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1

Fixed-Point Actions in 1-Loop Perturbation Theory  

E-print Network

It has been pointed out in recent papers that the example considered earlier in the O(N) sigma-model to test whether fixed-point actions are 1-loop perfect actually checked classical perfection only. To clarify the issue we constructed the renormalized trajectory explicitly in 1-loop perturbation theory. We found that the fixed-point action is not exactly 1-loop perfect. The cut-off effects are, however, strongly reduced also on the 1-loop level relative to those of the standard and tree level improved Symanzik actions. Some points on off- and on-shell improvement, Symanzik's program and fixed-point actions are also discussed.

Peter Hasenfratz; Ferenc Niedermayer

1997-06-02

2

New fixed point action for SU(3) lattice gauge theory  

E-print Network

We present a new fixed point action for SU(3) lattice gauge theory, which has --- compared to earlier published fixed point actions --- shorter interaction range and smaller violations of rotational symmetry in the static $q\\bar{q}$-potential even at shortest distances.

Marc Blatter; Ferenc Niedermayer

1996-05-14

3

The fixed point action of the Schwinger model  

E-print Network

We compute the fixed point action for the Schwinger model through an expansion in the gauge field. The calculation allows a check of the locality of the action. We test its perfection by computing the 1-loop mass gap at finite spatial volume.

F. Farchioni; V. Laliena

1997-09-08

4

Fixed Point SU(3) Gauge Actions: Scaling Properties and Glueballs  

E-print Network

We present a new parametrization of a SU(3) fixed point (FP) gauge action using smeared ("fat") gauge links. We report on the scaling behaviour of the FP action on coarse lattices by means of the static quark-antiquark potential, the hadronic scale $r_0$, the string tension $\\sigma$ and the critical temperature $T_c$ of the deconfining phase transition. In addition, we investigate the low lying glueball masses where we observe no scaling violations within the statistical errors.

Ferenc Niedermayer; Philipp Rufenacht; Urs Wenger

2000-11-07

5

Fixed Point Gauge Actions with Fat Links: Scaling and Glueballs  

E-print Network

A new parametrization is introduced for the fixed point (FP) action in SU(3) gauge theory using fat links. We investigate its scaling properties by means of the static quark-antiquark potential and the dimensionless quantities $r_0 T_c, T_c/\\sqrt{\\sigma}$ and $r_0 \\sqrt{\\sigma}$, where $T_c$ is the critical temperature of the deconfining phase transition, $r_0$ is the hadronic scale and $\\sigma$ is the effective string tension. These quantities scale even on lattices as coarse as $a \\approx 0.3$ fm. We also measure the glueball spectrum and obtain $m_{0^{++}}=1627(83)$ MeV and $m_{2^{++}}=2354(95)$ MeV for the masses of the scalar and tensor glueballs, respectively.

Ferenc Niedermayer; Philipp Rufenacht; Urs Wenger

2000-07-06

6

Simulating full QCD with the fixed point action  

SciTech Connect

Because of its complex structure the parametrized fixed point action can not be simulated with the available local updating algorithms. We constructed, coded, and tested an updating procedure with 2+1 light flavors, where the targeted s quark mass is at its physical value while the u and d quarks should produce pions lighter than 300 MeV. In the algorithm a partially global gauge update is followed by several accept/reject steps, where parts of the determinant are switched on gradually in the order of their costs. The trial configuration that is offered in the last, most expensive, stochastic accept/reject step differs from the original configuration by a Metropolis + over-relaxation gauge update over a subvolume of {approx}(1.3 fm){sup 4}. The acceptance rate in this accept/reject step is {approx}0.4. The code is optimized on different architectures and is running on lattices with L{sub s}{approx_equal}1.2 fm and 1.8 fm at a resolution of a{approx_equal}0.15 fm.

Hasenfratz, Anna; Hasenfratz, Peter; Niedermayer, Ferenc [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80304-0390 (United States); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland)

2005-12-01

7

Simulating Full QCD with the Fixed Point Action  

E-print Network

Due to its complex structure the parametrized fixed point action can not be simulated with the available local updating algorithms. We constructed, coded, and tested an updating procedure with 2+1 light flavors, where the targeted s-quark mass is at its physical value while the u- and d-quarks should produce pions lighter than 300MeV. In the algorithm a partially global gauge update is followed by several accept/reject steps, where parts of the determinant are switched on gradually in the order of their expenses. The trial configuration that is offered in the last, most expensive, stochastic accept/reject step differs from the original configuration by a Metropolis + over-relaxation gauge update over a sub-volume of ~(1.3 fm)^4. The acceptance rate in this accept/reject step is ~0.4. The code is optimized on different architectures and is running on lattices with L=1.2fm and 1.8fm at a resolution of a=0.15fm.

Anna Hasenfratz; Peter Hasenfratz; Ferenc Niedermayer

2005-06-25

8

Fixed point actions in SU(3) gauge theory: surface tension and topology  

E-print Network

This work is organized in two independent parts. In the first part are presented some results concerning the surface tension in SU(3) obtained with a parametrized fixed point action. In the second part, a new, approximately scale-invariant, parametrized fixed point action is proposed which is suitable to study the topology in SU(3).

F. Farchioni; A. Papa

1997-09-08

9

The fixed point action for the Schwinger model: a perturbative approach  

E-print Network

We compute the fixed point action of a properly defined renormalization group transformation for the Schwinger model through an expansion in the gauge field. It is local, with couplings exponentially suppressed with the distance. We check its perfection by computing the 1-loop mass gap at finite spatial volume, finding only exponentially vanishing cut off effects, in contrast with the standard action, which is affected by large power-like cut off effects. We point out that the 1-loop mass gap calculation provides a check of the classical perfection of the fixed point action, and not of the 1-loop perfection, as could be naively expected.

F. Farchioni; V. Laliena

1997-09-15

10

New results on cut-off effects in spectroscopy with the fixed point action  

E-print Network

Our study on the cut-off effects in quenched light hadron spectroscopy and pion scattering length with the fixed point action is extended by results obtained at a lattice spacing a=0.102 fm in a box of size L=1.8 fm. The cut-off effects are small, but clearly seen as the resolution is increased from a=0.153 fm to a=0.102 fm. In the quark mass region where the errors are small and under control, our results on the APE plot lie close to the extrapolated numbers of the CP-PACS Collaboration.

Peter Hasenfratz; K. Jimmy Juge; Ferenc Niedermayer

2004-11-24

11

Chiral properties of the fixed point action of the Schwinger model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the spectrum properties for a recently constructed fixed point lattice Dirac operator. We also consider the problem of the extraction of the fermion condensate, both by direct computation, and through the Banks-Casher formula by analyzing the density of eigenvalues of a redefined antihermitean lattice Dirac operator.

Farchioni, F.; Lang, C. B.; Wohlgenannt, M.

1998-08-01

12

2+1 flavor QCD with the fixed point action in the $?$-regime  

E-print Network

We generated configurations with the approximate fixed-point Dirac operator $D_\\mathrm{FP}$ on a $12^4$ lattice with $a \\approx 0.13 $fm where the scale was set by $r_0$. The distributions of the low lying eigenvalues in different topological sectors were compared with those of the Random Matrix Theory which leads to a prediction of the chiral condensate.

Peter Hasenfratz; Dieter Hierl; Vidushi Maillart; Ferenc Niedermayer; Andreas Schafer; Christof Weiermann; Manuel Weingart

2007-10-02

13

First results in QCD with 2+1 light flavors using the fixed-point action  

E-print Network

This is a progress report on 2+1 flavor simulation with the FP action on a lattice with spatial size L=1.2fm. Since m_{ud} is quite small in our simulation we are in the delta regime for the two light flavors where the low lying excitations are described by a quantum mechanical rotator. From here we extract the low energy constant F. We also measure the AWI mass and present results on numerical issues like low-mode averaging and autocorrelation times.

Anna Hasenfratz; Peter Hasenfratz; Dieter Hierl; Ferenc Niedermayer; Andreas Schäfer

2006-10-17

14

Existential Fixed-Point Logic  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to existential fixed-point logic. Among other things, we show that: (1) If a structure A satisfies an existential fixed-point formula ?, then A has a finite subset F such that every structure B with A |F = B |F satisfies ?. (2) Using existential fixed-point logic instead of first-order logic removes

Andreas Blass; Yuri Gurevich

1987-01-01

15

Gravitational Fixed Points from Perturbation Theory  

SciTech Connect

The fixed point structure of the renormalization flow in higher derivative gravity is investigated in terms of the background covariant effective action using an operator cutoff that keeps track of powerlike divergences. Spectral positivity of the gauge fixed Hessian can be satisfied upon expansion in the asymptotically free higher derivative coupling. At one-loop order in this coupling strictly positive fixed points are found for the dimensionless Newton constant g{sub N} and the cosmological constant lambda, which are determined solely by the coefficients of the powerlike divergences. The renormalization flow is asymptotically safe with respect to this fixed point and settles on a lambda(g{sub N}) trajectory after O(10) units of the renormalization mass scale to accuracy 10{sup -7}.

Niedermaier, Max R. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, 37000 Tours (France)

2009-09-04

16

Decomposition in Fixed Point Computation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One result of this paper is the most efficient complementary pivot algorithm to date for handling the optimization problem. The second major contribution is a general structure on fixed point problems which, when present, enables one to work in a lower di...

D. Solow

1977-01-01

17

Multiple Fixed-Point Cell  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper describes the construction and investigation of multiple fixed-point cells usable for the calibration of thermocouples at temperatures above 1100° C. These fixed-point cells made of pure graphite are characterized by a simple construction as well as by a flexible application. The cylindrical basic mount is equipped with a central hole for the insertion of a thermocouple, and with eight drill holes containing exchangeable cartridges which surround the central bore axially symmetrically. The cartridges are filled with different metal-carbon (Me-C) eutectics: cobalt-carbon (Co-C), nickel-carbon (Ni-C), palladium-carbon (Pd-C), and rhodium-carbon (Rh-C). The melting temperatures of the different Me-C eutectics of the cartridges were compared to the melting temperatures of commonly used Me-C eutectic fixed-point cells of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt by using a Pt/Pd thermocouple (Co-C, Ni-C) and Type B thermocouples (Pd-C, Rh-C). The uncertainties (k = 2 ) of the emfs measured at the inflection points of the melting curves are in the order of a few \\upmu V which correspond to temperature equivalents between 0.3 K and 0.6 K. Furthermore, the difference between the melting temperatures of the Co-C and Ni-C cartridges was found to be 4.2 K by using simultaneously two sets of four cartridges filled with the two materials and placed alternately in the eight outer holes of one basic mount.

Edler, F.; Ederer, P.

2014-08-01

18

Multiple Fixed-Point Cell  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper describes the construction and investigation of multiple fixed-point cells usable for the calibration of thermocouples at temperatures above 1100 C. These fixed-point cells made of pure graphite are characterized by a simple construction as well as by a flexible application. The cylindrical basic mount is equipped with a central hole for the insertion of a thermocouple, and with eight drill holes containing exchangeable cartridges which surround the central bore axially symmetrically. The cartridges are filled with different metal-carbon (Me-C) eutectics: cobalt-carbon (Co-C), nickel-carbon (Ni-C), palladium-carbon (Pd-C), and rhodium-carbon (Rh-C). The melting temperatures of the different Me-C eutectics of the cartridges were compared to the melting temperatures of commonly used Me-C eutectic fixed-point cells of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt by using a Pt/Pd thermocouple (Co-C, Ni-C) and Type B thermocouples (Pd-C, Rh-C). The uncertainties () of the emfs measured at the inflection points of the melting curves are in the order of a few V which correspond to temperature equivalents between 0.3 K and 0.6 K. Furthermore, the difference between the melting temperatures of the Co-C and Ni-C cartridges was found to be 4.2 K by using simultaneously two sets of four cartridges filled with the two materials and placed alternately in the eight outer holes of one basic mount.

Edler, F.; Ederer, P.

2014-07-01

19

CANONICAL CONJUGATIONS AT FIXED POINTS OTHER THAN THE DENJOYWOLFF POINT  

E-print Network

CANONICAL CONJUGATIONS AT FIXED POINTS OTHER THAN THE DENJOY­WOLFF POINT PIETRO POGGI­CORRADINI. The author is partially supported by NSF Grant DMS 97­06408. 1 #12; 2 PIETRO POGGI­CORRADINI Theorem 1

Poggi-Corradini, Pietro

20

Sequential conditions for fixed and periodic points  

E-print Network

SEOUL;ENTIA CONDITIONS FOR I)KD AND PERIODIC POINTS A Thesis by Burnis C. Peters, Jr. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE ~Au ust (Month...) 1970 (Year) Major Subject Mathematics SEQUENTIAL CONDITIONS FOR FIXED AND PERIODIC POINTS A Thesis by Burnis C. Peters, Jr. Approved as to style and content by: (Chai n of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member...

Peters, Burnis Charles

2012-06-07

21

Approximately J ? -homomorphisms: A fixed point approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The functional equation (?) is stable if any function g satisfying the equation (?)approximately is near to the true solution of (?). A functional equation is superstable if every solution satisfying the equation approximately is an exact solution of it. Using fixed point methods, we prove the stability and superstability of J?-homomorphisms between J?-algebras for the generalized Jensen-type functional equation

M. Eshaghi Gordji; A. Najati

2010-01-01

22

ASIC For Complex Fixed-Point Arithmetic  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) performs 24-bit, fixed-point arithmetic operations on arrays of complex-valued input data. High-performance, wide-band arithmetic logic unit (ALU) designed for use in computing fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) and for performing ditigal filtering functions. Other applications include general computations involved in analysis of spectra and digital signal processing.

Petilli, Stephen G.; Grimm, Michael J.; Olson, Erlend M.

1995-01-01

23

Fixed points and closure operators: Programmological aspects  

SciTech Connect

The present article continues the research of others into the declarative nature of specification languages that describe the properties of objects in the form of solutions of equations with the left-hand side solved for the unknown, i.e., equations of the form x = f(x), x {element_of} D, where D is the data universe and f is an operator on D. The main purpose of this study is to elucidate the essence of the iterative processes that can be used to find the solutions of this equation, i.e., the fixed points of the operator f. In the programmological context, the data universe should be viewed as a data type, i.e., the set of data should be endowed with an appropriate structure. Operating on the lowest level of abstraction, we regard the data universe as a partially ordered set (poset), and thus speak of the first approximation, the next approximation, and so on. The relevant programmological applications also impose certain restrictions on the operators. Specifically, we consider operators that preserve the initial relation on data. Indeed, if x{prime} is an approximation to x, then we naturally stipulate that f(x{prime}) be an approximation to f(x). Moreover, the operators in applications are always effective; and as we know, effectiveness implies monotonicity. Thus, we consider equations of the form x = f(x), x {element_of} D, where D is a poset and f a monotone operator on D. Contrary to other references, where we used direct methods traceable to the work of Tarski, the main instrument in this study are the so-called a-chains of the element a of a poset relative to an operator. This enables us, first, to describe the fixed points of a monotone operator on any poset and, second, to construct the closure operator on the set of fixed points of the initial monotone operator.

Bui, D.B.; Red`ko, V.N.

1995-09-01

24

Holographic non-Fermi-liquid fixed points.  

PubMed

Techniques arising from string theory can be used to study assemblies of strongly interacting fermions. Via this 'holographic duality', various strongly coupled many-body systems are solved using an auxiliary theory of gravity. Simple holographic realizations of finite density exhibit single-particle spectral functions with sharp Fermi surfaces, of a form distinct from those of the Landau theory. The self-energy is given by a correlation function in an infrared (IR) fixed-point theory that is represented by a two-dimensional anti de Sitter space (AdS(2)) region in the dual gravitational description. Here, we describe in detail the gravity calculation of this IR correlation function. PMID:21422019

Faulkner, Tom; Iqbal, Nabil; Liu, Hong; McGreevy, John; Vegh, David

2011-04-28

25

Partial Fixed-Point Logic on Infinite Structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: We consider an alternative semantics for partial fixed-point logic (PFP). To define the fixed point of a formula in this semantics, the sequence of stages induced by the formula is considered. As soon as this sequence becomes cyclic, the set of elements contained in every stage of the cycle is taken as the fixed point. It is shown that

Stephan Kreutzer; RWTH Aachen

2002-01-01

26

Fixed-point C language for digital signal processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fixed-point C language is proposed for convenient and efficient programming of fixed-point digital signal processors. This language has a `fix' data type that can have an individual integer wordlength according to the range of a variable. It can add or subtract two data having different integer wordlengths by automatically inserting shift operations. The accuracy of the fixed-point multiply operation is

Wonyong Sung; Jiyang Kang

1995-01-01

27

Stress-strain state of plates with point fixing  

Microsoft Academic Search

io Fixing at points, which is technologically expedient and easily practicable, is widely used in modern engineering practice. Such methods include rivet joints and weld seams ob- tained by point welding. A continuous weld seam may be regarded approximately as a system of fixing points. Note that, in applied plate and shell theories based on model concepts, there are no

N. I. Karpov; O. A. Karpova

1989-01-01

28

Error propagation in fixed-point ellipsometric inversions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Direct fixed-point inversions have been commonly used in ellipsometry for rapid determination of the optical constants and thickness of transparent and absorbing films formed on substrates. We formulate here the statistical covariance matrices of these optical parameters sought from a fixed-wave multiple sample, and multiple and single angle of incidence ellipsometric data using different known fixed-point inversions. Maple software used

T. Easwarakhanthan; P. Pigeat

2003-01-01

29

An extension of Mizoguchi-Takahaashi's fixed point theorem  

E-print Network

Our main theorem is an extension of the well-known Mizoguchi-Takahaashi's fixed point theorem [N. Mizogochi and W. Takahashi, Fixed point theorems for multi-valued mappings on complete metric space, {\\it J. Math. Anal. Appl.} 141 (1989) 177--188].

Gordji, M Eshaghi; Ramezani, M; Khodaei, H

2010-01-01

30

An extension of Mizoguchi-Takahaashi's fixed point theorem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our main theorem is an extension of the well-known Mizoguchi-Takahaashi's fixed point theorem [N. Mizogochi and W. Takahashi, Fixed point theorems for multi-valued mappings on complete metric space, {\\\\it J. Math. Anal. Appl.} 141 (1989) 177--188].

M. Eshaghi Gordji; H. Baghani; M. Ramezani; H. Khodaei

2010-01-01

31

On Fixed-point theorems in Intuitionistic Fuzzy metric Space  

E-print Network

In this paper, first we have established two sets of sufficient conditions for a mapping to have unique fixed point in a intuitionistic fuzzy metric space and then we have redefined the contraction mapping in a intuitionistic fuzzy metric space and thereafter we proved the Banach Fixed Point theorem.

T. K. Samanta; Sumit Mohinta; Iqbal H. Jebril

2010-11-06

32

Oxides in metal fixed points of the ITS-90  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the range between 0 °C and 961 °C, the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) depends to a great extent on the freezing points of the pure metals gallium, indium, tin, zinc, aluminium and silver. An up-to-date realization of these fixed points is based on cells containing metals of ultra-high purity (6N or better) and should include a correction for the influence of relevant impurities. Still, chemical analyses of the fixed-point material can show large amounts of oxygen, which had to be neglected so far, because of the lack of detailed knowledge about it, presuming it could be removed from the cell by applying a vacuum (less than 1 Pa) for a few hours. In this paper we discuss an equilibrium of several forms of oxygen in a fixed-point cell, gaseous in the cell's atmosphere, dissolved in the fixed-point metal and as oxide in a separate (solid) phase. We will conclude that in many fixed points most of the oxygen is not dissolved in the metal, but bound in oxides of the fixed-point metal as well as oxides of some impurities. To demonstrate the impact that the precipitation of impurity oxides has on thermometry, two indium fixed-point cells were doped with magnesium and chromium, which leave the fixed-point temperature unchanged. Further evidence is drawn from earlier work. All these results support the presumed existence of (at least one) persistent separate oxide phase in the fixed points of indium, tin, zinc and aluminium, which renders them eutectic or peritectic points and is a more likely reason why the oxygen content of a cell does not influence the fixed-point temperature. To complement these studies, thermodynamic calculations show how to treat the equilibrium in the cell quantitatively. Using available chemical data, a list is provided that indicates for each fixed-point metal (including the other metal fixed points of the ITS-90: mercury, gold, copper) the impurities that probably build oxides. Due to the agreement of the calculated values with the presented experimental results, we suggest excluding those impurities from the correction of a fixed-point temperature (e.g. the SIE method), unless there is strong evidence of their dissolution.

Fahr, Martin; Rudtsch, Steffen

2009-10-01

33

A new compact fixed-point blackbody furnace  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

More and more NMIs are realizing their primary scale themselves with fixed-point blackbodies as their reference standard. However, commercially available fixed-point blackbody furnaces of sufficient quality are not always easy to obtain. CHINO Corp. and NMIJ, AIST jointly developed a new compact fixed-point blackbody furnace. The new furnace has such features as 1) improved temperature uniformity when compared to previous products, enabling better plateau quality, 2) adoption of the hybrid fixed-point cell structure with internal insulation to improve robustness and thereby to extend lifetime, 3) easily ejectable and replaceable heater unit and fixed-point cell design, leading to reduced maintenance cost, 4) interchangeability among multiple fixed points from In to Cu points. The replaceable cell feature facilitates long term maintenance of the scale through management of a group of fixed-point cells of the same type. The compact furnace is easily transportable and therefore can also function as a traveling standard for disseminating the radiation temperature scale, and for maintaining the scale at the secondary level and industrial calibration laboratories. It is expected that the furnace will play a key role of the traveling standard in the anticipated APMP supplementary comparison of the radiation thermometry scale.

Hiraka, K.; Yamada, Y.; Ishii, J.; Oikawa, H.; Shimizu, T.; Kadoya, S.; Kobayashi, T.

2013-09-01

34

Simplified RPE Algorithm and its Fixed-Point Implementation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In mobile communication it is necessary to remove acoustic echo. Most acoustic echo cancellation algorithms are sensitive to double-talk. Recursive prediction error (RPE) algorithm is one of the best solutions to such problem. However integrating the algorithm into headsets is a challenging task due to conversion from floating-point to fixed-point. To address this problem, the simplification approach and fixed-point implementation

Yuan Hongxing; Wu Shaoqun; Zha Changjun

2011-01-01

35

Coincidence and fixed points in symmetric spaces under strict contractions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some common fixed point theorems due to Aamri and El Moutawakil [M. Aamri, D. El Moutawakil, Some new common fixed point theorems under strict contractive conditions, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 270 (2002) 181-188] and Pant and Pant [R.P. Pant, V. Pant, Common fixed points under strict contractive conditions, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 248 (2000) 327-332] proved for strict contractive mappings in metric spaces are extended to symmetric (semi-metric) spaces under tight conditions. Some related results are derived besides discussing illustrative examples which establish the utility of results proved in this note.

Imdad, M.; Ali, Javid; Khan, Ladlay

2006-08-01

36

A Discontinuity in the Distribution of Fixed Point Sums  

E-print Network

A Discontinuity in the Distribution of Fixed Point Sums Edward A. Bender Department of Mathematics existence of other discontinuities in f(n, r) for permutations. We generalize our results to other families

Bender, Ed

37

Combining Deduction Modulo and Logics of Fixed-Point Definitions  

E-print Network

Inductive and coinductive specifications are widely used in formalizing computational systems. Such specifications have a natural rendition in logics that support fixed-point definitions. Another useful formalization device is that of recursive specifications. These specifications are not directly complemented by fixed-point reasoning techniques and, correspondingly, do not have to satisfy strong monotonicity restrictions. We show how to incorporate a rewriting capability into logics of fixed-point definitions towards additionally supporting recursive specifications. In particular, we describe a natural deduction calculus that adds a form of "closed-world" equality - a key ingredient to supporting fixed-point definitions - to deduction modulo, a framework for extending a logic with a rewriting layer operating on formulas. We show that our calculus enjoys strong normalizability when the rewrite system satisfies general properties and we demonstrate its usefulness in specifying and reasoning about syntax-based ...

Baelde, David

2012-01-01

38

Symmetry-breaking bifurcations on multidimensional fixed point subspaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Symmetry-breaking bifurcations associated with fixed point subspaces of dimension greater than one are considered, for maximal isotropy subgroups, using techniques of blowing-up and degree theory. The leading non-linear term in the Taylor expansion of the bifurcation mapping restricted to the fixed point subspace, when satisfying a certain traversality condition or the non-vanishing of an appropriate index, governs the branching. Numerous

Ali Lari-Lavassani; William F. Langford; Koncay Huseyin

1994-01-01

39

Hopfsaddlenode bifurcation for fixed points of 3Ddi#eomorphisms  

E-print Network

map G is constructed, such that at the central bifurcation the derivative has two complex conjugateHopf­saddle­node bifurcation for fixed points of 3D­di#eomorphisms: analysis of a resonance `bubble­saddle­node bifurcation of fixed points of di#eo­ morphisms is analysed by means of a case study: a two­parameter model

Barcelona, Universitat de

40

Fixed point property for general topologies in some Banach spaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the fixed point property with respect to general vector topologies in L-embedded Banach spaces. Considering a class of topologies in l1 such that the standard basis is convergent, we characterize those of them for which the fixed point property holds. We show that in c0-sums of some Banach spaces the weak topology is in a sense the coarsest

MARIA A. JAP; ON PINEDA

2004-01-01

41

Existence and Properties of p-tupling Fixed Points  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We prove the existence of fixed points of p-tupling renormalization operators for interval and circle mappings having a critical point of arbitrary real degree r > 1. Some properties of the resulting maps are studied: analyticity, univalence, behavior as r tends to infinity.

Epstein, Henri

42

Entanglement entropy at infinite randomness fixed points in higher dimensions  

E-print Network

The entanglement entropy of the two-dimensional random transverse Ising model is studied with a numerical implementation of the strong disorder renormalization group. The asymptotic behavior of the entropy per surface area diverges at, and only at, the quantum phase transition that is governed by an infinite randomness fixed point. Here we identify a double-logarithmic multiplicative correction to the area law for the entanglement entropy. This contrasts with the pure area law valid at the infinite randomness fixed point in the diluted transverse Ising model in higher dimensions.

Yu-Cheng Lin; Ferenc Igloi; Heiko Rieger

2007-04-03

43

Exact scaling solutions and fixed points for general scalar field  

E-print Network

We show that the most general dark energy model that possesses a scaling solution $\\rho_\\phi\\propto a^n$ is the k-essence model, which includes both of the quintessence and tachyon models. The exact scaling solutions are then derived. The potential that gives the tracking solution in which dark energy exactly tracks the background matter field is the inverse squared potential. The quintessence field with exponential potential can be obtained from the k-essence field with the inverse squared potential. We also find the fixed points and study their main properties, whereby the scalar field dominant fixed point is identified.

Yungui Gong; Anzhong Wang; Yuan-Zhong Zhang

2006-03-13

44

Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points  

SciTech Connect

The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I. [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), 46 Ozernaya St., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation)] [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), 46 Ozernaya St., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation)

2013-09-11

45

Some Fixed Point Theorems in Multiplicative Metric Space  

E-print Network

\\"Ozavsar and Cevikel (Fixed point of multiplicative contraction mappings on multiplicative metric space. arXiv:1205.5131v1 [matn.GN] (2012))initiated the notion of the multiplicative metric space such that the usual triangular inequality is replaced by "multiplicative triangle inequality $d(x,y)\\leq d(x,z).d(z,y)$ for all $x,y,z\\in X$". The objective of this manuscript is to derive some fixed point theorems in the context of multiplicative metric space.

Muhammad Sarwar; Badshah-e-Rome

2014-09-17

46

Oxides in metal fixed points of the ITS90  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the range between 0 °C and 961 °C, the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) depends to a great extent on the freezing points of the pure metals gallium, indium, tin, zinc, aluminium and silver. An up-to-date realization of these fixed points is based on cells containing metals of ultra-high purity (6N or better) and should include a correction

Martin Fahr; Steffen Rudtsch

2009-01-01

47

A Hybrid Common Fixed Point Theorem under Certain Recent Properties  

PubMed Central

We prove a common fixed point theorem for a hybrid pair of occasionally coincidentally idempotent mappings via common limit range property. Our result improves some results from the existing literature, especially the ones contained in Sintunavarat and Kumam (2009). Some illustrative and interesting examples to highlight the realized improvements are also furnished. PMID:24592191

Imdad, Mohammad

2014-01-01

48

Fixed Point Problems for Linear Transformations on Pythagorean Triples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, an attempt is made to find all linear transformations that map a standard Pythagorean triple (a Pythagorean triple [x y z][superscript T] with y being even) into a standard Pythagorean triple, which have [3 4 5][superscript T] as their fixed point. All such transformations form a monoid S* under matrix product. It is found that S*…

Zhan, M.-Q.; Tong, J.-C.; Braza, P.

2006-01-01

49

A BROUWER FIXED POINT THEOREM FOR GRAPH ENDOMORPHISMS  

E-print Network

history. Brouwer's theorem follows from Lefschetz because a manifold M homeomorphic to the unit ball has assures that any continuous transformation on the closed ball in Euclidean space has a fixed point. First [17, 25, 16]. It has its use for example in game theory: the Kakutani generalization [28] has been

Knill, Oliver

50

Fixed points, stable manifolds, weather regimes, and their predictability  

In a simple, one-layer atmospheric model, we study the links between low-frequency variability and the model’s fixed points in phase space. The model dynamics is characterized by the coexistence of multiple “weather regimes.” To investigate the transitions from one regime to another, we focus on the identification of stable manifolds associated with fixed points. We show that these manifolds act as separatrices between regimes. We track each manifold by making use of two local predictability measures arising from the meteorological applications of nonlinear dynamics, namely, “bred vectors” and singular vectors. These results are then verified in the framework of ensemble forecasts issued from “clouds” (ensembles) of initial states. The divergence of the trajectories allows us to establish the connections between zones of low predictability, the geometry of the stable manifolds, and transitions between regimes.

Deremble, Bruno; D'Andrea, Fabio; Ghil, Michael [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United Staes). Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

2009-10-27

51

On String Theory Duals of Lifshitz-like Fixed Points  

E-print Network

We present type IIB supergravity solutions which are expected to be dual to certain Lifshitz-like fixed points with anisotropic scale invariance. They are expected to describe a class of D3-D7 systems and their finite temperature generalizations are straightforward. We show that there exist solutions that interpolate between these anisotropic solutions in the IR and the standard AdS5 solutions in the UV. This predicts anisotropic RG flows from familiar isotropic fixed points to anisotropic ones. In our case, these RG flows are triggered by a non-zero theta-angle in Yang-Mills theories that linearly depends on one of the spatial coordinates. We study the perturbations around these backgrounds and discuss the possibility of instability. We also holographically compute their thermal entropies, viscosities, and entanglement entropies.

Tatsuo Azeyanagi; Wei Li; Tadashi Takayanagi

2009-05-06

52

Expressive Equivalence of Least and Inflationary Fixed-Point Logic  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the relationship between least and inflationary fixed-point logic. By results of Gurevich and Shelah from 1986, it has been known that on finite structures both log- ics have the same expressive power. On infinite structures however, the question whether there is a formula inIFP not equivalent to anyLFP-formula was still open. In this paper, we settle the question

Stephan Kreutzer; RWTH Aachen

2002-01-01

53

Approximately J?-homomorphisms: A fixed point approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The functional equation (?) is stable if any function g satisfying the equation (?)approximately is near to the true solution of (?). A functional equation is superstable if every solution satisfying the equation approximately is an exact solution of it. Using fixed point methods, we prove the stability and superstability of J?-homomorphisms between J?-algebras for the generalized Jensen-type functional equation f({x+y}/{2})+f({x-y}/{2})=f(x).

Eshaghi Gordji, M.; Najati, A.

2010-05-01

54

Fixed points of multiplicative contraction mappings on multiplicative metric spaces  

E-print Network

In this paper, we first discussed multiplicative metric mapping by giving some topological properties of the relevant multiplicative metric space. As an interesting result of our discussions, we observed that the set of positive real numbers $\\mathbb{R}_+$ is a complete multiplicative metric space with respect to the multiplicative absolute value function. Furthermore, we introduced concept of multiplicative contraction mapping and proved some fixed point theorems of such mappings on complete multiplicative metric spaces

Muttalip Ozavsar; Adem Cengiz Cevikel

2012-05-23

55

The Dynamics of Multidimensional Secession: Fixed Points and Ideological Condensation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We explore a generalized, stochastic seceder model of societal dynamics with variable size polling groups and higher-dimensional opinion vectors, revealing its essential modes of self-organized segregation. Renormalizing to a discrete, deterministic version, we pin down the upper critical size of the sampling group and analytically uncover a self-similar hierarchy of dynamically stable, multiple-branch fixed points. In d?3, the evolving, coarsening population suffers collapse to a 2D ideological plane.

Soulier, Arne; Halpin-Healy, Tim

2003-06-01

56

Impurity and thermal modelling of SPRT fixed-points  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Impurities in pure metal fixed points for the calibration of standard platinum resistance thermometers (SPRTs) causes significant variations in the freezing temperature, of the order of sub-mK to several mK. This often represents the largest contribution to the overall uncertainty of the fixed point temperature, and it is therefore of great interest to explore ways of correcting for this effect. The sum of individual estimates (SIE) method, in which the contributions of all the impurities are summed, is the recommended way of determining the correction if one has an accurate knowledge of the impurities present and their low concentration liquidus slopes. However, due to the difficulty in obtaining reliable iningot impurity corrections, it remains useful to investigate the influence of impurities on freezing curves using modeling techniques, and ultimately to parameterize the freezing curve by e.g. least-squares fitting to make corrections to the temperature of the freeze. Some success in analyzing freezing curves has been achieved. When parameterizing experimentally determined freezing curves, it is necessary to reliably determine the freezing end-point, and minimize spurious thermal effects. We outline some methods for meeting these requirements. As the influence of impurities is always convolved with thermal influences it is instructive to construct a model which takes into account both heat and impurity transport. We describe the development of more sophisticated models which take both these effects into account.

Pearce, J. V.; Veltcheva, R. I.; Large, M. J.

2013-09-01

57

Quenched spectroscopy with fixed-point and chirally improved fermions  

E-print Network

We present results from quenched spectroscopy calculations with the parametrized fixed-point and the chirally improved Dirac operators. Both these operators are approximate solutions of the Ginsparg-Wilson equation and have good chiral properties. This allows us to work at small quark masses and we explore pseudoscalar-mass to vector-mass ratios down to 0.28. We discuss meson and baryon masses, their scaling properties, finite volume effects and compare our results with recent large scale simulations. We find that the size of quenching artifacts of the masses is strongly correlated with their experimentally observed widths and that the gauge and hadronic scales are consistent.

BGR Collaboration; Christof Gattringer; Meinulf Gockeler; Peter Hasenfratz; Simon Hauswirth; Kieran Holland; Thomas Jorg; Keisuke J. Juge; C. B. Lang; Ferenc Niedermayer; P. E. L. Rakow; Stefan Schaefer; Andreas Schafer

2003-07-08

58

Quenched QCD with fixed-point and chirally improved fermion  

E-print Network

In this contribution we present results from quenched QCD simulations with the parameterized fixed-point (FP) and the chirally improved (CI) Dirac operator. Both these operators are approximate solutions of the Ginsparg-Wilson equation and have good chiral properties. We focus our discussion on observables sensitive to chirality. In particular we explore pion masses down to 210 MeV in light hadron spectroscopy, quenched chiral logs, the pion decay constant and the pion scattering length. We discuss finite volume effects, scaling properties of the FP and CI operators and performance issues in their numerical implementation.

Christof Gattringer; Meinulf Göckeler; Peter Hasenfratz; Simon Hauswirth; Kieran Holland; Thomas Jörg; K. J. Juge; C. B. Lang; Ferenc Niedermayer; P. E. L. Rakow; Stefan Schaefer; Andreas Schäfer

2002-09-10

59

TCP over OBS - fixed-point load and loss.  

PubMed

The sending rate of commonly used TCP protocols is tightly coupled to packet loss within the network: a high rate of packet loss will cause a sender to slow down, thereby reducing the network load and decreasing subsequent packet loss rates. In this paper, we combine a widely verified source rate TCP model with an Optical Burst Switching (OBS) loss model, to find fixed-point input loads and loss rates for an OBS link carrying TCP traffic. In doing so, we show that if OBS networks are to be efficiently used to carry TCP traffic, many wavelengths with full wavelength conversion are required. PMID:19503115

Cameron, Craig; Le Vu, Hai; Choi, Jung; Bilgrami, Syed; Zukerman, Moshe; Kang, Minho

2005-11-14

60

Remarks on a fixed point theorem of Caristi  

E-print Network

1977) David Lee Egle, B . S . , Pan American University Chairman of Advisory Committee: L. F. Guseman, Jr. Let (X, d) be a complete metric space and f a selfmap of X. It is shown that various known theorems on the existence of fixed and periodic... CHAPTER 0 INTRODUCTION Let (X, d) be a metric space and let f be a selfmap of X; that is, f : X ~ X. Let N denote the positive integers and R the nonnegative real numbers. The ~se uence of iterates of f at point x X is the sec en e defined by f (x...

Egle, David Lee

2012-06-07

61

Instantons and the fixed point topological charge in the two-dimensional O(3) sigma-model  

E-print Network

We define a fixed point topological charge for the two-dimensional O(3) lattice sigma-model which is free of topological defects. We use this operator in combination with the fixed point action to measure the topological susceptibility for a wide range of correlation lengths. The results strongly suggest that it is not a physical quantity in this model. The procedure, however, can be applied to other asymptotically free theories as well.

Marc Blatter; Rudolf Burkhalter; Peter Hasenfratz; Ferenc Niedermayer

1995-08-29

62

A Floating-point to Fixed-point C Converter for Fixed-point Digital Signal Processors  

Microsoft Academic Search

An automatic scaling C program translator is developed for the efficient execution of application programs infixed-point digital signal processors. The program for range estimation is automatically generated by insertingcodes which collect the statistics of each signal during the simulation. With the range information, the number ofshifts needed for the scaling is determined and the floating-point program is converted to a

Ki-il Kum; Jiyang Kang

1997-01-01

63

Attracting fixed points for heavy particles in the vicinity of a vortex pair  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the behavior of heavy inertial particles in the flow field of two like-signed vortices. In a frame co-rotating with the two vortices, we find that stable fixed points exist for these heavy inertial particles; these stable frame-fixed points exist only for particle Stokes number St < Stcr. We estimate Stcr and compare this with direct numerical simulations, and find that the addition of viscosity increases the Stcr slightly. We find that the rate at which particles fall into the fixed points increases until the fixed points disappear at St = Stcr. These frame-fixed points are between fixed points and limit cycles in character.

Ravichandran, S.; Perlekar, Prasad; Govindarajan, Rama

2014-01-01

64

Fixed-point error analysis of Winograd Fourier transform algorithms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The quantization error introduced by the Winograd Fourier transform algorithm (WFTA) when implemented in fixed-point arithmetic is studied and compared with that of the fast Fourier transform (FFT). The effect of ordering the computational modules and the relative contributions of data quantization error and coefficient quantization error are determined. In addition, the quantization error introduced by the Good-Winograd (GW) algorithm, which uses Good's prime-factor decomposition for the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) together with Winograd's short length DFT algorithms, is studied. Error introduced by the WFTA is, in all cases, worse than that of the FFT. In general, the WFTA requires one or two more bits for data representation to give an error similar to that of the FFT. Error introduced by the GW algorithm is approximately the same as that of the FFT.

Patterson, R. W.; Mcclellan, J. H.

1978-01-01

65

The split common fixed-point problem for demicontractive mappings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on the very recent work by Censor and Segal (2009 J. Convex Anal. 16 587-600) and inspired by Xu (2006 Inverse Problems 22 2021-34) and Yang (2004 Inverse Problems 20 1261-6), we investigate an algorithm for solving the split common fixed-point problem for the class of demicontractive operators in a Hilbert space. Our results improve and/or develop previously discussed feasibility problems and related algorithms. It is worth mentioning that the convex feasibility formalism is at the core of the modeling of many inverse problems and has been used to model significant real-world problems, for instance, in sensor networks, in radiation therapy treatment planning, in computerized tomography and data compression, see Censor et al (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 2353-65) and Combettes (1996 Adv. Imaging Electron. Phys. 95 155-270) and references therein.

Moudafi, A.

2010-05-01

66

A Fixed-Point Iteration Method with Quadratic Convergence  

SciTech Connect

The fixed-point iteration algorithm is turned into a quadratically convergent scheme for a system of nonlinear equations. Most of the usual methods for obtaining the roots of a system of nonlinear equations rely on expanding the equation system about the roots in a Taylor series, and neglecting the higher order terms. Rearrangement of the resulting truncated system then results in the usual Newton-Raphson and Halley type approximations. In this paper the introduction of unit root functions avoids the direct expansion of the nonlinear system about the root, and relies, instead, on approximations which enable the unit root functions to considerably widen the radius of convergence of the iteration method. Methods for obtaining higher order rates of convergence and larger radii of convergence are discussed.

Walker, Kevin P. [Engineering Science Software, Inc.; Sham, Sam [ORNL

2012-01-01

67

Fixed Point Transformations Based Iterative Control of a Polymerization Reaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a paradigm of strongly coupled non-linear multi-variable dynamic systems the mathematical model of the free-radical polymerization of methyl-metachrylate with azobis (isobutyro-nitrile) as an initiator and toluene as a solvent taking place in a jacketed Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is considered. In the adaptive control of this system only a single input variable is used as the control signal (the process input, i.e. dimensionless volumetric flow rate of the initiator), and a single output variable is observed (the process output, i.e. the number-average molecular weight of the polymer). Simulation examples illustrate that on the basis of a very rough and primitive model consisting of two scalar variables various fixed-point transformations based convergent iterations result in a novel, sophisticated adaptive control.

Tar, József K.; Rudas, Imre J.

68

Coupled fixed point theorems for contractions in intuitionistic fuzzy normed spaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following the definition of coupled fixed point [T. G. Bhaskar, V. Lakshmikantham, Fixed point theorems in partially ordered metric spaces and applications, Nonlinear Anal. 65 (2006) 1379–1393], we prove a coupled fixed point theorem for contractive mappings in partially complete intuitionistic fuzzy normed spaces.

Madjid Eshaghi Gordji; Hamid Baghani; Yeol Je Cho

2011-01-01

69

24 CFR 50.16 - Decision points for policy actions.  

...2014-04-01 false Decision points for policy actions. 50.16 Section 50.16 ...ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY General Policy: Decision Points § 50.16 Decision points for policy actions. Either an EA and FONSI or...

2014-04-01

70

24 CFR 50.16 - Decision points for policy actions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Decision points for policy actions. 50.16 Section 50.16 ...ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY General Policy: Decision Points § 50.16 Decision points for policy actions. Either an EA and FONSI or...

2011-04-01

71

24 CFR 50.16 - Decision points for policy actions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Decision points for policy actions. 50.16 Section 50.16 ...ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY General Policy: Decision Points § 50.16 Decision points for policy actions. Either an EA and FONSI or...

2010-04-01

72

24 CFR 50.16 - Decision points for policy actions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Decision points for policy actions. 50.16 Section 50.16 ...ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY General Policy: Decision Points § 50.16 Decision points for policy actions. Either an EA and FONSI or...

2012-04-01

73

24 CFR 50.16 - Decision points for policy actions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Decision points for policy actions. 50.16 Section 50.16 ...ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY General Policy: Decision Points § 50.16 Decision points for policy actions. Either an EA and FONSI or...

