic eruption, even if it had been a flood basalt eruption.

  2. Comparative study of fluoride released and recharged from conventional pit and fissure sealants versus surface prereacted glass ionomer technology

    PubMed Central

    Salmerón-Valdés, Elias Nahum; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J; Alanis-Tavira, Jorge; Morales-Luckie, Raúl Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Context: The fluoride release of sealants in vitro shows a marked decrease. Giomers are distinguishable from manufactured resin-based sealants and contain prereacted glass-ionomer particles (PRG). Aims: To compare the amounts of fluoride released from the main pit and fissure of a resin-based sealant with that from a Giomer and to assess the abilities of the sealant and the Giomer to recharge when exposed to regular use of fluoride rinse. Materials and Methods: The readings for the fluoride concentration were carried out for 60 days using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. After this period, the samples were recharged using a fluoride mouth rinse. The amount of fluoride released after this recharge was determined for 5 days. The data were analyzed using Student's t- and analysis of variance tests. Results: In general, all materials presented higher fluoride release in the first 24 h; G1 and G4 showed a higher fluoride release in this period. On the other hand, G3 and G1 presented the most constant fluoride release until the 8th day, wherein all the sealants considerably decreased in the amount of fluoride released. Conclusion: G1 and G3 released higher concentrations of fluoride, although no significant differences were found. Giomers recharged in the first 24 h after polymerization presented an improved and sustained fluoride release. PMID:26957792

  3. Partitioning of Holocene kinematics and interaction between the Theistareykir Fissure Swarm and the Husavik-Flatey Fault, North Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, A.; Bonali, F. L.; Einarsson, P.; Hjartardóttir, Á. R.; Pasquarè Mariotto, F. A.

    2016-02-01

    Our research is aimed at contributing to the general understanding of how transform-rift junctions work, a topic that can be studied in exceptional detail in North Iceland, where the active transform Husavik-Flatey Fault (HFF) connects with the Gudfinnugja Fault (GF), the westernmost structure of the Theistareykir Fissure Swarm (TFS). We studied in the field: i) offsets along the easternmost HFF, ii) the geometry and kinematics of 649 faults and 1208 tension fractures in the TFS, iii) the interactions among all these structures. The HFF transtensional kinematics is compatible with the GF, which shows different offsets north and south of the junction between these two faults. We suggest the possible prolongation of the HFF beyond the junction, based on: i) the change in offsets and strikes of TFS normal faults, ii) the presence of en-échelon, NNW-SSE-striking normal faults and tension fractures with a slight right-lateral component, iii) the transition of some of the faults into tension fractures north of the prolongation of the HFF, and iv) the decrease in the cumulated offset of all the faults north of the HFF prolongation. We interpret these data as field evidence of the first stages of propagation of the HFF upward or across the TFS: This has clear implications for defining the potential rupture length of the HFF and, hence, for seismic hazard assessment.

  4. Genome-wide association studies of pit-and-fissure- and smooth-surface caries in permanent dentition.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Z; Shaffer, J R; Wang, X; Feingold, E; Weeks, D E; Lee, M; Cuenco, K T; Wendell, S K; Weyant, R J; Crout, R; McNeil, D W; Marazita, M L

    2013-05-01

    While genetics clearly influences dental caries risk, few caries genes have been discovered and validated. Recent studies have suggested differential genetic factors for primary dentition caries and permanent dentition caries, as well as for pit-and-fissure- (PF) and smooth- (SM) surface caries. We performed separate GWAS for caries in permanent-dentition PF surfaces (1,017 participants, adjusted for age, sex, and the presence of Streptococcus mutans) and SM surfaces (1,004 participants, adjusted for age, education group, and the presence of Streptococcus mutans) in self-reported whites (ages 14 to 56 yrs). Caries scores were derived based on visual assessment of each surface of each tooth; more than 1.2 million SNPs were either successfully genotyped or imputed and were tested for association. Two homologous genes were suggestively associated: BCOR (Xp11.4) in PF-surface caries (p value = 1.8E-7), and BCORL1 (Xq26.1) in SM-surface caries (p value = 1.0E-5). BCOR mutations cause oculofaciocardiodental syndrome, a Mendelian disease involving multiple dental anomalies. Associations of other plausible cariogenesis genes were also observed for PF-surface caries (e.g., INHBA, p value = 6.5E-6) and for SM-surface caries (e.g., CXCR1 and CXCR2, p value = 1.9E-6). This study supports the notion that genes differentially affect cariogenesis across the surfaces of the permanent dentition, and nominates several novel genes for investigation. PMID:23470693

  5. Effects of Aloe vera cream on chronic anal fissure pain, wound healing and hemorrhaging upon defection: a prospective double blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, N; Khademloo, M; Vosoughi, K; Assadpour, S

    2014-01-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant that promotes wound healing in burn injuries. A prospective clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of a topical cream containing 0.5% Aloe vera juice powder in the treatment of chronic anal fissures. The aloe cream was applied by the patients to the wound site 3 times per day for 6 weeks following the instructions of a physician. Pain was assessed with a visual analog scale before treatment and at the end of each week of treatment. Wound healing and the amount and severity of bleeding were examined and evaluated before and at the end of each week of treatment. There were statistically significant differences in chronic anal fissure pain, hemorrhaging upon defection and wound healing before and at the end of the first week of treatment also in comparison with control group (p < 0.0001). In this study, a topical cream containing aloe vera juice was an effective treatment for chronic anal fissures. This is a promising result indicating that further comparative studies are justified. PMID:24763890

  6. Poro-elastic modeling of Syringomyelia - a systematic study of the effects of pia mater, central canal, median fissure, white and gray matter on pressure wave propagation and fluid movement within the cervical spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Støverud, Karen H; Alnæs, Martin; Langtangen, Hans Petter; Haughton, Victor; Mardal, Kent-André

    2016-01-01

    Syringomyelia, fluid-filled cavities within the spinal cord, occurs frequently in association with a Chiari I malformation and produces some of its most severe neurological symptoms. The exact mechanism causing syringomyelia remains unknown. Since syringomyelia occurs frequently in association with obstructed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow, it has been hypothesized that syrinx formation is mechanically driven. In this study we model the spinal cord tissue either as a poro-elastic medium or as a solid linear elastic medium, and simulate the propagation of pressure waves through an anatomically plausible 3D geometry, with boundary conditions based on in vivo CSF pressure measurements. Then various anatomic and tissue properties are modified, resulting in a total of 11 variations of the model that are compared. The results show that an open segment of the central canal and a stiff pia (relative to the cord) both increase the radial pressure gradients and enhance interstitial fluid flow in the central canal. The anterior median fissure, anisotropic permeability of the white matter, and Poisson ratio play minor roles. PMID:26176823

  7. Deep subsurface mine stalactites trap endemic fissure fluid Archaea, Bacteria, and Nematoda possibly originating from ancient seas.

    PubMed

    Borgonie, Gaëtan; Linage-Alvarez, Borja; Ojo, Abidemi; Shivambu, Steven; Kuloyo, Olukayode; Cason, Errol D; Maphanga, Sihle; Vermeulen, Jan-G; Litthauer, Derek; Ralston, Colin D; Onstott, Tullis C; Sherwood-Lollar, Barbara; Van Heerden, Esta

    2015-01-01

    Stalactites (CaCO3 and salt) from water seeps are frequently encountered in ceilings of mine tunnels whenever they intersect water-bearing faults or fractures. To determine whether stalactites could be mineralized traps for indigenous fracture water microorganisms, we analyzed stalactites collected from three different mines ranging in depth from 1.3 to 3.1 km. During sampling in Beatrix gold mine (1.4 km beneath the surface), central South Africa, CaCO3 stalactites growing on the mine tunnel ceiling were collected and observed, in two cases, to contain a living obligate brackish water/marine nematode species, Monhystrella parvella. After sterilization of the outer surface, mineral layers were physically removed from the outside to the interior, and DNA extracted. Based upon 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequencing, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya in different combinations were detected for each layer. Using CT scan and electron microscopy the inner structure of CaCO3 and salt stalactites were analyzed. CaCO3 stalactites show a complex pattern of lamellae carrying bacterially precipitated mineral structures. Nematoda were clearly identified between these layers confirming that bacteria and nematodes live inside the stalactites and not only in the central straw. Salt stalactites exhibit a more uniform internal structure. Surprisingly, several Bacteria showing highest sequence identities to marine species were identified. This, together with the observation that the nematode M. parvella recovered from Beatrix gold mine stalactite can only survive in a salty environment makes the origin of the deep subsurface colonization enigmatic. The possibility of a Permian origin of fracture fluids is discussed. Our results indicate stalactites are suitable for biodiversity recovery and act as natural traps for microorganisms in the fissure water long after the water that formed the stalactite stopped flowing. PMID:26441844

  8. Evolution of dike opening during the March 2011 Kamoamoa fissure eruption, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lundgren, Paul; Poland, Michael; Miklius, Asta; Orr, Tim R.; Yun, Sang-Ho; Fielding, Eric; Liu, Zhen; Tanaka, Akiko; Szeliga, Walter; Hensley, Scott; Owen, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The 5–9 March 2011 Kamoamoa fissure eruption along the east rift zone of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i, followed months of pronounced inflation at Kīlauea summit. We examine dike opening during and after the eruption using a comprehensive interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data set in combination with continuous GPS data. We solve for distributed dike displacements using a whole Kīlauea model with dilating rift zones and possibly a deep décollement. Modeled surface dike opening increased from nearly 1.5 m to over 2.8 m from the first day to the end of the eruption, in agreement with field observations of surface fracturing. Surface dike opening ceased following the eruption, but subsurface opening in the dike continued into May 2011. Dike volumes increased from 15, to 16, to 21 million cubic meters (MCM) after the first day, eruption end, and 2 months following, respectively. Dike shape is distinctive, with a main limb plunging from the surface to 2–3 km depth in the up-rift direction toward Kīlauea's summit, and a lesser projection extending in the down-rift direction toward Pu`u `Ō`ō at 2 km depth. Volume losses beneath Kīlauea summit (1.7 MCM) and Pu`u `Ō`ō (5.6 MCM) crater, relative to dike plus erupted volume (18.3 MCM), yield a dike to source volume ratio of 2.5 that is in the range expected for compressible magma without requiring additional sources. Inflation of Kīlauea's summit in the months before the March 2011 eruption suggests that the Kamoamoa eruption resulted from overpressure of the volcano's magmatic system.

  9. Ground based measurements of the gas emission from the Holuhraun volcanic fissure eruption on Iceland 2014/2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galle, Bo; Arellano, Santiago; Conde, Vladimir; Pfeffer, Melissa; Barsotti, Sara; Stefansdottir, Gerður; Bergsson, Baldur; Bergsson, Bergur; Ingvarsson, Thorgils; Weber, Konradin

    2015-04-01

    The since 31 August 2014 ongoing volcanic eruption at Holuhraun on Iceland is by far the strongest source of sulfur dioxide in Europe over the last 230 years with sustained emission rates exceeding 100 000 ton/day. This gas emission severely affects local population and has become a concern also for air traffic. The eruption has in December continued at constant pace for 3.5 months. Three scenarios are envisaged for the future; (1) the eruption stops, (2) the fissure extends under the Vattnajökul glacier and (3) Bardarbunga volcano erupts. The two later scenarios will cause increased gas emission, severe ash emissions and extended flooding. Under the scope of the EU-project FUTUREVOLC, a project with 3.5 years duration, aiming at making Iceland a supersite for volcanological research as a European contribution to GEO, we are developing a version of the Scanning DOAS instrument that is adapted to high latitudes with low UV radiation and severe meteorological conditions. Since the first day of the eruption several of these novel instruments has been monitoring the SO2 emission from the eruption. Data from our instruments are still after 3.5 months the only sustained ground-based monitoring of this gas emission. A lot of work is however needed to sustain this operation at a very remote site and under severe field conditions. At the same time the very high concentrations in the gas plume, in combination with bad meteorological conditions require the development of novel methods to derive reliable flux estimates. In this presentation we will discuss the instrumental issues and present the latest version of the emission estimates made from our measurements.

  10. Deep subsurface mine stalactites trap endemic fissure fluid Archaea, Bacteria, and Nematoda possibly originating from ancient seas

    PubMed Central

    Borgonie, Gaëtan; Linage-Alvarez, Borja; Ojo, Abidemi; Shivambu, Steven; Kuloyo, Olukayode; Cason, Errol D.; Maphanga, Sihle; Vermeulen, Jan-G; Litthauer, Derek; Ralston, Colin D.; Onstott, Tullis C.; Sherwood-Lollar, Barbara; Van Heerden, Esta

    2015-01-01

    Stalactites (CaCO3 and salt) from water seeps are frequently encountered in ceilings of mine tunnels whenever they intersect water-bearing faults or fractures. To determine whether stalactites could be mineralized traps for indigenous fracture water microorganisms, we analyzed stalactites collected from three different mines ranging in depth from 1.3 to 3.1 km. During sampling in Beatrix gold mine (1.4 km beneath the surface), central South Africa, CaCO3 stalactites growing on the mine tunnel ceiling were collected and observed, in two cases, to contain a living obligate brackish water/marine nematode species, Monhystrella parvella. After sterilization of the outer surface, mineral layers were physically removed from the outside to the interior, and DNA extracted. Based upon 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequencing, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya in different combinations were detected for each layer. Using CT scan and electron microscopy the inner structure of CaCO3 and salt stalactites were analyzed. CaCO3 stalactites show a complex pattern of lamellae carrying bacterially precipitated mineral structures. Nematoda were clearly identified between these layers confirming that bacteria and nematodes live inside the stalactites and not only in the central straw. Salt stalactites exhibit a more uniform internal structure. Surprisingly, several Bacteria showing highest sequence identities to marine species were identified. This, together with the observation that the nematode M. parvella recovered from Beatrix gold mine stalactite can only survive in a salty environment makes the origin of the deep subsurface colonization enigmatic. The possibility of a Permian origin of fracture fluids is discussed. Our results indicate stalactites are suitable for biodiversity recovery and act as natural traps for microorganisms in the fissure water long after the water that formed the stalactite stopped flowing. PMID:26441844

  11. Caries-Preventive Effect of High-Viscosity Glass Ionomer and Resin-Based Fissure Sealants on Permanent Teeth: A Systematic Review of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2016-01-01

    Background Glass-ionomers are traditionally regarded to be inferior to resin as fissure sealants in protecting teeth from dental caries, due to their comparatively lower retention rate. Unlike low-viscosity glass-ionomers, high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC) are placed as sealants by pressing the material into pits and fissures with a petroleum-jelly-coated index finger. Hence, HVGIC sealants are assumed to penetrate pits and fissures deeper, resulting in a higher material retention rate, which may increase its caries-preventive effect. Methods The aim of this review was to answer the question as to whether, in patients with fully erupted permanent molar teeth, HVGIC based fissure sealants are less effective to protect against dental carious lesions in occlusal pits and fissures than resin-based fissure sealants? A systematic literature search in eight databases was conducted. Heterogeneity of accepted trials and imprecision of the established evidence were assessed. Extracted sufficiently homogenous datasets were pooled by use of a random-effects meta-analysis. Internal trial validity was evaluated. The protocol of this systematic review was registered with the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO / Nr.: CRD42015016007). Results Seven clinical trials were provisionally included for further review. Of these, one was excluded. Seven trial reports reporting on six trials were accepted. From these, 11 datasets were extracted and pooled in four meta-analyses. The results suggest no statistically significant differences after up to 48 months and borderline significant differences in favour of HVGIC sealants after 60 months (RR 0.29; 95% CI: 0.09–0.95; p = 0.04 / RD -0.07; 95% CI: -0.14, -0.01). The point estimates and upper confidence levels after 24, 36, 48 and 60 months of RR 1.36; RR 0.90; RR 0.62; RR 0.29 and 2.78; 1.67; 1.21; 0.95, respectively, further suggest a chronological trend in favour of HVGIC above resin

  12. Dental caries and first permanent molar pit and fissure morphology in 7- to 8-year-old children in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Dong; Chen, Xi; Frencken, Jo; Du, Min-Quan; Chen, Zhi

    2012-09-01

    To obtain the caries experience and, plaque accumulation severity and pit and fissure morphology in first permanent molars in 7-8 children in Wuhan, as a reasonable prediction of caries risk and preventive attention in the future, a convenient sample of five primary schools in the vicinity of the Wuhan University School and Hospital of Stomatology was drawn. Two calibrated examiners orally examined all present grade 2 children in the classroom, using standard caries plaque and tooth morphology criteria. Dental caries was scored at enamel (D(2)) and dentine (D(3)) for tooth and surface level. Independent variables were age, gender and school. Data analysis used analysis of variance and t-test. The sample comprised 1 043 7- and 8-year-olds. The prevalence of dental caries in permanent dentition was 8.7% and in primary dentition, 68.7%. Mean Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth/S (DMFT/S) scores were 0.11 and 0.14, respectively. Mean dmft/s scores were 2.8 and 5.0. The d-component constituted 75% of the d(3)mft index, while enamel carious lesions constituted 36% of the total number of carious lesions (d(2,3)-component). Prevalence of medium and deep pits and fissures was 84.6%. Prevalence of medium and severe plaque accumulation was 67.4%. Prevalence of dental caries in the deciduous and permanent dentitions of 7- to 8-year-old children was high. Deep pits and fissures in high caries risk children should be sealed. PMID:22699265

  13. Effectiveness of Ozone with or without the Additional Use of Remineralizing Solution on Non-Cavitated Fissure Carious Lesions in Permanent Molars

    PubMed Central

    Atabek, Didem; Oztas, Nurhan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of ozone alone and with a re-mineralizing solution following application on initial pit and fissure caries lesions in permanent molars. Methods: Forty children (9–12 years) having non-cavitated fissure caries lesions on bilateral 40 first permanent mandibular molar teeth were participated in the study. Patients were randomly allocated to 2 experimental groups consisting of 20 subjects. In the first group, ozone was applied once for 40 seconds to the assigned test teeth of each pair. In the second group, ozone was applied once for 40 seconds to the assigned test teeth of each pair with the use of re-mineralizing solution. Progression or improvement of the caries was assessed at baseline, immediately after treatment and at 1-,2-,3-, and 6 month follow-up by comparing the DIAGNOdent values, Clinical Severity Indexes, Oral Hygiene Scores. The results were analyzed statistically by using the Wilcoxon-Test for dependent samples in each group. When comparing different test groups (control and experimental groups) the Friedman S test followed by the Mann-Whitney U test was used. Results: A statistically significant difference was found between all of the control and experimental test lesions in each group (P<.001). However, there was no statistically significant difference between the ozone treated groups and those using the additional re-mineralizing solution (P>.001). Conclusions: Ozone treatment either alone or combined with a re-mineralizing solution was found to be effective for remineralization of initial fissure caries lesions. PMID:22654551

  14. Comparative evaluation of Shear bond strength of different Pit and fissure Sealants in Primary and Permanent teeth - An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Pushpalatha, H M; Ravichandra, K S; Srikanth, Koya; Divya, G; Done, Vasanthi; Krishna, K Bala; Patil, Vishwanath

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental caries among children is one of the greatest challenges faced by dentists globally; especially that of susceptible surfaces like the Pit and fissures. Dental sealants have proved to be an effective way to prevent caries development. The Clinical success of any material depends upon its adhesion to tooth structure, resistance to wear and ability to withstand the masticatory or occlusal forces. Hence it is important to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS). The Present study’s aim was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of different pit and fissure sealants placed on Primary molars and Permanent Premolars. Materials & Methods: Sixty noncarious extracted teeth comprising of thirty Primary molars and thirty Permanent Premolars were divided into four groups of 15 each. The buccal surfaces of all teeth were dried, etched and the etched surfaces of Primary molars (Group I) and Permanent Premolars (Group III) were placed with Helioseal-F while Groups II and IV, that included Primary molars and Permanent Premolars received Clinpro. Shear bond strength was evaluated and the mean was obtained for all the groups. The results were analyzed using twoway analysis of variance followed by Tukeys post hoc procedure to check for significant differences. Results: The specimens of unfilled sealant Clinpro (Groups II & IV) showed higher Shear bond strength when compared to the specimens of filled sealant Helioseal-F (Groups I & III). Conclusion: The unfilled sealant showed a better Shear bond strength compared to the filled sealant. The bond strength in Primary molars was slightly higher compared to Permanent Premolars. How to cite the article: Pushpalatha HM, Ravichandra KS, Srikanth K, Divya G, Done V, Krishna KB, Patil V. Comparative evaluation of Shear bond strength of different Pit and fissure Sealants in Primary and Permanent teeth - An In-Vitro Study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):84-9. PMID:24876707

  15. Non-destructive measurement of demineralization and remineralization in the occlusal pits and fissures of extracted 3rd molars with PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chulsung; Hsu, Dennis J.; Le, Michael H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to image the remineralization of early artificial caries lesion on smooth enamel surfaces of human and bovine teeth. However, most new dental decay is found in the pits and fissures of the occlusal surfaces of posterior dentition and it is in these high risk areas where the performance of new caries imaging devices need to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that PS-OCT can be used to measure the subsequent remineralization of artificial lesions produced in the pits and fissures of extracted 3rd molars. A PS-OCT system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire polarization resolved images of occlusal surfaces exposed to a demineralizing solution at pH-4.5 followed by a fluoride containing remineralizing solution at pH-7.0 containing 2-ppm fluoride. The integrated reflectivity was calculated to a depth of 200-µm in the entire lesion area using an automated image processing algorithm. Although a well-defined surface zone was clearly resolved in only a few of the samples that underwent remineralization, the PS-OCT measurements indicated a significant (p<0.05) reduction in the integrated reflectivity between the severity of the lesions that were exposed to the remineralization solution and those that were not. The lesion depth and mineral loss were also measured with polarized light microscopy and transverse microradiography after sectioning the teeth. These results show that PS-OCT can be used to non-destructively monitor the remineralization potential of anti-caries agents in the important pits and fissures of the occlusal surface.

  16. Transient Source Processes Prior to the March 2011 Kamoamoa Fissure Eruption, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaíi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, P.; Poland, M. P.; Miklius, A.; Anderson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and continuous GPS observations at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaíi, show spatially and temporally transient surface displacements in the months and weeks before the 5-9 March 2011 Kamoamoa fissure eruption. Interferograms computed from the Italian Space Agency's COSMO-SkyMed satellites and the German Aerospace Center's TerraSAR-X satellite show a distinctive triangular pattern of surface deformation that extends to the SE of Kīlauea Caldera starting approximately one month prior to the Kamoamoa eruption. GPS and electronic tilt meter time series for sites in the vicinity of this deformation show that this inflation transient is superimposed on the longer (~4-6 month) summit inflation. We examine and model the spatiotemporal evolution of the summit deformation. InSAR data from ascending and descending tracks are used to constrain models of the transient. To achieve low-levels of atmospheric phase noise required interferograms spanning four months prior to the eruption, thus involving multiple sources within the summit region (see figure). To solve for model parameters we use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo optimization approach. First, we model the co-eruption summit deflation to isolate the intra-caldera sources, consisting of a steeply dipping tensile dislocation (D) beneath the western edge of the caldera and a sub-horizontal, NE trending spheroidal pressure source (Y) in the center of the caldera at 1.5 km depth. We use these sources as starting models for the pre-eruption transient, which requires the addition of a sill (S) to explain the deformation that extends to the SE of the caldera. In a third step we add a simplified model for Kīlauea's rifts and basal detachment system to explain the coupled summit and south flank motion. Modeled at over 3 km beneath the surface, the transient sill source inflates over the month before the eruption and deflates during the four-day eruption. The sill runs parallel to

  17. Monitoring of the volcanic rock compositions during the 2012-2013 fissure eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volynets, Anna O.; Edwards, Benjamin R.; Melnikov, Dmitry; Yakushev, Anton; Griboedova, Irina

    2015-12-01

    Here we present the results from monitoring of the composition of rocks produced during the 2012-2013 fissure eruption at Tolbachik volcano (FTE). Major and trace element concentrations in 75 samples are reported. Products of this eruption are represented by high alumina basaltic trachyandesites with higher alkalis and titanium contents than in all previously studied rocks of the Tolbachik monogenetic volcanic field. Rocks erupted during the first three days (27-30 November) from the northern (also called Menyailov) group of vents are the most silica- and alkali-rich (SiO2 concentrations up to 55.35 wt.% and K2O up to 2.67 wt.%). From December onwards, when the eruptive activity switched from the Menyailov vents to the southern (Naboko) group of vents, silica content dropped by 2 wt.%, concentrations of MgO, FeO, TiO2 and Mg# increased, and K2O and Na2O concentrations and K2O/MgO ratio decreased. For the rest of the eruption the compositions of rocks remained constant and homogeneous; no systematic compositional differences between lava, bombs and scoria samples are evident. Trace element distributions in the rocks of the Menyailov and Naboko vent lavas are relatively uniform; Menyailov lavas have slightly higher Th, Nb, Hf, Y, and HREE concentrations than the Naboko vent lavas at more or less constant element ratios. We explain the initial change in geochemistry by tapping of a slightly cooler and fractionated (~ 3% Mt and 8% Cpx) upper part of the magma storage zone before the main storage area began to feed the eruption. Thermodynamic constraints show that apparent liquidus temperatures varied from 1142 °C to 1151 °C, and thermodynamic modeling shows that variations in compositions are consistent with a high degree of low pressure (100-300 MPa), nominally anhydrous fractionation of a parent melt compositionally similar to the 1975 Northern Breakthrough high-Mg basalt. Geochemistry, petrological observations and modeling are in agreement with the newly erupted

  18. Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction with endobronchial valves for patients with heterogeneous emphysema and intact interlobar fissures (the BeLieVeR-HIFi trial): study design and rationale.

    PubMed

    Davey, C; Zoumot, Z; Jordan, S; Carr, D H; Polkey, M I; Shah, P L; Hopkinson, N S

    2015-03-01

    Although lung volume reduction surgery improves survival in selected patients with emphysema, there has been ongoing interest in developing and evaluating bronchoscopic approaches to try to reduce lung volumes with less morbidity and mortality. The placement of endobronchial valves is one such technique, and although some patients have had a significant improvement, responses have been inconsistent because collateral ventilation prevents lobar atelectasis. We describe the protocol of a trial (ISRCTN04761234) aimed to show that a responder phenotype, patients with heterogeneous emphysema and intact interlobar fissures on CT scanning, can be identified prospectively, leading to a consistent benefit in clinical practice. PMID:24664535

  19. Superior Orbital Fissure Syndrome and Ophthalmoplegia Caused by Varicella Zoster Virus with No Skin Eruption in a Patient Treated with Tumor Necrosis Alpha Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Helene; Thomsen, Sidsel Thorup; Hansen, Stine Scott; Munksgaard, Signe Bruun; Lindelof, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus lies dormant in the dorsal root ganglia after symptomatic chicken pox infection, usually in childhood. If the virus reactivates in the trigeminal ganglia, it can cause varicella zoster ophthalmicus, which can have severe ocular complications. We report a case of a 73-year-old woman in severe immunosuppression due to treatment with mycophenolate mofetil, glucocorticosteroids and a tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor. The reactivation caused superior orbital fissure syndrome, which has only rarely been described in relation to varicella zoster virus reactivation. In our case, the syndrome was seen along with severe encephalitis. PMID:26600786

  20. Glass ionomer ART sealant and fluoride-releasing resin sealant in fissure caries prevention – results from a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The relative performance of ART sealant and fluoride-releasing resin sealant in preventing fissure caries in permanent molars was compared in a randomized clinical trial conducted in southern China (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01829334). Methods After obtaining ethical approval, healthy schoolchildren who had permanent first molars with occlusal fissures which were sound but deep or presented with only incipient caries were recruited for the study. Included molars were randomly allocated into one of four parallel study groups in units of left/right teeth per mouth. Two of the four groups adopted the methods of ART or fluoride-releasing resin sealant placement while the other two groups adopted the topical fluoride application methods. Fissure status of the molars in each group was evaluated every 6 months. Development of dentine caries and sealant retention over 24 months in the molars in the two sealant-using groups was compared in this report. Outcome on cost-effectiveness of all four groups over 36 months will be reported elsewhere. Results At baseline, a total of 280 children (383 molars) with mean age 7.8 years were involved for the two sealant groups. After 24 months, 261 children (357 molars) were followed. Proportions of molars with dentine caries were 7.3% and 3.9% in the ART sealant and fluoride-releasing resin sealant groups, respectively (chi-square test, p = 0.171). Life-table survival analysis showed that sealant retention (full and partial) rate over 24 months for the resin sealant (73%) was significantly higher than that (50%) for the ART sealant (p < 0.001). Molar survival (no development of dentine caries) rates in the ART sealant (93%) and fluoride-releasing resin sealant (96%) groups were not significantly different (p = 0.169). Multilevel logistic regression (GEE modeling) accounting for the effects of data clustering and confounding factors confirmed this finding. Conclusions Though the retention of fluoride

  1. The Alarcón Rise: detail mapping and preliminary results on the geometry, distribution and kinematics of faults and fissures on a ridge-transform system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spelz, R. M.; Fletcher, J. M.; Nieves-Cardoso, C.; Santa Rosa-del Rio, M.; Caress, D. W.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.; Guardado-France, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Alarcón Rise, the northernmost segment of the East Pacific Rise before it enters the Gulf of California, is the oldest and perhaps most active spreading ridge-transform system along the oblique-divergent Pacific-North America plate boundary in the southern Gulf of California. Magnetic anomalies along the main ridge axis, which stretches for nearly 50 km long in a NE-SW (034o) direction, suggest that spreading with new oceanic crust was fully established ca. 2.5 Ma, and that its modern configuration as the main plate boundary initiated ca. 2 Ma (Umhoefer, P.J. et al., 2007 Basin Research). High resolution (1m lateral/0.2m vertical) bathymetry data and direct observations of the entire ridge segment, collected and performed by MBARI's autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and ROV dives, respectively, during the 2012 Expedition to the Gulf of California, have revealed the presence of an intense array of fault-scarps and fissures displacing numerous neovolcanic landforms such as huge lava domes and smaller cones, pillow mounds and large sheet flows along the entire ridge. The relative age of the surface ruptures is wide-ranging. At some places the fractures appear to be relatively recent, as evident by the apparent young age of the fractured flows, based on having few sessile organisms and/or relatively thin sediment cover. In contrast, fractures and fault-scarps elsewhere are observed to have been partially or totally overrun by lava flows, suggesting their preexistence and relatively older age. The ridge parallel faults and fissures change orientation dramatically as they approach and wrap around the bordering Pescadero and Tamayo fracture zones, which limit the northern and southern flanks of the rise, respectively, giving the ridge a sigmoidal geometry with a Z-shaped symmetry. Moreover, the presence of an en echelon volcanic fissure system near the southern end of the ridge, measuring several kilometers long and oriented somewhat obliquely (~15o clockwise) to

  2. Superior Orbital Fissure Syndrome and Ophthalmoplegia Caused by Varicella Zoster Virus with No Skin Eruption in a Patient Treated with Tumor Necrosis Alpha Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Helene; Thomsen, Sidsel Thorup; Hansen, Stine Scott; Munksgaard, Signe Bruun; Lindelof, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus lies dormant in the dorsal root ganglia after symptomatic chicken pox infection, usually in childhood. If the virus reactivates in the trigeminal ganglia, it can cause varicella zoster ophthalmicus, which can have severe ocular complications. We report a case of a 73-year-old woman in severe immunosuppression due to treatment with mycophenolate mofetil, glucocorticosteroids and a tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor. The reactivation caused superior orbital fissure syndrome, which has only rarely been described in relation to varicella zoster virus reactivation. In our case, the syndrome was seen along with severe encephalitis. PMID:26600786

  3. Remote sensing and petrological observations on the 2012-2013 fissure eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka: Implications for reconstruction of the eruption chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Dmitry; Volynets, Anna O.

    2015-12-01

    We present a reconstruction of the chronological sequence of events that took place during the first days of the 2012-2013 Tolbachik fissure eruption using petrological data and remote sensing methods. We were forced to use this approach because bad weather conditions did not allow direct observations during the first two days of the eruption. We interpreted infrared images from the scanning radiometer VIIRS Suomi NPP and correlated the output with the results of the geochemical study, including comparison of the ash, deposited at the period from 27 to 29 November, with the samples of lava and bombs erupted from the Menyailov and Naboko vents. We argue that the compositional change observed in the eruption products (the decrease of SiO2 concentration and K2O/MgO ratio, increase of MgO concentration and Mg#) started approximately 24 h after the eruption began. At this time the center of activity moved to the southern part of the fissure, where the Naboko group of vents was formed; therefore, this timeframe also characterizes the timing of the Naboko vent opening. The Naboko group of vents remained active until the end of eruption in September 2013.

  4. Enhancing caries resistance in occlusal fissures with a short-pulsed CO2 9.6-μm laser: an in vitro pH-cycling study, preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charland, Daniel; Fulton, Crystal; Rechmann, Beate; Hewko, Mark; Featherstone, John; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Rechmann, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Treatment of occlusal surfaces with a short-pulsed CO2 9.6 μm wavelength laser has previously been proposed as a method for caries prevention. A sample of 20 extracted human molars were measured before and after demineralizationremineralization pH-cycling with ICDAS II visual inspection, DIAGNOdent, quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF), SoproLife in daylight and blue light-induced fluorescence mode, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS). Per tooth, one fissure was subjected to laser treatment using a short-pulsed CO2 laser at 9.6 μm wavelength with a fluence of 3.5 J/cm2, 20 Hz pulse repetition rate, 20 μs pulse duration, angulated handpiece, and focus diameter of 600 μm, while the other fissure was left untreated as control. The teeth were subjected to a demineralization-remineralization pH-cycling for 9 days. Cross-sectional micro-hardness testing was done as a gold standard to compare results with findings from the other detection methods used. Due to the small sample size reported, the trend observed was that laser treated fissures demonstrated a smaller relative mineral loss ▵Z than the controls. QLF findings followed a similar trend. Using a rotary catheter probe, OCT measurements were acquired from the various fissures to generate circularly mapped OCT depth images. PRS measurements of parallel- and cross-polarized spectra were acquired with a Raman microscope system. Preliminary OCT images showed differences in the initial air-tooth interface, with PRS results indicating a change in the surface property along with biochemical alterations after pH-cycling. Following pH-cycling, an increase in the OCT subsurface light backscattering intensity in the control fissures was observed compared to the laser test fissures. Porphyrin based fluorescence methods like DIAGNOdent and SoproLife, respectively demonstrated only additional light scattering due to the demineralization process.

  5. Long-distance magma transport from arc volcanoes inferred from the submarine eruptive fissures offshore Izu-Oshima volcano, Izu-Bonin arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Osamu; Geshi, Nobuo; Kawanabe, Yoshihisa; Ogitsu, Itaru; Taylor, Rex N.; Tuzino, Taqumi; Sakamoto, Izumi; Arai, Kohsaku; Nakano, Shun

    2014-09-01

    Long-distance lateral magma transport away from volcanic centers in island arcs is emerging as a common phenomenon where the regional stress regime is favorable. It should also be recognized as an important factor in the construction and growth of island arcs, and a potential trigger for devastating eruptions. In this contribution, we report on recent investigations into the magma dynamics of Izu-Oshima volcano, an active basaltic volcano with an extensive fissure system. Izu-Oshima is flanked by numerous, subparallel NW-SE trending submarine ridges extending up to 22 km to the NW and the SE from the central vent. During a recent submersible survey we have identified that these ridges are fissures which erupted basaltic spatter and lava flows. Furthermore, lavas are petrographically similar along each ridge, while there are noticeable differences between ridges. The subparallel ridges are observed to transect a series of seamounts - the Izu-Tobu monogenetic volcanoes - which are dispersed across this area of the rear-arc. However, there are consistent petrographic and chemical differences between these seamounts and the ridges, indicating that they have different magma sources, yet, they are essentially bounding each other in dive tracks. The most appropriate scenario for their development is one where the Izu-Tobu Volcanoes are fed by an "in-situ" underlying source, while the NW-SE ridges are fed by lateral magma transport from Izu-Oshima. Magma erupted from each ridge is of a consistent geochemistry along its length, but has experienced crystal fractionation and some plagioclase accumulation. Compositions of the ridges are also very similar to lavas from the subaerial cones that can be traced down the flanks of Izu-Oshima. This implies that pairs of subaerial cones and submarine ridges represent the locus of magma transport events away from the storage system beneath Izu-Oshima. Hence, magma from this crustal reservoir moved upward to feed the on-edifice cones

  6. Observations of a substantial cloud-aerosol indirect effect during the 2014-2015 Bárðarbunga-Veiðivötn fissure eruption in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Daniel T.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    2015-12-01

    The Bárðarbunga-Veiðivötn fissure eruption lasted from 31 August 2014 to 28 February 2015, during which its sulfur emissions dwarfed anthropogenic emissions from Europe. This natural experiment offers an excellent opportunity to investigate the aerosol indirect effect and the effect of effusive volcanic eruptions on climate. During the eruption cloud droplet effective radius (re) over the region surrounding Iceland was at the lowest value in the 14 year Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer data record during September and October 2014. The change in reflected solar radiation due to increased cloud reflectivity during September and October is estimated to exceed 2 W m-2 over the region surrounding Iceland, with increases of 1 W m-2 extending as far south as the Açores. The strength of the aerosol indirect effect diagnosed here reaffirms the ability of volcanic aerosols to affect cloud properties and ultimately the planetary albedo.

  7. Automatic classification of pulmonary peri-fissural nodules in computed tomography using an ensemble of 2D views and a convolutional neural network out-of-the-box.

    PubMed

    Ciompi, Francesco; de Hoop, Bartjan; van Riel, Sarah J; Chung, Kaman; Scholten, Ernst Th; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Jong, Pim A; Prokop, Mathias; van Ginneken, Bram

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we tackle the problem of automatic classification of pulmonary peri-fissural nodules (PFNs). The classification problem is formulated as a machine learning approach, where detected nodule candidates are classified as PFNs or non-PFNs. Supervised learning is used, where a classifier is trained to label the detected nodule. The classification of the nodule in 3D is formulated as an ensemble of classifiers trained to recognize PFNs based on 2D views of the nodule. In order to describe nodule morphology in 2D views, we use the output of a pre-trained convolutional neural network known as OverFeat. We compare our approach with a recently presented descriptor of pulmonary nodule morphology, namely Bag of Frequencies, and illustrate the advantages offered by the two strategies, achieving performance of AUC = 0.868, which is close to the one of human experts. PMID:26458112

  8. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Bonding Agent on the Tensile Bond Strength of Two Pit and Fissure Sealants Using Invasive and Non-invasive Techniques: An in–vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shamsher; Adlakha, Vivek; Babaji, Prashant; Chandna, Preetika; Thomas, Abi M.; Chopra, Saroj

    2013-01-01

    Background: Newer technologies and the development of pit and fissure sealants have shifted the treatment philosophy from ‘drill and fill’ to that of ‘seal and heal’. Aims: The purpose of this in–vitro study was to evaluate the effects of bonding agents on the tensile bond strengths of two pit and fissure sealants by using invasive and non-invasive techniques. Study Design and Methods: One hundred and twenty bicuspids were collected and teeth were divided into two groups: Group-I (Clinpro) and Group-II (Conseal f) with 60 teeth in each group. For evaluating tensile bond strengths, occlusal surfaces of all the teeth were flattened by reducing buccal and lingual cusps without disturbing fissures. Standardised polyvinyl tube was bonded to occlusal surfaces with respective materials. Sealants were applied, with or without bonding agents, in increments and they were light cured. Tensile bond strengths were determined by using Universal Testing Machine. Statistical Analysis: Data were then statistically analysed by using Student t–test for comparison. Results: A statistically significant difference was found in tensile bond strength in invasive with bonding agent group than in non-invasive with bonding agent group. Conclusion: This study revealed that invasive techniques increase the tensile bond strengths of sealants as compared to non- invasive techniques and that the use of a bonding agent as an intermediate layer between the tooth and fissure sealant is beneficial for increasing the bond strength. PMID:24298525

  9. Caries-preventive effect of glass ionomer and resin-based fissure sealants on permanent teeth: An update of systematic review evidence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This article constitutes a partial update of the original systematic review evidence by Yengopal et al. from 15 January 2008 (published in the Journal of Oral Science in 2009) with primary focus on research quality in regard to bias risk in trials. Its aim is to update the existing systematic review evidence from the English literature as to whether caries occurrence on pits and fissures of teeth sealed with either GIC or resin is the same. Methods In addition to the 12 trials included during the original systematic review, 5 new trials were identified during the database search (up to 26 August 2010) and 2 further trials were included from a hand search and reference check. Of these, 3 trials were excluded and 16 were accepted for data extraction and quality assessment. The quality of accepted trials was assessed, using updated quality criteria, and the risk of bias was investigated in more depth than previously reported. In addition, the focus of quantitative synthesis was shifted to single datasets that were extracted from the accepted trials. Results Twenty-six dichotomous and 4 continuous datasets were extracted. Meta-analysis and cumulative meta-analysis were used in combining clinically homogenous datasets. The overall outcome of the computed datasets suggest no difference between the caries-preventive effects of GIC- and resin-based fissure sealants. Conclusions This overall outcome is in agreement with the conclusions of the original systematic review. Although the findings of the trials identified in this update may be considered to be less affected by attrition- and publication bias, their risk of selection- and detection-/performance bias is high. Thus, verification of the currently available results requires further high quality randomised control trials. PMID:21276215

  10. Simulating the propagation of sulphur dioxide emissions from the fissure eruption in the Holuhraun lava field (Iceland) with the EURAD-IM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, Luise; Franke, Philipp; Friese, Elmar; Haas, Sarah; Lange, Anne Caroline; Elbern, Hendrik

    2015-04-01

    In the emergency case of a volcano eruption accurate forecasts of the transport of ash and gas emissions are crucial for health protection and aviation safety. In the frame of Earth System Knowledge Platform (ESKP) near real-time forecasts of ash and SO2 dispersion emitted by active volcanoes are simulated by the European Air pollution Dispersion Inverse Model (EURAD-IM). The model is driven by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) and includes detailed gas phase and particle dynamics modules, which allow for quantitative estimates of measured volcano releases. Former simulations, for example related to the Eyjafjallajökull outbreak in 2010, were in good agreement with measurement records of particle number and SO2 at several European stations. At the end of August 2014 an fissure eruption has begun on Iceland in the Holuhraun lava field to the north-east of the Bardarbunga volcano system. In contrast to the explosive eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull in 2010, the Holuhraun eruption is rather effusive with a large and continuous flow of lava and a significant release of sulphur dioxide (SO2) in the lower troposphere, while ash emissions are insignificant. Since the Holuhraun fissure eruption has started, daily forecasts of SO2 dispersion are produced for the European region (15 km horizontal resolution grid) and published on our website (http://apps.fz-juelich.de/iek-8/RIU/vorhersage_node.php). To simulate the transport of volcanic emissions, realistic source terms like mass release rates of ash and SO2 or plume heights are required. Since no representative measurements are currently available for the simulations, rough qualitative assumptions, based on reports from the Icelandic Met Office (IMO), are used. However, frequent comparisons with satellite observations show that the actual propagation of the volcanic emissions is generally well reflected by the model. In the middle of September 2014 several European measurement sides recorded extremely high

  11. Vesicle size analysis of magmatic and phreatomagmatic phases of the 934-40 AD Eldgjá fissure eruption, southern Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordarson, T.; Moreland, W.; Houghton, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    Eldgjá is a ~75 km volcanic fissure which erupted in the middle of the 10th century. It belongs to the Katla volcanic system and is of the mixed-cone row type. The eruption lasted several years and produced two large lava fields (18.3 km3) and a widespread basaltic tephra deposit (4.5 km3 or 1.3 km3 DRE). Proximal tephra deposits are up to 5 m thick and contain as many as 10 sub-units which vary in thickness parallel to the fissure, indicating multiple points of origin. Many of the lowest units were produced by phreatomagmatic activity and dispersion of these units indicate an origin below the Mýrdalsjökull glacier. Two sections were chosen to represent magmatic and phreatomagmatic activity. A 3.7 m section at Skælingar, 0.5 km south-east of Eldgjá, represents the magmatic products. The phreatomagmatic products are represented by a 2.7 m thick section at Stóragil, located 10-15 km south and east of the vent system. The sampled phreatomagmatic part of the section is 1.12 m thick. These sections were logged and then each sub-unit was sampled for density analysis which involves picking 100 clasts in the 8 to 32 mm size range from horizons less than 5 cm thick. Thin-sections were then made from representative clasts of each sub-unit. Nested images of these thin-sections were analysed for vesicle size and shape. The magmatic clasts have unimodal, normal to moderately log-normal density distributions with a mean density of 7900-7500 kg.m-3 (60-70% vesicularity) and a range of around 8600 kg.m-3 (40% vesicularity). The log-normal distribution of some samples may be explained by the inclusion of previously degassed magma in the eruption. The section at Stóragil contains both phreatomagmatic and magmatic products. The phreatomagmatic samples have characteristic plateau-like distributions with a mean density of 7200-7500 kg.m-3 (70-80% vesicularity) and a range of around 8420 kg.m-3 (45% vesicularity). One layer shows a change from phreatomagmatic to magmatic

  12. A model study of the pollution effects of the first 3 months of the Holuhraun volcanic fissure: comparison with observations and air pollution effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steensen, Birthe Marie; Schulz, Michael; Theys, Nicolas; Fagerli, Hilde

    2016-08-01

    The volcanic fissure at Holuhraun, Iceland started at the end of August 2014 and continued for 6 months to the end of February 2015, with an extensive lava flow onto the Holuhraun plain. This event was associated with large SO2 emissions, amounting up to approximately 4.5 times the daily anthropogenic SO2 emitted from the 28 European Union countries, Norway, Switzerland and Iceland. In this paper we present results from EMEP/MSC-W model simulations to which we added 750 kg s-1 SO2 emissions at the Holuhraun plain from September to November (SON), testing three different emission heights. The three simulated SO2 concentrations, weighted with the OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) satellite averaging kernel, are found to be within 30 % of the satellite-observed SO2 column burden. Constraining the SO2 column burden with the satellite data while using the kernel along with the three simulated height distributions of SO2, we estimate that the median of the daily burdens may have been between 13 and 40 kt in the North Atlantic area under investigation. We suggest this to be the uncertainty in the satellite-derived burdens of SO2, mainly due to the unknown vertical distribution of SO2. Surface observations in Europe outside Iceland showed concentration increases up to > 500 µg m-3 SO2 from volcanic plumes passing. Three well identified episodes, where the plume crossed several countries, are compared in detail to surface measurements. For all events, the general timing of the observed concentration peaks compared quite well to the model results. The overall changes to the European SO2 budget due to the volcanic fissure are estimated. Three-monthly wet deposition (SON) of SOx in the 28 European Union countries, Norway and Switzerland is found to be more than 30 % higher in the model simulation with Holuhraun emissions compared to a model simulation with no Holuhraun emissions. The largest increases, apart from extreme values on Iceland, are found on the coast of northern

  13. Surface topography and enamel-resin interface of pit and fissure sealants following visible light and argon laser polymerization: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Hicks, M J; Westerman, G H; Flaitz, C M; Powell, G L

    2000-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the effects of visible light and argon laser polymerization of pit and fissure sealants on surface topography and the enamel-sealant interface. Twenty caries-free human molars and premolars underwent soft tissue debridement and a fluoride-free prophylaxis. Fluoride-releasing sealant (UltraSeal XT Plus, South Jordan, UT 84095) was placed on the occlusal surfaces per the manufacturer's instructions, but underwent either visible-light polymerization for 30s (n = 10), or argon laser polymerization (0.231 J/cm2) for 10s (n = 10). The sealed teeth were thermocycled (500 cycles, 5 degrees to 50 degrees C) in artificial saliva. Surface morphology was evaluated by SEM. The teeth were sectioned for polarized light and SEM evaluation of the enamel-sealant interface, with two sections per tooth prepared for SEM. Phosphoric acid was used to unmask the enamel-sealant interface with one section; while the other section was not exposed to the phosphoric acid. Surface morphology of the sealant material was similar with both visible light and argon laser polymerization; however, there was a tendency for occasional areas of mild, focal cratering of the sealant surface with laser-curing. The junction between sealant and adjacent unsealed enamel was a relatively smooth transition without gaps, microspaces, crazing, exfoliative changes, or microfractures with both visible light and laser cured sealants. Acid treatment of the sections revealed resin tags which extended into the adjacent enamel for a considerable distance on SEM examination. The resin tas were similar in length and morphology with both visible light and argon laser curing. The enamel-sealant interface with visible light and laser curing showed intimate contact between the sealant and etched occlusal enamel with close apposition of the sealant. No microspaces were identified between the sealant and the occlusal enamel. An intact, interdigitating interface between a sealant and the adjacent

  14. Comparison of operational satellite SO2 products with ground-based observations in northern Finland during the Icelandic Holuhraun fissure eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ialongo, I.; Hakkarainen, J.; Kivi, R.; Anttila, P.; Krotkov, N. A.; Yang, K.; Li, C.; Tukiainen, S.; Hassinen, S.; Tamminen, J.

    2015-06-01

    This paper shows the results of the comparison of satellite SO2 observations from OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and OMPS (Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite) with ground-based measurements during the Icelandic Holuhraun fissure eruption in September 2014. The volcanic plume reached Finland on several days during the month of September. The SO2 total columns from the Brewer direct sun (DS) measurements in Sodankylä (67.42° N, 26.59° E), northern Finland, are compared to the satellite data. The operational satellite SO2 products are evaluated for high latitude conditions (e.g. large solar zenith angle, SZA). The results show that the best agreement can be found for lowest SZAs, close-to-nadir satellite pixels, cloud fraction below 0.3 and small distance between the station and the centre of the pixel. Under good retrieval conditions, the difference between satellite data and Brewer measurements remains mostly below the uncertainty on the satellite SO2 retrievals (up to about 2 DU at high latitudes). The satellite products assuming a priori profile with SO2 predominantly in the planetary boundary layer give total column values with the best agreement with the ground-based data. The analysis of the SO2 surface concentrations at four air quality stations in northern Finland shows that the volcanic plume coming from Iceland was located very close to the surface. This is connected to the fact that this was a fissure eruption and most of the SO2 was emitted into the troposphere. This is an exceptional case because the SO2 volcanic emissions directly affect the air quality levels at surface in an otherwise pristine environment like northern Finland. The time evolution of the SO2 concentrations peaks during the same days when large SO2 total column values are measured by the Brewer in Sodankylä and enhanced SO2 signal is visible over northern Finland from the satellite maps. Thus, the satellite retrievals were able to detect the spatiotemporal evolution of the volcanic

  15. Concept Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidya, Narendera

    This document, published in India by the Regional College of Education, deals with 13 subjects: the tough context (thinking), definitions of concept, functions of concept, the process of concept formation, discriminant learning, mediation process, second signalling system, factors affecting concept formation, studies in concept formation, the…

  16. Retention of a resin-based sealant and a glass ionomer used as a fissure sealant in children with special needs

    PubMed Central

    Nualart-Grollmus, Zacy-Carola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this research is to evaluate the retention of sealants of resin and resin-modified ionomeric glass pits and fissures, on first permanent molars of special patients. Material and Methods: The sample was comprised by 32 children. The ages were between 7 and 18 years. The sealing procedure was made with the relative isolation of the molars to be sealed, through the use of cotton rolls. Two molars were sealed with Clinpro Sealant 3M Dental and the others with Vitremer. Checking of the sealants was made after 3 and 6 months of their placement, evaluating with 3 values: TR: Totally Restrained; PR: Partially Restrained; and CL: Completely Lost. Results: 67.18% of the resinous sealants, and 70.31% of the glass ionomer sealants were successful after three months. After six months, 57.81% of the resin-based sealants and 51.56% of the glass ionomer sealants were successful. When performing the Chi-square statistical analysis (P<0.05) no statistical significance was observed after 6 months. Conclusions: The retention of the resin sealant was similar to that of the glass ionomer cement at the end of six months and the retention of sealants on maxillary teeth was higher than on mandibular teeth. Key words:Sealant, glass ionomer, retention, caries, special needs. PMID:25674325

  17. Investigating Alpine fissure rutilated quartz to constrain timing and conditions of post-metamorphic hydrothermal fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulaker, D. Z.; Schmitt, A. K.; Zack, T.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2013-12-01

    Rutilated quartz, aka Venus' hair, is finely-acicular rutile intergrown with host quartz generated by fluid-mediated co-crystallization. It is commonly found in hydrothermal veins, including the renown cleft mineral locations of the Swiss Alps. Previous studies of Alpine cleft mineralizations used rare hydrothermal monazite [1] and titanite [2] to constrain vein formation to ~13.5-15.2 Ma, postdating peak metamorphism by ~2-4 Ma. Temperature (T) estimates of 150-450°C are based on fluid inclusions and bulk quartz-mineral oxygen isotope exchange equilibria, and formation pressures (P) are 0.5-2.5 kbar (for a geothermal gradient of 30°C/km) [2]. The potential of rutilated quartz as a thermochronometer, however, has not been harnessed previously. Here, we present the first results of age and P-T determinations for rutilated quartz from six locations in the Swiss Alps (San Gottardo; Feldbach, Binntal; Pi Aul, Vals; Faido, Leventina; Elm, Steinbach; Binntal). Samples were cut and mounted in epoxy discs to expose rutile (0.03 to 1 mm in diameter) and its host quartz which was also imaged in cathodoluminescence (CL). CL images for half of the samples' host quartz exhibited strong sector zoning, while others reveal only weak CL zonation. Isotopic and trace element analyses were carried out by SIMS using a CAMECA ims1270 for U-Pb, O-isotopes, and Ti-in-quartz, and a LA-ICP-MS system (213 nm New Wave laser coupled to an Agilent 7500a) for Zr-in-rutile. U-Pb rutile ages average 15.5×2.0 Ma (2σ). T estimates are 352-575°C (rutile-quartz oxygen isotopes in touching domains), 470-530°C (Zr-in-rutile assuming P = 0.5 and equilibrium with host-rock zircon), and 251-391°C (Ti-in-quartz at assumed P = 0.5 kbar and aTiO2 = 1). CL zones are isotopically unzoned. Rutile-quartz oxygen isotopes are pressure insensitive, whereas Zr-in-rutile and Ti-in-quartz are minimum temperatures. These results demonstrate that rutilated quartz can constrain timing and conditions of post

  18. Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In today's climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, educators are challenged to continuously monitor student progress to ensure achievement. This article details how formative assessment helps educators meet this challenge and to ensure achievement. Formative assessment can influence learning and support achievement, allowing teachers…

  19. Nitroglycerin 0.4% ointment vs placebo in the treatment of pain resulting from chronic anal fissure: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Complications of chronic anal fissure (CAF) treatments are prompting interest in lower-risk therapies. This study was conducted to compare nitroglycerin (NTG) 0.4% ointment with placebo for pain associated with CAF. Methods In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, patients with one CAF and moderate-to-severe pain (≥50 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale [VAS]) received 375 mg NTG 0.4% (1.5 mg active ingredient) or 375 mg placebo ointment applied anally every 12 hours for 21 days. The primary end point was change from baseline VAS score in 24-hour pain averaged over days 14–18. Review of data from patients who withdrew early was blinded to treatment. To control for the confounding effects of analgesics, all patients received 650 mg acetaminophen for headache prophylaxis before each application. Results A total of 247 patients were enrolled (NTG, n = 123; placebo, n = 124). The prespecified baseline observation carried forward (BOCF) analysis found no significant difference between groups; however, a last observation carried forward (LOCF) analysis showed a significant advantage for NTG. A post hoc analysis (LOCF/BOCF hybrid) demonstrated a significant adjusted mean difference of −7.0 mm in favor of NTG 0.4% (95% CI −13.6, –0.4; P = .038). Headache was the most common adverse event in the NTG (69.9%) and placebo (47.6%) groups. Conclusions This was the first placebo-controlled study that also controlled for the confounding effects of analgesics used to treat NTG-induced headache. In patients with moderate-to-severe CAF pain, NTG 0.4% ointment effectively reduced CAF pain compared with placebo. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00522041 PMID:23815124

  20. Microsurgical management of pediatric ependymomas of the fourth ventricle via the trans-cerebellomedullary fissure approach: A review of 26 cases

    PubMed Central

    QIU, BO; WANG, YONG; WANG, WEI; WANG, CHAO; WU, PENGFEI; BAO, YIJUN; OU, SHAOWU; GUO, ZONGZE; WANG, YUNJIE

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the microsurgical management of 26 ependymomas of the fourth ventricle in children via the trans-cerebellomedullary fissure (CMF) approach was reviewed and evaluated. Clinical data were obtained from 26 ependymomas of the fourth ventricle treated with microsurgery using the trans-CMF approach from March 2006 to September 2010 at the Department of Neurosurgery of The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University (Shenyang, China). These data were collected and analyzed. Suboccipital median posterior fossa craniotomy and trans-CMF approach were performed in all cases for the microsurgical removal of the tumors. An additional incision was performed in the inferior medullary velum of 5 patients, in order to obtain adequate exposure of the tumors. As a result, all tumors were well exposed during surgery. Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 22 cases, near total resection (NTR) in 3 cases and subtotal resection (STR) in 1 case. All excised tumors were pathologically confirmed. No mortality occurred intraoperatively, and no patient presented with mutism or any other surgery-related complications. One patient suffered from postoperative hydrocephalus and received ventriculoperitoneal shunting, which relieved the symptoms. Over the 3.0–7.5-year follow-up period (mean, 4.8 years), tumor relapse occurred in 1 case with GTR, 2 cases with NTR and 1 case with STR. In total, 3 patients succumbed to tumor relapse and 4 were lost to follow-up. According to the literature and the clinical experience of the present authors, the trans-CMF approach provides safe and sufficient access to the fourth ventricle without the requirement of an incision in the inferior vermis. This approach prevents damage to the normal cerebellum and improves the surgical outcome. Tumor removal, restoration of cerebrospinal fluid circulation and preservation of brainstem function are factors that should be taken into consideration during surgery. For patients with

  1. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope evidence for mixing of magmatically related fluids with ground waters during Keweenawan Cu-Ag fissure-vein mineralization, Mamainse Point, Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, J.P.; Spooner, E.T.C.

    1985-01-01

    Primary chalcocite (Cc) mineralization at the Coppercorp mine occurs with vuggy Qz and minor calcite (Ct) in hydrothermal breccia veins following normal faults which cut Keweenawan plateau basalts and interflow sediments. Cc is the last and predominant sulfide in a paragenetic sequence of Py-Cp-Bn-Cc-Cu/sup 0/. Hematite (Hm) is found in equilibrium with all sulfides except Py. Fluid inclusion studies of vein Qz reveal a simple mixing trend between high temperature, high salinity brines, and lower temperature, more dilute hybrid fluids. The high end-member fluid temperatures strongly suggest a magmatic association, while the low salinity fluids are probably meteoric ground waters. delta/sup 13/C/sub pdb/ and delta/sup 18/O/sub smow/ values for ten Ct samples associated with sulfides average -4.0 per thousands (s=0.7) and 13.3 per thousands (s=2.1) respectively. These results suggest that the Coppercorp high-temperature ore-fluids were in equilibrium with an intrusion similar to the Jogran porphyry at depth, and that mixing with ground waters at higher levels in fissure veins resulted in sulfide precipitation by cooling, dilution and neutralization. Oxidation of this primary fluid at Coopercorp is also reflected by the ubiquitous presence of Hm with sulfide ores; negative delta/sup 34/S ratios from ten samples of Py, Cp or Cc and positive ratios from two rare baryte samples support this interpretation. Two samples of Py from Jogran give ratios typical of porphyry deposits, and may therefore represent the original undisturbed values of the ore-fluid.