2013-04-01

74

Fixed-Point Optimization Utility for C and C Based Digital Signal Processing Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fixed-point optimization utility software is devel- oped that can aid scaling and wordlength determination of digital signal processing algorithms written in C or C. This utility consists of two programs: the range estimator and the fixed-point simulator . The former estimates the ranges of floating- point variables for purposes of automatic scaling, and the latter translates floating-point programs into fixed-point

Seehyun Kim; Ki-Il Kum; Wonyong Sung

1998-01-01

75

Points fixes des applications compactes dans les espaces ULC  

E-print Network

A topological space is locally equiconnected if there exists a neighborhood $U$ of the diagonal in $X\\times X$ and a continuous map $\\lambda:U\\times[0,1]\\to X$ such that $\\lambda(x,y,0)=x$, $\\lambda(x,y,1)=y$ et $\\lambda(x,x,t)=x$ for $(x,y)\\in U$ and $(x,t)\\in X\\times[0,1]$. This class contains all ANRs, all locally contractible topological groups and the open subsets of convex subsets of linear topological spaces. In a series of papers, we extended the fixed point theory of compact continuous maps, which was well developped for ANRs, to all separeted locally equiconnected spaces. This generalization includes a proof of Schauder's conjecture for compact maps of convex sets. This paper is a survey of that work. The generalization has two steps: the metrizable case, and the passage from the metrizable case to the general case. The metrizable case is, by far, the most difficult. To treat this case, we introduced in [4] the notion of algebraic ANR. Since the proof that metrizable locally equiconnected spaces are...

Cauty, Robert

2010-01-01

76

Holographic Duals of a Family of N=1 Fixed Points  

E-print Network

We construct a family of warped AdS_5 compactifications of IIB supergravity that are the holographic duals of the complete set of N=1 fixed points of a Z_2 quiver gauge theory. This family interpolates between the T^{1,1} compactification with no three-form flux and the Z_2 orbifold of the Pilch-Warner geometry which contains three-form flux. This family of solutions is constructed by making the most general Ansatz allowed by the symmetries of the field theory. We use Killing spinor methods because the symmetries impose two simple projection conditions on the Killing spinors, and these greatly reduce the problem. We see that generic interpolating solution has a nontrivial dilaton in the internal five-manifold. We calculate the central charge of the gauge theories from the supergravity backgrounds and find that it is 27/32 of the parent N=2, quiver gauge theory. We believe that the projection conditions that we derived here will be useful for a much larger class of N=1 holographic RG-flows.

N. Halmagyi; K. Pilch; C. Romelsberger; N. P. Warner

2005-06-24

77

The $S^1$ fixed points in Quot-schemes and mirror principle computations  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the $S^1$-action on the Quot-scheme $\\\\Quot({\\\\cal E}^n)$ associated to the trivial bundle ${\\\\cal E}^n=CP^1\\\\times{\\\\smallBbb C}^n$. In particlular, the topology of the $S^1$-fixed-point components in $\\\\Quot({\\\\cal E}^n)$ and the $S^1$-weights of the normal bundle of these components are worked out. Mirror Principle, as developed by three of the current authors in the series of work [L-L-Y1, I, II, III,

Bong H. Lian; Chien-Hao Liu; Kefeng Liu; Shing-Tung Yau

2001-01-01

78

Some Extensions of Discrete Fixed Point Theorems and Their Applications to the Game Theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As is well-known in the game theory, fixed point theorems are useful to show the existence of Nash equilibrium. Since they are mathematical tools in continuous variables, it is expected that discrete fixed point theorems also useful to guarantee the existence of pure-strategy Nash equilibrium. In this talk, we review three types of discrete fixed point theorems, give some extensions, and apply them to non-cooperative games.

Kawasaki, Hidefumi

2009-09-01

79

Memory difference control of unknown unstable fixed points: Drifting parameter conditions and delayed measurement  

E-print Network

Difference control schemes for controlling unstable fixed points become important if the exact position of the fixed point is unavailable or moving due to drifting parameters. We propose a memory difference control method for stabilization of a priori unknown unstable fixed points by introducing a memory term. If the amplitude of the control applied in the previous time step is added to the present control signal, fixed points with arbitrary Lyapunov numbers can be controlled. This method is also extended to compensate arbitrary time steps of measurement delay. We show that our method stabilizes orbits of the Chua circuit where ordinary difference control fails.

Jens Christian Claussen; Thorsten Mausbach; Alexander Piel; Heinz Georg Schuster

2006-09-20

80

Copper Fixed-Point Measurements for Radiation Thermometry at National Research Council  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to its high transition temperature relative to other fixed points defined in the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) and its relatively low cost compared to silver and gold, copper is often chosen as the fixed point used to define the ITS-90 above 1235 K at national measurement institutes. Measurement of the copper freezing point can be done in a variety of furnaces. Although there are a large number of copper fixed-point designs, we expect the freezing temperatures to be the same. The difference between realizing different sized fixed points and the use of different furnaces in which to realize them is explored here. A traditional, large aperture fixed-point containing over 600 g of copper is compared to a hybrid-type fixed point containing only 15 g of copper and a commercial fixed point. Three types of furnaces including a heat-pipe furnace, a compact furnace, and a high-temperature blackbody were used to realize the copper freezing point. Between the fixed-point types, only the length of the plateau differed. However, a significant difference was found between the freezing temperatures determined in the different furnaces, and this difference was independent of cell type.

Todd, A. D. W.; Woods, D. J.

2014-07-01

81

System level fixed-point design based on an interpolative approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design process for fixed-point implementations eitherin software or in hardware requires a bit-true specificationof the algorithm in order to analyze quantization effectson an algorithmical level, abstracting from implementationaldetails.On the other hand, system design starts froma floating-point description into a fixed-point description becomesnecessary.Within this paper we present a tool thatallows an automated, interactive transformation from floating-pointANSI-C into a bit-true specification

Markus Willems; Volker Bürsgens; Holger Keding; Thorsten Grötker; Heinrich Meyr

1997-01-01

82

The resolution of field identification fixed points in diagonal coset theories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fixed point resolution problem is solved for diagonal coset theories. The primary fields into which the fixed points are resolved are described by submodules of the branching spaces, obtained as eigenspaces of the automorphisms that implement field identification. To compute the characters and the modular S-matrix we use ‘orbit Lie algebras’ and ‘twining characters’, which were introduced in a

Jürgen Fuchs; Bert Schellekens; Christoph Schweigert

1996-01-01

83

The Hopfsaddlenode bifurcation for fixed points of 3Ddi#eomorphisms  

E-print Network

The Hopf­saddle­node bifurcation for fixed points of 3D­di#eomorphisms: a computer assisted phenomena are studied near a Hopf­saddle­node (HSN) bifurcation of fixed points of 3D case is con­ sidered here. A model map is obtained by a natural construction, through per­ turbation

84

Hopf-saddle-node bifurcation for fixed points of 3D-diffeomorphisms  

E-print Network

map G is constructed, such that at the central bifurcation the derivative has two complex conjugateHopf-saddle-node bifurcation for fixed points of 3D-diffeomorphisms: analysis of a resonance-saddle-node bifurcation of fixed points of diffeo- morphisms is analysed by means of a case study: a two-parameter model

Broer, H.W.

85

Many flavor QCD as exploration of the walking behavior with the approximate IR fixed point  

E-print Network

We present the first report of the LatKMI collaboration on the the lattice QCD simulation performed at the KMI computer, "$\\varphi$", for the cases of 4 flavors and 8 flavors, the latter being expected to be a candidate for the walking technicolor having an approximate scale invariance near the infrared fixed point. The simulation was carried out based on the highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) action. In this proceedings, we report preliminary results on the spectrum, analyzed through the chiral perturbation theory and the finite-size hyperscaling. We observe qualitatively different behavior of the 8-flavor case in contrast to the 4-flavor case which shows clear indication of the hadronic phase as in the usual QCD.

Yasumichi Aoki; Tatsumi Aoyama; Masafumi Kurachi; Toshihide Maskawa; Kei-ichi Nagai; Hiroshi Ohki; Akihiro Shibata; Koichi Yamawaki; Takeshi Yamazaki

2012-02-21

86

Comparison of realizations of Re-C fixed points filled and measured at NPL and NRC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Re-C fixed point was filled at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), UK and its melting temperature compared to a fixed point that had been filled previously at NPL. Both of these fixed points were of the hybrid type and used a purified graphite foil between the sacrificial graphite sleeve and the outer crucible. The melting temperatures of these two fixed points were compared and found to agree within the comparison uncertainties. Another Re-C fixed point was filled at the National Research Council (NRC), Canada. This fixed point was also of the hybrid type but contained carbon-composite sheet as the liner between the sleeve and the outer crucible. The melting temperatures of the fixed point filled at NPL and the one filled at NRC were compared and found to agree within the uncertainties of the comparison. When the ITS-90 temperatures at the Re-C melting point (˜ 2474 °C) measured at NPL were compared to those measured at NRC they were also found to agree within the uncertainties of their respective scales.

Todd, A. D. W.; Lowe, D. H.; Dong, W.; Woods, D. J.

2013-09-01

87

A New Co-C Eutectic Fixed-Point Cell for Thermocouple Calibration at  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The eutectic Co-C is a promising system to serve as a thermometric fixed point beyond the freezing point of copper (). Some national metrology institutes have developed, characterized, and compared their Co-C fixed-point cells based on conventional designs. Indeed, the fixed-point cells constructed are directly inspired by the technologies applied to the fixed points of the ITS-90 to the lower levels of temperature. By studying the eutectic metal-carbon systems, is appears that the high temperatures of implementation give a set of difficulties, such as the strong mechanical stresses on the graphite crucibles, due to the important thermal expansion of the eutectic alloys during their phase transitions. If these devices are suitable with research activities to serve like primary standards, it is not envisaged to propose them for a direct application to the calibration activities for the industry. As regards the limited robustness of the conventional fixed-point cells constructed, an intensive use of these device would not be reasonable, in term of cost for example. In this paper, a new Co-C fixed-point design is introduced. This low cost device has been developed specifically for intensive use in thermocouple calibration activities, with the aim of achieving the lowest level of uncertainties as is practicable. Thus, in this paper, the metrological characterization of this device is also presented, and a direct comparison to a primary Co-C fixed-point cell previously constructed is discussed.

Failleau, G.; Deuzé, T.; Jouin, D.; Mokdad, S.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

2014-07-01

88

Comparison of the New NPL Primary Standard Ag Fixed-Point Blackbody Source with the Primary Standard Fixed Point of PTB  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Above the freezing point of silver (961.78 °C), the International Temperature Scale of 1990 is defined in terms of Planck's radiation law. The scale is maintained and disseminated using a validated and linear pyrometer in conjunction with a blackbody reference source at either the Ag, Au (1064.18 °C) or Cu (1084.62 °C) freezing point. In order to realize the scale with the highest precision high quality, well-characterised, reproducible fixed-point blackbody sources are required. Such sources have been maintained at NPL for a number of years, but it was felt that improvements to the design would be beneficial. A new Ag point blackbody source has therefore been constructed. The new design will improve the quality and reproducibility of the melting and freezing plateaux and reduce errors due to the `out-of-focus' size-of-source effect which is difficult to measure and to eliminate. Full details of the design of the new source, including results of the assessment of its performance, are described. Critical for the application of fixed-point blackbodies as primary temperature standards is the precise knowledge of the emissivity of the cavity, which causes a correction to the melting and freezing temperature of the ingot. As blackbody emissivities are difficult to assess experimentally, two different numerical approaches developed at NPL and PTB are used to calculate the blackbody emissivity. In order to further validate the performance of the new Ag fixed-point blackbody it has been compared with the Au primary fixed-point blackbody of PTB. For the comparison the ratios of the spectral radiances of the fixed-point blackbodies were measured at 650 nm and 950 nm using the PTB monochromator-based spectral radiance calibration facility, and at 654 nm and 953 nm using the PTB interference filter-based primary photoelectric pyrometer.

McEvoy, H. C.; Machin, G.; Friedrich, R.; Hartmann, J.; Hollandt, J.

2003-09-01

89

Floating to Fixed-Point Refinement in Matlab with an Object-Oriented Library  

Microsoft Academic Search

An object-oriented fixed-point library for Matlab has been developed. We present a design flow for DSP ASIC applications where this library is used for floating- to fixed-point refinement. Matlab is chosen for its excellence and popularity in system design and modeling. The library allows a system designer to model e.g. a receiver architecture with Matlab floating point operations and then

Henrik Olson; Axel Jantsch; Hannu Tenhunen

1999-01-01

90

Chiral Y junction of Luttinger liquid wires at weak coupling: Lines of stable fixed points  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We calculate the conductances of a Y-junction setup of Luttinger liquid wires threaded by a magnetic flux, allowing for a different interaction strength g3?g in the third wire. The scattering matrix and the matrix of conductances are parametrized by three variables. For these we derive coupled renormalization group (RG) equations, up to second order in the interaction, within the scattering state formalism. The fixed point structure of these equations is analyzed in detail. For a repulsive interaction (g,g3>0) there is only one stable fixed point, corresponding to the complete separation of the wires. For an attractive interaction (g<0 and/or g3<0) four fixed points are found, whose stability depends on the interaction strength. For special values of the interaction parameters (a) g=0, g3<0 or (b) g3+g2/2=0, g<0 we find whole lines of stable fixed points. We conjecture that lines of fixed points appear generically at interfaces in the interaction coupling constant space separating two regions with different stable fixed points. We also find that in certain regions of the g-g3 plane the RG flow is towards a fixed point without chirality, implying that the effect of the magnetic flux is completely screened.

Aristov, D. N.; Wölfle, P.

2012-07-01

91

Common fixed points in best approximation for Banach operator pairs with Ciric type I-contractions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The common fixed point theorems, similar to those of Ciric [Lj.B. Ciric, On a common fixed point theorem of a Gregus type, Publ. Inst. Math. (Beograd) (N.S.) 49 (1991) 174-178; Lj.B. Ciric, On Diviccaro, Fisher and Sessa open questions, Arch. Math. (Brno) 29 (1993) 145-152; Lj.B. Ciric, On a generalization of Gregus fixed point theorem, Czechoslovak Math. J. 50 (2000) 449-458], Fisher and Sessa [B. Fisher, S. Sessa, On a fixed point theorem of Gregus, Internat. J. Math. Math. Sci. 9 (1986) 23-28], Jungck [G. Jungck, On a fixed point theorem of Fisher and Sessa, Internat. J. Math. Math. Sci. 13 (1990) 497-500] and Mukherjee and Verma [R.N. Mukherjee, V. Verma, A note on fixed point theorem of Gregus, Math. Japon. 33 (1988) 745-749], are proved for a Banach operator pair. As applications, common fixed point and approximation results for Banach operator pair satisfying Ciric type contractive conditions are obtained without the assumption of linearity or affinity of either T or I. Our results unify and generalize various known results to a more general class of noncommuting mappings.

Hussain, N.

2008-02-01

92

Feasibility-Based Bounds Tightening via Fixed Points  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The search tree size of the spatial Branch-and-Bound algorithm for Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Programming depends on many factors, one of which is the width of the variable ranges at every tree node. A range reduction technique often employed is called Feasibility Based Bounds Tightening, which is known to be practically fast, and is thus deployed at every node of the search tree. From time to time, however, this technique fails to converge to its limit point in finite time, thereby slowing the whole Branch-and-Bound search considerably. In this paper we propose a polynomial time method, based on solving a linear program, for computing the limit point of the Feasibility Based Bounds Tightening algorithm applied to linear equality and inequality constraints.

Belotti, Pietro; Cafieri, Sonia; Lee, Jon; Liberti, Leo

93

Common fixed point theorems for maps under a contractive condition of integral type  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two common fixed point theorems for mapping of complete metric space under a general contractive inequality of integral type and satisfying minimal commutativity conditions are proved. These results extend and improve several previous results, particularly Theorem 4 of Rhoades [B.E. Rhoades, Two fixed point theorems for mappings satisfying a general contractive condition of integral type, Int. J. Math. Math. Sci. 63 (2003) 4007-4013] and Theorem 4 of Sessa [S. Sessa, On a weak commutativity condition of mappings in fixed point considerations, Publ. Inst. Math. (Beograd) (N.S.) 32 (46) (1982) 149-153].

Djoudi, A.; Merghadi, F.

2008-05-01

94

A floating-point to integer C converter with shift reduction for fixed-point digital signal processors  

Microsoft Academic Search

A floating-point to integer C program translator is developed for convenient programming and efficient use of fixed-point programmable digital signal processors (DSPs). It not only converts data types and supports automatic scaling, but also conducts shift optimization to enhance execution speed. Since the input and output of this translator are ANSI C compliant programs, it can be used for any

Ki-Il Kum; Jiyang Kang; Wonyong Sung

1999-01-01

95

47 CFR 90.473 - Operation of internal transmitter control systems through licensed fixed control points.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Operation of internal transmitter control systems through licensed fixed control points. 90.473 Section 90.473 Telecommunication...PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Transmitter Control Internal Transmitter Control Systems §...

2010-10-01

96

ON GUPTA-BELNAP REVISION THEORIES OF TRUTH, KRIPKEAN FIXED POINTS, AND THE NEXT STABLE SET.  

E-print Network

ON GUPTA-BELNAP REVISION THEORIES OF TRUTH, KRIPKEAN FIXED POINTS concepts associated with the revision theory* * of truth of Gupta and Belnap. We categorize) account of varied revision sequences - as a generalised algorit* *hmic theory of truth. This enables

Welch, Philip

97

Simulation-based word-length optimization method for fixed-point digital signal processing systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Word-length optimization and scaling software that utilizes the fixed-point simulation results using realistic input signal samples is developed for the application to general, including nonlinear and time-varying, signal processing systems. Word-length optimization is conducted to minimize the hardware implementation cost while satisfying a fixed-point performance measure. In order to minimize the computing time, signal grouping and efficient search methods are

Wonyong Sung; Ki-Il Kum

1995-01-01

98

On Fixed-point theorems in Intuitionistic Fuzzy metric Space I  

E-print Network

In this paper, first we have established two sets of sufficient conditions for a TS-IF contractive mapping to have unique fixed point in a intuitionistic fuzzy metric space. Then we have defined \\,$(\\,\\epsilon \\,,\\, \\lambda\\,)$\\, IF-uniformly locally contractive mapping and \\,$\\eta\\,-$\\,chainable space, where it has been proved that the \\,$(\\,\\epsilon \\,,\\, \\lambda\\,)$\\, IF-uniformly locally contractive mapping possesses a fixed point

T. K. Samanta; Sumit Mohinta

2011-03-15

99

Influence of Impurities and Filling Protocol on the Aluminum Fixed Point  

Microsoft Academic Search

To improve the uncertainty of the aluminum fixed point, a study was launched by LNE-INM\\/CNAM in the framework of the EUROMET\\u000a Project 732 “Toward more accurate temperature fixed points” (Coordinating laboratory: LNE-INM\\/CNAM, 17 partner countries).\\u000a A new open cell was filled with aluminum of 99.99995% purity. A French laboratory carried out elemental analysis of the sample\\u000a using glow discharge-mass spectrometry

E. Renaot; M. H. Valin; M. Elgourdou

2008-01-01

100

Fixed Points, Nash Equilibria, and the Existential Theory of the Reals  

E-print Network

Fixed Points, Nash Equilibria, and the Existential Theory of the Reals Marcus Schaefer School@cs.rochester.edu Abstract We introduce a new complexity class R based on the existential theory of the reals, and show points, Brouwer, existential theory of the real numbers, Nash equilibrium, computational complexity 1

Schaefer, Marcus

101

Cost-beneficial licensing action program at Turkey Point Plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Turkey Point plant cost-beneficial licensing action (CBLA) program focuses on safety-neutral regulatory issues that have the potential to require plant shutdown, derate, or preclude startup or that require operator workarounds to address.

Weinkam

1995-01-01

102

Cost-beneficial licensing action program at Turkey Point Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Turkey Point plant cost-beneficial licensing action (CBLA) program focuses on safety-neutral regulatory issues that have the potential to require plant shutdown, derate, or preclude startup or that require operator workarounds to address.

Weinkam, E.J. [Florida Power and Light Company, Miami, FL (United States)

1995-12-31

103

Miniature Fixed-Point Cell Approaches for Monitoring of Thermocouple Stability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the framework of the European Metrology Research Project ENG08 "MetroFission," LNE-Cnam and NPL have undertaken cooperative research into the development of temperature measurement solutions for the next generation of nuclear fission power plants. Currently, in-pile temperature monitoring is usually performed with nickel-based (Type K or N) thermocouples. When these thermocouples are exposed to a neutron flux, the thermoelements transmute, leading to large and unknown drifts in output. In addition, it is impossible to routinely recalibrate the thermocouples after irradiation for obvious reasons of safety. To alleviate this problem, both LNE-Cnam and NPL have developed, via differing approaches, in situ calibration methods for the thermocouples. The self-validating thermocouple methodologies are based on the principle of a miniature fixed-point cell to be co-located with the thermocouple measurement junction in use. The drift of the thermocouple can be monitored and corrected for by regular determination of the output at the phase transition of the fixed-point material: in effect performing regular in situ calibration checks. The two institutes have constructed miniature fixed-point cells for use at three different temperatures; the freezing point of silver ; LNE-Cnam), the freezing point of copper ; LNE-Cnam and NPL), and the melting point of Fe-C (; NPL). This paper introduces the construction and validation of the miniature fixed-point cells prior to use, to ensure traceability to the ITS-90. A comparison of the performance of the two cell designs is discussed, where typical industrial Type N thermocouples have been used for measurement of the fixed-point cells. Such initial measurements demonstrate the feasibility of each of these two approaches.

Failleau, G.; Elliott, C. J.; Deuzé, T.; Pearce, J. V.; Machin, G.; Sadli, M.

2014-07-01

104

Miniature Fixed-Point Cell Approaches for {{\\varvec{In Situ}}} Monitoring of Thermocouple Stability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the framework of the European Metrology Research Project ENG08 "MetroFission," LNE-Cnam and NPL have undertaken cooperative research into the development of temperature measurement solutions for the next generation of nuclear fission power plants. Currently, in-pile temperature monitoring is usually performed with nickel-based (Type K or N) thermocouples. When these thermocouples are exposed to a neutron flux, the thermoelements transmute, leading to large and unknown drifts in output. In addition, it is impossible to routinely recalibrate the thermocouples after irradiation for obvious reasons of safety. To alleviate this problem, both LNE-Cnam and NPL have developed, via differing approaches, in situ calibration methods for the thermocouples. The self-validating thermocouple methodologies are based on the principle of a miniature fixed-point cell to be co-located with the thermocouple measurement junction in use. The drift of the thermocouple can be monitored and corrected for by regular determination of the output at the phase transition of the fixed-point material: in effect performing regular in situ calibration checks. The two institutes have constructed miniature fixed-point cells for use at three different temperatures; the freezing point of silver (961.78° C ; LNE-Cnam), the freezing point of copper (1084.62° C ; LNE-Cnam and NPL), and the melting point of Fe-C ({˜ }1154° C ; NPL). This paper introduces the construction and validation of the miniature fixed-point cells prior to use, to ensure traceability to the ITS-90. A comparison of the performance of the two cell designs is discussed, where typical industrial Type N thermocouples have been used for measurement of the fixed-point cells. Such initial measurements demonstrate the feasibility of each of these two approaches.

Failleau, G.; Elliott, C. J.; Deuzé, T.; Pearce, J. V.; Machin, G.; Sadli, M.

2014-07-01

105

Fixed Point Results of Locally Contractive Mappings in Ordered Quasi-Partial Metric Spaces  

PubMed Central

Fixed point results for a self-map satisfying locally contractive conditions on a closed ball in an ordered 0-complete quasi-partial metric space have been established. Instead of monotone mapping, the notion of dominated mappings is applied. We have used weaker metric, weaker contractive conditions, and weaker restrictions to obtain unique fixed points. An example is given which shows that how this result can be used when the corresponding results cannot. Our results generalize, extend, and improve several well-known conventional results. PMID:24062629

Arshad, Muhammad; Ahmad, Jamshaid

2013-01-01

106

Fixed-Point Interactions and Renormalization Group Invariance in the Two-Nucleon System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the fixed-point interactions and the renormalization group invariance for an effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction in the leading-order (LO) chiral effective field theory (ChEFT) renormalized within the framework of the subtracted kernel method (SKM) approach. By solving a nonrelativistic Callan-Symanzik (NRCS) equation we show how the driving term evolves with the subtraction scale to keep the T-matrix invariant. We calculate the fixed-point interaction from the driving term and compare the results obtained with and without its evolution through the NRCS equation.

Timóteo, V. S.; Szpigel, S.; Durães, F. O.

107

One loop beta functions and fixed points in higher derivative sigma models  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the one loop beta functions of nonlinear sigma models in four dimensions containing general two- and four-derivative terms. In the O(N) model there are four such terms and nontrivial fixed points exist for all N{>=}4. In the chiral SU(N) models there are in general six couplings, but only five for N=3 and four for N=2; we find fixed points only for N=2, 3. In the approximation considered, the four-derivative couplings are asymptotically free but the coupling in the two-derivative term has a nonzero limit. These results support the hypothesis that certain sigma models may be asymptotically safe.

Percacci, Roberto; Zanusso, Omar [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. North, Waterloo, Ontario N2J 2Y5 (Canada); SISSA, via Beirut 4, I-34014 Trieste (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

2010-03-15

108

Parallel Fixed Point Implementation of a Radial Basis Function Network in an FPGA  

PubMed Central

This paper proposes a parallel fixed point radial basis function (RBF) artificial neural network (ANN), implemented in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) trained online with a least mean square (LMS) algorithm. The processing time and occupied area were analyzed for various fixed point formats. The problems of precision of the ANN response for nonlinear classification using the XOR gate and interpolation using the sine function were also analyzed in a hardware implementation. The entire project was developed using the System Generator platform (Xilinx), with a Virtex-6 xc6vcx240t-1ff1156 as the target FPGA. PMID:25268918

de Souza, Alisson C. D.; Fernandes, Marcelo A. C.

2014-01-01

109

Fixed Point Results for G-?-Contractive Maps with Application to Boundary Value Problems  

PubMed Central

We unify the concepts of G-metric, metric-like, and b-metric to define new notion of generalized b-metric-like space and discuss its topological and structural properties. In addition, certain fixed point theorems for two classes of G-?-admissible contractive mappings in such spaces are obtained and some new fixed point results are derived in corresponding partially ordered space. Moreover, some examples and an application to the existence of a solution for the first-order periodic boundary value problem are provided here to illustrate the usability of the obtained results. PMID:24895655

Roshan, Jamal Rezaei

2014-01-01

110

A least-squares fixed-point iterative algorithm for multiple illumination photoacoustic tomography  

PubMed Central

The optical absorption of tissues provides important information for clinical and pre-clinical studies. The challenge in recovering optical absorption from photoacoustic images is that the measured pressure depends on absorption and local fluence. One reconstruction approach uses a fixed-point iterative technique based on minimizing the mean-squared error combined with modeling of the light source to determine optical absorption. With this technique, convergence is not guaranteed even with an accurate measure of optical scattering. In this work we demonstrate using simulations that a new multiple illumination least squares fixed-point iteration algorithm improves convergence - even with poor estimates of optical scattering. PMID:24156078

Harrison, Tyler; Shao, Peng; Zemp, Roger J.

2013-01-01

111

Parameter estimation by fixed point of function of information processing intensity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a new method of estimating the dispersion of a distribution which is based on the surprising property of a function that measures information processing intensity. It turns out that this function has a maximum at its fixed point. Fixed-point equation is used to estimate the parameter of the distribution that is of interest to us. The main result consists in showing that only part of available experimental data is relevant for the parameters estimation process. We illustrate the estimation method by using the example of an exponential distribution.

Jankowski, Robert; Makowski, Marcin; Piotrowski, Edward W.

2014-12-01

112

Parallel Fixed Point Implementation of a Radial Basis Function Network in an FPGA.  

PubMed

This paper proposes a parallel fixed point radial basis function (RBF) artificial neural network (ANN), implemented in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) trained online with a least mean square (LMS) algorithm. The processing time and occupied area were analyzed for various fixed point formats. The problems of precision of the ANN response for nonlinear classification using the XOR gate and interpolation using the sine function were also analyzed in a hardware implementation. The entire project was developed using the System Generator platform (Xilinx), with a Virtex-6 xc6vcx240t-1ff1156 as the target FPGA. PMID:25268918

de Souza, Alisson C D; Fernandes, Marcelo A C

2014-01-01

113

Fixed Points of Contractive Mappings in b-Metric-Like Spaces  

PubMed Central

We discuss topological structure of b-metric-like spaces and demonstrate a fundamental lemma for the convergence of sequences. As an application we prove certain fixed point results in the setup of such spaces for different types of contractive mappings. Finally, some periodic point results in b-metric-like spaces are obtained. Two examples are presented in order to verify the effectiveness and applicability of our main results. PMID:25143980

Hussain, Nawab; Roshan, Jamal Rezaei

2014-01-01

114

Fixed points of contractive mappings in b-metric-like spaces.  

PubMed

We discuss topological structure of b-metric-like spaces and demonstrate a fundamental lemma for the convergence of sequences. As an application we prove certain fixed point results in the setup of such spaces for different types of contractive mappings. Finally, some periodic point results in b-metric-like spaces are obtained. Two examples are presented in order to verify the effectiveness and applicability of our main results. PMID:25143980

Hussain, Nawab; Roshan, Jamal Rezaei; Parvaneh, Vahid; Kadelburg, Zoran

2014-01-01

115

Combined GPS/GLONASS Precise Point Positioning with Fixed GPS Ambiguities  

PubMed Central

Precise point positioning (PPP) technology is mostly implemented with an ambiguity-float solution. Its performance may be further improved by performing ambiguity-fixed resolution. Currently, the PPP integer ambiguity resolutions (IARs) are mainly based on GPS-only measurements. The integration of GPS and GLONASS can speed up the convergence and increase the accuracy of float ambiguity estimates, which contributes to enhancing the success rate and reliability of fixing ambiguities. This paper presents an approach of combined GPS/GLONASS PPP with fixed GPS ambiguities (GGPPP-FGA) in which GPS ambiguities are fixed into integers, while all GLONASS ambiguities are kept as float values. An improved minimum constellation method (MCM) is proposed to enhance the efficiency of GPS ambiguity fixing. Datasets from 20 globally distributed stations on two consecutive days are employed to investigate the performance of the GGPPP-FGA, including the positioning accuracy, convergence time and the time to first fix (TTFF). All datasets are processed for a time span of three hours in three scenarios, i.e., the GPS ambiguity-float solution, the GPS ambiguity-fixed resolution and the GGPPP-FGA resolution. The results indicate that the performance of the GPS ambiguity-fixed resolutions is significantly better than that of the GPS ambiguity-float solutions. In addition, the GGPPP-FGA improves the positioning accuracy by 38%, 25% and 44% and reduces the convergence time by 36%, 36% and 29% in the east, north and up coordinate components over the GPS-only ambiguity-fixed resolutions, respectively. Moreover, the TTFF is reduced by 27% after adding GLONASS observations. Wilcoxon rank sum tests and chi-square two-sample tests are made to examine the significance of the improvement on the positioning accuracy, convergence time and TTFF. PMID:25237901

Pan, Lin; Cai, Changsheng; Santerre, Rock; Zhu, Jianjun

2014-01-01

116

Combined GPS/GLONASS Precise Point Positioning with Fixed GPS Ambiguities.  

PubMed

Precise point positioning (PPP) technology is mostly implemented with an ambiguity-float solution. Its performance may be further improved by performing ambiguity-fixed resolution. Currently, the PPP integer ambiguity resolutions (IARs) are mainly based on GPS-only measurements. The integration of GPS and GLONASS can speed up the convergence and increase the accuracy of float ambiguity estimates, which contributes to enhancing the success rate and reliability of fixing ambiguities. This paper presents an approach of combined GPS/GLONASS PPP with fixed GPS ambiguities (GGPPP-FGA) in which GPS ambiguities are fixed into integers, while all GLONASS ambiguities are kept as float values. An improved minimum constellation method (MCM) is proposed to enhance the efficiency of GPS ambiguity fixing. Datasets from 20 globally distributed stations on two consecutive days are employed to investigate the performance of the GGPPP-FGA, including the positioning accuracy, convergence time and the time to first fix (TTFF). All datasets are processed for a time span of three hours in three scenarios, i.e., the GPS ambiguity-float solution, the GPS ambiguity-fixed resolution and the GGPPP-FGA resolution. The results indicate that the performance of the GPS ambiguity-fixed resolutions is significantly better than that of the GPS ambiguity-float solutions. In addition, the GGPPP-FGA improves the positioning accuracy by 38%, 25% and 44% and reduces the convergence time by 36%, 36% and 29% in the east, north and up coordinate components over the GPS-only ambiguity-fixed resolutions, respectively. Moreover, the TTFF is reduced by 27% after adding GLONASS observations. Wilcoxon rank sum tests and chi-square two-sample tests are made to examine the significance of the improvement on the positioning accuracy, convergence time and TTFF. PMID:25237901

Pan, Lin; Cai, Changsheng; Santerre, Rock; Zhu, Jianjun

2014-01-01

117

The Critical Renormalization Fixed Point for Commuting Pairs of Area-Preserving Maps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We prove the existence of the critical fixed point ( F, G) for MacKay's renormalization operator for pairs of maps of the plane. The maps F and G commute, are area-preserving, reversible, real analytic, and they satisfy a twist condition.

Arioli, Gianni; Koch, Hans

2010-04-01

118

Three-element zoom lens with fixed distance between focal points.  

PubMed

This work deals with a theoretical analysis of zoom lenses with a fixed distance between focal points. Equations are derived for the primary (paraxial) design of the basic parameters of a three-element zoom lens. It is shown that the number of optical elements for such a lens must be larger than two. PMID:22739850

Mikš, Antonin; Novák, Ji?í; Novák, Pavel

2012-06-15

119

L-Fuzzy Fixed Points Theorems for L-Fuzzy Mappings via ??L-Admissible Pair  

PubMed Central

We define the concept of ??L-admissible for a pair of L-fuzzy mappings and establish the existence of common L-fuzzy fixed point theorem. Our result generalizes some useful results in the literature. We provide an example to support our result. PMID:24688441

Rashid, Maliha; Azam, Akbar

2014-01-01

120

Noise Probability Density Function in Fixed-Point Systems based on smooth operators  

E-print Network

requires accuracy evaluation to ensure algorithm integrity. Indeed, fixed-point arithmetic generates deviations must be limited to ensure algorithm integrity and application performance. Application accuracy the system and degrade computing accuracy. In this paper, a method based on Generalized Gaussian PDF

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

121

FIXED POINTS OF COMPOSITIONS OF EARTHQUAKES FRANCESCO BONSANTE AND JEANMARC SCHLENKER  

E-print Network

FIXED POINTS OF COMPOSITIONS OF EARTHQUAKES FRANCESCO BONSANTE AND JEAN­MARC SCHLENKER Abstract # r and E µ r be the right earthquakes on # and µ respectively. We show that the composition E # r # E estimates from the geometry of those AdS manifolds. 1. Introduction, main results 1.1. Earthquakes

Schlenker, Jean-Marc

122

FIXED POINTS OF COMPOSITIONS OF EARTHQUAKES FRANCESCO BONSANTE AND JEAN-MARC SCHLENKER  

E-print Network

FIXED POINTS OF COMPOSITIONS OF EARTHQUAKES FRANCESCO BONSANTE AND JEAN-MARC SCHLENKER Abstract and Eµ r be the right earthquakes on and µ respectively. We show that the composition E r Eµ r has the geometry of those AdS manifolds. 1. Introduction, main results 1.1. Earthquakes. In this paper we consider

Schlenker, Jean-Marc

123

A Fixed Point Charge Model for Water Optimized to the Vapor-Liquid Coexistence Properties  

E-print Network

@ipst.umd.edu #12;1 Abstract A new fixed-point charge potential model for water has been developed, targeting interactions in water, an intermolecular potential model valid over a broad range of densities and temperatures and their successful description of the structure of liquid water at near-ambient conditions. A Lennard-Jones potential

124

Is There a Curse of Dimensionality for Contraction Fixed Points in the Worst Case?  

E-print Network

Is There a Curse of Dimensionality for Contraction Fixed Points in the Worst Case? J. Rust, Rust (1997), Judd (1998), econometrics, Rust (1994), macroeconomics, Stokey and Lucas (1989), Cooper (1999), growth theory, Kydland and Prescott (1982), and finance and asset pricing, Lucas (1978), Rust

Traub, Joseph F.

125

A Linear Algorithm for Solving Fixed-Point Equations on Transition Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present an algorithm for effectively computing extremal fixed-points of a system of mutually recursive equations over a finite transition system. The proposed algorithm runs in time linear in the size of the transition system and linear in the size of the system of equations, thereby improving on [AC].

Bart Vergauwen; Johan Lewi

1992-01-01

126

Convexity of a family of meromorphically univalent functions by using two fixed points  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper a new class of meromorphic univalent functions in terms of an integral operator Fc(z)=?01cvcf(vz)dv,(c?1), is defined. We find some properties of this new class by using two fixed points.

M. Eshaghi Gordji; Ali Ebadian

2009-01-01

127

A Fixed Point Analysis of a Gene Pool GA with Mutation Alden H. Wright  

E-print Network

A Fixed Point Analysis of a Gene Pool GA with Mutation Alden H. Wright Computer Science University This paper analyzes a recombina- tion/mutation/selection genetic algorithm that uses gene pool recombination grant GR/R47394. repeated applications of crossover is a population in link- age equilibrium (also known

Wright, Alden H.

128

A Fixed Point Analysis of a Gene Pool GA with Mutation Alden H. Wright #  

E-print Network

A Fixed Point Analysis of a Gene Pool GA with Mutation Alden H. Wright # Computer Science This paper analyzes a recombina­ tion/mutation/selection genetic algorithm that uses gene pool recombination by EPSRC grant GR/R47394. repeated applications of crossover is a population in link­ age equilibrium (also

Wright, Alden H.

129

A Constructive Fixed-Point Theorem and the Feedback Semantics of Timed Systems  

E-print Network

is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage Micro Program, and the following companies: Agilent, DGIST, General Motors, Hewlett Packard, Infineon: it provides a method to construct the unique fixed point through iteration. In this paper, we extend

130

Communications in Applied Analysis 16 (2012), no. 3, 377388 MULTIPLE FIXED POINT THEOREMS  

E-print Network

1 Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Concordia College, Moorhead, MN 56562 USA E-mail: andersod@cord.edu 2 College of Arts and Sciences, Dakota State University, Madison, SD 57042 USA E. Multiple fixed point theorems in the spirit of the original work of Leggett-Williams are created using

Anderson, Douglas R.

131

The Hopfsaddlenode bifurcation for fixed points of 3Ddi#eomorphisms  

E-print Network

, to have a HSN bifurcation, one must impose certain generic conditions on the 3­jet of the map F [8]. In [8] we construct and study a model family of 3D maps for the HSN bifurcation of fixed points of the model map, a quasi­periodic Hopf bifurcation of invariant circles occurs, where an invariant circle

132

Convergence theorems of fixed points for Lipschitz pseudo-contractions in Hilbert spaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Let C be a closed convex subset of a real Hilbert space H and assume that T is a [kappa]-strict pseudo-contraction on C. Consider Mann's iteration algorithm given by It is proved that if the control sequence {[alpha]n} is chosen so that [kappa]<[alpha]n<1 and , then , where A=I-T and d(0,D) denotes the distance between the origin and the subset set D of H. As a consequence of this result, we prove that if T has a fixed point in C, then {xn} converges weakly to a fixed point of T. Also, we extend a result due to Reich to [kappa]-strict pseudo-contractions in the Hilbert space settingE Further, by virtue of hybridization projections, we establish a strong convergence theorem for Lipschitz pseudo-contractions. The results presented in this paper improve or extend the corresponding results of Browder and Petryshyn [F.E. Browder, W.V. Petryshyn, Construction of fixed points of nonlinear mappings in Hilbert spaces, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 20 (1967) 197-228], Rhoades [B.E. Rhoades, Fixed point iterations using infinite matrices, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 196 (1974) 162-176] and of Marino and Xu [G. Marino, H.-K. Xu, Weak and strong convergence theorems for strict pseudo-contractions in Hilbert spaces, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 329 (1) (2007) 336-346].

Zhou, Haiyun

2008-07-01

133

Quantum Corrected Drift-Diffusion Models: Solution Fixed Point Map and Finite Element Approximation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article deals with the analysis of the functional iteration, denoted Generalized Gummel Map (GGM), proposed in (10) for the decoupled solution of the Quantum Drift-Diffusion (QDD) model. The solution of the problem is characterized as the fixed point of the GGM, which permits the establishment of a close link between the theoretical existence analysis and the implementation of a

Carlo de Falco; Joseph W. Jeromeb; Riccardo Sacco

2008-01-01

134

Control of transient chaos in tent maps near crisis. I. Fixed point targeting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combinatorial techniques are applied to the symbolic dynamics representing transient chaotic behavior in tent maps in order to solve the problem of Ott-Grebogi-Yorke control to the nontrivial fixed point occurring in such maps. This approach allows ``preimage overlap'' to be treated exactly. Closed forms for both the probability of control being achieved and the average number of iterations to control

D. K. Arrowsmith

2000-01-01

135

Supergravity Solutions in the Low-$\\tan?$ $ ?_t$ Fixed Point Region  

E-print Network

There has been much discussion in the literature about applying the radiative electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) requirement to GUT models with supergravity. We motivate and discuss the application of the EWSB requirement to the low $\\tan\\beta$ fixed-point region and describe the solutions we find.

V. Barger; M. S. Berger; P. Ohmann

1994-05-02

136

Collective fixed point theorem and coincidence theorems in FC-spaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we present a KKM type theorem, some coincidence theorems in FC-spaces and a collective fixed-point theorem for a family of set-valued mappings defined on the product space of locally FC-spaces. As applications, some intersection theorems and minimax theorems are proved. Our results improve and generalize some recent results.

He, Rong-Hua; Li, Hong-Xu

2009-03-01

137

ON GUPTA-BELNAP REVISION THEORIES OF TRUTH, KRIPKEAN FIXED POINTS, AND THE NEXT STABLE SET.  

E-print Network

ON GUPTA-BELNAP REVISION THEORIES OF TRUTH, KRIPKEAN FIXED POINTS, AND THE NEXT STABLE SET. P.D.WELCH Abstract. We consider various concepts associated with the revision theory of truth of Gupta and Belnap. We of varied revision sequences - as a generalised algorithmic theory of truth. This enables something

Welch, Philip

138

ON GUPTABELNAP REVISION THEORIES OF TRUTH, KRIPKEAN FIXED POINTS, AND THE NEXT STABLE SET.  

E-print Network

ON GUPTA­BELNAP REVISION THEORIES OF TRUTH, KRIPKEAN FIXED POINTS, AND THE NEXT STABLE SET. P.D.WELCH Abstract. We consider various concepts associated with the revision theory of truth of Gupta and Belnap. We of varied revision sequences ­ as a generalised algorithmic theory of truth. This enables something

Welch, Philip

139

Comparison of the copper blackbody fixed-point cavities between NIS and LNE-Cnam  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the results of a bilateral comparison at the copper blackbody fixed point (1084.62 °C), one of the defining fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 in the high-temperature range. The ‘National Institute of Standards—Egypt (NIS)’ and the ‘Laboratoire Commun de Métrologie--France (LNE-Cnam)’ undertook such a comparison using an NIS linear pyrometer ‘LP4’ as a circulating radiation thermometer between the two laboratories. The main objective of this work was to compare the realizations of the copper blackbody fixed point for radiation thermometers and establish the level of agreement between the two laboratories in the high-temperature range. The comparison measurements revealed a slightly lower temperature of the NIS copper point than that of the LNE-Cnam copper point by about 0.08 °C. This difference is not significant with regard to the uncertainty and the stability of the pyrometer estimated as 0.15 °C. A second comparison was made a few months later by comparing simultaneously the two copper points at the LNE-Cnam premises. This comparison allowed determining a temperature difference of 0.045 ± 0.030 °C between the two cells, with the temperature of the LNE-Cnam cell being higher than that of NIS.

Ahmed, M. G.; Ali, K.; Bourson, F.; Sadli, M.