  2. The influence of specific foods and oral hygiene on the microflora of fissures and smooth surfaces of molar teeth: A 5-day study.

    PubMed

    Beighton, D; Brailsford, S R; Lynch, E; Chen, H Y; Clark, D T

    1999-01-01

    A group of 20 students, harbouring >10(4) mutans streptococci per millilitre of saliva, was enrolled into the study. Models for sampling, reproducibly, the dental plaque present in specific sites (fissure and smooth surface) on the dentition were developed and validated. Withdrawal of normal oral hygiene procedures for only 1 day resulted in approximately 10-fold increases in the number of micro-organisms recovered from both sites. The effect of supplementing the subjects' diets with particular food items given 5 times per day [lemonade (5.8% w/v sugars, 250 ml), biscuits (digestive biscuits, 67.6% w/w carbohydrate of which 22% w/w was sugars and 45.6% w/w was starch), caramel toffees and sugar lumps] on the number of micro-organisms recovered and on the composition of the flora at both sites was determined. Dental plaque samples were taken after 5 days and it was found that supplementation of the diet with toffee and sugar lumps resulted in significantly more micro-organisms at both sampling sites. The supplementation of the diets with lemonade or biscuits did not significantly alter the numbers of micro-organisms recovered from either site. The percentage composition of the plaque samples from both dental sites remained relatively unaffected by oral hygiene although there were lower levels of mutans streptococci which might be related to the use of an antimicrobial toothpaste containing fluoride, triclosan and zinc citrate. This study suggests that the cariogenicity of certain sucrose-containing foods may, in part, be due to the enhancement of plaque accumulation in addition to other effects on the percentage composition of the plaque which may become manifest on prolonged usage of these dietary foodstuffs. These observations are consistent with dietary survey findings which often find consumption of confectionery related to caries experience or incidence. PMID:10460958

  3. Galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, J.

    1984-11-01

    Implications of the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background on large and small angular scales for galaxy formation are reviewed. In primeval adiabatic fluctuations, a universe dominated by cold, weakly interacting nonbaryonic matter, e.g., the massive photino is postulated. A possible signature of photino annihilation in our galactic halo involves production of cosmic ray antiprotons. If the density is near its closure value, it is necessary to invoke a biasing mechanism for suppressing galaxy formation throughout most of the universe in order to reconcile the dark matter density with the lower astronomical determinations of the mean cosmological density. A mechanism utilizing the onset of primordial massive star formation to strip gaseous protogalaxies is described. Only the densest, early collapsing systems form luminous galaxies. (ESA)

  4. Comet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.

    2014-07-01

    There has been vast progress in our understanding of planetesimal formation over the past decades, owing to a number of laboratory experiments as well as to refined models of dust and ice agglomeration in protoplanetary disks. Coagulation rapidly forms cm-sized ''pebbles'' by direct sticking in collisions at low velocities (Güttler et al. 2010; Zsom et al. 2010). For the further growth, two model approaches are currently being discussed: (1) Local concentration of pebbles in nebular instabilities until gravitational instability occurs (Johansen et al. 2007). (2) A competition between fragmentation and mass transfer in collisions among the dusty bodies, in which a few ''lucky winners'' make it to planetesimal sizes (Windmark et al. 2012a,b; Garaud et al. 2013). Predictions of the physical properties of the resulting bodies in both models allow a distinction of the two formation scenarios of planetesimals. In particular, the tensile strength (i.e, the inner cohesion) of the planetesimals differ widely between the two models (Skorov & Blum 2012; Blum et al. 2014). While model (1) predicts tensile strengths on the order of ˜ 1 Pa, model (2) results in rather compactified dusty bodies with tensile strengths in the kPa regime. If comets are km-sized survivors of the planetesimal-formation era, they should in principle hold the secret of their formation process. Water ice is the prime volatile responsible for the activity of comets. Thermophysical models of the heat and mass transport close to the comet-nucleus surface predict water-ice sublimation temperatures that relate to maximum sublimation pressures well below the kPa regime predicted for formation scenario (2). Model (1), however, is in agreement with the observed dust and gas activity of comets. Thus, a formation scenario for cometesimals involving gravitational instability is favored (Blum et al. 2014).

  5. Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klahr, Hubert; Brandner, Wolfgang

    2011-02-01

    1. Historical notes on planet formation Bodenheimer; 2. The formation and evolution of planetary systems Bouwman et al.; 3. Destruction of protoplanetary disks by photoevaporation Richling, Hollenbach and Yorke; 4. Turbulence in protoplanetary accretion disks Klahr, Rozyczka, Dziourkevitch, Wunsch and Johansen; 5. The origin of solids in the early solar system Trieloff and Palme; 6. Experiments on planetesimal formation Wurm and Blum; 7. Dust coagulation in protoplanetary disks Henning, Dullemond, Wolf and Dominik; 8. The accretion of giant planet cores Thommes and Duncan; 9. Planetary transits: direct vision of extrasolar planets Lecavelier des Etangs and Vidal-Madjar; 10. The core accretion - gas capture model Hubickyj; 11. Properties of exoplanets Marcy, Fischer, Butler and Vogt; 12. Giant planet formation: theories meet observations Boss; 13. From hot Jupiters to hot Neptures … and below Lovis, Mayor and Udry; 14. Disk-planet interaction and migration Masset and Kley; 15. The Brown Dwarf - planet relation Bate; 16. From astronomy to astrobiology Brandner; 17. Overview and prospective Lin.

  6. Effect of occlusal calculus utilized as a potential "biological sealant" in special needs patients with gastric feeding tubes: a qualitative in vitro contrast to pit and fissure sealant restorations.

    PubMed

    Owens, Barry M; Sharp, Harry K; Fourmy, Emily E; Phebus, Jeffrey G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report and in vitro investigation was to evaluate the marginal microleakage of intact occlusal calculus of primary molars extracted from a special needs patient who received nutrition via a gastric feeding tube. An adolescent with a history of developmental disturbance presented for routine dental care in a hospital facility. Prophylaxis was performed, and 2 mandibular permanent molars were restored. Five primary molars were extracted due to mobility and delayed retention. Heavy deposits of intact calculus were present on the occlusal surfaces of the primary teeth. The extracted teeth were immersed in methylene blue dye solution, invested in acrylic resin, sectioned into blocks, and photographed at 20× and 40× magnification. Previously photographed calculus-free molars with pit and fissure sealants were reviewed and served as contrasting "restorations." The occlusal calculus on the primary teeth extracted from the patient absorbed the dye, while the comparison teeth containing pit and fissure sealants exhibited varying degrees of marginal dye penetration (microleakage). No marginal microleakage was noted in the calculus specimens, indicating that this substrate may serve as a "natural" occlusal surface sealant and that its removal from occlusal surfaces during routine oral prophylaxis may be unnecessary. PMID:27367629

  7. The feeder system for the 2014 fissure eruption at Holuhraun, Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland: Geodetic and seismic constraints on subsurface activity in the area north of the Vatnajökull ice cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Stéphanie; Parks, Michelle; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hooper, Andy; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrun; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Spaans, Karsten; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hensch, Martin; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Rafn Heimisson, Elias; Drouin, Vincent; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Pedersen, Rikke; Rut Hjartardóttir, Ásta; Magnússon, Eyjólfur

    2015-04-01

    An intense earthquake swarm began on 16 August 2014 at Bárðarbunga volcano under the Vatnajökull ice cap in Central Iceland. It marked the beginning of an intrusive activity, with a dyke propagating over 45 km northward. Such major magmatic activity has not been observed for the last three decades in Iceland, since the Krafla rifting episode 1975-1984. The dyke propagation stopped 15 days after the onset of the seismic activity, with the dyke distal end in the Holuhraun plain north of the Vatnajökull ice cap. A small 4 hour eruption marked the beginning of extrusive activity. A new fissure eruption opened up on 31 August at the northern dyke tip, with lava fountaining and feeding extensive lava flows. In January 2014 the surface covered by the lava had exceeded 80 km2, and the eruption activity does not show significant decline. We have carried out interferometric analysis of SAR data (InSAR) since the onset of the unrest. X-band satellite images from COSMO-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X satellites were acquired and analyzed to map ground surface deformation associated with the dyke emplacement. Despite most of the dyke propagation occurring under several hundreds meters of ice, the last 10 km were outside the ice cap, allowing better characterisation of the dyke-induced deformation. Here we focus on the deformation in the Holuhraun plain, in order to better understand the link between the surface deformation detected in the vicinity of the dyke by InSAR as well as GPS measurements, and the eruptive activity. The regular SAR acquisitions made over the Holuhraun area since the beginning of the unrest offer a unique opportunity to better understand the evolution of the intrusion feeding the fissure eruption. For that purpose, we focus on the faults and fissures forming the graben borders on the glacier as well as in the Holuhraun plain, initially mapped using high-resolution radar images, acquired by airborne radar. We extract movement along and perpendicular to these

  8. Formation testers

    SciTech Connect

    Brieger, E.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of a method for use in obtaining multiple pressure tests of an earth formation traversed by a well bore by use of a sidewall fluid sampler well tool which has a fluid pressure sampling chamber in the well tool in open fluid communication with a pad sealing means, comprising the steps of: for one selected level in a well bore, moving a pad sealing means on the well tool into engagement with the wall of a well bore and isolating a wall segment of the earth formation; after the pad sealing means engges the wall segment of the earth formation, generating a hydraulic pressure in the well tool and applying said hydraulic pressure to said fluid pressure sampling chamber for increasing the volume of said fluid pressure sampling chamber thereby to dray a fluid sample from the earth formation engaged by the pad sealing means into the fluid pressure sampling chamber, sensing the pressure of said fluid sample as it is drawn into the fluid pressure sampling chamber while the volume of the sampling chamber is being increased, relieving the hydraulic pressure in the well tool with respect to said fluid pressur sampling chamber for decreasing the volume of said fluid pressure sampling chamber thereby to contact the sampling chamber to dischrge the fluid sample through the pad sealing means; retracting the sealing pad means and, after retrction of sealing pad means from engagement from the wall of the well bore, moving the well tool to a second location at another level in the well bore and, at the second location, repeating the steps of the method performed at the one selected level for obtaining another fluid sample and pressure sensing at said second location.

  9. New volcanogenic-eruptive genetic type of diamond occurrence (based on studying the 2012-2013 Fissure Tolbachik Eruption in Kamchatka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Gennady; Anikin, Leonid; Filatov, Stanislav; Silaev, Valery; Petrovsky, Vitaly; Zolotarev, Andrey; Dunin-Barkovsky, Romuald; Volynets, Anna

    2014-05-01

    During the 2012-2013 Fissure Tolbachik eruption, diamonds were found both in fresh pyroclastics and in the effusive lava pores. Lavas are aphyric and subaphyric porous aluminous basaltic trachyandesites with rare megacrysts and subphenocrysts of plagioclase, olivine and pyroxene. Groundmass is hyalopilitic, pilotaxitic, occasionally hyaline, with abundant plagioclase microlites. So far, over 750 diamond grains have been found sized mostly 100-500 mkm. Generally, grains are well formed isometric, plane-faced and sharp-edged monocrystals of cubic-octahedral habit and green color, rarer colorless. Faces of rhombic-dodecahedron, tetragonal-trisoctahedron and trigonal-trisoctahedron also occur. Crystal cubic faces host pits of diffusive depletion, and pits with induction surfaces formed after the breakoff of syngenetic inclusions. Octahedral faces often show pyramidal etching pits formed at the dislocation outcrops. Pits contain coatings whose composition includes Fe, Mg, Ca, Si, and Cu-Sn (Zn) alloy films. Diamond X-ray diffraction data (Bruker APEX DUO, STOE IPDS II, MoKα-radiation, 788 reflections) show space group Fd-3m, cubic unit cell parameter a = 3.574(3) A and major reflections (111), (220), (311) etc. at Gandolfi pattern. Raman spectra with red beam reveal only one strong line at 1332 cm-1 typical for diamonds. Spectra excited by the 785 nm beam reveal a wide line with the peak at 1370 cm-1, whose intensity oscillates from 1% to 70% of the diamond line intensity at 1332 cm-1. Infrared absorption spectra reflect two lines with peaks at 1345 and 1130 cm-1, corresponding to structural C-defects (isolated N atoms). Partially, these defects occur in the positive charge state - N+. Structural nitrogen concentration in the form of C-defects varies from 150 to 500 ppm, while that in the form of N+ - from 10 to 30 ppm. Lines of infrared absorption on A and B1 nitrogen defects, as well as those on hydrogen defects typical for most natural diamonds, are not detected for

  10. Amphiplex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Shannon; Laaser, Jennifer; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-micelle complexes are currently under heavy investigation due to their potential applications in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy, yet the dynamics of the complex formation is still relatively unstudied. By varying the ratios of poly(styrene sulfonate) chains and cationic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(styrene) micelles and the ionic strength of the system, we created a variety of complex configurations of different sizes and charges. The complexes were characterized dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements which provided information regarding the hydrodynamic radius, distribution of sizes, and effective charge.

  11. Habit formation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle S; Graybiel, Ann M

    2016-03-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network. PMID:27069378

  12. Habit formation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kyle S.; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network. PMID:27069378

  13. Selective ablation of pit and fissure caries from occlusal surfaces using λ=355-nm laser pulses and air-abrasion demonstrated using PS-OCT and near-IR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Steven T.; Fan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    Several past studies have suggested that lasers with and without added chromophores can be used for the selective removal of dental caries from stained pit and fissures in preparation for composite sealant placement with minimal damage to sound, unstained tooth structure. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is a new nondestructive imaging technology that can be used to acquire images of caries lesions in occlusal surfaces. PSOCT is ideally suited to measure the caries depth and severity before and after selective removal from occlusal surfaces. In this study, λ=355-nm laser pulses of 5-ns duration at irradiation intensities ranging from 0.5-1.3 J/cm2 were scanned across tooth surfaces to selectively remove decayed enamel with and without the addition of India ink. PS-OCT images were acquired before and after removal. The laser removal was also compared to air abrasion in order to compare selectivity of these two conservative caries removal technologies.

  14. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  15. Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  16. A 12-month clinical evaluation of pit-and-fissure sealants placed with and without etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems in newly-erupted teeth

    PubMed Central

    NOGOURANI, Maryam Karami; JANGHORBANI, Mohsen; KHADEM, Parvin; JADIDI, Zahra; JALALI, Shahriar

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this one-year clinical study was to investigate the effect of two adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond, a two-step etch-and-rinse and Clearfil SE Bond, a two-step self-etch system) on pit-and-fissure sealant retention in newly-erupted teeth. This study compared the success of the sealants in mesial and distopalatal grooves with and without these two adhesive systems. Material and Methods In a clinical trial, 35 children aged 6-8 years undergoing sealant placement were recruited. This one-year clinical study scored 70 mesial and 70 distopalatal sealants of newly-erupted permanent maxillary first molar, with a split-mouth design. All children received sealant alone in one permanent maxillary molar tooth. Children were randomized into two groups. One group received Self-Etch (SE) bond plus sealant and the other group received Single Bond plus sealant in another permanent maxillary molar tooth. Clinical evaluation at 3, 6 and 12 months was performed and the retention was studied in terms of the success and failure. Results The success rate of sealant in the distopalatal groove, using SEB at 3, 6 and 12 months was 93.3% (95% CI: 68.0, 99.8), 73.3% (95% CI: 44.9, 92.2) and 66.7% (95% CI: 38.4, 88.2), respectively. It was greater than that of the distopalatal groove in SB group with a success rate of 62.5% (95% CI: 35.4, 84.8), 31.3% (95% CI: 11.8, 58.7) and 31.3% (95% CI: 11.8, 58.7), at the three evaluation periods. The success rate of sealant in the mesial groove using SEB was 86.6% (95% CI: 59.5, 98.3), 53.3% (95% CI: 26.6, 78.7) and 53.3% (95% CI: 26.6, 78.7), while this was 100% (95% CI: 79.4, 100.0), 81.3% (95% CI: 54.4, 96.0) and 81.3% (95% CI: 54.4, 96.0) using SB, at 3, 6 and 12-month evaluation periods. Conclusions These results support the use of these two bonding agents in pit-and-fissure sealants under both isolated and contaminated conditions. Further, SE bond seemed to be less sensitive to moisture contamination. PMID:22858703

  17. Star formation - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N. J., II

    1985-01-01

    Methods for studying star formation are reviewed. Stellar clusters and associations, as well as field stars, provide a fossil record of the star formation process. Regions of current star formation provide a series of snapshots of different epochs of star formation. A simplified picture of individual star formation as it was envisioned in the late 1970s is contrasted with the results of recent observations, in particular the outflow phenomenon.

  18. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production. PMID:21687599

  19. Hydrophilicity of dentin bonding systems influences in vitro Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Cadenaro, Milena; Gagliani, Massimo; Ferraroni, Monica; Tay, Franklin; Pashley, David; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate in vitro Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm formation on the surface of five light-curing experimental dental bonding systems (DBS) with increasing hydrophilicity. The null hypothesis tested was that resin chemical composition and hydrophilicity does not affect S. mutans biofilm formation. Methods Five light-curing versions of experimental resin blends with increasing hydrophilicity were investigated (R1, R2, R3, R4 and R5). R1 and R2 contained ethoxylated BisGMA/TEGDMA or BisGMA/TEGDMA, respectively, and were very hydrophobic, were representative of pit-and-fissure bonding agents. R3 was representative of a typical two-step etch- and-rinse adhesive, while R4 and R5 were very hydrophilic resins analogous to self-etching adhesives. Twenty-eight disks were prepared for each resin blend. After a 24 h-incubation at 37 °C, a multilayer monospecific biofilm of S. mutans was obtained on the surface of each disk. The adherent biomass was determined using the MTT assay and evaluated morphologically with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results R2 and R3 surfaces showed the highest biofilm formation while R1 and R4 showed a similar intermediate biofilm formation. R5 was more hydrophilic and acidic and was significantly less colonized than all the other resins. A significant quadratic relationship between biofilm formation and hydrophilicity of the resin blends was found. CLSM and SEM evaluation confirmed MTT assay results. Conclusions The null hypothesis was rejected since S. mutans biofilm formation was influenced by hydrophilicity, surface acidity and chemical composition of the experimental resins. Further studies using a bioreactor are needed to confirm the results and clarify the role of the single factors. PMID:24954666

  20. Structure Formation in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    Part I. Physical Processes and Numerical Methods Common to Structure Formations in Astrophysics: 1. The physics of turbulence E. Levêque; 2. The numerical simulation of turbulence W. Schmidt; 3. Numerical methods for radiation magnetohydrodynamics in astrophysics R. Klein and J. Stone; 4. The role of jets in the formation of planets, stars, and galaxies R. Banerjee, R. Pudritz and R. Ouyed; 5. Advanced numerical methods in astrophysical fluid dynamics A. Hujeirat and F. Heitsch; Part II. Structure and Star Formation in the Primordial Universe: 6. New frontiers in cosmology and galaxy formation challenges for the future R. Ellis and J. Silk; 7. Galaxy formation physics T. Abel, G. Bryan and R. Teyssier; 8. First stars formation, evolution, feedback effects V. Bromm, A. Ferrara and A. Heger; Part III. Contemporary Star and Brown Dwarf Formation: a) Cloud Formation and Fragmentation: 9. Diffuse interstellar medium and the formation of molecular clouds P. Hennebelle, M. Mac Low and E. Vazquez-Semadeni; 10. The formation of distributed and clustered stars in molecular clouds T. Megeath, Z. -Y. Li and A. Nordlund; b) Core Fragmentation and Star Formation: 11. The formation and evolution of prestellar cores P. André, S. Basu and S. Inutsuka; 12. Models for the formation of massive stars; Part IV. Protoplanetary Disks and Planet Formation M. Krumholz and I. Bonnell: 13. Observational properties of disks and young stellar objects G. Duchêne, F. Ménard, J. Muzzerolle and S. Mohanty; 14. Structure and dynamics of protoplanetary disks C. Dullemond, R. Durisen and J. Papaloizou; 15. Planet formation and evolution theory and observation Y. Alibert, I. Baraffe, W. Benz, G. Laughlin and S. Udry; 16. Planet formation assembling the puzzle G. Wurm and T. Guillot; Part V. Summary: 17. Open issues in small- and large-scale structure formation R. Klessen and M. Mac Low; 18. Final word E. Salpeter.

  1. Structure Formation in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles

    2011-02-01

    Part I. Physical Processes and Numerical Methods Common to Structure Formations in Astrophysics: 1. The physics of turbulence E. Levêque; 2. The numerical simulation of turbulence W. Schmidt; 3. Numerical methods for radiation magnetohydrodynamics in astrophysics R. Klein and J. Stone; 4. The role of jets in the formation of planets, stars, and galaxies R. Banerjee, R. Pudritz and R. Ouyed; 5. Advanced numerical methods in astrophysical fluid dynamics A. Hujeirat and F. Heitsch; Part II. Structure and Star Formation in the Primordial Universe: 6. New frontiers in cosmology and galaxy formation challenges for the future R. Ellis and J. Silk; 7. Galaxy formation physics T. Abel, G. Bryan and R. Teyssier; 8. First stars formation, evolution, feedback effects V. Bromm, A. Ferrara and A. Heger; Part III. Contemporary Star and Brown Dwarf Formation: a) Cloud Formation and Fragmentation: 9. Diffuse interstellar medium and the formation of molecular clouds P. Hennebelle, M. Mac Low and E. Vazquez-Semadeni; 10. The formation of distributed and clustered stars in molecular clouds T. Megeath, Z. -Y. Li and A. Nordlund; b) Core Fragmentation and Star Formation: 11. The formation and evolution of prestellar cores P. André, S. Basu and S. Inutsuka; 12. Models for the formation of massive stars; Part IV. Protoplanetary Disks and Planet Formation M. Krumholz and I. Bonnell: 13. Observational properties of disks and young stellar objects G. Duchêne, F. Ménard, J. Muzzerolle and S. Mohanty; 14. Structure and dynamics of protoplanetary disks C. Dullemond, R. Durisen and J. Papaloizou; 15. Planet formation and evolution theory and observation Y. Alibert, I. Baraffe, W. Benz, G. Laughlin and S. Udry; 16. Planet formation assembling the puzzle G. Wurm and T. Guillot; Part V. Summary: 17. Open issues in small- and large-scale structure formation R. Klessen and M. Mac Low; 18. Final word E. Salpeter.

  2. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  3. The Format Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oder, Norman

    2002-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of public libraries that investigated trends in audiovisual materials. Highlights include format issues; audiobooks; media budgets for various formats; video collections; DVDs; circulation; collection sizes; music CDs; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  4. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokine, Alexandre

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layout system using customized styles.

  5. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats. PMID:24338090

  6. Formation conditions of high-grade beryllium ore at the Snezhnoe deposit, Eastern Sayan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damdinova, L. B.; Smirnov, S. Z.; Damdinov, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    The structure and formation conditions of beryllium ore, as well as the fluorite and fluorite-microcline bodies at the Snezhnoe deposit in Eastern Sayan have been revealed and studied using geological, mineralogical, petrographic, and thermobarogeochemical methods. It has been established that the stringer and breccia ores were largely formed as a result of filling of open cavities (voids and fissures) rather than of replacement of low-Ca host rocks. Three types of high-grade ore consist of almost the same set of minerals in different proportions. Calcium and fluorine necessary for fluorite formation in three main types of ore have been supplied with the near-neutral high-F solutions (type I) and the solutions of elevated alkalinity (II, III types) in the form of complex compounds like Na2CaF 4 0 , Ca2Cl3F0, etc. Beryllium minerals were deposited within a temperature interval from ≥340 to 230°C due to the cooling of the solution and binding of F into fluorite with the breakdown of Be fluorine complexes and intense deposition of Be minerals.

  7. Star Formation for Predictive Primordial Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence

    The elegance of inflationary cosmology and cosmological perturbation theory ends with the formation of the first stars and galaxies, the initial sources of light that launched the phenomenologically rich process of cosmic reionization. Here we review the current understanding of early star formation, emphasizing unsolved problems and technical challenges. We begin with the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang and trace how they influenced subsequent star formation. The onset of chemical enrichment coincided with a sharp increase in the overall physical complexity of star forming systems. Ab-initio computational treatments are just now entering the domain of the predictive and are establishing contact with local observations of the relics of this ancient epoch.

  8. Criticality studies of actinides within fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Trevor

    The storage of nuclear waste in underground storage facilities presents numerous engineering challenges and risks. Experimental verification of engineered underground storage is impractical or prohibitively expensive, leaving scientists with few options. A 1995 report by Bowman and Venneri of the Los Alamos National Laboratory generated considerable controversy by hypothesizing that wastes composed of fissionable plutonium leached from underground storage containers could pose a nuclear criticality hazard. They proposed cases where plutonium collected in underground fractures could lead to sustained nuclear fission. In overmoderated cases, they argued that the resulting release of energy from fission could result in steam explosions, or even an underground nuclear explosion (autocriticality). Their hypothesis had severe implications for the feasibility of long-term nuclear waste storage in geologic repositories. The Bowman and Venneri hypothesis led to the need for a study of conditions that could lead to a critical event in a geologic repository due to releases of uranium or plutonium. Information about the likely consequences of a critical event is also important in repository design. To accomplish this study a numerical simulation code, GEOCRIT, was written to model radionuclide transport from the repository into a fracture below the repository. Once sufficient material has accumulated in the fracture and rock matrix, the neutronics portion of the code is started to simulate heat generation and fluid flow. The thermohydraulics portion of the code calculates heat generation from fission, stream functions, velocity, and pressure of the fluid in the fracture and rock matrix. The transport portion of the code incorporates numerous parameters that can be varied to simulate different radionuclide buildup in the fracture and rock matrix. Variation of the solubility, diffusion, deposition coefficients in the program yield different accumulations of radionuclides in the fracture and rock matrix. In each case the majority of the deposition occurs in the fracture and adjacent rock matrix. The variation in accumulated radionuclides led to different neutron distributions within the fracture and rock matrix. In each case the largest neutron flux is in the fracture leading to the highest temperature also being within the fracture. The increase in temperature leads to a transient bifurcating flow within the rock matrix. One potential risk for the geological repository is the buildup of radionuclide in the saturated rock with subsequent drying out of the rock matrix. This case is known as overmoderation, whereby the neutron flux increases as the water dries out. It has been hypothesized that certain configurations of radionuclides may be overmoderated and drying out of the water in the rock may lead to a critical event. Three cases of overmoderation were simulated with the code. Three different levels of accumulation of radionuclides within the fracture and rock matrix, with subsequent drying out of the crack, lead to an increase in neutron flux. This increase in neutron flux indicates that the accumulated radionuclide in the saturated fracture and rock matrix is overmoderated. In one of the overmoderated cases, the reactor reached a steady state with transient neutron behavior due to water in the surrounding rock changing from liquid to steam and back. One case shows a significant increase in neutron flux.

  9. Protocol for “Seal or Varnish?” (SoV) trial: a randomised controlled trial to measure the relative cost and effectiveness of pit and fissure sealants and fluoride varnish in preventing dental decay

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dental caries remains a significant public health problem, prevalence being linked to social and economic deprivation. Occlusal surfaces of first permanent molars are the most susceptible site in the developing permanent dentition. Cochrane reviews have shown pit and fissure sealants (PFS) and fluoride varnish (FV) to be effective over no intervention in preventing caries. However, the comparative cost and effectiveness of these treatments is uncertain. The primary aim of the trial described in this protocol is to compare the clinical effectiveness of PFS and FV in preventing dental caries in first permanent molars in 6-7 year-olds. Secondary aims include: establishing the costs and the relative cost-effectiveness of PFS and FV delivered in a community/school setting; examining the impact of PFS and FV on children and their parents/carers in terms of quality of life/treatment acceptability measures; and examining the implementation of treatment in a community setting. Methods/design The trial design comprises a randomised, assessor-blinded, two-arm, parallel group trial in 6–7 year old schoolchildren. Clinical procedures and assessments will be performed at 66 primary schools, in deprived areas in South Wales. Treatments will be delivered via a mobile dental clinic. In total, 920 children will be recruited (460 per trial arm). At baseline and annually for 36 months dental caries will be recorded using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) by trained and calibrated dentists. PFS and FV will be applied by trained dental hygienists. The FV will be applied at baseline, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 30 months. The PFS will be applied at baseline and re-examined at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months, and will be re-applied if the existing sealant has become detached/is insufficient. The economic analysis will estimate the costs of providing the PFS versus FV. The process evaluation will assess implementation and acceptability through acceptability

  10. Influence of Uncertain Parameters on the Leakage of CO2 to Overlying Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Nicolas, A.; Cody, B. M.; Bau, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    In the last two centuries, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have increased by about 35% as a result of anthropogenic emissions. To reduce these emissions, geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) has been advanced as an emerging technology. CCS involves the injection of CO2 in supercritical state into deep saline aquifers. Supercritical CO2 is less dense and less viscous than brine, which causes gravity override. If the retained CO2 finds a fault or abandoned well that leads to the surface, it may easily reach shallow groundwater resources or even the land surface affecting them prejudicially. The characterization of a potential site for storage of CO2 is typically a difficult task, given the uncertainties associated with the site properties of interest. Characteristics of the cap rock overlying the injected formations are decisive elements of a CCS system, especially its permeability and the spatial distribution of potential carbon escape pathways. In addition, leakage pathways may also be created during the CO2 injection process due to fissuring of the cap rock associated with the increased pore pressure and the ensuing effective stress reduction. Therefore, assessing the risk of leakage of CO2 given the uncertainty on the mentioned parameters is vital prior to the implementation of this technology. In this work, the variable parameters that are studied are: porosity and permeability of injected aquifers, cap rock permeability, as well as the location, size and permeability of carbon leakage pathways trough the sealing layers. Each of these parameters is associated to a statistical probability distribution function prescribed to represents typical ranges of variability. Several injection scenarios are investigated, which differ from one another depending on CO2 injection rates and time schedules. A semi-analytical model is used to simulate the injection of CO2 into a hypothetical deep saline aquifer overlain by a sequence of aquitards and

  11. Tropical cyclone formation

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.T.; Farrell, B.F. )

    1993-01-15

    The physics of tropical cyclone formation is not well understood, and more is known about the mature hurricane than the formative mechanisms that produce it. It is believed part of the reason for this can be traced to insufficient upper-level atmospheric data. Recent observations suggest that tropical cyclones are initiated by asymmetric interactions associated with migratory upper-level potential vorticity disturbances and low-level disturbances. Favored theories of cyclones formation, however, focus on internal processes associated with cumulus convection and/or air-sea interaction. This work focuses on external mechanisms of cyclone formation and, using both a two- and three-dimensional moist geostrophic momentum model, investigates the role of upper-level potential vorticity disturbances on the formation process. A conceptual model of tropical cyclone formation is proposed, and implications of the theory are discussed. 71 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Data format translation routines

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base.