2013-09-01

140

Bilateral ITS-90 comparison at WC-C peritectic fixed point between NIM and NPL  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The WC-C peritectic fixed point, nominal melting and freezing temperature 2747 °C, shows extremely good metrological potential. Elsewhere, we published a prototype scale comparison of the ITS-90 between NPL, NIM and CEM, using high temperature eutectic fixed points (HTFPs) of Co-C (1324 °C), Pt-C (1738 °C), and Re-C (2474 °C). In this paper we present the further results of the bilateral comparison of the ITS-90 at an even higher temperature, 2747 °C, between NIM and NPL using WC-C peritectic fixed points. A NIM single zone high temperature furnace, model Chino IR-80, was modified to extend its temperature to 2800 °C. Then, an NPL researcher, on secondment to NIM, filled two WC-C cells in the modified furnace in a vertical position. The two WC-C cells were then realized in the same furnace, in an horizontal position. Their melting temperatures, defined by the inflection point of the melting curves, were measured by a linear pyrometer, model NIM-PSP. NIM's ITS-90 scale was assigned to the two cells, which were then transported to NPL. The realization of NPL's ITS-90 was then assigned to the two cells by using a model HT9500 Thermogauge furnace to realize the fixed points and a linear pyrometer, model LP3, to determine their temperature. The difference from the mean value of the NIM and NPL ITS-90 values for the WC-C points was derived. This allowed us to compare ITS-90 as realized by the two institutes and to determine the uncertainty in the scale comparison.

Dong, W.; Lowe, D. H.; Lu, X.; Machin, G.; Yuan, Z.; Wang, T.; Bloembergen, P.; Xiao, C.

2013-09-01

141

``MULTICELLS'': A European Project on Cryogenic Temperature Fixed Points in Sealed Cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In January 2000 a European Project called "MULTICELLS" started, in the field of the realisation of temperature standard fixed points in the range (2.18 to 216.6) K, ending in April 2003. Two lines of cell design were developed for both modular multi-component cells (IMGC and INM down to 13.8 K) and 4He lambda-point cells (IMGC and PTB). The cells were tested mainly by INTiBS, NMi, NPL, and PTB. Studies were performed on the thermal design and to improve the knowledge of the underlying physical chemistry, with the goal of reducing the overall uncertainty budget to less than 0.1 mK. This involved also the comparison of the new modular multi-component cells, which are made of several elements—each realising one different fixed point, e.g., e-H2, Ne, O2, and Ar, but also D2, N2 and CO2— mounted on a common frame where the thermometers are fitted, with the previous-generation cells. The new cells represent a substantial improvement in the state-of-the-art of the realisation of these fixed points and of their use for the realisation of the ITS-90 and for thermometric checkpoints. A self-contained cryogenic-free computer-run cryostat is under development as the final stage of the Project for measuring the modular cells and for thermometer intercomparison.

Pavese, F.; Fellmuth, B.; Head, D.; Hermier, Y.; Peruzzi, A.; Szmyrka Grzebyk, A.; Zanin, L.

2003-09-01

142

Tympanic thermometer performance validation by use of a body-temperature fixed point blackbody  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of infrared tympanic thermometers within the medical community (and more generically in the public domain) has recently grown rapidly, displacing more traditional forms of thermometry such as mercury-in-glass. Besides the obvious health concerns over mercury the increase in the use of tympanic thermometers is related to a number of factors such as their speed and relatively non-invasive method of operation. The calibration and testing of such devices is covered by a number of international standards (ASTM1, prEN2, JIS3) which specify the design of calibration blackbodies. However these calibration sources are impractical for day-to-day in-situ validation purposes. In addition several studies (e.g. Modell et al4, Craig et al5) have thrown doubt on the accuracy of tympanic thermometers in clinical use. With this in mind the NPL is developing a practical, portable and robust primary reference fixed point source for tympanic thermometer validation. The aim of this simple device is to give the clinician a rapid way of validating the performance of their tympanic thermometer, enabling the detection of mal-functioning thermometers and giving confidence in the measurement to the clinician (and patient!) at point of use. The reference fixed point operates at a temperature of 36.3 °C (97.3 °F) with a repeatability of approximately +/- 20 mK. The fixed-point design has taken into consideration the optical characteristics of tympanic thermometers enabling wide-angled field of view devices to be successfully tested. The overall uncertainty of the device is estimated to be is less than 0.1°C. The paper gives a description of the fixed point, its design and construction as well as the results to date of validation tests.

Machin, Graham; Simpson, Robert

2003-04-01

143

Probability of local bifurcation type from a fixed point: A random matrix perspective  

E-print Network

Results regarding probable bifurcations from fixed points are presented in the context of general dynamical systems (real, random matrices), time-delay dynamical systems (companion matrices), and a set of mappings known for their properties as universal approximators (neural networks). The eigenvalue spectra is considered both numerically and analytically using previous work of Edelman et. al. Based upon the numerical evidence, various conjectures are presented. The conclusion is that in many circumstances, most bifurcations from fixed points of large dynamical systems will be due to complex eigenvalues. Nevertheless, surprising situations are presented for which the aforementioned conclusion is not general, e.g. real random matrices with Gaussian elements with a large positive mean and finite variance.

D. J. Albers; J. C. Sprott

2005-10-24

144

Comparison of Co-C eutectic fixed-point cells between VNIIM and VNIIOFI  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two national metrological institutes of the Russian Federation, VNIIM and VNIIOFI, take part in the international research plan of CCT WG5 for investigation of high-temperature fixed points (HTFP). In the framework of this CCT-WG5 HTFP Research Plan the both institutes have designed and built independently cobalt-carbon (Co-C) eutectic radiation cells. The comparison of the Co-C cells developed by the institutes was carried out with the aim of determination of a difference in the melting temperature due to difference in the constructional characteristics of the cells. The radiance-mode radiation thermometers with central wavelength nearby 650 nm were used for the fixed-point melting temperature measurements. The article presents preliminary results of the comparison, which shows agreement between melting temperature of the compared cells within 20 mK. The details of the comparison are reported.

Sild, Y.; Khlevnoy, B.; Matveyev, M.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Fuksov, V. M.

2013-09-01

145

Une g\\'en\\'eralisation de la conjecture de point fixe de Schauder  

E-print Network

We prove the following generalisation of Schauder's fixed point conjecture: Let $C_1,...,C_n$ be convex subsets of a Hausdorff topological vector space. Suppose that the $C_i$ are closed in $C=C_1\\cup...\\cup C_n$. If $f:C\\to C$ is a continuous function whose image is contained in a compact subset of $C$, then its Lefschetz number $\\Lambda(f)$ is defined. If $\\Lambda(f)\

Cauty, Robert

2012-01-01

146

Application of fixed point theory to chaotic attractors of forced oscillators  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of the structure of chaotic attractors of periodically forced second-order nonlinear oscillators suggests that the\\u000a theory of fixed points of transformations gives information about the fundamental topological structure of attractors. First\\u000a a simple extension of the Levinson index formula is proved. Then numerical evidence is used to formulate plausible conjectures\\u000a about absorbing regions containing chaotic attractors in forced

H. Bruce Stewart

1991-01-01

147

Quantization analysis for fixed-point implementation of speech processing for the hearing impaired  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade, real time digital signal processing (DSP) has found several new applications in the biomedical arena. One of these has been in the area of hearing aids. This paper presents quantization analysis of speech processing algorithms, for the hearing impaired, for implementation on Texas Instruments' (TI) TMS320C54x (C54x) fixed point DSP chip. These algorithms were initial implemented

N. Magotra; S. Bangalore; S. Savadatti; P. Kasthuri; S. Divakar; T. Stetzler; P. Gelabert

1999-01-01

148

Wilson, fixed point and Neuberger's lattice Dirac operator for the Schwinger model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We perform a comparison between different lattice regularizations of the Dirac operator for massless fermions in the framework of the single and two flavor Schwinger model. We consider a) the Wilson-Dirac operator at the critical value of the hopping parameter; b) Neuberger's overlap operator; c) the fixed point operator. We test chiral properties of the spectrum, dispersion relations and rotational invariance of the mesonic bound state propagators.

Farchioni, F.; Hip, I.; Lang, C. B.

1998-12-01

149

Comparison of nickel carbon and iron carbon eutectic fixed point cells for the calibration of thermocouples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three nickel-carbon (Ni-C) and three iron-carbon (Fe-C) eutectic fixed points cells of a new design, meeting the requirements for reliable applications and being suitable for the calibration of thermocouples, were constructed at PTB and Inmetro. Their melting temperatures were compared by using the high-temperature furnace of PTB (HTF-R) and two platinum\\/palladium (Pt\\/Pd) thermocouples. The measured emfs of the Ni-C eutectic

F. Edler; A. C. Baratto

2006-01-01

150

AMSC/CMSC 466 Tobias von Petersdorff 1 Fixed Point Iteration and Contraction Mapping Theorem  

E-print Network

AMSC/CMSC 466 Tobias von Petersdorff 1 Fixed Point Iteration and Contraction Mapping Theorem-posteriori error estimate x(k) -x q 1-q x(k) -x(k-1) (3) #12;AMSC/CMSC 466 Tobias von Petersdorff Proof. Pick x(0 that a given mapping g is a contraction, see the examples in sections 1.5, 1.6. #12;AMSC/CMSC 466 Tobias von

von Petersdorff, Tobias

151

Fast, Accurate Static Analysis for Fixed-Point Finite-Precision Effects in DSP Designs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Translating digital signal processing (DSP) software intoits finite-precision hardware implementation is often a time-consumingtask. We describe a new static analysis techniquethat can accurately analyze finite-precision effects arisingfrom fixed-point implementations of DSP algorithms.The technique is based on recent interval representation methodsfrom affine arithmetic, and the use of new probabilisticbounds. The resulting numerical error estimates are comparableto detailed statistical simulation, but achieve

Claire Fang Fang; Rob A. Rutenbar; Tsuhan Chen

2003-01-01

152

Long-Term Monitoring of Thermocouple Stability with Miniature Fixed-Point Cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme ENG08 "MetroFission" project, two National Measurement Institutes, LNE-Cnam (France) and NPL (UK), have cooperatively developed methods of in situ validation of thermocouple output for application in next-generation nuclear fission power plants. Miniature fixed-point cells for use at three temperatures were constructed in the first step of this project: at the freezing point of silver (), the freezing point of copper (), and the melting point of the iron-carbon eutectic (). This paper reports the results of a second step in the study, where the robustness of the self-validation method has been investigated. Typical industrial Type N thermocouples have been employed with each of the miniature fixed-point devices installed, and repeatedly thermally cycled through the melting and freezing transitions of the fixed-point ingots. The devices have been exposed to a total of up to 90 h in the molten state. Furthermore, the LNE-Cnam devices were also subjected to fast cool-down rates, on five occasions, where the rate is estimated to have been between and . The devices are shown to be repeatable, reliable, and robust over the course of these tests. The drift of the Type N thermocouple has been identified separately to the behavior of the device. A reliable method for improving thermocouple performance and process control is therefore demonstrated. Requirements for implementation and the advantages of each approach for monitoring and correcting thermocouple drift are discussed, and an uncertainty budget for self-validation is presented.

Elliott, C. J.; Failleau, G.; Deuzé, T.; Sadli, M.; Pearce, J. V.; Machin, G.

2014-04-01

153

Fixed-point vs. floating-point arithmetic comparison for adaptive optics real-time control computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most computers in the past have been equipped with floating point processing capabilities, allowing an easy and brute-force solution for the machine computation errors, not requiring any specific tailoring of the computation in nearly hundred percent of situations. However, the computation needed for the adaptive optics real-time control in 30-50 meter telescopes is big enough to cause trouble to conventional von-Neumann processors, even if Moore's Law is valid for the next years. Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGAs) have been proposed as a viable alternative to cope with such computation needs[1,2], but--at least today's chips--will require fixed-point arithmetic to be used instead. It is then important to evaluate up to what point the accuracy and stability of the control system will be affected by this limitation. This paper presents the simulation and laboratory results of the comparison between both arithmetics, specifically evaluated in an adaptive optics system. The real-time controller has been modeled as black box having as input the wavefront sensor camera digital output data, providing a digital output to the actuators of the deformable mirror, and with the task of internally computing all outputs from the inputs. MATLAB fixed-point library has been used to evaluate the effect of different precision lengths (5-10 fractional bits) in the computation of the Shack-Hartmann subaperture centroid, in comparison with the reference 64-bit floating-point arithmetic and with the noise floor of the real system, concluding that the effect of the limited precision can be overcome by adequately selecting the number of fractional bits used in the representation, and tailoring that number with the needs at every step of the algorithm.

Martín-Hernando, Yolanda; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis F.; Garcia-Talavera, Marcos R.

2008-07-01

154

Nonthermal fixed points, vortex statistics, and superfluid turbulence in an ultracold Bose gas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonthermal fixed points of the dynamics of a dilute degenerate Bose gas far from thermal equilibrium are analyzed in two and three spatial dimensions. Universal power-law distributions, previously found within a nonperturbative quantum-field theoretical approach and recently shown to be related to vortical dynamics and superfluid turbulence [Phys. Rev. B1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.84.020506 84, 020506(R) (2011)], are studied in detail. The results imply an interpretation of the scaling behavior in terms of independent vortex excitations of the superfluid and show that the statistics of topological excitations can be described in the framework of wave turbulence. The particular scaling exponents observed in the single-particle momentum distributions are found to be consistent with irreversibility as well as conservation laws obeyed by the wave interactions. Moreover, long-wavelength acoustic excitations of the vortex-bearing condensate, driven by vortex annihilations, are found to follow a nonthermal power law. Considering vortex correlations in a statistical model, the long-time departure from the nonthermal fixed point is related to vortex-antivortex pairing. The studied nonthermal fixed points are accessible in cold-gas experiments. The results shed light on fundamental aspects of superfluid turbulence and have strong potential implications for related phenomena, for example, in early universe inflation or quark-gluon plasma dynamics.

Nowak, Boris; Schole, Jan; Sexty, Dénes; Gasenzer, Thomas

2012-04-01

155

ANALYTICAL ACCURACY EVALUATION OF FIXED-POINT SYSTEMS Romuald Rocher, Daniel Menard, Olivier Sentieys and Pascal Scalart  

E-print Network

algorithm integrity and application performances. Application accuracy can be evaluated through differentANALYTICAL ACCURACY EVALUATION OF FIXED-POINT SYSTEMS Romuald Rocher, Daniel Menard, Olivier be con- verted into a fixed-point specification. This conversion re- quires accuracy evaluation to ensure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

156

Ultraviolet fixed point and massive composite particles in TeV scales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a further study of the dynamics of high-dimension fermion operators attributed to the theoretical inconsistency of the fundamental cutoff (quantum gravity) and the parity-violating gauge symmetry of the standard model. Studying the phase transition from a symmetry-breaking phase to a strong-coupling symmetric phase and the ?-function behavior in terms of four-fermion coupling strength, we discuss the critical transition point as a ultraviolet-stable fixed point where a quantum field theory preserving the standard model gauge symmetry with composite particles can be realized. The form-factors and masses of composite particles at TeV scales are estimated by extrapolating the solution of renormalization-group equations from the infrared-stable fixed point where the quantum field theory of standard model is realized and its phenomenology including Higgs mass has been experimentally determined. We discuss the probability of composite-particle formation and decay that could be experimentally verified in the LHC by measuring the invariant mass of relevant final states and their peculiar kinetic distributions.

Xue, She-Sheng

2014-10-01

157

Influence of Impurities and Filling Protocol on the Aluminum Fixed Point  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To improve the uncertainty of the aluminum fixed point, a study was launched by LNE-INM/CNAM in the framework of the EUROMET Project 732 “Toward more accurate temperature fixed points” (Coordinating laboratory: LNE-INM/CNAM, 17 partner countries). A new open cell was filled with aluminum of 99.99995% purity. A French laboratory carried out elemental analysis of the sample using glow discharge-mass spectrometry (GD-MS). The values of the equilibrium distribution coefficient k and of the derivative {? T_{{l}}/? ci_{{l}}} of the temperature of the liquidus line with respect to the concentration of impurity i will be obtained through collaboration with a French physical and chemical laboratory. In the past, some aluminum cells were opened after several melts and freezes. The aluminum ingot was sticking to the graphite crucible, indicating that physicochemical reactions had likely occurred between Al and C. To avoid this reaction, an effort was made to draw benefit from the Al2O3 film that appears immediately on the surface of the aluminum ingot when it is exposed to oxygen. The open aluminum cell was tested in different furnaces and with different thermal insulator arrangements inside the fixed-point assembly. The observed drifts of the plateaux were always larger than the expected values. The cell was opened to inspect the aluminum ingot. The ingot was extracted easily, since no sticking to the crucible had occurred. The aluminum showed a very bright surface, but the presence of many “craters” throughout the thickness of the ingot was surprising. In some cases, the thermometer well was even apparent.

Renaot, E.; Valin, M. H.; Elgourdou, M.

2008-06-01

158

Uncertainty due to non-linearity in radiation thermometers calibrated by multiple fixed points  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new method to estimate the uncertainty due to non-linearity is described on the n = 3 scheme basis. The expression of uncertainty is mathematically derived applying the random walk method. The expression is simple and requires only the temperatures of the fixed points and a relative uncertainty value for each flux-doubling derived from the non-linearity measurement. We also present an example of the method, in which the uncertainty of temperature measurement by a radiation thermometer is calculated on the basis of non-linearity measurement.

Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamada, Y.

2013-09-01

159

Material parameter extraction for terahertz time-domain spectroscopy using fixed-point iteration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple method to extract the far-infrared dielectric parameters of a homogeneous material from terahertz signals is explored in this paper. Provided with a reference, sample-probing terahertz signal and a known sample thickness, the method can determine the underlying complex refractive index of the sample within a few iterations based on the technique of fixed-point iteration. The iterative process is guaranteed to converge and gives the correct parameters when the material thickness exceeds 200 ?m at a frequency of 0.1 THz or 20 ?m at a frequency of 1.0 THz.

Withayachumnankul, W.; Ferguson, B.; Rainsford, T.; Mickan, S. P.; Abbott, D.

2005-07-01

160

An experimental study on ship detection based on the fixed-point polarimetric whitening filter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work investigates the fixed-point polarimetric whitening filter (FP-PWF) with respect to ship detection based on polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. The purposes of this work are: (i) to investigate the FP-PWF algorithm that incorporate texture, (ii) to examine the method of log-cumulants (MoLC) for shape parameter estimation associated with texture, and (iii) to assess the impact of the improved modeling and estimation on the discrepancy between specified and observed false alarm rate. A modified ship detection algorithm based on FP-PWF is proposed with improved modeling, estimation and detection performance. Experiments are performed on simulated radar ocean clutter.

Tao, Ding; Brekke, Camilla; Anfinsen, Stian Normann

2011-11-01

161

Vertex functions and infrared fixed point in Landau gauge SU(N) Yang-Mills theory  

E-print Network

The infrared behaviour of vertex functions in an SU(N) Yang-Mills theory in Landau gauge is investigated employing a skeleton expansion of the Dyson-Schwinger equations. The three- and four-gluon vertices become singular if and only if all external momenta vanish while the dressing of the ghost-gluon vertex remains finite in this limit. The running coupling as extracted from either of these vertex functions possesses an infrared fixed point. In general, diagrams including ghost-loops dominate in the infrared over purely gluonic ones.

Alkofer, R; Llanes-Estrada, F J; Alkofer, Reinhard; Fischer, Christian S.; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

2005-01-01

162

Vertex functions and infrared fixed point in Landau gauge SU(N) Yang-Mills theory  

E-print Network

The infrared behaviour of vertex functions in an SU(N) Yang-Mills theory in Landau gauge is investigated employing a skeleton expansion of the Dyson-Schwinger equations. The three- and four-gluon vertices become singular if and only if all external momenta vanish while the dressing of the ghost-gluon vertex remains finite in this limit. The running coupling as extracted from either of these vertex functions possesses an infrared fixed point. In general, diagrams including ghost-loops dominate in the infrared over purely gluonic ones.

Reinhard Alkofer; Christian S. Fischer; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada

2004-12-30

163

Search for the IR fixed point in the Twisted Polyakov Loop scheme (II)  

E-print Network

We measure the renormalized coupling in the Twisted Polyakov loop scheme for SU(3) gauge theory coupled with $N_f=12$ fundamental fermions. To find the infrared fixed point of this theory, we focus on the step scaling function for the renormalized coupling. We take the continuum limit using the linear function of $(a/L)^2$ and a constant fit function. We find that there is a sizeable systematic error due to the choice of the continuum extrapolation function in the low energy region. We will give some directions to reduce the systematic errors.

Etsuko Itou; Tatsumi Aoyama; Masafumi Kurachi; C. -J. David Lin; Hideo Matsufuru; Hiroshi Ohki; Tetsuya Onogi; Eigo Shintani; Takeshi Yamazaki

2010-11-02

164

Search for the IR fixed point in the twisted Polyakov loop scheme  

E-print Network

We present a non-perturbative study of the running coupling constant in the Twisted Polyakov Loop (TPL) scheme. We investigate how the systematic and statistical errors can be controlled {\\it via} a feasibility study in SU(3) pure Yang-Mills theory. We show that our method reproduces the perturbative determination of the running coupling in the UV. In addition, our numerical result agrees with the theoretical prediction of this coupling constant in the IR. We also present our preliminary results for $N_f=12$ QCD, where an IR fixed point may be present.

Erek Bilgici; Antonino Flachi; Etsuko Itou; Masafumi Kurachi; C. -J. David Lin; Hideo Matsufuru; Hiroshi Ohki; Tetsuya Onogi; Eigo Shintani; Takeshi Yamazaki

2009-10-21

165

Finiteness of fixed equilibrium configurations of point vortices in the plane with a background flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For a dynamic system consisting of n point vortices in an ideal plane fluid with a steady, incompressible and irrotational background flow, a more physically significant definition of a fixed equilibrium configuration is suggested. Under this new definition, if the complex polynomial w that determines the aforesaid background flow is non-constant, we have found an attainable generic upper bound \\frac{(m+n-1)!}{(m-1)!\\,n_1!\\cdots n_{i_0}!} for the number of fixed equilibrium configurations. Here, m = deg w, i0 is the number of species, and each ni is the number of vortices in a species. We transform the rational function system arising from fixed equilibria into a polynomial system, whose form is good enough to apply the BKK theory (named after Bernshtein (1975 Funct. Anal. Appl. 9 183-5), Khovanskii (1978 Funct. Anal. Appl. 12 38-46) and Kushnirenko (1976 Funct. Anal. Appl. 10 233-5)) to show the finiteness of its number of solutions. Having this finiteness, the required bound follows from Bézout's theorem or the BKK root count by Li and Wang (1996 Math. Comput. 65 1477-84).

Cheung, Pak-Leong; Ng, Tuen Wai

2014-10-01

166

Development of a new radiometer for the thermodynamic measurement of high temperature fixed points  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has developed a new radiometer to measure the thermodynamic melting point temperatures of high temperature fixed points with ultra-low uncertainties. In comparison with the NPL's Absolute Radiation Thermometer (ART), the "THermodynamic Optical Radiometer" (THOR) is more portable and compact, with a much lower size-of-source effect and improved performance in other parameters such as temperature sensitivity. It has been designed for calibration as a whole instrument via the radiance method, removing the need to calibrate the individual subcomponents, as required by ART, and thereby reducing uncertainties. In addition, the calibration approach has been improved through a new integrating sphere that has been designed to have greater uniformity.

Dury, M. R.; Goodman, T. M.; Lowe, D. H.; Machin, G.; Woolliams, E. R.

2013-09-01

167

A Method to Improve the Temperature Distribution of Holder Around the Fixed-Point Cell Position  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The temperature profile along the furnaces used in heating high-temperature fixed points has a crucial impact on the quality and duration of melting plateaux, accordingly the accuracy of thermodynamic temperature determination of such fixed points. This paper describes a simple, yet efficient, approach for improving the temperature uniformity along a cell holder in high-temperature blackbody (HTBB) furnaces that use pyrolytic graphite rings as heating elements. The method has been applied on the KRISS' HTBB furnace. In this work, an ideal solution for arranging the heating elements inside the furnace is presented by which the temperature gradient across the cell holder can be kept as low as possible. Numerical calculations, based on a finite element method, have been carried out to find the best possible arrangement of the rings. This has been followed by measuring the temperature gradient along an empty cell holder to validate our calculations. A temperature gradient of 100 mK has been achieved at over a length of 50 mm within a cell holder of 10 cm in length. It has also been shown that for a 20 cm long holder surrounded by rings with an arbitrary resistance profile, the temperature uniformity can be improved by adding a few "hot" rings around the cell holder.

Lim, S. D.; Karmalawi, A. M.; Salim, S. G. R.; Soliman, M. A.; Kim, B. H.; Lee, D. H.; Yoo, Y. S.

2014-07-01

168

Optimization of the thermogauge furnace for realizing high temperature fixed points  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The thermogauge furnace was commonly used in many NMIs as a blackbody source for calibration of the radiation thermometer. It can also be used for realizing the high temperature fixed point(HTFP). According to our experience, when realizing HTFP we need the furnace provide relative good temperature uniformity to avoid the possible damage to the HTFP. To improve temperature uniformity in the furnace, the furnace tube was machined near the tube ends with a help of a simulation analysis by "ansys workbench". Temperature distributions before and after optimization were measured and compared at 1300 °C, 1700°C, 2500 °C, which roughly correspond to Co-C(1324 °C), Pt-C(1738 °C) and Re-C(2474 °C), respectively. The results clearly indicate that through machining the tube the temperature uniformity of the Thermogage furnace can be remarkably improved. A Pt-C high temperature fixed point was realized in the modified Thermogauge furnace subsequently, the plateaus were compared with what obtained using old heater, and the results were presented in this paper.

Wang, T.; Dong, W.; Liu, F.

2013-09-01

169

S-sequence patterned illumination for fixed-point iterative multiple illumination photoacoustic tomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fixed-point iteration shows promise for quantitative reconstruction of optical absorption in photoacoustic tomography. However, there are issues that prevent the technique from being practical including: non-uniqueness of scattering and absorption profiles, divergence with over-iteration, and sensitivity to noise. Multiple illumination has been proposed to deal with the first problem, and may help with the second. The issue of noise may be balanced out by increasing the regularization parameter at the expense of the exactness of the reconstruction. In a multiple-illumination setup with a circular geometry where fluence is abundant, using a patterned illumination with a decoding step may provide an alternative which will boost SNR. We present a simple sequence of patterned illuminations based on an S-sequence that serves to improve SNR. While the forward model of the iterative method may be applied directly to the patterned excitations, including the decoding step improves SNR in an individual image by a factor equal to the size of the S-sequence, thus greatly improving convergence for a given value of regularization and SNR. For example, with 15 illuminations, 50-60dB noise levels with S-sequence patterned illuminations gives similar simulated performance to the 70dB case with single-source illuminations. This technique will allow the application of fixed-point iteration techniques in a broader range of SNR conditions without resorting to averaging.

Harrison, Tyler; Shao, Peng; Zemp, Roger

2014-03-01

170

Stability and superstability of Jordan homomorphisms and Jordan derivations on Banach algebras and C *-algebras: A fixed point approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using fixed point methods, we prove the Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability and superstability of Jordan homomorphisms (Jordan *-homomorphisms), and Jordan derivations (Jordan *-derivations) on Banach algebras (C*-algebras) for the generalized Jensen-type functional equationrf(x+yr)+rf(x-yr)=2f(x), where r is a fixed positive real number in (1,?).

M. Eshaghi Gordji; A. Najati; A. Ebadian

2011-01-01

171

Assessment of correct fixing rate for precise point positioning ambiguity resolution on a global scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ambiguity resolution (AR) for a single receiver has been a popular topic in Global Positioning System (GPS) recently. Ambiguity-resolution methods for precise point positioning (PPP) have been well documented in recent years, demonstrating that it can improve the accuracy of PPP. However, users are often concerned about the reliability of ambiguity-fixed PPP solution in practical applications. If ambiguities are fixed to wrong integers, large errors would be introduced into position estimates. In this paper, we aim to assess the correct fixing rate (CFR), i.e., number of ambiguities correctly fixing to the total number of ambiguities correctly and incorrectly fixing, for PPP user ambiguity resolution on a global scale. A practical procedure is presented to evaluate the CFR of PPP user ambiguity resolution. GPS data of the first 3 days in each month of 2010 from about 390 IGS stations are used for experiments. Firstly, we use GPS data collected from about 320 IGS stations to estimate global single-differenced (SD) wide-lane and narrow-lane satellite uncalibrated phase delays (UPDs). The quality of UPDs is evaluated. We found that wide-lane UPD estimates have a rather small standard deviation (Std) between 0.003 and 0.004 cycles while most of Std of narrow-lane estimates are from 0.01 to 0.02 cycles. Secondly, many experiments have been conducted to investigate the CFR of integer ambiguity resolution we can achieve under different conditions, including reference station density, observation session length and the ionospheric activity. The results show that the CFR of PPP can exceed 98.0 % with only 1 h of observations for most user stations. No obvious correlation between the CFR and the reference station density is found. Therefore, nearly homogeneous CFR can be achieved in PPP AR for global users. At user end, higher CFR could be achieved with longer observations. The average CFR for 30-min, 1-h, 2-h and 4-h observation is 92.3, 98.2, 99.5 and 99.7 %, respectively. In order to get acceptable CFR, 1 h is a recommended minimum observation time. Furthermore, the CFR of PPP can be affected by diurnal variation and geomagnetic latitude variation in the ionosphere. During one day at the hours when rapid ionospheric variations occur or in low geomagnetic latitude regions where equatorial electron density irregularities are produced relatively frequently, a significant degradation of the CFR is demonstrated.

Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Pan

2013-06-01

172

Stability of the Jensen--type functional equation in ternary Banach algebras: An alternative fixed point approach  

E-print Network

Using fixed point methods, we prove the generalized Hyers--Ulam--Rassias stability of ternary homomorphisms, and ternary multipliers in ternary Banach algebras for the Jensen--type functional equation

Gordji, M Eshaghi

2009-01-01

173

Unique normal forms near a degenerate elliptic fixed point in two-parametric families of area-preserving maps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We derive simplified normal forms for an area-preserving map in a neighbourhood of a degenerate resonant elliptic fixed point. Such fixed points appear in generic families of area-preserving maps. We also derive a simplified normal form for a generic two-parametric family. The normal forms are used to analyse bifurcations of n-periodic orbits. In particular, for n ? 6 we find regions of parameters where the normal form has ‘meandering’ invariant curves.

Gelfreich, Vassili; Gelfreikh, Natalia

2014-07-01

174

Sensitivity of collective action to uncertainty about climate tipping points  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite more than two decades of diplomatic effort, concentrations of greenhouse gases continue to trend upwards, creating the risk that we may someday cross a threshold for `dangerous' climate change. Although climate thresholds are very uncertain, new research is trying to devise `early warning signals' of an approaching tipping point. This research offers a tantalizing promise: whereas collective action fails when threshold uncertainty is large, reductions in this uncertainty may bring about the behavioural change needed to avert a climate `catastrophe'. Here we present the results of an experiment, rooted in a game-theoretic model, showing that behaviour differs markedly either side of a dividing line for threshold uncertainty. On one side of the dividing line, where threshold uncertainty is relatively large, free riding proves irresistible and trust illusive, making it virtually inevitable that the tipping point will be crossed. On the other side, where threshold uncertainty is small, the incentive to coordinate is strong and trust more robust, often leading the players to avoid crossing the tipping point. Our results show that uncertainty must be reduced to this `good' side of the dividing line to stimulate the behavioural shift needed to avoid `dangerous' climate change.

Barrett, Scott; Dannenberg, Astrid

2014-01-01

175

Self-validating type C thermocouples to 2300 °C using high temperature fixed points  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Above 1500 °C, tungsten-rhenium (W-Re) thermocouples are the most commonly used contact thermometers because they are practical and inexpensive. However in general loss of calibration is very rapid, and, due to their embrittlement at high temperature, it is generally not possible to remove them for recalibration from the process environments in which they are used. Even if removal for recalibration was possible this would be of, at best, very limited use due to large inhomogeneity effects. Ideally, these thermocouples require some mechanism to monitor their drift in-situ. In this study, we describe self-validation of Type C (W5%Re/W26%Re) thermocouples by means of miniature high temperature fixed points comprising crucibles containing respectively Co-C, Pt-C, Ru-C, and Ir-C eutectic alloys. An overview of developments in this area is presented.

Pearce, J. V.; Elliott, C. J.; Machin, G.; Ongrai, O.

2013-09-01

176

Thermal modelling comparing high temperature fixed point measurements by contact and non-contact thermometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports thermal modelling that aims to establish if the measurement method - either by a radiation thermometer or by a thermocouple - significantly influences the measured temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pd-C and Ru-C. It is clear that both measurement techniques have specific physical characteristics which may affect the temperature measured during the melting plateau. With the radiation thermometer, the radiation heat transfer is directly influenced by the environment because the back-wall is effectively viewing the cold outside environment. In the case of a thermocouple direct viewing of the outside world is blocked so radiation transport is significantly reduced; however, in the case of the thermocouple there is a different component of heat transfer, namely conduction from the thermowell walls in contact with the thermocouple along the thermocouple stem itself.

Castro, P.; Machin, G.; Pearce, J. V.

2013-09-01

177

A fixed point method for perturbation of bimultipliers and Jordan bimultipliers in C?-ternary algebras  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Let A be a C?-ternary algebra. A C-bilinear T :A×A?A is called a C?-ternary algebra bi-multiplier, if it satisfies T([abc],d)=[T(a,b)cd], T(a,[bcd])=[abT(c,d)] for all a,b,c,d?A. Also, the mapping T :A×A?A is a called C?-ternary algebra Jordan bimultiplier, if it satisfies T([aaa],a)=[T(a,a)aa], T(a,[aaa])=[aaT(a,a)] for all a ?A. Using the fixed point method, we investigate the generalized Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability of bimultipliers and Jordan bimultipliers in C?-ternary algebras. The concept of Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability originated from the Th.M. Rassias' stability theorem that appeared in his paper: [Th. M. Rassias, Proc. Am. Math. Soc. 72, 297 (1978)].

Ebadian, A.; Ghobadipour, N.; Eshaghi Gordji, M.

2010-10-01

178

Crustal deformation measurements in central Japan determined by a Global Positioning System fixed-point network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results are presented from temporally dense measurements of crustal deformation associated with the convergence of the Eurasian (EUR), Pacific, North American, and Philippine Sea (PHS) plates, carried out in April 1988 by a 10-station GPS fixed-point network established in central Japan. Using regional orbit relaxation methods, the analysis of the first 17-month data revealed significant horizontal deformation across the Suruga trough. Namely, it was found that a site in the northern tip of PHS plate moved nearly westward with a velocity of 28 +/-5 mm per year, and a site at the southeastern tip of EUR plate moved south-southwestward with a velocity of 18 +/-5 mm per year. A significant vertical uplift with a velocity of 20 mm/yr was detected at a site inland of the Tokai district located in the Akaishi uplift zone and at a site on the Hatsushima Island in Sagami Bay.

Shimada, Seiichi; Bock, Yehuda

1992-01-01

179

Point and Fixed Plot Sampling Inventory Estimates at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides calculation of systematic point sampling volume estimates for trees greater than or equal to 5 inches diameter breast height (dbh) and fixed radius plot volume estimates for trees < 5 inches dbh at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken County, South Carolina. The inventory of 622 plots was started in March 1999 and completed in January 2002 (Figure 1). Estimates are given in cubic foot volume. The analyses are presented in a series of Tables and Figures. In addition, a preliminary analysis of fuel levels on the SRS is given, based on depth measurements of the duff and litter layers on the 622 inventory plots plus line transect samples of down coarse woody material. Potential standing live fuels are also included. The fuels analyses are presented in a series of tables.

Parresol, Bernard, R.

2004-02-01

180

Correlation Between Immersion Profile and Measured Value of Fixed-Point Temperature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Assessment of thermal immersion effects in the melting and freezing points defined by the International Temperature Scale of 1990 is one of the vital issues of modern thermometry. In documents of the Consultative Committee for Thermometry, the deviation of the experimental immersion profile from the theoretical value of the hydrostatic effect at a height of about 3 cm to 5 cm from the thermometer well bottom is used for the estimation of the uncertainty due to unwanted thermal effects. This estimation assumes the occurrence of solely the hydrostatic effect all along the height of the well inner wall. Real distortions of the temperature gradient at the bottom and at the top part of the well caused by the change of heat-exchange conditions are not taken into account. To define more precisely the temperature gradient along the height of the well, a miniature PRT with a 30 mm sensitive element and a sheath length and diameter of about 60 mm and 6 mm, respectively, were used. Also, the measurements of fixed-points temperature at noticeably different slopes of immersion profiles due to variations of the thermometer heat exchange and phase transition realization conditions were produced by means of a standard platinum resistance thermometer (SPRT). The measurements were carried out at the tin and zinc freezing points. The immersion curves measured with a miniature thermometer demonstrated an increase of the temperature during its lifting in the first 1 cm to 3 cm above the bottom of the well. The measurement results at the zinc freezing point by means of the SPRT have not confirmed the correlation between the immersion curves, the received value of the Zn freezing temperature, and the estimation of its uncertainty.

Shulgat, O. S.; Fuksov, V. M.; Ivanova, A. G.; Gerasimov, S. F.; Pokhodun, A. I.

2014-04-01

181

Analyses of pointing actions of top male competitors in karate at world level  

Microsoft Academic Search

Karate takes a significant place in sport today. Work goal is determination of quantity indicators related to pointing action at sports fights at top-level male karate competitors. Pointing actions were analysed through basic pointing ways (attack, interception and counterattack) and pointing techniques that exist in sports fight and are defined by judging rules. Research is based on analysis of seven

Seied Mohammad Marandi; Vahid Zolaktaf; Mohammad Reza Batavani

2010-01-01

182

Assessment of tungsten/rhenium thermocouples with metal-carbon eutectic fixed points up to 1500°C  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four Type A thermocouples and two Type C thermocouples were calibrated at the Au fixed point and Co-C and Pd-C eutectic fixed points. The thermocouples were exposed to 1330 °C for a total of 100 hours. The maximum drift due to the exposure was found to be 4.8 °C. The fixed-point calibration EMF of these thermocouples deviated by less than 0.86% from the temperature specified by the standards ASTM E230-2003 for Type C and GOSTR 8.585-2001 for Type A. The length of one of Type A thermocouples A52 is longer than the others by 150mm. Making use of this provision it was possible to place annealed part of A52 to the temperature gradient part of calibration arrangement every time. Therefore observed aging effect was as low as 0.5 °C compared to the other thermocouples.

Gotoh, M.

2013-09-01

183

Assessment of tungsten/rhenium thermocouples with metal-carbon eutectic fixed points up to 1500°C  

SciTech Connect

Four Type A thermocouples and two Type C thermocouples were calibrated at the Au fixed point and Co-C and Pd-C eutectic fixed points. The thermocouples were exposed to 1330 °C for a total of 100 hours. The maximum drift due to the exposure was found to be 4.8 °C. The fixed-point calibration EMF of these thermocouples deviated by less than 0.86% from the temperature specified by the standards ASTM E230-2003 for Type C and GOSTR 8.585-2001 for Type A. The length of one of Type A thermocouples A52 is longer than the others by 150mm. Making use of this provision it was possible to place annealed part of A52 to the temperature gradient part of calibration arrangement every time. Therefore observed aging effect was as low as 0.5 °C compared to the other thermocouples.

Gotoh, M. [National Research Council of Canada 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa ON. Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada)] [National Research Council of Canada 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa ON. Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada)

2013-09-11

184

Thermodynamic temperature determinations of Co C, Pd C, Pt C and Ru C eutectic fixed-point cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thermodynamic temperatures during the melt and the freeze of Co-C, Pd-C, Pt-C and Ru-C metal-carbon fixed-point cells manufactured by LNE-INM/CNAM, NMIJ and NPL were determined by absolutely calibrated filter radiometers traceable to the PTB cryogenic radiometer and a radiance comparison method using an IKE LP3 radiation thermometer. The measurement uncertainties were below 400 mK at temperatures up to 2250 K. The results are in agreement within the combined uncertainties with a study on relative temperature differences of the same set of fixed-point cells. For the fixed-point cells manufactured by NPL the results are compared with a previous thermodynamic temperature measurement.

Anhalt, K.; Hartmann, J.; Lowe, D.; Machin, G.; Sadli, M.; Yamada, Y.

2006-04-01

185

Comparison of the New NPL Primary Standard Ag Fixed-Point Blackbody Source with the Primary Standard Fixed Point of PTB  

Microsoft Academic Search

Above the freezing point of silver (961.78 °C), the International Temperature Scale of 1990 is defined in terms of Planck's radiation law. The scale is maintained and disseminated using a validated and linear pyrometer in conjunction with a blackbody reference source at either the Ag, Au (1064.18 °C) or Cu (1084.62 °C) freezing point. In order to realize the scale

H. C. McEvoy; G. Machin; R. Friedrich; J. Hartmann; J. Hollandt

2003-01-01

186

Realization of the WC-C peritectic fixed point at NIM and NMIJ  

SciTech Connect

Three WC-C peritectic fixed point cells, constructed from different sources of tungsten with different nominal purities, were measured at NIM and NMIJ. The three cells were constructed at NMIJ by NIM and NMIJ staffs, and T{sub 90} values of the three cells were measured at NMIJ during the period 31 Aug. to 25 Dec. 2009. Thereafter, the three cells were then transported to NIM, and T{sub 90} values of these cells were measured from 7 Dec. 2011 to 9 Jan. 2012. The results showed that T{sub 90} values of the three cells measured at the two institutes agreed within 0.4 °C with the combined scale comparison uncertainty of 1.7 °C (k= 2). The main component of the uncertainty is not the uncertainty due to impurities of the cells but the scale uncertainty and the stability of the measurement system. From these results it can be concluded that the WC-C cell is stable enough to provide new means of international high-temperature scale comparison above 3000 K.

Wang, T.; Bai, C.; Yuan, Z.; Dong, W.; Lu, X. [National Institute of Metrology (NIM), Beijing (China)] [National Institute of Metrology (NIM), Beijing (China); Sasajima, N.; Yamada, Y.; Ara, C. [National Metrology Institute of Japan, AIST (NMIJ, AIST), Tsukuba (Japan)] [National Metrology Institute of Japan, AIST (NMIJ, AIST), Tsukuba (Japan)

2013-09-11

187

Realization of the WC-C peritectic fixed point at NIM and NMIJ  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three WC-C peritectic fixed point cells, constructed from different sources of tungsten with different nominal purities, were measured at NIM and NMIJ. The three cells were constructed at NMIJ by NIM and NMIJ staffs, and T90 values of the three cells were measured at NMIJ during the period 31 Aug. to 25 Dec. 2009. Thereafter, the three cells were then transported to NIM, and T90 values of these cells were measured from 7 Dec. 2011 to 9 Jan. 2012. The results showed that T90 values of the three cells measured at the two institutes agreed within 0.4 °C with the combined scale comparison uncertainty of 1.7 °C (k = 2). The main component of the uncertainty is not the uncertainty due to impurities of the cells but the scale uncertainty and the stability of the measurement system. From these results it can be concluded that the WC-C cell is stable enough to provide new means of international high-temperature scale comparison above 3000 K.

Wang, T.; Sasajima, N.; Yamada, Y.; Bai, C.; Yuan, Z.; Dong, W.; Ara, C.; Lu, X.

2013-09-01

188

Fixed Points and Stability for Quadratic Mappings in ? –Normed Left Banach Modules on Banach Algebras  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of the present paper is to investigate some new stability results by applying the alternative fixed point of generalized\\u000a quadratic functional equation\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a $$\\\\begin{array}{ll}f\\\\left(\\\\sum\\\\limits_{i=1}^{n}a_ix_i\\\\right)+{\\\\sum\\\\limits_{i=1}^{n-1}}{\\\\sum\\\\limits_{j=i+1}^{n}}\\\\left[f(a_ix_i+a_jx_j)+2f(a_ix_i-a_jx_j)\\\\right]\\\\\\\\ \\\\qquad \\\\quad = (3n-2){\\\\sum\\\\limits_{i=1}^{n}}a^2_{i}f(x_{i})\\\\end{array}$$\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a in ?–Banach modules on Banach algebras, where $${a_{1},\\\\dots,a_{n}\\\\in \\\\mathbb{Z}{\\\\setminus}\\\\{0\\\\}}$$ and some $${\\\\ell\\\\in\\\\{1 , 2 ,\\\\dots, n-1\\\\},}$$\\u000a a\\u000a \\u000a ?\\u000a  ? ±1 and a\\u000a \\u000a n\\u000a  = 1, where n is a positive integer greater

M. Eshaghi. Gordji; H. Khodaei; Th. M. Rassias

189

Adaptive fixed-point iterative shrinkage/thresholding algorithm for MR imaging reconstruction using compressed sensing.  

PubMed

Recently compressed sensing (CS) has been applied to under-sampling MR image reconstruction for significantly reducing signal acquisition time. To guarantee the accuracy and efficiency of the CS-based MR image reconstruction, it necessitates determining several regularization and algorithm-introduced parameters properly in practical implementations. The regularization parameter is used to control the trade-off between the sparsity of MR image and the fidelity measures of k-space data, and thus has an important effect on the reconstructed image quality. The algorithm-introduced parameters determine the global convergence rate of the algorithm itself. These parameters make CS-based MR image reconstruction a more difficult scheme than traditional Fourier-based method while implemented on a clinical MR scanner. In this paper, we propose a new approach that reveals that the regularization parameter can be taken as a threshold in a fixed-point iterative shrinkage/thresholding algorithm (FPIST) and chosen by employing minimax threshold selection method. No extra parameter is introduced by FPIST. The simulation results on synthetic and real complex-valued MRI data show that the proposed method can adaptively choose the regularization parameter and effectively achieve high reconstruction quality. The proposed method should prove very useful for practical CS-based MRI applications. PMID:24512794

Wu, Geming; Luo, Shuqian

2014-05-01

190

A Jiles-Atherton and fixed-point combined technique for time periodic magnetic field problems with hysteresis  

SciTech Connect

The hysteresis phenomenon can significantly affect the behavior of magnetic cores in electrical machines and devices. This paper presents a finite element solution of periodic steady state magnetic field problems in soft materials with scalar hysteresis. The Jiles-Atherton model is employed for the generation of symmetric B-H loops and it is coupled with the Fixed Point Technique for handling magnetic nonlinearities. The proposed procedure is applied to a hysteretic model problem whose analytical solution is available. The results show that the Fixed Point Technique can efficiently deal with non-single valued material characteristics under periodic operating conditions.

Chiampi, M.; Repetto, M. [Politecnico di Torino (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Elettrica Industriale] [Politecnico di Torino (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Elettrica Industriale; Chiarabaglio, D. [Istituto Elettrotecnico Nazionale Galileo Ferraris, Torino (Italy)] [Istituto Elettrotecnico Nazionale Galileo Ferraris, Torino (Italy)

1995-11-01

191

Thermodynamic Temperatures of High-Temperature Fixed Points: Uncertainties Due to Temperature Drop and Emissivity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study forms part of the European Metrology Research Programme project implementing the New Kelvin to assign thermodynamic temperatures to a selected set of high-temperature fixed points (HTFPs), Cu, Co-C, Pt-C, and Re-C. A realistic thermal model of these HTFPs, developed in finite volume software ANSYS FLUENT, was constructed to quantify the uncertainty associated with the temperature drop across the back wall of the cell. In addition, the widely applied software package, STEEP3 was used to investigate the influence of cell emissivity. The temperature drop, , relates to the temperature difference due to the net loss of heat from the aperture of the cavity between the back wall of the cavity, viewed by the thermometer, defining the radiance temperature, and the solid-liquid interface of the alloy, defining the transition temperature of the HTFP. The actual value of can be used either as a correction (with associated uncertainty) to thermodynamic temperature evaluations of HTFPs, or as an uncertainty contribution to the overall estimated uncertainty. In addition, the effect of a range of furnace temperature profiles on the temperature drop was calculated and found to be negligible for Cu, Co-C, and Pt-C and small only for Re-C. The effective isothermal emissivity is calculated over the wavelength range from 450 nm to 850 nm for different assumed values of surface emissivity. Even when furnace temperature profiles are taken into account, the estimated emissivities change only slightly from the effective isothermal emissivity of the bare cell. These emissivity calculations are used to estimate the uncertainty in the temperature assignment due to the uncertainty in the emissivity of the blackbody.

Castro, P.; Machin, G.; Bloembergen, P.; Lowe, D.; Whittam, A.

2014-07-01

192

MONITORING SMALL LANDBIRD COMMUNITIES IN TALLGRASS PRAIRIE: AN ASSESSMENT OF STRIP-TRANSECT AND FIXED-RADIUS POINT COUNTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surveying avian species during the breeding season is important to land managers for monitoring population trends and relative abundance. During spring 2003, we estimated species richness and abundance of breeding birds on 60 plots on Fort Riley Military Installation, KS. We used strip-transects and fixed-radius point counts conducted on the same plots but on different days. Our 100-m radius point

RUSSELL D. JAPUNTICH; DONALD P. ALTHOFF; PHILIP S. GIPSON; JEFFREY S. PONTIUS

193

The James constant, the Jordan-von Neumann constant, weak orthogonality, and fixed points for multivalued mappings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We give some sufficient conditions for the Domínguez-Lorenzo condition in terms of the James constant, the Jordan-von Neumann constant, and the coefficient of weak orthogonality. As a consequence, we obtain fixed point theorems for multivalued nonexpansive mappings.

Kaewkhao, Attapol

2007-09-01

194

The one loop measure in the Group Theoretic approach to String Theory: the case of two finite fixed points  

E-print Network

The measure for the one loop scattering of one and $N$ bosonic strings is calculated using the Group Theoretic approach to String Theory. The calculation is done for the case when the projective transformation associated with the loop can be parametrized in terms of two finite fixed points and the multiplier.

Leonidas Sandoval Jr

2001-06-02

195

Convergence Analysis and Numerical Study of a Fixed-Point Iterative Method for Solving Systems of Nonlinear Equations  

PubMed Central

We present a fixed-point iterative method for solving systems of nonlinear equations. The convergence theorem of the proposed method is proved under suitable conditions. In addition, some numerical results are also reported in the paper, which confirm the good theoretical properties of our approach. PMID:24795537

Huang, Na

2014-01-01

196

RG fixed points in supergravity duals of 4-d field theory and asymptotically AdS spaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, it has been conjectured that supergravity solutions with two asymptotically AdS5 regions describe the RG flow of a 4-d field theory from a UV fixed point to an interacting IR fixed point. In this paper we lend support to this conjecture by showing that, in the UV (IR) limit, the two-point function of a minimally coupled scalar field depends only on the UV (IR) region of the metric, asymptotic to AdS5. This result is consistent with the interpretation of the radial coordinate of Anti de Sitter space as an energy scale, and it may provide an analog of the Callan-Symanzik equation for supergravity duals of strongly coupled field theories.

Porrati, M.; Starinets, A.

1999-05-01

197

Well-Posedness Of Common Fixed Point Theorem For Three and Four Mappings Under Strict Contractive Conditions In Fuzzy metric Space  

E-print Network

None has studied the well-posedness of common fixed points in fuzzy metric space. In this paper, our target is to develop the well-posedness of common fixed points in fuzzy metric space. Also using weakly compatibility, implicit relation, property (E.A.) and strict contractive conditions, we have established the unique common fixed point for three self mappings and also for four self mappings in fuzzy metric space.

Sumit Mohinta; T. K. Samanta

2011-04-16

198

Consistent Newton-Raphson vs. fixed-point for variational multiscale formulations for incompressible Navier-Stokes  

E-print Network

The following paper compares a consistent Newton-Raphson and fixed-point iteration based solution strategy for a variational multiscale finite element formulation for incompressible Navier-Stokes. The main contributions of this work include a consistent linearization of the Navier-Stokes equations, which provides an avenue for advanced algorithms that require origins in a consistent method. We also present a comparison between formulations that differ only in their linearization, but maintain all other equivalences. Using the variational multiscale concept, we construct a stabilized formulation (that may be considered an extension of the MINI element to nonlinear Navier-Stokes). We then linearize the problem using fixed-point iteration and by deriving a consistent tangent matrix for the update equation to obtain the solution via Newton-Raphson iterations. We show that the consistent formulation converges in fewer iterations, as expected, for several test problems. We also show that the consistent formulation ...

Turner, D Z; Hjelmstad, K D

2008-01-01

199

On the maximum number of fixed points in automorphisms of prime order of 2(v; k; 1) designs  

E-print Network

). Further, for 3 Ÿ k Ÿ 5 and for any prime p j 1 mod k(k \\Gamma 1), we establish necessary and sufficient Ÿ 5 and for any prime p j 1 mod k(k \\Gamma 1), we establish necessary and sufficient conditions on vOn the maximum number of fixed points in automorphisms of prime order of 2­(v; k; 1) designs D. L

Stinson, Douglas

200

Construction and in-situ characterisation of high-temperature fixed point cells devoted to industrial applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Among the activities of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) project HiTeMS one work package is devoted to the development and testing of industrial solutions for long-standing temperature measurement problems at the highest temperatures. LNE-Cnam, NPL, TUBITAK-UME have worked on the design of high temperature fixed points (HTFP) suitable for in-situ temperature monitoring to be implemented in the facilities of CEA (Commissariat à l'énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives). Several high temperature fixed point cells were constructed in these three national metrology institutes (NMIs) using a rugged version of cells based on the hybrid design of the laboratory HTFP developed and continuously improved at LNE-Cnam during the last years. The fixed points of interest were Co-C, Ru-C and Re-C corresponding to melting temperatures of 1324 °C, 1953 °C and 2474 °C respectively. The cells were characterised at the NMIs after their construction. Having proved robust enough, they were transported to CEA and tested in an induction furnace and cycled from room temperature to temperatures much above the melting temperatures (> +400 °C) with extremely high heating and cooling rates (up to 10 000 K/h). All the cells withstood the tests and the melting plateaus could be observed in all cases.

Sadli, Mohamed; Bourson, Frédéric; Diril, Ahmet; Journeau, Christophe; Lowe, Dave; Parga, Clemente

2014-08-01

201

Fixed-point vs. floating-point arithmetic comparison for adaptive optics real-time control computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most computers in the past have been equipped with floating point processing capabilities, allowing an easy and brute-force solution for the machine computation errors, not requiring any specific tailoring of the computation in nearly hundred percent of situations. However, the computation needed for the adaptive optics real-time control in 30-50 meter telescopes is big enough to cause trouble to conventional

Yolanda Martín-Hernando; Luis F. Rodríguez-Ramos; Marcos R. Garcia-Talavera

2008-01-01

202

APPROACHING THE TIPPING POINT CLIMATE RISKS, FAITH AND POLITICAL ACTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scientific and media reports have become enthralled by the apocalyptic overtones of climatic 'tipping points'. These are thresholds after which a relatively small shift in the Earth system (e.g. melting Arctic perma-frost) has a big, sudden impact on the overall system. Related is the prospect of runaway or 'irreversible' global warming. But it has also revived an interest in its

Stefan Skrimshire

2008-01-01

203

The stability of a quadratic type functional equation with the fixed point alternative  

E-print Network

In this paper, we achieve the general solution and the generalized Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability for the quadratic type functional equation &f(x+y+2cz)+f(x+y-2cz)+c^2f(2x)+c^2f(2y) &=2[f(x+y)+c^2f(x+z)+c^2f(x-z)+c^2f(y+z)+c^2f(y-z)] {2.6 cm} for fixed integers $c$ with $c\

Gordji, M Eshaghi

2008-01-01

204

Fixed points and functional equations connected with derivations on Banach algebras  

Microsoft Academic Search

Let 1?m?4 be a fixed integer and let f:X?Y be a mapping with X, Y two vector spaces. The functional equation (1.1) is said to be additive if m=1, quadratic if m=2, cubic if m=3 and quartic if m=4, respectively. For convenience, a solution of (1.1) will be called an m-mapping. Let \\u000a \\u000a , \\u000a \\u000a be two algebras. An m-mapping \\u000a \\u000a will be

Z. Alizadeh; M. Eshaghi Gordji; H. Khodaei

205

The stability of a quadratic type functional equation with the fixed point alternative  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we achieve the general solution and the generalized Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability for the quadratic type functional equation &f(x+y+2cz)+f(x+y-2cz)+c^2f(2x)+c^2f(2y) &=2[f(x+y)+c^2f(x+z)+c^2f(x-z)+c^2f(y+z)+c^2f(y-z)] {2.6 cm} for fixed integers $c$ with $c\\\

M. Eshaghi Gordji; H. Khodaei

2008-01-01

206

General form of fixed point indices of an iterated C map and infiniteness of minimal periods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Let f be a smooth self-map of a compact manifold and be a family of compact subsets of periodic points of f. Under some natural condition on the family we find the form of the sequence of indices of iterations , which generalizes the classical theorem of Chow, Mallet-Paret and Yorke. We apply this knowledge to study the structure of

Grzegorz Graff; Piotr Nowak-Przygodzki

2008-01-01

207

Control of transient chaos in tent maps near crisis.??I.??Fixed point targeting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combinatorial techniques are applied to the symbolic dynamics representing tran- sient chaotic behaviour in tent maps in order to solve the problem of OGY control to the non-trivial xed point occurring in such maps. This approach allows 'pre-image overlap' to be treated exactly. Closed forms for both the probability of control being achieved and the average number of iterations to

D. K. Arrowsmith

2000-01-01

208

Fixed points on the nonlinear dynamic properties of hydraulic engine mounts and parameter identification method: Experiment and theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Of the various types of passive engine mounts, hydraulic engine mounts (HEMs) have the best noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) performance. Based on the third type HEM, which has an inertia track, decoupler and disturbing plate, the influences of the three hydraulic mechanisms, the length of the inertia track or the diameter of the orifice on the dynamic properties were studied experimentally. The working principles of the hydraulic mechanisms and the relationship between the dynamic properties of the three type HEMs were revealed clearly. It was discovered that the frequency-variant dynamic properties of HEMs with an inertia track or an orifice have excitation amplitude-invariant fixed points. Based on the theory of engineering hydromechanics, a nonlinear lumped parameter model (LPM) for an HEM with an inertia track was established, and an analytical solution was obtained in which the fixed point of dynamic stiffness in-phase was discovered theoretically. According to the phenomena of fixed points and the constant value of dynamic stiffness in-phase at higher bands, a new parameter identification method (PIM) was presented, which is clear in theory and is time and cost savings, the identified results are reliable. The results show that the fluid flow through an orifice can be replaced by a fluid flow through an equivalent length of inertia track. After this, a PIM for the fluid-flow local loss factor was developed. The identified results and the numerical simulations show that the reason the disturbing plate can keep the dynamic stiffness lower at higher bands is that the disturbing plate can sharply increase the quadratic fluid damping due to larger local loss, and then the resonance of the fluid flow through the decoupler channel or orifice is greatly attenuated. This conclusion is a useful attempt to explain the working principle of the disturbing plate.

Fan, Ranglin; Lu, Zhenhua

2007-09-01

209

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 on the NTS, CAU 516 includes six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) consisting of two septic systems, a sump and piping, a clean-out box and piping, dry wells, and a vehicle decontamination area. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from July 22 through August 14, 2003, with supplemental sampling conducted in late 2003 and early 2004. The potential exposure pathways for any contaminants of concern (COCs) identified during the development of the DQOs at CAU 516 gave rise to the following objectives: (1) prevent or mitigate exposure to media containing COCs at concentrations exceeding PALs as defined in the corrective action investigation plan; and (2) prevent the spread of COCs beyond each CAS. The following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 516: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Clean Closure; and Alternative 3 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Alternative 1, No Further Action, is the preferred corrective action for two CASs (06-51-02 and 22-19-04). Alternative 2, Clean Closure, is the preferred corrective action for four CASs (03-59-01, 03-59-02, 06-51-01, and 06-51-03). The selected alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated, as well as meeting all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will further eliminate the contaminated media at CAU 516.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-04-28

210

Audio video based fast fixed-point independent vector analysis for multisource separation in a room environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fast fixed-point independent vector analysis (FastIVA) is an improved independent vector analysis (IVA) method, which can achieve faster and better separation performance than original IVA. As an example IVA method, it is designed to solve the permutation problem in frequency domain independent component analysis by retaining the higher order statistical dependency between frequencies during learning. However, the performance of all IVA methods is limited due to the dimensionality of the parameter space commonly encountered in practical frequency-domain source separation problems and the spherical symmetry assumed with the source model. In this article, a particular permutation problem encountered in using the FastIVA algorithm is highlighted, namely the block permutation problem. Therefore a new audio video based fast fixed-point independent vector analysis algorithm is proposed, which uses video information to provide a smart initialization for the optimization problem. The method cannot only avoid the ill convergence resulting from the block permutation problem but also improve the separation performance even in noisy and high reverberant environments. Different multisource datasets including the real audio video corpus AV16.3 are used to verify the proposed method. For the evaluation of the separation performance on real room recordings, a new pitch based evaluation criterion is also proposed.

Liang, Yanfeng; Naqvi, Syed Mohsen; Chambers, Jonathon A.

2012-12-01

211

A Characterization of Cauchy Sequences in Fuzzy Metric Spaces and Its Application to Fuzzy Fixed Point Theory  

E-print Network

We introduce the concept of fuzzy Ciric-Matkowski contractive mappings as a generalization of fuzzy Meir-Keeler type contractions. We also introduce a class $\\Psi_1$ of gauge functions $\\psi:(0,1]\\to(0,1]$ in the sense that, for any $r\\in(0,1)$, there exists $\\rho\\in(r,1)$ such that $1-r> \\tau >1-\\rho$ implies $\\psi(\\tau)\\geq 1-r$. We show that fuzzy $\\psi$-contractive mappings ($\\psi\\in\\Psi_1$) are fuzzy Ciric-Matkowski contractive mappings. Then, we present a characterization of $M$-Cauchy sequences in fuzzy metric spaces. This characterization is used to establish new fuzzy fixed point theorems. Our results include those of Mihet (Fuzzy $\\psi$-contractive mappings in non-Archimedean fuzzy metric spaces, Fuzzy Sets Syst. 159(2008) 739--744.), Wardowski (Fuzzy contractive mappings and fixed points in fuzzy metric spaces, Fuzzy Sets Syst. 222(2013) 108--114) and others. Examples are given to support the results.

Mortaza Abtahi

2014-10-20

212

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 423, Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CADD provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend a preferred corrective action for the single Corrective Action Site (CAS), 03-02-002-0308, within CAU 423. Corrective Action Unit 423 is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The TTR is approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles[mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The UDP is approximately 73 meters (m) (240 feet [ft]) northwest of the northwest corner of Building 03-60, the Auto Maintenance Shop. Corrective Action Unit 423 is comprised of the UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60. The UDP received waste oil products from the Auto Maintenance Shop, a light-duty fleet maintenance shop in the Area 3 compound, from 1965 to 1989 or 1990 (DOE/NV, 1997).

DOE /NV

1999-06-19

213

Newton-Raphson method and fixed-point technique in finite element computation of magnetic field problems in media with hysteresis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparison between the Newton-Raphson method and the fixed-point technique in hysteretic magnetic field problems is presented. Four different approaches are studied and contrast between them in terms of the convergence rate and computation time consumption is highlighted. The Newton-Raphson-based approaches are found better than the iteration schemes associated with the fixed-point technique for a model problem

Jlilius Saitz

1999-01-01

214

A Phase-Field Solidification Model of Almost Pure ITS-90 Fixed Points  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A two-dimensional axisymmetric phase-field model of thermo-solutal solidification in freezing-point cells used for calibrating standard platinum resistance thermometers for realization and dissemination of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 is presented. The cell is essentially a graphite crucible containing an ingot of very pure metal (of order 99.9999 %). A graphite tube is inserted along the axis of the ingot to enable immersion of the thermometer in the metal. In this study, the metal is tin (freezing temperature of 231.928° C). During the freezing of these cells, a steady, reproducible temperature is realized, with a defined temperature that can be used to calibrate thermometers with uncertainties {<}1 mK. The model is applied to understand the effect of experimental parameters, such as initiation technique and furnace homogeneity, on the measured freezing curve. Results show that freezing curves whose behavior is consistent with the Scheil theory of solidification can be obtained with a specific furnace temperature profile, and provided that the freeze is of a long duration, the results are consistent with previous one-dimensional models and experiments. Morphological instability is observed with the inner interface initiation technique, causing the interface to adopt a cellular structure. This elevates the measured temperature, in accordance with the Gibbs-Thomson effect. In addition, the influence of initiation techniques on the solidification behavior is examined. The model indicates that an initially smooth inner mantle can `de-wet' from the thermometer well-forming agglomerated solid droplets, following recalescence, under certain conditions. This manifests as a measured temperature depression due to the Gibbs-Thomson effect, with a magnitude of 100 {\\upmu } K to 200 {\\upmu } K in simulations. The temperature rises to that of the stable outer mantle as freezing progresses and the droplets re-melt. It is demonstrated that the effect occurs below a critical mantle thickness. A physical explanation for the origin of the effect is offered showing that it is consistent with solid-state de-wetting phenomena. Consideration is also given to the limitations of the current model configuration.

Large, M. J.; Pearce, J. V.

2014-08-01

215

A Phase-Field Solidification Model of Almost Pure ITS-90 Fixed Points  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A two-dimensional axisymmetric phase-field model of thermo-solutal solidification in freezing-point cells used for calibrating standard platinum resistance thermometers for realization and dissemination of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 is presented. The cell is essentially a graphite crucible containing an ingot of very pure metal (of order 99.9999 %). A graphite tube is inserted along the axis of the ingot to enable immersion of the thermometer in the metal. In this study, the metal is tin (freezing temperature of ). During the freezing of these cells, a steady, reproducible temperature is realized, with a defined temperature that can be used to calibrate thermometers with uncertainties mK. The model is applied to understand the effect of experimental parameters, such as initiation technique and furnace homogeneity, on the measured freezing curve. Results show that freezing curves whose behavior is consistent with the Scheil theory of solidification can be obtained with a specific furnace temperature profile, and provided that the freeze is of a long duration, the results are consistent with previous one-dimensional models and experiments. Morphological instability is observed with the inner interface initiation technique, causing the interface to adopt a cellular structure. This elevates the measured temperature, in accordance with the Gibbs-Thomson effect. In addition, the influence of initiation techniques on the solidification behavior is examined. The model indicates that an initially smooth inner mantle can `de-wet' from the thermometer well-forming agglomerated solid droplets, following recalescence, under certain conditions. This manifests as a measured temperature depression due to the Gibbs-Thomson effect, with a magnitude of to in simulations. The temperature rises to that of the stable outer mantle as freezing progresses and the droplets re-melt. It is demonstrated that the effect occurs below a critical mantle thickness. A physical explanation for the origin of the effect is offered showing that it is consistent with solid-state de-wetting phenomena. Consideration is also given to the limitations of the current model configuration.

Large, M. J.; Pearce, J. V.

2014-07-01

216

Metformine : le point sur les mcanismes d'action Metformin: new insights on the mechanisms of action  

E-print Network

1 Metformine : le point sur les mécanismes d'action Metformin: new insights on the mechanisms-Salpêtrière (AP-HP), Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Paris, France Mots-clés : Metformine ­ Diabète de type 2 ­ AMPK ­ Métabolisme énergétique Keywords : Metformin ­ Type 2 diabetes ­ AMPK ­ Energy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

217

The molecular basis of a neuroendocrine fixed action pattern: egg laying in Aplysia.  

PubMed

We describe a gene family that encodes the proteins controlling the egg-laying behavior of Aplysia. The family evolved by duplication and divergence from a common ancestral gene. The ELH gene family is expressed in the atrial gland, in the bag cells, and in a small network of neurons in the central ganglia. The bag cells and the atrial gland express distinct members of the family that encode different precursor proteins. These contain one or more biologically active peptides that can be released by proteolytic cleavage. The bag cell precursor releases several peptides that have multiple sites of action and may generate different components of the egg-laying behavior. Coordination of the full stereotyped behavior is achieved by simultaneous release of these peptides from the bag cell processes. PMID:6327167

Mahon, A C; Scheller, R H

1983-01-01

218

Nonanalyticities in a strongly correlated Fermi liquid: Corrections to scaling at the Fermi-liquid fixed point  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use scaling and renormalization-group techniques to analyze the leading nonanalyticities in a Fermi liquid. We show that a physically motivated scaling hypothesis reproduces the results known from perturbation theory for the density of states, the density-of-states fluctuations, the specific heat, the spin susceptibility, and the nematic magnetic susceptibility. We also discuss the absence of nonanalytic terms in the density susceptibility. We then use a recent effective field theory for clean electron systems to derive the scaling hypothesis by means of renormalization-group techniques. This shows that the exponents (although not the prefactors) of the nonanalyticities that were previously derived by means of perturbative techniques are indeed exact, and can be understood as the leading corrections to scaling at the stable Fermi-liquid fixed point.

Belitz, D.; Kirkpatrick, T. R.

2014-01-01

219

Characterizing the size distribution of particles in urban stormwater by use of fixed-point sample-collection methods  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) and in collaboration with the Root River Municipal Stormwater Permit Group monitored eight urban source areas representing six types of source areas in or near Madison, Wis. in an effort to improve characterization of particle-size distributions in urban stormwater by use of fixed-point sample collection methods. The types of source areas were parking lot, feeder street, collector street, arterial street, rooftop, and mixed use. This information can then be used by environmental managers and engineers when selecting the most appropriate control devices for the removal of solids from urban stormwater. Mixed-use and parking-lot study areas had the lowest median particle sizes (42 and 54 (u or mu)m, respectively), followed by the collector street study area (70 (u or mu)m). Both arterial street and institutional roof study areas had similar median particle sizes of approximately 95 (u or mu)m. Finally, the feeder street study area showed the largest median particle size of nearly 200 (u or mu)m. Median particle sizes measured as part of this study were somewhat comparable to those reported in previous studies from similar source areas. The majority of particle mass in four out of six source areas was silt and clay particles that are less than 32 (u or mu)m in size. Distributions of particles ranging from 500 (u or mu)m were highly variable both within and between source areas. Results of this study suggest substantial variability in data can inhibit the development of a single particle-size distribution that is representative of stormwater runoff generated from a single source area or land use. Continued development of improved sample collection methods, such as the depth-integrated sample arm, may reduce variability in particle-size distributions by mitigating the effect of sediment bias inherent with a fixed-point sampler.

Selbig, William R.; Bannerman, Roger T.

2011-01-01

220

What you find is not always what you fix—How other aspects than causes of accidents decide recommendations for remedial actions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In accident investigation, the ideal is often to follow the principle “what-you-find-is-what-you-fix”, an ideal reflecting that the investigation should be a rational process of first identifying causes, and then implement remedial actions to fix them. Previous research has however identified cognitive and political biases leading away from this ideal. Somewhat surprisingly, however, the same factors that often are highlighted in

Jonas Lundberg; Carl Rollenhagen; Erik Hollnagel

2010-01-01

221

"Raising the Point!": An Artistic Approach in Supporting a Community's Call to Action  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the notion of action and personal agency. The author discusses his experiences constructing an arts installation that supported a grassroots effort to revitalize Hunts Point, a community in the South Bronx that is home to 11,000 families, eighteen waste transfer stations, 40% of New York City's sewage, all of the…

Mendez, Jason

2013-01-01

222

Action Research on Underpinnings for Physics by Jeffrey Hengesbach, Mountain Pointe High School, Tempe, Arizona  

E-print Network

Action Research on Underpinnings for Physics by Jeffrey Hengesbach, Mountain Pointe High School with examining the science background (underpinnings) appropriate for students starting high school physics to physics. In many cases, at the high school level it is the first opportunity a student has to truly

Steinberg, Richard N.

223

CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 423: BUILDING 03-60 UNDERGROUND DISCHARGE POINT, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA, REVISION 0, JUNE 1998  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Area 3 Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (Corrective Action Unit 423) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 423 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is comprised of Corrective Action Site 03-02-002-0308. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for Corrective Action Unit 423. The scope of this Correction Action Decision Document consists of the following: ? Develop corrective action objectives. ? Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. ? Develop corrective action alternatives. ? Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. ? Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for the Corrective Action Unit. In January 1998, a corrective action investigation was performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit No. 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1997). A hydrocarbon plume was found to emanate from near the bottom of the Underground Discharge Point to the west. The plume encompasses approximately 65 square meters (700 square feet). The highest total petroleum hydrocarbon level detected was 2,400 milligrams per kilogram. No other contaminants were detected above preliminary action levels. Details of the investigation can be found in Appendix A of this document. Based on the potential exposure pathways identified during the Data Quality Objectives process, the following corrective action objectives have been identified for Corrective Action Unit 423: ? Prevent or mitigate human exposure to subsurface soil containing contaminants of concern. ? Prevent adverse impacts to groundwater quality. Based on the review of existing data, future land use assumption, and current operations at the Tonopah Test Range, the following alternatives were developed for consideration at the Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point: ? Alternative 1 - No Action ? Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls ? Alternative 3 - Partial Excavation, Disposal, and Administrative Controls ? Alternative 4 - In Situ Bioremediation The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred alternative for Corrective Action Unit 423 is Alternative 2, Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. The preferred corrective action alternative was evaluated on technical merit, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. The alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternative also meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils.

NONE

1998-06-01

224

Asymptotically free four-Fermi theory in 4 dimensions at the z=3 Lifshitz-like fixed point  

SciTech Connect

We show that a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio type four-fermion coupling at the z=3 Lifshitz-like fixed point in 3+1 dimensions is asymptotically free and generates a mass scale dynamically. This result is nonperturbative in the limit of a large number of fermion species. The theory is ultraviolet complete and at low energies exhibits Lorentz invariance as an emergent spacetime symmetry. Many of our results generalize to z=d in odd d spatial dimensions; z=d=1 corresponds to the Gross-Neveu model. The above mechanism of mass generation has potential applications to the fermion mass problem and to dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We present a scenario in which a composite Higgs field arises from a condensate of these fermions, which then couples to quarks and leptons of the standard model. Such a scenario could eliminate the need for the Higgs potential and the associated hierarchy problem. We also show that the axial anomaly formula at z=3 coincides with the usual one in the relativistic domain.

Dhar, Avinash; Mandal, Gautam [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Wadia, Spenta R. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India); International Centre for Theoretical Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

2009-11-15

225

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit  (CAU) 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, is located in Areas 6 and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: •06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well •06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole •25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping •25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

Grant Evenson

2007-02-01

226

The PowerPoint Presentation and Its Corollaries: How Genres Shape Communicative Action in Organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acknowledgments We appreciate the helpful comments,of Mark Zachry and Charlotte Thralls on an earlier draft of this chapter. This research was supported in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation (award #ITR-0085725). ii The PowerPoint Presentation and Its Corollaries: How Genres Shape Communicative Action in Organizations Abstract In this chapter, we examine how and with what consequences the

JoAnne Yates; Wanda Orlikowski

227

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516 is located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the Nevada Test Site. CAU 516 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 as Septic Systems and Discharge Points, and is comprised of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs): {sm_bullet} CAS 03-59-01, Bldg 3C-36 Septic System {sm_bullet} CAS 03-59-02, Bldg 3C-45 Septic System {sm_bullet} CAS 06-51-01, Sump and Piping {sm_bullet} CAS 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris {sm_bullet} CAS 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping {sm_bullet} CAS 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 06-51-02 and 22-19-04 is no further action. The NDEP-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 03-59-01, 03-59-02, 06-51-01, and 06-51-03 is clean closure. Closure activities included removing and disposing of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH)-impacted septic tank contents, septic tanks, distribution/clean out boxes, and piping. CAU 516 was closed in accordance with the NDEP-approved CAU 516 Corrective Action Plan (CAP). The closure activities specified in the CAP were based on the recommendations presented in the CAU 516 Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2004). This Closure Report documents CAU 516 closure activities. During closure activities, approximately 186 tons of hydrocarbon waste in the form of TPH-impacted soil and debris, as well as 89 tons of construction debris, were generated and managed and disposed of appropriately. Waste minimization techniques, such as field screening of soil samples and the utilization of laboratory analysis to characterize and classify waste streams, were employed during the performance of closure work.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-02-01

228

Application of Avery-Peterson fixed point theorem to nonlinear boundary value problem of fractional differential equation with the Caputo's derivative  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, by means of the Avery-Peterson fixed point theorem, we establish the existence result of at least triple positive solutions of four-point boundary value problem of nonlinear differential equation with Caputo's fractional order derivative. An example illustrating our main result is given. Our results complements previous work in the area of boundary value problems of nonlinear fractional differential equations.

Liu, Yang

2012-12-01

229

Analogies between the Torque-Free Motion of a Rigid Body about a Fixed Point and Light Propagation in Anisotropic Media  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An apparently unnoticed analogy between the torque-free motion of a rotating rigid body about a fixed point and the propagation of light in anisotropic media is stated. First, a new plane construction for visualizing this torque-free motion is proposed. This method uses an intrinsic representation alternative to angular momentum and independent of…

Bellver-Cebreros, Consuelo; Rodriguez-Danta, Marcelo

2009-01-01

230

Strong Convergence Theorems for a Common Fixed Point of a Finite Family of Bregman Weak Relativity Nonexpansive Mappings in Reflexive Banach Spaces  

PubMed Central

We introduce an iterative process for finding an element of a common fixed point of a finite family of Bregman weak relatively nonexpansive mappings. Our theorems improve and unify most of the results that have been proved for this important class of nonlinear operators. PMID:24757423

2014-01-01

231

Stability of iterative procedures with errors for approximating common fixed points of a couple of q-contractive-like mappings in Banach spaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, Agarwal, Cho, Li and Huang [R.P. Agarwal, Y.J. Cho, J. Li, N.J. Huang, Stability of iterative procedures with errors approximating common fixed points for a couple of quasi-contractive mappings in q-uniformly smooth Banach spaces, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272 (2002) 435-447] introduced the new iterative procedures with errors for approximating the common fixed point of a couple of quasi-contractive mappings and showed the stability of these iterative procedures with errors in Banach spaces. In this paper, we introduce a new concept of a couple of q-contractive-like mappings (q>1) in a Banach space and apply these iterative procedures with errors for approximating the common fixed point of the couple of q-contractive-like mappings. The results established in this paper improve, extend and unify the corresponding ones of Agarwal, Cho, Li and Huang [R.P. Agarwal, Y.J. Cho, J. Li, N.J. Huang, Stability of iterative procedures with errors approximating common fixed points for a couple of quasi-contractive mappings in q-uniformly smooth Banach spaces, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272 (2002) 435-447], Chidume [C.E. Chidume, Approximation of fixed points of quasi-contractive mappings in Lp spaces, Indian J. Pure Appl. Math. 22 (1991) 273-386], Chidume and Osilike [C.E. Chidume, M.O. Osilike, Fixed points iterations for quasi-contractive maps in uniformly smooth Banach spaces, Bull. Korean Math. Soc. 30 (1993) 201-212], Liu [Q.H. Liu, On Naimpally and Singh's open questions, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 124 (1987) 157-164; Q.H. Liu, A convergence theorem of the sequence of Ishikawa iterates for quasi-contractive mappings, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 146 (1990) 301-305], Osilike [M.O. Osilike, A stable iteration procedure for quasi-contractive maps, Indian J. Pure Appl. Math. 27 (1996) 25-34; M.O. Osilike, Stability of the Ishikawa iteration method for quasi-contractive maps, Indian J. Pure Appl. Math. 28 (1997) 1251-1265] and many others in the literature.

Zeng, Lu-Chuan; Yao, Jen-Chih

2006-09-01

232

Pointing losses in single-axis and fixed-mount earth-station antennas due to satellite movement  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are substantial cost advantages in the use of single-axis or fixed-mount earth-station antennas, thus reducing or eliminating the need for autotracking in earth-stations operating with quasi-stationary satellites. Such cost advantages are more relevant in small antennas where the tracking system represents a larger percentage of the overall cost. In addition, small antennas are particularly suitable to be operated without

L. M. Buchsbaum

1986-01-01

233

Asymptotic Freedom, Dimensional Transmutation, and an Infra-red Conformal Fixed Point for the $?$-Function Potential in 1-dimensional Relativistic Quantum Mechanics  

E-print Network

We consider the Schr\\"odinger equation for a relativistic point particle in an external 1-dimensional $\\delta$-function potential. Using dimensional regularization, we investigate both bound and scattering states, and we obtain results that are consistent with the abstract mathematical theory of self-adjoint extensions of the pseudo-differential operator $H = \\sqrt{p^2 + m^2}$. Interestingly, this relatively simple system is asymptotically free. In the massless limit, it undergoes dimensional transmutation and it possesses an infra-red conformal fixed point. Thus it can be used to illustrate non-trivial concepts of quantum field theory in the simpler framework of relativistic quantum mechanics.

M. H. Al-Hashimi; A. M. Shalaby; U. -J. Wiese

2014-04-11

234

The NIST eutectic project: construction of Co C, Pt C and Re C fixed-point cells and their comparison with the NMIJ  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has initiated a project on novel high-temperature fixed-points by use of metal (carbide)-carbon eutectics to lower uncertainties in thermodynamic temperature measurement. As the first stage of the NIST eutectic project, a comparison of Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C eutectic fixed-point cells was conducted between the NIST and the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) at the NIST to verify the quality of the NIST eutectic cells in addition to checking for possible furnace and radiation thermometer effects on the eutectic fixed-point realizations. In the comparison, two high-temperature furnaces, two radiation thermometers and one gold-point blackbody were used. A Nagano M furnace and a Linear Pyrometer 3 radiation thermometer were transferred from NMIJ and were used in conjunction with a Thermo Gauge furnace and an Absolute Pyrometer 1 radiation thermometer of NIST to check the dependence on the measurement equipment. The results showed that Co-C cells agreed to 73 mK. The melting temperature of the NIST Pt-C cell was approximately 270 mK lower than that of the NMIJ cell, with a comparison uncertainty of roughly 110 mK (k = 2), due to the poor purity of Pt powder. Although the Re-C comparison showed instability of the comparison system, they agreed within 100 mK. Though further improvement is necessary for the Pt-C cell, such as the use of higher purity Pt, the filling and measuring technique has been established at the NIST.

Sasajima, N.; Yoon, H. W.; Gibson, C. E.; Khromchenko, V.; Sakuma, F.; Yamada, Y.