  13. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layoutmore » system using customized styles.« less

  14. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  15. Bcl6a function is required during optic cup formation to prevent p53-dependent apoptosis and colobomata

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiwoon; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Gross, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in BCOR (Bcl6 corepressor) are found in patients with oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome, a congenital disorder affecting visual system development, and loss-of-function studies in zebrafish and Xenopus demonstrate a role for Bcor during normal optic cup development in preventing colobomata. The mechanism whereby BCOR functions during eye development to prevent colobomata is not known, but in other contexts it serves as a transcriptional corepressor that potentiates transcriptional repression by B cell leukemia/lymphoma 6 (BCL6). Here, we have explored the function of the zebrafish ortholog of Bcl6, Bcl6a, during eye development, and our results demonstrate that Bcl6a, like Bcor, is required to prevent colobomata during optic cup formation. Our data demonstrate that Bcl6a acts downstream of Vax1 and Vax2, known regulators of ventral optic cup formation and choroid fissure closure, and that bcl6a is a direct target of Vax2. Together, this regulatory network functions to repress p53 expression and thereby suppress apoptosis in the developing optic cup. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that Bcl6a functions cooperatively with Bcor, Rnf2 and Hdac1 in a common gene regulatory network that acts to repress p53 and prevent colobomata. Together, these data support a model in which p53-dependent apoptosis needs to be tightly regulated for normal optic cup formation and that Bcl6a, Bcor, Rnf2 and Hdac1 activities mediate this regulation. PMID:23669349

  16. Ice Formation on Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, L

    1939-01-01

    This report makes use of the results obtained in the Gottingen ice tunnel in which the atmospheric conditions are simulated and the process of ice formation photographed. The effect of ice formation is threefold: 1) added weight to the airplane; 2) a change in the lift and drag forces; 3) a change in the stability characteristics.

  17. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  18. Formative Assessment in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxenford-O'Brian, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation responds to critical gaps in current research on formative assessment practice which could limit successful implementation of this practice within the K-12 classroom context. The study applies a socio cultural perspective of learning to interpret a cross-case analysis of formative assessment practice occurring during one…

  19. School Formative Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Data-driven instructional improvement relies on developing coherent systems that allow school staff to generate, interpret, and act upon quality formative information on students and school programs. This article offers a formative feedback system model that captures how school leaders and teachers structure artifacts and practices to create…

  20. Effects of hydraulic frac fluids and formation waters on groundwater microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Núria; Krüger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Shale gas is being considered as a complementary energy resource to other fossil fuels. Its exploitation requires using advanced drilling techniques and hydraulic stimulation (fracking). During fracking operations, large amounts of fluids (fresh water, proppants and chemicals) are injected at high pressures into the formations, to create fractures and fissures, and thus to release gas from the source rock into the wellbore. The injected fluid partly remains in the formation, while up to 40% flows back to the surface, together with reservoir waters, sometimes containing dissolved hydrocarbons, high salt concentrations, etc. The aim of our study was to investigate the potential impacts of frac or geogenic chemicals, frac fluid, formation water or flowback on groudnwater microbial communities. Laboratory experiments under in situ conditions (i.e. at in situ temperatures, with high pressure, etc.) were conducted using groundwater samples from three different locations. Series of microcosms (3 of each kind) containing R2 broth medium or groundwater spiked with either single frac chemicals (including biocides), frac fluids, artificial reservoir water, NaCl, or different mixtures of reservoir water and frac fluid (to simulate flowback) were incubated in the dark. Controls included non-amended and non-inoculated microcosms. Classical microbiological methods and molecular analyses were used to assess changes in the microbial abundance, community structure and function in response to the different treatments. Microbial communities were quite halotolerant and their growth benefited from low concentrations of reservoir waters or salt, but they were negatively affected by higher concentrations of formation waters, salt, biocides, frac fluids or flowback. Changes on the microbial community structure could be detected by T-RFLP. Single frac components like guar gum or choline chloride could be used as substrates, while the effects of others like triethanolamine or light oil

  1. Sparse Image Format

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. Itmore » supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.« less

  2. Sparse Image Format

    SciTech Connect

    Eads, Damian Ryan

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. It supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.

  3. The formation of natural cryogenic brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starinsky, Abraham; Katz, Amitai

    2003-04-01

    The source of salts in the Ca-chloridic, hypersaline brines (up to 190 g Cl L -1) occurring in crystalline basement rocks in the Canadian, Fennoscandian and Bohemian Shields and their evolution have been investigated and reported. The Cl-Br-Na relationship indicates that these waters have been concentrated from seawater, by freezing during glacial times. The Na/Cl ratio (0.25 to 0.35) in the more saline fluids is compatible with cooling down to -30°C, where the most saline waters have been concentrated by a factor of 25 to 30 relative to the parent seawater. The brines formed from seawater within cryogenic troughs, along the subarctic continental margins, around ice sheets. The depressions within which the brines formed are the cryogenic analogues of the classic, evaporitic lagoon. One million years suffice to saturate with brine a 2000km-radius by 1km-depth rock volume at an H 2O removal rate of only 2.8 mm/yr. Density-induced brine migration on a continental scale takes place via fissures below the ice. Our calculations, that were performed on a hypothetical ice sheet with dimensions compatible with the Laurentide ice sheet, demonstrate that during 1m.y., a 60m thick cryogenic sediment section could have formed. However, the precipitated minerals (mirabilite and hydrohalite) are repeatedly dispersed by the advance and retreat of the ice sheet, dissolved by melt water-seawater mixtures, and eroded during postglacial uplift, leaving almost no trace in the geological record. The cryogenic brines formed intermittently during and between glacial periods. The repeating advance and retreat of the ice sheets exerted a major control on the direction and intensity of brine flow. The cryogenic concentration of seawater and the migration of brine towards the center of the glaciostatic depression occurred mainly during the build up of the ice sheet, while reversal of the water flow from the center of the cryogenic basin outwards happened upon deglaciation. The flow of the

  4. Teaching Letter Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Steve; Madan, Avi J.

    1981-01-01

    The authors describe a remedial technique for teaching letter formation to students with handwriting difficulties. The approach blends traditional procedures (modeling, physical prompts, tracing, self correction, etc.) with cognitive behavior modification principles. (CL)

  5. Circumstellar grain formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draine, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Dust formation around cool giant and supergiant stars is examined in terms of grain formulation. Optical properties of small clusters, molecular physics of cluster nucleation and growth, circumstellar mass flows, and their application to alpha Ori are discussed.

  6. Display formats manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The standards and procedures for the generation of operational display formats to be used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) display control system are presented. The required effort, forms, and fundamentals for the design, specifications, and production of display formats are identified. The principles of display design and system constraints controlling the creation of optimum operational displays for mission control are explained. The basic two types of MCC display systems for presenting information are described.

  7. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  8. Autonomous Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Strategic Plan for the Aerospace Technology Enterprise includes ambitious objectives focused on affordable air travel, reduced emissions, and expanded aviation-system capacity. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with NASA Ames Research Center, the Boeing Company, and the University of California, Los Angeles, has embarked on an autonomous-formation-flight project that promises to make significant strides towards these goals. For millions of years, birds have taken advantage of the aerodynamic benefit of flying in formation. The traditional "V" formation flown by many species of birds (including gulls, pelicans, and geese) enables each of the trailing birds to fly in the upwash flow field that exists just outboard of the bird immediately ahead in the formation. The result for each trailing bird is a decrease in induced drag and thus a reduction in the energy needed to maintain a given speed. Hence, for migratory birds, formation flight extends the range of the system of birds over the range of birds flying solo. The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) Project is seeking to extend this symbiotic relationship to aircraft.

  9. Heritability and reliability of automatically segmented human hippocampal formation subregions.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Christopher D; Hibar, Derrek P; van Velzen, Laura S; Zannas, Anthony S; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; McMahon, Katie; Prasad, Gautam; Kelly, Sinéad; Faskowitz, Joshua; deZubiracay, Greig; Iglesias, Juan E; van Erp, Theo G M; Frodl, Thomas; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Jahanshad, Neda; Schmaal, Lianne; Sämann, Philipp G; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-03-01

    The human hippocampal formation can be divided into a set of cytoarchitecturally and functionally distinct subregions, involved in different aspects of memory formation. Neuroanatomical disruptions within these subregions are associated with several debilitating brain disorders including Alzheimer's disease, major depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Multi-center brain imaging consortia, such as the Enhancing Neuro Imaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) consortium, are interested in studying disease effects on these subregions, and in the genetic factors that affect them. For large-scale studies, automated extraction and subsequent genomic association studies of these hippocampal subregion measures may provide additional insight. Here, we evaluated the test-retest reliability and transplatform reliability (1.5T versus 3T) of the subregion segmentation module in the FreeSurfer software package using three independent cohorts of healthy adults, one young (Queensland Twins Imaging Study, N=39), another elderly (Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, ADNI-2, N=163) and another mixed cohort of healthy and depressed participants (Max Planck Institute, MPIP, N=598). We also investigated agreement between the most recent version of this algorithm (v6.0) and an older version (v5.3), again using the ADNI-2 and MPIP cohorts in addition to a sample from the Netherlands Study for Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) (N=221). Finally, we estimated the heritability (h(2)) of the segmented subregion volumes using the full sample of young, healthy QTIM twins (N=728). Test-retest reliability was high for all twelve subregions in the 3T ADNI-2 sample (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.70-0.97) and moderate-to-high in the 4T QTIM sample (ICC=0.5-0.89). Transplatform reliability was strong for eleven of the twelve subregions (ICC=0.66-0.96); however, the hippocampal fissure was not consistently reconstructed across 1.5T and 3T field strengths (ICC=0

  10. Positronium Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    Positronium formation in muscle at +4°C and -4°C was examined by the measurement of the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation. Since the positronium formation rate in ice is considerably higher than it is in water, there should be a comparable increase in the positronium formation rate in muscle tissue if recent speculation that cellular water is ordered in a semicrystalline icelike state is correct. Comparison of the angular correlation from muscle at +4°C with that from water at +4°C shows no enhancement of the positronium formation rate. Frozen muscle at -4°C shows an enhancement of the positronium formation rate of approximately half that found in ice at -4°C, indicating that most cellular water undergoes a normal water-ice transition when frozen. It is concluded therefore that cell water in muscle is not ordered in a hexagonal icelike structure. While the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cell water is in the liquid state, the hypothesis that cell water is ordered in an undetermined close packed structure which transforms to the hexagonal ice structure at or near 0°C cannot be ruled out. PMID:5436881

  11. Formation of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, George W.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of the earth is discussed in the context of the formation of the sun and the planets, and a standard model for such a formation assuming gravitational instability in a dense interstellar molecular cloud is outlined, along with the most significant variant of the model in which the loss of the nebular gas occurred after the formation of the earth. The formation of the sun and solar nebulae is addressed, and the coagulation of grains and the formation of small planetesimals are covered, along with the gravitational accumulation of planetesimals into planetary embryos and final stages of accumulation - embryos of planets. It is pointed out that the final stage of accumulation consists of the collision of these embryos; because of their large size, particularly after their further growth, these collisions represent giant impacts. It is concluded that the earth was initially an extremely hot and melted planet, surrounded by a fragile atmosphere and subject to violent impacts by bodies of the size of Ceres and even the moon.

  12. Molecules in star formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, F. H.

    The author reviews current ideas and models in the problem of star formation from molecular cloud cores that are relatively isolated from the influences of other forming stars. He discusses the time scales, flow dynamics, and density and temperature structures applicable to each of the four stages of the entire process: (1) formation of a magnetized cloud core by ambipolar diffusion and evolution to a pivotal state of gravomagneto catastrophe; (2) self-similar collapse of the pivotal configuration and the formation of protostars, disks, and pseudo-disks; (3) onset of a magnetocentrifugally driven, lightly ionized wind from the interaction of an accretion disk and the magnetosphere of the central star, and the driving of bipolar molecular outflows; (4) evolution of pre-main-sequence stars surrounded by dusty accretion disks. For each of these stages and processes, he considers the characteristics of the molecular diagnostics needed to investigate the crucial aspects of the observational problem.

  13. Thrombus formation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara C.

    2005-01-01

    To examine thrombus formation in a living mouse, new technologies involving intravital videomicroscopy have been applied to the analysis of vascular windows to directly visualize arterioles and venules. After vessel wall injury in the microcirculation, thrombus development can be imaged in real time. These systems have been used to explore the role of platelets, blood coagulation proteins, endothelium, and the vessel wall during thrombus formation. The study of biochemistry and cell biology in a living animal offers new understanding of physiology and pathology in complex biologic systems. PMID:16322780

  14. Crystal Formation in Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Bernardo S; Mangan, Matthew S; Latz, Eicke

    2016-05-20

    The formation and accumulation of crystalline material in tissues is a hallmark of many metabolic and inflammatory conditions. The discovery that the phase transition of physiologically soluble substances to their crystalline forms can be detected by the immune system and activate innate immune pathways has revolutionized our understanding of how crystals cause inflammation. It is now appreciated that crystals are part of the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including gout, silicosis, asbestosis, and atherosclerosis. In this review we discuss current knowledge of the complex mechanisms of crystal formation in diseased tissues and their interplay with the nutrients, metabolites, and immune cells that account for crystal-induced inflammation. PMID:26772211

  15. Gaussian entanglement of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.M.; Giedke, G.; Krueger, O.; Werner, R. F.; Cirac, J.I.

    2004-05-01

    We introduce a Gaussian version of the entanglement of formation adapted to bipartite Gaussian states by considering decompositions into pure Gaussian states only. We show that this quantity is an entanglement monotone under Gaussian operations and provide a simplified computation for states of arbitrary many modes. For the case of one mode per site the remaining variational problem can be solved analytically. If the considered state is in addition symmetric with respect to interchanging the two modes, we prove additivity of the considered entanglement measure. Moreover, in this case and considering only a single copy, our entanglement measure coincides with the true entanglement of formation.

  16. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of

  17. BISAC Variable Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Technology and Libraries, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents revision of Book Industry Systems Advisory Committee (BISAC) format designed specifically for electronic transmission of purchase orders for monograph or series titles combining fixed and variable length data fields which was approved in January 1983. Special characters, sample address descriptions, summary of fixed records, glossary, and…

  18. The Formation of Trihalomethanes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, R. Rhodes; Umphres, Mark D.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are a number of factors important in the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) including the nature of aquatic humus and the influences of preozonation, bromide, pH, and chlorine. A brief investigation is also conducted into the kinetics of the THM reaction. Several major research needs are represented. (CS)

  19. Reconsidering Formative Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Roy D.; Breivik, Einar; Wilcox, James B.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between observable responses and the latent constructs they are purported to measure has received considerable attention recently, with particular focus on what has become known as formative measurement. This alternative to reflective measurement in the area of theory-testing research is examined in the context of the potential…

  20. Formation of Freirian Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Phyllis

    This paper is written for people who are already familiar with the philosophy and methodology of Paulo Freire's liberatory education and are interested in creating a formation program for adult education facilitators using his ideas. The author describes the paper as "a collection of thoughts, of things to consider," when organizing such a…

  1. Formation of planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, Stuart J.

    1991-01-01

    Formation of planetesimals is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) nebular structure; (2) aerodynamics of the solid bodies in the nebula; (3) problems with gravitational instability; (4) particle growth by coagulation; properties of fractal aggregates; and (5) coagulation and settling of fractal aggregates.

  2. Technobabble: File Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    1999-01-01

    Considers the confusion of over 20 different kinds of graphics programs. Briefly distinguishes between some of the more popular graphics formats (Photoshop, TIFF, JPEG, GIF, PICT, and EPS), and describes the benefits and disadvantages of each in the context of journalism education. (SC)

  3. FORMATION OF PHOTOCHEMICAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective was to develop a better understanding of smog aerosol formation with particular reference to haze in the Southern California area. This study combined laboratory work with ambient air studies. Counting of particles by light scattering was the principle physical tech...

  4. Common file formats.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Shonda A; Littlejohn, Timothy G; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2007-01-01

    This appendix discusses a few of the file formats frequently encountered in bioinformatics. Specifically, it reviews the rules for generating FASTA files and provides guidance for interpreting NCBI descriptor lines, commonly found in FASTA files. In addition, it reviews the construction of GenBank, Phylip, MSF and Nexus files. PMID:18428774

  5. Bacterial formate hydrogenlyase complex

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Jennifer S.; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Haumann, Michael; Palmer, Tracy; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Sargent, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli can carry out a mixed-acid fermentation that ultimately produces molecular hydrogen. The enzyme directly responsible for hydrogen production is the membrane-bound formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex, which links formate oxidation to proton reduction and has evolutionary links to Complex I, the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase. Although the genetics, maturation, and some biochemistry of FHL are understood, the protein complex has never been isolated in an intact form to allow biochemical analysis. In this work, genetic tools are reported that allow the facile isolation of FHL in a single chromatographic step. The core complex is shown to comprise HycE (a [NiFe] hydrogenase component termed Hyd-3), FdhF (the molybdenum-dependent formate dehydrogenase-H), and three iron-sulfur proteins: HycB, HycF, and HycG. A proportion of this core complex remains associated with HycC and HycD, which are polytopic integral membrane proteins believed to anchor the core complex to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. As isolated, the FHL complex retains formate hydrogenlyase activity in vitro. Protein film electrochemistry experiments on Hyd-3 demonstrate that it has a unique ability among [NiFe] hydrogenases to catalyze production of H2 even at high partial pressures of H2. Understanding and harnessing the activity of the FHL complex is critical to advancing future biohydrogen research efforts. PMID:25157147

  6. Kepler Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler has vastly increased our knowledge of planets and planetary systems located close to stars. The new data shows surprising results for planetary abundances, planetary spacings and the distribution of planets on a mass-radius diagram. The implications of these results for theories of planet formation will be discussed.

  7. 500+ Writing Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Margaret E.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests a multitude of ideas for students to communicate their ideas in writing using the language of mathematics. Includes a sampling of 500+ writing formats, 67 abbreviated writing assignments, and three complete assignments along with a sample student response to each. Sample assignments include advice column, biographical sketch, commercial,…

  8. Formation in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennon, Fred; Jacobsen, Douglas; Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt; Thatamanil, John J.; Porterfield, Amanda; Moore, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    What is the relationship between the academic knowledge of the guild and the formation of students in the classroom? This Forum gathers four essays originally presented at a Special Topics Session at the 2009 conference of the American Academy of Religion (Atlanta, Georgia), with a brief introductory essay by Fred Glennon explaining the genesis of…

  9. Insights on galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, James Steven

    1999-12-01

    Recent advances in theoretical modeling coupled with a wealth of new observational data, provide a unique opportunity for gaining insight into process of galaxy formation. I present results which test and develop current theories. The analysis utilizes state of the art theoretical modeling and makes predictions aimed at comparisons with some of the latest and upcoming observational data sets. In part I, I discuss an analysis of the structure and properties of dark matter halos (believed to govern the dynamical evolution of galaxies). The results make use of very high-resolution N-body simulations, and are derived from a new hierarchical halo finder, designed especially for these projects and to complement advancements in simulation technology. I present information on the dark matter halo substructure, density profiles, angular momentum structure, and collision rates. In part II, I discuss some aspects of galaxy formation theory in light of new observational data. The discussion includes an investigation of the nature of high-redshift galaxies, the local velocity function of galaxies, and the use of gamma ray telescopes to probe the extra-galactic background light-the latter analysis is done in the context of semi-analytic modeling of galaxy formation. The most important conclusions of this thesis are as follows. (1)Dark matter halos at high redshift are much less concentrated than previously believed. implying that quiescently star-forming galaxies at high redshift are larger and dimmer than expected. (2)The observed bright. abundant. and highly clustered high- redshift (Lyman-break) galaxies are likely starbursts driven by collisions between relatively small galaxies at z ~ 3. And (3)there is a real possibility of using the growing advances in γ-ray astronomy to probe many poorly constrained processes of galaxy formation, including the stellar initial mass function and the star formation history of the universe.

  10. Pattern formation today

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Richardson, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Patterns are orders embedded in randomness. They may appear as spatial arrangements or temporal series, and the elements may appear identical or with variations. Patterns exist in the physical world as well as in living systems. In the biological world, patterns can range from simple to complex, forming the basic building blocks of life. The process which generates this ordering in the biological world was termed pattern formation. Since Wolpert promoted this concept four decades ago, scientists from molecular biology, developmental biology, stem cell biology, tissue engineering, theoretical modeling and other disciplines have made remarkable progress towards understanding its mechanisms. It is time to review and re-integrate our understanding. Here, we explore the origin of pattern formation, how the genetic code is translated into biological form, and how complex phenotypes are selected over evolutionary time. We present four topics: Principles, Evolution, Development, and Stem Cells and Regeneration. We have interviewed several leaders in the field to gain insight into how their research and the field of pattern formation have shaped each other. We have learned that both molecular process and physico-chemical principles are important for biological pattern formation. New understanding will emerge through integration of the analytical approach of molecular-genetic manipulation and the systemic approach of model simulation. We regret that we could not include every major investigator in the field, but hope that this Special Issue of the Int. J. Dev. Biol. represents a sample of our knowledge of pattern formation today, which will help to stimulate more research on this fundamental process. PMID:19557673

  11. Examination of Jan-Mayen and Elan microcontinents formation conditions based on analogue modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makushkina, Anna; Dubinin, Evgeniy; Grokholsky, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    There are many isolated blocks of continental crust within oceanic crust. In this study we will consider on the Elan Bank and the Jan Mayen ridge. Both these structures formed through complex history of rifts propagation. Elan Bank was formed by ridge jumping during the breakup of India and Antarctica in later Albian (117-118 Ma). Elan Bank was transferred from the Indian to the Antarctic plate via a ridge jump. The role of hot spot is unclear - probably it was the cause of ridge jumping. Thus Elan Bank is isolated block of continental crust, which was consequently accompanied by close eruption of LIP Kerguelen. Jan Mayen Ridge formed via ridge jumping into Greenlandian margin. Aegir Ridge between Europe and Greenland/Jan Mayen margins was active between chron C24 b (~55 Ma) to chron C7 (~24.7 Ma). Next step was the probable weakening of Greenlandian lithosphere by hot-spot and Kolbensei spreading ridge formation which is active since 23.5-22 Ma (chron C6) to nowadays. From others studies we know that Jan Mayen microcontinental block was rotating between anomalies C13 (33.5-33.0 Ma) and 5D (17.6-17.2 Ma). In laboratory of analogue modeling we held series of experiments dedicated to study of rifts propagation. Aim of our modeling was to study main parameters of microcontinents formation during rifting and initial spreading processes. In our model we suggest formation of these two microcontinents due to overlapping of counter rifts. Researching certain model parameters allow us to suggest that microcontinents formation happens when: (1) propagation of counter fissures is symmetrical and simultaneous; (2) initial rifts are shifted from each other on 1,5-3 cm; (3) heterogeneities in model plate (hard block parallel to extension) reduce the probability of microcontinent formation; (4) during the extension and accretion of new "oceanic" crust microcontinent undergoes rotation in horizontal and vertical planes. From our experiments we can preliminary conclude that

  12. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 7o S, 172o W (188o E) and shows a remarkable martian geologic deposit known as the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation, seen here as the raised plateau in the upper two-thirds of the image, is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region the deposit has been heavily eroded by the wind to produce a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These parallel ridges point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to sculpt the dry landscape of Mars. The Medusae Fossae Formation has been completely stripped from the surface in the lower third of the image, revealing a harder layer below that is more resistant to wind erosion. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Several ancient craters that were once completely buried by this deposit are being exposed, or exhumed, as the overlying Medusae Formation is removed. Very few impact craters are visible on this Formation, indicating that the surface seen today is relatively young, and that the processes of erosion are likely to be actively occurring. The Story Medusa of Greek mythology fame, the name-giver to this region, had snaky locks of hair that could turn a person to stone. Wild and unruly, this monster of the underworld could certainly wreak havoc on the world of the human imagination. As scary as she was, Medusa would have no advantage over the fierce, masterful winds blowing across Mars, which once carved the streaky, terrain at the top of this image. Wild and whipping, these winds have slowly eroded away the 'topsoil,' revealing ancient craters and other surface features they once covered. The loosely cemented particles of this 'topsoil' are likely made up of dust

  13. Format( )MEDIC( )Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, K.

    1994-09-01

    This document is a description of a computer program called Format( )MEDIC( )Input. The purpose of this program is to allow the user to quickly reformat wind velocity data in the Model Evaluation Database (MEDb) into a reasonable 'first cut' set of MEDIC input files (MEDIC.nml, StnLoc.Met, and Observ.Met). The user is cautioned that these resulting input files must be reviewed for correctness and completeness. This program will not format MEDb data into a Problem Station Library or Problem Metdata File. A description of how the program reformats the data is provided, along with a description of the required and optional user input and a description of the resulting output files. A description of the MEDb is not provided here but can be found in the RAS Division Model Evaluation Database Description document.

  14. Pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Czirok, Andras; Little, Charles D

    2012-06-01

    Vasculogenesis, the assembly of the first vascular network, is an intriguing developmental process that yields the first functional organ system of the embryo. In addition to being a fundamental part of embryonic development, vasculogenic processes also have medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how morphogenesis of tissue level structures can be controlled through cell behavior patterns that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes. Mathematical analyses and computer simulations can help conceptualize how to bridge organizational levels and thus help in evaluating hypotheses regarding the formation of vascular networks. Here, we discuss the ideas that have been proposed to explain the formation of the first vascular pattern: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. PMID:22692888

  15. Cosmological structure formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the current forefront problem of physical cosmology, the formation of structures (galaxies, clusters, great walls, etc.) in the universe is presented. Solutions require two key ingredients: (1) matter; and (2) seeds. Regarding the matter, it now seems clear that both baryonic and non-baryonic matter are required. Whether the non-baryonic matter is hot or cold depends on the choice of seeds. Regarding the seeds, both density fluctuations and topological defects are discussed. The combination of isotropy of the microwave background and the recent observations indicating more power on large scales have severly constrained, if not eliminated, Gaussian fluctuations with equal power on all scales, regardless of the eventual resolution of both the matter and seed questions. It is important to note that all current structure formation ideas require new physics beyond SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1).

  16. Emptiness Formation Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Nicholas; Ng, Stephen; Starr, Shannon

    2016-08-01

    We present rigorous upper and lower bounds on the emptiness formation probability for the ground state of a spin-1/2 Heisenberg XXZ quantum spin system. For a d-dimensional system we find a rate of decay of the order {exp(-c L^{d+1})} where L is the sidelength of the box in which we ask for the emptiness formation event to occur. In the {d=1} case this confirms previous predictions made in the integrable systems community, though our bounds do not achieve the precision predicted by Bethe ansatz calculations. On the other hand, our bounds in the case {d ≥ 2} are new. The main tools we use are reflection positivity and a rigorous path integral expansion, which is a variation on those previously introduced by Toth, Aizenman-Nachtergaele and Ueltschi.

  17. Formation of bacterial nanocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Mikhail; Kudryashova, Ekaterina; Suzina, Natalia; Ariskina, Elena; Voronkov, Vadim

    1998-07-01

    Existence of nanobacteria received increasing attention both in environmental microbiology/geomicro-biology and in medical microbiology. In order to study a production of nanoforms by typical bacterial cells. Effects of different physical factors were investigated. Treatment of bacterial cultures with microwave radiation, or culturing in field of electric current resulted in formation a few types of nanocells. The number and type of nanoforms were determined with type and dose of the treatment. The produced nanoforms were: i) globules, ii) clusters of the globules--probably produced by liaison, iii) nanocells coated with membrane. The viability of the globules is an object opened for doubts. The nanocells discovered multiplication and growth on solidified nutrient media. The authors suggest that formation of nanocells is a common response of bacteria to stress-actions produced by different agents.

  18. Prominence Formation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, B. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    Martens and Zwaan (ApJ v. 558 872) have proposed a prominence/ filament formation model in which differential rotation drives reconnection between two initially unconnected active regions to form helical field lines that support mass and are held down by overlying field. Using an MHD solver with adaptive refinement we simulated this process by imposing a shear flow meant to mimic differential rotation on two bipolar flux distributions meant to mimic distinct active regions. In some runs the flux systems are initially potential while in others they have been twisted by footpoint rotation to inject helicity prior to imposing the shear flow. The resulting structures are studied to understand the role of helicity in the formation of prominence-like structures.