2006-04-01

235

Real-time high-rate co-seismic displacement from ambiguity-fixed precise point positioning: Application to earthquake early warning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract<p label="1">Nowadays more and more high-rate real-time GPS data become available that provide a great opportunity to contribute to earthquake early warning (EEW) system in terms of capturing regional surface displacements, as an independent information source, useful for promptly estimating the magnitude of large destructive earthquake. In our study, we demonstrate the performance of the real-time ambiguity-<span class="hlt">fixed</span> precise <span class="hlt">point</span> positioning (PPP) approach using 5 Hz GPS data collected during El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake (Mw 7.2, 4 April 2010). The PPP-based displacements show to agree with accelerometer-based displacement at centimeter level. The key for successfully obtaining high precision displacements is the efficient ambiguity resolution. PPP with ambiguity <span class="hlt">fixing</span> can result in correct permanent co-seismic offsets and correct recovery of moment magnitude and fault slip inversion at levels comparable to post-processing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Xingxing; Ge, Maorong; Zhang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yong; Guo, Bofeng; Wang, Rongjiang; Klotz, Jürgen; Wickert, Jens</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24851629"> <span id="translatedtitle">Initial effects of a treatment by <span class="hlt">fixed</span> partial dentures supported by mini dental implants from a patient's <span class="hlt">point</span> of view.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mini dental implants (MDIs) in dentistry are recommended for cases with adequate bone quality and height, but a lack of alveolar bone width. Some studies well documented successful usage of MDIs for a removable denture support, but studies of MDIs supporting <span class="hlt">fixed</span> prosthodontic restorations are scarce. We aimed to study the effect of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> partial dentures (FPD) therapy supported by MDIs or by MDIs and natural teeth, on patients self perceived oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL), self perceived oral aesthetics and self perceived chewing function. A total of 23 patients (10 female and 13 men, age range from 54 to 78 years) were included and 61 MDIs were inserted, 10 in the maxilla and 51 in the mandible. In 14 patients FPDs were constructed only on MDIs and in 9 patients FPDs were constructed on both, MDIs and natural teeth. FPDs on MDIs were replacing mostly mandibular incisors, the second maxillary incisors and the first maxillary premolars. Those FPDs supported by both, MDIs and natural teeth had some MDIs inserted in frontal regions to allow a FPD construction. The three questionnaires: the OHIP-CRO14 for the assessment of OHRQoL, the OES-CRO for assessment of oral aesthetics and the Chewing function questionnaire (CFQ) for assessment of chewing function have been administrated twice:prior to the MDIs insertion and three months after the FPD treatment supported by MDIs had been finished. The CFQ and the OHIP summary scores significantly decreased revealing better OHRQoL and better chewing ability after treatment, and the OES scores significantly increased indicating increased self perceived oral aesthetics (p < 0.01). Clinical examination revealed no periimplant inflammation. Patients' data supplement the initially promising clinical findings. However, further follow ups will be necessary to finally confirm the long term clinical benefit of MDIs. PMID:24851629</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Persi?, Sanja; Palac, Antonija; Vojvodi?, Denis; Celebi?, Asja</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/817228"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Investigation Plan for Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge <span class="hlt">Points</span>, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office's (NNSA/NSO's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective <span class="hlt">action</span> alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge <span class="hlt">Points</span>, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 516 consists of six Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Sites: 03-59-01, Building 3C-36 Septic System; 03-59-02, Building 3C-45 Septic System; 06-51-01, Sump Piping, 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris; 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping; and 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the NTS, CAU 516 is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls, and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information and process knowledge on the expected nature and extent of contamination of CAU 516 are insufficient to select preferred corrective <span class="hlt">action</span> alternatives; therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective <span class="hlt">action</span> investigation. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective <span class="hlt">action</span> alternatives in the corrective <span class="hlt">action</span> decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/663544"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corrective <span class="hlt">action</span> investigation plan for Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit Number 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge <span class="hlt">Point</span>, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit (CAU) Number 423, the Building 03-60 Underground Discharge <span class="hlt">Point</span> (UDP), which is located in Area 3 at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, part of the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 225 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU Number 423 is comprised of only one Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Site (CAS) which includes the Building 03-60 UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60 to a <span class="hlt">point</span> approximately 73 meters (240 feet) northwest. The UDP was used between approximately 1965 and 1990 to dispose of waste fluids from the Building 03-60 automotive maintenance shop. It is likely that soils surrounding the UDP have been impacted by oil, grease, cleaning supplies and solvents as well as waste motor oil and other automotive fluids released from the UDP.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NONE</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-10-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/16838"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Investigation Plan for Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit No. 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge <span class="hlt">Point</span>, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), and the US Department of Defense. The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Units (CAUS) or Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Sites (CASs) (FFACO, 1996). As per the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective <span class="hlt">action(s</span>) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective <span class="hlt">actions</span>. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU No. 423, the Building 03-60 Underground Discharge <span class="hlt">Point</span> (UDP), which is located in Area 3 at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, part of the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figures 1-1 and 1-2). Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit No. 423 is comprised of only one CAS (No. 03-02-002-0308), which includes the Building 03-60 UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60 to a <span class="hlt">point</span> approximately 73 meters (m) (240 feet [ft]) northwest as shown on Figure 1-3.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DOE /NV</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/841387"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Decision Document for Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge <span class="hlt">Points</span>, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1 with ROTC 1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge <span class="hlt">Points</span>, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit 516 is comprised of the following Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Sites (CASs): (1) 03-59-01 - Bldg 3C-36 Septic System; (2) 03-59-02 - Bldg 3C-45 Septic System; (3) 06-51-01 - Sump and Piping; (4) 06-51-02 - Clay Pipe and Debris; (5) 06-51-03 - Clean Out Box and Piping; and (7) 22-19-04 - Vehicle Decontamination Area. The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of an acceptable corrective <span class="hlt">action</span> alternative for each CAS within CAU 516. Corrective <span class="hlt">action</span> investigation activities were performed between July 22 and August 14, 2003, as set forth in the Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Investigation Plan. Supplemental sampling was conducted in late 2003 and early 2004.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alfred N. Wickline</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/4606"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Plan for Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit 423: Area 3 Building 03-60 Underground Discharge <span class="hlt">Point</span>, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Plan provides the closure methods for Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit (CAU) 423: Area 3 Building 03-60 Underground Discharge <span class="hlt">Point</span> (UDP), Tonoopah Test Range, Nevada. CAU 423 consists of the UDP and an associated discharge pipeline extending from Building 03-60. Corrective <span class="hlt">action</span> investigations were completed in January 1998, and are documented in the Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Decision Document (US DOE, 1998). Results indicate an asymmetrical hydrocarbon plume, measuring 11 meters (m) 35 ft in length, 6 m (20 ft) in width, and 4 to 20 m (14 to 65 ft) in depth, has formed beneath the UDP and migrated westward. Petroleum hydrocarbon levels were identified above the 100 miligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) <span class="hlt">action</span> level specified in Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 445A (NAC 1996). The highest petroleum hydrocarbon concentration detected was 2,4000 mg/kg at 6 m, 20 ft, below surface grade as diesel. Corrective <span class="hlt">actions</span> will consist of administrative controls and in place closure of th e UDP and its associated discharge pipeline.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bechtel Nevada</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-10-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3111458"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Action</span> and Emotion Recognition from <span class="hlt">Point</span> Light Displays: An Investigation of Gender Differences</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Folk psychology advocates the existence of gender differences in socio-cognitive functions such as ‘reading’ the mental states of others or discerning subtle differences in body-language. A female advantage has been demonstrated for emotion recognition from facial expressions, but virtually nothing is known about gender differences in recognizing bodily stimuli or body language. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential gender differences in a series of tasks, involving the recognition of distinct features from <span class="hlt">point</span> light displays (PLDs) depicting bodily movements of a male and female actor. Although recognition scores were considerably high at the overall group level, female participants were more accurate than males in recognizing the depicted <span class="hlt">actions</span> from PLDs. Response times were significantly higher for males compared to females on PLD recognition tasks involving (i) the general recognition of ‘biological motion’ versus ‘non-biological’ (or ‘scrambled’ motion); or (ii) the recognition of the ‘emotional state’ of the PLD-figures. No gender differences were revealed for a control test (involving the identification of a color change in one of the dots) and for recognizing the gender of the PLD-figure. In addition, previous findings of a female advantage on a facial emotion recognition test (the ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test’ (Baron-Cohen, 2001)) were replicated in this study. Interestingly, a strong correlation was revealed between emotion recognition from bodily PLDs versus facial cues. This relationship indicates that inter-individual or gender-dependent differences in recognizing emotions are relatively generalized across facial and bodily emotion perception. Moreover, the tight correlation between a subject's ability to discern subtle emotional cues from PLDs and the subject's ability to basically discriminate biological from non-biological motion provides indications that differences in emotion recognition may - at least to some degree – be related to more basic differences in processing biological motion per se. PMID:21695266</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alaerts, Kaat; Nackaerts, Evelien; Meyns, Pieter; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Wenderoth, Nicole</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED429826.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improving the Grade <span class="hlt">Point</span> Average of Our At-Risk Students: A Collaborative Group <span class="hlt">Action</span> Research Approach.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper focuses on the use of a group <span class="hlt">action</span> research approach to help student teachers develop strategies to improve the grade <span class="hlt">point</span> average of at-risk students. Teaching interventions such as group work and group and individual tutoring were compared to teaching strategies already used in the field. Results indicated an improvement in the…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saurino, Dan R.; Hinson, Kenneth; Bouma, Amy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60585684"> <span id="translatedtitle">Addendum to the Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Decision Document\\/Closure Report for Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit 406: Area 3 Building 03-74 & Building 03-58 Underground Discharge <span class="hlt">Points</span> and Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit 429: Area 3 Building 03-55 & Area 9 Building 09-52 Underground Discharge <span class="hlt">Points</span>, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document constitutes an addendum to the March 2000, Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Decision Document \\/ Closure Report for Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit 406: Area 3 Building 03-74 & 03-58 Underground Discharge <span class="hlt">Points</span> and Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit 429: Area 3 Building 03-55 & Area 9 Building 09-52 Underground Discharge <span class="hlt">Points</span> (TTR) as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lynn Kidman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009Metro..46...47P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Critical review of information relevant to the correction of the effect of chemical impurities in gases used for the realization of ITS-90 <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">According to the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) on which the expression of uncertainty in the field of metrology is based, since 1995, 'it is assumed that the results of a measurement have been corrected for all recognised significant systematic effects'. Since the International Temperature Scale of 1990 specifies that the substances used for the realization of the '<span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span>' be 'ideally pure', to fully implement the intent of the GUM corrections should be applied for any chemical impurities that affect the value of the measurand. In general, thermometrists' opinion is that significant laboratory research and more literature search are still needed for further progress towards reliable corrections. This paper, reviewing the available literature data, shows that the situation is more favourable in the case of the substances used for the realization of the Scale reference <span class="hlt">points</span> in the range 13.8 K to 273.16 K based on the use of hydrogen, neon, oxygen and argon. The appendix reports a similar review also for nitrogen. Then the paper discusses the other conditions, physical-chemical and thermal, of the substances inside the thermometric cells, concurring with the chemical impurity effects to the overall state of knowledge of the realized triple <span class="hlt">point</span> temperature relevant to the solution of the problem of performing the corrections.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pavese, Franco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008Metro..45.3004K"> <span id="translatedtitle">SUPPLEMENTARY COMPARISON: Final report on the <span class="hlt">fixed-point</span> comparison of Au/Pt thermocouples (APMP supplementary comparison APMP.T-S4)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Au/Pt thermocouple is the most accurate thermocouple in the temperature range of 0 to 1000 °C and is widely used in many NMIs (national measurement institutes) to disseminate the ITS-90 temperature scale in their countries. Over the years, there has been no comparison on this thermocouple within the APMP region. The objective of this comparison is to assess the degree of equivalence of the calibration results at the ITS-90 <span class="hlt">fixed-points</span> of Ga, Sn, Zn, Al and Ag. This is a round robin comparison involving three NMIs—KRISS, NMISA and NMIA. KRISS was invited to be the pilot laboratory and was asked to prepare the two artifacts (Au/Pt thermocouple) to be circulated. This report describes the measurement procedures and equipment used in each laboratory, and compares the results and associated uncertainties obtained from the measurements by the participants. The maximum deviation at different <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> among the three laboratories is in the range of 10 mK to 60 mK. This comparison can be used as a pilot study for another forthcoming comparison on the Au/Pt thermocouples including more participants in the APMP region. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the APMP, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Yong-Gyoo; Liedberg, Hans; Jahan, Ferdouse</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/01/00/47/95/PDF/BEAUDRY_Cyrille_Action_recognition_in_videos_using_frequency_analysis_of_critical_point_trajectories.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">ACTION</span> RECOGNITION IN VIDEOS USING FREQUENCY ANALYSIS OF CRITICAL <span class="hlt">POINT</span> TRAJECTORIES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">based on the optical flow estimation is presented, where critical <span class="hlt">points</span> of the flow field are extracted requires critical <span class="hlt">points</span> of motion flow field, thus permitting a lower computation time and a better¨id de- tector, where interest <span class="hlt">points</span> are estimated from temporal Ga- bor filters and 2D spatial gaussian</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19256819"> <span id="translatedtitle">Universality class of replica symmetry breaking, scaling behavior, and the low-temperature <span class="hlt">fixed-point</span> order function of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A scaling theory of replica symmetry breaking (RSB) in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model is presented in the framework of critical phenomena for the scaling regime of large RSB orders kappa , small temperatures T , and small (homogeneous) magnetic fields H . We employ the pseudodynamical picture [R. Oppermann, M. J. Schmidt, and D. Sherrington, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 127201 (2007)], where two critical <span class="hlt">points</span> CP1 and CP2 are associated with the order function's pseudodynamical limits lim_{a-->infinity}q(a)=1 and lim_{a-->0}q(a)=0 at (T=0 , H=0 , 1kappa=0) . CP1 - and CP2 -dominated contributions to the free energy functional F[q(a)] require an unconventional scaling hypothesis. We determine the scaling contributions in accordance with detailed numerical self-consistent solutions for up to 200 orders of RSB. Power laws, scaling functions, and crossover lines are obtained. CP1 -dominated behavior is found for the nonequilibrium susceptibility, which decays like chi_{1}=kappa;{-53}f_{1}(Tkappa;{-53}) , for the entropy, which obeys S(T=0) approximately chi_{1};{2} , and for the subclass of diverging parameters a_{i}=kappa;{53}f_{a_{i}}(Tkappa;{-53}) [describing Parisi box sizes m_{i}(T) identical witha_{i}(T)T ], with f_{1}(zeta) approximately zeta and f_{a_{i}}(zeta) approximately 1zeta for zeta-->infinity , while f(0) is finite. CP2 -dominated behavior, controlled by the magnetic field H while temperature is irrelevant, is retrieved in the plateau height (or width) of the order function q(a) according to q_{pl}(H)=kappa;{-1}f_{pl}(H;{23}kappa;{-1}) with f_{pl}mid R:(zeta)mid R:_{zeta-->infinity} approximately zeta and f_{pl}(0) finite. Divergent characteristic RSB orders kappa_{CP1}(T) approximately T;{-35} and kappa_{CP2}(H) approximately H;{-23} , respectively, describe the crossover from mean field SK- to RSB-critical behavior with rational-valued exponents extracted with high precision from our RSB data. The order function q(a) is obtained as a <span class="hlt">fixed-point</span> function q(a) of RSB flow, in agreement with integrated <span class="hlt">fixed-point</span> energy and susceptibility distributions. PMID:19256819</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oppermann, R; Schmidt, M J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IJT....35..547P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Performance of Pt-C, CrC-CrC, CrC-C, and Ru-C <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Points</span> for Thermocouple Calibrations Above 1600 C</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A series of high-temperature <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> (HTFPs) Pt-C (1738 , and Ru-C (1953 ) have been constructed at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the Laboratoire National de métrologie et d'Essais and Conservatoire national des arts et métiers (LNE-Cnam). These are required for the calibration of high-temperature thermocouples in the framework of work package 6 of the European Metrology Research Programme IND01 project "HiTeMS." The goal of this work package is to establish a European capability that can determine low-uncertainty reference functions of non-standard high-temperature thermocouples. For reference functions to be widely applicable, measurements must be performed by more than one institute and preferably by more than one method. Due to the high price of the ingot materials, miniature HTFP cells are used. NPL and LNE-Cnam constructed their HTFP cells with different designs; these are described here, together with the performance of the cells using both radiation thermometry and thermocouples. The melting temperature of the Ru-C cells (for thermocouple calibrations) was determined using radiation thermometry at both NPL and LNE-Cnam, and the two results are compared. The suitability of the cells for calibration of W-Re and Rh-Ir thermocouples is evaluated, and some results are presented. Some discussion is given regarding the materials challenges when calibrating Rh-Ir thermocouples up to 2000 C.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pearce, J. V.; Elliott, C. J.; Lowe, D. H.; Failleau, G.; Deuzé, T.; Bourson, F.; Sadli, M.; Machin, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://publications.idiap.ch/downloads/papers/2012/Lefakis_ICMLA_2012.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Macro-<span class="hlt">Action</span> Discovery Based on Change <span class="hlt">Point</span> Detection and Boosting Leonidas Lefakis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">entails an avatar navigating a 3D environment. By using DPBoost to decompose the problem into a number an avatar in a virtual 3D environment (see Figure 1). The task presented to the avatar is one of reaching <span class="hlt">point</span> of view. The task is further complicated by the fact that given solely the avatar's view</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://math.uci.edu/~brusso/WalterREF.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">[1] Sasha Abramsky, Breadline USA: The Hidden Scandal of American Hunger and How to <span class="hlt">Fix</span> it, Poli-<span class="hlt">Point</span>Press, Sausalito, California (2009).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">References [1] Sasha Abramsky, Breadline USA: The Hidden Scandal of American Hunger and How to <span class="hlt">Fix</span>. Barlett, James B. Steele, America: Who Stole the Dream?, Andrews and McMeel, Kansas City, Mo. (1996). #12</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Russo, Bernard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1001.1710v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Physical meaning and a duality of concepts of wave function, <span class="hlt">action</span> functional, entropy, the <span class="hlt">Pointing</span> vector, the Einstein tensor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Physical meaning and a duality of concepts of wave function, <span class="hlt">action</span> functional, entropy, the <span class="hlt">Pointing</span> vector, the Einstein tensor and so on can be disclosed by investigating the state of material systems such as thermodynamic and gas dynamic systems, systems of charged particles, cosmologic systems and others. These concepts play a same role in mathematical physics. They are quantities that specify a state of material systems and also characteristics of physical fields. The duality of these concepts reveals in the fact that they can at once be both functionals and state functions or potentials. As functionals they are defined on nonintegrable manifold (for example, on tangent one), and as a state function they are defined on integrable manifold (for example, on cotangent one). The transition from functionals to state functions dicribes the mechanism of physical structure origination. The properties of these concepts can be studied by the example of entropy and <span class="hlt">action</span>. The role of these concepts in mathematical physics and field theory will be demonstrated. Such results have been obtained by using skew-symmetric forms. In addition to exterior forms, the skew-symmetric forms, which are obtained from differential equations and, in distinction to exterior forms, are evolutionary ones and are defined on nonintegrable manifolds, were used.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. I. Petrova</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ns.msu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Parental-Leave-Form-9-24-2012-AcadStaff-FTFac1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parental Leave Planning Form for Academic Staff and <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Term Faculty (Note: all of these personnel <span class="hlt">actions</span> must be officially executed in EBS)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Parental Leave Planning Form for Academic Staff and <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Term Faculty (Note? o Is this leave being split with a partner who is an MSU faculty the parental leave. This should represent a return to the normal workload</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/22837672"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computational fluid dynamics simulations of fluid flow and heat transfer at the wall–particle contact <span class="hlt">points</span> in a <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed reactor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An accurate description of the fluid flow and heat transfer within a <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed reactor is desirable. The prevailing models of fluid flow invoke either a constant velocity (plug-flow) profile, or make use of a single axial velocity component with radial variation across the tube diameter. However, difficulties in predicting reactor performance and the wide disagreement between effective heat transfer coefficients</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. A. Logtenberg; M. Nijemeisland; A. G. Dixon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/9589"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Investigation Plan for Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit 406: Area 3 Building 03-74 and Building 03-58 Under ground Discharge <span class="hlt">Points</span> and Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Unit 429: Area 3 Building 03-55 and Area 9 Building 09-52 Underground Discharge <span class="hlt">Points</span>, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Units (CAUs) or Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective <span class="hlt">action(s</span>) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. Corrective <span class="hlt">Action</span> Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective <span class="hlt">actions</span>. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Underground Discharge <span class="hlt">Points</span> (UDPs) included in both CAU 406 and CAU 429. The CAUs are located in Area 3 and Area 9 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DOE/NV</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-05-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=month&id=EJ1010251"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Action</span> Imitation at 1.5 Years Is Better than <span class="hlt">Pointing</span> Gesture in Predicting Late Development of Language Production at 3 Years of Age</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study examined whether poor <span class="hlt">pointing</span> gestures and imitative <span class="hlt">actions</span> at 18 months of age uniquely predicted late language production at 36 months, beyond the role of poor language at 18 months of age. Data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study were utilized. Maternal reports of the children's nonverbal skills and language were…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zambrana, Imac M.; Ystrom, Eivind; Schjolberg, Synnve; Pons, Francisco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1408.0635v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">A note on gauge-<span class="hlt">fixing</span> in the electroweak sector of UED with BLKTs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In Universal Extra-Dimensional Models with one compact space like extra dimension, a $Z_2$ symmetry is imposed upon the <span class="hlt">action</span> to have the chiral fermions present in the Standard Model. Orbifolding results into two <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> along this extra space like direction. One is allowed to add operators which respect the symmetry of the theory at these <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span>. The coefficients of these operators are in general free parameters. In this note we will discuss the procedure of gauge-<span class="hlt">fixing</span> when only kinetic terms involving fields are added to the boundary <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span>. We further discuss, the composition and masses of Goldstone and any physical scalar that emerges after the symmetry breaking in this set up with different choices of gauge.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anindya Datta; Avirup Shaw</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4175927"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bodily Fluid Analysis of Non-Serum Samples using <span class="hlt">Point</span>-of-Care Testing with iSTAT and Piccolo Analyzers Versus a <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Hospital Chemistry Analytical Platform</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Introduction: Forward deployed military medical units can provide sophisticated medical care with limited resources. <span class="hlt">Point</span>-of-Care Testing (POCT) may facilitate care and expedite diagnosis. This study assessed the accuracy of results for POCT for non-serum samples (pleural, peritoneal, and cerebrospinal fluid) using iSTAT and Piccolo hand-held devices compared with results obtained using a hospital chemistry analyzer. Methods: Pleural, peritoneal, and cerebrospinal fluids obtained during routine care were simultaneously analyzed on a Vitros 5600 automated clinical chemistry hospital analyzer, iSTAT, and Piccolo POCT devices. Results: POCT results were highly correlated with the Vitros 5600 for pleural fluid LDH, glucose, and triglycerides (TG); for peritoneal fluid bilirubin, TG, glucose, albumin, and protein; and glucose for cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusion: POCT results for non-serum samples from pleural, peritoneal, and cerebrospinal fluid correlate with standard hospital chemistry analysis. The results of this study demonstrate potential for possible new diagnostic roles for POCT in resource-limited environments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Davis, Konrad; Helman, Donald; Abadie, Jude</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/405959"> <span id="translatedtitle">United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Decision document for no further response <span class="hlt">action</span> planned: Bullen <span class="hlt">Point</span> Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Decision Document discusses the selection of no further <span class="hlt">action</span> as the recommended <span class="hlt">action</span> for two sites located at the Bullen <span class="hlt">Point</span> radar installation. The United States Air Force (Air Force) completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and a Risk Assessment for the five sites located at the Bullen <span class="hlt">Point</span> installation (U.S. Air Force 1996a,b). Based on the findings of these activities, two sites are recommended for no further <span class="hlt">action</span>. Sites at the Bullen <span class="hlt">Point</span> radar installation recommended for no further <span class="hlt">action</span> are: Old Landfill/Dump Site East (LF06) and Drum Storage Area (SS10).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karmi, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-05-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/405975"> <span id="translatedtitle">United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Decision document for no further response <span class="hlt">action</span> planned Oliktok <span class="hlt">Point</span> Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This Decision Document discusses the selection of no further <span class="hlt">action</span> as the recommended <span class="hlt">action</span> for four sites located at the Oliktok <span class="hlt">Point</span> radar installation. The United States Air Force (Air Force) completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and a Risk Assessment for the eight sites located at the Oliktok <span class="hlt">Point</span> installation (U.S. Air Force 1996a,b). Based on the findings of these activities, four sites are recommended for no further <span class="hlt">action</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karmi, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-06-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.compadre.org/Repository/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=12400&DocID=3102"> <span id="translatedtitle">Least <span class="hlt">Action</span> (Gravity/Free)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The EJS Least <span class="hlt">Action</span> (Gravity/Free) model illustrates the principle of least <span class="hlt">action</span> for the one dimensional motion of a free particle or a particle subject to a constant gravitational force. The simulation displays height versus time, with the path broken into equally spaced time intervals. The user can set the initial and final heights, as well as the number of time intervals to be used. The user can then adjust the intermediate heights in order to minimize the <span class="hlt">action</span> along the path, or else allow the computer to implement an algorithm for finding the path of least <span class="hlt">action</span>. Both the <span class="hlt">action</span> of the current path and the least <span class="hlt">action</span> so far observed with the current parameters are displayed. The simulation can also display average values for velocity, change in velocity, acceleration, kinetic energy, potential energy, the Lagrangian function, and total mechanical energy for each segment of the path. This helps to illustrate that the path of least <span class="hlt">action</span> is also a path of constant acceleration (zero if there is no gravity) and constant total energy. The algorithm minimizes the <span class="hlt">action</span> by examining three consecutive <span class="hlt">points</span> on the path. The outer two <span class="hlt">points</span> are held <span class="hlt">fixed</span> and basic calculus can be used to determine the value for the middle height that minimizes the <span class="hlt">action</span> for this segment of the path. This procedure is repeated for each segment of three <span class="hlt">points</span> on the path, moving left to right. If this entire process is repeated over and over the path will gradually approach the path of global least <span class="hlt">action</span>. This approach, and the entire EJS Least <span class="hlt">Action</span> (Gravity/Free) model, was inspired by the Principle of Least <span class="hlt">Action</span> Interactive page by Edwin Taylor and Slavomir Tuleja.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Timberlake, Todd</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760028008&hterms=root+mean+square&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Droot%2Bmean%2Bsquare"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> memory least squares filtering</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Buxbaum has reported on three algorithms for computing least squares estimates that are based on <span class="hlt">fixed</span> amounts of data. In this correspondence, the filter is arranged as a <span class="hlt">point</span>-deleting Kalman filter concatenated with the standard <span class="hlt">point</span>-inclusion Kalman filter. The resulting algorithm is couched in a square root framework for greater numerical stability, and special attention is given to computer implementation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bierman, G. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/handle/1808/13603"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed-Point</span>-Like Theorems on Subspaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">, such that ?x ?M, [ Fki (x) #6;= ? ] =? [ ?y ? Fˆki (x), ???R, ?y ? F k i (x) ] . (3.19) Proof of Claim 3.5. Let i? I and k ? {1, . . . ,ki}. We distinguish two cases. Assume first that Fki is l.s.c. Let U k i = {x ?M | F k i (x) #6;= ?}. Then U k i is an open...¯ ?M =Gk1 (V1) such that for every k = 1, . . . ,k1, F1k(x¯)? x¯ #6;= ?, that is, f k(x¯)? x¯. #1; A second consequence of Theorem 2.1 is the following generalization of Gale and Mas- Colell’s theorem [8], which is also a generalization of Kakutani’s...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bich, Philippe; Cornet, Bernard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-08-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1972-THESIS-F965"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> theorems in ultrametric spaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">are integers, bd $ 0, 3 does not divide a, b, c, or d, a and b are relatively prime, and c and d are relatively prime. Case l. a & 8 & 0. Then 3(3 ? + 3 ? ) ! 2 2 2 2 (x +1) (y +1) I 3 (32a a + I) (328 c + 1) 2 2 3(3 ) (3 ad + bc)bd (3 b (3 d ) 3 ad... 3 &1. Case 3. 0 & n & l 3 Let X = -a, ! ~3(* + ) 3(3 ? + 3 (x +1) (y +1) I 2 a a 2g 2 2 - 2 b2 ? ) c d ? +)) ~ 3( ? + ? ) a c 3b 3d 2 2 212 2 2 3(3 ad + 3 bc)bd(3 3 ) 2 2X 2 2 2p 2 3(3 )(3 ad + bc)bd(3 3 ) 1-2X-p (a+3 b )(c+3 d ) 3...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fullbright, Steven Edward</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.optimization-online.org/DB_FILE/2009/06/2319.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">CONVERGENCE OF <span class="hlt">FIXED-POINT</span> CONTINUATION ALGORITHMS ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Jun 18, 2009 ... solving the nuclear norm minimization problem [33]. By incorporating ..... the parameter µ in (3.6), we arrive at the following FPCA algorithm (Algorithm 1) as proposed in [33]. ..... is called the unrecoverable energy (see [36]).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://calvino.polito.it/ricerca/2004/pdf/18_2004/art_18_2004.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">FIXED</span> <span class="hlt">POINT</span> THEORY OF MULTIVALUED WEIGHTED MAPS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">to integrate old results with new ones, many of them recently obtained by the second author. We also believe to 8 cover old results, mainly those obtained before 1980, while the remaining sections deal with more</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ceragioli, Francesca</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/71268"> <span id="translatedtitle">Holographic non-Fermi-liquid <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Techniques arising from string theory can be used to study assemblies of strongly interacting fermions. Via this ‘holographic duality’, various strongly coupled many-body systems are solved using an auxiliary theory of ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Faulkner, Tom</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4724724"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Point</span> Decimal Multiplication Using RPS Algorithm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Decimal multiplication is an integral part of financial, commercial, and Internet-based computations. A novel design for single digit decimal multiplication that reduces the critical path delay and area for an iterative multiplier is proposed in this research. The partial products are generated using single digit multipliers, and are accumulated based ona novel RPS algorithm. This design uses n single digit</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rekha K. James; T. K. Shahana; K. Poulose Jacob; Sreela Sasi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Metro..50.3002N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Final report on EURAMET.T-K3.1: Bilateral comparison of the realisations of the ITS-90 at the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> of Hg, H2O, Ga, Sn and Zn</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A bilateral comparison has been organized between VSL, The Netherlands, and BIM, Bulgaria, of the realisations of the international temperature scale ITS-90 at the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> of Hg, H2O, Ga, In, Sn and Zn using a long-stem SPRT of very good stability as the transfer device. This comparison is registered as EURAMET project T-K3.1 in the BIPM key comparison database and its results are linked to those of key comparison CCT-K3. This comparison was organized in the framework of Phare project BG 2005/017-353.02.02, Lot 1, and is in this framework financed by the EU. This project ran from March 2008 to the end of February 2009. For all <span class="hlt">points</span> of the measurements, a good agreement between the results obtained by BIM and in CCT-K3 could be demonstrated. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nedialkov, Sasho; Bosma, Rien; Dierikx, Erik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004LNP...639...79R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Abelian Gauge <span class="hlt">Fixing</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The formation of monopoles and their condensation in the QCD ground state is a feature which is related to abelian gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span>, discussed in this chapter. The gluon field acquires a singularity in the vicinity of <span class="hlt">points</span> in space where abelian gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> fails and magnetic monopoles are formed there. The ideas discussed in this chapter can be found in the 1974 and 1981 seminal papers of Polyakov [9] and t Hooft [92, 93]. It is also very instructive to read the Sect. 23.3 (vol. 2) of Weinbergs Quantum Theory of Fields [55]. The formation of monopoles in QCD is still a subject of occasional debate [94, 95] The choice of the abelian gauge is, of course, not unique, and nor is the corresponding definition of the monopoles. However, lattice calculation performed by the Pisa group [19, 20, 21, 25] suggest that the condensation of monopoles in the QCD ground state is remarkably independent of the gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> condition. The recent gauge invariant definition of monopoles, proposed by Gubarev and Zakharov [96, 97], is not discussed in these lectures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ripka, Georges</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://uwdc.library.wisc.edu/collections/Arts/Suzuki"> <span id="translatedtitle">The American Suzuki Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens <span class="hlt">Point</span>: the Suzuki Method in <span class="hlt">Action</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dr. Shinichi Suzuki developed the Suzuki method of violin instruction in Japan shortly after World War II. The University of Wisconsin-Stevens <span class="hlt">Point</span> (UWSP) is home to the American Suzuki Institute, founded in 1971 by UWSP professor of violin, Margery V. Aber, who was an admirer of Suzuki's teaching method. This digital collection presents moving image footage recorded in 1976, when Suzuki spent two weeks at the American Suzuki Institute, giving lectures and demonstrations, as well as teaching both master classes and group classes. A search on the site for Suzuki will retrieve 35 videos in an easily browsed list. Additional instructions for searching by topic are given in the introductory essay, and it is also possible to search by the titles of musical compositions. For example, a keyword search on twinkle yields 5 recordings of Suzuki's students playing "Twinkle, twinkle little star" or other Twinkle variations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://mathnet.preprints.org/EMIS/journals/HOA/AAA/Volume2003_4/260.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> and periodic <span class="hlt">points</span> of semiflows of holomorphic maps</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Let $\\\\phi$ be a semiflow of holomorphic maps of a bounded domain\\u000a$D$ in a complex Banach space. The general question arises under\\u000awhich conditions the existence of a periodic orbit of $\\\\phi$ implies that $\\\\phi$ itself is periodic. An answer is provided, in the first part of this paper, in the case in which $D$ is the open unit</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Edoardo Vesentini</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..MAR.K1146S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Algorithmic-Reducibility = Renormalization-Group <span class="hlt">Fixed-Points</span>; "Noise"-Induced Phase-Transitions (NITs) to Accelerate Algorithmics ("NIT-Picking") Replacing CRUTCHES!!!: Gauss Modular/Clock-Arithmetic Congruences = Signal X Noise PRODUCTS. .</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cook-Levin computational-"complexity"(C-C) algorithmic-equivalence reduction-theorem reducibility equivalence to renormalization-(semi)-group phase-transitions critical-phenomena statistical-physics universality-classes <span class="hlt">fixed-points</span>, is exploited with Gauss modular/clock-arithmetic/model congruences = signal X noise PRODUCT reinterpretation. Siegel-Baez FUZZYICS=CATEGORYICS(SON of "TRIZ"): Category-Semantics(C-S) tabular list-format truth-table matrix analytics predicts and implements "noise"-induced phase-transitions (NITs) to accelerate versus to decelerate Harel [Algorithmics(1987)]-Sipser[Intro. Theory Computation(1997) algorithmic C-C: "NIT-picking" to optimize optimization-problems optimally(OOPO). Versus iso-"noise" power-spectrum quantitative-only amplitude/magnitude-only variation stochastic-resonance, this "NIT-picking" is "noise" power-spectrum QUALitative-type variation via quantitative critical-exponents variation. Computer-"science" algorithmic C-C models: Turing-machine, finite-state-models/automata, are identified as early-days once-workable but NOW ONLY LIMITING CRUTCHES IMPEDING latter-days new-insights!!!</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siegel, J.; Carl-Ludwig Siegel, Edward</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Metro..51.3001P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Final report on EURAMET.T-K3.5: Bilateral comparison of SPRT calibration at the ITS-90 <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Points</span> of Ar, Hg, H2O, Ga, In, Sn, Zn and Al</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ROTH+CO. AG (Switzerland) was designated by METAS for participation in the MRA in the field of thermometry. To demonstrate its technical competence, ROTH+CO. AG asked VSL (the Netherlands) for a bilateral comparison of SPRT calibration at the ITS-90 <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> of Ar, Hg, H2O, Ga, In, Sn, Zn and Al. The comparison, designated as EURAMET.T-K3.5, was initiated in February 2013 (with the preparation of the technical protocol) and completed in July 2014 (with the CCT approval of the final report). The results showed a satisfactory degree of equivalence between VSL and ROTH+CO. AG, and were successfully linked to EUROMET.T-K3 and CCT-K3 key comparisons. As a consequence, ROTH+CO. AG is now able to support CMCs for the services covered by this comparison and publish them in the KCDB. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peruzzi, A.; Bruin-Barendregt, C.; Bosma, R.; Senn, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12455795"> <span id="translatedtitle">Saddle <span class="hlt">points</span> of stringy <span class="hlt">action</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is shown that Einstein-Yang-Mills-dilaton theory has a countable family of static globally regular solutions which are purely magnetic but uncharged. The discrete spectrum of masses of these solutions is bounded from above by the mass of extremal Gibbons-Maeda solution. As follows from linear stability analysis all solutions are unstable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Piotr Bizon; Erwin Schrodinger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22051200"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multiple <span class="hlt">point</span> <span class="hlt">action</span> mechanism of valproic acid-teratogenicity alleviated by folic acid, vitamin C, and N-acetylcysteine in chicken embryo model.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The teratogenicity of antiepilepsy drug valproic acid (VPA) mostly is found in genetic and somatic levels, causing teratogenesis involving neurotubular defects (NTDs), anencephaly, lumbosacral meningomyelocele, and leg dysfunction due to spina bifida aperta. A diversity of nutraceutics have been tried to alleviate the risk of VPA-teratogenicity. The effect was varying. In order to promote the preventive prescription, to find out its <span class="hlt">action</span> mechanism can be rather crucial. We used chicken embryo model to try the effect of folic acid (FA), ascorbic acid (AA), and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). VPA at 30mM showed the higher malformation rate (66.7%) with the least mortality (22.2%). Pathological findings indicated that the cervical muscle was more susceptible to VPA injury than the ankle muscle. VPA downregulated levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), histone deacetylase (HDAC) and folate, and upregulated H(2)O(2) and homocysteine. FA, AA, and NAC significantly upregulated SOD, but only AA alone activated GSH. AA and NAC downregulated H(2)O(2), while FA was totally ineffective. All three nutraceutics comparably rescued HDAC with simultaneously suppressed homocysteine accumulation and folate re-elevation, although less effectively by NAC. Based on these data, we conclude VPA possesses "Multiple <span class="hlt">Point</span> <span class="hlt">Action</span> Mechanism". In addition to affecting the cited transcription and translation levels, we hypothesize that VPA competitively antagonize the glutamic acid to couple with pteroic acid in biosynthesis of dihydrofolic acid (DHFA). H(2)O(2) directly destroyed the NADPH reducing system at dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) levels, while completely restored by AA, an implication in preservation of intact apoenzymes. In addition, the GSH-GSSG system is sandwiched between the reducing systems NADPH/NADP and DHA-AA, its net balance is highly dependent on in situ in vivo Redox state, hence folic acid transformation is varying. To rescue the VPA-induced teratogenicity, simultaneous multiple prescriptions are suggested. PMID:22051200</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hsieh, Chiu-Lan; Wang, Hui-Er; Tsai, Wan-Jane; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Peng, Robert Y</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5728750"> <span id="translatedtitle">Serial floating <span class="hlt">point</span> formatter</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A floating <span class="hlt">point</span> formatter for changing <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> serial digital data, such as that received by a seismic data acquisition system, is disclosed wherein <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> serial digital data is received and scaled to remove any bias added by preamplification. The scaled data is shifted a predetermined number of bits and a resulting exponent is calculated. The shifted data signal and corresponding exponent are combined and further scaled to permit stacking the data without exceeding the system capacity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peterson, R. D.; Penner, W. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-11-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19914554"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electrical Discharges from <span class="hlt">Pointed</span> Conductors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Surface <span class="hlt">Action</span> in Electrical Discharges from <span class="hlt">Points</span>.-The lag phenomena shown by the discharges from some <span class="hlt">points</span> indicate a special surface <span class="hlt">action</span>. Various possible surface <span class="hlt">actions</span> are discussed and attention is centered upon an adhering layer of gas molecules. Further evidence is sought in discharges from <span class="hlt">points</span> made of different materials. Electrical Discharges from Water <span class="hlt">Points</span>. Surface Electric Intensities and Stopping</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John Zeleny</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1920-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://homepage.usask.ca/~ece220/papers/fixedweek.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Why a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> workweek?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The main goal of this article is to explain why the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> workweek appeared. To this purpose we differentiate between “jobs” and “hours per job”. We consider an economy where hours and number of workers are substitutes in production but in which hiring a worker entails a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> cost plus a variable cost per hour worked. As a consequence, firms</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Antonia Díaz; Cristina Echevarria</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pbskids.org/cyberchase/ufixit/launch.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">U <span class="hlt">Fix</span> It</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ziff needs you to help him <span class="hlt">fix</span> his buildings! With your tool bag, you will <span class="hlt">fix</span> windows, doors, and roofs. Sounds easy right? It may not be as easy as you may think. You will need to use what you have learned in math class to make new ones that fit just right. You will get your own Cyberchase Master Builder certificate when the job is done!</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010Nonli..23..475W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of the noise-induced transition and the exploration of the phase space for the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation using the minimum <span class="hlt">action</span> method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Noise-induced transition in the solutions of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (K-S) equation is investigated using the minimum <span class="hlt">action</span> method derived from the large deviation theory. This is then used as a starting <span class="hlt">point</span> for exploring the configuration space of the K-S equation. The particular example considered here is the transition between a stable <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> and a stable travelling wave. Five saddle <span class="hlt">points</span>, up to constants due to translational invariance, are identified based on the information given by the minimum <span class="hlt">action</span> path. Heteroclinic orbits between the saddle <span class="hlt">points</span> are identified. Relations between noise-induced transitions and the saddle <span class="hlt">points</span> are examined.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wan, X.; Zhou, X.; E, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.eitedu.com/flash/res_placement/res_placement.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Resistor Placement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Flash Player 6 or greater is required to view this website. You are a student worker in the ACME Community College electronics department. Students have left 50 <span class="hlt">fixed</span> resistors on the lab bench. Your supervisor has asked you to return these resistors to the proper drawers and she has given you 10 minutes to complete the task. Enter your name and click the Start button. A <span class="hlt">fixed</span> resistor will be displayed. Click on and drag the resistor to the proper drawer. If placed in the correct drawer, a green light will be displayed. If placed incorrectly, a red light will be displayed and the resistor will be displayed at the bottom of the screen.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NuPhB.883..581S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supermembrane <span class="hlt">actions</span> for Gaiotto-Maldacena backgrounds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We write down the supermembrane <span class="hlt">actions</span> for M-theory backgrounds dual to general N=2 four-dimensional superconformal field theories. The <span class="hlt">actions</span> are given to all orders in fermions and are in a particular ?-gauge. When an extra U(1) isometry is present, our <span class="hlt">actions</span> reduce to ?-gauge <span class="hlt">fixed</span> Green-Schwarz <span class="hlt">actions</span> for the corresponding Type IIA backgrounds.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stefa?ski, Bogdan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1302.1312v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Functionals in Asymptotically Safe Gravity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We summarize the status of constructing <span class="hlt">fixed</span> functionals within the f(R)-truncation of Quantum Einstein Gravity in three spacetime dimensions. Focusing on curvatures much larger than the IR-cutoff scale, it is shown that the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> equation admits three different scaling regimes: for classical and quantum dominance the equation becomes linear and has power-law solutions, while the balanced case gives rise to a generalized homogeneous equation whose order is reduced by one and whose solutions are non-analytical.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maximilian Demmel; Frank Saueressig; Omar Zanusso</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvD..90g4505D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extracting hadron masses from <span class="hlt">fixed</span> topology simulations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lattice QCD simulations tend to become stuck in a single topological sector at fine lattice spacing or when using chirally symmetric overlap quarks. In such cases physical observables differ from their full QCD counterparts by finite volume corrections. These systematic errors need to be understood on a quantitative level and possibly removed. In this paper we extend an existing relation from the literature between two-<span class="hlt">point</span> correlation functions at <span class="hlt">fixed</span> and the corresponding hadron masses at unfixed topology by calculating all terms proportional to 1/V2 and 1/V3, where V is the spacetime volume. Since parity is not a symmetry at <span class="hlt">fixed</span> topology, parity mixing is comprehensively discussed. In the second part of this work we apply our equations to a simple model, quantum mechanics on a circle both for a free particle and for a square-well potential, where we demonstrate in detail, how to extract physically meaningful masses from computations or simulations at <span class="hlt">fixed</span> topology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dromard, Arthur; Wagner, Marc</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/150833"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Fix</span> Issue 8</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">to do a <span class="hlt">FIX</span> without them. However, in contemplating Christian and Manfred and the "Incarnations" characters, I began to think of other characters in the guise of our familiar blond and curly friends in particular two characters who've been inhabiting... more. It's decaf." The blonde woman sneered at the proferred theI'mos. The pink-tinted edges of a streetlight three driveways down entered the car, creating crazy shadows and giving the woman a faintly satanic look. Leslie shrugged at Kira's refusal...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Multiple Contributors</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/150831"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Fix</span> Issue 6</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">story as well. It was great to see it, as I'm currently enjoying Mary Renault's The Persian Boy again. That's about all ror now, except to say that the next issue of THE <span class="hlt">FIX</span> will appear at ZCon. I know I'm giving you all a very short deadline... with that straight jacket!) Leah, they were so beautiful and so painful, just the way poetry should be. Re: "Retribution". Susan, I love your Vanessa. The Ice Queen lives! And I didn't shed a tear. Re: "The Fight at the Ford". tears. See, gang, they weep a...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Multiple Contributors</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://patft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.htm&r=1&p=1&f=G&l=50&d=PTXT&S1=%28%28slot+AND+Palatine%29+AND+phonation%29&OS=slot+and+Palatine+and+phonation&RS=%28%28slot+AND+Palatine%29+AND+phonation%29"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> lingual orthodontic appliance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://patft.uspto.gov/netahtml/PTO/search-adv.htm">US Patent & Trademark Office Database</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The invention relates to a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> lingual orthodontic appliance which, when installed on the patient, rests on the lingual surface of the teeth and the palatine and inferior alveolar mucous membranes, comprising a base and support element (1) destined to be rested on the oral mucous membrane, substantially horseshoe-conformed, a plurality of elastic connecting elements (2) made by the modelling of a steel wire or similar with predetermined elastic characteristics, <span class="hlt">fixed</span> at an end to the base and support element (1), and at the other of its ends on a respective bracket (3), the bracket or brackets (3) being made in synthetic resin and in a number which is equal to that of the teeth to be treated, and being conformed in such a way as to exhibit a concave face (7) which will be cemented on the equally concave lingual surface of the tooth, the other, convex, face (8) exposed to the oral cavity being superficially perfectly smooth and having a convexity which is equal to the development of the corresponding surface of the tooth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-05-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25396111"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> sagittal plane imbalance.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Study Design?Literature review. Objective?To discuss the evaluation and management of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> sagittal plane imbalance. Methods?A comprehensive literature review was performed on the preoperative evaluation of patients with sagittal plane malalignment, as well as the surgical strategies to address sagittal plane deformity. Results?Sagittal plane imbalance is often caused by de novo scoliosis or iatrogenic flat back deformity. Understanding the etiology and magnitude of sagittal malalignment is crucial in realignment planning. Objective parameters have been developed to guide surgeons in determining how much correction is needed to achieve favorable outcomes. Currently, the goals of surgery are to restore a sagittal vertical axis?<?5 cm, pelvic tilt?<?20 degrees, and lumbar lordosis equal to pelvic incidence?±?9 degrees. Conclusion?Sagittal plane malalignment is an increasingly recognized cause of pain and disability. Treatment of sagittal plane imbalance varies according to the etiology, location, and severity of the deformity. <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> sagittal malalignment often requires complex reconstructive procedures that include osteotomy correction. Reestablishing harmonious spinopelvic alignment is associated with significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life outcome measures and patient satisfaction. PMID:25396111</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Savage, Jason W; Patel, Alpesh A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3883090"> <span id="translatedtitle">Turning Knowledge Into <span class="hlt">Action</span> at the <span class="hlt">Point</span>-of-Care: The Collective Experience of Nurses Facilitating the Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Facilitation is considered a way of enabling clinicians to implement evidence into practice by problem solving and providing support. Practice development is a well-established movement in the United Kingdom that incorporates the use of facilitators, but in Canada, the role is more obtuse. Few investigations have observed the process of facilitation as described by individuals experienced in guideline implementation in North America. AimTo describe the tacit knowledge regarding facilitation embedded in the experiences of nurses implementing evidence into practice. Methods: Twenty nurses from across Canada were purposively selected to attend an interactive knowledge translation symposium to examine what has worked and what has not in implementing evidence in practice. This study is an additional in-depth analysis of data collected at the symposium that focuses on facilitation as an intervention to enhance evidence uptake. Critical incident technique was used to elicit examples to examine the nurses’ facilitation experiences. Participants shared their experiences with one another and completed initial data analysis and coding collaboratively. The data were further thematically analyzed using the qualitative inductive approach of constant comparison. Results: A number of factors emerged at various levels associated with the successes and failures of participants’ efforts to facilitate evidence-based practice. Successful implementation related to: (a) focus on a priority issue, (b) relevant evidence, (c) development of strategic partnerships, (d) the use of multiple strategies to effect change, and (e) facilitator characteristics and approach. Negative factors influencing the process were: (a) poor engagement or ownership, (b) resource deficits, (c) conflict, (d) contextual issues, and (e) lack of evaluation and sustainability. Conclusions: Factors at the individual, environmental, organizational, and cultural level influence facilitation of evidence-based practice in real situations at the <span class="hlt">point</span>-of-care. With a greater understanding of factors contributing to successful or unsuccessful facilitation, future research should focus on analyzing facilitation interventions tailored to address barriers and enhance facilitators of evidence uptake. PMID:23796066</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dogherty, Elizabeth J; Harrison, Margaret B; Graham, Ian D; Vandyk, Amanda Digel; Keeping-Burke, Lisa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://publications.aldenwright.fastmail.us/wright_vose1995stability_fixed_points.ps.gz"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stability of Vertex <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Points</span> and Applications Michael D. Vose</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">) which can be regarded as answering the following fundamental questions for a simple genetic algorithm: 1 of Montana Missoula, MT 59812­1008 Abstract In the Infinite Population Simple Genetic Algorithm, stability. In a sense, G is a GA: anything that ever could be proved about the simple genetic algorithm (for arbitrary</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wright, Alden H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://publications.aldenwright.fastmail.us/wright_vose1995stability_fixed_points.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stability of Vertex <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Points</span> and Applications Michael D. Vose</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">of Montana Missoula, MT 59812-1008 Abstract In the Infinite Population Simple Genetic Algorithm, stability section) which can be regarded as answering the following fundamental questions for a simple genetic is exact. In a sense, G is a GA: anything that ever could be proved about the simple genetic algorithm (for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wright, Alden H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.optimization-online.org/DB_FILE/2014/03/4302.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> and variational principles with applications to capability ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">supported by the USA National Science Foundation under grant DMS-1007132. 3Aix-Marseille ...... individual (?i), social (?s) and environmental (?e) influences; see [20]. Functionings. ...... Theories of Distributive Justice. Cambridge: Harvard ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.macalester.edu/~kaplan/preprints/chaosinbrain.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">FINDING AND CHARACTERIZING UNSTABLE <span class="hlt">FIXED</span> <span class="hlt">POINTS</span> BY CONTROLLING SYSTEM DYNAMICS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">of the uncontrolled system can be estimated. The important question ... may not be decidable on the basis of time to an untrained eye. Faced with a more difficult test, say, distinguishing the EEG from spectrally matched noise difference between EEG and other neurological signals and spectrally matched "surrogate data."1 In other</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kaplan, Daniel T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/g5158v7111658703.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Points</span> and Quartic Functional Equations in ? -Banach Modules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Let M = { 1, 2, . . . , n } and let $${\\\\mathcal {V}=\\\\{\\\\,I \\\\subseteq M: 1 \\\\in I\\\\,\\\\}}$$ , where n is an integer greater than 1. Denote $${M{\\\\setminus}{I}}$$ by I\\u000a \\u000a c\\u000a for $${I \\\\in \\\\mathcal {V}.}$$ We investigate the solution of the following generalized quartic functional equation\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a $$\\\\begin{array}{ll} \\\\sum\\\\limits_{I \\\\in\\\\mathcal {V}}f\\\\, \\\\left({\\\\sum\\\\limits_{i \\\\in I}}a_ix_i-\\\\sum\\\\limits_{i \\\\in I^c}a_ix_i\\\\right) \\\\, = \\\\,2^{n-2} \\\\sum\\\\limits_{1\\\\leq</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Eshaghi Gordji; H. Khodaei; A. Najati</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.iam.unibe.ch/tilpub/2002/rs02.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intuitionistic <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> theories for strictly positive operators</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">arithmetic and 0 2 sentences over the theory ACA-i for times iterated arithmetic comprehension without set, it is proved that ID i (strict) is conservative over ACA-i for all negative arithmetic and 0 2 sentences, where ACA-i denotes the natural theory of times iterated arithmetic comprehension without set</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jäger, Gerhard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ma.utexas.edu/mp_arc/c/00/00-138.ps.gz"> <span id="translatedtitle">Existence and properties of ptupling <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> Henri Epstein</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">[\\GammaL; 0] of the negative real axis (L ? 1) and satisfies ¸(x) ? x on this interval. Again for avoiding repetitions, this works rather well for p = 1, ([EE, E2, E3]). It is much less effective, as we. This suggests that the solution (and in parti</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1970-THESIS-S531"> <span id="translatedtitle">Examples involving shrinking conditions of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> theorems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">such that ( m m d~f(x), f(v), ? k d(x, y) for all m ~ n (S5) there exists a in (0, 1/2) such that ior each x, y in X, d(f(x), f(y)) ~ a(d(x, f(x)) + d(y, f(y))) Purther discus. , ion of these shrinking cnndi tions can be simplified and shortened... such that ( m m d~f(x), f(v), ? k d(x, y) for all m ~ n (S5) there exists a in (0, 1/2) such that ior each x, y in X, d(f(x), f(y)) ~ a(d(x, f(x)) + d(y, f(y))) Purther discus. , ion of these shrinking cnndi tions can be simplified and shortened...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sharp, Douglas Andrew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhFl...25h3303S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Active microrheology: <span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-velocity versus <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-force</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In active microrheology, a probe particle is driven by an external force through a complex medium and its motion studied in order to infer properties of the embedding material. It is conducted in two limiting forms: either the probe is propelled by a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> force, as with magnetic tweezers, or it is driven at a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> velocity, as with optical tweezers. Recent work has shown that the mean probe motion can be interpreted as an effective material viscosity, but that this viscosity depends on whether the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-force or <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-velocity mode is employed. We compute the effective viscosity probed by <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-velocity active microrheology of a dilute colloidal dispersion. A comparison is made between this new result and the effective viscosity probed in the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-force mode. In the absence of hydrodynamic interactions, the particle-phase contributions to the effective viscosity for the two modes differ by exactly a factor of two. A simple scaling argument has been previously advanced to rationalize this difference: in the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-force mode, the probe is free to diffuse, and thus the relaxation time scale is set by the relative diffusivity between probe and bath. However, in the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-velocity mode, thermal motion of the probe particle is "frozen out" because the probe cannot diffuse; the relaxation rate is thus halved. The ratio of the two rates is independent of how quickly the probe particle is driven through the suspension—the extent and shape of microstructural deformation is the same for the two cases. In contrast, when the suspended particles interact hydrodynamically, the distortions to the suspension microstructure in the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-velocity versus <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-force modes differ. We show that, depending on the strength of the hydrodynamic interactions, the ratio of the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-velocity to the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-force microstructural contributions to the effective viscosity may be as small as 1.3, and only approaches 2.0 when hydrodynamic interactions among the particles are negligibly weak. While this ratio varies both as a function of the strength of the deformation imposed and of the strength of hydrodynamic interactions, the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-velocity effective viscosity agrees qualitatively with that already measured for the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-force mode: the colloidal dispersion thins in the limit of weak hydrodynamic interactions; and it first thins and then thickens in the limit of strong hydrodynamic interactions, as the strength of deformation increases, recovering characteristics of shear-(force-) thinning and thickening well known in colloidal dispersions. The agreement between the two, and with traditional macrorheological approaches, shows that both <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-force and <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-velocity provide a useful tool for the interrogation of complex fluids.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swan, James W.; Zia, Roseanna N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27707869"> <span id="translatedtitle">Batalin-Vilkovisky gauge-<span class="hlt">fixing</span> of a chiral two-form in six dimensions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We perform the gauge-<span class="hlt">fixing</span> of the theory of a chiral two-form boson in six\\u000adimensions starting from the <span class="hlt">action</span> given by Pasti, Sorokin and Tonin. We use\\u000athe Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism, introducing antifields and writing down an\\u000aextended <span class="hlt">action</span> satisfying the classical master equation. Then we gauge-<span class="hlt">fix</span> the\\u000athree local symmetries of the extended <span class="hlt">action</span> in two different ways.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chris Van Den Broeck; Kor Van Hoof</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21513251"> <span id="translatedtitle">Non-perturbative analysis of the Gribov-Zwanziger <span class="hlt">action</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the non-perturbative regime the usual gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> is not sufficient due to the Gribov problem. To deal with it one can restrict the integration in the path integral to the first Gribov region by using the Gribov-Zwanziger <span class="hlt">action</span>. In its local form it features additional auxiliary fields which mix with the gluon at the two-<span class="hlt">point</span> level. We present an explicit infrared analysis of this <span class="hlt">action</span>. We show that from the two possible scaling solutions obtained previously only one remains: It coincides exactly with the results from the Faddeev-Popov <span class="hlt">action</span>, i.e., the ghost propagator is infrared enhanced and the gluon propagator infrared suppressed and the corresponding power law behavior is described by only one parameter {kappa} = 0.5953.... This corroborates the argument by Zwanziger that for functional equations it suffices to take into account the appropriate boundary conditions and no explicit restriction in the path integral measure is required.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huber, Markus Q. [Physikalisch-Theoretisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Alkofer, Reinhard [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, 8010 Graz (Austria); Sorella, Silvio P. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Instituto de Fisica, UERJ - Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier 524, 20550-013 Maracana, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.optimization-online.org/DB_FILE/2011/03/2953.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Chance-Constrained Model & Cutting Planes for <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Broadband ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microwave, in the context of this work, refers to terrestrial <span class="hlt">point-to-point</span> digital .... this, the binary decision variables y obtain a new index m. The minimum cost <span class="hlt">fixed</span> ... ability that the effective capacity supports the routed traffic. In other words</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6989374"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> of stringlike models via OSp(D/2)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Within the formalism of OSrho(D/2) supersymmetry, wherein extended BRST transformations correspond to supertranslations, the authors <span class="hlt">fix</span> the gauge of bosonic stringlike models in the form, par. deltag = 0, ..sqrt..g = rho. The <span class="hlt">action</span> has no propagating or interacting conformal ghosts and the Srho(2) symmetry between the ghosts is manifest.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Delbourgo, R.; Jarvis, P.D.; Zhang, R.B.; Thompson, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/663519"> <span id="translatedtitle">Total effective dose equivalent associated with <span class="hlt">fixed</span> uranium surface contamination</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report provides the technical basis for establishing a uranium <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-contamination <span class="hlt">action</span> level, a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> uranium surface contamination level exceeding the total radioactivity values of Appendix D of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, part 835 (10CFR835), but below which the monitoring, posting, and control requirements for Radiological Areas are not required for the area of the contamination. An area of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> uranium contamination between 1,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} and that level corresponding to an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 100 mrem requires only routine monitoring, posting to alert personnel of the contamination, and administrative control. The more extensive requirements for monitoring, posting, and control designated by 10CFR835 for Radiological Areas do not have to be applied for these intermediate <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-contamination levels.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bogard, J.S.; Hamm, R.N.; Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; England, C.A.; Swenson, D.E.; Brown, K.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25342411"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> drug eruption to propofol.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a case of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> drug eruption to propofol following a series of sedations of a patient for a number of day case procedures. The patient experienced oedema and blistering of his penis, increasing in severity and duration following each subsequent exposure. The diagnosis was confirmed by punch biopsy following an intravenous challenge test with propofol. Whilst reports of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> drug eruptions to anaesthetic induction agents are uncommon, a number of drugs used commonly by anaesthetists are known triggers. We discuss <span class="hlt">fixed</span> drug eruptions in relation to anaesthetic practice, aiming to raise awareness of this adverse drug reaction. PMID:25342411</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allchurch, L G V; Crilly, H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://chiron.valdosta.edu/are/vol5no1/Thesis%20PDF/LFloyd_ARE.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Project Your <span class="hlt">Points</span> With Power<span class="hlt">Point</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this <span class="hlt">action</span> research was to determine if requiring students to create Power<span class="hlt">Point</span> presentations would have an impact on their ability to choose pertinent facts from various sites then synthesize those facts into a written report. Twenty-eight students from an average eighth-grade social studies class participated in the instructional unit. Data collection included pre- and post-intervention student surveys,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Linda H. Floyd; Lars F. Leader</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3669743"> <span id="translatedtitle">Choosing <span class="hlt">Actions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Actions</span> that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from <span class="hlt">actions</span> that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible <span class="hlt">actions</span> that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen <span class="hlt">actions</span> are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes <span class="hlt">actions</span> that are chosen from <span class="hlt">actions</span> that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to <span class="hlt">action</span> choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37439722"> <span id="translatedtitle">Are courageous <span class="hlt">actions</span> successful <span class="hlt">actions</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">When asked to describe a courageous <span class="hlt">action</span> they have taken personally, people overwhelmingly describe an <span class="hlt">action</span> with a successful outcome (Pury, Kowalski, & Spearman, 2007). Study 1 replicated these findings in observations of other people. Fifty participants described a courageous <span class="hlt">action</span> taken by another person and made parallel ratings to Pury et al. Participants in Study 1 also described <span class="hlt">actions</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cynthia L. S. Pury; Autumn D. Hensel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...05..072R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Higher derivative corrections to O-plane <span class="hlt">actions</span>: NS-NS sector</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We classify all possible two- and four-derivative couplings of bulk NS-NS sector fields to a single O p-plane which are compatible with diffeomorphism invariance and B-field gauge invariance. This is applicable to type IIA or IIB superstrings or to the bosonic string. We then consider this general <span class="hlt">action</span> in various classes of backgrounds that admit a U(1) isometry and determine the constraints on the couplings from consistency with T-duality. We show that this consistency requires the two-derivative <span class="hlt">action</span> to vanish, and the entire non-linear four-derivative <span class="hlt">action</span> is <span class="hlt">fixed</span> up to one overall constant which can be determined by comparison with a two-<span class="hlt">point</span> scattering amplitude. The resulting <span class="hlt">action</span> is consistent with all previously computed couplings.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robbins, Daniel; Wang, Zhao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5262286"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coset space dimensional reduction and gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> over the supercircle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper the constraints of CSDR are solved for vector gauge fields over a coset space IOSp(1/2, R)/OSp(1/2, R) including supertranslations (extended BRST transformations) and ordinary translations (rotations on the circle). The gauge-<span class="hlt">fixing</span> <span class="hlt">action</span> incorporates standard ghost and multiplier fields (and their modes) but is nonpolynomial in an additional scalar field {phi} and its modes. There is a new {phi}-BRST invariance with respect to {phi} dependent gauge transformations, a bosonic counterpart of the usual ghost-BRST invariance. In the Abelian case, {phi} can be integrated out, leading to a formalism equivalent to ordinary covariant gauge-<span class="hlt">fixing</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jarvis, P.D. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Tasmania, Box 252c, GPO, Hobart Tasmania 7001 (AU))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24130130"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prolactin <span class="hlt">actions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Molecular genetics and other contemporary approaches have contributed to a better understanding of prolactin (PRL) <span class="hlt">actions</span> at the cellular and organismal levels. In this review, several advances in knowledge of PRL <span class="hlt">actions</span> are highlighted. Special emphasis is paid to areas of progress with consequences for understanding of human PRL <span class="hlt">actions</span>. The impacts of these advances on future research priorities are analyzed. PMID:24130130</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Horseman, Nelson D; Gregerson, Karen A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IJMPA..2950099H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence of the big <span class="hlt">fix</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We give an evidence of the Big <span class="hlt">Fix</span>. The theory of wormholes and multiverse suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are <span class="hlt">fixed</span> in such a way that the total entropy at the late stage of the universe is maximized, which we call the maximum entropy principle. In this paper, we discuss how it can be confirmed by the experimental data, and we show that it is indeed true for the Higgs vacuum expectation value vh. We assume that the baryon number is produced by the sphaleron process, and that the current quark masses, the gauge couplings and the Higgs self-coupling are <span class="hlt">fixed</span> when we vary vh. It turns out that the existence of the atomic nuclei plays a crucial role to maximize the entropy. This is reminiscent of the anthropic principle, however it is required by the fundamental law in our case.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hamada, Yuta; Kawai, Hikaru; Kawana, Kiyoharu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Browse/Mac"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mac <span class="hlt">Fix</span>It Guides</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The i<span class="hlt">Fix</span>It guides are extremely helpful to computer repair technicians who would like to be able to <span class="hlt">fix</span> Apple brand computers as well as PCs. The guides included on the site are mainly dedicated to Apple laptops, including MacBooks, PowerBooks, and iBooks, but also include a few guides pertaining to the Mac Mini. There are numerous guides to choose from, all organized by computer type, computer specifications, and what the repairperson would like to accomplish. The guides are extremely easy to follow and contain detailed pictures and diagrams, which are very helpful. Most of the guides are also downloadable. The guides include lists of tools and links to purchase the tools if the user doesn�t have them. All of the information on i<span class="hlt">Fix</span>It is free and no login is required.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/15213311"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sweeping <span class="hlt">Points</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Given a set of <span class="hlt">points</span> in the plane, and a sweep-line as a tool, what is best way to move the <span class="hlt">points</span> to a target <span class="hlt">point</span> using\\u000a a sequence of sweeps? In a sweep, the sweep-line is placed at a start position somewhere in the plane, then moved orthogonally\\u000a and continuously to another parallel end position, and then lifted from</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adrian Dumitrescu; Minghui Jiang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55100206"> <span id="translatedtitle">Suppression of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> pattern noise for infrared image system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we propose suppression of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> pattern noise (FPN) and compensation of soft defect for improvement of object tracking in cooled staring infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) imaging system. FPN appears an observable image which applies to non-uniformity compensation (NUC) by temperature. Soft defect appears glittering black and white <span class="hlt">point</span> by characteristics of non-uniformity for IR detector by</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jungsoo Han; Kyung-Hoon Bae</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Friction&pg=4&id=EJ944366"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Costs and Hours Constraints</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are <span class="hlt">fixed</span> costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, William R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1798760"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Action</span> spectra again?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Action</span> spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. <span class="hlt">Action</span> spectra were among the first assays to <span class="hlt">point</span> to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates of effect. Preliminary estimates suggest that ozone layer depletion may seriously impact such important biological end-<span class="hlt">points</span> as skin cancer, cataracts, the immune system, crop yields, and oceanic phytoplankton. So <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra continue to play a central role in important photobiological research. PMID:1798760</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coohill, T P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1110.1621v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Non-Quadratic Gauge <span class="hlt">Fixing</span> and Ghosts for Gauge Theories on the Hypersphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has been suggested that using a gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> Lagrangian that is not quadratic in a gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> condition is most appropriate for gauge theories formulated on a hypersphere. We reexamine the appropriate ghost <span class="hlt">action</span> that is to be associated with gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span>, applying a technique that has been used for ensuring that the propagator for a massless spin-two field is transverse and traceless. It is shown that this non-quadratic gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> Lagrangian leads to two pair of complex Fermionic ghosts and two Bosonic real ghosts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. T. Brandt; D. G. C. McKeon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21607977"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonquadratic gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> and ghosts for gauge theories on the hypersphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has been suggested that using a gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> Lagrangian that is not quadratic in a gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> condition is most appropriate for gauge theories formulated on a hypersphere. We reexamine the appropriate ghost <span class="hlt">action</span> that is to be associated with gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span>, applying a technique that has been used for ensuring that the propagator for a massless spin-two field is transverse and traceless. It is shown that this nonquadratic gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> Lagrangian leads to two pair of complex Fermionic ghosts and two Bosonic real ghosts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brandt, F. T. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05315-970 (Brazil); McKeon, D. G. C. [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Algoma University, Sault St. Marie, Ontario P6A 2G4 (Canada)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54973070"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tipping <span class="hlt">Points</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A climate tipping <span class="hlt">point</span>, at least as I have used the phrase, refers to a situation in which a changing climate forcing has reached a <span class="hlt">point</span> such that little additional forcing (or global temperature change) is needed to cause large, relatively rapid, climate change. Present examples include potential loss of all Arctic sea ice and instability of the West Antarctic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Hansen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=107209"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regulation of the Carnitine Pathway in Escherichia coli: Investigation of the cai-<span class="hlt">fix</span> Divergent Promoter Region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The divergent structural operons caiTABCDE and <span class="hlt">fix</span>ABCX of Escherichia coli are required for anaerobic carnitine metabolism. Transcriptional monocopy lacZ fusion studies showed that both operons are coexpressed during anaerobic growth in the presence of carnitine, respond to common environmental stimuli (like glucose and nitrate), and are modulated positively by the same general regulators, CRP and FNR, and negatively by H-NS. Overproduction of the CaiF specific regulatory protein mediating the carnitine signal restored induction in an fnr mutant, corresponding to its role as the primary target for anaerobiosis. Transcript analysis identified two divergent transcription start <span class="hlt">points</span> initiating 289 bp apart. DNase I footprinting revealed three sites with various affinities for the binding of the cAMP-CRP complex inside this regulatory region. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that previously reported perfect CRP motif 1, centered at ?41.5 of the cai transcriptional start site, plays a direct role in the sole cai activation. In contrast, mutation in CRP site 2, positioned at ?69.5 of the <span class="hlt">fix</span> promoter, caused only a threefold reduction in <span class="hlt">fix</span> expression. Thus, the role of the third CRP site, located at ?126.5 of <span class="hlt">fix</span>, might be to reinforce the <span class="hlt">action</span> of site 2. A critical 50-bp cis-acting sequence overlapping the <span class="hlt">fix</span> mRNA start site was found, by deletion analysis, to be necessary for cai transcription. This region is thought to be involved in transduction of the signal mediated by the CaiF regulator. PMID:9573142</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Buchet, Anne; Eichler, Knut; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andree</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFMGC44A..01H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tipping <span class="hlt">Points</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A climate tipping <span class="hlt">point</span>, at least as I have used the phrase, refers to a situation in which a changing climate forcing has reached a <span class="hlt">point</span> such that little additional forcing (or global temperature change) is needed to cause large, relatively rapid, climate change. Present examples include potential loss of all Arctic sea ice and instability of the West Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. Tipping <span class="hlt">points</span> are characterized by ready feedbacks that amplify the effect of forcings. The notion that these may be runaway feedbacks is a misconception. However, present "unrealized" global warming, due to the climate system's thermal inertia, exacerbates the difficulty of avoiding global warming tipping <span class="hlt">points</span>. I argue that prompt efforts to slow CO2 emissions and absolutely reduce non-CO2 forcings are both essential if we are to avoid tipping <span class="hlt">points</span> that would be disastrous for humanity and creation, the planet as civilization knows it.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hansen, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5121308"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of warning and protective <span class="hlt">action</span> implementation times for chemical weapons accidents. [None</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This is a preliminary evaluation of warning systems and protective <span class="hlt">action</span> options for off-site emergency planning for chemical weapons accidents. The analysis concentrates on the timing of warning and protective <span class="hlt">action</span> implementation which is defined as the length of time it will take to protect off-site populations given different warning systems and protective <span class="hlt">action</span> configurations. The evaluation concludes: (1) A specialized warning system using tone alert radios, automatic telephone dialing systems, sirens, or some combination thereof is desirable within 10 km of the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> sites. (2) A rapid means of respiratory protection and expedient protective sheltering are the protective <span class="hlt">actions</span> that could be most rapidly implemented within 10 km of a <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-site release <span class="hlt">point</span>. (3) Populations at distances greater than 10 km should have time to evacuate without the installation of specialized warning systems except in institutional facilities such as schools and nursing homes. (4) The detection and warning decision times are critical elements in determining the feasibility of population protection. A 5-to-15-minute organizational response is needed to provide warning to potentially threatened populations. Even an expedient organizational response, however, will not provide 100% assurance that everyone will have time to learn of the accident and take <span class="hlt">action</span>. 9 refs., 4 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sorensen, J.H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title9-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title9-vol2-sec417-3.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">9 CFR 417.3 - Corrective <span class="hlt">actions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL <span class="hlt">POINT</span> (HACCP) SYSTEMS § 417.3 Corrective <span class="hlt">actions</span>. (a) The written HACCP plan shall identify the corrective <span class="hlt">action</span>...a deviation from a critical limit. The HACCP plan shall describe the corrective...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7274E..13B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Integrating assist feature print <span class="hlt">fixing</span> with OPC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A challenge in model-based assist feature placement is to find optimal placements while satisfying mask rules and preventing AF printing. There are numerous strategies for achieving this ranging from fully rule-based methods to pixel-based inversion. Our proposed solution is to identify the optimal locations of assist features using modeling information based strictly on optics and resist stack optical characteristics. Once these positions have been found, preliminary AFs can be placed. At this <span class="hlt">point</span> suggested sizes and shapes can be identified, although these can later be modified. In a later step, MRC cleanup, printability <span class="hlt">fixing</span>, and main-pattern OPC can be performed simultaneously. This has the advantage of allowing the use of the full process model to predict the location of OPC edges accurately, and use calibrated or 3d mask models to determine assist feature printing behavior. This correction is done while maintaining MRC constraints. In this flow, an AF placement field, generated from the pre-OPC target patterns, can be used to provide accurate guidance on how to move assist features to get the most benefit while keeping other constraints in mind. Using this method, a range of printability <span class="hlt">fixing</span> strategies, guided by placement benefits, is available. We present data showing that the benefit of AF placements can be determined from optical parameters, on target (non-OPC) data, and that this method leads to beneficial yet compliant masks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barnes, Levi D.; Poonawala, Amyn; Painter, Benjamin D.; Jost, Andrew M.; Takei, TJ; Li, Yong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/434314"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> target flammable gas upgrades</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the past, <span class="hlt">fixed</span> target flammable gas systems were not supported in an organized fashion. The Research Division, Mechanical Support Department began to support these gas systems for the 1995 run. This technical memo describes the new approach being used to supply chamber gasses to <span class="hlt">fixed</span> target experiments at Fermilab. It describes the engineering design features, system safety, system documentation and performance results. Gas mixtures provide the medium for electron detection in proportional and drift chambers. Usually a mixture of a noble gas and a polyatomic quenching gas is used. Sometimes a small amount of electronegative gas is added as well. The mixture required is a function of the specific chamber design, including working voltage, gain requirements, high rate capability, aging and others. For the 1995 <span class="hlt">fixed</span> target run all the experiments requested once through gas systems. We obtained a summary of problems from the 1990 <span class="hlt">fixed</span> target run and made a summary of the operations logbook entries from the 1991 run. These summaries primarily include problems involving flammable gas alarms, but also include incidents where Operations was involved or informed. Usually contamination issues were dealt with by the experimenters. The summaries are attached. We discussed past operational issues with the experimenters involved. There were numerous incidents of drift chamber failure where contaminated gas was suspect. However analyses of the gas at the time usually did not show any particular problems. This could have been because the analysis did not look for the troublesome component, the contaminant was concentrated in the gas over the liquid and vented before the sample was taken, or that contaminants were drawn into the chambers directly through leaks or sub-atmospheric pressures. After some study we were unable to determine specific causes of past contamination problems, although in argon-ethane systems the problems were due to the ethane only.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schmitt, R.; Squires, B.; Gasteyer, T.; Richardson, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004JCoAM.162...57L"> <span id="translatedtitle">More accuracy at <span class="hlt">fixed</span> precision</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several different techniques and software intend to improve the accuracy of results computed in a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> finite precision. Here we focus on the CENA method that processes an automatic correction of the first-order effect of the rounding errors the computation generates. This method provides a corrected result and a bound of the residual error for a class of algorithms we identify. We present the main features of the CENA method and illustrate its interests and limitations with examples.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Langlois, Philippe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/615933"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reasoning About Knowledge and <span class="hlt">Action</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper discusses the problems of representing and reasoning with information about knowledge and <span class="hlt">action</span>. The first section discusses the importance of having systems that understand the concept of knowledge, and how knowledge is related to <span class="hlt">action</span>. Section 2 <span class="hlt">points</span> out some of the special problems that are involved in reasoning about knowledge, and section S presents a logic of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robert C. Moore</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=game+AND+communicative+AND+competence&pg=6&id=EJ238900"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Action</span> Mazes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An <span class="hlt">action</span> maze is a series of reading cards, the first of which outlines a problem situation and offers readers a number of possible courses of <span class="hlt">action</span>. By working in groups through the cards, communicative skills are developed. The cards can also be used as a writing exercise. (PJM)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rinvolucri, M. F. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5549377"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of slurry versus <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed reactor costs for indirect liquefaction applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This work is a comparative evaluation of slurry reactors and <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed reactors, with special emphasis on cost. Relative differences between slurry reactors and <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed reactors have been <span class="hlt">pointed</span> out in previous reviews; the differences pertinent to indirect liquefaction are summarized here. Design of both types is outlined.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Prakash, A.; Bendale, P.G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24510691"> <span id="translatedtitle">Widespread bullous <span class="hlt">fixed</span> drug eruption.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 53-year-old man developed a widespread erythematous eruption which rapidly evolved into fluid-filled bulla mostly involving the distal areas of all four limbs and erosions on the oral as well as anogenital mucosa. Based on clinical presentation, chronology of drug exposure, past events and histopathology as diagnosis of widespread bullous <span class="hlt">fixed</span> drug eruption was made over Steven Johnson-toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome. Steroids were deferred and the lesions healed with minimal pigmentation within a week. Differentiating between the two entities has been historically difficult, and yet can have significant therapeutic and prognostic implications. PMID:24510691</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Patell, Rushad D; Dosi, Rupal V; Shah, Purav C; Joshi, Harshal S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/curie_point/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Curie <span class="hlt">Point</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this activity best suited as a demonstration, learners observe that when a piece of iron gets too hot, it loses its ability to be magnetized. The temperature at which this occurs is known as the Curie <span class="hlt">Point</span>. This simple set-up involving a lantern battery and Tinkertoys⢠demonstrates this phenomenon. Adult supervision required, as the wire will get hot in this activity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Exploratorium, The</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://concord.org/stem-resources/dew-point"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dew <span class="hlt">Point</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Determine the dew <span class="hlt">point</span> temperature for your classroom through a hands-on experiment. Use humidity and temperature probes to investigate the temperature at which it would rain in your classroom! Learn about water density and the conditions necessary to produce fog or rain.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Consortium, The C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/AEC/AEF/1996/crumlish_enzyme.php"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enzyme <span class="hlt">Action</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this activity that can be used as a lab or demonstration, learners use Lactaid® and lactose to demonstrate the concept of enzyme <span class="hlt">action</span>. Learners test a drop of milk and Lactaid® for the presence of glucose using glucose test paper. Learners also discover the color range of glucose test paper readings. In addition, learners construct paper models to help visualize enzyme <span class="hlt">action</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Crumlish, Jane</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61266954"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mathematical simulation of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> bed reactors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anaerobic digestion of agricultural wastes using conventional stirred-reactor technology has been unsuccessful in treatment of dilute waste streams. The development of ''<span class="hlt">fixed</span> bed'' anaerobic reactors has provided an effective method of utilizing dilute waste for methane production. <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> bed reactors, or anaerobic filters, are unique among anaerobic reactor designs in that a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> support medium is placed inside the reactor</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. P. Bolte; R. A. Nordstedt; M. V. Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6874758"> <span id="translatedtitle">Final consolidated <span class="hlt">action</span> plan to Tiger Team</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document contains the planned <span class="hlt">actions</span> to correct the deficiences identified in the Tiger Team Assessments of Sandia California (August 1990) and Sandia New Mexico (May 1991). Information is also included on the management structures, estimated costs, root causes, prioritization and schedules for the <span class="hlt">Action</span> Plan. This Plan is an integration of the two individual <span class="hlt">Action</span> Plans to provide a cost effective, integrated program for implementation by Sandia and monitoring by DOE. This volume (I) contains the findings and <span class="hlt">actions</span> concerning the environment. Tables 4.2 and 4.7 summarize the annual costs estimated for completing the <span class="hlt">actions</span>. The total costs for completion of all the <span class="hlt">actions</span> are estimated to be $283 million over a 12 year period; the majority of the <span class="hlt">actions</span> to be completed and costs incurred in the first five years. Resources are provided from DOE-ER/WM, the DOE/DP landlord funds (one time, physical <span class="hlt">fixes</span>), and from the Sandia Indirect Budget.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1433948"> <span id="translatedtitle">SFT <span class="hlt">Action</span> for Separated D-branes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an <span class="hlt">action</span> for Cubic String Field Theory with one embedding coordinate treated separately. We truncate the <span class="hlt">action</span> at level (3,9), but unlike many other works we do not impose twist symmetry. We also allow arbitrary zero-modes for the direction considered special. Our <span class="hlt">action</span> provides a starting <span class="hlt">point</span> for the study of numerous configurations of D-branes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Longton, Matheson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1203.4615v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">SFT <span class="hlt">Action</span> for Separated D-branes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an <span class="hlt">action</span> for Cubic String Field Theory with one embedding coordinate treated separately. We truncate the <span class="hlt">action</span> at level (3,9), but unlike many other works we do not impose twist symmetry. We also allow arbitrary zero-modes for the direction considered special. Our <span class="hlt">action</span> provides a starting <span class="hlt">point</span> for the study of numerous configurations of D-branes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matheson Longton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.math.uah.edu/stat/point/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Point</span> Estimation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Created by Kyle Siegrist of the University of Alabama-Huntsville, this is an online, interactive lesson on <span class="hlt">point</span> estimation. The author provides examples, exercises, and applets about the topic. More specifically, they concern estimators, method of moments, maximum likelihood, Bayes' estimators, best unbiased estimators, and sufficient, complete and ancillary statistics. Additionally, the author provides links to external resources for students looking to engage in a more in-depth study of the topic. This is simply one lesson in a series of seventeen. They are easily accessible as the author has created the site in an online textbook format.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siegrist, Kyle</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59007254"> <span id="translatedtitle">Covert <span class="hlt">Action</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In what is now seen as the twilight of the Cold War, James E. Baker and I published a book entitled Regulating Covert <span class="hlt">Action</span>: Practices, Contexts, and Policies of Covert Coercion Abroad in International and American Law. A variety of covert activities were commonly being conducted in international politics in the use of military, economic, diplomatic, and propaganda instruments. Even</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. Michael Reisman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol5-sec90-637.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">47 CFR 90.637 - Restrictions on operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...false Restrictions on operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. 90...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES...637 Restrictions on operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. ...for control stations, operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol5-sec80-381.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">47 CFR 80.381 - Frequencies for operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...false Frequencies for operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. 80...COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES...SERVICES Frequencies Operational <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Stations § 80.381 Frequencies for operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008IJT....29..984Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Realization of the Temperature Scale in the Range from 234.3 K (Hg Triple <span class="hlt">Point</span>) to 1084.62°C (Cu Freezing <span class="hlt">Point</span>) in Croatia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article describes the realization of the International Temperature Scale in the range from 234.3 K (mercury triple <span class="hlt">point</span>) to 1084.62°C (copper freezing <span class="hlt">point</span>) at the Laboratory for Process Measurement (LPM), Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture (FSB), University of Zagreb. The system for the realization of the ITS-90 consists of the sealed <span class="hlt">fixed-point</span> cells (mercury triple <span class="hlt">point</span>, water triple <span class="hlt">point</span> and gallium melting <span class="hlt">point</span>) and the apparatus designed for the optimal realization of open <span class="hlt">fixed-point</span> cells which include the gallium melting <span class="hlt">point</span>, tin freezing <span class="hlt">point</span>, zinc freezing <span class="hlt">point</span>, aluminum freezing <span class="hlt">point</span>, and copper freezing <span class="hlt">point</span>. The maintenance of the open <span class="hlt">fixed-point</span> cells is described, including the system for filling the cells with pure argon and for maintaining the pressure during the realization.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zvizdic, Davor; Veliki, Tomislav; Grgec Bermanec, Lovorka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/22702596"> <span id="translatedtitle">Straw combustion in a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> bed combustor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Straw and herbaceous energy crops are key biomass materials for greenhouse gas neutral energy production. Combustion of straw and two herbaceous crops was investigated in a <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed reactor for a range of air flow-rates (234–1170kg\\/m2h). The <span class="hlt">fixed</span> bed tests simulate the moving bed combustion where the distance along a grate corresponds to the time on the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> bed. Measured temperatures,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adela Khor; Changkook Ryu; Yao-bin Yang; Vida N. Sharifi; Jim Swithenbank</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://practicalaction.org/home"> <span id="translatedtitle">Practical <span class="hlt">Action</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Founded over 40 years ago by an economist, Practical <span class="hlt">Action</span>'s aim is to help impoverished people "use technology to challenge poverty", to gain "access to technical options and knowledge", and "influence the social, economic and institutional systems for innovation and use of technology." The "Downloads" tab has a link to "Practical Answers" that cover almost two dozen themes and lets users browse the extensive library, submit technical questions to expert, and it also provides users with a section entitled "Share" which documents peoples' experience with Practical <span class="hlt">Action</span>. Visitors will also find the "Featured Articles" section of the Downloads useful and full of such practical information as "Build Your Own Tippy Tap", for hand washing after toileting and a "Solar Voltaic System Design Info Sheet" that covers electrical design issues. Back on the homepage, visitors will find links to their social networking, e-newsletter, and the latest from their series of blogs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24554561"> <span id="translatedtitle">The influence of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> orthodontic appliances on halitosis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Halitosis is a widely spread condition. There are numerous causes. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> orthodontic appliances on the occurrence of halitosis. 55 patients in an orthodontic practice were monitored at three <span class="hlt">points</span> in time after application of orthodontic appliance (T1: immediately after application, T2: 4 weeks after application, T3: 3 months after application). Monitoring included patient self-evaluation, plaque index, tongue coating index and organoleptic measurement. The subjective parameters taste, dry mouth and breath odor did not show statistical differences. However, with the presence of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> orthodontic appliances, confidence when performing dental hygiene decreased statistically significantly (p = 0.003). Additionally, the tongue coating index showed a statistically significant difference between T1 and T2 (p = 0.012) as well as T1 and T3 (p ? 0.001). Analogous results were found for organoleptic measurement (T1 and T2 [p = 0.002]; T1 and T3 [p ? 0.001]) and plaque index (T1 and T2/ T3 [p ? 0.001]). <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> orthodontic appliances lead to a statistically significant increase of the plaque and tongue coating indices. A statistically significant increase was also observed with organoleptic measurement scores. The suspected positive correlation between halitosis and <span class="hlt">fixed</span> orthodontic appliances was confirmed. Halitosis can be an important indicator of oral health during orthodontic treatment and can serve as a motivating factor for adequate patient oral health care maintenance. PMID:24554561</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zurfluh, Monika A; van Waes, Hubertus J M; Filippi, Andreas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21306074"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simplifying <span class="hlt">fixed</span> implant dental prosthetics.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Through following the FPPD protocol for multiple adjacent implants, and delivering final abutments, picking up the metal framework, and delivering provisionals, many benefits are gained. The benefits of following the FPPD protocol are as follows: The restorative dentist is trying-in and delivering the final abutments in one visit as opposed to removing them and placing them multiple times. This requires less chair time and time for the patient. It also reduces the mechanical stress on the abutment screw and implant body due to the elimination of multiple try-in appointments. When the metal framework is tried-in and verified for fit, the restorative dentist has the opportunity check the retention, check the margins, and make any corrections that might be needed. The abutments will be staying in the mouth when the framework is picked up. This metal try-in allows for a verification of the bite to be given to the dental lab. The delivery of provisionals manufactured by the dental laboratory offers many advantages in the FPPD technique. The patient has a form of tooth much earlier in the traditional appointment sequence. The patient can now offer feedback to the doctor and laboratory for fabrication of the permanent prosthesis with regards to shape and color. The laboratory-fabricated provisionals offer progressive loading to the implants through having a reduced occlusion yet allowing food to stimulate the implants. Overall, the FPPD technique offers shorter appointment times, more rapid delivery of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> supported teeth, improved doctor-technician communication, and less mechanical wear on the implant parts. PMID:21306074</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tischler, Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=opening+AND+business&pg=7&id=EJ817905"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Action</span> Learning: Avoiding Conflict or Enabling <span class="hlt">Action</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Action</span> learning is based on the premise that <span class="hlt">action</span> and learning are inextricably entwined and it is this potential, to enable <span class="hlt">action</span>, which has contributed to the growth of <span class="hlt">action</span> learning within education and management development programmes. However has this growth in <span class="hlt">action</span> learning lead to an evolution or a dilution of Revan's classical…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Corley, Aileen; Thorne, Ann</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21502548"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evolutionary quantum cosmology in a gauge-<span class="hlt">fixed</span> picture</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the classical and quantum models of a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space-time, coupled to a perfect fluid, in the context of the consensus and a gauge-<span class="hlt">fixed</span> Lagrangian frameworks. It is shown that, either in the usual or in the gauge-<span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">actions</span>, the evolution of the Universe based on the classical cosmology represents a late time power law expansion, coming from a big-bang singularity in which the scale factor goes to zero for the standard matter, and tending towards a big-rip singularity in which the scale factor diverges for the phantom fluid. We then employ the familiar canonical quantization procedure in the given cosmological setting to find the cosmological wave functions in the corresponding minisuperspace. Using a gauge-<span class="hlt">fixed</span> (reduced) Lagrangian, we show that it may lead to a Schroedinger equation for the quantum-mechanical description of the model under consideration, the eigenfunctions of which can be used to construct the time dependent wave function of the Universe. We use the resulting wave function in order to investigate the possibility of the avoidance of classical singularities due to quantum effects by means of the many-worlds and ontological interpretation of quantum cosmology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vakili, Babak [Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University (IAU), Chalous Branch, P. O. Box 46615-397, Chalous (Iran, Islamic Republic of)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fixed+AND+assets&id=EJ666104"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gaining Insight into an Organization's <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Assets.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Discusses issues related to school district implementation of June 2001 Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement 34 designed to change how schools report <span class="hlt">fixed</span> assets. Includes planning for GASB implementation, conducting <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-asset inventories, and making time for GASB reporting. (PKP)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hardy, Elisabet</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ciencia&pg=7&id=EJ652774"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-Response Questions with a Difference.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Offers three types of <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-response questions that are designed to overcome drawbacks appearing in the conventional forms of <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-response questions such as not allowing the examiner to investigate reasoning, background, or prevent guessing. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnstone, Alex H.; Ambusaidi, Abdullah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/35552706"> <span id="translatedtitle">Overfeed <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed combustion of wood</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Research on the combustion of wood on a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> grate with a separate supply of combustion air is described in this paper. From the layer of the wood on the grate, only <span class="hlt">fixed</span> carbon was burned in the primary combustion chamber in the presence of primary air, whereas the volatiles were burned subsequently in the secondary combustion chamber in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Janez Oman; Matija Tuma</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=PIC&pg=3&id=EJ335414"> <span id="translatedtitle">Negotiating a <span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-Unit Price Contract.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Discusses the concept of "<span class="hlt">fixed</span>-unit price contracting," an arrangement that is becoming popular with private industry councils (PICs). Guidelines include (1) find out as much as you can about the PIC's requirements; (2) figure out whether you can meet the PIC's requirements; and (3) keep in mind that most elements of a <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-unit price contract…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pasquale, Mathew; Morrison, Wade</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1405.5812v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fourier Accelerated Conjugate Gradient Lattice Gauge <span class="hlt">Fixing</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We provide details of the first implementation of a non-linear conjugate gradient method for Landau and Coulomb gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> with Fourier acceleration. We find clear improvement over the Fourier accelerated steepest descent method, with the average time taken for the algorithm to converge to a <span class="hlt">fixed</span>, high accuracy, being reduced by a factor of 2 to 4.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. J. Hudspith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JMP....53k5611L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optimal mixing and optimal stirring for <span class="hlt">fixed</span> energy, <span class="hlt">fixed</span> power, or <span class="hlt">fixed</span> palenstrophy flows</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider passive scalar mixing by a prescribed divergence-free velocity vector field in a periodic box and address the following question: Starting from a given initial inhomogeneous distribution of passive tracers, and given a certain energy budget, power budget, or finite palenstrophy budget, what incompressible flow field best mixes the scalar quantity? We focus on the optimal stirring strategy recently proposed by Lin et al. ["Optimal stirring strategies for passive scalar mixing," J. Fluid Mech. 675, 465 (2011)], 10.1017/S0022112011000292 that determines the flow field that instantaneously maximizes the depletion of the H-1 mix-norm. In this work, we bridge some of the gap between the best available a priori analysis and simulation results. After recalling some previous analysis, we present an explicit example demonstrating finite-time perfect mixing with a finite energy constraint on the stirring flow. On the other hand, using a recent result by Wirosoetisno et al. ["Long time stability of a classical efficient scheme for two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations," SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 50(1), 126-150 (2012)], 10.1137/110834901 we establish that the H-1 mix-norm decays at most exponentially in time if the two-dimensional incompressible flow is constrained to have constant palenstrophy. Finite-time perfect mixing is thus ruled out when too much cost is incurred by small scale structures in the stirring. Direct numerical simulations in two dimensions suggest the impossibility of finite-time perfect mixing for flows with <span class="hlt">fixed</span> power constraint and we conjecture an exponential lower bound on the H-1 mix-norm in this case. We also discuss some related problems from other areas of analysis that are similarly suggestive of an exponential lower bound for the H-1 mix-norm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lunasin, Evelyn; Lin, Zhi; Novikov, Alexei; Mazzucato, Anna; Doering, Charles R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23832643"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> combination of amlodipine/atorvastatin: from mechanisms to trials.