  19. Format-Preserving Encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellare, Mihir; Ristenpart, Thomas; Rogaway, Phillip; Stegers, Till

    Format-preserving encryption (FPE) encrypts a plaintext of some specified format into a ciphertext of identical format—for example, encrypting a valid credit-card number into a valid credit-card number. The problem has been known for some time, but it has lacked a fully general and rigorous treatment. We provide one, starting off by formally defining FPE and security goals for it. We investigate the natural approach for achieving FPE on complex domains, the “rank-then-encipher” approach, and explore what it can and cannot do. We describe two flavors of unbalanced Feistel networks that can be used for achieving FPE, and we prove new security results for each. We revisit the cycle-walking approach for enciphering on a non-sparse subset of an encipherable domain, showing that the timing information that may be divulged by cycle walking is not a damaging thing to leak.

  20. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  1. Hail Formation in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Matthew

    Hail poses a substantial threat to life and property in the state of Florida. These losses could be minimized through better understanding of the relationships between atmospheric variables that impact hail formation in Florida. Improving hail forecasting in Florida requires analyzing a number of meteorological parameters and synoptic data related to hail formation. NOAA archive data was retrieved to create a database that was used to categorize text files of hail days. The text files were entered into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory website to create National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis maps of atmospheric variables for Florida hail days as well as days leading to the hail event. These data were then analyzed to determine the relationship between variables that affect hail formation, in general, across different regions and seasons in Florida using Statistical Product and Service Solutions. The reasoning for the differing factors affecting hail formation between regions, seasons and hail sizes were discussed, as well as forecasting suggestions relating to region and month in Florida. The study found that the majority of all hail that occurs in Florida is during the wet season. A low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water and lower than average Sea Level Pressure, in most cases, is present during hail days in Florida. Furthermore, results show that Vector Wind magnitude increases as hail size increases. Additionally, several atmospheric variables useful to studying hail events, such as Lifted Index, Precipitable Water, Sea Level Pressure, Vector Wind and Temperature have significant correlations with each other depending on the region and season being observed. Strong correlations between low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water values and the occurrence of hail events are discussed, as well as the relationship between temperature anomalies at various

  2. Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamine, Kentaro; Reddy, Naveen; Daddi, Emanuele; Sargent, Mark T.

    2016-07-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the current status of observational and computational studies on galaxy formation and evolution. In particular, a joint analysis of star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses, and metallicities of galaxies throughout cosmic time can shed light on the processes by which galaxies build up their stellar mass and enrich the environment with heavy elements. Comparison of such observations and the results of numerical simulations can give us insights on the physical importance of various feedback effects by supernovae and active galactic nuclei. In Sect. 1, we first discuss the primary methods used to deduce the SFRs, stellar masses, and (primarily) gas-phase metallicities in high-redshift galaxies. Then, we show how these quantities are related to each other and evolve with time. In Sect. 2, we further examine the distribution of SFRs in galaxies following the `Main Sequence' paradigm. We show how the so-called `starbursts' display higher specific SFRs and SF efficiencies by an order of magnitude. We use this to devise a simple description of the evolution of the star-forming galaxy population since z ˜3 that can successfully reproduce some of the observed statistics in the infrared (IR) wavelength. We also discuss the properties of molecular gas. In Sect. 3, we highlight some of the recent studies of high-redshift galaxy formation using cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We discuss the physical properties of simulated galaxies such as luminosity function and escape fraction of ionizing photons, which are important statistics for reionization of the Universe. In particular the escape fraction of ionizing photons has large uncertainties, and studying gamma-ray bursts (which is the main topic of this conference) can also set observational constraints on this uncertain physical parameter as well as cosmic star formation rate density.

  3. Mesospheric cloud formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Formation of mesospheric clouds as a result of deposition of large amounts of H2O by the heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) of the solar power satellite system is discussed. The conditions which must be met in order to form and maintain clouds near the mesopause are described. The frequency and magnitude of H2O injections from the HLLV rocket exhaust are considered.

  4. Formation of Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph; Bouwens, Rychard

    1999-07-01

    Bulges, often identified with the spheroidal component of a galaxy,have a complex pedigree. Massive bulges are generally red and old,but lower mass bulges have broader dispersions in color that may becorrelated with disk colors. This suggests different formationscenarios. I will review possible formation sequences for bulges,describe the various signatures that distinguish these scenarios, anddiscuss implications for the high redshift universe.

  5. Terrestrial planet formation

    PubMed Central

    Righter, K.; O’Brien, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (∼106 y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few × 106 y), and finally embryos to planets (107–108 y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  6. Tetrahedron Formation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Jose J.

    2003-01-01

    Spacecraft flying in tetrahedron formations are excellent instrument platforms for electromagnetic and plasma studies. A minimum of four spacecraft - to establish a volume - is required to study some of the key regions of a planetary magnetic field. The usefulness of the measurements recorded is strongly affected by the tetrahedron orbital evolution. This paper considers the preliminary development of a general optimization procedure for tetrahedron formation control. The maneuvers are assumed to be impulsive and a multi-stage optimization method is employed. The stages include targeting to a fixed tetrahedron orientation, rotating and translating the tetrahedron and/or varying the initial and final times. The number of impulsive maneuvers citn also be varied. As the impulse locations and times change, new arcs are computed using a differential corrections scheme that varies the impulse magnitudes and directions. The result is a continuous trajectory with velocity discontinuities. The velocity discontinuities are then used to formulate the cost function. Direct optimization techniques are employed. The procedure is applied to the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) to compute preliminary formation control fuel requirements.

  7. Mars brine formation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Bullock, Mark A.; Stoker, Carol R.

    1992-01-01

    Evaporites, particularly carbonates, nitrates, and sulfates, may be major sinks of volatiles scavenged from the martian atmosphere. Mars is thought to have once had a denser, warmer atmosphere that permitted the presence of liquid surface water. The conversion of atmospheric CO2 into carbonate is hypothesized to have degraded the martian climate to its present state of a generally subfreezing, desiccated desert. The rate for such a conversion under martian conditions is poorly known, so the time scale of climate degradation by this process cannot be easily evaluated. If some models are correct, carbonate formation may have been fast at geological time scales. The experiments of Booth and Kieffer also imply fast (10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7) yr) removal of the missing CO2 inventory, estimated to be 1 - 5 bar, by means of carbonate formation. The timing of formation of many of the fluvial features observed on Mars is, in large part, dependent on when and how fast the atmosphere changed. A knowledge of the rate at which carbonates and nitrates formed is also essential for assessing the probability that life, or its chemical precursors, could have developed on Mars. No previous experiments have quantitatively evaluated the rate of solution for a suite of mobile anions and cations from unaltered minerals and atmospheric gases into liquid water under Mars-like conditions. Such experiments are the focus of this task.

  8. Terrestrial planet formation.

    PubMed

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  9. Model of kimberlite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrovitsky, Sergey; Fiveyskaya, Lyudmila

    2013-04-01

    The critical goals in recognizing the nature of kimberlites are to find out: (1) the primary composition of melt of these rocks and (2) the principal processes of evolution of primary composition of kimberlites while ascending from mantle depth towards earth surface. Suppose, that the primary composition of kimberlite melt-fluid was in fact the composition of asthenosphere melt geochemically being close to alkaline-basalt (Hi-µ) saturated with high CO2. The genetic relation of kimberlites with basaltoids is indicated by a spatial and temporal affinity of their formation (Carlson et al, 2006; Lehmann et al, 2010; Tappe et al, 2012), similarity of the pattern of incompatible elements distribution, presence of megacryst minerals in alkaline basaltoids, Pyr-Alm garnet included, and finally, model calculation of parent melt composition for low-Cr megacryst minerals; it showed this composition to be typical for the alkaline basaltoid (Jones, 1980). At the asthenosphere level there was differentiation of basaltoid melt-fluid which was responsible for formation of its different parts with varying melt to fluid ratio and possibly varying content of alkalis (K2O). The outbreak of asthenosphere substance through lithosphere mantle proceeded by different scenarios: (a) With a noticeable dominance of fluid component kimberlites were formed by the capture and contamination of high-Mg, high-Cr rocks of lithosphere mantle that caused formation of high-Mg kimberlites. That corresponds to model of Russell (2012). (b) With a considerable proportion of melt phase depending on saturation in fluid there formed magnesium-ferriferous and ferriferous-titaniferous petrochemical types of kimberlites. There is no doubt that in formation of these kimberlite types the contamination of lithosphere material was the case, at the much lower level than in formation of high-Mg kimberlites. This model logically explains steady differences of petrochemistry of kimberlites making up clusters of

  10. Formation of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, G.; Coradini, A.

    2003-04-01

    In this presentation we address the problem of the formation of giant planets and their regular satellites. We study in particular the problem of formation of the Jupiter System comparing the results of the model with the present characteristics of the system, in order to identify what are those better represented by our approach. In fact here, using a 3-D hydro-dynamical code, we study the modalities of gas accretion onto a solid core, believed to be the seed from which Jupiter started. To do that we have modelled three main regions: the central planet, a turbulent accretion disk surrounding it and an extended region from which the gas is collected. In the extended region we treat the gas as a frictionless fluid. Our main goal is to identify what are the characteristics of the planet during its growth and the physical parameters affecting its growth at the expenses of the nebular gas present in the feeding zone. Moreover we want to understand what are the thermodynamical parameters characterizing the gas captured by the planet and swirling around it. Finally, we check if a disk can be formed in prograde rotation around the planet and if this disk can survive the final phases of the planet formation. Due to the interaction between the accreting planet and the disk it has been necessary to develop a complete model of the Jupiter’s structure. In fact the radiation emitted by the growing planet heats up the surrounding gas. In turn the planet’s thermodynamic structure depend on the mass accretion rate onto it. When the accretion is rapid, shock waves in the gas are formed close to the planet. This region cannot be safely treated by a numerical code; for this reason we have developed a semi-analytically model of a a turbulent accretion disk to be considered as transition between the planet and the surrounding disk.

  11. Liposome formation in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claassen, D. E.; Spooner, B. S.

    Liposomes are artificial vesicles with a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The formation of liposomes is a self-assembly process that is driven by the amphipathic nature of phospholipid molecules and can be observed during the removal of detergent from phospholipids dissolved in detergent micelles. As detergent concentration in the mixed micelles decreases, the non-polar tail regions of phospholipids produce a hydrophobic effect that drives the micelles to fuse and form planar bilayers in which phospholipids orient with tail regions to the center of the bilayer and polar head regions to the external surface. Remaining detergent molecules shield exposed edges of the bilayer sheet from the aqueous environment. Further removal of detergent leads to intramembrane folding and membrane vesiculation, forming liposomes. We have observed that the formation of liposomes is altered in microgravity. Liposomes that were formed at 1-g did not exceed 150 nm in diameter, whereas liposomes that were formed during spaceflight exhibited diameters up to 2000 nm. Using detergent-stabilized planar bilayers, we determined that the stage of liposome formation most influenced by gravity is membrane vesiculation. In addition, we found that small, equipment-induced fluid disturbances increased vesiculation and negated the size-enhancing effects of microgravity. However, these small disturbances had no effect on liposome size at 1-g, likely due to the presence of gravity-induced buoyancy-driven fluid flows (e.g., convection currents). Our results indicate that fluid disturbances, induced by gravity, influence the vesiculation of membranes and limit the diameter of forming liposomes.

  12. Multiple star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Adam L.

    2010-11-01

    In this thesis, I present a study of the formation and evolution of stars, particularly multiple stellar systems. Binary stars provide a key constraint on star formation because any successful model should reproduce the mass-dependent frequency, distribution of separations, and distribution of mass ratios. I have pursued a number of surveys for different ranges of parameter space, all yielding one overarching conclusion: binary formation is fundamentally tied to mass. Solar-mass stars have a high primordial binary frequency (50%--75%) and a wide range of separations (extending to >10,000 AU), but as the system mass decreases, the frequency and separation distribution also decrease. For brown dwarfs, binaries are rare (~10%--15%) and have separations of <5 AU. Inside of this outer separation cutoff, the separation distribution appears to be log-flat for solar-mass stars, and perhaps for lower-mass systems. Solar-mass binary systems appear to have a flat mass ratio distribution, but for primary masses <0.3 Msun, the distribution becomes increasingly biased toward similar-mass companions. My results also constrain the binary formation timescale and the postformation evolutionary processes that sculpt binary populations. The dynamical interaction timescale in sparse associations like Taurus and Upper Sco is far longer than their ages, which suggests that those populations are dynamically pristine. However, binary systems in denser clusters undergo significant dynamical processing that strips outer binary companions; the difference in wide binary properties between my sample and the field is explained by the composite origin of the field population. I also have placed the individual components of young binary systems on the HR diagram in order to infer their coevality. In Taurus, binary systems are significantly more coeval (Δτ~0.5 Myr) than the association as a whole (Δτ~3--5 Myr). Finally, my survey of young very-low-mass stars and brown dwarfs found no planetary

  13. Modeling river delta formation.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-10-23

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  14. Modeling river delta formation

    PubMed Central

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2007-01-01

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  15. Adiabatic Halo Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzani, A.; Turchetti, G.; Benedetti, C.; Rambaldi, S.; Servizi, G.

    2005-06-08

    In a high intensity circular accelerator the synchrotron dynamics introduces a slow modulation in the betatronic tune due to the space-charge tune depression. When the transverse motion is non-linear due to the presence of multipolar effects, resonance islands move in the phase space and change their amplitude. This effect introduces the trapping and detrapping phenomenon and a slow diffusion in the phase space. We apply the neo-adiabatic theory to describe this diffusion mechanism that can contribute to halo formation.

  16. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  17. Formats for Presenting Procedural Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaiwes, Arthur S.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty male college students performed a mock communication controller's task under three different instructional formats, short sentences, logical tree, and coding. It was concluded that format variations mainly influence the more difficult tasks. (Author/DE)

  18. Tooth formation - delayed or absent

    MedlinePlus

    Delayed or absent tooth formation; Teeth - delayed or absent formation ... The age at which the tooth comes in varies. Most infants get their first tooth between 6 and 9 months, but it may be earlier or later. ...

  19. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  20. The Planet Formation Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, S.; Buscher, D. F.; Monnier, J. D.; PFI Science, the; Technical Working Group

    2014-04-01

    Among the most fascinating and hotly-debated areas in contemporary astrophysics are the means by which planetary systems are assembled from the large rotating disks of gas and dust which attend a stellar birth. Although important work is being done both in theory and observation, a full understanding of the physics of planet formation can only be achieved by opening observational windows able to directly witness the process in action. The key requirement is then to probe planet-forming systems at the natural spatial scales over which material is being assembled. By definition, this is the so-called Hill Sphere which delineates the region of influence of a gravitating body within its surrounding environment. The Planet Formation Imager project has crystallized around this challenging goal: to deliver resolved images of Hill-Sphere-sized structures within candidate planet-hosting disks in the nearest star-forming regions. In this contribution we outline the primary science case of PFI and discuss how PFI could significantly advance our understanding of the architecture and potential habitability of planetary systems. We present radiation-hydrodynamics simulations from which we derive preliminary specifications that guide the design of the facility. Finally, we give an overview about the interferometric and non-interferometric technologies that we are investigating in order to meet the specifications.

  1. Fullerene formation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Mintmire, J.W.

    1996-04-05

    Why does the highly symmetric carbon cluster C{sub 60} form in such profusion under the right conditions? This question was first asked in 1985, when Kroto suggested that the predominance of the C{sub 60} carbon clusters observed in the molecular beam experiments could be explained by the truncated icosahedral (or soccer ball) form. The name given to this cluster, buckminsterfullerene, led to the use of the term fullerenes for the family of hollow-cage carbon clusters made up of even numbers of triply coordinated carbons arranged with 12 pentagonal rings and an almost arbitrary number of hexagonal rings. More than a decade later, we still lack a completely satisfying understanding of the fundamental chemistry that takes place during fullerene formation. Most current models for fullerene formation require a facile mechanism for ring rearrangement in the fullerene structure, but the simplest proposed mechanisms are believed to have unrealistically high activation barriers. In recent research calculations have suggested that atomic carbon in the reaction mixture could act as a catalyst and allow substantially lower activation barriers for fullerene annealing. This article discusses the background for this research and other adjunct research. 14 refs.

  2. Biofilm formation by haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Fröls, Sabrina; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2012-12-01

    A fluorescence-based live-cell adhesion assay was used to examine biofilm formation by 20 different haloarchaea, including species of Halobacterium, Haloferax and Halorubrum, as well as novel natural isolates from an Antarctic salt lake. Thirteen of the 20 tested strains significantly adhered (P-value  < 0.05) to a plastic surface. Examination of adherent cell layers on glass surfaces by differential interference contrast, fluorescence and confocal microscopy showed two types of biofilm structures. Carpet-like, multi-layered biofilms containing micro- and macrocolonies (up to 50 μm in height) were formed by strains of Halobacterium salinarum and the Antarctic isolate t-ADL strain DL24. The second type of biofilm, characterized by large aggregates of cells adhering to surfaces, was formed by Haloferax volcanii DSM 3757T and Halorubrum lacusprofundi DL28. Staining of the biofilms formed by the strongly adhesive haloarchaeal strains revealed the presence of extracellular polymers, such as eDNA and glycoconjugates, substances previously shown to stabilize bacterial biofilms. For Hbt. salinarum DSM 3754T and Hfx. volcanii DSM 3757T , cells adhered within 1 day of culture and remained viable for at least 2 months in mature biofilms. Adherent cells of Hbt. salinarum DSM 3754T showed several types of cellular appendages that could be involved in the initial attachment. Our results show that biofilm formation occurs in a surprisingly wide variety of haloarchaeal species. PMID:23057712

  3. STUDIES ON SHELL FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Norimitsu; Wilbur, Karl M.

    1961-01-01

    Details of crystal growth in the calcitostracum of Crassostrea virginica have been studied with the purpose of analyzing the formation of the overlapping rows of oriented tabular crystals characteristic of this part of the shell. Crystal elongation, orientation, and dendritic growth suggest the presence of strong concentration gradients in a thin layer of solution in which crystallization occurs. Formation of the overlapping rows can be explained by three processes observed in the shell: a two-dimensional tree-like dendritic growth in which one set of crystal branchings creeps over an adjacent set of branchings; three-dimensional dendritic growth; and growth by dislocation of crystal surfaces. Multilayers of crystals may thus be formed at one time. This is favored by infrequent secretion of a covering organic matrix which would inhibit crystal growth. The transitional zone covering the outer part of the calcitostracum and the inner part of the prismatic region is generally characterized by aggregates of small crystals with definite orientation. Growth in this zone appears to take place in a relatively homogeneous state of solution without strong concentration gradients. Thin membranes and bands of organic matrix were commonly observed in the transitional zone bordering the prismatic region. The membrane showed a very fine oriented network pattern. PMID:13783329

  4. Urbanization and Slum Formation

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Kai Hong

    2007-01-01

    The formation of slums need not be inevitable with rapid urbanization. Such an argument appears to be contradicted by evidence of large slum populations in a large number of developing countries and particularly in rapidly urbanizing regions like Asia. The evidence discussed suggests that city authorities faced with rapid urban development lack the capacity to cope with the diverse demands for infrastructural provision to meet economic and social needs. Not only are strategic planning and intervention major issues in agenda to manage rapid urbanization, but city governments are not effectively linking the economic development trajectory to implications for urban growth and, hence, housing needs. In the following discussion, a case study is presented in support of the argument that city governments have to first recognize and then act to establish the link that is crucial between economic development, urban growth, and housing. This is the agendum that has been largely neglected by city and national governments that have been narrowly focused on economic growth with the consequent proliferation of slum formation as a housing solution. PMID:17387618

  5. Modeling of microstructure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaz, M.; Gandin, C.A.; Jacot, A.; Charbon, C.

    1995-12-31

    As macroscopic models of solidification are now well advanced, the simulation of microstructure formation is becoming increasingly important. Tools based on Greens` functions (i.e., front-tracking) or diffuse interface methods (e.g., phase field) have been developed recently for the calculation of individual dendritic grains or of a few eutectic lamellae. Although very powerful and useful, such methods cannot be extended at present to the scale of a whole process mainly because of the very large computation time involved. At the intermediate mesoscopic scale of the grains, Monte Carlo (MC) or Cellular Automata (CA) methods can integrate nucleation and grain growth mechanisms in order to simulate the formation of grains during solidification. These latter methods have been coupled with Finite Element (FE) heat flow calculations in order to predict the grain structure at the scale of a whole process (computer metallography). The microstructural features which can be predicted using this coupled CA-FE model are: the morphology of the grains (columnar, equiaxed), the columnar-to-equiaxed transition, the selection of grains in the columnar zone, the crystallographic texture of the grains, the extension of grains in open regions of liquid, etc. Calculated parameters of the three-dimensional grain structure can also be related to the same entities obtained in metallographic cross sections (computer stereology).

  6. Method for measuring pollutant formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annen, Kurt (Inventor); Stickler, David B. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Diagnostic methods for determining an instantaneous rate of pollutant formation in a combustion system are based on measurement of chemiluminescence intensity generated simultaneously with the formation of the pollutant. The chemiluminescent signal is generated by an analog reaction which occurs in parallel with a key step in the formation of a specific pollutant of interest. The connection between the analog reaction and the pollution reaction is such that the chemiluminescent signal indicates the local, instantaneous formation rate of the pollutant of interest.

  7. PEX13 deficiency in mouse brain as a model of Zellweger syndrome: abnormal cerebellum formation, reactive gliosis and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Müller, C. Catharina; Nguyen, Tam H.; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Meshram, Mallika; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Cao, Siyu; Sharp, Peter; Fietz, Pamela B.; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline; Crane, Denis I.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Delayed cerebellar development is a hallmark of Zellweger syndrome (ZS), a severe neonatal neurodegenerative disorder. ZS is caused by mutations in PEX genes, such as PEX13, which encodes a protein required for import of proteins into the peroxisome. The molecular basis of ZS pathogenesis is not known. We have created a conditional mouse mutant with brain-restricted deficiency of PEX13 that exhibits cerebellar morphological defects. PEX13 brain mutants survive into the postnatal period, with the majority dying by 35 days, and with survival inversely related to litter size and weaning body weight. The impact on peroxisomal metabolism in the mutant brain is mixed: plasmalogen content is reduced, but very-long-chain fatty acids are normal. PEX13 brain mutants exhibit defects in reflex and motor development that correlate with impaired cerebellar fissure and cortical layer formation, granule cell migration and Purkinje cell layer development. Astrogliosis and microgliosis are prominent features of the mutant cerebellum. At the molecular level, cultured cerebellar neurons from E19 PEX13-null mice exhibit elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-2 (MnSOD), and show enhanced apoptosis together with mitochondrial dysfunction. PEX13 brain mutants show increased levels of MnSOD in cerebellum. Our findings suggest that PEX13 deficiency leads to mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, neuronal cell death and impairment of cerebellar development. Thus, PEX13-deficient mice provide a valuable animal model for investigating the molecular basis and treatment of ZS cerebellar pathology. PMID:20959636

  8. Dyke-path formation in relation to the eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and Bardarbunga-Holuhraun 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2015-04-01

    Dykes are extension fractures and form when the magmatic overpressure is high enough to rupture (break) the host rock. Their formation is entirely analogous to that of many joints and human-made hydraulic fractures, such as are used to increase permeability in reservoirs. When generating their paths, dykes use existing weaknesses (e.g., cooling joints) in the host rock. The maximum depth of large tension fractures below the surface of a rift zone, however, is mostly less than a few hundred metres. If the fractures extend to greater depths, they must change into closed normal faults which are generally not used as magma paths. There are thus no large tension fractures or wide-open faults at great depths ready to be filled with magma to form a dyke. While magma flow in dykes, as in other fluid-driven fractures, is at any point in various directions dyke segmentation may indicate the overall large-scale flow direction. Thus, dykes composed of large-spaced disconnected segments in lateral sections are primarily formed in vertical magma flow at segmentation depth whereas those composed of large-spaced disconnected segments in vertical sections are primarily formed in lateral magma flow. The far-field displacement and stress fields of segmented dykes are similar to those generated by single, continuous dykes of similar dimensions, particularly when the distances between the nearby tips of the segments become small in comparison with segment lengths. Most dykes become arrested and never supply magma to eruptions. Feeder-dykes normally reach the surface only along parts of their lengths (strike-dimensions). The volumetric flow or effusion rate of magma through a feeder-dyke or volcanic fissure depends on the aperture (opening) of the dyke or fissure in the 3rd power. All these theoretical and observational results are here applied to the dyke emplacements associated with the eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and Bardarbunga-Holuhraun 2014. The results make it possible to

  9. Formative Assessment: Simply, No Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos, Kathleen; Neuman, Susan B.

    2012-01-01

    Among the types of assessment the closest to daily reading instruction is formative assessment. In contrast to summative assessment, which occurs after instruction, formative assessment involves forming judgments frequently in the flow of instruction. Key features of formative assessment include identifying gaps between where students are and…

  10. LISA satellite formation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, J. J. C. M.; Visser, P. N. A. M.; Jennrich, O.

    The joint ESA-NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission consists of a triangular formation of three satellites aiming at detecting gravitational waves. In linear approximation the LISA satellites describe a circle around a reference point, maintaining a fixed position with respect to each other. The reference point, the center of the triangle, orbits the Sun in a circular orbit, trailing the Earth at twenty degrees. In reality the distance between the satellites will vary by about one to two percent and the angle between the arms of the antenna will vary by about 0.5° over the course of one year for the nominal LISA satellite configuration. For measurement accuracy it is desirable that the pointing offset of the telescopes be kept small. This makes it necessary to actuate the telescopes or to control the formation. It was assumed that the LISA satellites are equipped with six μN engines that would allow to keep the two cubical proof masses within each satellite in almost perfect free fall. It was found that control forces up to about 700 μN are required for maintaining the absolute triangular LISA formation, leading to unacceptable excursions of the proof masses from free fall. However, these forces compensate predominantly very low frequency variations of the arm lengths and angles of the triangle, which are then to be compensated by the telescope actuators. The variations are outside the aimed LISA measurement bandwidth (10 -4-0.1 Hz). In addition, the effect of thruster noise, orbit determination errors and orbit injection errors was examined. The effect of these error sources on the arm lengths and orientation angles between the LISA satellites was assessed both in open loop and in closed loop, where the closed loop was based on a proportional-derivative (PD) controller. It was found that orbit determination errors of the order of a few km in position and a few mm/s in velocity lead to negligible closed loop control forces. In addition, orbit

  11. Theories of galaxy formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.J.T.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of some theories of galaxy formation that are consistent with the hot big bang origin of the universe is reviewed. In the cosmic turbulence theory, an attempt is made to explain not only the characteristic masses and angular momenta of galaxies, but to describe in detail the spectrum of galaxy clustering problems with regard to the observed abundances of the light elements, a Kolmogorov spectrum of turbulence and the fireball are discussed. Attention is given to a primordial chaotic magnetic field, the comparison between baryon-symmetric cosmologies, the origin of galactic spin and theories starting from isothermal perturbations. Also considered are the dilemma of the initial conditions with respect to the era after 10 to the -4th s, and the pancake theory, in which the planar structures that arise provide a natural explanation for filamentary structures.

  12. Physics of amniote formation.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vincent; Murukutla, Ameya Vaishnavi; Chevalier, Nicolas R; Gallois, Benjamin; Capellazzi-Resta, Marina; Picquet, Pierre; Peaucelle, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    We present a detailed study of the formation of the amniotic sac in the avian embryo, and a comparison with the crocodile amniotic sac. We show that the amniotic sac forms at a circular line of stiffness contrast, separating rings of cell domains. Cells align at this boundary, and this in turn orients and concentrates the tension forces. The tissue fold which forms the amniotic sac is locked exactly along this line due to the colocalization of the stiffness contrast and of the tensile force. In addition, the tensile force plays a regenerative role when the amniotic sac is cut. The fold forming the ventral side of the embryo displays the same characteristics. This work shows that amniote embryogenesis consists of a cascade of buckling events taking place at the boundaries between regions of differing mechanical properties. Hence, amniote embryogenesis relies on a simple and robust biomechanical scheme used repeatedly, and selected ancestrally. PMID:27627351

  13. Pattern Formation in Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2011-04-01

    Pattern formation is ubiquitous in nature, from sand ripples formed by wind to the development of a complex biological organism with different organs and a central nervous system. In the realm of materials, patterns are formed invariably when matter is transformed between different solid, liquid or gaseous states far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Material failure is itself mediated by the propagation of cracks that form intricate patterns. Understanding how patterns form and evolve is key to design materials with desired properties and to optimize their performance and safety. This talk will discuss recent progress made to understand three distinct class of patterns including the highly branched snow-flake-like dendritic patterns formed during the solidification process, polycrystalline patterns shaped by grain boundaries, and crack patterns.

  14. Dislocation Formation in Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Akihiko; Onuki, Akira

    2006-05-01

    An interaction between dislocations and phase transitions is studied by a phase field model both in two and three dimensional systems. Our theory is a simple extension of the traditional linear elastic theory, and the elastic energy is a periodic function of local strains which is reflecting the periodicity of crystals. We find that the dislocations are spontaneously formed by quenching. Dislocations are formed from the interface of binary alloys, and slips are preferentially gliding into the soft metals. In three dimensional systems, formation of dislocations under applied strain is studied in two phase state. We find that the dislocation loops are created from the surface of hard metals. We also studied the phase separation above the coexisting temperature which is called as the Cottrell atmosphere. Clouds of metals cannot catch up with the motion of dislocations at highly strained state.