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Risk factors are rarely seen individually, and the 2 most common and most frequently associated risk factors are hypertension and dyslipidemia (DL). Studies conducted in different parts of the world uniquely <span class="hlt">point</span> out insufficient efficacy of hypertension and DL treatment, which is reflected in blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein levels higher than target values. A reason of this therapeutic failure is the reduced adherence, which is mainly caused by multidrug therapy. A possible solution for this problem is the use of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> combinations. The main advantages of amlodipine/atorvastatin <span class="hlt">fixed</span> combination are synergistic effect of these 2 components, a single-dose treatment, high safety profile, and good tolerance. PMID:23832643</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ivanovic, Branislava; Tadic, Marijana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7636125"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effect of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> payment on hospital costs.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">New Medicare regulations have replaced the cost-based system of reimbursement of capital expenditures by hospitals with a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> payment per case based on assigned diagnostic-related groups. For the first time, hospitals must pay the governmental share of their capital costs. At the same time, overall reform <span class="hlt">points</span> toward more capitation or <span class="hlt">fixed</span> payments from all payers. This article discusses possible responses to legislative and competitive reforms by hospital management and the resulting effectiveness of the changes. To identify the potential effect of capital payment reform, we highlight some of the key provisions and assumptions of the new regulations, discuss the management implications of a changed capital payment system, and explore alternative models of hospital investment behavior in a world where one price for services for all buyers is a probable scenario. PMID:7636125</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B; Teplensky, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title24-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title24-vol1-sec84-80.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">24 CFR 84.80 - Conditions for use of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span> amount) grants.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">24 Housing and Urban Development...of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span> amount... Section 84.80 Housing and Urban Development...Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development...of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title24-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title24-vol1-sec84-80.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">24 CFR 84.80 - Conditions for use of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span> amount) grants.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">24 Housing and Urban Development...of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span> amount... Section 84.80 Housing and Urban Development...Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development...of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title24-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title24-vol1-sec84-80.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">24 CFR 84.80 - Conditions for use of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span> amount) grants.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">24 Housing and Urban Development...of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span> amount... 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class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">24 Housing and Urban Development...of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span> amount... Section 84.80 Housing and Urban Development...Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development...of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title24-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title24-vol1-sec84-80.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">24 CFR 84.80 - Conditions for use of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span> amount) grants.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">24 Housing and Urban Development...of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span> amount... Section 84.80 Housing and Urban Development...Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development...of Lump Sum (<span class="hlt">fixed</span> price or <span class="hlt">fixed</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://vonholle.cos.ucf.edu/main/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/VonHolle_etal_2006.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Facilitations between the introduced nitrogen-<span class="hlt">fixing</span> tree, Robinia pseudoacacia, and nonnative plant</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">pseudoacacia, a nitrogen-<span class="hlt">fixing</span>, clonal tree species native to the central Appa- lachian and Ozark Mountains, is considered to be one of the top 100 worldwide woody plant invaders. We initiated this project to determine, prompting us to recommend no management <span class="hlt">action</span> of black locust and a monitoring program and possible removal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Von Holle, Betsy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://jcb.rupress.org/cgi/reprint/16/1/143.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">CONTRAST BETWEEN OSMIUM-<span class="hlt">FIXED</span> AND PERMANGANATE-<span class="hlt">FIX</span> ED TOAD SPINAL GANGLIA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chains of vesicles are prominent near the plasma membranes of both the neurons and satellite cells of osmium-<span class="hlt">fixed</span> toad spinal ganglia. In permanganate-<span class="hlt">fixed</span> specimens, how- ever, such vesicles are absent, and in their place are continuous invaginations of the plasma membranes of these ceils. The discrepancy suggests that the serried vesicles seen in osmium- <span class="hlt">fixed</span> preparations arise through disintegration of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">JACK ROSENBLUTH</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3481005"> <span id="translatedtitle">Instant Attraction: Immediate <span class="hlt">Action</span>-Effect Bindings Occur for Both, Stimulus- and Goal-Driven <span class="hlt">Actions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Flexible behavior is only possible if contingencies between own <span class="hlt">actions</span> and following environmental effects are acquired as quickly as possible; and recent findings indeed <span class="hlt">point</span> toward an immediate formation of <span class="hlt">action</span>-effect bindings already after a single coupling of an <span class="hlt">action</span> and its effect. The present study explored whether these short-term bindings occur for both, stimulus- and goal-driven <span class="hlt">actions</span> (“forced-choice <span class="hlt">actions</span>” vs. “free-choice <span class="hlt">actions</span>”). Two experiments confirmed that immediate <span class="hlt">action</span>-effect bindings are formed for both types of <span class="hlt">actions</span> and affect upcoming behavior. These findings support the view that <span class="hlt">action</span>-effect binding is a ubiquitous phenomenon which occurs for any type of <span class="hlt">action</span>. PMID:23112787</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Janczyk, Markus; Heinemann, Alexander; Pfister, Roland</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-02-12/pdf/2013-03122.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 9866 - Special Local Regulation; Moss <span class="hlt">Point</span> Rockin' the Riverfront Festival; Robertson Lake & O'Leary...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Moss <span class="hlt">Point</span> Rockin' the Riverfront Festival; Robertson Lake & O'Leary Lake; Moss <span class="hlt">Point</span>, MS AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. <span class="hlt">ACTION</span>...special local regulation for a portion of Robertson Lake & O'Leary Lake, Moss <span class="hlt">Point</span>, MS. This <span class="hlt">action</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7083685"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> target issues for the Tevatron Upgrade</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Tevatron Upgrade poses some interesting prospects for the <span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-Target program if an option to extract the high energy proton beam is preserved. This paper presents a summary of the advantages of increased energy for <span class="hlt">fixed</span> target experiments, and evaluates some of the more challenging technical issues. In particular, Bottom production, muon and neutrino interactions, and polarized /bar p/ experiments would benefit substantially from a higher energy primary beam. The new Main Injector will also be important for <span class="hlt">fixed</span> target experiments as a source for test beams and intense kaon and neutrino beams. 4 refs., 2 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stefanski, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-08-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://business.rice.edu/uploadedFiles/Corporate/ALP/ALP_Application_2011.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Action</span> Learning Project Company Application</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">starting and ending <span class="hlt">point</span> · Provide students with experiential learning and an opportunity to apply<span class="hlt">Action</span> Learning Project 2013 Company Application and Information BUSINESS.RICE.EDU/ALP #12;Rice, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, sexual orientation, disability</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alvarez, Pedro J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ798588.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preference for Reinforcers under Progressive- and <span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-Ratio Schedules: A Comparison of Single and Concurrent Arrangements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Progressive-ratio (PR) schedules were used to identify the break <span class="hlt">point</span> (i.e., the last schedule value completed) for 2 reinforcers under single and concurrent schedules. After the respective break <span class="hlt">points</span> were established, the same reinforcers were presented under concurrent <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio (FR) schedules that were yoked to the break <span class="hlt">points</span> obtained…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Glover, Ashley C.; Roane, Henry S.; Kadey, Heather J.; Grow, Laura L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IJT....35..604S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary Measurements of the Xenon Triple <span class="hlt">Point</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ever since the construction and definition of the highly successful International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90), one severe deficiency of the scale has been recognized, without a reliable remedy. The problem is the fact that the only then available high-quality <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> between the argon triple <span class="hlt">point</span> and the water triple <span class="hlt">point</span> was the mercury triple <span class="hlt">point</span>, which unfortunately is situated rather closely to the water triple <span class="hlt">point</span>, thus having an extremely strong influence on the interpolation function of SPRTs in the range. Already before 1990, measurements on possible <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> better placed in this temperature range have been investigated, such as the triple <span class="hlt">points</span> of krypton and xenon. However, results have been rather elusive, mainly regarding the rather large melting range of their transition. A turning <span class="hlt">point</span> was the 2005 paper from the National Research Council (NRC, Canada), where it was established that the relatively high content of krypton was the culprit for the large melting range of the xenon transitions published previously. Indeed, measurements on a xenon sample with very low krypton content produced a very high-quality plateau, of the same level as other ITS-90 <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span>. However, no follow-up measurements have been reported, and thus neither have comparison measurements been reported. Shortly, after the appearance of the NRC paper, Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM, Italy) acquired a batch of the same high-purity xenon as used by NRC with the aim of preparing a few sealed cells with it and trying to reproduce the NRC results. However, with the start of the Neon Project (Euromet Project 770), the realization of these intentions had to be postponed until now. Last December, three cells of different design have been filled with this high-quality xenon and preliminary results of the measurements on the triple <span class="hlt">point</span> are reported.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steur, P. P. M.; Giraudi, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=46084"> <span id="translatedtitle">EVALUATING MULTICOMPONENT COMPETITIVE ADSORPTION IN <span class="hlt">FIXED</span> BEDS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An equilibrium column model (ECM) was developed to evaluate multicomponent competition in <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed adsorption columns. The model ignores mass transfer resistances and uses ideal adsorbed solution theory to predict the competitive effects in multicomponent mixtures. The bed capac...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB90161498"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geodetic <span class="hlt">Fixing</span> of Tide Gauge Bench Marks.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Under the auspices of the International Association for Physical Sciences of the Ocean (IAPSO) a committee was established to identify the oceanographic and geophysical requirements for <span class="hlt">fixing</span> Tide Gauge Bench Marks (TGBM's) in an absolute terrestrial coo...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. E. Carter, D. G. Aubrey, T. Baker, C. Boucher, C. LeProvost</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3879843"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stabilising Springs for <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Lingual Retainer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most treated malocclusion needs <span class="hlt">fixed</span> lingual retention. To stabilise <span class="hlt">fixed</span> lingual retainer in the exact location needs proper stabilisation. Proper stabilization requires a holding spring. This Stabilising Spring should be easy to fabricate and help the clinician to stabilise the retainer quickly and save the chair side time. More over it should not irritate the mucosa and should be easy to insert and remove. PMID:24392431</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karthikeyan, M.K.; Ramachandraprabhakar; Saravanan, R.; Rajvikram, N.; Kuppuchamy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/759408"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computational Adequacy of the <span class="hlt">FIX</span>-Logic</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract This paper presents computational adequacy results for the <span class="hlt">FIX</span> logical system introduced by Crole and Pitts in LICS ’90. More precisely, we take two simple PCF style languages (whose dynamic semantics follow a call-by- value and call-by-name regime) give translations of the languages into suitable judgements in the <span class="hlt">FIX</span>-logic and prove that the translations are adequate for the static</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roy L. Crole</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/34559109"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mycorrhizae of nitrogen-<span class="hlt">fixing</span> legumes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most plant species form mycorrhizae, which are symbiotic fungus-root associations. Many plants can also form symbioses with specific bacteria or actinomycetes which produce root nodules and <span class="hlt">fix</span> atmospheric nitrogen within these nodules. The tripartite mycorrhiza-legume-Rhizobium symbiosis is the subject of this review. Mycorrhizal nitrogen-<span class="hlt">fixing</span> legumes include many important temperate and tropical crops, e.g. clover, lucerne, beans (Phaseolus andVicia), peas, soybean,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. S. Hayman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27091715"> <span id="translatedtitle">Learning <span class="hlt">Actions</span> from Observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the area of imitation learning, one of the important research problems is <span class="hlt">action</span> representation. There has been a growing interest in expressing <span class="hlt">actions</span> as a combination of meaningful subparts called <span class="hlt">action</span> primitives. <span class="hlt">Action</span> primitives could be thought of as elementary building blocks for <span class="hlt">action</span> representation. In this article, we present a complete concept of learning <span class="hlt">action</span> primitives to recognize</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Volker Kruger; Dennis Herzog; Sanmohan Baby; Ales Ude; Danica Kragic</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15205741"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Palmar <span class="hlt">fixed</span> angle plating systems for instable distal radius fractures].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Internal fixation of distal radius fractures often shows the problem of secondary dislocation due to dorsal comminution and osteoporosis. Although dorsal plating systems provide good stabilization, the intraoperative control of reduction is difficult in the comminuted area with high incidence for the need of cancellous bone graft. Occurrence of extensor tendon complications including tendonitis and rupture is not uncommon. The use of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> angle devices by a palmar approach has demonstrated the advantage of better visualization and control at the fracture side. The subchondrale support of the articular surface by <span class="hlt">fixed</span> angle pegs or screws prevents secondary dislocation allowing early mobilization. Better soft tissue coverage is associated with a low complication rate. 62 patients (average age 55 years) were treated with different <span class="hlt">fixed</span> angel devices according to the fracture type and underwent retrospective evaluation with mean follow-up of 11 months (6-23 months). According to the AO Classification there were 3 A2, 24 A3, 7 B3, 14 C1, 9 C2 und 5 C3 fractures. The majority beside the B3 types and one C3 fracture were dorsally displaced. All of them showed healing without relevant secondary loss of reduction. Mean DASH score reached 19 <span class="hlt">points</span>. PMID:15205741</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krimmer, H; Pessenlehner, C; Hasselbacher, K; Meier, M; Roth, F; Meier, R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title9-vol2/pdf/CFR-2014-title9-vol2-sec417-3.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">9 CFR 417.3 - Corrective <span class="hlt">actions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...INSPECTION ACT HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL <span class="hlt">POINT</span> (HACCP) SYSTEMS § 417.3 Corrective <span class="hlt">actions</span>...response to a deviation from a critical limit. The HACCP plan...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=paper&pg=4&id=EJ1020428"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reflections on Working with Virtual <span class="hlt">Action</span> Learning</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper brings together the reflections of the authors on their shared and individual experiences of virtual <span class="hlt">action</span> learning. Whilst many conclusions are shared, there are also some <span class="hlt">points</span> of difference in practices.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pedler, Mike; Hauser, Bernhard; Caulat, Ghislaine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title21-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title21-vol2-sec120-10.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 120.10 - Corrective <span class="hlt">actions</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...HAZARD ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL CONTROL <span class="hlt">POINT</span> (HACCP) SYSTEMS General Provisions § 120...<span class="hlt">action</span> plans, which become part of their HACCP plans in accordance with § 120...to determine whether modification of the HACCP plan is required to reduce the risk...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img 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href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/976620"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gauge invariance in 2Pi effective <span class="hlt">actions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">(Abstract damaged) The 2PI (two particle irreducible) effective <span class="hlt">action</span> is a general field theoretic tool for addressing this problem. In constructing it one introduces sources for both the fields and their two-<span class="hlt">point</span> bilinears.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mottola, E. (Emil)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0810.4618v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">A New Case for Direct <span class="hlt">Action</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An obstacle to the development of direct <span class="hlt">action</span> version of electromagnetism was that in the end it failed to fulfill its initial promise of avoiding the problem of infinite Coulomb self-energy in the Maxwell theory of the classical <span class="hlt">point</span> charge. This paper suggests a small but significant modification of the traditional direct <span class="hlt">action</span> theory which overcomes that obstacle. Self-<span class="hlt">action</span> is retained but the associated energy is rendered finite and equal to zero in the special case of null motion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Ibison</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://www.cac.cornell.edu/VW/MPIP2P/"> <span id="translatedtitle">MPI <span class="hlt">Point-to-Point</span> Communication</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This module details and differentiates the various types of <span class="hlt">point-to-point</span> communication available in MPI. <span class="hlt">Point-to-point</span> communication involves transmission of a message between a pair of processes, as opposed to collective communication, which involves a group of processes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=affirmative+AND+action&pg=2&id=EJ754539"> <span id="translatedtitle">Affirmative <span class="hlt">Action</span> Is an International Issue</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article contains comments on the article by Vasquez and Jones (see record 2006-01690-003), which focuses on diversity and begins with a discussion of affirmative <span class="hlt">action</span>. The current author discusses his own three related <span class="hlt">points</span>: first, it is virtually impossible, in our current culture, to agree on what constitutes affirmative <span class="hlt">action</span> and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pipes, Randolph B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-11-27/pdf/2012-28718.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 70847 - Entergy Nuclear Indian <span class="hlt">Point</span> 2, LLC; Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Indian <span class="hlt">Point</span> Nuclear...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is giving notice that by petition dated April 16, 2012; the Natural Resources Defense Council, Inc. (the petitioner) has requested that the NRC take <span class="hlt">action</span> with regard to Indian <span class="hlt">Point</span>...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1014273"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diesel Particulate Oxidation Model: Combined Effects of Volatiles and <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Carbon Combustion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Diesel particulate samples were collected from a light duty engine operated at a single speed-load <span class="hlt">point</span> with a range of biodiesel and conventional fuel blends. The oxidation reactivity of the samples was characterized in a laboratory reactor, and BET surface area measurements were made at several <span class="hlt">points</span> during oxidation of the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> carbon component of both types of particulate. The <span class="hlt">fixed</span> carbon component of biodiesel particulate has a significantly higher surface area for the initial stages of oxidation, but the surface areas for the two particulates become similar as <span class="hlt">fixed</span> carbon oxidation proceeds beyond 40%. When <span class="hlt">fixed</span> carbon oxidation rates are normalized to total surface area, it is possible to describe the oxidation rates of the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> carbon portion of both types of particulates with a single set of Arrhenius parameters. The measured surface area evolution during particle oxidation was found to be inconsistent with shrinking sphere oxidation. When the oxidation model for the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> carbon was combined with a first-order model for the release and oxidation of volatiles, it was possible to obtain good agreement with the observed oxidation rates for both types of nascent (non-devolatilized) particulates. Additional studies are underway to confirm that intermediate fuel blends behave consistently with these limiting cases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23495569"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Resin-bonded <span class="hlt">fixed</span> partial dentures].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A resin-bonded <span class="hlt">fixed</span> partial denture is a prosthetic construction which can replace I or several teeth in an occlusal system and which comprises a pontic element which is adhesively attached to 1 or more abutment teeth. To compensate for the limited shear strength of the adhesive layer, the Jixed partial denture is occlusally supported by the abutment(s). A direct resin-bonded <span class="hlt">fixed</span> partial denture is made of composite, reinforced or not by a frame of flexible metal or fiber material. For an indirect resin-bonded <span class="hlt">fixed</span> partial denture, a metal, fibre-reinforced composite or ceramic substructure is fabricated in a dental laboratory. The basic principle of a resin-bonded <span class="hlt">fixed</span> partial denture is minimal invasiveness. However, a restoration in an abutment tooth requires a certain occlusal space which is realized by tooth preparation. Resistance preparations may be performed to improve the longevity of resin-bonded <span class="hlt">fixed</span> partial dentures. Both financially and biologically, a resin-bonded bridge is a cost-effective prosthetic construction. The longevity is limited, but when the construction fails the negative consequences for the abutments are generally limited, which leaves open several types of other treatments. PMID:23495569</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kreulen, C M; Creugers, N H J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title29-vol5/pdf/CFR-2014-title29-vol5-sec1910-161.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">29 CFR 1910.161 - <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> extinguishing systems, dry chemical.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...false <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> extinguishing systems, dry chemical. 1910.161 Section 1910.161...161 <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> extinguishing systems, dry chemical. (a) Scope and application. ...<span class="hlt">fixed</span> extinguishing systems, using dry chemical as the extinguishing agent,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-09-18/pdf/2013-22729.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 57250 - Federal Credit Union Ownership of <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Assets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Federal Credit Union Ownership of <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Assets AGENCY: National Credit Union...credit union (FCU) ownership of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> assets to help FCUs better understand...its operations.\\1\\ NCUA's <span class="hlt">fixed</span> assets rule interprets and...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol5-sec80-387.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">47 CFR 80.387 - Frequencies for Alaska <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... 2013-10-01 false Frequencies for Alaska <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. 80.387 Section 80...STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Alaska <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Stations § 80.387 Frequencies for Alaska <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. (a) The...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol5-sec80-387.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">47 CFR 80.387 - Frequencies for Alaska <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... 2011-10-01 false Frequencies for Alaska <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. 80.387 Section 80...STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Alaska <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Stations § 80.387 Frequencies for Alaska <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. (a) The...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol5-sec80-387.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">47 CFR 80.387 - Frequencies for Alaska <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... 2012-10-01 false Frequencies for Alaska <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. 80.387 Section 80...STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Alaska <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Stations § 80.387 Frequencies for Alaska <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. (a) The...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title47-vol5-sec80-387.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">47 CFR 80.387 - Frequencies for Alaska <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... 2010-10-01 false Frequencies for Alaska <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. 80.387 Section 80...STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Alaska <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Stations § 80.387 Frequencies for Alaska <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. (a) The...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol2/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol2-sec25-277.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">47 CFR 25.277 - Temporary <span class="hlt">fixed</span> earth station operations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Temporary <span class="hlt">fixed</span> earth station operations. 25.277 Section 25...Technical Operations § 25.277 Temporary <span class="hlt">fixed</span> earth station operations. (a) When an earth station in the <span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-Satellite...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol2/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol2-sec25-277.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">47 CFR 25.277 - Temporary <span class="hlt">fixed</span> earth station operations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Temporary <span class="hlt">fixed</span> earth station operations. 25.277 Section 25...Technical Operations § 25.277 Temporary <span class="hlt">fixed</span> earth station operations. (a) When an earth station in the <span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-Satellite...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2011-title47-vol5-sec80-381.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">47 CFR 80.381 - Frequencies for operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequencies for operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. 80... STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Operational <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Stations § 80.381 Frequencies for operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2012-title47-vol5-sec80-381.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">47 CFR 80.381 - Frequencies for operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequencies for operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. 80... STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Operational <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Stations § 80.381 Frequencies for operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title47-vol5/pdf/CFR-2013-title47-vol5-sec80-381.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">47 CFR 80.381 - Frequencies for operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequencies for operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations. 80... STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Frequencies Operational <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Stations § 80.381 Frequencies for operational <span class="hlt">fixed</span> stations....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title49-vol4/pdf/CFR-2011-title49-vol4-sec218-109.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">49 CFR 218.109 - Hand-operated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> derails.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hand-operated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> derails. 218.109 Section 218.109 ...Handling Equipment, Switches, and <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Derails § 218.109 Hand-operated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> derails. (a)(1) Each...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title49-vol4/pdf/CFR-2012-title49-vol4-sec218-109.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">49 CFR 218.109 - Hand-operated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> derails.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hand-operated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> derails. 218.109 Section 218.109 ...Handling Equipment, Switches, and <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Derails § 218.109 Hand-operated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> derails. (a)(1) Each...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title49-vol4/pdf/CFR-2013-title49-vol4-sec218-109.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">49 CFR 218.109 - Hand-operated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> derails.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hand-operated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> derails. 218.109 Section 218.109 ...Handling Equipment, Switches, and <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Derails § 218.109 Hand-operated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> derails. (a)(1) Each...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title49-vol4/pdf/CFR-2010-title49-vol4-sec218-109.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">49 CFR 218.109 - Hand-operated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> derails.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hand-operated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> derails. 218.109 Section 218.109 ...Handling Equipment, Switches, and <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Derails § 218.109 Hand-operated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> derails. (a)(1) Each...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4236137"> <span id="translatedtitle">Controlling Cyanobacterial Blooms in Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China: Will Nitrogen Reductions Cause Replacement of Non-N2 <span class="hlt">Fixing</span> by N2 <span class="hlt">Fixing</span> Taxa?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Excessive anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs have caused an alarming increase in harmful cyanobacterial blooms, threatening sustainability of lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China’s third largest freshwater lake, typifies this predicament, with toxic blooms of the non-N2 <span class="hlt">fixing</span> cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. dominating from spring through fall. Previous studies indicate N and P reductions are needed to reduce bloom magnitude and duration. However, N reductions may encourage replacement of non-N2 <span class="hlt">fixing</span> with N2 <span class="hlt">fixing</span> cyanobacteria. This potentially counterproductive scenario was evaluated using replicate, large (1000 L), in-lake mesocosms during summer bloom periods. N+P additions led to maximum phytoplankton production. Phosphorus enrichment, which promoted N limitation, resulted in increases in N2 <span class="hlt">fixing</span> taxa (Anabaena spp.), but it did not lead to significant replacement of non-N2 <span class="hlt">fixing</span> with N2 <span class="hlt">fixing</span> cyanobacteria, and N2 fixation rates remained ecologically insignificant. Furthermore, P enrichment failed to increase phytoplankton production relative to controls, indicating that N was the most limiting nutrient throughout this period. We propose that Microcystis spp. and other non-N2 <span class="hlt">fixing</span> genera can maintain dominance in this shallow, highly turbid, nutrient-enriched lake by outcompeting N2 <span class="hlt">fixing</span> taxa for existing sources of N and P stored and cycled in the lake. To bring Taihu and other hypertrophic systems below the bloom threshold, both N and P reductions will be needed until the legacy of high N and P loading and sediment nutrient storage in these systems is depleted. At that <span class="hlt">point</span>, a more exclusive focus on P reductions may be feasible. PMID:25405474</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paerl, Hans W.; Xu, Hai; Hall, Nathan S.; Zhu, Guangwei; Qin, Boqiang; Wu, Yali; Rossignol, Karen L.; Dong, Linghan; McCarthy, Mark J.; Joyner, Alan R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/2198586"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Cost Effective Pipelined Divider for Double Precision Floating <span class="hlt">Point</span> Number</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The growth of high-performance application in computer graphics, signal processing and scientific computing is a key driver for high performance, <span class="hlt">fixed</span> latency, pipelined floating <span class="hlt">point</span> dividers. Solutions available in the literature use large lookup table for double precision floating <span class="hlt">point</span> operations. In this paper, we propose a cost effective, <span class="hlt">fixed</span> latency pipelined divider using modified Taylor-series expansion for double precision</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sandeep B. Singh; Jayanta Biswas; S. K. Nandy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.compadre.org/Repository/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=11528&DocID=2451"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Torque Dynamo and Motor Model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Torque Dynamo and Motor Model solves the coupled differential equations for an electric motor driven by a dynamo (generator). The model can be used as to illustrate elementary instabilities or bifurcations discussed in courses about nonlinear oscillators and dynamical systems. When the dynamo is driven at constant torque, chaotic reversals of the generated current and of the angular rotation of the motor are observed. The main window displays the dynamo angular velocity ?1, motor angular velocity ?2 and current I time series and a second window displays the phase space. The stator current Is (A), torque T (Nâ¢m), and resistance R (ohm) are adjustable. The <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Torque Dynamo and Motor Model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double click the ejs_chaos_<span class="hlt">Fixed</span>TorqueDynamoAndMotor.jar file to run the program if Java is installed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christian, Wolfgang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20975122"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Point</span> set registration: coherent <span class="hlt">point</span> drift.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Point</span> set registration is a key component in many computer vision tasks. The goal of <span class="hlt">point</span> set registration is to assign correspondences between two sets of <span class="hlt">points</span> and to recover the transformation that maps one <span class="hlt">point</span> set to the other. Multiple factors, including an unknown nonrigid spatial transformation, large dimensionality of <span class="hlt">point</span> set, noise, and outliers, make the <span class="hlt">point</span> set registration a challenging problem. We introduce a probabilistic method, called the Coherent <span class="hlt">Point</span> Drift (CPD) algorithm, for both rigid and nonrigid <span class="hlt">point</span> set registration. We consider the alignment of two <span class="hlt">point</span> sets as a probability density estimation problem. We fit the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) centroids (representing the first <span class="hlt">point</span> set) to the data (the second <span class="hlt">point</span> set) by maximizing the likelihood. We force the GMM centroids to move coherently as a group to preserve the topological structure of the <span class="hlt">point</span> sets. In the rigid case, we impose the coherence constraint by reparameterization of GMM centroid locations with rigid parameters and derive a closed form solution of the maximization step of the EM algorithm in arbitrary dimensions. In the nonrigid case, we impose the coherence constraint by regularizing the displacement field and using the variational calculus to derive the optimal transformation. We also introduce a fast algorithm that reduces the method computation complexity to linear. We test the CPD algorithm for both rigid and nonrigid transformations in the presence of noise, outliers, and missing <span class="hlt">points</span>, where CPD shows accurate results and outperforms current state-of-the-art methods. PMID:20975122</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Myronenko, Andriy; Song, Xubo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IEITI..93.1497K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-Width Group CSD Multiplier Design</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents an error compensation method for <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-width group canonic signed digit (GCSD) multipliers that receive a W-bit input and generate a W-bit product. To efficiently compensate for the truncation error, the encoded signals from the GCSD multiplier are used for the generation of the error compensation bias. By Synopsys simulations, it is shown that the proposed method leads to up to 84% reduction in power consumption and up to 78% reduction in area compared with the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-width modified Booth multipliers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Yong-Eun; Cho, Kyung-Ju; Chung, Jin-Gyun; Huang, Xinming</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981SoEn...27...13K"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">fixed</span> Fresnel lens with tracking collector</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The application of a wide angle concentrating Fresnel lens to a linear solar energy system, in which the optical concentration is stationary while the absorber follows the locus of best foci, is investigated. The two substantial direction possibilities of the linear axis, east-west and polar, are compared to each other. It is shown that such a concentrator may operate about six hours a day throughout the year with an average effective concentration exceeding 10. Specifically, a polar installation, including a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> lens and a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> assembly of separate absorbers behind it, may enable sufficient concentration for residential heating and airconditioning without any moving parts</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kritchman, E. M.; Friesem, A. A.; Yekutieli, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-05-17/pdf/2013-10567.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 29063 - Survey of Urban Rates for <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Voice and <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Broadband Residential Services</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...DA 13-598] Survey of Urban Rates for <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Voice and <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Broadband...include in their survey responses rates for any service that cannot...this Order is mandatory, and failure to comply may lead to enforcement...will send a copy of this Urban Rate Survey Order in a report...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26189739"> <span id="translatedtitle">A continous <span class="hlt">point</span> process model for daily rainfall</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A probabilistic model for the temporal description of daily rainfall at a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> is presented. The model is a member of the family of <span class="hlt">point</span> process models. Model development is based on statistics estimated from rainfall data in Lebanon. Scale considerations for Markovian models and a theory of projection are used to determine the continuous process of alternation between</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. Najem; Ecole Superieure</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.dms.umontreal.ca/~rousseac/Christopher_Rousseau.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The moduli space of germs of generic families of analytic diffeomorphisms unfolding a parabolic <span class="hlt">fixed</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we describe the moduli space of germs of generic families of analytic diffeomorphisms which unfold a parabolic <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> of codimension 1. In (11) (and also (15)), it was shown that the Ecalle-Voroninmodulus can be unfolded to give a complete modulus for such germs. The modulus is defined on a ramified sector in the canonical perturbation parameter</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Christopher; C. Rousseau</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.kurims.kyoto-u.ac.jp/preprint/file/RIMS1725.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microlocal analysis of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> singularities of WKB solutions of a Schrodinger equation with</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">by the algebraic Mathieu equation. We further show that, in analyzing the structure of WKB solutions of a MathieuRIMS-1725 Microlocal analysis of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> singularities of WKB solutions of a Schr¨odinger equation solutions of a Schr¨odinger equation with a merging triplet of two simple poles and a simple turning <span class="hlt">point</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.kurims.kyoto-u.ac.jp/preprint/file/RIMS1725.ps.gz"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microlocal analysis of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> singularities of WKB solutions of a Schrodinger equation with</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">by the algebraic Mathieu equation. We further show that, in analyzing the structure of WKB solutions of a MathieuRIMS­1725 Microlocal analysis of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> singularities of WKB solutions of a SchrË?odinger equation solutions of a SchrË?odinger equation with a merging triplet of two simple poles and a simple turning <span class="hlt">point</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=interval+AND+training&pg=6&id=EJ750161"> <span id="translatedtitle">Determinants of Human <span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-Interval Performance Following Varied Exposure to Reinforcement Schedules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Undergraduates given accurate instructions pressed keys for token <span class="hlt">points</span> under either a variety of reinforcement schedules (variety training) or under a single schedule. Response rates on a <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval (FI) test schedule then were assessed. Experiment 1 compared variety training inclusive of FI-optimal rates (functional) to training excluding…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Torgrud, Laine J.; Holborn, Stephen W.; Zak, Robert D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50307938"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mutual information analysis of turbo equalizers for <span class="hlt">fixed</span> and fading channels</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper considers performance and design issues for turbo equalizers. Analytic expressions are derived for the mutual information convergence <span class="hlt">point</span> of the turbo equalizer. The BER is then found analytically. Results are obtained for both <span class="hlt">fixed</span> and fading channels, and in conditions of both perfect channel state information as well as unknown estimated channels. Finally, we introduce design rules for</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matthew J. M. Peacock; Iain B. Collings</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://computing.ornl.gov/SC10/documents/Vetter_Memphis_SC10.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Presented by Memphis: Finding and <span class="hlt">Fixing</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presented by Memphis: Finding and <span class="hlt">Fixing</span> NUMA-Related Performance Problems on Multi-core Platforms Access (NUMA) is a problem that will only get worse � However, trends in microprocessor design are pushing NUMA to ever-smaller scales � These slides* examine the current state of NUMA and � Demonstrate</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53740010"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> beam and mechanically steerable antennas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The principal design features and performance characteristics of <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-beam and mechanically scanned antennas that are commonly found in today's operational electronic countermeasures (ECM) and electronic support measures (ESM) equipment are reviewed. The requirements driving the design of steerable ECM antennas are wide bandwidth, high efficiency, and the ability to handle high average power levels. The main types of antennas include</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. S. Hardie; H. B. Sefton Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://webapps.seattleu.edu/albers/syllabi/14SQ_UCOR1630_Fitzpatrick.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spring 2014 CAN WE <span class="hlt">FIX</span> HEALTH CARE?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spring 2014 CAN WE <span class="hlt">FIX</span> HEALTH CARE? HEALTH ECONOMICS & POLICY 1 Dr. Katie Fitzpatrick UCOR1630 in health care policy. You will analyze health-related issues in the news, create and interpret graphical- plexity of the health care system and an appreciation of the tradeoffs in health care policy. Course</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carter, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/23416604"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improved <span class="hlt">fixed</span> bed models for metal biosorption</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes the application of two new mathematical models, derived from an existing model with two adjustable parameters, to simulate the breakthrough curves of metal biosorption in <span class="hlt">fixed</span> bed columns. No new adjustable parameters are introduced into the modified models. The models offer a fast and accurate alternative to the conventional mass balance-based models which are much more complicated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">K. H Chu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cims.nyu.edu/~almgren/papers/fixedincome.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Execution Strategies in <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Income Markets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Execution Strategies in <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Income Markets Robert Almgren April 2, 2013 Reducing trading costs from overall return. Con- versely, having an effective strategy to execute trades and to mea- sure techniques in equities have advanced far ahead of those in other markets such as futures, options, foreign</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Almgren, Robert F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40499029"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> factors affecting hoof health</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hoof trimming data were collected from the University of Illinois dairy farm. Normality transformed scores for six traits (corkscrew claw (CC), heel erosion (HE), interdigital dermatitis (ID), laminitis (LA), sole ulcers (SU) and white line separation (WLS)) were tested for <span class="hlt">fixed</span> factors (breed, year, season, age, trimming interval and months postpartum) by an animal model. Ayrshires and Jerseys had ‘better’</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. C. Huang; R. D. Shanks; G. C. McCoy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26506016"> <span id="translatedtitle">Generalized model for <span class="hlt">fixed</span> transmission rights auction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the open access deregulated power market, <span class="hlt">fixed</span> transmission rights (FTR) are proposed to facilitate the way to deal with transmission congestion issues. When these rights are utilized with locational marginal prices, they lead to an efficient use of the transmission system and assign prices to transmission system users based on the way energy is actually delivered. These rights are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. I. Alomoush; S. M. Shahidehpour</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://zonalandeducation.com/mstm/physics/waves/standingWaves/standingWaves1/StandingWaves1.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Standing Waves, Medium <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> At Both Ends</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This simulation illustrates the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth harmonic oscillation of a string <span class="hlt">fixed</span> at both ends on a musical instrument. Users are able to choose any oscillation they wish to view or they can combine different harmonics and view the result.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zobel, Edward</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-08-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6138847"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microanalysis of <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval responding</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval schedule of reinforcement is one of the more widely studied schedules in the experimental analysis of behavior and is also a common baseline for behavior pharmacology. Despite many intensive studies, the controlling variables and the pattern of behavior engendered are not well understood. The present study examined the microstructure and superstructure of the behavior engendered by a <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval 5- and a <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval 15-minute schedule of food reinforcement in the pigeon. Analysis of performance typical of <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval responding indicated that the scalloped pattern does not result from smooth acceleration in responding, but, rather, from renewed pausing early in the interval. Individual interresponse-time (IRT) analyses provided no evidence of acceleration. There was a strong indication of alternation is shorter-longer IRTs, but these shorter-longer IRTs did not occur at random, reflecting instead a sequential dependency in successive IRTs. Furthermore, early in the interval there was a high relative frequency of short IRTs. Such a pattern of early pauses and short IRTs does not suggest behavior typical of reinforced responding as exemplified by the pattern found near the end of the interval. Thus, behavior from clearly scalloped performance can be classified into three states: postreinforcement pause, interim behavior, and terminal behavior. 31 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gentry, G.D.; Weiss, B.; Laties, V.G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title29-vol5/pdf/CFR-2014-title29-vol5-sec1910-27.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">29 CFR 1910.27 - <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> ladders.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...load shall be considered in the design of rails and fastenings. (2) Design stresses...For <span class="hlt">fixed</span> ladders consisting of wood side rails and wood rungs or cleats, used at a...Individual-rung Ladders. (2) Side rails. Side rails which might be used...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1332996"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of ethanol on multiple <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio schedule performances: dynamic interactions at different <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio values.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Key pecking by three pigeons was maintained under a multiple <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio schedule of food presentation. The <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval value remained at 3 minutes, while the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio size was increased systematically in 30-response increments from 30 to either 120 (two pigeons) or 150 (one pigeon). At least two lower <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio values were also redetermined. The effects of ethanol (5 to 2.5 g/kg) were assessed at each of the different schedule parameters. Both overall and running response rates under the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio schedule decreased with increases in the size of the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio schedule; pause duration under the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio schedule was directly related to increases in <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio size. Overall and running rates of responding under the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval schedule changed little with increases in the size of the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio schedule. Despite the relative invariance of <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval responding across the different <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio values, the effects of ethanol on responding under the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval schedule differed depending on the size of the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio schedule. Greater increases occurred in both overall and in lower local rates of responding under the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval schedule when the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio value was 120 or 150. The effects of ethanol on responding under the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio schedule also depended on the size of the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> ratio. Increases in responding under the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio schedule were typically greater at the higher <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio values where response rates were lower. When the effects of ethanol were redetermined at the lower <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio parameter values, rates and patterns of responding were comparable to those obtained initially. However, the dose-effect curves for responding under both <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio and <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval schedules were shifted up and to the right of those determined during the ascending series. The effects of ethanol can depend on rate or responding, behavioral history, and the context in which behavior occurs. PMID:7411015</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barrett, J E; Stanley, J A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/10191144"> <span id="translatedtitle">Final consolidated <span class="hlt">action</span> plan to Tiger Team. Volume 1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document contains the planned <span class="hlt">actions</span> to correct the deficiences identified in the Tiger Team Assessments of Sandia California (August 1990) and Sandia New Mexico (May 1991). Information is also included on the management structures, estimated costs, root causes, prioritization and schedules for the <span class="hlt">Action</span> Plan. This Plan is an integration of the two individual <span class="hlt">Action</span> Plans to provide a cost effective, integrated program for implementation by Sandia and monitoring by DOE. This volume (I) contains the findings and <span class="hlt">actions</span> concerning the environment. Tables 4.2 and 4.7 summarize the annual costs estimated for completing the <span class="hlt">actions</span>. The total costs for completion of all the <span class="hlt">actions</span> are estimated to be $283 million over a 12 year period; the majority of the <span class="hlt">actions</span> to be completed and costs incurred in the first five years. Resources are provided from DOE-ER/WM, the DOE/DP landlord funds (one time, physical <span class="hlt">fixes</span>), and from the Sandia Indirect Budget.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ArtSa..48..141O"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Algorithm for Determining the Coordinates of a <span class="hlt">Point</span> in Three-Dimensional Space by Using the Auxiliary <span class="hlt">Point</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the process of satellite navigation, and also in the many tasks of classical positioning, we need to calculate the corrections to the initial (or approximate) location of the <span class="hlt">point</span> using precise measurement of distances to the permanent <span class="hlt">points</span> of reference (reference <span class="hlt">points</span>). In this paper the authors have provided a way of developing Hausbrandt's equations, on the basis of which the exact coordinates of the <span class="hlt">point</span> in two-dimensional space can be determined by using the computed correction to the coordinates of the auxiliary <span class="hlt">point</span>. The authors developed generalised equations for threedimensional space introducing additional <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> and have presented proof of derived formulas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oszczak, Bartlomiej; Sitnik, Eliza</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ann.jussieu.fr/~frey/papers/meshing/Alauzet%20F.,%203d%20transient%20fixed%20point%20mesh%20adaptation%20for%20time-dependent%20problems.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">3D transient <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> mesh adaptation for time-dependent problems: Application to CFD simulations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">: Application to CFD simulations F. Alauzet a,*, P.J. Frey b , P.L. George a , B. Mohammadi c a INRIA, Projet of unstructured meshes in three dimensions for transient problems with an empha- sis on CFD simulations estimate; CFD; Euler equations; Unit mesh 1. Introduction Nowadays, reducing the complexity of numerical</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frey, Pascal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23030905"> <span id="translatedtitle">Balance between absorbing and positive <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> in resource consumption models.