  15. Group Formation in Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demange, Gabrielle; Wooders, Myrna

    2005-01-01

    Broad and diverse ranges of activities are conducted within and by organized groups of individuals, including political, economic and social activities. These activities have recently become a subject of intense interest in economics and game theory. Some of the topics investigated in this collection are models of networks of power and privilege, trade networks, co-authorship networks, buyer-seller networks with differentiated products, and networks of medical innovation and the adaptation of new information. Other topics are social norms on punctuality, clubs and the provision of club goods and public goods, research and development and collusive alliances among corporations, and international alliances and trading agreements. While relatively recent, the literature on game theoretic studies of group formation in economics is already vast. This volume provides an introduction to this important literature on game-theoretic treatments of situations with networks, clubs, and coalitions, including some applications.

  16. Mechanism of GEMS formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R

    2004-03-10

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) were examined using 200 keV analytical transmission electron microscopy. The morphologies and crystallography of embedded relict grains reveal that GEMS are pseudomorphs formed by irradiation processing of crystals free-floating in space. Some GEMS retain a compositional and morphological ''memory'' of the crystal from which they formed. Pseudomorphism rules out condensation, annealing, flash heating, or shock melting as alternative mechanisms of GEMS formation. A significant and often dominant fraction of the atoms in GEMS were sputtered deposited from other grains. Therefore, a normal (solar) isotopic composition is not a reliable indicator of whether GEMS formed in the solar system or in presolar interstellar or circumstellar environments.

  17. Myxobacteria Fruiting Body Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi

    2006-03-01

    Myxobacteria are social bacteria that swarm and glide on surfaces, and feed cooperatively. When starved, tens of thousands of cells change their movement pattern from outward spreading to inward concentration; they form aggregates that become fruiting bodies, inside which cells differentiate into nonmotile, environmentally resistant spores. Traditionally, cell aggregation has been considered to imply chemotaxis, a long-range cell interaction mediated by diffusing chemicals. However, myxobacteria aggregation is the consequence of direct cell-contact interactions. I will review our recent efforts in modeling the fruiting body formation of Myxobacteria, using lattice gas cellular automata models that are based on local cell-cell contact signaling. These models have reproduced the individual phases in Myxobacteria development such as the rippling, streaming, early aggregation and the final sporulation; the models can be unified to simulate the whole developmental process of Myxobacteria.

  18. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Hajime; Ioka, Kunihito; Nozawa, Takaya E-mail: kunihito.ioka@kek.jp

    2014-07-01

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission.

  19. Glass formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. S.; Day, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of containerless glass-forming experiments conducted aboard the Space Shuttle in 1985, using a single-axis acoustic levitator furnace apparatus. An attempt was made to obtain quantitative evidence for the suppression of heterogeneous nucleation/crystallization in containerless melts under microgravity conditions, as well as to study melt homogenization in the absence of gravity-driven convection and assess the feasibility of laser fusion target glass microsphere preparation with a microgravity apparatus of the present type. A ternary calcia-gallia-silica glass thus obtained indicated a 2-3-fold increase in glass-formation tendency for this material composition in microgravity, by comparison with 1g.

  20. Recipes for planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael R.

    2009-11-01

    Anyone who has ever used baking soda instead of baking powder when trying to make a cake knows a simple truth: ingredients matter. The same is true for planet formation. Planets are made from the materials that coalesce in a rotating disk around young stars - essentially the "leftovers" from when the stars themselves formed through the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds of gas and dust. The planet-making disk should therefore initially have the same gas-to-dust ratio as the interstellar medium: about 100 to 1, by mass. Similarly, it seems logical that the elemental composition of the disk should match that of the star, reflecting the initial conditions at that particular spot in the galaxy.

  1. Streamer formation in sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHarg, M. G.; Kammae, T.; Nielsen, H. C.

    2005-12-01

    Models of sprite formation for positive cloud-to-ground lightning strokes predict both downward (positive), and upward (negative) propagating streamers. Previous high speed camera observations of sprites are generally consistent with these predictions, but have been unable to resolve the temporal formation of the streamers due to frame rates limited to a few thousand frames per second. We report observations made during the evening of 9 July 2005 at 10,000 frames per second, with the image intensifier gated to 50 microseconds per frame. These observations often show the streamer head to be a bead-like structure propagating downward at approximately 7x106 m/s for 1,500 microseconds. The bead is followed by a dark region, and the main emissions from the sprite column are delayed ~800 microseconds after the passage of the streamer head. There are also "beads" which clearly propagate upward. Some events appear to be very similar to laboratory images of time resolved streamer zones. We interpret these observations in terms of positive/negative streamers. We see evidence for branching of the streamer tips in several cases, as well as evidence of upward propagating streamers transitioning into a more diffuse emission. Previous work (Pasko and Stenbaek-Nielsen, GRL 29(10), 2002) indicates this transition region has a lower border at an altitude when the dielectric relaxation time scale equals the time scale for an individual electron to develop into a streamer, and an upper border when the dielectric relaxation time scale roughly equals the dissociative attachment time scale. The present observations appear to be broadly consistent with this interpretation.

  2. Hazards to Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, J.

    2001-05-01

    The Orion Nebula provides a remarkable window on the first few million years in the lives of typical young stars and planetary systems. HST has demonstrated that most young stars in the Nebula are surrounded by circumstellar disks (the so-called `proplyds'). While these observations show that planet forming environments may be common, they also demonstrate that Orion's disks are being destroyed by intense UV radiation fields. `Gravel' sufficiently large to resist photo-erosion (meter scale solids or ices) may lock-up sufficient material to eventually build rocky planets. Indeed, there is evidence for large solids in some proplyds. But, the hydrogen and helium needed for the formation of giant planets will be removed. To form in Orion-like environments, giant planets must be assembled promptly prior to UV exposure. Even rocky planets may not form if the photoionized disk corona causes surviving large particles in the disk to spiral into the central star. Thus, nearby massive stars pose severe hazards to planet formation. Star counts indicate that most stars form in Orion-like environments. Only about 10% of young stars are born in shielded environments such as the Taurus or L1641 clouds where disks may escape photo-erosion. In dark clouds, the majority of stars (> 80%) form in non-hierarchal multiple star systems where close encounters with sibling stars can destroy disks and eject young planets. Thus, most stars may never develop planetary systems. These considerations indicate that extra-Solar planets may be rare, contrary to the popular view. These conclusions are consistent with the recent discoveries of extra-Solar planets around a few percent of single stars.

  3. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 16 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 11o N, 159o W (201o E) and shows examples of the remarkable variations that can be seen in the erosion of the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region, like many others throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, the surface has been eroded by the wind into a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These ridges generally point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to erode the landscape of Mars. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Within this single image it is possible to see differing amounts of erosion and stripping of layers in the Medusae Fossae Formation. Near the bottom (southern) edge of the image a rock layer with a relatively smooth upper surface covers much of the image. Moving upwards (north) in the image this layer becomes more and more eroded. At first there are isolated regions where the smooth unit has been eroded to produce sets of parallel ridges and knobs. Further north these linear knobs increase in number, and only small, isolated patches of the smooth upper surface remain. Finally, at the top of the image, even the ridges have been removed, exposing the remarkably smooth top of hard, resistant layer below. This sequence of layers with differing hardness and resistance to erosion is common on Earth and on Mars, and suggests significant variations in the physical properties, composition, particle size, and/or cementation of these martian layers. As is common throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, very few impact craters are visible, indicating that the surface exposed is relatively young, and that the process of erosion may be active today

  4. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 16 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 11o N, 159o W (201o E) and shows examples of the remarkable variations that can be seen in the erosion of the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region, like many others throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, the surface has been eroded by the wind into a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These ridges generally point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to erode the landscape of Mars. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Within this single image it is possible to see differing amounts of erosion and stripping of layers in the Medusae Fossae Formation. Near the bottom (southern) edge of the image a rock layer with a relatively smooth upper surface covers much of the image. Moving upwards (north) in the image this layer becomes more and more eroded. At first there are isolated regions where the smooth unit has been eroded to produce sets of parallel ridges and knobs. Further north these linear knobs increase in number, and only small, isolated patches of the smooth upper surface remain. Finally, at the top of the image, even the ridges have been removed, exposing the remarkably smooth top of hard, resistant layer below. This sequence of layers with differing hardness and resistance to erosion is common on Earth and on Mars, and suggests significant variations in the physical properties, composition, particle size, and/or cementation of these martian layers. As is common throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, very few impact craters are visible, indicating that the surface exposed is relatively young, and that the process of erosion may be active today

  5. Gas formation. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane.

    PubMed

    Stolper, D A; Lawson, M; Davis, C L; Ferreira, A A; Santos Neto, E V; Ellis, G S; Lewan, M D; Martini, A M; Tang, Y; Schoell, M; Sessions, A L; Eiler, J M

    2014-06-27

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a "clumped isotope" technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models. PMID:24970083

  6. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive experimental program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms leading to bubble generation during fluid handling procedures in a microgravity environment. Several key fluid handling procedures typical for PCG experiments were identified for analysis in that program. Experiments were designed to specifically understand how such procedures can lead to bubble formation. The experiments were then conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which is capable of simulating a low gravity environment by executing a parabolic flight attitude. However, such a flight attitude can only provide a low gravity environment of approximately 10-2go for a maximum period of 30 seconds. Thus all of the tests conducted for these experiments were designed to last no longer than 20 seconds. Several experiments were designed to simulate some of the more relevant fluid handling procedures during protein crystal growth experiments. These include submerged liquid jet cavitation, filling of a cubical vessel, submerged surface scratch, attached drop growth, liquid jet impingement, and geysering experiments. To date, four separate KC-135 flight campaigns were undertaken specifically for performing these experiments. However, different experiments were performed on different flights.

  7. Nuclear ``pasta'' formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Hughto, J.; Berry, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of complex nonuniform phases of nuclear matter, known as nuclear pasta, is studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations containing 51200 nucleons. A phenomenological nuclear interaction is used that reproduces the saturation binding energy and density of nuclear matter. Systems are prepared at an initial density of 0.10fm-3 and then the density is decreased by expanding the simulation volume at different rates to densities of 0.01fm-3 or less. An originally uniform system of nuclear matter is observed to form spherical bubbles (“swiss cheese”), hollow tubes, flat plates (“lasagna”), thin rods (“spaghetti”) and, finally, nearly spherical nuclei with decreasing density. We explicitly observe nucleation mechanisms, with decreasing density, for these different pasta phase transitions. Topological quantities known as Minkowski functionals are obtained to characterize the pasta shapes. Different pasta shapes are observed depending on the expansion rate. This indicates nonequilibrium effects. We use this to determine the best ways to obtain lower energy states of the pasta system from MD simulations and to place constraints on the equilibration time of the system.

  8. Acromioclavicular joint cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Andrew D; Miller, Joshua D; Zeller, John L

    2010-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an uncommon and unusual sequela associated with shoulder pathophysiology. The majority of literature on ACJ cysts consists of individual case reports with no definitive literature review currently available. In addition to a comprehensive literature review, four clinical cases are presented in this report. First described by Craig (1984), a total of 41 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Of these cases, five occurred with the rotator cuff musculature intact. The remaining 36 cases of ACJ cysts occurred in patients with a complete tear/avulsion of the rotator cuff. Previous attempts at compiling a complete record of all reported cases have combined several distinct conditions into a single category. This article presents two distinct etiologies for the pathogenesis of ACJ cyst formation. In the presence of an intact rotator cuff, a Type 1 cyst can form superficially and be limited to the ACJ. Following a massive or traumatic tear of the rotator cuff, mechanical instability of the humeral head can cause a deterioration of the inferior acromioclavicular capsule (cuff tear arthropathy) and an overproduction of synovial fluid. Overtime, a "geyser" of fluid can form between the glenohumeral and the ACJ, forming a Type 2 cyst. This differentiation and categorization is essential for appropriate classification and treatment. PMID:20069645

  9. Studies on Shell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Norimitsu; Sharp, D. Gordon; Wilbur, Karl M.

    1958-01-01

    Electron microscope observations have been made by means of the replica method on growth processes of calcite crystals of the nacreous layer of the shell of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Layer formation is initiated by the secretion of a conchiolin matrix and the deposition of rounded crystal seeds on or in this material. In some areas crystal seeds are elongate and within a given area show a similar orientation, probably due to slower deposition. The seeds appear to increase in size by dendritic growth, and smaller seeds become incorporated into larger ones which come into contact to form a single layer. With further growth, crystals overlap, forming a step-like arrangement. The direction of growth is frequently different in neighboring regions. Crystal seeds deposited on crystal surfaces are usually elongate and oriented. Well developed crystals have a tabular idiomorphic form and are parallel in their growth. Rounded and irregular crystals were also observed. The crystals show reticular structure with units of the order of 100 A and striations corresponding with the rhombohedral axes of the crystals. The role of the mantle is discussed in relation to the growth patterns of crystals and shell structure. PMID:13549499

  10. Beach-cusp formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Field experiments on beach-cusp formation were undertaken to document how the cuspate form develops and to test the edge-wave hypothesis on the uniform spacing of cusps. These involved observations of cusps forming from an initially plane foreshore. The cuspate form was observed to be a product of swash modification of an intertidal beach ridge as follows. A ridge, cut by a series of channels quasi-equally spaced along its length, was deposited onto the lower foreshore. The ridge migrated shoreward with flood tide, while the longshore positions of the channels remained fixed. On ebb tide, changes in swash circulation over the ridge allowed the upwash to flow shoreward through the channels and the channel mouths were eroded progressively wider until adjacent mouths met, effecting a cuspate shape. Measured spacings of cusps, ranging in size from less than 1 m to more than 12 m, agree well with computed spacings due to either zero-mode subharmonic or zero-mode synchronous edge waves. Edge-wave-induced longshore variations in run up will cause water ponded behind a ridge to converge at points of low swash and flow seaward as relatively narrow currents eroding channels spaced at one edge-wave wavelength for synchronous edge waves or one half wavelength for subharmonic edge waves. The channels are subsequently modified into cusp troughs as described above.

  11. Large Format Radiographic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. Rohrer; Lacey Stewart; M. D. Wilke; N. S. King; S. A Baker; Wilfred Lewis

    1999-08-01

    Radiographic imaging continues to be a key diagnostic in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiographic recording systems have taken on many form, from high repetition-rate, gated systems to film recording and storage phosphors. Some systems are designed for synchronization to an accelerator while others may be single shot or may record a frame sequence in a dynamic radiography experiment. While film recording remains a reliable standby in the radiographic community, there is growing interest in investigating electronic recording for many applications. The advantages of real time access to remote data acquisition are highly attractive. Cooled CCD camera systems are capable of providing greater sensitivity with improved signal-to-noise ratio. This paper begins with a review of performance characteristics of the Bechtel Nevada large format imaging system, a gated system capable of viewing scintillators up to 300 mm in diameter. We then examine configuration alternatives in lens coupled and fiber optically coupled electro-optical recording systems. Areas of investigation include tradeoffs between fiber optic and lens coupling, methods of image magnification, and spectral matching from scintillator to CCD camera. Key performance features discussed include field of view, resolution, sensitivity, dynamic range, and system noise characteristics.

  12. The formation of dew

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beysens, D.

    Dew is the condensation into liquid droplets of water vapor on a substrate. The presence of a substrate is the origin of the peculiarities and richness of the phenomenon. We review the aspects related to heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth of water droplets. A key point is the drop interaction through drop fusion or coalescence, which leads to scaling in the growth and gives universality to the process. The effects of substrate heterogeneity and gravity effects are also considered. Coalescence events lead to temporal and spatio-temporal fluctuations in the substrate coverage, drop configuration, etc., which give rise to a very peculiar dynamics. When the substrate is a liquid or a liquid crystal, the drop pattern can exhibit special spatial orders, such as crystalline, hexatic phases and fractal contours. And condensation on a solid substrate near its melting point can make the drop jump. The applications of monitoring dew formation are manyfold. Examples can be found in nanoelectronics and optics (vapor deposition and thin films), medicine (sterilization process), agriculture (green houses). We here discuss in greater details the production of clean water by "atmospheric wells".

  13. Gaining Insight into Star Formation: Resolved Star Formation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebst, Kelley; Scowen, Paul A.

    2014-06-01

    Until recently astronomers have used star formation laws to measure the star formation rate and star formation efficiency of galaxies only on global scales because of the poor resolution of available data. What I am now capable of producing is a spatially resolved star formation law that can provide direct insight into the physical processes that govern star formation and assess the short-term nature of bursts of star formation and the longer-term nature of larger-scale events that can dictate the global distribution of stars and the ultimate fate of a galaxy as a whole. I am using exquisite narrowband optical data from a variety of sources, including the Hubble Space Telescope, and Kitt Peak National Observatory, etc., in conjunction with infrared data from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey and the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey, neutral gas data from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, and molecular gas data from the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association Survey of Nearby Galaxies, to provide star formation rates and star formation efficiencies on previously inaccessible small spatial scales across a suite of galaxies that represent a range of star formation environments and scales. My sample includes 18 spiral galaxies ranging from 2.1 to 15.1 Mpc in distance and offers a large range of morphological types (i.e. a large range of star formation environments). I am using these data to test different models of star formation modes under a variety of physical conditions and relate the variations I observe to the known local physical conditions and the associated star formation histories for each locale within each galaxy.This is the heart of the matter - that the nature and evolution of the local physical environment intimately influences how stars can form, how quickly and how massive those stars are allowed to form, and as a result how they shape the local conditions for subsequent star formation. It is this tracking of the stellar ecology that is vital for

  14. Formation of Bidisperse Particle Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, Jenn Wei; Zhao, Bing; Law, Adrian W. K.; Adams, E. Eric

    2014-11-01

    When a group of dense particles is released instantaneously into water, their motion has been conceptualized as a circulating particle thermal (Ruggerber 2000). However, Wen and Nacamuli (1996) observed the formation of particle clumps characterized by a narrow, fast moving core shedding particles into wakes. They observed the clump formation even for particles in the non-cohesive range as long as the source Rayleigh number was large (Ra > 1E3) or equivalently the source cloud number (Nc) was small (Nc < 3.2E2). This physical phenomenon has been investigated by Zhao et al. (2014) through physical experiments. They proposed the theoretical support for Nc dependence and categorized the formation processes into cloud formation, transitional regime and clump formation. Previous works focused mainly on the behavior of monodisperse particles. The present study further extends the experimental investigation to the formation process of bidisperse particles. Experiments are conducted in a glass tank with a water depth of 90 cm. Finite amounts of sediments with various weight proportions between coarser and finer particles are released from a cylindrical tube. The Nc being tested ranges from 6E-3 to 9.9E-2, which covers all the three formation regimes. The experimental results showed that the introduction of coarse particles promotes cloud formation and reduce the losses of finer particles into the wake. More quantitative descriptions of the effects of source conditions on the formation processes will be presented during the conference.

  15. Plasmapause formation at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Jia, X.; Jackman, C. M.; Hospodarsky, G.; Coates, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    Cassini observations during a rapid, high-latitude, dawnside pass from Saturn's lobe to inner magnetosphere on 25 June 2009 provide strong evidence for the formation of a "plasmapause" at Saturn by Vasyliunas-type nightside reconnection of previously mass-loaded flux tubes. A population of hot, tenuous plasma that lies between the lobe and the dense inner magnetospheric plasma is consistent with a region formed by very recent injection from a reconnection region in the tail, including low density, high temperature, supercorotational flow, a significant O+ content, and the near-simultaneous observation of enhanced Saturn kilometric radiation emissions. The sharp boundary between that region and the cool dense inner magnetospheric plasma thus separates flux tubes that were involved in the reconnection from those that successfully traversed the nightside without mass loss. This event demonstrates that tail reconnection can strip off inner magnetospheric plasma in to at least dipole L = 8.6. Clear evidence of flux tube interchange driven by the sharp boundary is found, both inward moving flux tubes of hotter plasma and, for the first time, the outward moving cool population. The outward moving cool regions have azimuthal sizes less than 1 RS, were probably created within the past 1.2 h, and have outflow speeds greater than about 5 km/s. At the outer edge of the reconnected region, there is also a possible signature of Dungey-type lobe reconnection following the initial Vasyliunas-type reconnection. Observations from this event are entirely consistent with previously described global MHD simulations of tail reconnection, plasmoid departure, and Saturnward injection of reconnected flux.

  16. The Tuscaloosa Formation revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hansley, P.L.

    1996-09-01

    A petrologic study of the Upper Cretaceous lower Tuscaloosa Formation in the Gulf Coast from depths of 2,700 to 6,000 in indicates that anomalously high porosity (>20 percent) in deep gas and condensate-bearing sandstones (5,000 to 6,000 m) is approximately evenly divided between primary and secondary porosity. Primary porosity was preserved by early, iron-rich grain-rimming chlorite and quartz overgrowths. Most secondary porosity resulted from dissolution of carbonate cements. Moldic pores outlined by chlorite were created by dissolution of unstable feldspars and rock fragments. Interparticle clay microporosity is significant in sandstones containing authigenic kaolinite and (or) chlorite. Pores were filled in the deepest sandstones by quartz overgrowths and a late magnesium-rich chlorite that is commonly obscured by fibrous illite. Voids were created in the early Tertiary(?) by acidic meteoric waters and during deep burial by brines carrying organic and inorganic acids that were released during hydrocarbon maturation in neighboring shales. Oil fills dissolution voids in ankerite cement and albitized plagioclase and coats most authigenic minerals. Two-phase primary fluid inclusions in quartz overgrowths which also contain oil-bearing inclusions have homogenization temperatures between 125{degrees}C and 134{degrees}C. These temperatures combined with a burial history reconstruction indicate that hydrocarbons migrated into Tuscaloosa sandstones during the Miocene. Overpressuring began in the middle Tertiary along with gas generation in the Tuscaloosa. These events coincided with the end of deep meteoric flow through the Gulf section and the beginning of a compactional hydrologic regime. Precipitation of quartz overgrowths and hydrocarbons at this time locally created effective pressure seals.

  17. Planet formation and searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Ryan Michael

    2009-08-01

    This thesis explores the possibilities for discovery of terrestrial-mass planets in the habitable zones of their host stars. Towards this aim, we present the results of three projects and discuss another two preliminary studies of further explorations. In so doing, we explore a fairly comprehensive range of possibilities regarding the formation and detection of terrestrial- mass planets in the habitable zone. We first study the potential for terrestrial planets to form in situ in and around the habitable zones of M-dwarf stars. We proceed to explore the feasibility of searches for these planets using the transit method via Monte- Carlo simulations. We find that M-dwarfs pose an interesting challenge for study: being inherently dim, widely spread on the sky, and photometrically variable. We present results of simulated ground-based transit search campaigns as well as simulated searches from a modest satellite mission. Our second project is a straightforward extension of the previous study: a collaborative effort to search for transit signals around the nearest M-dwarf: Proxima Centauri. We describe our observations as well as the Monte-Carlo analysis used to place constraints on the possible planetary radii and periods. Our third project is a search for transiting extra-solar Jovian planets using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. We search through the private Keck radial- velocity datasets for undiscovered Rossiter-McLaughlin signals. We present our results in the form of both strong null-result datasets as well as potential transiting systems. We then briefly analyze these larger Jovian planets for potential to harbor potentially habitable terrestrial satellites. Our final preliminary analysis looks into the potential for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope to detect transiting Neptune-mass planets orbiting M-dwarfs which could then lead to terrestrial-mass planet detections. The sum of these efforts is a comprehensive investigation into the likelihood and

  18. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An exotic terrain of wind-eroded ridges and residual smooth surfaces are seen in one of the highest resolution images ever taken of Mars from orbit. The Medusae Fossae formation is believed to be formed of the fragmental ejecta of huge explosive volcanic eruptions. When subjected to intense wind-blasting over hundreds of millions of years, this material erodes easily once the uppermost tougher crust is breached. In the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shown on the right, the crust, or cap rock, can be seen in the upper right part of the picture. The finely-spaced ridges are similar to features on Earth called yardangs, which are formed by intense winds plucking individual grains from, and by wind-driven sand blasting particles off, sedimentary deposits.

    The MOC image was taken on October 30, 1997 at 11:05 AM PST, shortly after the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft's 31st closest approach to Mars. The image covers an area 3.6 X 21.5 km (2.2 X 13.4 miles) at 3.6 m (12 feet) per picture element--craters only 11 m (36 feet, about the size of a swimming pool) across can be seen. The context image (left; the best Viking view of the area; VO 1 387S34) has a resolution of 240 m/pixel, or 67 times lower resolution than the MOC frame.

    Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  19. Formative Assessment Probes: Is It a Rock? Continuous Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2013-01-01

    A lesson plan is provided for a formative assessment probe entitled "Is It a Rock?" This probe is designed for teaching elementary school students about rocks through the use of a formative assessment classroom technique (FACT) known as the group Frayer Model. FACT activates students' thinking about a concept and can be used to…

  20. Lichen-rock interaction in volcanic environments: evidences of soil-precursor formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vingiani, S.; Adamo, P.; Terribile, F.

    2012-04-01

    The weathering action of the lichens Lecidea fuscoatra (L.) Ach. and Stereocaulon vesuvianum Pers. on basaltic rock collected on the slopes of Mt. Etna (Sicily) at 1550 m a.s.l. has been studied using optical (OM) and electron (SEM) microscopy equipped with microanalytical device (EDS). Biological factors associated with lichen growth play a major role in the weathering of minerals on bare rocks and contribute to the preliminary phases of soil formation. The present work investigates the biogeophysical and biogeochemical weathering associated to the growth of epilithic lichens on lava flows from Mt. Etna (Sicily) and Mt. Vesuvius (Campania). The chosen lichen species were the crustose Lecidea fuscoatra (L.) Ach., the foliose Xanthoparmelia conspersa and the fructicose Stereocaulon vesuvianum Pers. An integrated approach based on the study of both disturbed and undisturbed samples of lichenized rock was applied in order to appreciate the complexity of the rock-lichen interface environment in terms of micromorphological, mineralogical and chemical properties. XRD and XRF analyses coupled to microscopical (OM), submicroscopical (SEM) and microanalitical (EDS) observations were the used techniques. In both study environments, the chemical, mineralogical and micromorphological properties of the uncoherent materials found at the lichen-rock interface suggest they consist of rock fragments eroded from the surroundings and accumulated in cavities and fissures of the rough lava flows. According to the thallus morphology, the lichens colonizing the lava preserve the interface materials from further aeolic and water erosion, provide these materials of organic matter and moisture, entrap allochtonous quartz and clay minerals. The calcium oxalate production by L. fuscoatra and X. conspersa, the Al enrichment around S. vesuvianum hyphae and the occurrence of Fe-oxide phases at the rock-lichen interface are evidences of lichens interaction with the underlying sediments. Indeed

  1. The Formation of Galactic Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carollo, C. Marcella; Ferguson, Henry C.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2000-03-01

    Part I. Introduction: What are galactic bulges?; Part II. The Epoch of Bulge Formation: Origin of bulges; Deep sub-mm surveys: High-z ULIRGs and the formation of spheroids; Ages and metallicities for stars in the galactic bulge; Integrated stellar populations of bulges: First results; HST-NICMOS observations of galactic bulges: Ages and dust; Inside-out bulge formation and the origin of the Hubble sequence; Part III. The Timescales of Bulge Formation: Constraints on the bulge formation timescale from stellar populations; Bulge building with mergers and winds; Role of winds, starbursts, and activity in bulge formation; Dynamical timescales of bulge formation; Part IV. Physical Processes in Bulge Formation: the role of bars for secular bulge formation; Bars and boxy/peanut-shaped bulges: an observational point of view; Boxy- and peanut-shaped bulges; A new class of bulges; The role of secondary bars in bulge formation; Radial transport of molecular gas to the nuclei of spiral galaxies; Dynamical evolution of bulge shapes; Two-component stellar systems: Phase-space constraints; Central NGC 2146 - a firehose-type bending instability?; Bulge formation: the role of the multi-phase ISM; Global evolution of a self-gravitating multi-phase ISM in the central kpc region of galaxies; Part V. Bulge Phenomenology: Bulge-disk decomposition of spiral galaxies in the near-infrared; The triaxial bulge of NGC 1371; The bulge-disk orthogonal decoupling in galaxies: NGC 4698 and NGC 4672; The kinematics and the origin of the ionized gas in NGC 4036; Optically thin thermal plasma in the galactic bulge; X-ray properties of bulges; The host galaxies of radio-loud AGN; The centers of radio-loud early-type galaxies with HST; Central UV spikes in two galactic spheroids; Conference summary: where do we stand?

  2. The formation of Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfli, G. M.; Hochard, C.; Vérard, C.; Wilhem, C.; vonRaumer, J.

    2013-05-01

    The making of Pangea is the result of large-scale amalgamation of continents and micro-continents, which started at the end of the Neoproterozoic with the formation of Gondwana. As pieces were added to Gondwana on its South-American, Antarctica and Australia side, ribbon-like micro-continents were detached from its African and South-Chinese side: Cadomia in the late Neoproterozoic, Avalonia and Hunia in the Ordovician, Galatia in the Devonian and Cimmeria in the Permian. Cadomia was re-accreted to Gondwana, but the other ribbon-continents were accreted to Baltica, North-China, Laurussia or Laurasia. Finding the origin of these numerous terranes is a major geological challenge. Recently, a global plate tectonic model was developed together with a large geological/geodynamic database, at the Lausanne University, covering the last 600 Ma of the Earth's history. Special attention was given to the placing of Gondwana derived terranes in their original position, using all possible constraints. We propose here a solution for the Variscan terranes, another paper deals with the Altaids. The Galatian super-terrane was detached from Gondwana in the Devonian, during the opening of Paleotethys, and was quickly separated into four sub-terranes that started to by-pass each other. The leading terranes collided at the end of the Devonian with the Hanseatic terrane detached from Laurussia. In the Carboniferous, Gondwana started to impinge onto the amalgamated terranes, creating the Variscan chain and the Pangean super-continent. East of Spain Paleotethys remained opened until the Triassic, subducting northward under Laurasia. Roll-back of the Paleotethyan slab triggered the collapse of most of the European Variscan orogen, which was replaced by series of Permian rifts, some of them becoming oceanized back-arc basins during the Triassic. Major force changes at the Pangean plate limits at the end of the Triassic provoked its break-up, through the opening of the proto

  3. Formation Algorithms and Simulation Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wette, Matthew; Sohl, Garett; Scharf, Daniel; Benowitz, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Formation flying for spacecraft is a rapidly developing field that will enable a new era of space science. For one of its missions, the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) project has selected a formation flying interferometer design to detect earth-like planets orbiting distant stars. In order to advance technology needed for the TPF formation flying interferometer, the TPF project has been developing a distributed real-time testbed to demonstrate end-to-end operation of formation flying with TPF-like functionality and precision. This is the Formation Algorithms and Simulation Testbed (FAST) . This FAST was conceived to bring out issues in timing, data fusion, inter-spacecraft communication, inter-spacecraft sensing and system-wide formation robustness. In this paper we describe the FAST and show results from a two-spacecraft formation scenario. The two-spacecraft simulation is the first time that precision end-to-end formation flying operation has been demonstrated in a distributed real-time simulation environment.

  4. Formative Assessment: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Randy Elliot

    2011-01-01

    This paper covers six interrelated issues in formative assessment (aka, "assessment for learning"). The issues concern the definition of formative assessment, the claims commonly made for its effectiveness, the limited attention given to domain considerations in its conceptualisation, the under-representation of measurement principles in that…

  5. New Frontiers in Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noyce, Pendred E., Ed.; Hickey, Daniel T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Formative assessment is a powerful learning tool that is too seldom, too haphazardly, and too ineffectively used in the United States," Pendred E. Noyce writes in the introduction to this volume. "The purpose of this book is to delve into why this is so and how it can be changed." Formative assessment involves constantly monitoring student…

  6. The Principal as Formative Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nidus, Gabrielle; Sadder, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Formative coaching, an approach that uses student work as the foundation for mentoring and professional development, can help principals become more effective instructional leaders. In formative coaching, teaches and coaches analyze student work to determine next steps for instruction. This article shows how a principal can use the steps of the…

  7. FORMATION OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    (1) Gas-phase chemistry. With the clear and profound effect of the VOC/NOx ratio on SOA formation, we will augment gas-phase VOC oxidation mechanisms in atmospheric models to account for the effect of NOx level on the mechanism of SOA formation; (2) Revis...

  8. Portable File Format (PFF) specifications.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2015-02-01

    Created at Sandia National Laboratories, the Portable File Format (PFF) allows binary data transfer across computer platforms. Although this capability is supported by many other formats, PFF files are still in use at Sandia, particularly in pulsed power research. This report provides detailed PFF specifications for accessing data without relying on legacy code.

  9. Star formation in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2009-03-15

    We develop a simple semianalytic model of the star formation rate as a function of time. We estimate the star formation rate for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  10. The Apennine Bench Formation revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Hawke, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Apennine Bench Formation consists of pre-mare light plains materials that crop out south of the crater Archimedes, inside the Imbrium basin. This material was ascribed to either impact or volcanic origins. The characteristics of Apollo 15 KREEP basalts and the Apennine Bench Formation are reviewed to determine whether their characteristics are compatible with a volcanic origin.

  11. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As w...

  12. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As ...

  13. Physics of primordial star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2012-09-01

    The study of primordial star formation has a history of nearly sixty years. It is generally thought that primordial stars are one of the key elements in a broad range of topics in astronomy and cosmology, from Galactic chemical evolution to the formation of super-massive blackholes. We review recent progress in the theory of primordial star formation. The standard theory of cosmic structure formation posits that the present-day rich structure of the Universe developed through gravitational amplification of tiny matter density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang. It has become possible to study primordial star formation rigorously within the framework of the standard cosmological model. We first lay out the key physical processes in a primordial gas. Then, we introduce recent developments in computer simulations. Finally, we discuss prospects for future observations of the first generation of stars.

  14. Core formation by giant impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonks, W. B.; Melosh, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas about the accretion and early evolution of the Earth and the other terrestrial planets have recently undergone a number of revolutionary changes. It has become clear that giant impacts were far from rare events. In the later stages of accretion any given planetary embryo is liable to be struck several times by other bodies of up to half its own diameter. Such an impact may have the ability to trigger core formation. Traditional accretion models have had great difficulty explaining the formation of the core. If one admits the importance of infrequent large events that may melt an entire hemisphere, the core formation difficulty vanishes. Millimeter-size iron blebs in the melted region will rain out due to their density difference with the silicate melt. Core formation may not require the melting of the entire hemisphere of the planet. The conditions are explored under which impact induced core formation may occur.

  15. Dynamics of Earth orbiting formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploen, Scott R.; Scharf, Daniel P.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Acikmese, Ahmed B.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the equations of motion of a formation consisting of n spacecraft in Earth orbit are derived via Lagrange's equations. The equations of motion of the formation are developed with respect to both (1) a bound Keplerian reference orbit, and (2) a specific spacecraft in the formation. The major orbital perturbations acting on a formation in low Earth orbit are also included in the analysis. In contrast to the traditional approach based on the balance of linear momentum, the use of Lagrange's equations leads to a high-level matrix derivation of the formation equations of motion. The matrix form of the nonlinear motion equations is then linearized about a bound Keplerian reference orbit. Next, it is demonstrated that under the assumption of a circular reference orbit, the linearized equations of motion reduce to the well-known Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations. The resulting linear and nonlinear dynamic equations lead to maximal physical insight into the structure of formation dynamics, and are ideally suited for use in the design and validation of formation guidance and control laws.

  16. Dynamics of rock varnish formation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of rock varnish from the southwestern United States suggest that the Mn-phase in rock varnish has neither the chemistry nor the crystal structure of birnessite. Rather, the Mn-rich phase is non-crystalline and contains Ba, Ca, Fe, Al, and P. Unknowns concerning the formation of this non-crystalline Mn phase must be resolved before researchers are able to define chemical parameters of rock varnish formation based upon conditions of formation of the Mn phase. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Antihydrogen Formation using Cold Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Bowe, P.D.; Hangst, J.S.; Amoretti, M.; Carraro, C.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Johnson, I.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Bouchta, A.; Doser, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Landua, R.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L.V.

    2004-10-20

    Antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of the hydrogen atom, can be formed by mixing cold samples of antiprotons and positrons. In 2002 the ATHENA collaboration succeeded in the first production of cold antihydrogen. By observing and imaging the annihilation products of the neutral, non-confined, antihydrogen atoms annihilating on the walls of the trap we can observe the production in quasi-real-time and study the dynamics of the formation mechanism. The formation mechanism strongly influences the final state of the formed antihydrogen atoms, important for future spectroscopic comparison with hydrogen. This paper briefly summarizes the current understanding of the antihydrogen formation in ATHENA.

  18. Dissipative processes in galaxy formation.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, J

    1993-01-01

    A galaxy commences its life in a diffuse gas cloud that evolves into a predominantly stellar aggregation. Considerable dissipation of gravitational binding energy occurs during this transition. I review here the dissipative processes that determine the critical scales of luminous galaxies and the generation of their morphology. The universal scaling relations for spirals and ellipticals are shown to be sensitive to the history of star formation. Semiphenomenological expressions are given for star-formation rates in protogalaxies and in starbursts. Implications are described for elliptical galaxy formation and for the evolution of disk galaxies. PMID:11607396

  19. Dynamics of interfacial pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological model of dendritic solidification incorporating interfacial kinetics, crystalline anisotropy, and a local approximation for the dynamics of the thermal diffusion field is proposed. The preliminary results are in qualitative agreement with natural dendrite-like pattern formation.

  20. Conduction heating of hydrocarbonaceous formations

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, J. E.

    1985-10-08

    A waveguide structure is emplanted in the earth to bound a particular volume of an earth formation with a waveguide structure formed of respective rows of discrete elongated electrodes wherein the spacing between rows is greater than the distance between electrodes in a respective row and in the case of vertical electrodes substantially less than the thickness of the hydrocarbonaceous earth formation. Electrical power at no more than a relatively low frequency is applied between respective rows of the electrodes to deliver power to the formation while producing relatively uniform heating thereof and limiting the relative loss of heat to adjacent barren regions to less than a tolerable amount. At the same time the temperature of the electrodes is controlled near the vaporization point of water thereat to maintain an electrically conductive path between the electrodes and the formation.

  1. Maximum likelihood topographic map formation.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, Marc M

    2005-03-01

    We introduce a new unsupervised learning algorithm for kernel-based topographic map formation of heteroscedastic gaussian mixtures that allows for a unified account of distortion error (vector quantization), log-likelihood, and Kullback-Leibler divergence. PMID:15802004

  2. Immigration, Integration and Ghetto Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    We study ghetto formation in a population with natives and immigrants in the framework of the two-dimensional Ising-model with Kawasaki-exchange dynamics. It is the phase structure of the Ising model, the integration speed and the immigration rate which determine whether ghetto formation between natives and immigrants can be avoided or not. Our simulations are performed in- and out-of-equilibrium.

  3. Cosmic strings and galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    The cosmogonical model proposed by Zel'dovich and Vilenkin (1981), in which superconducting cosmic strings act as seeds for the origin of structure in the universe, is discussed, summarizing the results of recent theoretical investigations. Consideration is given to the formation of cosmic strings, the microscopic structure of strings, gravitational effects, cosmic string evolution, and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Simulation results are presented in graphs, and several outstanding issues are listed and briefly characterized.

  4. Formation of high-grade ignimbrites Part II. A pyroclastic suspension current model with implications also for low-grade ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freundt, Armin

    Analogue experiments in part I led to the conclusion that pyroclastic flows depositing very high-grade ignimbrite move as dilute suspension currents. In the thermo-fluid-dynamical model developed, the degree of cooling of expanded turbulent pyroclastic flows dynamically evolves in response to entrainment of air and mass loss to sedimentation. Initial conditions of the currents are derived from column-collapse modeling for magmas with an initial H2O content of 1-3wt.% erupting through circular vents and caldera ring-fissures. The flows spread either longitudinally or radially from source up to a runout distance that increases with higher mass flux but decreases with higher gas content, temperature, bottom slope and coarser initial grain size. Progressive dilution by entrainment and sedimentation causes pyroclastic currents to transform into buoyant ash plumes at the runout distance. The ash plumes reach stratospheric heights and distribute 30-80% of the erupted material as widespread co-ignimbrite ash. Pyroclastic suspension currents with initial mass fluxes of 107-1012kg/s can spread for tens of kilometers with only limited cooling, although they move as supercritical, strongly entraining currents for the eruption conditions considered here. With increasing eruption mass flux, cooling during passage through the fountain diminishes while cooling during flow transport increases. The net effect is that eruption temperature exerts the prime control on emplacement temperature. Pyroclastic suspension currents can form welded ignimbrite across their entire extent if eruption temperature is To>1.3.Tmw, the minimum welding temperature. High eruption rates, a large fraction of fine ash, and a ring-fissure vent favor the formation of extensive high-grade ignimbrite. For very hot eruptions producing sticky, partially molten pyroclasts, analysis of particle aggregation systematics shows that factors favoring longer runout also favor more efficient aggregation, which reduces

  5. Geochemical study of products associated with spontaneous oxidation of coal in the Cerro Pelado Formation, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M.; Márquez, G.; Alejandre, F. J.; Del Río, J. J.; Hurtado, A.

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this research work is a geochemical, mineralogical, and textural characterization of spontaneously smouldered coal-derived products in northwestern Venezuela (Cerro Pelado Formation, some 10 km from Pedregal city). Several solid samples were collected from this formation, six of unweathering coal, an other six of resulting unmelted rocks forming on a surface coal bed, and the last four of mineralizations found accumulating around gas vents. The fresh coal and the unmelted material were analysed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and proximate techniques. Products such as magnetite and chabazite-K were identified in the alteration rocks. Likewise, both materials were also studied in order to determine the mobilization of 17 elements into the environment; such elements were analysed through inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy on extracts obtained by a sequential extraction method: each sample was firstly extracted with MilliQ water and then the resultant residue was washed. This and the subsequently resulting residues are extracted according to the mentioned procedure by using, respectively, ammonium acetate, chlorhydric acid, peroxide and chlorhydric acid, nitric acid and fluorhydric acid, and nitric acid. The studied elements are classified as highly mobile (Na, Ni, ...), nearly immobile (Ti, P) and partially mobile (Mg, Fe, K, ...). In regards to mineralizations around fumaroles associated with smoldering coal seams, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses have revealed the presence of salammoniac, mascagnite and other solid combustion compounds formed by reaction of gas emitted from coal oxidation, in addition to previously non-reported sulfur-rich by-products associated with gas fissures, particularly ammonium thiosulfate, a phase first obtained only synthetically in the laboratory. Another objective of the research was to collect and analyse gases escaping from surficial vents

  6. Graben formation and dike arrest during the 2009 Harrat Lunayyir dike intrusion in Saudi Arabia: Insights from InSAR, stress calculations and analog experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenbin; Jónsson, Sigurjón; Corbi, Fabio; Rivalta, Eleonora

    2016-04-01

    Detailed spatial and temporal accounts of propagating dikes from crustal deformation data, including their interplay with faulting, are rare, leaving many questions about how this interplay affects graben formation and the arrest of dikes unanswered. Here we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations, stress calculations, and analog experiments to investigate the interaction between an intruding dike and normal faulting during the 2009 Harrat Lunayyir dike intrusion in western Saudi Arabia. We generated five displacement maps from InSAR data to unravel the temporal evolution of deformation covering the majority of the intrusion. We find that the observed surface displacements can be modeled by a ~2 m thick dike with an upper tip ~2 km below the surface on 16 May 2009, 4 weeks after the onset of seismic unrest. In the following three days, the dike propagated to within ~1 km of the surface with graben-bounding normal faulting dominating the near-field deformation. The volume of the dike doubled between mid-May and mid-June. We carried out analog experiments that indicate that the wedge-shaped graben grew outward with the faulting style changing progressively from normal faulting to oblique. Coulomb failure stress change calculations show that the intruding dike caused two zones of shallow horizontal tension on both sides of the dike, producing two zones of fissuring and normal faulting at the surface. In return, the faulting provoked compression around the upper tip of the dike, holding back its vertical propagation.

  7. Modes of clustered star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfalzner, S.; Kaczmarek, T.; Olczak, C.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The recent realization that most stars form in clusters, immediately raises the question of whether star and planet formation are influenced by the cluster environment. The stellar density in the most prevalent clusters is the key factor here. Whether dominant modes of clustered star formation exist is a fundamental question. Using near-neighbour searches in young clusters, Bressert and collaborators claim this not to be the case. They conclude that - at least in the solar neighbourhood - star formation is continuous from isolated to densely clustered environments and that the environment plays a minor role in star and planet formation. Aims: We investigate under which conditions near-neighbour searches in young clusters can distinguish between different modes of clustered star formation. Methods: Model star clusters with different memberships and density distributions are set up and near-neighbour searches are performed. We investigate the influence of the combination of different cluster modes, observational biases, and types of diagnostic on the results. Results: We find that the specific cluster density profile, the relative sample sizes, the limitations of the observation, and the choice of diagnostic method decide, whether modelled modes of clustered star formation are detected by near-neighbour searches. For density distributions that are centrally concentrated but span a wide density range (for example, King profiles), separate cluster modes are only detectable under ideal conditions (sample selection, completeness) if the mean density of the individual clusters differs by at least a factor of ~65. Introducing a central cut-off can lead to an underestimate of the mean density by more than a factor of ten especially in high density regions. The environmental effect on star and planet formation is similarly underestimated for half of the population in dense systems. Conclusions: Local surface-density distributions are a very useful tool for single

  8. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  9. The Dynamics of Latifundia Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhuāngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia. PMID:24376597

  10. The dynamics of latifundia formation.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhuāngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia. PMID:24376597

  11. Modeling of Mitochondrial Donut Formation.

    PubMed

    Long, Qi; Zhao, Danyun; Fan, Weimin; Yang, Liang; Zhou, Yanshuang; Qi, Juntao; Wang, Xin; Liu, Xingguo

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic cell organelles. Continual cycles of fusion and fission play an important role in mitochondrial metabolism and cellular signaling. Previously, a novel mitochondrial morphology, the donut, was reported in cells after hypoxia-reoxygenation or osmotic pressure changes. However, the mechanism of donut formation remained elusive. Here, we obtained the distribution of donut diameters (D = 2R) and found that 95% are >0.8 μm. We also performed highly precise measurements of the mitochondrial tubule diameters using superresolution and electron microscopy. Then, we set up a model by calculating the mitochondrial bending energy and osmotic potential during donut formation. It shows that the bending energy is increased as the radius of curvature, R, gets smaller in the process of donut formation, especially for radii <0.4 μm, creating a barrier to donut formation. The calculations also show that osmotic potential energy release can balance the rising bending energy through volume expansion. Finally, we revealed the donut formation process in a Gibbs free-energy-dependent model combining calculations and measurements. PMID:26331247

  12. The Physics of Planetesimal Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob; Armitage, Philip; Youdin, Andrew; Li, Rixin

    2015-12-01

    Planetesimals are the precursors to planets, and understanding their formation is an essential step towards developing a complete theory of planet formation. For small solid particles (e.g., dust grains) to coagulate into planetesimals, however, requires that these particles grow beyond centimeter sizes; with traditional coagulation physics, this is very difficult. The streaming instability, which is a clumping process akin to the pile-up of cars in a traffic jam, generates sufficiently high solid densities that the mutual gravity between the clumped particles eventually causes their collapse towards planetesimal mass and size scales. Exploring this transition from dust grains to planetesimals is still in its infancy but is extremely important if we want to understand the basics of planet formation. Here, I present a series of high resolution, first principles numerical simulations of potoplanetary disk gas and dust to study the clumping of particles via the streaming instability and the subsequent collapse towards planetesimals. These simulations have been employed to characterize the planetesimal population as a function of radius in protoplanetary disks. The results of these simulations will be crucial for planet formation models to correctly explain the formation and configuration of solar systems.

  13. Star formation in Galactic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to trace how the star-forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large-scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of the order of 30 km s-1 that compress the gas and form dense clouds (n > several × 102 cm-3) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of n > 103 cm-3 which occur on size scales of ≈1 pc for low-mass star-forming regions (M < 100 M⊙), and up to sizes approaching 10 pc for higher mass regions (M > 103 M⊙). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr time-scale of the simulation with a star formation rate of ≈10-1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the star formation per free-fall time varies from our assumed 100 per cent at our sink accretion radius to values of <10-3 at low densities.

  14. SW New Mexico Oil Well Formation Tops

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shari Kelley

    2015-10-21

    Rock formation top picks from oil wells from southwestern New Mexico from scout cards and other sources. There are differing formation tops interpretations for some wells, so for those wells duplicate formation top data are presented in this file.

  15. Formative Evaluation in the Performance Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Walter; King, Debby

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the traditional formative evaluation model used by instructional designers; summarizes Kirkpatrick's model of evaluation; proposes the integration of part of Kirkpatrick's model with traditional formative evaluation; and discusses performance-context formative evaluation. (three references) (LRW)

  16. Mathematical Models for Somite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ruth E.; Schnell, Santiago; Maini, Philip K.

    2009-01-01

    Somitogenesis is the process of division of the anterior–posterior vertebrate embryonic axis into similar morphological units known as somites. These segments generate the prepattern which guides formation of the vertebrae, ribs and other associated features of the body trunk. In this work, we review and discuss a series of mathematical models which account for different stages of somite formation. We begin by presenting current experimental information and mechanisms explaining somite formation, highlighting features which will be included in the models. For each model we outline the mathematical basis, show results of numerical simulations, discuss their successes and shortcomings and avenues for future exploration. We conclude with a brief discussion of the state of modeling in the field and current challenges which need to be overcome in order to further our understanding in this area. PMID:18023728

  17. Granuloma Formation in Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Broos, Caroline E.; van Nimwegen, Menno; Hoogsteden, Henk C.; Hendriks, Rudi W.; Kool, Mirjam; van den Blink, Bernt

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disorder of unknown cause, affecting multiple organs, but mainly the lungs. The exact order of immunological events remains obscure. Reviewing current literature, combined with careful clinical observations, we propose a model for granuloma formation in pulmonary sarcoidosis. A tight collaboration between macrophages, dendritic cells, and lymphocyte subsets, initiates the first steps toward granuloma formation, orchestrated by cytokines and chemokines. In a substantial part of pulmonary sarcoidosis patients, granuloma formation becomes an on-going process, leading to debilitating disease, and sometimes death. The immunological response, determining granuloma sustainment is not well understood. An impaired immunosuppressive function of regulatory T cells has been suggested to contribute to the exaggerated response. Interestingly, therapeutical agents commonly used in sarcoidosis, such as glucocorticosteroids and anti-TNF agents, interfere with granuloma integrity and restore the immune homeostasis in autoimmune disorders. Increasing insight into their mechanisms of action may contribute to the search for new therapeutical targets in pulmonary sarcoidosis. PMID:24339826

  18. An XML portable chart format.

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, H. C.; Raila, W. F.; Berkowicz, D. A.; Barnett, G. O.

    1998-01-01

    The clinical chart remains the fundamental record of outpatient clinical care. As this information migrates to electronic form, there is an opportunity to create standard formats for transmitting these charts. This paper describes work toward a Portable Chart Format (PCF) that can represent the relevant aspects of an outpatient chart. The main goal of the format is to provide a packaging medium for outpatient clinical charts in a transfer of care scenario. A secondary goal is to support the aggregation of comparable clinical data for outcomes analysis. The syntax used for PCF is Extended Markup Language (XML), a W3C standard. The structure of the PCF is based on a clinically relevant view of the data. The data definitions and nomenclature used are based primarily on existing clinical standards. PMID:9929315

  19. Supershells and propagating star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maclow, M. M.; Mccray, R.; Kafatos, M.

    1986-01-01

    Correlated supernovae from an OB association can carve large cavities (greater than 100 pc) in the interstellar medium (ISM), and can punch holes completely through the disk of a spiral galaxy. Supernova remnant energy within such a cavity is thermalized before the shock reaches the supershell. Thus stellar wind theory may be used to model these superbubbles. We describe how the evolution of the superbubble depends on the density distribution of the galactic disk gas and the rate of supernovae in the OB association. At a radius of 100 to 300 pc, the supershell becomes gravitationally unstable, forming giant molecular clouds which are the sites for new star formation. This gravitational instability of the supershells provides a physical mechanism for propagating star formation and may account for the observation of bursts of star formation in galaxies.

  20. Star formation in unperturbed LIRGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Carrera, I.; Olguín, L.; Ambrocio-Cruz, P.; Verley, S.; Rosado, M.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Repetto, P.; Vázquez, C.; Aguilera, V.

    2011-10-01

    Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) are galaxies with L_{FIR} > 10^11 L_{sun} (Sanders & Mirabel 1996). For a star-forming galaxy to emit at a LIRG level, it must have a very high star formation rate (SFR). In the local Universe, the star formation (SF) is primarily triggered by interactions. However, at intermediate redshift, a large fraction of LIRGs are disk galaxies with little sign of recent merger activity (Zheng et al. 2004). The question arises whether the intermediate redshift LIRGs are ``triggered'' or experiencing ``normal'', if elevated, SF. Understanding these SF processes is important since this type of systems may have contributed to 20% or more of the cosmic star-formation rate in the early Universe (Blain & Phillips 2002).

  1. Angular momentum and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strittmatter, P. A.

    The present investigation is mainly concerned with the importance of high angular resolution observations in studies of star formation and, in particular, with elucidating the role which angular momentum plays in the process. A brief report is included on recent high angular resolution observations made with the Steward Observatory speckle camera system. A consideration of the angular momentum in interstellar clouds indicates that rotation precludes quasi-spherical contraction. A number of solutions to this angular momentum problem are examined, taking into account questions concerning the help provided by high angular resolution observations for an elucidation of the various possible scenarios of star formation. Technical aspects involved in obtaining suitable data are investigated. It is concluded that high angular resolution observations hold considerable promise for solving at least some of the problems associated with the role of angular momentum in star formation.

  2. Formation dynamics in geostationary ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonova, Sofya

    2016-08-01

    A relative motion model for a satellite formation composed of two Earth-orbiting spacecraft located in the geostationary ring is developed taking into account major gravitational and non-gravitational forces. A previously existing model featuring perturbation due to J_2 is enhanced by the perturbations due to solar radiation pressure arising from unequal area-to-mass ratios, as well as the secular and long-periodic gravitational perturbations due to the Sun and the Moon. The extended relative motion model is validated using several typical formation geometries against a reference generated by numerical integration of the absolute orbits of the two spacecraft. The results of this work can find application in future on-orbit servicing and formation flying missions in near-geostationary orbit.

  3. Pattern formation in multiplex networks

    PubMed Central

    Kouvaris, Nikos E.; Hata, Shigefumi; Guilera, Albert Díaz-

    2015-01-01

    The advances in understanding complex networks have generated increasing interest in dynamical processes occurring on them. Pattern formation in activator-inhibitor systems has been studied in networks, revealing differences from the classical continuous media. Here we study pattern formation in a new framework, namely multiplex networks. These are systems where activator and inhibitor species occupy separate nodes in different layers. Species react across layers but diffuse only within their own layer of distinct network topology. This multiplicity generates heterogeneous patterns with significant differences from those observed in single-layer networks. Remarkably, diffusion-induced instability can occur even if the two species have the same mobility rates; condition which can never destabilize single-layer networks. The instability condition is revealed using perturbation theory and expressed by a combination of degrees in the different layers. Our theory demonstrates that the existence of such topology-driven instabilities is generic in multiplex networks, providing a new mechanism of pattern formation. PMID:26042606

  4. Bundle Formation in Biomimetic Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Maarten; Pape, A C H; Voets, Ilja K; Rowan, Alan E; Portale, Giuseppe; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-08-01

    Bundling of single polymer chains is a crucial process in the formation of biopolymer network gels that make up the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. This bundled architecture leads to gels with distinctive properties, including a large-pore-size gel formation at very low concentrations and mechanical responsiveness through nonlinear mechanics, properties that are rarely observed in synthetic hydrogels. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we study the bundle formation and hydrogelation process of polyisocyanide gels, a synthetic material that uniquely mimics the structure and mechanics of biogels. We show how the structure of the material changes at the (thermally induced) gelation point and how factors such as concentration and polymer length determine the architecture, and with that, the mechanical properties. The correlation of the gel mechanics and the structural parameters obtained from SAXS experiments is essential in the design of future (synthetic) mimics of biopolymer networks. PMID:27409975

  5. Formation dynamics in geostationary ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonova, Sofya

    2016-05-01

    A relative motion model for a satellite formation composed of two Earth-orbiting spacecraft located in the geostationary ring is developed taking into account major gravitational and non-gravitational forces. A previously existing model featuring perturbation due to J_2 is enhanced by the perturbations due to solar radiation pressure arising from unequal area-to-mass ratios, as well as the secular and long-periodic gravitational perturbations due to the Sun and the Moon. The extended relative motion model is validated using several typical formation geometries against a reference generated by numerical integration of the absolute orbits of the two spacecraft. The results of this work can find application in future on-orbit servicing and formation flying missions in near-geostationary orbit.

  6. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  7. The MARC II Format: A Communications Format for Bibliographic Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avram, Henriette D.; And Others

    Utilizing both the experience gained from the Machine-Readable Cataloging (MARC) Pilot Project, which tested the feasibility of distributing Library of Congress cataloging in machine readable form to various users, and the results of extensive consultation with the library community and persons at the Library of Congress, a format for…

  8. Formation Flying In Highly Elliptical Orbits Initializing the Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mailhe, Laurie; Schiff, Conrad; Hughes, Steven

    2000-01-01

    In this paper several methods are examined for initializing formations in which all spacecraft start in a common elliptical orbit subsequent to separation from the launch vehicle. The tetrahedron formation used on missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS), Auroral Multiscale Midex (AMM), and Cluster is used as a test bed Such a formation provides full three degrees-of-freedom in the relative motion about the reference orbit and is germane to several missions. The type of maneuver strategy that can be employed depends on the specific initial conditions of each member of the formation. Single-impulse maneuvers based on a Gaussian variation-of-parameters (VOP) approach, while operationally simple and intuitively-based, work only in a limited sense for a special class of initial conditions. These 'tailored' initial conditions are characterized as having only a few of the Keplerian elements different from the reference orbit. Attempts to achieve more generic initial conditions exceed the capabilities of the single impulse VOP. For these cases, multiple-impulse implementations are always possible but are generally less intuitive than the single-impulse case. The four-impulse VOP formalism discussed by Schaub is examined but smaller delta-V costs are achieved in our test problem by optimizing a Lambert solution.

  9. Formation of the first stars.

    PubMed

    Bromm, Volker

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the formation of the first stars is one of the frontier topics in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Their emergence signalled the end of the cosmic dark ages, a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, leading to a fundamental transformation of the early Universe through the production of ionizing photons and the initial enrichment with heavy chemical elements. We here review the state of our knowledge, separating the well understood elements of our emerging picture from those where more work is required. Primordial star formation is unique in that its initial conditions can be directly inferred from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model of cosmological structure formation. Combined with gas cooling that is mediated via molecular hydrogen, one can robustly identify the regions of primordial star formation, the so-called minihalos, having total masses of ~10(6) M⊙ and collapsing at redshifts z ≈ 20-30. Within this framework, a number of studies have defined a preliminary standard model, with the main result that the first stars were predominantly massive. This model has recently been modified to include a ubiquitous mode of fragmentation in the protostellar disks, such that the typical outcome of primordial star formation may be the formation of a binary or small multiple stellar system. We will also discuss extensions to this standard picture due to the presence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, of heating from self-annihalating WIMP dark matter, or cosmic rays. We conclude by discussing possible strategies to empirically test our theoretical models. Foremost among them are predictions for the upcoming James Webb space telescope (JWST), to be launched ~2018, and for 'stellar archaeology', which probes the abundance pattern in the oldest, most-metal poor stars in our cosmic neighborhood, thereby constraining the nucleosynthesis inside the first supernovae. PMID:24168986

  10. Pattern formation in the geosciences

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation is a natural property of nonlinear and non-equilibrium dynamical systems. Geophysical examples of such systems span practically all observable length scales, from rhythmic banding of chemical species within a single mineral crystal, to the morphology of cusps and spits along hundreds of kilometres of coastlines. This article briefly introduces the general principles of pattern formation and argues how they can be applied to open problems in the Earth sciences. Particular examples are then discussed, which summarize the contents of the rest of this Theme Issue. PMID:24191107

  11. Ice formation in amorphous cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czihak, C.; Müller, M.; Schober, H.; Vogl, G.

    2000-03-01

    We investigate the formation of ice in wet amorphous cellulose in the temperature range of 190 K⩽T⩽280 K. Due to voids and pores in the cellulose film, water molecules are able to form crystalline aggregates. Beyond that, water is able to penetrate between cellulose chains where it can adsorb to hydroxyl side groups. From diffraction data we suggest an aggregation of low-density amorphous (lda) ice at cellulose surfaces. The formation of lda ice shows a clear temperature dependence which will be discussed together with recent inelastic neutron scattering results.

  12. High-Mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilke, P.

    2016-05-01

    A review on current theories and observations of high-mass star formation is given. Particularly the influence of magnetic fields and feedback mechanisms, and of varying initial conditions on theories are discussed. The, in my biased view, most important observations to put strong constraints on models of high-mass star formation are presented, in particular bearing on the existence and properties of high-mass starless cores, the role of filaments in the mass transport to high-mass cores, and the properties of disks around high-mass stars.

  13. Star formation and its triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, F.

    2016-06-01

    The relation between star formation and gas density appears linear for galaxies on the main sequence, and when the molecular gas is considered. However, the star formation efficiency (SFE) defined as the ratio of SFR to gas surface densities, can be much higher when SF is triggered by a dynamical process such as galaxy interaction or mergers, or even secular evolution and cold gas accretion. I review recent work showing how the SFE can vary as a function of morphological type, environment, or redshift. Physical processes able to explain positive and negative feedback from supernovae or AGN are discussed.

  14. Star formation and gas supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catinella, B.

    2016-06-01

    A detailed knowledge of how gas cycles in and around galaxies, and how it depends on galaxy properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate, is crucial to understand galaxy formation and evolution. We take advantage of the most sensitive surveys of cold gas in massive galaxies, GASS and COLD GASS, as well as of the state-of-the-art HI blind survey ALFALFA to investigate how molecular and atomic hydrogen reservoirs vary along and across the main sequence of star-forming galaxies.

  15. Star formation and extinct radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the evidence for the existence of now-extinct radioactivities in primitive solar system material, giving attention to implications for the early stages of sun and solar system formation. The characteristics of possible disturbances in dense molecular clouds which can initiate the formation of cloud cores is discussed, with emphasis on these disturbances able to generate fresh radioactivities. A one-solar mass red giant star on the asymptotic giant branch appears to have been the best candidate to account for the short-lived extinct radioactivities in the early solar system.

  16. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in typical and extreme galaxies. The typical galaxies are selected to be free of active galactic nuclei (AGN), while the extreme galaxies host quasars (the most luminous class of AGN). These two environments are each insightful in their own way; quasars are among the most violent objects in the universe, literally reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to small galaxies which are forming stars at unsustainably high rates. The current paradigm of galaxy formation and evolution suggests that extreme circumstances are key stepping stones in the assembly of galaxies like our Milky Way. To test this paradigm and fully explore its ramifications, this dual approach is needed. My sample of AGN-free galaxies is drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. This Halpha-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to detect star-forming galaxies without a bias toward continuum luminosity. This type of selection ensures that this sample is not biased toward galaxies that are large or nearby. My work studies the KISS galaxies in the mid- and far-infrared using photometry from the IRAC and MIPS instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. These infrared bands are particularly interesting for star formation studies because the ultraviolet light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-infrared (24mum MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transitions features in the mid-infrared (8.0mum IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The work I present here examines the efficiencies of PAH and thermal dust emission as tracers of star-formation rates over a wide range of galactic stellar masses. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has a highly variable efficiency that does not systematically depend on galactic stellar mass

  17. Star formation in distant galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca-Volmerange, B.

    Scenarios of galactic evolution, essentially based on our knowledge of nearby galaxies have been proposed. Star formation laws, initial mass function, metallicity are the main parameters. The author shortly reviews the present status of these parameters in distant galaxies and gives some deductive conclusions from a comparison with the most distant (z ≥ 3) galaxies.

  18. Formative Assessment in Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Heidi; Lui, Angela; Palma, Maria; Hefferen, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is crucial to students' growth as dancers. When used within the framework of formative assessment, or assessment for learning, feedback results in actionable next steps that dancers can use to improve their performances. This article showcases the work of two dance specialists, one elementary and one middle school teacher, who have…

  19. Formative Considerations Using Integrative CALL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Philip; Shaver, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Addresses technical and learning issues relating to a formative implementation of a computer assisted language learning (CALL) browser-based intermediate Russian program. Instruction took place through a distance education implementation and in a grouped classroom using a local-area network. Learners indicated the software was clear, motivating,…

  20. Cloud formation in substellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helling, Christiane

    2009-02-01

    Clouds seem like an every-day experience. But-do we know how clouds form on brown dwarfs and extra-solar planets? How do they look like? Can we see them? What are they composed of? Cloud formation is an old-fashioned but still outstanding problem for the Earth atmosphere, and it has turned into a challenge for the modelling of brown dwarf and exo-planetary atmospheres. Cloud formation imposes strong feedbacks on the atmospheric structure, not only due to the clouds own opacity, but also due to the depletion of the gas phase, possibly leaving behind a dynamic and still supersaturated atmosphere. I summarise the different approaches taken to model cloud formation in substellar atmospheres and workout their differences. Focusing on the phase-non-equilibrium approach to cloud formation, I demonstrate the inside we gain from detailed microphysical modelling on for instance the material composition and grain size distribution inside the cloud layer on a Brown Dwarf atmosphere. A comparison study on four different cloud approaches in Brown Dwarf atmosphere simulations demonstrates possible uncertainties in interpretation of observational data.

  1. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-07-01

    Biofilm-grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline-binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S. pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S. pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  2. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Summary Biofilm‐grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline‐binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S. pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S. pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  3. Constraints on galaxy formation theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalay, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    The present theories of galaxy formation are reviewed. The relation between peculiar velocities, temperature fluctuations of the microwave background and the correlation function of galaxies point to the possibility that galaxies do not form uniformly everywhere. The velocity data provide strong constraints on the theories even in the case when light does not follow mass of the universe.

  4. Stereotype Formation: Biased by Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Pelley, Mike E.; Reimers, Stian J.; Calvini, Guglielmo; Spears, Russell; Beesley, Tom; Murphy, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose that biases in attitude and stereotype formation might arise as a result of learned differences in the extent to which social groups have previously been predictive of behavioral or physical properties. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that differences in the experienced predictiveness of groups with respect to evaluatively neutral…

  5. Formative Assessment: A Cybernetic Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roos, Bertil; Hamilton, David

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers alternative assessment, feedback and cybernetics. For more than 30 years, debates about the bi-polarity of formative and summative assessment have served as surrogates for discussions about the workings of the mind, the social implications of assessment and, as important, the role of instruction in the advancement of learning.…

  6. The EPRDATA Format: A Dialogue

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, III, Henry Grady

    2015-08-18

    Recently the Los Alamos Nuclear Data Team has communicated certain issues of concern in relation to the new electron/photon/relaxation ACE data format as released in the eprdata12 library. In this document those issues are parsed, analyzed, and answered.

  7. Formative Assessment in Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughland, Tony; Kilpatrick, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    This action learning study in a year three classroom explored the implementation of five formative assessment principles to assist students' understandings of the scientific topic of liquids and solids. These principles were employed to give students a greater opportunity to express their understanding of the concepts. The study found that…

  8. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  9. Chevrons formation in laminar erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devauchelle, Olivier; Josserand, Christophe; Lagree, Pierre-Yves; Zaleski, Stephane; Nguyen, Khanh-Dang; Malverti, Luce; Lajeunesse, Eric

    2007-11-01

    When eroded by laminar free-surface flows, granular substrates may generate a rich variety of natural patterns. Among them are dunes, similar to the ones observed by Charru and Hinch in a Couette cell (Charru F, Hinch EJ ; Ripple formation on a particle bed sheared by a viscous liquid. Part 1. Steady flow ; JOURNAL OF FLUID MECHANICS 550: 111-121 MAR 10 2006). Chevron-shaped instabilities as those found on the sea-shore, can also be observed, sometimes in competition against dunes formation. These were first pointed out by Daerr et al. when pulling a plate covered with granular material out of a bath of water (Daerr A, Lee P, Lanuza J, et al. ; Erosion patterns in a sediment layer ; PHYSICAL REVIEW E 67 (6): Art. No. 065201 Part 2 JUN 2003). Both instabilities can grow in laminar open-channel flows, an experimental set-up which is more easily controlled. The mechanisms leading to the formation of these patterns are investigated and compared. Whereas dunes formation requires vertical inertia effects, we show that chevrons may result from the non-linear evolution of bars instability, which may grow even in purely viscous flows.

  10. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying the data. They can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). ...

  11. Monogamy of entanglement of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Thiago R.; Cornelio, Marcio F.; Fanchini, Felipe F.

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that a particle cannot freely share entanglement with two or more particles. This restriction is generally called monogamy. However the formal quantification of such restriction is only known for some measures of entanglement and for two-level systems. The first and broadly known monogamy relation was established by Coffman, Kundu, and Wootters for the square of the concurrence. Since then, it is usually said that the entanglement of formation is not monogamous, as it does not obey the same relation. We show here that despite that, the entanglement of formation cannot be freely shared and therefore should be said to be monogamous. Furthermore, the square of the entanglement of formation does obey the same relation of the squared concurrence, a fact recently noted for three particles and extended here for N particles. Therefore the entanglement of formation is as monogamous as the concurrence. We also numerically study how the entanglement is distributed in pure states of three qubits and the relation between the sum of the bipartite entanglement and the classical correlation.

  12. Audiences for Contemporary Radio Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lull, James T.; And Others

    A radio audience survey of 110 sample geographic clusters in the Santa Barbara, California, area served a twofold purpose: the construction of a demographic profile of audience types according to radio format choices, and the identification and analysis of various audience subgroups. A skip interval technique of these geographic clusters resulted…

  13. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  14. Pattern Formation in Convective Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, R.; Bestehorn, M.; Haken, H.

    The present article reviews recent progress in the study of pattern formation in convective instabilities. After a brief discussion of the relevant basic hydrodynamic equations as well as a short outline of the mathematical treatment of pattern formation in complex systems the self-organization of spatial and spatio-temporal structures due to convective instabilities is considered. The formation of various forms of convective patterns arising in the Bénard experiment, i.e. in a horizontal fluid layer heated from below, is discussed. Then the review considers pattern formation in the Bénard instability in spherical geometries. In that case it can be demonstrated how the interaction among several convective cells may lead to time dependent as well as chaotic evolution of the spatial structures. Finally, the convective instability in a binary fluid mixture is discussed. In contrast to the instability in a single component fluid the instability may be oscillatory. In that case convection sets in in the form of travelling wave patterns which in addition to a complicated and chaotic temporal behaviour exhibit more or less spatial irregularity already close to threshold.

  15. A standard audit trail format

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, M.

    1995-02-01

    The central role of audit trails, or (more properly) logs, in security monitoring needs little description, for it is too well known for any to doubt it. Auditing, or the analysis of logs, is a central part of security not only in computer system security but also in analyzing financial and other non-technical systems. As part of this process, it is often necessary to reconcile logs from different sources. This speaks of a need for a standard logging format. A standard log format robust enough to meet the needs of heterogeneity, transportability across various network protocols, and flexibility sufficient to meet a variety of needs in very different environments must satisfy two basic properties: extensibility and portability. This report presents the author`s proposed format for a standard log record. In section 3, he shows how and where the translation should be done, and in section 4 he demonstrates how log records from several disparate systems would be put into this format. Section 5 concludes with some observations and suggestions for future work.

  16. Peripheral Leptin Regulates Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Russell T.; Kalra, Satya P.; Wong, Carmen P.; Philbrick, Kenneth A.; Lindenmaier, Laurence B.; Boghossian, Stephane; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence does not support the prevailing view that leptin, acting through a hypothalamic relay, decreases bone accrual by inhibiting bone formation. To clarify the mechanisms underlying regulation of bone architecture by leptin, we evaluated bone growth and turnover in wild type (WT) mice, leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and ob/ob mice treated with leptin. We also performed hypothalamic leptin gene therapy to determine the effect of elevated hypothalamic leptin levels on osteoblasts. Finally, to determine the effects of loss of peripheral leptin signaling on bone formation and energy metabolism, we used bone marrow (BM) from WT or db/db donor mice to reconstitute the hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell compartments in lethally irradiated WT recipient mice. Decreases in bone growth, osteoblast-lined bone perimeter and bone formation rate were observed in ob/ob mice and greatly increased in ob/ob mice following subcutaneous administration of leptin. Similarly, hypothalamic leptin gene therapy increased osteoblast-lined bone perimeter in ob/ob mice. In spite of normal osteoclast-lined bone perimeter, db/db mice exhibited a mild but generalized osteopetrotic-like (calcified cartilage encased by bone) skeletal phenotype and greatly reduced serum markers of bone turnover. Tracking studies and histology revealed quantitative replacement of BM cells following BM transplantation. WT mice engrafted with db/db BM did not differ in energy homeostasis from untreated WT mice or WT mice engrafted with WT BM. Bone formation in WT mice engrafted with WT BM did not differ from WT mice, whereas bone formation in WT mice engrafted with db/db cells did not differ from the low rates observed in untreated db/db mice. In summary, our results indicate that leptin, acting primarily through peripheral pathways, increases osteoblast number and activity. PMID:22887758

  17. Inside-out Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    The compact multi-transiting planet systems discovered by Kepler challenge planet formation theories. Formation in situ from disks with radial mass surface density, Σ, profiles similar to the minimum mass solar nebula but boosted in normalization by factors >~ 10 has been suggested. We propose that a more natural way to create these planets in the inner disk is formation sequentially from the inside-out via creation of successive gravitationally unstable rings fed from a continuous stream of small (~cm-m size) "pebbles," drifting inward via gas drag. Pebbles collect at the pressure maximum associated with the transition from a magnetorotational instability (MRI)-inactive ("dead zone") region to an inner MRI-active zone. A pebble ring builds up until it either becomes gravitationally unstable to form an ~1 M ⊕ planet directly or induces gradual planet formation via core accretion. The planet may undergo Type I migration into the active region, allowing a new pebble ring and planet to form behind it. Alternatively, if migration is inefficient, the planet may continue to accrete from the disk until it becomes massive enough to isolate itself from the accretion flow. A variety of densities may result depending on the relative importance of residual gas accretion as the planet approaches its isolation mass. The process can repeat with a new pebble ring gathering at the new pressure maximum associated with the retreating dead-zone boundary. Our simple analytical model for this scenario of inside-out planet formation yields planetary masses, relative mass scalings with orbital radius, and minimum orbital separations consistent with those seen by Kepler. It provides an explanation of how massive planets can form with tightly packed and well-aligned system architectures, starting from typical protoplanetary disk properties.

  18. Inside-out planet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2014-01-01

    The compact multi-transiting planet systems discovered by Kepler challenge planet formation theories. Formation in situ from disks with radial mass surface density, Σ, profiles similar to the minimum mass solar nebula but boosted in normalization by factors ≳ 10 has been suggested. We propose that a more natural way to create these planets in the inner disk is formation sequentially from the inside-out via creation of successive gravitationally unstable rings fed from a continuous stream of small (∼cm-m size) 'pebbles', drifting inward via gas drag. Pebbles collect at the pressure maximum associated with the transition from a magnetorotational instability (MRI)-inactive ('dead zone') region to an inner MRI-active zone. A pebble ring builds up until it either becomes gravitationally unstable to form an ∼1 M {sub ⊕} planet directly or induces gradual planet formation via core accretion. The planet may undergo Type I migration into the active region, allowing a new pebble ring and planet to form behind it. Alternatively, if migration is inefficient, the planet may continue to accrete from the disk until it becomes massive enough to isolate itself from the accretion flow. A variety of densities may result depending on the relative importance of residual gas accretion as the planet approaches its isolation mass. The process can repeat with a new pebble ring gathering at the new pressure maximum associated with the retreating dead-zone boundary. Our simple analytical model for this scenario of inside-out planet formation yields planetary masses, relative mass scalings with orbital radius, and minimum orbital separations consistent with those seen by Kepler. It provides an explanation of how massive planets can form with tightly packed and well-aligned system architectures, starting from typical protoplanetary disk properties.

  19. 40 CFR 1502.10 - Recommended format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recommended format. 1502.10 Section... § 1502.10 Recommended format. Agencies shall use a format for environmental impact statements which will... following standard format for environmental impact statements should be followed unless the...

  20. What Is Formation? A Conceptual Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutphen, Molly; de Lange, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the principles and connotations of the term "formation." In our discussion of formation, we draw on different disciplines in order to widen and deepen our understanding of the concept of formation. We also mirror the formation concept against comparable terms and draw on studies in which it has been applied in…

  1. Field technique of permeability tests in highly fissured limestone strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Salihi, Adnan; Asaad, Abdulah

    2002-05-01

    Résumé.L'étude de dispositifs de dénoyage est nécessaire pour l'amélioration de sites avant la construction de certaines structures. L'étude de dispositifs de dénoyage efficaces exige d'estimer la valeur du coefficient de perméabilité in situ. Les relations disponibles pour estimer le coefficient de perméabilité ont été développées sur la base de mesures et de conditions de terrain limitées, et les prédictions varient de plusieurs ordres de grandeur. C'est pourquoi il est nécessaire de réaliser des mesures de perméabilité sur le terrain et de déterminer la relation qui permet le meilleur ajustement de ces mesures avant l'étude du dispositif de dénoyage pour des conditions locales et géologiques spécifiques. Ce papier présente des mesures de perméabilité sur le terrain dans des niveaux calcaires complexes chaotiques et diagénétisés. Il propose également une analyse comparative de plusieurs relations disponibles dans la littérature destinées à prédire le coefficient de perméabilité in situ. L'analyse est faite en conditions permanentes et non permanentes. Les résultats montrent que la valeur du coefficient de perméabilité dépend du niveau de la nappe, qui est affecté par le régime de marées. On montre que l'équation de l'US Navy donne la meilleure corrélation avec les mesures de terrain. Resumen.El diseño de sistemas de desecado es necesario para mejorar las condiciones de un emplazamiento antes de la construcción de determinadas estructuras. El diseño de un sistema eficiente de desecado requiere de la estimación del valor de la permeabilidad in-situ. Las relaciones disponibles para tal fin han sido desarrolladas bajo condiciones y medidas de campo limitadas; sus predicciones varían en algunos órdenes de magnitud. Por tanto, es necesario tomar medidas de permeabilidad en campo y determinar la relación que reproduce mejor dichas medidas como paso previo al diseño de un sistema de desecado en condiciones geológicas y de emplazamiento específicas. Este artículo presenta medidas de permeabilidad en campo para estratos de calcita caóticos y diagenéticos. También ofrece un análisis comparativo de diversas relaciones disponibles en la bibliografía con el fin de predecir el valor de la permeabilidad in-situ. El análisis se ha hecho tanto en régimen permanente como en estacionario. Los resultados demuestran que la permeabilidad depende del nivel freático, el cual está afectado por las mareas. La ecuación de la Marina estadounidense es la que proporciona una mejor correlación con las medidas de campo.

  2. An extraction algorithm of pulmonary fissures from multislice CT image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Saita, Shinsuke; Yasutomo, Motokatsu; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakano, Yasutaka; Sasagawa, Michizo; Eguchi, Kenji; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2005-04-01

    Aging and smoking history increases number of pulmonary emphysema. Alveoli restoration destroyed by pulmonary emphysema is difficult and early direction is important. Multi-slice CT technology has been improving 3-D image analysis with higher body axis resolution and shorter scan time. And low-dose high accuracy scanning becomes available. Multi-slice CT image helps physicians with accurate measuring but huge volume of the image data takes time and cost. This paper is intended for computer added emphysema region analysis and proves effectiveness of proposed algorithm.

  3. Nuclide migration through a planar fissure with matrix diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.

    1985-04-01

    This report presents the first results of a new analytical study of the hydrological transport of a radioactive contaminant through a planar fracture in porous rock. The purpose is to predict the space-time dependent concentration of the contaminant in the groundwater, as affected by advective transport within the fracture and by molecular diffusion of the contaminant into and out of pores that intersect the fracture surfaces.

  4. [Comparative studies on fissure sealing: composite versus Cermet cement].

    PubMed

    Hickel, R; Voss, A

    1989-06-01

    Fifty two molars sealed with either composite or Cermet cement were compared. The composite sealant was applied after enamel etching using a rubber dam. Before sealing with Cermet cement the enamel was only cleaned with pumice powder and sodium hypochlorie and the material was applied without enamel etching. After an average follow-up of 1.6 years composite sealants proved to be significantly more reliable. Cermet cement sealings showed defects more frequently. PMID:2517111

  5. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O.

    1990-01-01

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  6. ASDF: A new data format for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, P.; Droettboom, M.; Bray, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present the case for developing a successor format for the immensely successful FITS format. We first review existing alternative formats and discuss why we do not believe they provide an adequate solution. The proposed format is called the Advanced Scientific Data Format (ASDF) and is based on an existing text format, YAML, that we believe removes most of the current problems with the FITS format. An overview of the capabilities of the new format is given along with specific examples. This format has the advantage that it does not limit the size of attribute names (akin to FITS keyword names) nor place restrictions on the size or type of values attributes have. Hierarchical relationships are explicit in the syntax and require no special conventions. Finally, it is capable of storing binary data within the file in its binary form. At its basic level, the format proposed has much greater applicability than for just astronomical data.

  7. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  8. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  9. Formation of quasiparallel Alfven solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, R. L.; Kennel, C. F.; Mjolhus, E.

    1992-01-01

    The formation of quasi-parallel Alfven solitons is investigated through the inverse scattering transformation (IST) for the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equation. The DNLS has a rich complement of soliton solutions consisting of a two-parameter soliton family and a one-parameter bright/dark soliton family. In this paper, the physical roles and origins of these soliton families are inferred through an analytic study of the scattering data generated by the IST for a set of initial profiles. The DNLS equation has as limiting forms the nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS), Korteweg-de-Vries (KdV) and modified Korteweg-de-Vries (MKdV) equations. Each of these limits is briefly reviewed in the physical context of quasi-parallel Alfven waves. The existence of these limiting forms serves as a natural framework for discussing the formation of Alfven solitons.

  10. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Ralph W.; Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse (20) using one or more delay loops (10). The delay loops (10) have a partially reflective beam splitter (12) and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors (14) arranged such that the laser beam pulse (20) enters into the delay loop (10) through the beam splitter (12) and circulates therein along a delay loop length (24) defined by the mirrors (14). As the laser beam pulse (20) circulates within the delay loop (10) a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse (20) strikes the beam splitter (12). The laser beam pulse (20) is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56). The delay loops (10) are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56) using additive waveform synthesis.

  11. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  12. The dynamics of city formation*

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J. Vernon; Venables, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines city formation in a country whose urban population is growing steadily over time, with new cities required to accommodate this growth. In contrast to most of the literature there is immobility of housing and urban infrastructure, and investment in these assets is taken on the basis of forward-looking behavior. In the presence of these fixed assets cities form sequentially, without the population swings in existing cities that arise in current models, but with swings in house rents. Equilibrium city size, absent government, may be larger or smaller than is efficient, depending on how urban externalities vary with population. Efficient formation of cities with internalization of externalities involves local government intervention and borrowing to finance development. The paper explores the institutions required for successful local government intervention. PMID:25089087

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  14. THE BLACK HOLE FORMATION PROBABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Drew; Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-02-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. We present an initial exploration of the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}). Although we find that it is difficult to derive a unique P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) using current measurements of both the BH mass distribution and the degree of chemical enrichment by massive stars, we demonstrate how P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) changes with these various observational and theoretical uncertainties. We anticipate that future studies of Galactic BHs and theoretical studies of core collapse will refine P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) and argue that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be useful as input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment.

  15. Line formation in turbulent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahlberg, J.

    The methods of mean field electrodynamics are used to investigate the influence of stochastic velocity fields on line formation. Due to numerical difficulties in such concepts, only two point correlations are taken into account. But there are some difficulties: Different models can yield different profiles - for the same parameter - or vice versa, a different interpretation of the same profile can yield different correlation lengths and also different velocities. Care is required in interpreting these parameters as real hydrodynamics ones.

  16. Method for fracturing subterranean formations

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, S. W.; Conway, M. W.

    1985-11-19

    The present invention relates to a thermally stable crosslinked gel fracturing fluid for use in the treatment of subterranean formations penetrated by a well bore. The fracturing fluid comprises an aqueous liquid, a gelling agent comprising a selected modified cellulose ether, a crosslinking agent and any additional additives that may be present. The fracturing fluid is thermally stable under shear at temperatures in excess of about 200/sup 0/ F.

  17. The Black Hole Formation Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Drew; Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-02-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. We present an initial exploration of the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, P BH(M ZAMS). Although we find that it is difficult to derive a unique P BH(M ZAMS) using current measurements of both the BH mass distribution and the degree of chemical enrichment by massive stars, we demonstrate how P BH(M ZAMS) changes with these various observational and theoretical uncertainties. We anticipate that future studies of Galactic BHs and theoretical studies of core collapse will refine P BH(M ZAMS) and argue that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be useful as input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment.

  18. Memory Formation Shaped by Astroglia.

    PubMed

    Zorec, Robert; Horvat, Anemari; Vardjan, Nina; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, the most heterogeneous glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS), execute a multitude of homeostatic functions and contribute to memory formation. Consolidation of synaptic and systemic memory is a prolonged process and hours are required to form long-term memory. In the past, neurons or their parts have been considered to be the exclusive cellular sites of these processes, however, it has now become evident that astrocytes provide an important and essential contribution to memory formation. Astrocytes participate in the morphological remodeling associated with synaptic plasticity, an energy-demanding process that requires mobilization of glycogen, which, in the CNS, is almost exclusively stored in astrocytes. Synaptic remodeling also involves bidirectional astroglial-neuronal communication supported by astroglial receptors and release of gliosignaling molecules. Astroglia exhibit cytoplasmic excitability that engages second messengers, such as Ca(2+), for phasic, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), for tonic signal coordination with neuronal processes. The detection of signals by astrocytes and the release of gliosignaling molecules, in particular by vesicle-based mechanisms, occurs with a significant delay after stimulation, orders of magnitude longer than that present in stimulus-secretion coupling in neurons. These particular arrangements position astrocytes as integrators ideally tuned to support time-dependent memory formation. PMID:26635551

  19. Vortex Formation in Shallow Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Donald

    2006-11-01

    Vortical structures having a scale much larger than the depth of the flow, which arise in bluff body wakes, jets, and mixing layers generated in shallow layers, show distinctive features due to the influence of bed friction. Cinema techniques of high-image-density particle image velocimetry are employed to characterize quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional aspects of the vortex development in terms of: patterns of vorticity; flow topology involving definition of critical points; and global spectral and cross-spectral analyses, based on simultaneous time records at thousands of grid points of the cinema imaging. Taken together, these representations lead to an understanding of the relationship between coherent vortex development and unsteadiness along the bed and, furthermore, provide a basis for exploration of concepts generic to separated shear layers in shallow flows. These concepts include: suppression of a primary mode of vortex formation due to bed friction and emergence of another mode; resonant coupling between a gravity wave of the shallow layer and vortex formation, leading to large-scale vortices; and passive and active (open loop) control, which can either retard or enhance the onset of vortex formation. These studies suggest opportunities for further investigation on both experimental and numerical fronts. Collaboration with Haojun Fu, Alis Ekmekci, Jung-Chang Lin, and Muammer Ozgoren is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Modeling of Dynamic FRC Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Yung; Barnes, Dan; Dettrick, Sean

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a 2-D resistive MHD code, Lamy Ridge, to simulate the entire FRC formation process in Tri Alpha's C2 device, including initial formation, translation, merging and settling into equilibrium. Two FRC's can be created simultaneously, and then translated toward each other so that they merge into a single FRC. The code couples the external circuits around the formation tubes to the partially ionized plasma inside. Plasma and neutral gas are treated as two fluids. Dynamic and energetic equations, which take into account ionization and charge exchange, are solved in a time advance manner. The geometric shape of the vessel is specified by a set of inputs that defines the boundaries, which are handled by a cut-cell algorithm in the code. Multiple external circuits and field coils can be easily added, removed or relocated through individual inputs. The design of the code is modular and flexible so that it can be applied to future devices. The results of the code are in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements on the C2 device.