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effect of resource usage on economic growth has been studied in multiple models. However, the generic effect of improving resource usage efficacy through improved technical skills has not been studied in detail. We here analyze a model incorporating resource usage by capital and the parallel production of technical skill in order to study the effect of improving the efficacy of resources usage with advanced technologies. We show that a practically inevitable result of such a model is that improving the resource usage efficacy leads to a lower steady-state level of resources. A surprising conclusion from ordinary differential equations realization of the model is an extreme sensitivity to parameters, where a small parameter change can lead to an irreversible state through a hysteresis mechanism between a scenario of a collapse of the economy and a scenario of sustainable economy. This sensitivity is lost when spatial stochastic simulations are performed. In the stochastic regime the two scenarios coexist, with different fractions of the lattice residing in each state. Changing parameters smoothly changes the fraction of lattice sites in each state. The transition between the collapsed economy and the sustainable one is not symmetrical. Escape from the collapsed situation can only occur through diffusion from neighboring sustained lattice sites. On the other hand, the collapse can occur even in the absence of diffusion. This difference leads to diffusion dependent capital growth, where an optimal capital is obtained for middiffusion values. Such a transition may actually be generic phenomena in ecological and economic systems. PMID:23030905</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Behar, Hilla; Shnerb, Nadav; Louzoun, Yoram</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.378a2042W"> <span id="translatedtitle">The infrared <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> of Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory: A renormalization group analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The infrared behavior of gluon and ghost propagators in Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory has been at the center of an intense debate over the last decade. Different solutions of the Dyson-Schwinger equations have a different behavior of the propagators in the infrared: in the so-called scaling solutions both propagators follow a power law, while in the decoupling solutions the gluon propagator shows a massive behavior. The latest lattice results favor the decoupling solutions. In this contribution, after giving a brief overview of the present status of analytical and semi-analytical approaches to the infrared regime of Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory, we will show how Callan-Symanzik renormalization group equations in an epsilon expansion reproduce both types of solutions and single out the decoupling solutions as the infrared-stable ones for space-time dimensions greater than two, in agreement with the lattice calculations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weber, Axel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EL....10757011L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Message passing and Monte Carlo algorithms: Connecting <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> with metastable states</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mean field-like approximations (including naive mean-field, Bethe and Kikuchi and more general cluster variational methods) are known to stabilize ordered phases at temperatures higher than the thermodynamical transition. For example, in the Edwards-Anderson model in 2 dimensions these approximations predict a spin glass transition at finite T. Here we show that the spin glass solutions of the Cluster Variational Method (CVM) at plaquette level do describe well the actual metastable states of the system. Moreover, we prove that these states can be used to predict non-trivial statistical quantities, like the distribution of the overlap between two replicas. Our results support the idea that message passing algorithms can be helpful to accelerate Monte Carlo simulations in finite-dimensional systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lage-Castellanos, A.; Mulet, R.; Ricci-Tersenghi, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22900014"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pattern recognition in neural networks with competing dynamics: coexistence of <span class="hlt">fixed-point</span> and cyclic attractors.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the properties of the dynamical phase transition occurring in neural network models in which a competition between associative memory and sequential pattern recognition exists. This competition occurs through a weighted mixture of the symmetric and asymmetric parts of the synaptic matrix. Through a generating functional formalism, we determine the structure of the parameter space at non-zero temperature and near saturation (i.e., when the number of stored patterns scales with the size of the network), identifying the regions of high and weak pattern correlations, the spin-glass solutions, and the order-disorder transition between these regions. This analysis reveals that, when associative memory is dominant, smooth transitions appear between high correlated regions and spurious states. In contrast when sequential pattern recognition is stronger than associative memory, the transitions are always discontinuous. Additionally, when the symmetric and asymmetric parts of the synaptic matrix are defined in terms of the same set of patterns, there is a discontinuous transition between associative memory and sequential pattern recognition. In contrast, when the symmetric and asymmetric parts of the synaptic matrix are defined in terms of independent sets of patterns, the network is able to perform both associative memory and sequential pattern recognition for a wide range of parameter values. PMID:22900014</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Herrera-Aguilar, José L; Larralde, Hernán; Aldana, Maximino</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2790829"> <span id="translatedtitle">Competition Between Transients in the Rate of Approach to a <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Point</span>*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this paper is to provide and apply tools for analyzing a specific aspect of transient dynamics not covered by previous theory. The question we address is whether one component of a perturbed solution to a system of differential equations can overtake the corresponding component of a reference solution as both converge to a stable node at the origin, given that the perturbed solution was initially farther away and that both solutions are nonnegative for all time. We call this phenomenon tolerance, for its relation to a biological effect. We show using geometric arguments that tolerance will exist in generic linear systems with a complete set of eigenvectors and in excitable nonlinear systems. We also define a notion of inhibition that may constrain the regions in phase space where the possibility of tolerance arises in general systems. However, these general existence theorems do not not yield an assessment of tolerance for specific initial conditions. To address that issue, we develop some analytical tools for determining if particular perturbed and reference solution initial conditions will exhibit tolerance. PMID:20011076</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Day, Judy; Rubin, Jonathan E.; Chow, Carson C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.math.ku.dk/~berg/manus/bdur8.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> for a transformation of Hausdorff moment sequences and iteration of a rational</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">sequences can also be characterized as bounded Stieltjes moment sequences, where Stieltjes moment sequences general Hamburger moment problem see the monograph by Akhiezer [1]. In [8] the authors introduced a non-linear multiplicative transformation from Hausdorff moment sequences to Stieltjes moment sequences. In [9] we introduced</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berg, Christian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50449111"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adaptive sigma delta ADC for WiMAX <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> wireless applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The increasing demand for wireless broadband connection emerged in worldwide interoperability microwave access (WiMAX) system which is revolutionizing the broadband wireless world by providing it with a specific standard and ensures the inter-operability among different providers. WiMAX systems support different signal bandwidths (1.25 MHz-20 MHz) and different modulation schemes (BPSK to 64 QAM). For such a multi-mode system, a sigma</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bahar Jalali Farahani; M. Ismail</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.optimization-online.org/DB_FILE/2007/09/1775.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optimization by the <span class="hlt">Fixed-Point</span> Method Version 2.11</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nov 26, 2011 ... Behaviour, and in 1947 von Neumann conjectured the equivalence of linear programs and matrix games, introduced ... Another strand is that the common history of the computer is not that reasonable: the notion of a stored.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.mat.uniroma2.it/~perfetti/lavori/dcds/amsinst.ps"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> theorems in the Arnol'd model about instability of the actionvariables in phasespace</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">tools suggested by Arnol'd i.e. the contraction mapping method togheter with the ``conical metric = R=2Ã?Z); '' and ¯ are real parameters. Physically H represents a pendulum ( 1 2 I 2 1 + ''(cos ' 1 and ¯ = 0; following [A], we consider the motions that ``develop along the separatrix of the pendulum''. We</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Perfetti, Paolo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ma.utexas.edu/mp_arc/c/97/97-478.ps.gz"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> theorems in the Arnol'd model about instability of the actionvariables in phasespace</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">tools suggested by Arnol'd i.e. the contraction mapping method togheter with the ``conical metric = R=2Ã?Z); '' and ¯ are real parameters. Physically H represents a pendulum ( 1 2 I 2 1 + ''(cos ' 1 of the pendulum''. We therefore write the equations H 1 (I 1 ; ' 1 ) = 1 2 I 2 1 + ''(cos ' 1 \\Gamma 1) = 0; H 2</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1409.8322v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Points</span> Structure & Effective Fractional Dimension for O(N) Models with Long-Range Interactions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study O(N) models with power-law interactions by using functional renormalization group methods: we show that both in Local Potential Approximation (LPA) and in LPA' their critical exponents can be computed from the ones of the corresponding short-range O(N) models at an effective fractional dimension. In LPA such effective dimension is given by $D_{eff}=2d/\\sigma$, where d is the spatial dimension and $d+\\sigma$ is the exponent of the power-law decay of the interactions. In LPA' the prediction by Sak [Phys. Rev. B 8, 1 (1973)] for the critical exponent $\\eta$ is retrieved and an effective fractional dimension $D_{eff}'$ is obtained. Using these results we determine the existence of multicritical universality classes of long-range O(N) models and we present analytical predictions for the critical exponent $\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nicolo Defenu; Andrea Trombettoni; Alessandro Codello</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">441</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ann.jussieu.fr/~frey/papers/levelsets/Zhang%20Y.T.,%20Fixed%20point%20iterative%20sweeping%20methods.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed-point</span> iterative sweeping methods for static Hamilton-Jacobi equations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">on relatively coarse grids. The acceleration is even more when the grid is further refined. More- over the Gauss the Gauss-Seidel iterations and alternating sweeping strat- egy to achieve the fast convergence and high order approximations eas- ily. In this paper, we adopt the Gauss-Seidel idea and alternating</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Frey, Pascal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">442</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1102.2096v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intuitionistic fuzzy ?-?-contractive mappings and <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> theorems in non-Archimedean intuitionistic fuzzy metric spaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper intuitionistic fuzzy {\\psi}-{\\phi}-contractive mappings are introduced. Intuitionistic fuzzy Banach contraction theorem for M-complete non-Archimedean intuitionistic fuzzy metric spaces and intuitionistic fuzzy Elelstein contraction theorem for non-Archimedean intuitionistic fuzzy metric spaces by intuitionistic fuzzy {\\psi}-{\\phi}-contractive mappings are proved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bivas Dinda; T. K. Samanta; Iqbal H. Jebril</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">443</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JMAA..326..960C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Approximation of common <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> for finite families of nonself asymptotically nonexpansive mappings in Banach spaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Let E be a real uniformly convex Banach space, K be a closed convex nonempty subset of E which is also a nonexpansive retract with retraction P. Let be asymptotically nonexpansive mappings of K into E with sequences (respectively) satisfying kin->1 as n->[infinity], i=1,2,...,m, and . Let be a sequence in [[epsilon],1-[epsilon</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chidume, C. E.; Ali, Bashir</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">444</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014FBS....55..971R"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Points</span> of the Similarity Renormalization Group and the Nuclear Many-Body Problem</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Similarity Renormalization Group reduces the off-shellness by driving the evolved interaction towards a diagonal band. We analyze the infrared limit and the corresponding on-shell interactions and its consequences for light nuclei. Using a harmonic oscillator shell model we obtain a Tjon line B ? = 4 B t - 3 B d which can be understood from a combinatorics counting of nucleon pairs and triplets in the triton and ?-particle and compares favorably with realistic calculations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruiz Arriola, E.; Szpigel, S.; Timóteo, V. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">445</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.di.unito.it/~marcog/Downloads/MMB06_GGMS.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Point</span> Approximations for TCP Behavior in Networks of Routers Implementing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">interactions between TCP and the underlying IP network. This makes the development of accurate model for TCP characteristics of the IP network are know, and try to derive from them the throughput of TCP connections; #12;II cases the delay) of TCP connections, the round trip time, and the loss characteristics of the IP network</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gribaudo, Marco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">446</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/c10216j7x1g3m1x8.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Use of Eutectic <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Points</span> to Characterize a Spectrometer for Earth Observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A small palm-sized, reference spectrometer, mounted on a remote-controlled model helicopter is being developed and tested\\u000a by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in conjunction with City University, London. The developed system will be used as\\u000a a key element for field vicarious calibration of optical earth observation systems in the visible-near infrared (VNIR) region.\\u000a The spectrometer is hand held, low weight,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saber G. R. Salim; Nigel P. Fox; Emma R. Woolliams; Rainer Winkler; Heather M. Pegrum; Tong Sun; Ken T. V. Grattan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">447</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53009069"> <span id="translatedtitle">Use of Eutectic <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Points</span> to Characterize a Spectrometer for Earth Observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A small palm-sized, reference spectrometer, mounted on a remote-controlled model helicopter is being developed and tested by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in conjunction with City University, London. The developed system will be used as a key element for field vicarious calibration of optical earth observation systems in the visible-near infrared (VNIR) region. The spectrometer is hand held, low weight,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saber G. R. Salim; Nigel P. Fox; Emma R. Woolliams; Rainer Winkler; Heather M. Pegrum; Tong Sun; Ken T. V. Grattan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">448</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/97/35/66/PDF/2010-113_hal.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Point</span> H2S Gas Detectors Intended for Use in Industrial Safety Applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">the performance of the H2S gas detectors that were tested: · Response time and alarm trigger duration (set at 5 time) Response curve Test gas: 2, 8,12 and 18 ppm Long-term drift and "standby" Continuous opération installée! where H2S can be found in ambient air in order to prevent toxic risk. The tests, requested</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">449</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://math.uchicago.edu/~shmuel/fpt.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">J. <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">point</span> theory appl. Online First c 2009 Birkhauser Verlag Basel/Switzerland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">occurred in surgery theory. Thus, we study when a proper map can be properly homotoped, or boundedly of Proposition. Suppose there were such an f. Consider a circle of rotation C where the radius is less than c/2</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weinberger, Shmuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">450</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SJADS...8.1523D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Competition Between Transients in the Rate of Approach to a <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> <span class="hlt">Point</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this paper is to provide and apply tools for analyzing a specific aspect of transient dynamics not covered by previous theory. The question we address is whether one component of a perturbed solution to a system of differential equations can overtake the corresponding component of a reference solution as both converge to a stable node at the origin, given that the perturbed solution was initially farther away and that both solutions are nonnegative for all time. We call this phenomenon tolerance, for its relation to a biological effect. We show using geometric arguments that tolerance will exist in generic linear systems with a complete set of eigenvectors and in excitable nonlinear systems. We also define a notion of inhibition that may constrain the regions in phase space where the possibility of tolerance arises in general systems. However, these general existence theorems do not not yield an assessment of tolerance for specific initial conditions. To address that issue, we develop some analytical tools for determining if particular perturbed and reference solution initial conditions will exhibit tolerance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Day, Judy; Rubin, Jonathan E.; Chow, Carson C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">451</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18461122"> <span id="translatedtitle">Species-specific diversity of a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> motor pattern: the electric organ discharge of Gymnotus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Understanding <span class="hlt">fixed</span> motor pattern diversity across related species provides a window for exploring the evolution of their underlying neural mechanisms. The electric organ discharges of weakly electric fishes offer several advantages as paradigmatic models for investigating how a neural decision is transformed into a spatiotemporal pattern of <span class="hlt">action</span>. Here, we compared the far fields, the near fields and the electromotive force patterns generated by three species of the pulse generating New World gymnotiform genus Gymnotus. We found a common pattern in electromotive force, with the far field and near field diversity determined by variations in amplitude, duration, and the degree of synchronization of the different components of the electric organ discharges. While the rostral regions of the three species generate similar profiles of electromotive force and local fields, most of the species-specific differences are generated in the main body and tail regions of the fish. This causes that the waveform of the field is highly site dependant in all the studied species. These findings support a hypothesis of the relative separation of the electrolocation and communication carriers. The presence of early head negative waves in the rostral region, a species-dependent early positive wave at the caudal region, and the different relationship between the late negative peak and the main positive peak suggest three <span class="hlt">points</span> of lability in the evolution of the electrogenic system: a) the variously timed neuronal inputs to different groups of electrocytes; b) the appearance of both rostrally and caudally innervated electrocytes, and c) changes in the responsiveness of the electrocyte membrane. PMID:18461122</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rodríguez-Cattaneo, Alejo; Pereira, Ana Carolina; Aguilera, Pedro A; Crampton, William G R; Caputi, Angel A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">452</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2323572"> <span id="translatedtitle">Species-Specific Diversity of a <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Motor Pattern: The Electric Organ Discharge of Gymnotus</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Understanding <span class="hlt">fixed</span> motor pattern diversity across related species provides a window for exploring the evolution of their underlying neural mechanisms. The electric organ discharges of weakly electric fishes offer several advantages as paradigmatic models for investigating how a neural decision is transformed into a spatiotemporal pattern of <span class="hlt">action</span>. Here, we compared the far fields, the near fields and the electromotive force patterns generated by three species of the pulse generating New World gymnotiform genus Gymnotus. We found a common pattern in electromotive force, with the far field and near field diversity determined by variations in amplitude, duration, and the degree of synchronization of the different components of the electric organ discharges. While the rostral regions of the three species generate similar profiles of electromotive force and local fields, most of the species-specific differences are generated in the main body and tail regions of the fish. This causes that the waveform of the field is highly site dependant in all the studied species. These findings support a hypothesis of the relative separation of the electrolocation and communication carriers. The presence of early head negative waves in the rostral region, a species-dependent early positive wave at the caudal region, and the different relationship between the late negative peak and the main positive peak suggest three <span class="hlt">points</span> of lability in the evolution of the electrogenic system: a) the variously timed neuronal inputs to different groups of electrocytes; b) the appearance of both rostrally and caudally innervated electrocytes, and c) changes in the responsiveness of the electrocyte membrane. PMID:18461122</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rodríguez-Cattaneo, Alejo; Pereira, Ana Carolina; Aguilera, Pedro A.; Crampton, William G. R.; Caputi, Angel A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">453</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.forestry.gov.uk/pdf/fcfc124.pdf/$FILE/fcfc124.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Climate change <span class="hlt">action</span> plan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Delivery Climate change <span class="hlt">action</span> plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change <span class="hlt">action</span> plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change <span class="hlt">Action</span> Plan Climate change <span class="hlt">action</span> plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">454</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=honey&pg=6&id=ED419128"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Action</span> Learning at Work.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This book contains 34 papers examining the theory, process, and outcomes of <span class="hlt">action</span> learning at work. The following papers are included: "An Introduction to the Text" (Alan Mumford); "The Learning Equation" (Reg Revans); "<span class="hlt">Action</span> Learning as a Vehicle for Learning" (Alan Mumford); "Placing <span class="hlt">Action</span> Learning and <span class="hlt">Action</span> Research in Context" (Cliff…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mumford, Alan, Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">455</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12636851"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vlasov model using kinetic phase <span class="hlt">point</span> trajectories.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A method of solution of the collisionless Vlasov equation by following <span class="hlt">fixed</span> collisionless phase <span class="hlt">point</span> ("particle") trajectories (characteristics) in phase space is presented. It solves the coupled Vlasov Maxwell system self-consistently and employs the Leapfrog-Trapezoidal scheme to solve for the characteristics explicitly. It then uses the bilinear finite element interpolation scheme in phase space and maps vital instantaneous phase <span class="hlt">point</span> information (distribution function) to a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> background phase space mesh while retaining it at the phase <span class="hlt">point</span>. The scheme is an enhanced second order one in time and fourth order in space. The code is then used to model a thermal plasma as well as two stream instability using mobile electrons and <span class="hlt">fixed</span> background ions: the scheme being a momentum conserving one by construction allows energy conservation without assignment of particle shape functions; Langmuir waves are obtained with very good agreement with the Bohm-Gross dispersion relation; the two stream results do not show any numerically induced oscillations attributed to the initial well-ordered velocity distributions. Retention of the characteristics also minimized diffusion. Extensive numerical stability analysis deriving Courant condition for the scheme as well as behavior of computational modes are done in Appendix A, as well as estimating the impact of numerical diffusion in Appendix B. Two to five dimensional versions in phase space exist. PMID:12636851</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kazeminezhad, F; Kuhn, S; Tavakoli, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">456</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1208.2038v1"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-Functionals of three-dimensional Quantum Einstein Gravity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the non-perturbative renormalization group flow of f(R)-gravity in three-dimensional Asymptotically Safe Quantum Einstein Gravity. Within the conformally reduced approximation, we derive an exact partial differential equation governing the RG-scale dependence of the function f(R). This equation is shown to possess two isolated and one continuous one-parameter family of scale-independent, regular solutions which constitute the natural generalization of RG <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> to the realm of infinite-dimensional theory spaces. All solutions are bounded from below and give rise to positive definite kinetic terms. Moreover, they admit either one or two UV-relevant deformations, indicating that the corresponding UV-critical hypersurfaces remain finite dimensional despite the inclusion of an infinite number of coupling constants. The impact of our findings on the gravitational Asymptotic Safety program and its connection to new massive gravity is briefly discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maximilian Demmel; Frank Saueressig; Omar Zanusso</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">457</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..MARX22010S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Finding saddle <span class="hlt">points</span> using Gentlest ascent dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present dynamical equations for determining transition states and escape paths from basins of attraction of a stable system on a potential energy landscape. It is shown that the stable <span class="hlt">fixed</span> <span class="hlt">points</span> of such dynamical systems are the index-1 saddle <span class="hlt">points</span>. The method relies on determining the smallest eigenvalue of the Hessian matrix. The formalism is easy to extend to systems of higher dimensions and can be used to explore the free energy landscapes of systems whose large time scale separation makes the standard molecular dynamics inefficient. The utility of the algorithm is demonstrated by evaluating the activation parameters for homogeneous and heterogeneous dislocation nucleation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Samanta, Amit; Zhou, Xiang; E, Weinan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">458</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11103584"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improving the quality of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> prosthodontic services.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">I have discussed only the three problems most frequently mentioned by laboratory technicians in the Lab Management Today survey. In my opinion, there are many more areas in <span class="hlt">fixed</span> prosthodontics that need attention. To achieve this, we must improve the quality of the procedures we use in creating <span class="hlt">fixed</span> prostheses. Laboratory technicians observe the quality of impressions, tooth preparations and interocclusal records that are sent to them by the dentists with whom they work. Their statements about the need for improvement on several of the aspects of the clinical procedure are of concern. It is dentists' professional responsibility to upgrade their clinical techniques so that they produce high-quality impressions of adequate tooth preparations and transfer information about the proper interocclusal relationship to the dental technician. PMID:11103584</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christensen, G J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">459</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60242109"> <span id="translatedtitle">Catalyst deactivation and <span class="hlt">fixed</span> bed reactor modeling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An experimental study was conducted of the vapor-phase hydrogenation of benzene on a nickel-kieselguhr catalyst in a quasi-adiabatic <span class="hlt">fixed</span> bed catalytic reactor consisting of a central active zone of catalyst admixed with diluent (glass, iron, or aluminum) and bounded by inert zones composed of the diluent alone. Startup dynamics and steady-state studies were carried out for fresh and partially deactivated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Billimoria</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">460</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0806.2957v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Unphysical Gauge <span class="hlt">Fixing</span> in Higgs Mechanism</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The unitary gauge in the Higgs mechanism is to impose the condition of $\\phi =\\phi^\\dagger $ on the Higgs fields. However, this is not the gauge <span class="hlt">fixing</span> but simply a procedure for producing the massive vector boson fields by hand. The Lagrangian density of the weak interactions should be reconsidered by starting from the massive vector boson fields which couple to the fermion currents as the initial ingredients.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Fujita; A. Kusaka; K. Tsuda; S. Oshima</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-06-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">461</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1612951H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ellipsoidal Effects in the <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Geodetic Boundary Value Problem</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">After applying topographic reductions and downward continuation on the observed boundary data the linearized Geodetic Boundary Value Problem (GBVP) degenerates into an ellipsoidal problem. Although the ellipsoidal boundary surface possesses a much simpler topology than the original topographical surface of the Earth, this simplified problem still cannot be solved in an elementary analytical way; in contrast, the "simple" GBVP related to a spherical boundary surface and the normal (radial) derivative is rigorously solvable by spherical integral formulae. In the past, various approaches have been developed for approximate solutions of the ellipsoidal GBVP, starting from the classical work by Sagrebin (1956). These approaches, mainly applied to the free GBVP, rely on first order approximations with respect to the flattening of the ellipsoid of revolution and can be subdivided in three groups. The first group is based on modifications of the spherical integral kernel, resulting in anisotropic kernel functions depending on the azimuth between the computation <span class="hlt">point</span> and the moving integration <span class="hlt">point</span>. In the second group the boundary data are reduced for "ellipsoidal effects" and inserted into spherical integral formulae. Finally, in the third group the ellipsoidal boundary data is formally inserted into the spherical solution formula, and a correction term is added for consideration of the ellipsoidal effect. An advantage of the third approach, propagated by Heck and Seitz (2003) for the linearized scalar-free GBVP, consists in the fact that the correction term can easily be evaluated from some global geopotential model in the form of a spherical harmonic series. In the paper the three groups of approaches are discussed for the case of the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> GBVP. A first-order solution of the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> GBVP related to an ellipsoidal boundary is derived in detail according to the procedure presented in Heck and Seitz (2003). Finally, the resulting ellipsoidal correction term is investigated numerically in the space as well as in the frequency domain.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heck, Bernhard; Seitz, Kurt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">462</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014RaSc...49..630F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Equipment selection heuristics for microwave <span class="hlt">fixed</span> links</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microwave <span class="hlt">fixed</span> links use highly standardized radio equipment and, in the radio equipment standard referenced in this paper, there is a choice between exactly two radio systems when the assigner wishes to resolve a specific data rate exactly: one using a relatively lower-order modulation scheme and one a relatively higher-order scheme. Although the higher-order equipment requires less bandwidth for an isolated link, these systems radiate at higher powers and require larger protection ratios in the radio interference environment which lead to well-established trade-offs between modulation, bandwidth, equivalent isotropic radiated power, and frequency assignment criteria. Our earlier research showed that by extending the Frequency Assignment Problem to include equipment selection and using lower-order modulation equipment on selected links, we can actually reduce the overall span of frequencies required for a network frequency assignment. This work focused on the development of integer programming formulations and analyzed the exact solutions obtained. Exact solutions are impractical for real world problems; hence, here we focus on the development of heuristics for equipment selection. We can model the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> link network as a complete graph where the vertices represent <span class="hlt">fixed</span> link frequency assignment requests and the edges represent interference between pairs of vertices. Using a graph theoretic analysis of the interference problem, we propose heuristic techniques and discuss the relative success of our approach in this article.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Flood, I. D.; Allen, S. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">463</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17604504"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-combination and emerging glaucoma therapies.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ocular hypotensive agents are the only approved pharmacotherapy for glaucoma. Despite significant advances during the past two decades, a large proportion of glaucoma patients require more than one drug. The most recent additions to the armamentarium of antiglaucoma drugs are <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-combination products for the glaucoma patient who is insufficiently responsive to monotherapy. <span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-combination products have the combined efficacy of two ocular hypotensive drugs, and the convenience of a two-drug treatment regimen in a single container, which may aid patient adherence to treatment. Available <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-combination products consist of timolol 0.5% as an invariant with brimonidine 0.2%, dorzolamide 2%, travoprost 0.004%, latanoprost 0.005% or bimatoprost 0.03%. Research on more advanced antiglaucoma medications continues. Promising new directions appear to be the Rho-kinase inhibitors, microtubule-disrupting agents, serotonergics and cannabimimetics. Efforts continue to improve existing antiglaucoma drugs in an attempt to design second-generation cholinomimetics, adrenergics, prostaglandins and prostamides. PMID:17604504</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Woodward, David F; Chen, June</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">464</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900004271&hterms=Ultrasonic+Nozzle&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DUltrasonic%2BNozzle"> <span id="translatedtitle">RSRM nozzle <span class="hlt">fixed</span> housing cooldown test</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Flight 5 aft segments with nozzles were exposed to -17 F temperatures while awaiting shipment to KSC in February, 1989. No records were found which show that any previous nozzles were exposed to air temperatures as low as those seen by the Flight 5 nozzles. Thermal analysis shows that the temperature of the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> housing, and forward and aft exit cone components dropped as low as -10 F. Structural analysis of the nozzles at these low temperatures show the forward and aft exit cone adhesive bonds to have a positive margin of safety, based on a 2.0 safety factor. These analyses show the normal and shear stresses in the <span class="hlt">fixed</span> housing bond as low values. However, the hoop and meridinal stresses were predicted to be in the 4000 psi range; the failure stress allowable of EA913NA adhesive at -7 F. If the bonds did break in directions perpendicular to the surfaces, called bond crazing, no normal bond strength would be lost. Testing was conducted in two phases, showing that no degradation to the adhesive bonds occurred while the Flight 5 nozzles were subjected to subzero temperatures. The results of these tests are documented. Phase 1 testing cooled a full-scale RSRM insulated <span class="hlt">fixed</span> housing to -13 F, with extensive bondline inspections. Phase 2 testing cooled the witness panel adhesive tensile buttions to -13 F, with failure strengths recorded before, during, and after the cooldown.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bolieau, D. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">465</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2748487"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-interval and <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio reinforcement schedules with human subjects</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Operant laboratory studies were conducted as part of the regular activities of a psychiatric research ward. This report includes only some early data obtained from the ward staff, not the patients. A multiple schedule having alternating <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio and <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval components permitted observations of acquisition and maintenance of behavior at low schedule values, transition to and final performance at greater schedule values, and behavioral changes after a limited-hold contingency was added to the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval. Prior to the added limited-hold, subjects used watches to time the interval, and usually responded only once before obtaining each <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval reinforcement. Short limited-hold values eliminated clock watching and increased <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval responding. Subjects communicated freely with each other, and it was clear that their performances were controlled both by the contingencies and by instructions. Just as clearly, the instructions themselves were controlled by the contingencies. It was concluded that the kinds of verbal control that were responsible for “nonstandard” <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-interval performances did not require the postulation of any new behavioral principles. PMID:22477562</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stoddard, Lawrence T.; Sidman, Murray; Brady, Joseph V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">466</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1322114"> <span id="translatedtitle">Human choice in "counterintuitive" situations: <span class="hlt">fixed</span>- versus progressive-ratio schedules.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">College undergraduates were given repeated opportunities to choose between a <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio and a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement. Completions of a progressive-ratio schedule produced <span class="hlt">points</span> (exchangeable for money) and incremented that response requirement by 20 responses with each consecutive choice. In the reset condition, completion of a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> ratio produced the same number of <span class="hlt">points</span> and also reset the progressive ratio back to its initial value. In the no-reset condition, the progressive ratio continued to increase by increments of 20 throughout the session with each successive selection of this schedule, irrespective of <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio choices. Subjects' schedule choices were sensitive to parametric manipulations of the size of the <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-ratio schedule and were consistent with predictions made on the basis of minimizing the number of responses emitted per <span class="hlt">point</span> earned, which is a principle of most optimality theories. Also, the present results suggest that if data from human performances are to be compared with results for other species, humans should be exposed to schedules of reinforcement for long periods of time, as is commonly done with nonhuman subjects. PMID:1645102</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wanchisen, B A; Tatham, T A; Hineline, P N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">467</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5503925"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Action</span> spectrum for phototherapy of psoriasis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using a monochromator the <span class="hlt">action</span> spectrum for ultraviolet phototherapy of psoriasis was determined for radiation between 254 and 313 nm and compared to the <span class="hlt">action</span> spectrum for erythema of uninvolved adjacent skin. Daily exposures of different doses of 254, 280, 290, 296, 300, 304 and 313 nm radiation were observed. Wavelengths of 254, 280, 290 nm were erythemogenic but not therapeutic even at 10 to 50 times the minimal erythema dose. At the other wavelengths studied, the 2 <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra were similar. In general, <span class="hlt">fixed</span> daily doses cleared at lower cumulative dose than did incrementally increased daily doses. The small number of suberythemogenic exposure doses required suggests that monochromatic radiation may have advantages over broadband sources.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Parrish, J.A.; Jaenicke, K.F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">468</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=journal+AND+of+AND+general+AND+psychology&id=EJ812306"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inferences about <span class="hlt">Action</span> Engage <span class="hlt">Action</span> Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Verbal descriptions of <span class="hlt">actions</span> activate compatible motor responses [Glenberg, A. M., & Kaschak, M. P. (2002). Grounding language in <span class="hlt">action</span>. "Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9", 558-565]. Previous studies have found that the motor processes for manual rotation are engaged in a direction-specific manner when a verb disambiguates the direction of…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Taylor, Lawrence J.; Lev-Ari, Shiri; Zwaan, Rolf A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">469</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.epa.gov/radiation/docs/er/400-r-92-001.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">MANUAL OF PROTECTIVE <span class="hlt">ACTION</span> GUIDES PROTECTIVE <span class="hlt">ACTIONS</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">by the cognizant agency (e.g., the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the case of commer~alnuclear reactorsMANUAL OF PROTECTIVE <span class="hlt">ACTION</span> GUIDES -AND PROTECTIVE <span class="hlt">ACTIONS</span> FOR NUCLEAR INCIDENTS Office in establishing emergency response plans and in making decisions during a nuclear incident. It provides</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">470</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800016022&hterms=gean&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dgean"> <span id="translatedtitle">SPS antenna <span class="hlt">pointing</span> control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">pointing</span> control of a microwave antenna of the Satellite Power System was investigated emphasizing: (1) the SPS antenna <span class="hlt">pointing</span> error sensing method; (2) a rigid body <span class="hlt">pointing</span> control design; and (3) approaches for modeling the flexible body characteristics of the solar collector. Accuracy requirements for the antenna <span class="hlt">pointing</span> control consist of a mechanical <span class="hlt">pointing</span> control accuracy of three arc-minutes and an electronic phased array <span class="hlt">pointing</span> accuracy of three arc-seconds. Results based on the factors considered in current analysis, show that the three arc-minute overall <span class="hlt">pointing</span> control accuracy can be achieved in practice.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hung, J. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">471</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21833296"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deriving motor primitives through <span class="hlt">action</span> segmentation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of the present experiment is to further understand the effect of levels of processing (top-down vs. bottom-up) on the perception of movement kinematics and primitives for grasping <span class="hlt">actions</span> in order to gain insight into possible primitives used by the mirror system. In the present study, we investigated the potential of identifying such primitives using an <span class="hlt">action</span> segmentation task. Specifically, we investigated whether or not segmentation was driven primarily by the kinematics of the <span class="hlt">action</span>, as opposed to high-level top-down information about the <span class="hlt">action</span> and the object used in the <span class="hlt">action</span>. Participants in the experiment were shown 12 <span class="hlt">point</span>-light movies of object-centered hand/arm <span class="hlt">actions</span> that were either presented in their canonical orientation together with the object in question (top-down condition) or upside down (inverted) without information about the object (bottom-up condition). The results show that (1) despite impaired high-level <span class="hlt">action</span> recognition for the inverted <span class="hlt">actions</span> participants were able to reliably segment the <span class="hlt">actions</span> according to lower-level kinematic variables, (2) segmentation behavior in both groups was significantly related to the kinematic variables of change in direction, velocity, and acceleration of the wrist (thumb and finger tips) for most of the included <span class="hlt">actions</span>. This indicates that top-down activation of an <span class="hlt">action</span> representation leads to similar segmentation behavior for hand/arm <span class="hlt">actions</span> compared to bottom-up, or local, visual processing when performing a fairly unconstrained segmentation task. Motor primitives as parts of more complex <span class="hlt">actions</span> may therefore be reliably derived through visual segmentation based on movement kinematics. PMID:21833296</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hemeren, Paul E; Thill, Serge</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">472</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/46/67/93/PDF/How_will_be_future_labor_studies2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The future of labor studies, from a labor lawyer's <span class="hlt">point</span> of view. 1.How might future labor studiesevolve, from a French labor lawyer's <span class="hlt">point</span> of view?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">the two types of employment contract, <span class="hlt">fixed</span> term contract and open-ended term contract, by a "sole laborThe future of labor studies, from a labor lawyer's <span class="hlt">point</span> of view. 1.How might future labor studiesevolve, from a French labor lawyer's <span class="hlt">point</span> of view? I would first <span class="hlt">point</span> out several factors that may</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">473</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10135224"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of slurry versus <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed reactor costs for indirect liquefaction applications. A supplement to final report: Design of slurry reactor for indirect liquefaction applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This work is a comparative evaluation of slurry reactors and <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed reactors, with special emphasis on cost. Relative differences between slurry reactors and <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed reactors have been <span class="hlt">pointed</span> out in previous reviews; the differences pertinent to indirect liquefaction are summarized here. Design of both types is outlined.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Prakash, A.; Bendale, P.G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">474</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/34680920"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bradyrhizobium japonicum possesses two discrete sets of electron transfer flavoprotein genes: <span class="hlt">fix</span>A, <span class="hlt">fix</span>B and etfS, etfL</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A group of four co-regulated genes (<span class="hlt">fix</span>A, <span class="hlt">fix</span>B, <span class="hlt">fix</span>C, <span class="hlt">fix</span>X) essential for symbiotic nitrogen fixation has been described in several rhizobial species, including Bradyrhizobium japonicum. The complete nucleotide sequence of the B. japonicum <span class="hlt">fix</span>A, <span class="hlt">fix</span>B and <span class="hlt">fix</span>C, genes is reported here. The derived amino acid sequences confirmed the previously noted sequence similarity between <span class="hlt">Fix</span>A and the g-subunit and between <span class="hlt">Fix</span>B</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marianne Weidenhaupt; Patricia Rossi; Christoph Beck; Hans-Martin Fischer; Hauke Hennecke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">475</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://agcenter.ucdavis.edu//documents/dairy_guide_eng.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">LEADERSHIP, <span class="hlt">ACTION</span>, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP,</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">TRAINING GUIDE LEADERSHIP, <span class="hlt">ACTION</span>, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, <span class="hlt">ACTION</span>, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, <span class="hlt">ACTION</span>, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, <span class="hlt">ACTION</span>, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, <span class="hlt">ACTION</span>, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, DAIRY SAFETY WORKER OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH TRAINING AND EDUCATION PROGRAM</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leistikow, Bruce N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">476</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18252526"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span>-weight on-line learning.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Conventional artificial neural networks perform functional mappings from their input space to their output space. The synaptic weights encode information about the mapping in a manner analogous to long-term memory in biological systems. This paper presents a method of designing neural networks where recurrent signal loops store this knowledge in a manner analogous to short-term memory. The synaptic weights of these networks encode a learning algorithm. This gives these networks the ability to dynamically learn any functional mapping from a (possibly very large) set, without changing any synaptic weights. These networks are adaptive dynamic systems. Learning is online continually taking place as part of the network's overall behavior instead of a separate, externally driven process. We present four higher order <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-weight learning networks. Two of these networks have standard backpropagation embedded in their synaptic weights. The other two utilize a more efficient gradient-descent-based learning rule. This new learning scheme was discovered by examining variations in <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-weight topology. We present empirical tests showing that all these networks were able to successfully learn functions from both discrete (Boolean) and continuous function sets. Largely, the networks were robust with respect to perturbations in the synaptic weights. The exception was the recurrent connections used to store information. These required a tight tolerance of 0.5%. We found that the cost of these networks scaled approximately in proportion to the total number of synapses. We consider evolving <span class="hlt">fixed</span> weight networks tailored to a specific problem class by analyzing the meta-learning cost surface of the networks presented. PMID:18252526</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Younger, A S; Conwell, P R; Cotter, N E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">477</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/handle/1808/8430"> <span id="translatedtitle">Essential and <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Oils of Kansas Plants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">contain the O i l . , U. S. D., 1666. 809. Arctium ' lappa- L. Burdock. Thss. Bonaldson, A. J . P., 1890, 123 ob­ tained by extracting with petroleum benzine 8.6^ of a l i g h t yellow <span class="hlt">fixed</span> o i l . U. S. B. 689. Root y i e l d s also .065/£ v o l a... 060 Anagallis arvensie P. 50 512 Anethol 50 512 Anise, O i l of 30 694 Anthemis cotula L. 41 1772 Arachidic Acid - 79 809 Arc turn lappa L. 4o 695 Artemes^a absinthium L,-— — — — — 42 1131 Asarol £lcohol 67 1131 Asarum canadensis L...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wellington, Earl J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1908-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">478</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1984MiJo...27..143H"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> beam and mechanically steerable antennas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The principal design features and performance characteristics of <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-beam and mechanically scanned antennas that are commonly found in today's operational electronic countermeasures (ECM) and electronic support measures (ESM) equipment are reviewed. The requirements driving the design of steerable ECM antennas are wide bandwidth, high efficiency, and the ability to handle high average power levels. The main types of antennas include spirals, helices, horns, and waveguide radiators. ESM antennas are characterized by wide bandwidth and multiple polarization responses to insure reception of all signals of interest. The types of ESM antennas discussed here include log periodic dipole arrays, spiral antennas, and wideband horns.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hardie, G. S.; Sefton, H. B., Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">479</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920000618&hterms=blizzards&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dblizzards"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Fixed</span> Or Controlled-Movement Foot Restraint</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Foot restraint gives user three options: holds user's feet in <span class="hlt">fixed</span> position, allows them to slide sideways, or allows them to pivot independently about axis through ball of foot, as user chooses. Selects degree of restraint to suit task at hand. Movements to enter and leave foot restraint simple and direct. Simply forces each cleat lightly into space between rails until spring force of movable rail secures it. Body movements for sliding and rotation equally straightforward. Designed for use in absence of gravitation, restraint useful on Earth, underwater or in some hazardous locations where movements restricted.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reilly, Gloria B.; Blizzard, Noah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">480</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3491875"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Action</span> understanding and active inference</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have suggested that the mirror-neuron system might be usefully understood as implementing Bayes-optimal perception of <span class="hlt">actions</span> emitted by oneself or others. To substantiate this claim, we present neuronal simulations that show the same representations can prescribe motor behavior and encode motor intentions during <span class="hlt">action</span>–observation. These simulations are based on the free-energy formulation of active inference, which is formally related to predictive coding. In this scheme, (generalised) states of the world are represented as trajectories. When these states include motor trajectories they implicitly entail intentions (future motor states). Optimizing the representation of these intentions enables predictive coding in a prospective sense. Crucially, the same generative models used to make predictions can be deployed to predict the <span class="hlt">actions</span> of self or others by simply changing the bias or precision (i.e. attention) afforded to proprioceptive signals. We illustrate these <span class="hlt">points</span> using simulations of handwriting to illustrate neuronally plausible generation and recognition of itinerant (wandering) motor trajectories. We then use the same simulations to produce synthetic electrophysiological responses to violations of intentional expectations. Our results affirm that a Bayes-optimal approach provides a principled framework, which accommodates current thinking about the mirror-neuron system. Furthermore, it endorses the general formulation of <span class="hlt">action</span> as active inference. PMID:21327826</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mattout, Jeremie; Kilner, James</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">481</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/82342"> <span id="translatedtitle">Manipulation with diverse <span class="hlt">actions</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We define the Diverse <span class="hlt">Action</span> Manipulation (DAMA) problem in which we are given a mobile robot, a set of movable objects, and a set of diverse, possibly non-prehensile manipulation <span class="hlt">actions</span>, and the objective is to find a ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barry, Jennifer L. (Jennifer Lynn)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">482</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.shu.ac.uk/mediacentre/sites/c3ri/files/Review%20Spring%202013.PDF"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spring 2013 <span class="hlt">Action</span> blockbuster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spring 2013 <span class="hlt">Action</span> blockbuster Sheffield's claim on first <span class="hlt">action</span> movie Also inside Global warning the burglar escapes his pursuers by boarding a train as it leaves a platform. Finally, a policeman tackles him</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wrigley, Stuart</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">483</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://matec.org/animations/#Single_Action_Gripper"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single <span class="hlt">Action</span> Gripper</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This website includes a cut-away animation of a pneumatic single <span class="hlt">action</span> gripper. Objective: Describe how the 180 single <span class="hlt">action</span> gripper works. You can find the animation under the heading "Automation Technology."</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">484</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/865138"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ash level meter for a <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed coal gasifier</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An ash level meter for a <span class="hlt">fixed</span>-bed coal gasifier is provided which utilizes the known ash level temperature profile to monitor the ash bed level. A bed stirrer which travels up and down through the extent of the bed ash level is modified by installing thermocouples to measure the bed temperature as the stirrer travels through the stirring cycle. The temperature measurement signals are transmitted to an electronic signal process system by an FM/FM telemetry system. The processing system uses the temperature signals together with an analog stirrer position signal, taken from a position transducer disposed to measure the stirrer position to compute the vertical location of the ash zone upper boundary. The circuit determines the fraction of each total stirrer cycle time the stirrer-derived bed temperature is below a selected set <span class="hlt">point</span>, multiplies this fraction by the average stirrer signal level, multiplies this result by an appropriate constant and adds another constant such that a 1 to 5 volt signal from the processor corresponds to a 0 to 30 inch span of the ash upper boundary level. Three individual counters in the processor store clock counts that are representative of: (1) the time the stirrer temperature is below the set <span class="hlt">point</span> (500.degree. F.), (2) the time duration of the corresponding stirrer travel cycle, and (3) the corresponding average stirrer vertical position. The inputs to all three counters are disconnected during any period that the stirrer is stopped, eliminating corruption of the measurement by stirrer stoppage.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">485</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1283583"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variation in the <span class="hlt">action</span> spectrum of erythrolabe among deuteranopes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1. Eight deuteranopes matched a mixture of a monochromatic light on the long wave side of the neutral <span class="hlt">point</span> and a violet (450 nm) primary to a <span class="hlt">fixed</span> white as well as a monochromatic light on the short wave side of the neutral <span class="hlt">point</span> mixed with a red (650 nm) primary, to the same white. For lambda greater than 530 nm, the former set of matches defined the <span class="hlt">action</span> spectrum of the long wave sensitive foveal cones, and for lambda less than 480 nm, the latter that of the short wave sensitive cones. 2. Individual differences in the former matches were approximately correlated with the respective ratio of the sensitivities of the wave-length of the anomaloscope primaries, in a way that individual differences of the latter were not. 3. Assuming that eye media differences alone account for the differences in long wave sensitive foveal <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra, the spectral reflectivity of the foveal fundus was predicted for these deuteranopes. The prediction is inconsistent with measurement. 4. Thirteen deuteranopes matched monochromatic spectral lights with a green (535 nm) and a blue (460 nm) primary. The result were analysed by von Kries' method in which differences in matching due to differences in eye media absorption are obviated. The matches of five differed significantly from one another when so analysed. It was concluded that at least one of two <span class="hlt">action</span> spectra of the foveal cones of every one of these five differed from that of all of the others. 5. The canon that deuteranopes accept normal colour matches was evaluated by confronting a single normal with five deuternopes in the analytical anomaloscope of Baker & Rushton, set in the mode of each of the five in turn. Obvious differences existed between this normal's matches and those of four of five deuteranopes. 6. Explanations for differences in the spectrum of erythrolabe in different deuteranopes are evaluated. The possibilities that all have the identical visual pigment but (a) in cones with different optical funnelling properties or (b) in different optical densities are considered. Preliminary results are not in agreement with the expectations of either of these ideas. 7. It is suggested that the visual pigment in the foveal long wave sensitive cones of different deuternopes (and of different normals) may have different extinction spectra. The idea is consistent with micro-spectrophotometric measurements of rhodopsin in individual rods from different frogs (Bowmaker, Loew & Leibman, 1975). PMID:301186</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alpern, M; Pugh, E N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">486</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title29-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title29-vol5-sec1910-24.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">29 CFR 1910.24 - <span class="hlt">Fixed</span> industrial stairs.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...the intent of this section to preclude the use of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> ladders for access to elevated tanks, towers, and similar structures, overhead traveling cranes, etc., where the use of <span class="hlt">fixed</span> ladders is common practice.) Spiral stairways shall...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNu