Science.gov

Sample records for flagellar genes activates

  1. Deduction of upstream sequences of Xanthomonas campestris flagellar genes responding to transcription activation by FleQ

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, R.-M.; Yang, T.-C.; Yang, S.-H.; Tseng, Y.-H. . E-mail: yhtseng@chtai.ctc.edu.tw

    2005-10-07

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), a close relative to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is the pathogen causing black rot in cruciferous plants. In P. aeruginosa, FleQ serves as a cognate activator of {sigma}{sup 54} in transcription from several {sigma}{sup 54}-dependent promoters of flagellar genes. These P. aeruginosa promoters have been analyzed for FleQ-binding sequences; however, no consensus was deduced. Xcc, although lacks fleSR, has a fleQ homologue residing among over 40 contiguously clustered flagellar genes. A fleQ mutant, Xc17fleQ, constructed by insertional mutation is deficient in FleQ protein, non-flagellated, and immobile. Transcriptional fusion assays on six putative {sigma}{sup 54}-dependent promoters of the flagellar genes, fliE, fliQ, fliL, flgG, flgB, and flhF, indicated that each of them is also FleQ dependent. Each of these promoters has a sequence with weak consensus to 5'-gaaacCCgccgCcgctTt-3', immediately upstream of the predicted {sigma}{sup 54}-binding site, with an imperfect inverted repeat containing a GC-rich center flanked by several A and T at 5'- and 3'-ends, respectively. Replacing this region in fliE promoter with a HindIII recognition sequence abolished the transcription, indicating that this region responds to transcription activation by FleQ.

  2. Aeromonas hydrophila Lateral Flagellar Gene Transcriptional Hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelms, Markus; Gonzalez, Victor; Merino, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila AH-3 lateral flagella are not assembled when bacteria grow in liquid media; however, lateral flagellar genes are transcribed. Our results indicate that A. hydrophila lateral flagellar genes are transcribed at three levels (class I to III genes) and share some similarities with, but have many important differences from, genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A. hydrophila lateral flagellum class I gene transcription is σ70 dependent, which is consistent with the fact that lateral flagellum is constitutively transcribed, in contrast to the characteristics of V. parahaemolyticus. The fact that multiple genes are included in class I highlights that lateral flagellar genes are less hierarchically transcribed than polar flagellum genes. The A. hydrophila lafK-fliEJL gene cluster (where the subscript L distinguishes genes for lateral flagella from those for polar flagella) is exclusively from class I and is in V. parahaemolyticus class I and II. Furthermore, the A. hydrophila flgAMNL cluster is not transcribed from the σ54/LafK-dependent promoter and does not contain class II genes. Here, we propose a gene transcriptional hierarchy for the A. hydrophila lateral flagella. PMID:23335410

  3. Identification of Escherichia coli region III flagellar gene products and description of two new flagellar genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D H; Matsumura, P

    1984-01-01

    Region III flagellar genes in Escherichia coli are involved with the assembly and rotation of the flagella, as well as taxis. We subcloned the flaB operon from a lambda fla transducing phage onto plasmid pMK2004. Two additional genes were found at the flaB locus, and we subdivided the flaB gene into flaB1, flaBII, and flaBIII. The cheY suppressor mutations which have previously been mapped to flaB were further localized to flaB11 (Parkinson et al., J. Bacteriol. 155:265-274, 1983). Until now, gene product identification has not been possible for these genes because of their low levels of gene expression. Overexpression of the flagellar genes was accomplished by placing the flaB operon under the control of the lacUV5 or tac promoters. Plasmid-encoded proteins were examined in a minicell expression system. By correlating various deletions and insertions in the flaB operon with the ability to complement specific flagellar mutants and code for polypeptides, we made the following gene product assignments: flaB 1, 60 kilodaltons; flaB 11, 38 kilodaltons; flaB111, 28 kilodaltons; flaC, 56 kilodaltons; fla0, 16 kilodaltons; and flaE, 54 kilodaltons. Images PMID:6094477

  4. Fusions of flagellar operons to lactose genes on a mu lac bacteriophage.

    PubMed Central

    Komeda, Y

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies have defined 29 genes necessary for synthesis of the Escherichia coli flagellar apparatus. This study analyzed the transcriptional control of flagellar genes, using Mu d (Apr lac) phage to generate flagellar mutants by insertion. These mutants contained operon fusions of flagellar genes to the lac genes of the Mu d phage and allowed the measurement of flagellar operon expression by detection of beta-galactosidase activity. These fusion mutants expressed the enzyme activity constitutively, and an autogenous regulation mechanism was not revealed. Lambda transducing phages carrying these chromosomal fla-lac fusions were also isolated and used to examine the effect of different fla mutations on expression of each flagellar operon. The results showed that flagellar operons are divided into six classes; (class 1) the flbB operon, which controls all of the other flagellar operons; (class 2) the flaU and flbC operons, which are controlled by the flbB operon gene products and are not required for the expression of other Fla operons; (class 3) the flbA, flaG, flaD, flaN, flaB, and flaA operons, which are under flbB operon control and are required for the expression of other fla operons; (class4) the flaZ operon, which is controlled by the gene products of the group 1 and 3 operons and is required for hag transcription; (class 5) the mocha and flaS operons, which are controlled by the gene products of the group 1 and 3 operons; and (class 6) the hag operon. These results are discussed with respect to the possible assembly sequence of the fla gene products. PMID:7037746

  5. A Complete Set of Flagellar Genes Acquired by Horizontal Transfer Coexists with the Endogenous Flagellar System in Rhodobacter sphaeroides▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Sebastian; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Fabela, Salvador; Osorio, Aurora; Dreyfus, Georges; Vinuesa, Pablo; Camarena, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria swim in liquid environments by means of a complex rotating structure known as the flagellum. Approximately 40 proteins are required for the assembly and functionality of this structure. Rhodobacter sphaeroides has two flagellar systems. One of these systems has been shown to be functional and is required for the synthesis of the well-characterized single subpolar flagellum, while the other was found only after the genome sequence of this bacterium was completed. In this work we found that the second flagellar system of R. sphaeroides can be expressed and produces a functional flagellum. In many bacteria with two flagellar systems, one is required for swimming, while the other allows movement in denser environments by producing a large number of flagella over the entire cell surface. In contrast, the second flagellar system of R. sphaeroides produces polar flagella that are required for swimming. Expression of the second set of flagellar genes seems to be positively regulated under anaerobic growth conditions. Phylogenic analysis suggests that the flagellar system that was initially characterized was in fact acquired by horizontal transfer from a γ-proteobacterium, while the second flagellar system contains the native genes. Interestingly, other α-proteobacteria closely related to R. sphaeroides have also acquired a set of flagellar genes similar to the set found in R. sphaeroides, suggesting that a common ancestor received this gene cluster. PMID:17293429

  6. Flagellar apparatus gene sequences of Aeromonas hydrophila AL09-73 isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flagellar apparatus genes of recent outbreak Aeromonas hydrophila AL09-73 isolate were sequenced and characterized. Total 28 flagellar genes were identified. The sizes of the genes range from 318 to 2001 nucleotides, which potentially encode different complex flagellar proteins. At nucleotide and...

  7. Flagellar transcriptional activators FlbB and FlaI: gene sequences and 5' consensus sequences of operons under FlbB and FlaI control.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D H; Frantz, B B; Matsumura, P

    1988-01-01

    The regulation of the expression of the operons in the flagella-chemotaxis regulon in Escherichia coli has been shown to be a highly ordered cascade which closely parallels the assembly of the flagellar structure and the chemotaxis machinery (T. Iino, Annu. Rev. Genet. 11:161-182, 1977; Y. Komeda, J. Bacteriol. 168: 1315-1318). The master operon, flbB, has been sequenced, and one of its gene products (FlaI) has been identified. On the basis of the deduced amino acid sequence, the FlbB protein has similarity to an alternate sigma factor which is responsible for expression of flagella in Bacillus subtilis. In addition, we have sequenced the 5' regions of a number of flagellar operons and compared these sequences with the 5' region of flagellar operons directly and indirectly under FlbB and FlaI control. We found both a consensus sequence which has been shown to be in all other flagellar operons (J. D. Helmann and M. J. Chamberlin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:6422-6424) and a derivative consensus sequence, which is found only in the 5' region of operons directly under FlbB and FlaI control. Images PMID:2832369

  8. Identification and characterization of flagellar biosynthetic genes in Yersinia ruckeri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using transposon mutagenesis we have identified a Yersinia ruckeri serovar I mutant defective in both motility and production of secreted lipase activity. Sequence analysis of this mutant revealed a single transposon insertion in an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to flhA, a flagellar biosynt...

  9. Basal Body Structures Differentially Affect Transcription of RpoN- and FliA-Dependent Flagellar Genes in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Flagellar biogenesis in Helicobacter pylori is regulated by a transcriptional hierarchy governed by three sigma factors, RpoD (σ80), RpoN (σ54), and FliA (σ28), that temporally coordinates gene expression with the assembly of the flagellum. Previous studies showed that loss of flagellar protein export apparatus components inhibits transcription of flagellar genes. The FlgS/FlgR two-component system activates transcription of RpoN-dependent genes though an unknown mechanism. To understand better the extent to which flagellar gene regulation is coupled to flagellar assembly, we disrupted flagellar biogenesis at various points and determined how these mutations affected transcription of RpoN-dependent (flaB and flgE) and FliA-dependent (flaA) genes. The MS ring (encoded by fliF) is one of the earliest flagellar structures assembled. Deletion of fliF resulted in the elimination of RpoN-dependent transcripts and an ∼4-fold decrease in flaA transcript levels. FliH is a cytoplasmic protein that functions with the C ring protein FliN to shuttle substrates to the export apparatus. Deletions of fliH and genes encoding C ring components (fliM and fliY) decreased transcript levels of flaB and flgE but had little or no effect on transcript levels of flaA. Transcript levels of flaB and flgE were elevated in mutants where genes encoding rod proteins (fliE and flgBC) were deleted, while transcript levels of flaA was reduced ∼2-fold in both mutants. We propose that FlgS responds to an assembly checkpoint associated with the export apparatus and that FliH and one or more C ring component assist FlgS in engaging this flagellar structure. IMPORTANCE The mechanisms used by bacteria to couple transcription of flagellar genes with assembly of the flagellum are poorly understood. The results from this study identified components of the H. pylori flagellar basal body that either positively or negatively affect expression of RpoN-dependent flagellar genes. Some of these

  10. A mutation that uncouples flagellum assembly from transcription alters the temporal pattern of flagellar gene expression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Mangan, E K; Bartamian, M; Gober, J W

    1995-01-01

    The transcription of flagellar genes in Caulobacter crescentus is regulated by cell cycle events that culminate in the synthesis of a new flagellum once every cell division. Early flagellar gene products regulate the expression of late flagellar genes at two distinct stages of the flagellar trans-acting hierarchy. Here we investigate the coupling of early flagellar biogenesis with middle and late flagellar gene expression. We have isolated mutants (bfa) that do not require early class II flagellar gene products for the transcription of middle or late flagellar genes. bfa mutant strains are apparently defective in a negative regulatory pathway that couples early flagellar biogenesis to late flagellar gene expression. The bfa regulatory pathway functions solely at the level of transcription. Although flagellin promoters are transcribed in class II/bfa double mutants, there is no detectable flagellin protein on immunoblots prepared from mutant cell extracts. This finding suggests that early flagellar biogenesis is coupled to gene expression by two distinct mechanisms: one that negatively regulates transcription, mediated by bfa, and another that functions posttranscriptionally. To determine whether bfa affects the temporal pattern of late flagellar gene expression, cell cycle experiments were performed in bfa mutant strains. In a bfa mutant strain, flagellin expression fails to shut off at its normal time in the cell division cycle. This experimental result indicates that bfa may function as a regulator of flagellar gene transcription late in the cell cycle, after early flagellar structures have been assembled. PMID:7768816

  11. Rcs signalling-activated transcription of rcsA induces strong anti-sense transcription of upstream fliPQR flagellar genes from a weak intergenic promoter: regulatory roles for the anti-sense transcript in virulence and motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingfeng; Harshey, Rasika M

    2009-10-01

    In Salmonella enterica, an activated Rcs signalling system inhibits initiation of transcription of the flhD master operon. Under these conditions, where motility is shut down, microarray experiments showed an increased RNA signal for three flagellar genes -fliPQR- located upstream of rcsA. We show here that it is the anti-sense (AS) strand of these genes that is transcribed, originating at a weak promoter in the intergenic region between fliR and rcsA. RcsA is an auxiliary regulator for the Rcs system, whose transcription is dependent on the response regulator RcsB. Rcs-activated rightward transcription, but not translation, of rcsA is required for stimulation of leftward AS transcription. Our results implicate a combined action of RcsB and rcsA transcription in activating the AS promoter, likely by modulating DNA superhelicity in the intergenic region. We show that the AS transcript regulates many genes in the Rcs regulon, including SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence and stress-response genes. In the wild-type strain the AS transcript is present in low amounts, independent of Rcs signalling. Here, AS transcription modulates complementary sense RNA levels and impacts swarming motility. It appears that the flagellar AS transcript has been co-opted by the Rcs system to regulate virulence. PMID:19703110

  12. Rcs signaling-activated transcription of rcsA induces strong anti-sense transcription of upstream fliPQR flagellar genes from a weak intergenic promoter: regulatory roles for the anti-sense transcript in virulence and motility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingfeng; Harshey, Rasika M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In Salmonella enterica, an activated Rcs signaling system inhibits initiation of transcription of the flhD master operon. Under these conditions, where motility is shut down, microarray experiments showed an increased RNA signal for three flagellar genes - fliPQR - located upstream of rcsA. We show here that it is the anti-sense (AS) strand of these genes that is transcribed, originating at a weak promoter in the intergenic region between fliR and rcsA. RcsA is an auxiliary regulator for the Rcs system, whose transcription is dependent on the response regulator RcsB. Rcs-activated rightward transcription, but not translation, of rcsA is required for stimulation of leftward AS transcription. Our results implicate a combined action of RcsB and rcsA transcription in activating the AS promoter, likely by modulating DNA superhelicity in the intergenic region. We show that the AS transcript regulates many genes in the Rcs regulon, including SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence and stress-response genes. In the wild-type strain the AS transcript is present in low amounts, independent of Rcs signaling. Here, AS transcription modulates complementary sense RNA levels and impacts swarming motility. It appears that the flagellar AS transcript has been co-opted by the Rcs system to regulate virulence. PMID:19703110

  13. Functional Activation of the Flagellar Type III Secretion Export Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andrew M.; Calvo, Rebecca A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Flagella are assembled sequentially from the inside-out with morphogenetic checkpoints that enforce the temporal order of subunit addition. Here we show that flagellar basal bodies fail to proceed to hook assembly at high frequency in the absence of the monotopic protein SwrB of Bacillus subtilis. Genetic suppressor analysis indicates that SwrB activates the flagellar type III secretion export apparatus by the membrane protein FliP. Furthermore, mutants defective in the flagellar C-ring phenocopy the absence of SwrB for reduced hook frequency and C-ring defects may be bypassed either by SwrB overexpression or by a gain-of-function allele in the polymerization domain of FliG. We conclude that SwrB enhances the probability that the flagellar basal body adopts a conformation proficient for secretion to ensure that rod and hook subunits are not secreted in the absence of a suitable platform on which to polymerize. PMID:26244495

  14. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies orthologs of ciliary disease genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2005-01-01

    The important role that cilia and flagella play in human disease creates an urgent need to identify genes involved in ciliary assembly and function. The strong and specific induction of flagellar-coding genes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggests that transcriptional profiling of such cells would reveal new flagella-related genes. We have conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA transcript levels during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas by using maskless photolithography method-produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences for all exons of the 19,803 predicted genes. This analysis represents previously uncharacterized whole-genome transcriptional activity profiling study in this important model organism. Analysis of strongly induced genes reveals a large set of known flagellar components and also identifies a number of important disease-related proteins as being involved with cilia and flagella, including the zebrafish polycystic kidney genes Qilin, Reptin, and Pontin, as well as the testis-expressed tubby-like protein TULP2.

  15. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies orthologs of ciliary disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2005-01-01

    The important role that cilia and flagella play in human disease creates an urgent need to identify genes involved in ciliary assembly and function. The strong and specific induction of flagellar-coding genes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggests that transcriptional profiling of such cells would reveal new flagella-related genes. We have conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA transcript levels during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas by using maskless photolithography method-produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences for all exons of the 19,803 predicted genes. This analysis represents previously uncharacterized whole-genome transcriptional activity profiling study in this important model organism. Analysis of strongly induced genes reveals a large set of known flagellar components and also identifies a number of important disease-related proteins as being involved with cilia and flagella, including the zebrafish polycystic kidney genes Qilin, Reptin, and Pontin, as well as the testis-expressed tubby-like protein TULP2. PMID:15738400

  16. A developmentally regulated Caulobacter flagellar promoter is activated by 3' enhancer and IHF binding elements.

    PubMed Central

    Gober, J W; Shapiro, L

    1992-01-01

    The transcription of a group of flagellar genes is temporally and spatially regulated during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle. These genes all share the same 5' cis-regulatory elements: a sigma 54 promoter, a binding site for integration host factor (IHF), and an enhancer sequence, known as the ftr element. We have partially purified the ftr-binding proteins, and we show that they require the same enhancer sequences for binding as are required for transcriptional activation. We have also partially purified the Caulobacter homolog of IHF and demonstrate that it can facilitate in vitro integrase-mediated lambda recombination. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we provide the first demonstration that natural enhancer sequences and IHF binding elements that reside 3' to the sigma 54 promoter of a bacterial gene, flaNQ, are required for transcription of the operon, in vivo. The IHF protein and the ftr-binding protein is primarily restricted to the predivisional cell, the cell type in which these promoters are transcribed. flaNQ promoter expression is localized to the swarmer pole of the predivisional cell, as are other flagellar promoters that possess these regulatory sequences 5' to the start site. The requirement for an IHF binding site and an ftr-enhancer element in spatially transcribed flagellar promoters indicates that a common mechanism may be responsible for both temporal and polar transcription. Images PMID:1392079

  17. Effects of various agents on flagellar activity, flagellar autotomy and cell viability in four species of Chlamydomonas (chlorophyta: volvocales).

    PubMed

    Lewin, R A; Lee, T H; Fang, L S

    1982-01-01

    Over 200 strains of green algal flagellates, representing about 100 species, were examined for their suitability as experimental organisms for studies of flagellar activity. The cells of all species shed their flagella under unfavourable conditions of temperature or pH, or in the presence of alcohols, detergents or toxic agents of various kinds. For further studies of flagellar activity, motility and autotomy (biologically induced shedding) in particular, we selected four species of Chlamydomonas: C. dysosmos Moewus, C. moewusii Gerloff, C. monoica Strehlow and C. reinhardtii Dangeard. Agents found to inhibit motility without inducing death or flagellar autotomy included azide, arsenite, thiosulphate, cyanide, ferricyanide, hydroxylamine, chloral hydrate, malonate, p-chloro-mercury benzoate and cytochalasin-B, each in a limited range of concentrations which differed according to species and strain. Higher concentrations of these agents caused the flagella to be shed. Since flagellar autotomy is a means by which a cell can quickly reduce the area of its permeable surface, it may have a positive survival value for species liable to be subjected to unfavourable physicochemical conditions. PMID:6764045

  18. T-POP array identifies EcnR and PefI-SrgD as novel regulators of flagellar gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Christopher E; Lee, Changhan; Hughes, Kelly T

    2009-03-01

    The T-POP transposon was employed in a general screen for tetracycline (Tet)-induced chromosomal loci that exhibited Tet-activated or Tet-repressed expression of a fliC-lac transcriptional fusion. Insertions that activated flagellar transcription were located in flagellar genes. T-POP insertions that exhibited Tet-dependent fliC-lac inhibition were isolated upstream of the ecnR, fimZ, pefI-srgD, rcsB, and ydiV genes and in the flagellar gene flgA, which is located upstream of the anti-sigma(28) factor gene flgM. When expressed from the chromosomal P(araBAD) promoter, EcnR, FimZ, PefI-SrgD, and RcsB inhibited the transcription of the flagellar class 1 flhDC operon. YdiV, which is weakly homologous to EAL domain proteins involved in cyclic-di-GMP regulation, appears to act at a step after class 1 transcription. By using a series of deletions of the regulatory genes to try to disrupt each pathway, these regulators were found to act largely independently of one another. These results identify EcnR and PefI-SrgD as additional components of the complex regulatory network controlling flagellar expression. PMID:19114490

  19. T-POP Array Identifies EcnR and PefI-SrgD as Novel Regulators of Flagellar Gene Expression▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Christopher E.; Lee, Changhan; Hughes, Kelly T.

    2009-01-01

    The T-POP transposon was employed in a general screen for tetracycline (Tet)-induced chromosomal loci that exhibited Tet-activated or Tet-repressed expression of a fliC-lac transcriptional fusion. Insertions that activated flagellar transcription were located in flagellar genes. T-POP insertions that exhibited Tet-dependent fliC-lac inhibition were isolated upstream of the ecnR, fimZ, pefI-srgD, rcsB, and ydiV genes and in the flagellar gene flgA, which is located upstream of the anti-σ28 factor gene flgM. When expressed from the chromosomal ParaBAD promoter, EcnR, FimZ, PefI-SrgD, and RcsB inhibited the transcription of the flagellar class 1 flhDC operon. YdiV, which is weakly homologous to EAL domain proteins involved in cyclic-di-GMP regulation, appears to act at a step after class 1 transcription. By using a series of deletions of the regulatory genes to try to disrupt each pathway, these regulators were found to act largely independently of one another. These results identify EcnR and PefI-SrgD as additional components of the complex regulatory network controlling flagellar expression. PMID:19114490

  20. FliZ is a global regulatory protein affecting the expression of flagellar and virulence genes in individual Xenorhabdus nematophila bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Jubelin, Grégory; Lanois, Anne; Severac, Dany; Rialle, Stéphanie; Longin, Cyrille; Gaudriault, Sophie; Givaudan, Alain

    2013-10-01

    Heterogeneity in the expression of various bacterial genes has been shown to result in the presence of individuals with different phenotypes within clonal bacterial populations. The genes specifying motility and flagellar functions are coordinately regulated and form a complex regulon, the flagellar regulon. Complex interplay has recently been demonstrated in the regulation of flagellar and virulence gene expression in many bacterial pathogens. We show here that FliZ, a DNA-binding protein, plays a key role in the insect pathogen, Xenorhabdus nematophila, affecting not only hemolysin production and virulence in insects, but efficient swimming motility. RNA-Seq analysis identified FliZ as a global regulatory protein controlling the expression of 278 Xenorhabdus genes either directly or indirectly. FliZ is required for the efficient expression of all flagellar genes, probably through its positive feedback loop, which controls expression of the flhDC operon, the master regulator of the flagellar circuit. FliZ also up- or downregulates the expression of numerous genes encoding non-flagellar proteins potentially involved in key steps of the Xenorhabdus lifecycle. Single-cell analysis revealed the bimodal expression of six identified markers of the FliZ regulon during exponential growth of the bacterial population. In addition, a combination of fluorescence-activated cell sorting and RT-qPCR quantification showed that this bimodality generated a mixed population of cells either expressing ("ON state") or not expressing ("OFF state") FliZ-dependent genes. Moreover, studies of a bacterial population exposed to a graded series of FliZ concentrations showed that FliZ functioned as a rheostat, controlling the rate of transition between the "OFF" and "ON" states in individuals. FliZ thus plays a key role in cell fate decisions, by transiently creating individuals with different potentials for motility and host interactions. PMID:24204316

  1. Differentiation of Salmonella phase 1 flagellar antigen types by restriction of the amplified fliC gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kilger, G; Grimont, P A

    1993-01-01

    The large antigenic diversity (over 2,300 serotypes) expressed by Salmonella strains can probably be observed at the genetic level. The phase 1 flagellin gene fliC was amplified, and the amplified fragment was cleaved with a mixture of both endonucleases TaqI and ScaI. The restriction patterns observed allowed differentiation of flagellar types b, i, d, j, l,v, and z10. Flagellar group g (g,m, g,p, or g,m,s) could be differentiated from the other flagellar types. Flagellar types r and e,h could not be separated, although they could be distinguished from the other flagellar types studied. Practical applications of flagellar gene restriction are the distinction between serotype Gallinarum-Pullorum, which carries a cryptic gene for flagellar type g,m, and nonmotile Vi-negative variants of serotype Typhi, and the tentative assignation of nonmotile variants of Salmonella serotypes to a flagellar type. Images PMID:8388886

  2. Identification of flagellar motility genes in Yersinia ruckeri by transposon mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we demonstrate that flagellar secretion is required for production of secreted lipase activity in the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri and that neither of these activities is necessary for virulence in rainbow trout. Our results suggest a possible molecular mechanism for the emergence of non-mot...

  3. RpoE may promote flagellar gene expression in Salmonella enterica serovar typhi under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong; Sheng, Xiumei; Zhang, Haifang; Zou, Xin; Ni, Bin; Xu, Shungao; Zhu, Xueming; Xu, Huaxi; Huang, Xinxiang

    2011-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi z66 positive strain contains a fljBA-like operon on a linear plasmid. The operon contains the gene fljB:z66 which encodes the z66 antigen. RpoE is a sigma factor σ(E) that initiates transcription of a series of genes in Escherichia and Salmonella under environmental stresses. To investigate whether the gene fljB:z66 is regulated by RpoE (σ(E)), a rpoE deletion mutant of S. enterica serovar Typhi (ΔrpoE) was prepared in this study. The defective motility of the ΔrpoE was confirmed firstly. Transcriptional expression of flagellar genes was screened using a genomic DNA microarray. Some class-2 and most class-3 flagellar genes were downregulated in the ΔrpoE after 30 min of hyperosmotic stress. The expression of fliA and fljB:z66, a class-2 flagellar gene and a class-3 flagellar gene, obviously decreased; however, expression of the class-1 flagellar genes flhDC did not change obviously in the ΔrpoE compared to the wild-type strain in the same conditions. Results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that the expression levels of fliA and fljB:z66 in the ΔrpoE after 30 min of hyperosmotic stress decreased about five and eightfold, respectively, compared to the wild-type strain. Similar results were observed at 120 min of hyperosmotic stress. Western blotting and qRT-PCR analysis showed that expression of fliA and fljB:z66 was significantly increased after supplemental expression of rpoE with a recombinant plasmid pBADrpoE in the ΔrpoE strain. These results demonstrated that RpoE promoted the expression of class-3 flagellar genes and it might be performed by initiating the expression of fliA in S. enterica serovar Typhi under hyperosmotic stress. PMID:20717675

  4. DNA sequence analysis, gene product identification, and localization of flagellar motor components of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Malakooti, J; Komeda, Y; Matsumura, P

    1989-01-01

    The Escherichia coli operon designated flaA contains seven flagellar genes; among them are two switch protein genes whose products are believed to interface with the motility and chemotaxis machinery of the cell. Complementation analysis using several plasmids carrying different portions of the flaA operon and analysis of expression of these plasmids in minicells allowed the identification of two flagellar gene products. The MotD (now called FliN) protein, a flagellar switch protein, was determined to have an apparent molecular weight of 16,000, and the FlaAI (FliL) protein, encoded by a previously unidentified gene, had an apparent molecular weight of 17,000. DNA sequence analysis of the motD gene revealed an open reading frame of 414 base pairs. There were two possible initiation codons (ATG) for motD translation, the first of which overlapped with the termination codon of the upstream gene, flaAII (fliN). The wild-type flaAI gene on the chromosome was replaced with a flaAI gene mutated in vitro. Loss of the flaAI gene product resulted in a nonmotile and nonflagellated phenotype. The subcellular location for both the MotD and FlaAI proteins was determined; the FlaAI protein partitioned exclusively in the insoluble fraction of a whole minicell sonic extract, whereas the MotD protein remained in both the soluble and insoluble fractions. In addition, we subcloned a 2.2-kilobase-pair DNA fragment capable of complementing the remaining four genes of the flaA operon (flbD [fliO], flaR [fliP], flaQ [fliQ], and flaP [fliR]). Images PMID:2651416

  5. Timing of flagellar gene expression in the Caulobacter cell cycle is determined by a transcriptional cascade of positive regulatory genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, N; Chen, L S; Mullin, D A; Newton, A

    1991-01-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus flagellar (fla) genes are organized in a regulatory hierarchy in which genes at each level are required for expression of those at the next lower level. To determine the role of this hierarchy in the timing of fla gene expression, we have examined the organization and cell cycle regulation of genes located in the hook gene cluster. As shown here, this cluster is organized into four multicistronic transcription units flaN, flbG, flaO, and flbF that contain fla genes plus a fifth transcription unit II.1 of unknown function. Transcription unit II.1 is regulated independently of the fla gene hierarchy, and it is expressed with a unique pattern of periodicity very late in the cell cycle. The flaN, flbG, and flaO operons are all transcribed periodically, and flaO, which is near the top of the hierarchy and required in trans for the activation of flaN and flbG operons, is expressed earlier in the cell cycle than the other two transcription units. We have shown that delaying flaO transcription by fusing it to the II.1 promoter also delayed the subsequent expression of the flbG operon and the 27- and 25-kDa flagellin genes that are at the bottom of the regulatory hierarchy. Thus, the sequence and timing of fla gene expression in the cell cycle are determined in large measure by the positions of these genes in the regulatory hierarchy. These results also suggest that periodic transcription is a general feature of fla gene expression in C. crescentus. Images PMID:1847367

  6. Expression of an early gene in the flagellar regulatory hierarchy is sensitive to an interruption in DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Dingwall, A; Zhuang, W Y; Quon, K; Shapiro, L

    1992-01-01

    Genes involved in the biogenesis of the flagellum in Caulobacter crescentus are expressed in a temporal order and are controlled by a trans-acting regulatory hierarchy. Strains with mutations in one of these genes, flaS, cannot transcribe flagellar structural genes and divide abnormally. This gene was cloned, and it was found that its transcription is initiated early in the cell cycle. Subclones that restored motility to FlaS mutants also restored normal cell division. Although transcription of flaS was not dependent on any other known gene in the flagellar hierarchy, it was autoregulated and subject to mild negative control by other genes at the same level of the hierarchy. An additional level of control was revealed when it was found that an interruption of DNA replication caused the inhibition of flaS transcription. The flaS transcript initiation site was identified, and an apparently unique promoter sequence was found to be highly conserved among the genes at the same level of the hierarchy. The flagellar genes with this conserved 5' region all initiate transcription early in the cell cycle and are all sensitive to a disruption in DNA replication. Mutations in these genes also cause an aberrant cell division phenotype. Therefore, flagellar genes at or near the top of the hierarchy may be controlled, in part, by a unique transcription factor and may be responsive to the same DNA replication cues that mediate other cell cycle events, such as cell division. Images PMID:1372311

  7. Temporal and spatial regulation of fliP, an early flagellar gene of Caulobacter crescentus that is required for motility and normal cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Gober, J W; Boyd, C H; Jarvis, M; Mangan, E K; Rizzo, M F; Wingrove, J A

    1995-01-01

    In Caulobacter crescentus, the genes encoding a single polar flagellum are expressed under cell cycle control. In this report, we describe the characterization of two early class II flagellar genes contained in the orfX-fliP locus. Strains containing mutations in this locus exhibit a filamentous growth phenotype and fail to express class III and IV flagellar genes. A complementing DNA fragment was sequenced and found to contain two potential open reading frames. The first, orfX, is predicted to encode a 105-amino-acid polypeptide that is similar to MopB, a protein which is required for both motility and virulence in Erwinia carotovora. The deduced amino acid sequence of the second open reading frame, fliP, is 264 amino acids in length and shows significant sequence identity with the FliP protein of Escherichia coli as well as virulence proteins of several plant and mammalian pathogens. The FliP homolog in pathogenic organisms has been implicated in the secretion of virulence factors, suggesting that the export of virulence proteins and some flagellar proteins share a common mechanism. The 5' end of orfX-fliP mRNA was determined and revealed an upstream promoter sequence that shares few conserved features with that of other early Caulobacter flagellar genes, suggesting that transcription of orfX-fliP may require a different complement of trans-acting factors. In C. crescentus, orfX-fliP is transcribed under cell cycle control, with a peak of transcriptional activity in the middle portion of the cell cycle. Later in the cell cycle, orfX-fliP expression occurs in both poles of the predivisional cell. Protein fusions to a lacZ reporter gene indicate that FliP is specifically targeted to the swarmer compartment of the predivisional cell. PMID:7601828

  8. The RcsCDB signaling system and swarming motility in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium: dual regulation of flagellar and SPI-2 virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingfeng; Zhao, Yifang; McClelland, Michael; Harshey, Rasika M

    2007-12-01

    The Rcs phosphorelay is a multicomponent signaling system that positively regulates colanic acid synthesis and negatively regulates motility and virulence. We have exploited a spontaneously isolated mutant, IgaA(T191P), that is nearly maximally activated for the Rcs system to identify a vast set of genes that respond to the stimulation, and we report new regulatory properties of this signaling system in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Microarray data show that the Rcs system normally functions as a positive regulator of SPI-2 and other genes important for the growth of Salmonella in macrophages, although when highly activated the system completely represses the SPI-1/SPI-2 virulence, flagellar, and fimbrial biogenesis pathways. The auxiliary protein RcsA, which works with RcsB to positively regulate colanic acid and other target genes, not only stimulates but also antagonizes the positive regulation of many genes in the igaA mutant. We show that RcsB represses motility through the RcsB box in the promoter region of the master operon flhDC and that RcsA is not required for this regulation. Curiously, RcsB selectively stimulates expression of the flagellar type 3 secretion genes fliPQR; an RcsAB box located downstream of fliR influences this regulation. We show that excess colanic acid impairs swimming and inhibits swarming motility, consistent with the inverse regulation of the two pathways by the Rcs system. PMID:17905992

  9. Comprehensive Mapping of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Devon M.; Bonocora, Richard P.; Wade, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellar synthesis is a highly regulated process in all motile bacteria. In Escherichia coli and related species, the transcription factor FlhDC is the master regulator of a multi-tiered transcription network. FlhDC activates transcription of a number of genes, including some flagellar genes and the gene encoding the alternative Sigma factor FliA. Genes whose expression is required late in flagellar assembly are primarily transcribed by FliA, imparting temporal regulation of transcription and coupling expression to flagellar assembly. In this study, we use ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to comprehensively map the E. coli FlhDC and FliA regulons. We define a surprisingly restricted FlhDC regulon, including two novel regulated targets and two binding sites not associated with detectable regulation of surrounding genes. In contrast, we greatly expand the known FliA regulon. Surprisingly, 30 of the 52 FliA binding sites are located inside genes. Two of these intragenic promoters are associated with detectable noncoding RNAs, while the others either produce highly unstable RNAs or are inactive under these conditions. Together, our data redefine the E. coli flagellar regulatory network, and provide new insight into the temporal orchestration of gene expression that coordinates the flagellar assembly process. PMID:25275371

  10. Molecular Characterization of fliD Gene Encoding Flagellar Cap and Its Expression among Clostridium difficile Isolates from Different Serogroups

    PubMed Central

    Tasteyre, Albert; Karjalainen, Tuomo; Avesani, Véronique; Delmée, Michel; Collignon, Anne; Bourlioux, Pierre; Barc, Marie-Claude

    2001-01-01

    The fliD gene encoding the flagellar cap protein (FliD) of Clostridium difficile was studied in 46 isolates belonging to serogroups A, B, C, D, F, G, H, I, K, X, and S3, including 30 flagellated strains and 16 nonflagellated strains. In all but three isolates, amplification by PCR and reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the fliD gene is present and transcribed in both flagellated and nonflagellated strains. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of amplified fliD gene products revealed interstrain homogeneity, with one of two major patterns (a and b) found in all but one of the strains, which had pattern c. A polyclonal monospecific antiserum raised to the recombinant FliD protein reacted in immunoblots with crude flagellar preparations from 28 of 30 flagellated strains but did not recognize FliD from nonflagellated strains. The fliD genes from five strains representative of the three different RFLP groups were sequenced, and sequencing revealed 100% identity between the strains with the same pattern and 88% identity among strains with different patterns. Our results show that even though FliD is a structure exposed to the outer environment, the flagellar cap protein is very well conserved, and this high degree of conservation suggests that it has a very specific function in attachment to cell or mucus receptors. PMID:11230454

  11. The Helicobacter pylori flbA flagellar biosynthesis and regulatory gene is required for motility and virulence and modulates urease of H. pylori and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    McGee, David J; Coker, Christopher; Testerman, Traci L; Harro, Janette M; Gibson, Susan V; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori and Proteus mirabilis ureases are nickel-requiring metallo-enzymes that hydrolyse urea to NH3 and CO2. In both H. pylori and in an Escherichia coli model of H. pylori urease activity, a high affinity nickel transporter, NixA, is required for optimal urease activity, whereas the urea-dependent UreR positive transcriptional activator governs optimal urease expression in P. mirabilis. The H. pylori flbA gene is a flagellar biosynthesis and regulatory gene that modulates urease activity in the E. coli model of H. pylori urease activity. All flbA mutants of eight strains of H. pylori were non-motile and five had a strain-dependent alteration in urease activity. The flbA gene decreased urease activity 15-fold when expressed in E. coli containing the H. pylori urease locus and the nixA gene; this was reversed by disruption of flbA. The flbA gene decreased nixA transcription. flbA also decreased urease activity three-fold in E. coli containing the P. mirabilis urease locus in a urea- and UreR-dependent fashion. Here the flbA gene repressed the P. mirabilis urease promoter. Thus, FlbA decreased urease activity of both H. pylori and P. mirabilis, but through distinct mechanisms. H. pylori wild-type strain SS1 colonised gerbils at a mean of 5.4 x 10(6) cfu/g of antrum and caused chronic gastritis and lesions in the antrum. In contrast, the flbA mutant did not colonise five of six gerbils and caused no lesions, indicating that motility mediated by flbA was required for colonisation. Because FlbA regulates flagellar biosynthesis and secretion, as well as forming a structural component of the flagellar secretion apparatus, two seemingly unrelated virulence attributes, motility and urease, may be coupled in H. pylori and P. mirabilis and possibly also in other motile, ureolytic bacteria. PMID:12448680

  12. Mutations in the Borrelia burgdorferi Flagellar Type III Secretion System Genes fliH and fliI Profoundly Affect Spirochete Flagellar Assembly, Morphology, Motility, Structure, and Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lihui; Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Jun; Norris, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi migrates to distant sites in the tick vectors and mammalian hosts through robust motility and chemotaxis activities. FliH and FliI are two cytoplasmic proteins that play important roles in the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated export and assembly of flagellar structural proteins. However, detailed analyses of the roles of FliH and FliI in B. burgdorferi have not been reported. In this study, fliH and fliI transposon mutants were utilized to dissect the mechanism of the Borrelia type III secretion system. The fliH and fliI mutants exhibited rod-shaped or string-like morphology, greatly reduced motility, division defects (resulting in elongated organisms with incomplete division points), and noninfectivity in mice by needle inoculation. Mutants in fliH and fliI were incapable of translational motion in 1% methylcellulose or soft agar. Inactivation of either fliH or fliI resulted in the loss of the FliH-FliI complex from otherwise intact flagellar motors, as determined by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Flagellar assemblies were still present in the mutant cells, albeit in lower numbers than in wild-type cells and with truncated flagella. Genetic complementation of fliH and fliI mutants in trans restored their wild-type morphology, motility, and flagellar motor structure; however, full-length flagella and infectivity were not recovered in these complemented mutants. Based on these results, disruption of either fliH or fliI in B. burgdorferi results in a severe defect in flagellar structure and function and cell division but does not completely block the export and assembly of flagellar hook and filament proteins. PMID:25968649

  13. Expression of nipP.w of Pectobacterium wasabiae is dependent on functional flgKL flagellar genes.

    PubMed

    Laasik, Eve; Põllumaa, Lee; Pasanen, Miia; Mattinen, Laura; Pirhonen, Minna; Mäe, Andres

    2014-01-01

    While flagellum-driven motility is hypothesized to play a role in the virulence of Pectobacterium species, there is no direct evidence that genes involved in flagellum assembly regulate the synthesis of virulence factors. The purpose of this study was to identify genes that affect the production or secretion of necrosis-inducing protein (Nip) in the strain SCC3193. Transposon mutagenesis of an RpoS strain overexpressing NipP.w was performed, and a mutant associated with decreased necrosis of tobacco leaves was detected. The mutant contained a transposon in the regulatory region upstream of the flagellar genes flgK and flgL. Additional mutants were generated related to the flagellar genes fliC and fliA. The mutation in flgKL, but not those in fliC and fliA, inhibited nipP.w transcription. Moreover, the regulatory effect of the flgKL mutation on nipP.w transcription was partially dependent on the Rcs phosphorelay. Secretion of NipP.w was also dependent on a type II secretion mechanism. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the flgKL mutation is responsible for reduced motility and lower levels of nipP.w expression. PMID:24173527

  14. Escherichia coli flagellar genes as target sites for integration and expression of genetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Evans, Lewis D B; Frost, Joe; Davenport, Peter W; Yarkoni, Orr; Fraser, Gillian M; Ajioka, James W

    2014-01-01

    E. coli is a model platform for engineering microbes, so genetic circuit design and analysis will be greatly facilitated by simple and effective approaches to introduce genetic constructs into the E. coli chromosome at well-characterised loci. We combined the Red recombinase system of bacteriophage λ and Isothermal Gibson Assembly for rapid integration of novel DNA constructs into the E. coli chromosome. We identified the flagellar region as a promising region for integration and expression of genetic circuits. We characterised integration and expression at four candidate loci, fliD, fliS, fliT, and fliY, of the E. coli flagellar region 3a. The integration efficiency and expression from the four integrations varied considerably. Integration into fliD and fliS significantly decreased motility, while integration into fliT and fliY had only a minor effect on the motility. None of the integrations had negative effects on the growth of the bacteria. Overall, we found that fliT was the most suitable integration site. PMID:25350000

  15. Escherichia coli Flagellar Genes as Target Sites for Integration and Expression of Genetic Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Evans, Lewis D. B.; Frost, Joe; Davenport, Peter W.; Yarkoni, Orr; Fraser, Gillian M.; Ajioka, James W.

    2014-01-01

    E. coli is a model platform for engineering microbes, so genetic circuit design and analysis will be greatly facilitated by simple and effective approaches to introduce genetic constructs into the E. coli chromosome at well-characterised loci. We combined the Red recombinase system of bacteriophage λ and Isothermal Gibson Assembly for rapid integration of novel DNA constructs into the E. coli chromosome. We identified the flagellar region as a promising region for integration and expression of genetic circuits. We characterised integration and expression at four candidate loci, fliD, fliS, fliT, and fliY, of the E. coli flagellar region 3a. The integration efficiency and expression from the four integrations varied considerably. Integration into fliD and fliS significantly decreased motility, while integration into fliT and fliY had only a minor effect on the motility. None of the integrations had negative effects on the growth of the bacteria. Overall, we found that fliT was the most suitable integration site. PMID:25350000

  16. A Protein Methylation Pathway in Chlamydomonas Flagella Is Active during Flagellar Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Mark J.; Ulland, Megan

    2008-01-01

    During intraflagellar transport (IFT), the regulation of motor proteins, the loading and unloading of cargo and the turnover of flagellar proteins all occur at the flagellar tip. To begin an analysis of the protein composition of the flagellar tip, we used difference gel electrophoresis to compare long versus short (i.e., regenerating) flagella. The concentration of tip proteins should be higher relative to that of tubulin (which is constant per unit length of the flagellum) in short compared with long flagella. One protein we have identified is the cobalamin-independent form of methionine synthase (MetE). Antibodies to MetE label flagella in a punctate pattern reminiscent of IFT particle staining, and immunoblot analysis reveals that the amount of MetE in flagella is low in full-length flagella, increased in regenerating flagella, and highest in resorbing flagella. Four methylated proteins have been identified in resorbing flagella, using antibodies specific for asymmetrically dimethylated arginine residues. These proteins are found almost exclusively in the axonemal fraction, and the methylated forms of these proteins are essentially absent in full-length and regenerating flagella. Because most cells resorb cilia/flagella before cell division, these data indicate a link between flagellar protein methylation and progression through the cell cycle. PMID:18701702

  17. pH regulates genes for flagellar motility, catabolism, and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Lisa M; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Bondurant, Sandra S; Radmacher, Michael; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 were compared as a function of steady-state external pH. Cultures were grown to an optical density at 600 nm of 0.3 in potassium-modified Luria-Bertani medium buffered at pH 5.0, 7.0, and 8.7. For each of the three pH conditions, cDNA from RNA of five independent cultures was hybridized to Affymetrix E. coli arrays. Analysis of variance with an alpha level of 0.001 resulted in 98% power to detect genes showing a twofold difference in expression. Normalized expression indices were calculated for each gene and intergenic region (IG). Differential expression among the three pH classes was observed for 763 genes and 353 IGs. Hierarchical clustering yielded six well-defined clusters of pH profiles, designated Acid High (highest expression at pH 5.0), Acid Low (lowest expression at pH 5.0), Base High (highest at pH 8.7), Base Low (lowest at pH 8.7), Neutral High (highest at pH 7.0, lower in acid or base), and Neutral Low (lowest at pH 7.0, higher at both pH extremes). Flagellar and chemotaxis genes were repressed at pH 8.7 (Base Low cluster), where the cell's transmembrane proton potential is diminished by the maintenance of an inverted pH gradient. High pH also repressed the proton pumps cytochrome o (cyo) and NADH dehydrogenases I and II. By contrast, the proton-importing ATP synthase F1Fo and the microaerophilic cytochrome d (cyd), which minimizes proton export, were induced at pH 8.7. These observations are consistent with a model in which high pH represses synthesis of flagella, which expend proton motive force, while stepping up electron transport and ATPase components that keep protons inside the cell. Acid-induced genes, on the other hand, were coinduced by conditions associated with increased metabolic rate, such as oxidative stress. All six pH-dependent clusters included envelope and periplasmic proteins, which directly experience external pH. Overall, this study showed that (i) low pH accelerates acid

  18. Synthetic Cystic Fibrosis Sputum Medium Regulates Flagellar Biosynthesis through the flhF Gene in Burkholderia cenocepacia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Brijesh; Cardona, Silvia T.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia belongs to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), a group of at least 18 distinct species that establish chronic infections in the lung of people with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). The sputum of CF patients is rich in amino acids and was previously shown to increase flagellar gene expression in B. cenocepacia. We examined flagellin expression and flagellar morphology of B. cenocepacia grown in synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium (SCFM) compared to minimal medium. We found that CF nutritional conditions induce increased motility and flagellin expression. Individual amino acids added at the same concentrations as found in SCFM also increased motility but not flagellin expression, suggesting a chemotactic effect of amino acids. Electron microscopy and flagella staining demonstrated that the increase in flagellin corresponds to a change in the number of flagella per cell. In minimal medium, the ratio of multiple: single: aflagellated cells was 2:3.5:4.5; while under SCFM conditions, the ratio was 7:2:1. We created a deletion mutant, ΔflhF, to study whether this putative GTPase regulates the flagellation pattern of B. cenocepacia K56-2 during growth in CF conditions. The ΔflhF mutant exhibited 80% aflagellated, 14% single and 6% multiple flagellated bacterial subpopulations. Moreover, the ratio of multiple to single flagella in WT and ΔflhF was 3.5 and 0.43, respectively in CF conditions. The observed differences suggest that FlhF positively regulates flagellin expression and the flagellation pattern in B. cenocepacia K56-2 during CF nutritional conditions. PMID:27379216

  19. Inactivation of Serpulina hyodysenteriae flaA1 and flaB1 periplasmic flagellar genes by electroporation-mediated allelic exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Rosey, E L; Kennedy, M J; Petrella, D K; Ulrich, R G; Yancey, R J

    1995-01-01

    Serpulina hyodysenteriae, the etiologic agent of swine dysentery, contains complex periplasmic flagella which are composed of multiple class A and class B polypeptides. To examine the role these proteins play in flagellar synthesis, structure, and function and to develop strains which may provide insight into the importance of motility in the etiology of this pathogen, we constructed specific periplasmic flagellar mutations in S. hyodysenteriae B204. The cloned flaA1 and flaB1 genes were disrupted by replacement of internal fragments with chloramphenicol and/or kanamycin gene cassettes. Following delivery of these suicide plasmids into S. hyodysenteriae, homologous recombination and allelic exchange at the targeted chromosomal flaA1 and flaB1 genes was verified by PCR, sequence, and Southern analysis. The utility of a chloramphenicol resistance gene cassette for targeted gene disruption was demonstrated and found more amenable than kanamycin as a selective marker in S. hyodysenteriae. Immunoblots of cell lysates of the flagellar mutants with antiserum raised against purified FlaA or FlaB confirmed the absence of the corresponding sheath or core protein. Both mutations selectively abolished expression of the targeted gene without affecting synthesis of the other flagellar polypeptide. flaA1 and flaB1 mutant strains exhibited altered motility in vitro and were less efficient in movement through a liquid medium. Paradoxically, isogenic strains containing specifically disrupted flaA1 or flaB1 alleles were capable of assembling periplasmic flagella that were morphologically normal as evidenced by electron microscopy. This is the first report of specific inactivation of a motility-associated gene in spirochetes. PMID:7592350

  20. Identification of flgZ as a Flagellar Gene Encoding a PilZ Domain Protein That Regulates Swimming Motility and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; González de Heredia, Elena; Baena, Irene; Martín-Martín, Irene; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC) and one phosphodiesterase (BifA) implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ. PMID:24504373

  1. Decay of Genes Encoding the Oomycete Flagellar Proteome in the Downy Mildew Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis

    PubMed Central

    Judelson, Howard S.; Shrivastava, Jolly; Manson, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Zoospores are central to the life cycles of most of the eukaryotic microbes known as oomycetes, but some genera have lost the ability to form these flagellated cells. In the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans, genes encoding 257 proteins associated with flagella were identified by comparative genomics. These included the main structural components of the axoneme and basal body, proteins involved in intraflagellar transport, regulatory proteins, enzymes for maintaining ATP levels, and others. Transcripts for over three-quarters of the genes were up-regulated during sporulation, and persisted to varying degrees in the pre-zoospore stage (sporangia) and motile zoospores. Nearly all of these genes had orthologs in other eukaryotes that form flagella or cilia, but not species that lack the organelle. Orthologs of 211 of the genes were also absent from a sister taxon to P. infestans that lost the ability to form flagella, the downy mildew Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Many of the genes retained in H. arabidopsidis were also present in other non-flagellates, suggesting that they play roles both in flagella and other cellular processes. Remnants of the missing genes were often detected in the H. arabidopsidis genome. Degradation of the genes was associated with local compaction of the chromosome and a heightened propensity towards genome rearrangements, as such regions were less likely to share synteny with P. infestans. PMID:23077652

  2. Identification and characterization of the products of six region III flagellar genes (flaAII.3 through flaQII) of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Homma, M; Iino, T; Macnab, R M

    1988-01-01

    A portion of flagellar region III of the Salmonella typhimurium genome has been cloned and shown to contain six genes: flaAII.3, flaAIII, flaS, flaR, flaQI, and flaQII. Of these, all but flaQI were known to exist from mutant studies; the former flaQ has been renamed flaQII. The genes were shown by minicell analysis to encode proteins with apparent molecular masses of 28, 48, 15, 46, 17, and 37 kilodaltons, respectively. The presence of a flagellar-gene-specific promoter in the vicinity of flaQI was established by testing expression of the plasmid-encoded tetracycline resistance gene in artificial constructions. In minicell preparations, the flaAII.3 and flaR products were found principally in the cytoplasmic fraction; the rest were found principally in the membrane fraction. A comparison between the homologous genes of S. typhimurium and Escherichia coli confirmed that their genomic organizations were similar and that their products had similar molecular masses and isoelectric points. Images PMID:2834334

  3. FlgM is secreted by the flagellar export apparatus in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Rebecca A; Kearns, Daniel B

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is assembled from over 20 structural components, and flagellar gene regulation is morphogenetically coupled to the assembly state by control of the anti-sigma factor FlgM. In the Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica, FlgM inhibits late-class flagellar gene expression until the hook-basal body structural intermediate is completed and FlgM is inhibited by secretion from the cytoplasm. Here we demonstrate that FlgM is also secreted in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis and is degraded extracellularly by the proteases Epr and WprA. We further demonstrate that, like in S. enterica, the structural genes required for the flagellar hook-basal body are required for robust activation of σ(D)-dependent gene expression and efficient secretion of FlgM. Finally, we determine that FlgM secretion is strongly enhanced by, but does not strictly require, hook-basal body completion and instead demands a minimal subset of flagellar proteins that includes the FliF/FliG basal body proteins, the flagellar type III export apparatus components FliO, FliP, FliQ, FliR, FlhA, and FlhB, and the substrate specificity switch regulator FliK. PMID:25313396

  4. Listeria monocytogenes DNA Glycosylase AdlP Affects Flagellar Motility, Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Bae, Dongryeoul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is structurally similar to the Bacillus cereus alkyl base DNA glycosylase (AlkD), was identified. This determinant was involved in the transcriptional repression of flagellar motility genes and was named adlP (encoding an AlkD-like protein [AdlP]). Deletion of adlP activated the expression of flagellar motility genes at 37°C and disrupted the temperature-dependent inhibition of L. monocytogenes motility. The adlP null strains demonstrated decreased survival in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and less virulence in mice. Furthermore, the deletion of adlP significantly decreased biofilm formation and impaired the survival of bacteria under several stress conditions, including the presence of a DNA alkylation compound (methyl methanesulfonate), an oxidative agent (H2O2), and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our findings strongly suggest that adlP may encode a bifunctional protein that transcriptionally represses the expression of flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. IMPORTANCE We discovered a novel protein that we named AlkD-like protein (AdlP). This protein affected flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. Our data suggest that AdlP may be a bifunctional protein that represses flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. PMID:27316964

  5. Repression of Flagellar Genes in Exponential Phase by CsgD and CpxR, Two Crucial Modulators of Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Dudin, Omaya; Geiselmann, Johannes; Ogasawara, Hiroshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli adapts its lifestyle to the variations of environmental growth conditions, swapping between swimming motility or biofilm formation. The stationary-phase sigma factor RpoS is an important regulator of this switch, since it stimulates adhesion and represses flagellar biosynthesis. By measuring the dynamics of gene expression, we show that RpoS inhibits the transcription of the flagellar sigma factor, FliA, in exponential growth phase. RpoS also partially controls the expression of CsgD and CpxR, two transcription factors important for bacterial adhesion. We demonstrate that these two regulators repress the transcription of fliA, flgM, and tar and that this regulation is dependent on the growth medium. CsgD binds to the flgM and fliA promoters around their −10 promoter element, strongly suggesting direct repression. We show that CsgD and CpxR also affect the expression of other known modulators of cell motility. We propose an updated structure of the regulatory network controlling the choice between adhesion and motility. PMID:24272779

  6. Incomplete flagellar structures in Escherichia coli mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Komeda, Y

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants with defects in 29 flagellar genes identified so far were examined by electron microscopy for possession of incomplete flagellar structures in membrane-associated fractions. The results are discussed in consideration of the known transcriptional interaction of flagellar genes. Hook-basal body structures were detected in flaD, flaS, flaT, flbC, and hag mutants. The flaE mutant had a polyhook-basal body structure. An intact basal body appeared in flaK mutants. Putative precursors of the basal body were detected in mutants with defects in flaM, flaU, flaV, and flaY. No structures homologous to the flagellar basal body or its parts were detected in mutants with defects in flaA, flaB, flaC, flaG, flaH, flaI, flaL, flaN, flaO, flaP, flaQ, flaR, flaW, flaX, flbA, flbB, and flbD. One flaZ mutant had an incomplete flagellar basal body structure and another formed no significant structure, suggesting that flaZ is responsible for both basal body assembly and the transcription of the hag gene. Images PMID:7007337

  7. CEP290 tethers flagellar transition zone microtubules to the membrane and regulates flagellar protein content

    PubMed Central

    Craige, Branch; Tsao, Che-Chia; Diener, Dennis R.; Hou, Yuqing; Lechtreck, Karl-Ferdinand; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in human CEP290 cause cilia-related disorders that range in severity from isolated blindness to perinatal lethality. Here, we describe a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant in which most of the CEP290 gene is deleted. Immunoelectron microscopy indicated that CEP290 is located in the flagellar transition zone in close association with the prominent microtubule–membrane links there. Ultrastructural analysis revealed defects in these microtubule–membrane connectors, resulting in loss of attachment of the flagellar membrane to the transition zone microtubules. Biochemical analysis of isolated flagella revealed that the mutant flagella have abnormal protein content, including abnormal levels of intraflagellar transport proteins and proteins associated with ciliopathies. Experiments with dikaryons showed that CEP290 at the transition zone is dynamic and undergoes rapid turnover. The results indicate that CEP290 is required to form microtubule–membrane linkers that tether the flagellar membrane to the transition zone microtubules, and is essential for controlling flagellar protein composition. PMID:20819941

  8. Actin-interacting and flagellar proteins in Leishmania spp.: Bioinformatics predictions to functional assignments in phagosome formation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Several motile processes are responsible for the movement of proteins into and within the flagellar membrane, but little is known about the process by which specific proteins (either actin-associated or not) are targeted to protozoan flagellar membranes. Actin is a major cytoskeleton protein, while polymerization and depolymerization of parasite actin and actin-interacting proteins (AIPs) during both processes of motility and host cell entry might be key events for successful infection. For a better understanding the eukaryotic flagellar dynamics, we have surveyed genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of pathogenic Leishmania spp. to identify pertinent genes/proteins and to build in silico models to properly address their putative roles in trypanosomatid virulence. In a search for AIPs involved in flagellar activities, we applied computational biology and proteomic tools to infer from the biological meaning of coronins and Arp2/3, two important elements in phagosome formation after parasite phagocytosis by macrophages. Results presented here provide the first report of Leishmania coronin and Arp2/3 as flagellar proteins that also might be involved in phagosome formation through actin polymerization within the flagellar environment. This is an issue worthy of further in vitro examination that remains now as a direct, positive bioinformatics-derived inference to be presented. PMID:21637533

  9. Actin-interacting and flagellar proteins in Leishmania spp.: Bioinformatics predictions to functional assignments in phagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Michely C; Costa, Marcília P; Pacheco, Ana C L; Kamimura, Michel T; Silva, Samara C; Carneiro, Laura D G; Sousa, Ana P L; Soares, Carlos E A; Souza, Celeste S F; de Oliveira, Diana Magalhães

    2009-07-01

    Several motile processes are responsible for the movement of proteins into and within the flagellar membrane, but little is known about the process by which specific proteins (either actin-associated or not) are targeted to protozoan flagellar membranes. Actin is a major cytoskeleton protein, while polymerization and depolymerization of parasite actin and actin-interacting proteins (AIPs) during both processes of motility and host cell entry might be key events for successful infection. For a better understanding the eukaryotic flagellar dynamics, we have surveyed genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of pathogenic Leishmania spp. to identify pertinent genes/proteins and to build in silico models to properly address their putative roles in trypanosomatid virulence. In a search for AIPs involved in flagellar activities, we applied computational biology and proteomic tools to infer from the biological meaning of coronins and Arp2/3, two important elements in phagosome formation after parasite phagocytosis by macrophages. Results presented here provide the first report of Leishmania coronin and Arp2/3 as flagellar proteins that also might be involved in phagosome formation through actin polymerization within the flagellar environment. This is an issue worthy of further in vitro examination that remains now as a direct, positive bioinformatics-derived inference to be presented. PMID:21637533

  10. In Helicobacter pylori auto-inducer-2, but not LuxS/MccAB catalysed reverse transsulphuration, regulates motility through modulation of flagellar gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background LuxS may function as a metabolic enzyme or as the synthase of a quorum sensing signalling molecule, auto-inducer-2 (AI-2); hence, the mechanism underlying phenotypic changes upon luxS inactivation is not always clear. In Helicobacter pylori, we have recently shown that, rather than functioning in recycling methionine as in most bacteria, LuxS (along with newly-characterised MccA and MccB), synthesises cysteine via reverse transsulphuration. In this study, we investigated whether and how LuxS controls motility of H. pylori, specifically if it has its effects via luxS-required cysteine metabolism or via AI-2 synthesis only. Results We report that disruption of luxS renders H. pylori non-motile in soft agar and by microscopy, whereas disruption of mccAHp or mccBHp (other genes in the cysteine provision pathway) does not, implying that the lost phenotype is not due to disrupted cysteine provision. The motility defect of the ΔluxSHp mutant was complemented genetically by luxSHp and also by addition of in vitro synthesised AI-2 or 4, 5-dihydroxy-2, 3-pentanedione (DPD, the precursor of AI-2). In contrast, exogenously added cysteine could not restore motility to the ΔluxSHp mutant, confirming that AI-2 synthesis, but not the metabolic effect of LuxS was important. Microscopy showed reduced number and length of flagella in the ΔluxSHp mutant. Immunoblotting identified decreased levels of FlaA and FlgE but not FlaB in the ΔluxSHp mutant, and RT-PCR showed that the expression of flaA, flgE, motA, motB, flhA and fliI but not flaB was reduced. Addition of DPD but not cysteine to the ΔluxSHp mutant restored flagellar gene transcription, and the number and length of flagella. Conclusions Our data show that as well as being a metabolic enzyme, H. pylori LuxS has an alternative role in regulation of motility by modulating flagellar transcripts and flagellar biosynthesis through production of the signalling molecule AI-2. PMID:20691071

  11. Vaccination with recombinant flagellar proteins FlgJ and FliN induce protection against Brucella abortus 544 infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianbo; Xu, Jie; Xie, Yongfei; Qiu, Yefeng; Fu, Simei; Yuan, Xitong; Ke, Yuehua; Yu, Shuang; Du, Xinying; Cui, Mingquan; Chen, Yanfen; Wang, Tongkun; Wang, Zhoujia; Yu, Yaqing; Huang, Kehe; Huang, Liuyu; Peng, Guangneng; Chen, Zeliang; Wang, Yufei

    2012-12-28

    Brucella has been considered as a non-motile, facultative intracellular pathogenic bacterium. However, the genome sequences of different Brucella species reveal the presence of the flagellar genes needed for the construction of a functional flagellum. Due to its roles in the interaction between pathogen and host, we hypothesized that some of the flagellar proteins might induce protective immune responses and these proteins will be good subunit vaccine candidates. This study was conducted to screening of protective antigens among these flagellar proteins. Firstly, according to the putative functional roles, a total of 30 flagellar genes of Brucella abortus were selected for in vitro expression. 15 of these flagellar genes were successfully expressed as his-tagged recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli ER2566. Then, these proteins were purified and used to analyze their T cell immunity induction activity by an in vitro gamma interferon (IFN-γ) assay. Five of the flagellar proteins could stimulate significantly higher levels of IFN-γ secretion in splenocytes from S19 immunized mice, indicating their T cell induction activity. Finally, immunogenicity and protection activity of these 5 flagellar proteins were evaluated in BALB/c mice. Results showed that immunization with FlgJ (BAB1_0260) or FliN (BAB2_0122) plus adjuvant could provide protection against B. abortus 544 infection. Furthermore, mice immunized with FlgJ and FliN developed a vigorous immunoglobulin G response, and in vitro stimulation of their splenocytes with immunizing proteins induced the secretion of IFN-γ. Altogether, these data suggest that flagellar proteins FlgJ and FliN are protective antigens that could produce humoral and cell-mediated responses in mice and candidates for use in future studies of vaccination against brucellosis. PMID:22854331

  12. The Escherichia coli O157 Flagellar Regulatory Gene flhC and Not the Flagellin Gene fliC Impacts Colonization of Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Dobbin, Heather S.; Hovde, Carolyn J.; Williams, Christopher J.; Minnich, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    A virulent European Escherichia coli O157:H− isolate is nonmotile due to a 12-bp deletion in the flagellar regulatory gene flhC. To investigate the contribution of flhC in the relationship between E. coli O157:H7 and cattle, we constructed a similar flhC regulatory mutant in the well-characterized strain ATCC 43894. There was no difference in the growth rate between the wild type and this regulatory mutant, but phenotypic arrays showed substrate utilization differences. Survival in the bovine gastrointestinal tract and colonization of the rectoanal junction mucosa were assessed. Mixtures of both strains were given orally or rectally to steers or administered into the rumen of cattle dually cannulated at the rumen and duodenum. One day post-oral dose, most rectal/fecal isolates (74%) were the regulatory mutant, but by 3 days post-oral dose and throughout the 42-day experiment, ≥80% of the isolates were wild type. Among steers given a rectal application of both strains, wild-type isolates were the majority of isolates recovered on all days. The regulatory mutant survived better than the wild type in both the rumen and duodenum. To test the role of motility, a filament mutant (ΔfliC) was constructed and similar cattle experiments were performed. On all days post-oral dose, the majority of isolates (64% to 98%) were the filament mutant. In contrast, both strains were recovered equally post-rectal application. Thus, the regulatory mutant survived passage through the bovine gastrointestinal tract better than the wild type but failed to efficiently colonize cattle, and the requirement of flhC for colonization was not dependent on a functional flagellum. PMID:16622228

  13. Genetic Analysis and Detection of fliCH1 and fliCH12 Genes Coding for Serologically Closely Related Flagellar Antigens in Human and Animal Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The E. coli flagellar types H1 and H12 show a high serological cross-reactivity and molecular serotyping appears an advantageous method to establish a clear discrimination between these flagellar types. Analysis of fliCH1 and fliCH12 gene sequences showed that they were 97.5% identical at the nucleotide level. Because of this high degree of homology we developed a two-step real-time PCR detection procedure for reliable discrimination of H1 and H12 flagellar types in E. coli. In the first step, a real-time PCR assay for common detection of both fliCH1 and fliCH12 genes is used, followed in a second step by real-time PCR assays for specific detection of fliCH1 and fliCH12, respectively. The real-time PCR for common detection of fliCH1 and fliCH12 demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity as it reacted with all tested E. coli H1 and H12 strains and not with any of the reference strains encoding all the other 51 flagellar antigens. The fliCH1 and fliCH12 gene specific assays detected all E. coli H1 and all E. coli H12 strains, respectively (100% sensitivity). However, both assays showed cross-reactions with some flagellar type reference strains different from H1 and H12. The real-time PCR assays developed in this study can be used in combination for the detection and identification of E. coli H1 and H12 strains isolated from different sources. PMID:26913025

  14. Multiple kinetic states for the flagellar motor switch.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, S C; Koshland, D E

    1989-01-01

    By means of a computerized video processing system, the flagellar motors of Escherichia coli were shown to have multiple kinetic states for each rotational direction. High-resolution analysis of flagellar motors revealed new kinetic states both in wild-type cells and in a strain deleted of other signal-transducing genes to which CheY had been introduced. This strain, RP1091, retained residual kinase activity that could phosphorylate CheY, complicating the biochemical identification of certain kinetic states. The behavioral effect of CheY on single flagellar motors was ultrasensitive, with an apparent Hill coefficient of 5.5 +/- 1.9 (SD) and a half-maximal effect at 10.1 +/- 0.5 (SD) microM CheY. Based on the CheY concentration dependence, a two-state model is clearly excluded, even for the simpler system of CheY-induced rotational reversals in the deletion strain. The data are best described by a four-state model, with two clockwise and two counterclockwise states. Images PMID:2681161

  15. Homologues of the 24-kDa flagellar Ca(2+)-binding protein gene of Trypanosoma cruzi are present in other members of the Trypanosomatidae family.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, R A; Linss, J; Thomaz, N; Olson, C L; Engman, D M; Goldenberg, S

    1997-07-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding the 24-kDa flagellar Ca(2+)-binding protein (FCaBP) of the Dm28c clone of Trypanosoma cruzi was cloned and characterized. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with those of the FCaBPs of other T. cruzi strains revealed greater than 97% sequence conservation. FCaBP-like genes are found in Trypanosoma conorhini, Trypanosoma freitasi, Trypanosoma lewisi, Herpetomonas megaseliae, Leptomonas seymouri, and Phytomonas serpens, but not in Crithidia deanei, Leishmania amazonensis, or Endotrypanum schaudinni: Among various T. cruzi strains, FCaBP genes are located on chromosomes of different size, although all strains possess multiple FCaBP genes organized as tandemly arranged gene families. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that FCaBP mRNAs are produced in all organisms possessing FCaBP-hybridizing sequences, indicating that expression of FCaBP or an FCaBP-like protein is common to a number of trypanosomatid species. PMID:9225770

  16. Negative transcriptional regulation in the Caulobacter flagellar hierarchy.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H; Dingwall, A; Shapiro, L

    1989-01-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus flagellum is formed at a specific time in the cell cycle and its assembly requires the ordered expression of a large number of genes. These genes are controlled in a positive trans-acting hierarchy that reflects the order of assembly of the flagellum. Using plasmids carrying transcriptional fusions of either a neo or a lux reporter gene to the promoters of three flagellar genes representing different ranks in the hierarchy (the hook operon, a basal body gene flbN, and the flaO gene), we have measured the level of chimeric gene expression in 13 flagellar mutant backgrounds. Mutants in the hook operon or in basal body genes caused overproduction of both hook operon and basal body gene chimeric mRNAs, suggesting that negative regulation is superimposed on the positive trans-acting control for these early events in the flagellar hierarchy. Mutants in the structural genes and in genes involved in flagellar assembly had no effect on flaO expression, placing the flaO gene near the top of the hierarchy. However, flaO expression appears to be under negative control by two regulatory genes flaS and flaW. Negative control, as a response to the completion of specific steps in the assembly process, may be an important mechanism used by the cell to turn off flagellar gene expression once the gene product is no longer needed. Images PMID:2771950

  17. Roles of cheY and cheZ gene products in controlling flagellar rotation in bacterial chemotaxis of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, S C; Koshland, D E

    1987-01-01

    To understand output control in bacterial chemotaxis, we varied the levels of expression of cellular cheY and cheZ genes and found that the overproduction of the corresponding proteins affected Escherichia coli swimming behavior. In the absence of other signal-transducing gene products, CheY overproduction made free-swimming cells tumble more frequently. A plot of the fraction of the population that are tumbling versus the CheY concentration was hyperbolic, with half of the population tumbling at 30 microM (25,000 copies per cell) CheY monomers in the cytosol. Overproduction of aspartate receptor (Tar) by 30-fold had a negligible effect on CheY-induced tumbling, so Tar does not sequester CheY. CheZ overproduction decreased tumbling in all tumbling mutants except certain flaAII(cheC) mutants. In the absence of other chemotaxis gene products, CheZ overproduction inhibited CheY-induced tumbling. Models for CheY as a tumbling signal and CheZ as a smooth-swimming signal to control flagellar rotation are discussed. Images PMID:3546269

  18. Flagellar dynamics of a connected chain of active, polar, Brownian particles

    PubMed Central

    Chelakkot, Raghunath; Gopinath, Arvind; Mahadevan, L.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    We show that active, self-propelled particles that are connected together to form a single chain that is anchored at one end can produce the graceful beating motions of flagella. Changing the boundary condition from a clamp to a pivot at the anchor leads to steadily rotating tight coils. Strong noise in the system disrupts the regularity of the oscillations. We use a combination of detailed numerical simulations, mean-field scaling analysis and first passage time theory to characterize the phase diagram as a function of the filament length, passive elasticity, propulsion force and noise. Our study suggests minimal experimental tests for the onset of oscillations in an active polar chain. PMID:24352670

  19. Flagellar dynamics of a connected chain of active, polar, Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Chelakkot, Raghunath; Gopinath, Arvind; Mahadevan, L; Hagan, Michael F

    2014-03-01

    We show that active, self-propelled particles that are connected together to form a single chain that is anchored at one end can produce the graceful beating motions of flagella. Changing the boundary condition from a clamp to a pivot at the anchor leads to steadily rotating tight coils. Strong noise in the system disrupts the regularity of the oscillations. We use a combination of detailed numerical simulations, mean-field scaling analysis and first passage time theory to characterize the phase diagram as a function of the filament length, passive elasticity, propulsion force and noise. Our study suggests minimal experimental tests for the onset of oscillations in an active polar chain. PMID:24352670

  20. Xenocin Export by the Flagellar Type III Pathway in Xenorhabdus nematophila

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Preeti; Park, Dongjin; Forst, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The xenocin operon of Xenorhabdus nematophila consists of xciA and ximB genes encoding a 64-kDa xenocin and 42-kDa immunity protein to kill competing microbes in the insect larva. The catalytic domain of xenocin has RNase activity and is responsible for its cytotoxicity. Under SOS conditions, xenocin is produced with immunity protein as a complex. Here, we show that xenocin and immunity protein complex are exported through the flagellar type III system of X. nematophila. Secretion of xenocin complex was abolished in an flhA strain but not in an fliC strain. The xenocin operon is not linked to the flagellar operon transcriptionally. The immunity protein is produced alone from a second, constitutive promoter and is targeted to the periplasm in a flagellum-independent manner. For stable expression of xenocin, coexpression of immunity protein was necessary. To examine the role of immunity protein in xenocin export, an enzymatically inactive protein was produced by site-directed mutagenesis in the active site of the catalytic domain. Toxicity was abolished in D535A and H538A variants of xenocin, which were expressed alone without an immunity domain and secreted in the culture supernatant through flagellar export. Secretion of xenocin through the flagellar pathway has important implications in the evolutionary success of X. nematophila. PMID:23335409

  1. Quorum sensing positively regulates flagellar motility in pathogenic Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Vibrios belonging to the Harveyi clade are among the major pathogens of aquatic organisms. Quorum sensing (QS) is essential for virulence of V. harveyi towards different hosts. However, most virulence factors reported to be controlled by QS to date are negatively regulated by QS, therefore suggesting that their impact on virulence is limited. In this study, we report that QS positively regulates flagellar motility. We found that autoinducer synthase mutants showed significantly lower swimming motility than the wild type, and the swimming motility could be restored by adding synthetic signal molecules. Further, motility of a luxO mutant with inactive QS (LuxO D47E) was significantly lower than that of the wild type and of a luxO mutant with constitutively maximal QS activity (LuxO D47A). Furthermore, we found that the expression of flagellar genes (both early, middle and late genes) was significantly lower in the luxO mutant with inactive QS when compared with wild type and the luxO mutant with maximal QS activity. Motility assays and gene expression also revealed the involvement of the quorum-sensing master regulator LuxR in the QS regulation of motility. Finally, the motility inhibitor phenamil significantly decreased the virulence of V. harveyi towards gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae. PMID:24528485

  2. A chemotactic signaling surface on CheY defined by suppressors of flagellar switch mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Roman, S J; Meyers, M; Volz, K; Matsumura, P

    1992-01-01

    CheY is the response regulator protein that interacts with the flagellar switch apparatus to modulate flagellar rotation during chemotactic signaling. CheY can be phosphorylated and dephosphorylated in vitro, and evidence indicates that CheY-P is the activated form that induces clockwise flagellar rotation, resulting in a tumble in the cell's swimming pattern. The flagellar switch apparatus is a complex macromolecular structure composed of at least three gene products, FliG, FliM, and FliN. Genetic analysis of Escherichia coli has identified fliG and fliM as genes in which mutations occur that allele specifically suppress cheY mutations, indicating interactions among these gene products. We have generated a class of cheY mutations selected for dominant suppression of fliG mutations. Interestingly, these cheY mutations dominantly suppressed both fliG and fliM mutations; this is consistent with the idea that the CheY protein interacts with both switch gene products during signaling. Biochemical characterization of wild-type and suppressor CheY proteins did not reveal altered phosphorylation properties or evidence for phosphorylation-dependent CheY multimerization. These data indicate that suppressor CheY proteins are specifically altered in the ability to transduce chemotactic signals to the switch at some point subsequent to phosphorylation. Physical mapping of suppressor amino acid substitutions on the crystal structure of CheY revealed a high degree of spatial clustering, suggesting that this region of CheY is a signaling surface that transduces chemotactic signals to the switch. Images PMID:1400175

  3. The bacterial flagellar protein export apparatus processively transports flagellar proteins even with extremely infrequent ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Kinoshita, Miki; Aldridge, Phillip D.; Namba, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    For self-assembly of the bacterial flagellum, a specific protein export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) as the energy source to transport component proteins to the distal growing end. The export apparatus consists of a transmembrane PMF-driven export gate and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex composed of FliH, FliI and FliJ. The FliI6FliJ complex is structurally similar to the α3β3γ complex of FOF1-ATPase. FliJ allows the gate to efficiently utilize PMF to drive flagellar protein export but it remains unknown how. Here, we report the role of ATP hydrolysis by the FliI6FliJ complex. The export apparatus processively transported flagellar proteins to grow flagella even with extremely infrequent or no ATP hydrolysis by FliI mutation (E211D and E211Q, respectively). This indicates that the rate of ATP hydrolysis is not at all coupled with the export rate. Deletion of FliI residues 401 to 410 resulted in no flagellar formation although this FliI deletion mutant retained 40% of the ATPase activity, suggesting uncoupling between ATP hydrolysis and activation of the gate. We propose that infrequent ATP hydrolysis by the FliI6FliJ ring is sufficient for gate activation, allowing processive translocation of export substrates for efficient flagellar assembly. PMID:25531309

  4. Regulation of flagellar motility during biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Sarah B.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria swim in liquid or swarm over solid surfaces by synthesizing rotary flagella. The same bacteria that are motile also commonly form non-motile multicellular aggregates held together by an extracellular matrix called biofilms. Biofilms are an important part of the lifestyle of pathogenic bacteria and it is assumed that there is a motility-to-biofilm transition wherein the inhibition of motility promotes biofilm formation. The transition is largely inferred from regulatory mutants that reveal the opposite regulation of the two phenotypes. Here we review the regulation of motility during biofilm formation in Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Escherichia, and we conclude that the motility-to-biofilm transition, if necessary, likely involves two steps. In the short term, flagella are functionally regulated to either inhibit rotation or modulate the basal flagellar reversal frequency. Over the long term, flagellar gene transcription is inhibited and in the absence of de novo synthesis, flagella are likely diluted to extinction through growth. Both short term and long term control is likely important to the motility-to-biofilm transition to stabilize aggregates and optimize resource investment. We emphasize the newly discovered classes of flagellar functional regulators and speculate that others await discovery in the context of biofilm formation. PMID:23480406

  5. Reconstitution of flagellar sliding.

    PubMed

    Alper, Joshua; Geyer, Veikko; Mukundan, Vikram; Howard, Jonathon

    2013-01-01

    The motile structure within eukaryotic cilia and flagella is the axoneme. This structure typically consists of nine doublet microtubules arranged around a pair of singlet microtubules. The axoneme contains more than 650 different proteins that have structural, force-generating, and regulatory functions. Early studies on sea urchin sperm identified the force-generating components, the dynein motors. It was shown that dynein can slide adjacent doublet microtubules in the presence of ATP. How this sliding gives rise to the beating of the axoneme is still unknown. Reconstitution assays provide a clean system, free from cellular effects, to elucidate the underlying beating mechanisms. These assays can be used to identify the components that are both necessary and sufficient for the generation of flagellar beating. PMID:23498749

  6. Molecular Architecture of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The flagellum is one of the most sophisticated self-assembling molecular machines in bacteria. Powered by the proton-motive force, the flagellum rapidly rotates in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction, which ultimately controls bacterial motility and behavior. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica have served as important model systems for extensive genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of the flagellum, providing unparalleled insights into its structure, function, and gene regulation. Despite these advances, our understanding of flagellar assembly and rotational mechanisms remains incomplete, in part because of the limited structural information available regarding the intact rotor–stator complex and secretion apparatus. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) has become a valuable imaging technique capable of visualizing the intact flagellar motor in cells at molecular resolution. Because the resolution that can be achieved by cryo-ET with large bacteria (such as E. coli and S. enterica) is limited, analysis of small-diameter bacteria (including Borrelia burgdorferi and Campylobacter jejuni) can provide additional insights into the in situ structure of the flagellar motor and other cellular components. This review is focused on the application of cryo-ET, in combination with genetic and biophysical approaches, to the study of flagellar structures and its potential for improving the understanding of rotor–stator interactions, the rotational switching mechanism, and the secretion and assembly of flagellar components. PMID:24697492

  7. Insect Stage-Specific Receptor Adenylate Cyclases Are Localized to Distinct Subdomains of the Trypanosoma brucei Flagellar Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Saada, Edwin A.; Kabututu, Z. Pius; Lopez, Miguel; Shimogawa, Michelle M.; Langousis, Gerasimos; Oberholzer, Michael; Riestra, Angelica; Jonsson, Zophonias O.; Wohlschlegel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the Trypanosoma brucei flagellum (synonymous with cilium) plays important roles in host-parasite interactions. Several studies have identified virulence factors and signaling proteins in the flagellar membrane of bloodstream-stage T. brucei, but less is known about flagellar membrane proteins in procyclic, insect-stage parasites. Here we report on the identification of several receptor-type flagellar adenylate cyclases (ACs) that are specifically upregulated in procyclic T. brucei parasites. Identification of insect stage-specific ACs is novel, as previously studied ACs were constitutively expressed or confined to bloodstream-stage parasites. We show that procyclic stage-specific ACs are glycosylated, surface-exposed proteins that dimerize and possess catalytic activity. We used gene-specific tags to examine the distribution of individual AC isoforms. All ACs examined localized to the flagellum. Notably, however, while some ACs were distributed along the length of the flagellum, others specifically localized to the flagellum tip. These are the first transmembrane domain proteins to be localized specifically at the flagellum tip in T. brucei, emphasizing that the flagellum membrane is organized into specific subdomains. Deletion analysis reveals that C-terminal sequences are critical for targeting ACs to the flagellum, and sequence comparisons suggest that differential subflagellar localization might be specified by isoform-specific C termini. Our combined results suggest insect stage-specific roles for a subset of flagellar adenylate cyclases and support a microdomain model for flagellar cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling in T. brucei. In this model, cAMP production is compartmentalized through differential localization of individual ACs, thereby allowing diverse cellular responses to be controlled by a common signaling molecule. PMID:24879126

  8. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  9. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles.

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander M; Weig, Cornelius; Oswald, Peter; Frey, Erwin; Fischer, Peer; Liedl, Tim

    2016-02-10

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  10. Regulation of Flagellar Length in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nedra F.; Iyer, Janaki Kannan; Buchheim, Julie A.; Meek, William

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has two apically localized flagella that are maintained at an equal and appropriate length. Assembly and maintenance of flagella requires a microtubule-based transport system known as intraflagellar transport (IFT). During IFT, proteins destined for incorporation into or removal from a flagellum are carried along doublet microtubules via IFT particles. Regulation of IFT activity therefore is pivotal in determining the length of a flagellum. Reviewed is our current understanding of the role of IFT and signal transduction pathways in the regulation of flagellar length. PMID:18692148

  11. Step-Wise Loss of Bacterial Flagellar Torsion Confers Progressive Phagocytic Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Lovewell, Rustin R.; Collins, Ryan M.; Acker, Julie L.; O'Toole, George A.; Wargo, Matthew J.; Berwin, Brent

    2011-01-01

    Phagocytosis of bacteria by innate immune cells is a primary method of bacterial clearance during infection. However, the mechanisms by which the host cell recognizes bacteria and consequentially initiates phagocytosis are largely unclear. Previous studies of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa have indicated that bacterial flagella and flagellar motility play an important role in colonization of the host and, importantly, that loss of flagellar motility enables phagocytic evasion. Here we use molecular, cellular, and genetic methods to provide the first formal evidence that phagocytic cells recognize bacterial motility rather than flagella and initiate phagocytosis in response to this motility. We demonstrate that deletion of genes coding for the flagellar stator complex, which results in non-swimming bacteria that retain an initial flagellar structure, confers resistance to phagocytic binding and ingestion in several species of the gamma proteobacterial group of Gram-negative bacteria, indicative of a shared strategy for phagocytic evasion. Furthermore, we show for the first time that susceptibility to phagocytosis in swimming bacteria is proportional to mot gene function and, consequently, flagellar rotation since complementary genetically- and biochemically-modulated incremental decreases in flagellar motility result in corresponding and proportional phagocytic evasion. These findings identify that phagocytic cells respond to flagellar movement, which represents a novel mechanism for non-opsonized phagocytic recognition of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21949654

  12. Flagellar apparatus structure of choanoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Karpov, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    Phylum choanoflagellata is the nearest unicellular neighbor of metazoa at the phylogenetic tree. They are single celled or form the colonies, can be presented by naked cells or live in theca or lorica, but in all cases they have a flagellum surrounded by microvilli of the collar. They have rather uniform and peculiar flagellar apparatus structure with flagellar basal body (FB) producing a flagellum, and non-flagellar basal body (NFB) lying orthogonal to the FB. Long flagellar transition zone contains a unique structure among eukaryotes, the central filament, which connects central microtubules to the transversal plate. Both basal bodies are composed of triplets and interconnected with fibrillar bridge. They also contain the internal arc-shaped connectives between the triplets. The FB has prominent transitional fibers similar to those of chytrid zoospores and choanocytes of sponges, and a radial microtubular root system. The ring-shaped microtubule organizing center (MTOC) produces radial root microtubules, but in some species a MTOC is represented by separate foci. The NFB has a narrow fibrillar root directed towards the Golgi apparatus in association with membrane-bounded sac. Prior to cell division, the basal bodies replicate and migrate to poles of elongated nucleus. The basal bodies serve as MTOCs for the spindle microtubules during nuclear division by semiopen orthomitosis. PMID:27148446

  13. Studies on the mechanism of bacterial flagellar rotation and the flagellar number regulation.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Many motile bacteria have the motility organ, the flagellum. It rotates by the rotary motor driven by the ion-motive force and is embedded in the cell surface at the base of each flagellar filament. Many researchers have been studying its rotary mechanism for years, but most of the energy conversion processes have been remained in mystery. We focused on the flagellar stator, which works at the core process of energy conversion, and found that the periplasmic region of the stator changes its conformation to be activated only when the stator units are incorporated into the motor and anchored at the cell wall. Meanwhile, the physiologically important supramolecular complex is localized in the cell at the right place and the right time with a proper amount. How the cell achieves such a proper localization is the fundamental question for life science, and we undertake this problem by analyzing the mechanism for biogenesis of a single polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus. Here I describe the molecular mechanism of how the flagellum is generated at the specific place with a proper number, and also how the flagellar stator is incorporated into the motor to complete the functional motor assembly, based on our studies. PMID:27581279

  14. Structural diversity of bacterial flagellar motors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songye; Beeby, Morgan; Murphy, Gavin E; Leadbetter, Jared R; Hendrixson, David R; Briegel, Ariane; Li, Zhuo; Shi, Jian; Tocheva, Elitza I; Müller, Axel; Dobro, Megan J; Jensen, Grant J

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is one of nature's most amazing and well-studied nanomachines. Its cell-wall-anchored motor uses chemical energy to rotate a microns-long filament and propel the bacterium towards nutrients and away from toxins. While much is known about flagellar motors from certain model organisms, their diversity across the bacterial kingdom is less well characterized, allowing the occasional misrepresentation of the motor as an invariant, ideal machine. Here, we present an electron cryotomographical survey of flagellar motor architectures throughout the Bacteria. While a conserved structural core was observed in all 11 bacteria imaged, surprisingly novel and divergent structures as well as different symmetries were observed surrounding the core. Correlating the motor structures with the presence and absence of particular motor genes in each organism suggested the locations of five proteins involved in the export apparatus including FliI, whose position below the C-ring was confirmed by imaging a deletion strain. The combination of conserved and specially-adapted structures seen here sheds light on how this complex protein nanomachine has evolved to meet the needs of different species. PMID:21673657

  15. DksA and ppGpp Directly Regulate Transcription of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Justin J.; Durfee, Tim; Gourse, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    The components of the Escherichia coli flagella apparatus are synthesized in a three-level transcriptional cascade activated by the master regulator FlhDC. The cascade coordinates the synthesis rates of a large number of gene products with each other and with nutritional conditions. Recent genome-wide studies have reported that flagellar transcription is altered in cells lacking the transcription regulators DksA or ppGpp, but some or all reported effects could be indirect, and some are contradictory. We report here that the activities of promoters at all three levels of the cascade are much higher in strains lacking dksA, resulting in overproduction of flagellin and hyperflagellated cells. In vitro, DksA/ppGpp inhibits the flhDC promoter and the σ70-dependent fliA promoter transcribing the gene for σ28. However, DksA and ppGpp do not affect the σ28-dependent fliA promoter or the σ28-dependent fliC promoter in vitro, suggesting that the dramatic effects on expression of those genes in vivo are mediated indirectly through direct effects of DksA/ppGpp on FlhDC and σ28 expression. We conclude that DksA/ppGpp inhibits expression of the flagellar cascade during stationary phase and following starvation, thereby coordinating flagella and ribosome assembly and preventing expenditure of scarce energy resources on synthesis of two of the cell’s largest macromolecular complexes. PMID:19889089

  16. Transcriptional Analysis of the MrpJ Network: Modulation of Diverse Virulence-Associated Genes and Direct Regulation of mrp Fimbrial and flhDC Flagellar Operons in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Nadine J.; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence. PMID:25847961

  17. Transcriptional analysis of the MrpJ network: modulation of diverse virulence-associated genes and direct regulation of mrp fimbrial and flhDC flagellar operons in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Bode, Nadine J; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-06-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence. PMID:25847961

  18. Biochemical, immunological, metabolic, and molecular studies on flagellar development in Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Levasseur, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The emergent flagellum of Euglena gracilis arises from an anterior invagination of the organism and possesses, along with the typical eukaryotic axoneme, a glycoprotein surface layer, a complement of structurally complex mastigonemes and a paraxial rod. Nonionic detergent extraction of isolated flagella yielded a fraction containing 21% of the flagellar protein. This fraction contained at least 25 components. In vivo radiolabeling experiments indicated that Euglena possessed a pool of flagellar precursors. This was evidence by the observation that flagellar proteins radiolabeled during an initial regeneration could be mobilized to flagella of a subsequent regeneration. At least one component in the pool was present in sufficient quantity to support an entire regeneration. This protein was tentatively identified as a mastigonemal protein of M{sub r} {approximately} 220,000. A cDNA library was constructed to investigate flagellar gene expression in Euglena.

  19. RflM mediates target specificity of the RcsCDB phosphorelay system for transcriptional repression of flagellar synthesis in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Kühne, Caroline; Singer, Hanna M; Grabisch, Eva; Codutti, Luca; Carlomagno, Teresa; Scrima, Andrea; Erhardt, Marc

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial flagellum enables directed movement of Salmonella enterica towards favorable conditions in liquid environments. Regulation of flagellar synthesis is tightly controlled by various environmental signals at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The flagellar master regulator FlhD4 C2 resides on top of the flagellar transcriptional hierarchy and is under autogenous control by FlhD4 C2 -dependent activation of the repressor rflM. The inhibitory activity of RflM depends on the presence of RcsB, the response regulator of the RcsCDB phosphorelay system. In this study, we elucidated the molecular mechanism of RflM-dependent repression of flhDC. We show that RcsB and RflM form a heterodimer that coordinately represses flhDC transcription independent of RcsB phosphorylation. RcsB-RflM complex binds to a RcsB box downstream the P1 transcriptional start site of the flhDC promoter with increased affinity compared to RcsB in the absence of RflM. We propose that RflM stabilizes binding of unphosphorylated RcsB to the flhDC promoter in absence of environmental cues. Thus, RflM is a novel auxiliary regulatory protein that mediates target specificity of RcsB for flhDC repression. The cooperative action of the RcsB-RflM repressor complex allows Salmonella to fine-tune initiation of flagellar gene expression and adds another level to the complex regulation of flagellar synthesis. PMID:27206164

  20. Motility and Flagellar Glycosylation in Clostridium difficile▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Twine, Susan M.; Reid, Christopher W.; Aubry, Annie; McMullin, David R.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Austin, John; Logan, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, intact flagellin proteins were purified from strains of Clostridium difficile and analyzed using quadrupole time of flight and linear ion trap mass spectrometers. Top-down studies showed the flagellin proteins to have a mass greater than that predicted from the corresponding gene sequence. These top-down studies revealed marker ions characteristic of glycan modifications. Additionally, diversity in the observed masses of glycan modifications was seen between strains. Electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry was used to demonstrate that the glycan was attached to the flagellin protein backbone in O linkage via a HexNAc residue in all strains examined. Bioinformatic analysis of C. difficile genomes revealed diversity with respect to glycan biosynthesis gene content within the flagellar biosynthesis locus, likely reflected by the observed flagellar glycan diversity. In C. difficile strain 630, insertional inactivation of a glycosyltransferase gene (CD0240) present in all sequenced genomes resulted in an inability to produce flagellar filaments at the cell surface and only minor amounts of unmodified flagellin protein. PMID:19749038

  1. Flagellar Cap Protein FliD Mediates Adherence of Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to Enterocyte Microvilli.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Suely C F; Luiz, Wilson B; Vieira, Mônica A M; Ferreira, Rita C C; Garcia, Bruna G; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Sampaio, Jorge L M; Ferreira, Luís C S; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2016-04-01

    The expression of flagella correlates with different aspects of bacterial pathogenicity, ranging from adherence to host cells to activation of inflammatory responses by the innate immune system. In the present study, we investigated the role of flagella in the adherence of an atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strain (serotype O51:H40) to human enterocytes. Accordingly, isogenic mutants deficient in flagellin (FliC), the flagellar structural subunit; the flagellar cap protein (FliD); or the MotAB proteins, involved in the control of flagellar motion, were generated and tested for binding to differentiated Caco-2 cells. Binding of the aEPEC strain to enterocytes was significantly impaired in strains with the fliCa nd fliD genes deleted, both of which could not form flagella on the bacterial surface. A nonmotile but flagellated MotAB mutant also showed impaired adhesion to Caco-2 cells. In accordance with these observations, adhesion of a EPEC strain 1711-4 to Caco-2 cells was drastically reduced after the treatment of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD. In addition, incubation of a EPEC bacteria with specific anti-FliD serum impaired binding to Caco-2 cells. Finally, incubation of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD, followed by immunolabeling, showed that the protein was specifically bound to the microvillus tips of differentiated Caco-2 cells. The a EPEC FliD or anti-FliD serum also reduced the adherence of prototype typical enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic, and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains to Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings further strengthened the role of flagella in the adherence of a EPEC to human enterocytes and disclosed the relevant structural and functional involvement of FliD in the adhesion process. PMID:26831466

  2. Xylan-Degrading Catalytic Flagellar Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ágnes; Szabó, Veronika; Kovács, Mátyás; Patkó, Dániel; Tóth, Balázs; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    Flagellin, the main component of flagellar filaments, is a protein possessing polymerization ability. In this work, a novel fusion construct of xylanase A from B. subtilis and Salmonella flagellin was created which is applicable to build xylan-degrading catalytic nanorods of high stability. The FliC-XynA chimera when overexpressed in a flagellin deficient Salmonella host strain was secreted into the culture medium by the flagellum-specific export machinery allowing easy purification. Filamentous assemblies displaying high surface density of catalytic sites were produced by ammonium sulfate-induced polymerization. FliC-XynA nanorods were resistant to proteolytic degradation and preserved their enzymatic activity for a long period of time. Furnishing enzymes with self-assembling ability to build catalytic nanorods offers a promising alternative approach to enzyme immobilization onto nanostructured synthetic scaffolds. PMID:25966869

  3. Alternative flagellar filament types in the haloarchaeon Haloarcula marismortui.

    PubMed

    Pyatibratov, Michael G; Beznosov, Sergey N; Rachel, Reinhard; Tiktopulo, Elizabeth I; Surin, Alexei K; Syutkin, Alexei S; Fedorov, Oleg V

    2008-10-01

    Many Archaea use rotation of helical flagellar filaments for swimming motility. We isolated and characterized the flagellar filaments of Haloarcula marismortui, an archaeal species previously considered to be nonmotile. Two Haloarcula marismortui phenotypes were discriminated--their filaments are composed predominantly of either FlaB or FlaA2 flagellin, and the corresponding genes are located on different replicons. FlaB and FlaA2 filaments differ in antigenicity and thermostability. FlaA2 filaments are distinctly thicker (20-22 nm) than FlaB filaments (16-18 nm). The observed filaments are nearly twice as thick as those of other characterized euryarchaeal filaments. The results suggest that the helicity of Haloarcula marismortui filaments is provided by a mechanism different from that in the related haloarchaeon Halobacterium salinarum, where 2 different flagellin molecules present in comparable quantities are required to form a helical filament. PMID:18923552

  4. Reduced Protein Synthesis Fidelity Inhibits Flagellar Biosynthesis and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongqiang; Evans, Christopher R.; Ling, Jiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Accurate translation of the genetic information from DNA to protein is maintained by multiple quality control steps from bacteria to mammals. Genetic and environmental alterations have been shown to compromise translational quality control and reduce fidelity during protein synthesis. The physiological impact of increased translational errors is not fully understood. While generally considered harmful, translational errors have recently been shown to benefit cells under certain stress conditions. In this work, we describe a novel regulatory pathway in which reduced translational fidelity downregulates expression of flagellar genes and suppresses bacterial motility. Electron microscopy imaging shows that the error-prone Escherichia coli strain lacks mature flagella. Further genetic analyses reveal that translational errors upregulate expression of a small RNA DsrA through enhancing its transcription, and deleting DsrA from the error-prone strain restores motility. DsrA regulates expression of H-NS and RpoS, both of which regulate flagellar genes. We demonstrate that an increased level of DsrA in the error-prone strain suppresses motility through the H-NS pathway. Our work suggests that bacteria are capable of switching on and off the flagellar system by altering translational fidelity, which may serve as a previously unknown mechanism to improve fitness in response to environmental cues. PMID:27468805

  5. Flagellar flows around bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauparas, Justas; Lauga, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Flagellated bacteria on nutrient-rich substrates can differentiate into a swarming state and move in dense swarms across surfaces. A recent experiment measured the flow in the fluid around an Escherichia coli swarm [Wu, Hosu, and Berg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 4147 (2011)], 10.1073/pnas.1016693108. A systematic chiral flow was observed in the clockwise direction (when viewed from above) ahead of the swarm with flow speeds of about 10 μ m /s , about 3 times greater than the radial velocity at the edge of the swarm. The working hypothesis is that this flow is due to the action of cells stalled at the edge of a colony that extend their flagellar filaments outward, moving fluid over the virgin agar. In this work we quantitatively test this hypothesis. We first build an analytical model of the flow induced by a single flagellum in a thin film and then use the model, and its extension to multiple flagella, to compare with experimental measurements. The results we obtain are in agreement with the flagellar hypothesis. The model provides further quantitative insight into the flagella orientations and their spatial distributions as well as the tangential speed profile. In particular, the model suggests that flagella are on average pointing radially out of the swarm and are not wrapped tangentially.

  6. Genetic Diversity of the fliC Genes Encoding the Flagellar Antigen H19 of Escherichia coli and Application to the Specific Identification of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli O121:H19

    PubMed Central

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O121:H19 belong to a specific clonal type distinct from other classical EHEC and major enteropathogenic E. coli groups and is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. Sequencing of the fliC genes associated with the flagellar antigen H19 (fliCH19) revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH19 gene sequences in E. coli. A cluster analysis of 12 fliCH19 sequences, 4 from O121 and 8 from non-O121 E. coli strains, revealed five different genotypes. All O121:H19 strains fell into one cluster, whereas a second cluster was formed by five non-O121:H19 strains. Cluster 1 and cluster 2 strains differ by 27 single nucleotide exchanges in their fliCH19 genes (98.5% homology). Based on allele discrimination of the fliCH19 genes, a real-time PCR test was designed for specific identification of EHEC O121:H19. The O121 fliCH19 PCR tested negative in 73 E. coli H19 strains that belonged to serogroups other than O121, including 28 different O groups, O-nontypeable H19, and O-rough:H19 strains. The O121 fliCH19 PCR reacted with all 16 tested O121:H19 strains and 1 O-rough:H19 strain which was positive for the O121 wzx gene. A cross-reaction was observed only with E. coli H32 strains which share sequence similarities in the target region of the O121 fliCH19 PCR. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O121 wzx) and the detection of O121 fliCH19 allele type contributes to improving the identification and molecular serotyping of EHEC O121:H19 motile and nonmotile strains and variants of these strains lacking stx genes. PMID:25862232

  7. Approaches for functional analysis of flagellar proteins in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Oberholzer, Michael; Lopez, Miguel A.; Ralston, Katherine S.; Hill, Kent L.

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum is a highly conserved organelle serving motility, sensory and transport functions. Although genetic, genomic and proteomic studies have led to the identification of hundreds of flagellar and putative flagellar proteins, precisely how these proteins function individually and collectively to drive flagellum motility and other functions remains to be determined. In this chapter we provide an overview of tools and approaches available for studying flagellum protein function in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. We begin by outlining techniques for in vitro cultivation of both T. brucei lifecycle stages, as well as transfection protocols for the delivery of DNA constructs. We then describe specific assays used to assess flagellum function including flagellum preparation and quantitative motility assays. We conclude the chapter with a description of molecular genetic approaches for manipulating gene function. In summary, the availability of potent molecular tools, as well as the health and economic relevance of T. brucei as a pathogen, combine to make the parasite an attractive and integral experimental system for the functional analysis of flagellar proteins. PMID:20409810

  8. Incomplete flagellar structures in nonflagellate mutants of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Iino, T; Horiguchi, T; Yamaguchi, S

    1978-01-01

    Incomplete flagellar structures were detected in osmotically shocked cells or membrane-associated fraction of many nonflagellate mutants of Salmonella typhimurium by electron microscopy. The predominant types of these structures in the mutants were cistron specific. The incomplete basal bodies were detected in flaFI, flaFIV, flaFVIII, and flaFIX mutants, the structure homologous to a basal body in flaFV mutants, the polyhook-basal body complex in flaR mutants, and the hook-basal body complex in flaL and flaU mutants. No structures homologous to flagellar bases or their parts were detected in the early-fla group nonflagellate mutants of flaAI, flaAII, flaAIII, flaB, flaC, flaD, flaE, flaFII, flaFIII, flaFVI, flaFVII, flaFX, flaK, and flaM. From these observations, a process of flagellar morphogenesis was postulated. The functions of the early-fla group are essential to the formation of S ring-M ring-rod complexes bound to the membrane. The completion of basal bodies requires succeeding functions of flaFI, flaFIV, flaFVIII, and flaFIX. Next, the formation of hooks attached to basal bodies proceeds by the function of flaFV and by flaR, which controls the hook length. Flagellar filaments appear at the tips of hooks because of the functions of flaL, flaU, and flagellin genes. Images PMID:342514

  9. Sequence Variations in the Flagellar Antigen Genes fliCH25 and fliCH28 of Escherichia coli and Their Use in Identification and Characterization of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O145:H25 and O145:H28

    PubMed Central

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) serogroup O145 is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. EHEC O145 encompasses motile and non-motile strains of serotypes O145:H25 and O145:H28. Sequencing the fliC-genes associated with the flagellar antigens H25 and H28 revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH25 and fliCH28 gene sequences in E. coli. Based on allele discrimination of these fliC-genes real-time PCR tests were designed for identification of EHEC O145:H25 and O145:H28. The fliCH25 genes present in O145:H25 were found to be very similar to those present in E. coli serogroups O2, O100, O165, O172 and O177 pointing to their common evolution but were different from fliCH25 genes of a multiple number of other E. coli serotypes. In a similar way, EHEC O145:H28 harbor a characteristic fliCH28 allele which, apart from EHEC O145:H28, was only found in enteropathogenic (EPEC) O28:H28 strains that shared some common traits with EHEC O145:H28. The real time PCR-assays targeting these fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] alleles allow better characterization of EHEC O145:H25 and EHEC O145:H28. Evaluation of these PCR assays in spiked ready-to eat salad samples resulted in specific detection of both types of EHEC O145 strains even when low spiking levels of 1–10 cfu/g were used. Furthermore these PCR assays allowed identification of non-motile E. coli strains which are serologically not typable for their H-antigens. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O145wzy) and detection of the respective fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] allele types contributes to improve identification and molecular serotyping of E. coli O145 isolates. PMID:26000885

  10. The role of the Kinesin-13 family protein TbKif13-2 in flagellar length control of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kuan Yoow; Ersfeld, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    TbKif13-2, a member of the microtubule-depolymerising Kinesin-13 family was localised at the tip of the flagellum in Trypanosoma brucei. Its predicted activity suggested a role in the regulation of axonemal length. However, using gene deletion and overexpression of TbKif13-2 we show that, in procyclic T. brucei, this kinesin has only a very limited effect on flagellar length. Gene deletion resulted in no significant elongation of the flagellum and overexpression only slightly decreased flagellar length and the rate of growth of a new flagellum during cell division. This is in contrast to studies in Leishmania major, where overexpression of the TbKif13-2 homologue resulted in a significant length reduction of the flagellum. Knockout of TbKif13-2 has, however, an effect on the initial growth of the emerging new flagellum. In conclusion, we show that TbKif13-2 has only a marginal impact on flagellar length in T. brucei. PMID:20728476

  11. Transcriptional regulation of coordinate changes in flagellar mRNAs during differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amoebae into flagellates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Walsh, C.J.

    1988-06-01

    The nuclear run-on technique was used to measure the rate of transcription of flagellar genes during the differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amebae into flagellates. Synthesis of mRNAs for the axonemal proteins ..cap alpha..- and BETA-tubulin and flagellar calmodulin, as well as a coordinately regulated poly(A)/sup +/ RNA that codes for an unidentified protein, showed transient increases averaging 22-fold. The rate of synthesis of two poly(A)/sup +/ RNAs common to ameobae and flagellates was low until the transcription of the flagellar genes began to decline, at which time synthesis of the RNAs found in ameobae increased 3- to 10-fold. The observed changes in the rate of transcription can account quantitatively for the 20-fold increase in flagellar mRNA concentration during the differentiation. The data for the flagellar calmodulin gene demonstrate transcriptional regulation for a nontubulin axonemal protein. The data also demonstrate at least two programs of transcriptional regulation during the differentiation and raise the intriguing possibility that some significant fraction of the nearly 200 different proteins of the flagellar axoneme is transcriptionally regulated during the 1 h it takes N. gruberi amebae to form visible flagella.

  12. Modulation of toxin production by the flagellar regulon in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Annie; Hussack, Greg; Chen, Wangxue; KuoLee, Rhonda; Twine, Susan M; Fulton, Kelly M; Foote, Simon; Carrillo, Catherine D; Tanha, Jamshid; Logan, Susan M

    2012-10-01

    We show in this study that toxin production in Clostridium difficile is altered in cells which can no longer form flagellar filaments. The impact of inactivation of fliC, CD0240, fliF, fliG, fliM, and flhB-fliR flagellar genes upon toxin levels in culture supernatants was assessed using cell-based cytotoxicity assay, proteomics, immunoassay, and immunoblotting approaches. Each of these showed that toxin levels in supernatants were significantly increased in a fliC mutant compared to that in the C. difficile 630 parent strain. In contrast, the toxin levels in supernatants secreted from other flagellar mutants were significantly reduced compared with that in the parental C. difficile 630 strain. Transcriptional analysis of the pathogenicity locus genes (tcdR, tcdB, tcdE, and tcdA) revealed a significant increase of all four genes in the fliC mutant strain, while transcription of all four genes was significantly reduced in fliM, fliF, fliG, and flhB-fliR mutants. These results demonstrate that toxin transcription in C. difficile is modulated by the flagellar regulon. More significantly, mutant strains showed a corresponding change in virulence compared to the 630 parent strain when tested in a hamster model of C. difficile infection. This is the first demonstration of differential flagellum-related transcriptional regulation of toxin production in C. difficile and provides evidence for elaborate regulatory networks for virulence genes in C. difficile. PMID:22851750

  13. Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirody, Jasmine; Berry, Richard; Oster, George

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) drives swimming in a wide variety of bacterial species, making it crucial for several fundamental biological processes including chemotaxis and community formation. Recent experiments have shown that the structure of this nanomachine is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating units (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding invalidates the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. Here, we put forward a model for the torque generation mechanism of this motor and propose that the maximum speed of the motor increases as additional torque-generators are recruited. This is contrary to the current widely-held belief that there is a universal upper limit to the speed of the BFM. Our result arises from the assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence and consolidate our predictions with arguments that a processive motor must have a high duty ratio at high loads.

  14. Energy source of flagellar type III secretion.

    PubMed

    Paul, Koushik; Erhardt, Marc; Hirano, Takanori; Blair, David F; Hughes, Kelly T

    2008-01-24

    Bacterial flagella contain a specialized secretion apparatus that functions to deliver the protein subunits that form the filament and other structures to outside the membrane. This apparatus is related to the injectisome used by many gram-negative pathogens and symbionts to transfer effector proteins into host cells; in both systems this export mechanism is termed 'type III' secretion. The flagellar secretion apparatus comprises a membrane-embedded complex of about five proteins, and soluble factors, which include export-dedicated chaperones and an ATPase, FliI, that was thought to provide the energy for export. Here we show that flagellar secretion in Salmonella enterica requires the proton motive force (PMF) and does not require ATP hydrolysis by FliI. The export of several flagellar export substrates was prevented by treatment with the protonophore CCCP, with no accompanying decrease in cellular ATP levels. Weak swarming motility and rare flagella were observed in a mutant deleted for FliI and for the non-flagellar type-III secretion ATPases InvJ and SsaN. These findings show that the flagellar secretion apparatus functions as a proton-driven protein exporter and that ATP hydrolysis is not essential for type III secretion. PMID:18216859

  15. Listeria monocytogenes DNA glycosylase AdiP affects flagellar motility, biofilm formation, virulence, and stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is struct...

  16. Isolation and characterization of flagellar filaments from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    Isolated flagellar filaments from the type strain of Bacillus cereus, ATCC 14579, were shown to consist of 34, 32 and 31 kDa proteins in similar proportions as judged by band intensities on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of these three proteins of strain ATCC 14579 were identical with the deduced sequences of three flagellin genes BC1657, BC1658 and BC1659 in the whole genome sequence. Strain ATCC 14579 was classified into serotype T2 by a flagellar serotyping scheme for B. cereus strains that are untypeable into known flagellar serotypes H1 to H23. Flagellar filaments from a reference strain of serotype T2 contained two protein bands at 34 and 32 kDa, but a single protein band at 39 kDa was detected in flagellar filaments of a reference strain of serotype H1. Two murine monoclonal antibodies, 1A5 and 2A5, which recognize both the 34 and 32 kDa flagellins and a single flagellin of 32 kDa, respectively, were specifically reactive with B. cereus strains ATCC 14579 and serotype T2 in whole-cell ELISA and bacterial motility inhibition tests. In immunoelectron microscopy with monoclonal antibodies 1A5 and 2A5, colloidal gold spheres were shown to localize almost evenly over the entire part of flagellar filaments. Since strain ATCC 14579, and presumably strain serotype T2, are unusual among B. cereus strains in possessing multiple genes that encode flagellin subunits, a possible unique mechanism may contribute to assembly of multiple flagellin subunits into the filament over its entire length. PMID:25227778

  17. Identification of a 35-kilodalton serovar-cross-reactive flagellar protein, FlaB, from Leptospira interrogans by N-terminal sequencing, gene cloning, and sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, M; Surujballi, O; Nielsen, K; Nadin-Davis, S; Randall, G

    1997-01-01

    During the screening of antibodies to pathogenic leptospires, a murine monoclonal antibody (designated M138) was found to react with various serovars. An antigen of approximately 35 kDa from Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona, which reacted strongly with M138, was characterized by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and identified as a flagellin, a class B polypeptide subunit (FlaB) of the periplasmic flagella. The gene encoding the FlaB protein, flaB, was amplified from the genomic DNA of several pathogenic serovars by PCR with a single pair of oligonucleotide primers, suggesting that FlaB is highly conserved among these serovars. Cloning and sequence analysis of flaB from serovar pomona revealed that it contains an 849-bp open reading frame with a G + C content of 46.88% which encodes a 283-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 31.297 kDa and a predicted pI of 9.065. A sequence comparison of flagellin proteins revealed that the amino acid sequence is most variable in the central portion of the serovar pomona FlaB, which is believed to contain specific sequence information and which may thus be useful in the design of DNA or synthetic peptide probes suitable for the detection of infection with pathogenic leptospires. PMID:9317049

  18. Flagellar waveform analysis of swimming algal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtuldu, Huseyin; Johnson, Karl; Gollub, Jerry

    2011-11-01

    The twin flagella of the green alga Chlamydomas reinhardtii are driven by dynein molecular motors to oscillate at about 50-60 Hz in a breaststroke motion. For decades, Chlamydomas has been used as a model organism for studies of flagellar motility, and of genetic disorders of ciliary motion. However, little is known experimentally about the flagellar waveforms, and the resulting time-dependent force distribution along the 250 nm diameter flagella. Here, we study flagellar dynamics experimentally by confining cells in quasi-2D liquid films. From simultaneous measurements of the cell body velocity and the time-dependent velocities along the center lines of the two flagella, we determine the drag coefficients, and estimate the power expended by the body and the flagella, comparing our findings with measurements based on the induced fluid flow field. We contrast the results for the quite different beating patterns of synchronous and asynchronous flagella, respectively. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-0803153.

  19. Rhythmicity, recurrence, and recovery of flagellar beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats with apparently unfailing periodicity, yet responds rapidly to stimuli. Like the human heartbeat, flagellar oscillations are now known to be noisy. Using the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we explore three aspects of nonuniform flagellar beating. We report the existence of rhythmicity, waveform noise peaking at transitions between power and recovery strokes, and fluctuations of interbeat intervals that are correlated and even recurrent, with memory extending to hundreds of beats. These features are altered qualitatively by physiological perturbations. Further, we quantify the recovery of periodic breaststroke beating from transient hydrodynamic forcing. These results will help constrain microscopic theories on the origins and regulation of flagellar beating. Financial support is acknowledged from the EPSRC, ERC Advanced Investigator Grant No. 247333, and a Senior Investigator Award from the Wellcome Trust.

  20. Hydrodynamic interaction of bacterial flagella - flagellar bundling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sookkyung

    2013-11-01

    Flagellar bundling is an important aspect of locomotion in bacteria such as Escherichia coli. To study the hydrodynamic behavior of helical flagella, we present a computational model that is based on the geometry of the bacterial flagellar filament at the micrometer scale. We consider two model flagella, each of which has a rotary motor at its base with the rotation rate of the motor set at 100 Hz. Bundling occurs when both flagella are left-handed helices turning counterclockwise (when viewed from the nonmotor end of the flagellum looking back toward the motor) or when both flagella are right-handed helices turning clockwise. Helical flagella of the other combinations of handedness and rotation direction do not bundle. In this work we use the generalized immersed boundary method combined with the unconstrained Kirchhoff rod theory, which allows us to study the complicated hydrodynamics of flagellar behavior. This is a joint work with Charlie Peskin at NYU. NSF

  1. Mesoscopic modeling of bacterial flagellar microhydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gebremichael, Yeshitila; Ayton, Gary S; Voth, Gregory A

    2006-11-15

    A particle-based hybrid method of elastic network model and smooth-particle hydrodynamics has been employed to describe the propulsion of bacterial flagella in a viscous hydrodynamic environment. The method explicitly models the two aspects of bacterial propulsion that involve flagellar flexibility and long-range hydrodynamic interaction of low-Reynolds-number flow. The model further incorporates the molecular organization of the flagellar filament at a coarse-grained level in terms of the 11 protofilaments. Each of these protofilaments is represented by a collection of material points that represent the flagellin proteins. A computational model of a single flexible helical segment representing the filament of a bacterial flagellum is presented. The propulsive dynamics and the flow fields generated by the motion of the model filament are examined. The nature of flagellar deformation and the influence of hydrodynamics in determining the shape of deformations are examined based on the helical filament. PMID:16935949

  2. Flagellar region 3b supports strong expression of integrated DNA and the highest chromosomal integration efficiency of the Escherichia coli flagellar regions

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli is routinely used as the chassis for a variety of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Identification and analysis of reliable chromosomal integration and expression target loci is crucial for E. coli engineering. Chromosomal loci differ significantly in their ability to support integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuits. In this study, we investigate E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions 2 and 3b. Integration of the genetic circuit into seven and nine highly conserved genes of the flagellar regions 2 (motA, motB, flhD, flhE, cheW, cheY and cheZ) and 3b (fliE, F, G, J, K, L, M, P, R), respectively, showed significant variation in their ability to support chromosomal integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuit. While not reducing the growth of the engineered strains, the integrations into all 16 target sites led to the loss of motility. In addition to high expression, the flagellar region 3b supports the highest efficiency of integration of all E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions and is therefore potentially the most suitable for the integration of synthetic genetic circuits. PMID:26074421

  3. Sodium-driven energy conversion for flagellar rotation of the earliest divergent hyperthermophilic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Takekawa, Norihiro; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kaneseki, Tsuyoshi; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a hyperthermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing and carbon-fixing bacterium that can grow at temperatures up to 95 °C. A. aeolicus has an almost complete set of flagellar genes that are conserved in bacteria. Here we observed that A. aeolicus has polar flagellum and can swim with a speed of 90 μm s−1 at 85 °C. We expressed the A. aeolicus mot genes (motA and motB), which encode the torque generating stator proteins of the flagellar motor, in a corresponding mot nonmotile mutant of Escherichia coli. Its motility was slightly recovered by expression of A. aeolicus MotA and chimeric MotB whose periplasmic region was replaced with that of E. coli. A point mutation in the A. aeolicus MotA cytoplasmic region remarkably enhanced the motility. Using this system in E. coli, we demonstrate that the A. aeolicus motor is driven by Na+. As motor proteins from hyperthermophilic bacteria represent the earliest motor proteins in evolution, this study strongly suggests that ancient bacteria used Na+ for energy coupling of the flagellar motor. The Na+-driven flagellar genes might have been laterally transferred from early-branched bacteria into late-branched bacteria and the interaction surfaces of the stator and rotor seem not to change in evolution. PMID:26244427

  4. Sodium-driven energy conversion for flagellar rotation of the earliest divergent hyperthermophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Takekawa, Norihiro; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kaneseki, Tsuyoshi; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a hyperthermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing and carbon-fixing bacterium that can grow at temperatures up to 95 °C. A. aeolicus has an almost complete set of flagellar genes that are conserved in bacteria. Here we observed that A. aeolicus has polar flagellum and can swim with a speed of 90 μm s(-1) at 85 °C. We expressed the A. aeolicus mot genes (motA and motB), which encode the torque generating stator proteins of the flagellar motor, in a corresponding mot nonmotile mutant of Escherichia coli. Its motility was slightly recovered by expression of A. aeolicus MotA and chimeric MotB whose periplasmic region was replaced with that of E. coli. A point mutation in the A. aeolicus MotA cytoplasmic region remarkably enhanced the motility. Using this system in E. coli, we demonstrate that the A. aeolicus motor is driven by Na(+). As motor proteins from hyperthermophilic bacteria represent the earliest motor proteins in evolution, this study strongly suggests that ancient bacteria used Na(+) for energy coupling of the flagellar motor. The Na(+)-driven flagellar genes might have been laterally transferred from early-branched bacteria into late-branched bacteria and the interaction surfaces of the stator and rotor seem not to change in evolution. PMID:26244427

  5. Flagellar Glycosylation in Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis▿

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Andrew E.; Twine, Susan M.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Titball, Richard W.; Essex-Lopresti, Angela E.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Prior, Joann L.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylation of proteins is known to impart novel physical properties and biological roles to proteins from both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In this study, gel-based glycoproteomics were used to identify glycoproteins of the potential biothreat agent Burkholderia pseudomallei and the closely related but nonpathogenic B. thailandensis. Top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry (MS) analyses identified that the flagellin proteins of both species were posttranslationally modified by novel glycans. Analysis of proteins from two strains of each species demonstrated that B. pseudomallei flagellin proteins were modified with a glycan with a mass of 291 Da, while B. thailandensis flagellin protein was modified with related glycans with a mass of 300 or 342 Da. Structural characterization of the B. thailandensis carbohydrate moiety suggests that it is an acetylated hexuronic acid. In addition, we have identified through mutagenesis a gene from the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen biosynthetic cluster which is involved in flagellar glycosylation, and inactivation of this gene eliminates flagellar glycosylation and motility in B. pseudomallei. This is the first report to conclusively demonstrate the presence of a carbohydrate covalently linked to a protein in B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis, and it suggests new avenues to explore in order to examine the marked differences in virulence between these two species. PMID:21602339

  6. A novel non-homologous recombination-mediated mechanism for Escherichia coli unilateral flagellar phase variation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Hu, Bo; Zhou, Zhemin; Guo, Dan; Guo, Xi; Ding, Peng; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2012-05-01

    Flagella contribute to the virulence of bacteria through chemotaxis, adhesion to and invasion of host surfaces. Flagellar phase variation is believed to facilitate bacterial evasion of the host immune response. In this study, the flnA gene that encodes Escherichia coli H17 flagellin was examined by whole genome sequencing and genetic deletion analysis. Unilateral flagellar phase variation has been reported in E. coli H3, H47 and H17 strains, although the mechanism for phase variation in the H17 strain has not been previously understood. Analysis of phase variants indicated that the flagellar phase variation in the H17 strain was caused by the deletion of an ∼35 kb DNA region containing the flnA gene from diverse excision sites. The presence of covalently closed extrachromosomal circular forms of this excised 35 kb region was confirmed by the two-step polymerase chain reaction. The deletion and complementation test revealed that the Int1157 integrase, a tyrosine recombinase, mediates the excision of this region. Unlike most tyrosine recombinases, Int1157 is suggested to recognize diverse sites and mediate recombination between non-homologous DNA sequences. This is the first report of non-homologous recombination mediating flagellar phase variation. PMID:22287625

  7. Interacting Protein Kinases Involved in the Regulation of Flagellar Length

    PubMed Central

    Erdmann, Maja; Scholz, Anne; Melzer, Inga M.; Schmetz, Christel; Wiese, Martin

    2006-01-01

    A striking difference of the life stages of the protozoan parasite Leishmania is a long flagellum in the insect stage promastigotes and a rudimentary organelle in the mammalian amastigotes. LmxMKK, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase from Leishmania mexicana, is required for growth of a full-length flagellum. We identified LmxMPK3, a MAP kinase homologue, with a similar expression pattern as LmxMKK being not detectable in amastigotes, up-regulated during the differentiation to promastigotes, constantly expressed in promastigotes, and shut down during the differentiation to amastigotes. LmxMPK3 null mutants resemble the LmxMKK knockouts with flagella reduced to one-fifth of the wild-type length, stumpy cell bodies, and vesicles and membrane fragments in the flagellar pocket. A constitutively activated recombinant LmxMKK activates LmxMPK3 in vitro. Moreover, LmxMKK is likely to be directly involved in the phosphorylation of LmxMPK3 in vivo. Finally, LmxMPK3 is able to phosphorylate LmxMKK, indicating a possible feedback regulation. This is the first time that two interacting components of a signaling cascade have been described in the genus Leishmania. Moreover, we set the stage for the analysis of reversible phosphorylation in flagellar morphogenesis. PMID:16467378

  8. Torque-generating units of the bacterial flagellar motor step independently.

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, A D; Berg, H C

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the variance in rotation period of tethered cells as a function of mean rotation rate have shown that the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a stepping motor. Here, by measurement of the variance in rotation period as a function of the number of active torque-generating units, it is shown that each unit steps independently. PMID:8842231

  9. Protein turbines. I: The bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed Central

    Elston, T C; Oster, G

    1997-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is driven by a flux of ions between the cytoplasm and the periplasmic lumen. Here we show how an electrostatic mechanism can convert this ion flux into a rotary torque. We demonstrate that, with reasonable parameters, the model can reproduce many of the experimental measurements. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 p720-a PMID:9251788

  10. Flagellar Synchronization Independent of Hydrodynamic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Jülicher, Frank

    2012-09-01

    Inspired by the coordinated beating of the flagellar pair of the green algae Chlamydomonas, we study theoretically a simple, mirror-symmetric swimmer, which propels itself at low Reynolds number by a revolving motion of a pair of spheres. We show that perfect synchronization between these two driven spheres can occur due to the motion of the swimmer and local hydrodynamic friction forces. Hydrodynamic interactions, though crucial for net propulsion, contribute little to synchronization for this free-moving swimmer.

  11. Monitoring bacterial chemotaxis by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer: Absence of feedback from the flagellar motors

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Thomas S.; Delalez, Nicolas; Pichler, Klemens; Berg, Howard C.

    2006-01-01

    We looked for a feedback system in Escherichia coli that might sense the rotational bias of flagellar motors and regulate the activity of the chemotaxis receptor kinase. Our search was based on the assumption that any machinery that senses rotational bias will be perturbed if flagellar rotation stops. We monitored the activity of the kinase in swimming cells by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between Renilla luciferase fused to the phosphatase, CheZ, and yellow fluorescent protein fused to the response regulator, CheY. Then we jammed the flagellar motors by adding an antifilament antibody that crosslinks adjacent filaments in flagellar bundles. At steady state, the rate of phosphorylation of CheY is equal to the rate of dephosphorylation of CheY-P, which is proportional to the degree of association between CheZ and CheY-P, the quantity sensed by BRET. No changes were observed, even upon addition of an amount of antibody that stopped the swimming of >95% of cells within a few seconds. So, the kinase does not appear to be sensitive to motor output. The BRET technique is complementary to one based on FRET, described previously. Its reliability was confirmed by measurements of the response of cells to the addition of attractants. PMID:16452163

  12. Studies on flagellar shortening in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Cherniack, J.

    1985-01-01

    Flagellar shortening of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was promoted by sodium chloride, pyrophosphate (sodium, potassium and ammonium salts), EDTA and EGTA, succinate, citrate and oxalate (sodium salts), caffeine and aminophylline. Removal of calcium from the medium potentiated the effects of these agents in inducing shortening. Investigations of the release of phosphorylated compounds to the medium during pyrophosphate-induced flagellar shortening of cells pre-labelled with /sup 32/P, revealed an as yet unidentified /sup 32/P-labelled compound with distinct chromatographic properties. Chromatography and electrophoresis indicates that it is a small, highly polar molecule with a high charge to mass ratio, containing thermo- and acid-labile phosphate linkages. Investigations showed of the release of /sup 35/S-labelled protein to the medium from cells pre-labelled with /sup 35/S-sulfate showed that flagellated cells released two prominent polypeptides which comigrated with ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-flagellar tubulin on SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, while deflagellated cells did not.

  13. Self-Sustained Oscillatory Sliding Movement of Doublet Microtubules and Flagellar Bend Formation.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the basis for flagellar and ciliary movements is ATP-dependent sliding between adjacent doublet microtubules. However, the mechanism for converting microtubule sliding into flagellar and ciliary movements has long remained unresolved. The author has developed new sperm models that use bull spermatozoa divested of their plasma membrane and midpiece mitochondrial sheath by Triton X-100 and dithiothreitol. These models enable the observation of both the oscillatory sliding movement of activated doublet microtubules and flagellar bend formation in the presence of ATP. A long fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by synchronous sliding of the sperm flagella and a short fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by metachronal sliding exhibited spontaneous oscillatory movements and constructed a one beat cycle of flagellar bending by alternately actuating. The small sliding displacement generated by metachronal sliding formed helical bends, whereas the large displacement by synchronous sliding formed planar bends. Therefore, the resultant waveform is a half-funnel shape, which is similar to ciliary movements. PMID:26863204

  14. Self-Sustained Oscillatory Sliding Movement of Doublet Microtubules and Flagellar Bend Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ishijima, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the basis for flagellar and ciliary movements is ATP-dependent sliding between adjacent doublet microtubules. However, the mechanism for converting microtubule sliding into flagellar and ciliary movements has long remained unresolved. The author has developed new sperm models that use bull spermatozoa divested of their plasma membrane and midpiece mitochondrial sheath by Triton X-100 and dithiothreitol. These models enable the observation of both the oscillatory sliding movement of activated doublet microtubules and flagellar bend formation in the presence of ATP. A long fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by synchronous sliding of the sperm flagella and a short fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by metachronal sliding exhibited spontaneous oscillatory movements and constructed a one beat cycle of flagellar bending by alternately actuating. The small sliding displacement generated by metachronal sliding formed helical bends, whereas the large displacement by synchronous sliding formed planar bends. Therefore, the resultant waveform is a half-funnel shape, which is similar to ciliary movements. PMID:26863204

  15. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A; Porter, Mary E

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  16. Cross talk between type III secretion and flagellar assembly systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Soscia, Chantal; Hachani, Abderrahman; Bernadac, Alain; Filloux, Alain; Bleves, Sophie

    2007-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytotoxicity is linked to a type III secretion system (T3SS) that delivers effectors into the host cell. We show here that a negative cross-control exists between T3SS and flagellar assembly. We observed that, in a strain lacking flagella, T3SS gene expression, effector secretion, and cytotoxicity were increased. Conversely, we revealed that flagellar-gene expression and motility were decreased in a strain overproducing ExsA, the T3SS master regulator. Interestingly, a nonmotile strain lacking the flagellar filament (DeltafliC) presented a hyperefficient T3SS and a nonmotile strain assembling flagella (DeltamotAB) did not. More intriguingly, a strain lacking motCD genes is a flagellated strain with a slight defect in swimming. However, in this strain, T3SS gene expression was up-regulated. These results suggest that flagellar assembly and/or mobility antagonizes the T3SS and that a negative cross talk exists between these two systems. An illustration of this is the visualization by electron microscopy of T3SS needles in a nonmotile P. aeruginosa strain, needles which otherwise are not detected. The molecular basis of the cross talk is complex and remains to be elucidated, but proteins like MotCD might have a crucial role in signaling between the two processes. In addition, we found that the GacA response regulator negatively affects the T3SS. In a gacA mutant, the T3SS effector ExoS is hypersecreted. Strikingly, GacA was previously reported as a positive regulator for motility. Globally, our data document the idea that some virulence factors are coordinately but inversely regulated, depending on the bacterial colonization phase and infection types. PMID:17307856

  17. The Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirody, Jasmine A.; Berry, Richard M.; Oster, George

    2016-08-01

    Recent experiments on the bacterial flagellar motor have shown that the structure of this nanomachine, which drives locomotion in a wide range of bacterial species, is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating units (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding invalidates the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. Here, we propose that, contrary to previous assumptions, the maximum speed of the motor is not universal, but rather increases as additional torque-generators are recruited. This result arises from our assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence and consolidate our predictions with arguments that a processive motor must have a high duty ratio at high loads.

  18. The Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor.

    PubMed

    Nirody, Jasmine A; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

    2016-08-01

    Recent experiments on the bacterial flagellar motor have shown that the structure of this nanomachine, which drives locomotion in a wide range of bacterial species, is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating complexes (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding brings under scrutiny the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. In this study, we propose that, contrary to previous assumptions, the maximum speed of the motor increases as additional stators are recruited. This result arises from our assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence in chimeric motors, as well as with the requirement that a processive motor driving a large load via an elastic linkage must have a high duty ratio. PMID:27508439

  19. The Bacterial Flagellar Type III Export Gate Complex Is a Dual Fuel Engine That Can Use Both H+ and Na+ for Flagellar Protein Export

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Hara, Noritaka; Aldridge, Phillip D.; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) to transport flagellar proteins to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure for self-assembly. The transmembrane export gate complex is a H+–protein antiporter, of which activity is greatly augmented by an associated cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Here, we report that the export gate complex can use sodium motive force (SMF) in addition to PMF across the cytoplasmic membrane to drive protein export. Protein export was considerably reduced in the absence of the ATPase complex and a pH gradient across the membrane, but Na+ increased it dramatically. Phenamil, a blocker of Na+ translocation, inhibited protein export. Overexpression of FlhA increased the intracellular Na+ concentration in the presence of 100 mM NaCl but not in its absence, suggesting that FlhA acts as a Na+ channel. In wild-type cells, however, neither Na+ nor phenamil affected protein export, indicating that the Na+ channel activity of FlhA is suppressed by the ATPase complex. We propose that the export gate by itself is a dual fuel engine that uses both PMF and SMF for protein export and that the ATPase complex switches this dual fuel engine into a PMF-driven export machinery to become much more robust against environmental changes in external pH and Na+ concentration. PMID:26943926

  20. Genome sequence of Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans strain 4834-R reveals that flagellar motility is not a general feature of xanthomonads

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Xanthomonads are plant-associated bacteria responsible for diseases on economically important crops. Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans (Xff) is one of the causal agents of common bacterial blight of bean. In this study, the complete genome sequence of strain Xff 4834-R was determined and compared to other Xanthomonas genome sequences. Results Comparative genomics analyses revealed core characteristics shared between Xff 4834-R and other xanthomonads including chemotaxis elements, two-component systems, TonB-dependent transporters, secretion systems (from T1SS to T6SS) and multiple effectors. For instance a repertoire of 29 Type 3 Effectors (T3Es) with two Transcription Activator-Like Effectors was predicted. Mobile elements were associated with major modifications in the genome structure and gene content in comparison to other Xanthomonas genomes. Notably, a deletion of 33 kbp affects flagellum biosynthesis in Xff 4834-R. The presence of a complete flagellar cluster was assessed in a collection of more than 300 strains representing different species and pathovars of Xanthomonas. Five percent of the tested strains presented a deletion in the flagellar cluster and were non-motile. Moreover, half of the Xff strains isolated from the same epidemic than 4834-R was non-motile and this ratio was conserved in the strains colonizing the next bean seed generations. Conclusions This work describes the first genome of a Xanthomonas strain pathogenic on bean and reports the existence of non-motile xanthomonads belonging to different species and pathovars. Isolation of such Xff variants from a natural epidemic may suggest that flagellar motility is not a key function for in planta fitness. PMID:24195767

  1. Life with eight flagella: flagellar assembly and division in Giardia

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Scott C.; House, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances Flagellar movement in Giardia, a common intestinal parasitic protist, is critical to its survival in the host. Each axoneme is unique in possessing a long, cytoplasmic portion as well as a membrane-bound portion. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for the assembly of membrane-bound regions, yet the cytoplasmic regions may be assembled by IFT-independent mechanisms. Steady-state axoneme length is maintained by IFT and by intrinsic and active microtubule dynamics. Following mitosis and prior to their segregation, giardial flagella undergo a multigenerational division cycle in which the parental eight flagella migrate and reposition to different cellular locations; eight new flagella are assembled de novo. Each daughter cell thus inherits four mature and four newly synthesized flagella. PMID:20580308

  2. Function of FlhB, a membrane protein implicated in the bacterial flagellar type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A; Barker, Clive S; Kostyukova, Alla S; Samatey, Fadel A

    2013-01-01

    The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system, and it plays an active role in the regulation of protein export. In this study conserved properties of FlhB that are important for its function were investigated. Replacing the flhB gene (or part of the gene) in Salmonella typhimurium with the flhB gene of the distantly related bacterium Aquifex aeolicus greatly reduces motility. However, motility can be restored to some extent by spontaneous mutations in the part of flhB gene coding for the cytoplasmic domain of Aquifex FlhB. Structural analysis suggests that these mutations destabilize the structure. The secondary structure and stability of the mutated cytoplasmic fragments of FlhB have been studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results suggest that conformational flexibility could be important for FlhB function. An extragenic suppressor mutation in the fliS gene, which decreases the affinity of FliS to FliC, partially restores motility of the FlhB substitution mutants. PMID:23874605

  3. Flagellar motor based micro hybrid devices.

    PubMed

    Tung, S; Kim, J-W

    2004-01-01

    We are in the process of developing a series of micro hybrid devices based on tethered flagellar motors. Examples of the devices include a microfluidic pump and a micro AC dynamo. The microfluidic pump is realized through the tethering of a harmless strain of Escherichia coli cells to a MEMS based micro channel. Each E. coli cell is about 3 mum long and 1 mum in diameter, with several flagella that are driven at the base by molecular rotary motors. The operational principle of the micro pump is based on the viscous pumping effect where continuous rotation of the tethered cells forms a fluidic conveyor belt that 'drags' fluid from one end of the channel to the other. We used hydrodynamic loading to synchronize cell rotation in order to maximize the fluid pumping capability. The micro dynamo is realized through the integration of tethered flagellar motors with micro ferromagnetic beads and micro copper coils. The micro dynamo generates AC power by using the tethered cells to create a rotating magnetic field around the copper coils. Preliminary result indicates a high power density when compared to other biologically based micro power generators. PMID:17270806

  4. Flagellar synchronization through direct hydrodynamic interactions.

    PubMed

    Brumley, Douglas R; Wan, Kirsty Y; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01

    Flows generated by ensembles of flagella are crucial to development, motility and sensing, but the mechanisms behind this striking coordination remain unclear. We present novel experiments in which two micropipette-held somatic cells of Volvox carteri, with distinct intrinsic beating frequencies, are studied by high-speed imaging as a function of their separation and orientation. Analysis of time series shows that the interflagellar coupling, constrained by lack of connections between cells to be hydrodynamical, exhibits a spatial dependence consistent with theory. At close spacings it produces robust synchrony for thousands of beats, while at increasing separations synchrony is degraded by stochastic processes. Manipulation of the relative flagellar orientation reveals in-phase and antiphase states, consistent with dynamical theories. Flagellar tracking with exquisite precision reveals waveform changes that result from hydrodynamic coupling. This study proves unequivocally that flagella coupled solely through a fluid can achieve robust synchrony despite differences in their intrinsic properties.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02750.001. PMID:25073925

  5. Flagellar synchronization through direct hydrodynamic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brumley, Douglas R; Wan, Kirsty Y; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01

    Flows generated by ensembles of flagella are crucial to development, motility and sensing, but the mechanisms behind this striking coordination remain unclear. We present novel experiments in which two micropipette-held somatic cells of Volvox carteri, with distinct intrinsic beating frequencies, are studied by high-speed imaging as a function of their separation and orientation. Analysis of time series shows that the interflagellar coupling, constrained by lack of connections between cells to be hydrodynamical, exhibits a spatial dependence consistent with theory. At close spacings it produces robust synchrony for thousands of beats, while at increasing separations synchrony is degraded by stochastic processes. Manipulation of the relative flagellar orientation reveals in-phase and antiphase states, consistent with dynamical theories. Flagellar tracking with exquisite precision reveals waveform changes that result from hydrodynamic coupling. This study proves unequivocally that flagella coupled solely through a fluid can achieve robust synchrony despite differences in their intrinsic properties. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02750.001 PMID:25073925

  6. Complex spatial organization and flagellin composition of flagellar propeller from marine magnetotactic ovoid strain MO-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Jia; Santini, Claire-Lise; Bernadac, Alain; Ruan, Juanfang; Zhang, Sheng-Da; Kato, Takayuki; Li, Ying; Namba, Keiichi; Wu, Long-Fei

    2012-03-01

    Marine magnetotactic ovoid bacterium MO-1 is capable of swimming along the geomagnetic field lines by means of its two sheathed flagellar bundles at a speed up to 300 μm/s. In this study, by using electron microscopy, we showed that, in each bundle, six individual flagella were organized in hexagon with a seventh in the middle. We identified 12 flagellin paralogs and 2 putative flagellins in the genome of MO-1. Among them, 13 were tandemly located on an ~ 17-kb segment while the 14th was on a separated locus. Using reverse transcription PCR and quantitative PCR, we found that all the 14 flagellin or putative flagellin genes were transcribed and that 2 of them were more abundantly expressed than others. A nLC (nanoliquid chromatography)-ESI (electrospray ionization)-MS/MS (mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) mass spectrometry analysis identified all the 12 flagellin proteins in three glycosylated polypeptide bands resolved by one-dimensional denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 10 of them in 21 spots obtained by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis of flagellar extracts. Most spots contained more than one flagellin, and eight of the ten identified flagellins existed in multiple isoforms. Taken together, these results show unprecedented complexity in the spatial organization and flagellin composition of the flagellar propeller. Such architecture is observed only for ovoid-coccoid, bilophotrichously flagellated magnetotactic bacteria living in marine sediments, suggesting a species and environmental specificity. PMID:22245577

  7. Analysis of an engineered Salmonella flagellar fusion protein, FliR-FlhB.

    PubMed

    Van Arnam, John S; McMurry, Jonathan L; Kihara, May; Macnab, Robert M

    2004-04-01

    Salmonella FliR and FlhB are membrane proteins necessary for flagellar export. In Clostridium a fliR-flhB fusion gene exists. We constructed a similar Salmonella fusion gene which is able to complement fliR, flhB, and fliR flhB null strains. Western blotting revealed that the FliR-FlhB fusion protein retains the FlhB protein's cleavage properties. We conclude that the FliR and FlhB proteins are physically associated in the wild-type Salmonella basal body, probably in a 1:1 ratio. PMID:15060055

  8. Characterization of Escherichia coli Flagellar Mutants That are Insensitive to Catabolite Repression

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Michael; Simon, Melvin

    1974-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the synthesis of the flagellar organelle is sensitive to catabolite repression. Synthesis requires the presence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate receptor protein (Crp) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP); i.e., mutants that lack Crp or adenylcyclase (Cya) synthesize no flagella. We isolated and characterized a series of mutants (cfs) that restored flagella-forming ability in a Crp strain of E. coli. The mutations in these strains were transferred onto episomes and they were then introduced into a variety of other strains. The presence of the mutation resulted in flagella synthesis in Cya and Crp strains as well as in the wild type grown under conditions of catabolite repression. Deletion analysis and other genetic studies indicated that: (i) the cfs mutations had a dominant effect when they were in the transconfiguration in merodiploids: (ii) they occurred in or very close to the flaI gene: and (iii) their expression required the presence of an intact flaI gene adjacent to the cfs mutation. Biochemical studies showed that the synthesis of at least two flagellar polypeptides, the hook subunit and an amber fragment of flagellin, were absent in strains that carried a cya mutation. Their synthesis was depressed in strains grown under conditions of catabolite repression. The presence of the cfs mutation restored the specific synthesis of these two polypeptides. We suggest that the formation of the flaI gene product is the step in flagellar synthesis that is catabolite sensitive and requires cAMP. We propose a regulatory function for the product of the flaI gene. Images PMID:4373438

  9. Loss of the lac operon contributes to Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through derepression of flagellar synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lingyan; Ni, Zhiwei; Wang, Lei; Feng, Lu; Liu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella, a genus that is closely related to Escherichia coli, includes many pathogens of humans and other animals. A notable feature that distinguishes Salmonella from E. coli is lactose negativity, because the lac operon is lost in most Salmonella genomes. Here, we expressed the lac operon in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and compared the virulence of the Lac(+) strain to that of the wild-type strain in a murine model, invasion assays, and macrophage replication assays. We showed that the Lac(+) strain is attenuated in vivo and the attenuation of virulence is caused by its defect in epithelial cell invasion. However, the invasion-defective phenotype is unrelated to lactose utilization. Through sequencing and the comparison of the transcriptome profile between the Lac(+) and wild-type strains during invasion, we found that most flagellar genes were markedly downregulated in the Lac(+) strain, while other genes associated with invasion, such as the majority of genes encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1, were not differentially expressed. Moreover, we discovered that lacA is the major repressor of flagellar gene expression in the lac operon. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the lac operon decreases Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through repression of flagellar biosynthesis. As the ability to invade epithelial cells is a critical virulence determinant of Salmonella, our results provide important evidence that the loss of the lac operon contributes to the evolution of Salmonella pathogenicity. PMID:25362512

  10. Exchange of rotor components in functioning bacterial flagellar motor

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuoka, Hajime; Inoue, Yuichi; Terasawa, Shun; Takahashi, Hiroto; Ishijima, Akihiko

    2010-03-26

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a rotary motor driven by the electrochemical potential of a coupling ion. The interaction between a rotor and stator units is thought to generate torque. The overall structure of flagellar motor has been thought to be static, however, it was recently proved that stators are exchanged in a rotating motor. Understanding the dynamics of rotor components in functioning motor is important for the clarifying of working mechanism of bacterial flagellar motor. In this study, we focused on the dynamics and the turnover of rotor components in a functioning flagellar motor. Expression systems for GFP-FliN, FliM-GFP, and GFP-FliG were constructed, and each GFP-fusion was functionally incorporated into the flagellar motor. To investigate whether the rotor components are exchanged in a rotating motor, we performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. After photobleaching, in a tethered cell producing GFP-FliN or FliM-GFP, the recovery of fluorescence at the rotational center was observed. However, in a cell producing GFP-FliG, no recovery of fluorescence was observed. The transition phase of fluorescence intensity after full or partially photobleaching allowed the turnover of FliN subunits to be calculated as 0.0007 s{sup -1}, meaning that FliN would be exchanged in tens of minutes. These novel findings indicate that a bacterial flagellar motor is not a static structure even in functioning state. This is the first report for the exchange of rotor components in a functioning bacterial flagellar motor.

  11. Pseudomonas syringae Coordinates Production of a Motility-Enabling Surfactant with Flagellar Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Adrien Y.; Shimada, Briana K.; Mullin, Sean W. A.; Dunlap, Christopher A.; Bowman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Using a sensitive assay, we observed low levels of an unknown surfactant produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a that was not detected by traditional methods yet enabled swarming motility in a strain that exhibited deficient production of syringafactin, the main characterized surfactant produced by P. syringae. Random mutagenesis of the syringafactin-deficient strain revealed an acyltransferase with homology to rhlA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that was required for production of this unidentified surfactant, subsequently characterized by mass spectrometry as 3-(3-hydroxyalkanoyloxy) alkanoic acid (HAA). Analysis of other mutants with altered surfactant production revealed that HAA is coordinately regulated with the late-stage flagellar gene encoding flagellin; mutations in genes involved in early flagellar assembly abolish or reduce HAA production, while mutations in flagellin or flagellin glycosylation genes increase its production. When colonizing a hydrated porous surface, the bacterium increases production of both flagellin and HAA. P. syringae was defective in porous-paper colonization without functional flagella and was slightly inhibited in this movement when it lacked surfactant production. Loss of HAA production in a syringafactin-deficient strain had no effect on swimming but abolished swarming motility. In contrast, a strain that lacked HAA but retained syringafactin production exhibited broad swarming tendrils, while a syringafactin-producing strain that overproduced HAA exhibited slender swarming tendrils. On the basis of further analysis of mutants altered in HAA production, we discuss its regulation in Pseudomonas syringae. PMID:22194459

  12. Flagellar localization of a novel isoform of myosin, myosin XXI, in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Katta, Santharam S; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A; Gupta, Chhitar M

    2009-04-01

    Leishmania major genome analysis revealed the presence of putative genes corresponding to two myosins, which have been designated to class IB and a novel class, class XXI, specifically present in kinetoplastids. To characterize these myosin homologs in Leishmania, we have cloned and over-expressed the full-length myosin XXI gene and variable region of myosin IB gene in bacteria, purified the corresponding proteins, and then used the affinity purified anti-sera to analyze the expression and intracellular distribution of these proteins. Whereas myosin XXI was expressed in both the promastigote and amastigote stages, no expression of myosin IB could be detected in any of the two stages of these parasites. Further, myosin XXI expression was more predominant in the promastigote stage where it was preferentially localized in the proximal region of the flagellum. The observed flagellar localization was not dependent on the myosin head region or actin but was exclusively determined by the myosin tail region, as judged by over-expressing GFP conjugates of full-length myosin XXI, its head domain and its tail domain separately in Leishmania. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immuno-gold electron microscopy analyses revealed that this protein was partly associated with paraflagellar rod proteins but not with tubulins in the flagellar axoneme. Our results, for the first time, report the expression and detailed analysis of cellular localization of a novel class of myosin, myosin XXI in trypanosomatids. PMID:19121339

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Salmonella FliI, the ATPase component of the type III flagellar protein-export apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Minamino, Tohru; Imada, Katsumi; Tahara, Aiko; Kihara, May; Macnab, Robert M.; Namba, Keiichi

    2006-10-01

    Crystals of an N-terminally truncated variant of the Salmonella flagellar ATPase FliI, which exports substrate proteins into the central channel of the growing flagellar structure by utilizing the energy of ATP hydrolysis, have been obtained and characterized by X-ray diffraction. Most of the structural components making up the bacterial flagellum are translocated through the central channel of the growing flagellar structure by the type III flagellar protein-export apparatus in an ATPase-driven manner and are assembled at the growing end. FliI is the ATPase that drives flagellar protein export using the energy of ATP hydrolysis. FliI forms an oligomeric ring structure in order to attain maximum ATPase activity. In this study, FliI(Δ1–18), an N-terminally truncated variant of FliI lacking the first 18 residues, was purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique with PEG 8000 as a precipitant. FliI(Δ1–18) crystals grew in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 48, b = 73, c = 126 Å, β = 94°, and diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution. Anomalous difference Patterson maps of Os-derivative and Pt-derivative crystals showed significant peaks in their Harker sections, indicating that both derivatives are suitable for structure determination.

  14. Flagellar force production during regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukich, John N.; Clodfelter, Catherine; Bernd, Karen K.

    2009-11-01

    Several respiratory, digestive, and reproductive disorders originate with motional dysfunction of cilia and flagella. The usefulness of cilia and flagella is understood, but the internal mechanism for creating their breast stroke-like motion is not. This study reports on standardization of calibration, trapping and cell movement recording methods. Our techniques permit us to measure the flagellar swimming force of Chlamydomonas during flagella regeneration. We find that as flagella length increases, the flagellar force is maximized after 50% of full length is achieved except for a significant dip at 75% of full length. These results raise many questions regarding the flagella infrastructure.

  15. High hydrostatic pressure induces counterclockwise to clockwise reversals of the Escherichia coli flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Kimura, Yoshifumi; Homma, Michio; Ishijima, Akihiko; Terazima, Masahide

    2013-04-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a reversible rotary machine that rotates a left-handed helical filament, allowing bacteria to swim toward a more favorable environment. The direction of rotation reverses from counterclockwise (CCW) to clockwise (CW), and vice versa, in response to input from the chemotaxis signaling circuit. CW rotation is normally caused by binding of the phosphorylated response regulator CheY (CheY-P), and strains lacking CheY are typically locked in CCW rotation. The detailed mechanism of switching remains unresolved because it is technically difficult to regulate the level of CheY-P within the concentration range that produces flagellar reversals. Here, we demonstrate that high hydrostatic pressure can induce CW rotation even in the absence of CheY-P. The rotation of single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli cells with the cheY gene deleted was monitored at various pressures and temperatures. Application of >120 MPa pressure induced a reversal from CCW to CW at 20°C, although at that temperature, no motor rotated CW at ambient pressure (0.1 MPa). At lower temperatures, pressure-induced changes in direction were observed at pressures of <120 MPa. CW rotation increased with pressure in a sigmoidal fashion, as it does in response to increasing concentrations of CheY-P. Application of pressure generally promotes the formation of clusters of ordered water molecules on the surfaces of proteins. It is possible that hydration of the switch complex at high pressure induces structural changes similar to those caused by the binding of CheY-P. PMID:23417485

  16. Two Distinct Ca2+ Signaling Pathways Modulate Sperm Flagellar Beating Patterns in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Haixin; Suarez, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperactivation, a swimming pattern of mammalian sperm in the oviduct, is essential for fertilization. It is characterized by asymmetrical flagellar beating and an increase of cytoplasmic Ca2+. We observed that some mouse sperm swimming in the oviduct produce high-amplitude pro-hook bends (bends in the direction of the hook on the head), whereas other sperm produce high-amplitude anti-hook bends. Switching direction of the major bends could serve to redirect sperm toward oocytes. We hypothesized that different Ca2+ signaling pathways produce high-amplitude pro-hook and anti-hook bends. In vitro, sperm that hyperactivated during capacitation (because of activation of CATSPER plasma membrane Ca2+ channels) developed high-amplitude pro-hook bends. The CATSPER activators procaine and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) also induced high-amplitude pro-hook bends. Thimerosal, which triggers a Ca2+ release from internal stores, induced high-amplitude anti-hook bends. Activation of CATSPER channels is facilitated by a pH rise, so both Ca2+ and pH responses to treatments with 4-AP and thimerosal were monitored. Thimerosal triggered a Ca2+ increase that initiated at the base of the flagellum, whereas 4-AP initiated a rise in the proximal principal piece. Only 4-AP triggered a flagellar pH rise. Proteins were extracted from sperm for examination of phosphorylation patterns induced by Ca2+ signaling. Procaine and 4-AP induced phosphorylation of proteins on threonine and serine, whereas thimerosal primarily induced dephosphorylation of proteins. Tyrosine phosphorylation was unaffected. We concluded that hyperactivation, which is associated with capacitation, can be modulated by release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores to reverse the direction of the dominant flagellar bend and, thus, redirect sperm. PMID:21389347

  17. Novel Components of the Flagellar System in Epsilonproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Beile; Lara-Tejero, Maria; Lefebre, Matthew; Goodman, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Motility is essential for the pathogenesis of many bacterial species. Most bacteria move using flagella, which are multiprotein filaments that rotate propelled by a cell wall-anchored motor using chemical energy. Although some components of the flagellar apparatus are common to many bacterial species, recent studies have shown significant differences in the flagellar structures of different bacterial species. The molecular bases for these differences, however, are not understood. The flagella from epsilonproteobacteria, which include the bacterial pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pylori, are among the most divergent. Using next-generation sequencing combined with transposon mutagenesis, we have conducted a comprehensive high-throughput genetic screen in Campylobacter jejuni, which identified several novel components of its flagellar system. Biochemical analyses detected interactions between the identified proteins and known components of the flagellar machinery, and in vivo imaging located them to the bacterial poles, where flagella assemble. Most of the identified new components are conserved within but restricted to epsilonproteobacteria. These studies provide insight into the divergent flagella of this group of bacteria and highlight the complexity of this remarkable structure, which has adapted to carry out its conserved functions in the context of widely diverse bacterial species. PMID:24961693

  18. Divalent Cation Control of Flagellar Motility in African Trypanosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westergard, Anna M.; Hutchings, Nathan R.

    2005-03-01

    Changes in calcium concentration have been shown to dynamically affect flagellar motility in several eukaryotic systems. The African trypanosome is a monoflagellated protozoan parasite and the etiological agent of sleeping sickness. Although cell motility has been implicated in disease progression, very little is currently known about biochemical control of the trypanosome flagellum. In this study, we assess the effects of extracellular changes in calcium and nickel concentration on trypanosome flagellar movement. Using a flow through chamber, we determine the relative changes in motility in individual trypanosomes in response to various concentrations of calcium and nickel, respectively. Extracellular concentrations of calcium and nickel (as low as 100 micromolar) significantly inhibit trypanosome cell motility. The effects are reversible, as indicated by the recovery of motion after removal of the calcium or nickel from the chamber. We are currently investigating the specific changes in flagellar oscillation and coordination that result from calcium and nickel, respectively. These results verify the presence of a calcium-responsive signaling mechanism(s) that regulates flagellar beat in trypanosomes.

  19. Flagellar motility is necessary for Aeromonas hydrophila adhesion.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yingxue; Lin, Guifang; Chen, Wenbo; Xu, Xiaojin; Yan, Qingpi

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion to host surface or cells is the initial step in bacterial pathogenesis, and the adhesion mechanisms of the fish pathogenic bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila were investigated in this study. First, a mutagenesis library of A. hydrophila that contained 332 random insertion mutants was constructed via mini-Tn10 Km mutagenesis. Four mutants displayed the most attenuated adhesion. Sequence analysis revealed that the mini-Tn10 insertion sites in the four mutant strains were flgC(GenBank accession numbers KX261880), cytb4(GenBank accession numbers JN133621), rbsR(GenBank accession numbers KX261881) and flgE(GenBank accession numbers JQ974982). To further study the roles of flgC and flgE in the adhesion of A. hydrophila, some biological characteristics of the wild-type strain B11, the mutants M121 and M240, and the complemented strains C121 and C240 were investigated. The results showed that the mutation in flgC or flgE led to the flagellar motility of A. hydrophila significant reduction or abolishment. flgC was not necessary for flagellar biosynthesis but was necessary for the full motility of A. hydrophila, flgE was involved in both flagellar biosynthesis and motility. The flagellar motility is necessary for A. hydrophila to adhere to the host mucus, which suggests flagellar motility plays crucial roles in the early infection process of this bacterium. PMID:27432325

  20. Preparation and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals of bacterial flagellar sigma factor σ{sup 28} in complex with the σ{sup 28}-binding region of its antisigma factor, FlgM

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Kengo; Ichihara, Hisako; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Ishihama, Akira; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2007-03-01

    A complex of E. coli flagellar and chemotaxis-specific sigma factor σ{sup 28} bound to the σ{sup 28}-binding region of its antisigma factor FlgM was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å. The sigma 28 kDa (σ{sup 28}) factor is a transcription factor specific for the expression of bacterial flagellar and chemotaxis genes. Its antisigma factor, FlgM, binds σ{sup 28} factor and inhibits its activity as a transcription factor. In this study, crystals of the complex between Escherichia coli σ{sup 28} and the C-terminal σ{sup 28}-binding region of FlgM were obtained. The crystals belong to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.7 (2), c = 51.74 (3) Å, containing one complex in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. An X-ray intensity data set was collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å.

  1. Defects in the Flagellar Motor Increase Synthesis of Poly-γ-Glutamate in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jia Mun; Guttenplan, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis swims in liquid media and swarms over solid surfaces, and it encodes two sets of flagellar stator homologs. Here, we show that B. subtilis requires only the MotA/MotB stator during swarming motility and that the residues required for stator force generation are highly conserved from the Proteobacteria to the Firmicutes. We further find that mutants that abolish stator function also result in an overproduction of the extracellular polymer poly-γ-glutamate (PGA) to confer a mucoid colony phenotype. PGA overproduction appeared to be the result of an increase in the expression of the pgs operon that encodes genes for PGA synthesis. Transposon mutagenesis was conducted to identify insertions that abolished colony mucoidy and disruptions in known transcriptional regulators of PGA synthesis (Com and Deg two-component systems) as well as mutants defective in transcription-coupled DNA repair (Mfd)-reduced expression of the pgs operon. A final class of insertions disrupted proteins involved in the assembly of the flagellar filament (FliD, FliT, and FlgL), and these mutants did not reduce expression of the pgs operon, suggesting a second mechanism of PGA control. PMID:24296669

  2. Adenine Nucleotide Metabolism and a Role for AMP in Modulating Flagellar Waveforms in Mouse Sperm1

    PubMed Central

    Vadnais, Melissa L.; Cao, Wenlei; Aghajanian, Haig K.; Haig-Ladewig, Lisa; Lin, Angel M.; Al-Alao, Osama; Gerton, George L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT While most ATP, the main energy source driving sperm motility, is derived from glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, the metabolic demands of the cell require the efficient use of power stored in high-energy phosphate bonds. In times of high energy consumption, adenylate kinase (AK) scavenges one ATP molecule by transphosphorylation of two molecules of ADP, simultaneously yielding one molecule of AMP as a by-product. Either ATP or ADP supported motility of detergent-modeled cauda epididymal mouse sperm, indicating that flagellar AKs are functional. However, the ensuing flagellar waveforms fueled by ATP or ADP were qualitatively different. Motility driven by ATP was rapid but restricted to the distal region of the sperm tail, whereas ADP produced slower and more fluid waves that propagated down the full flagellum. Characterization of wave patterns by tracing and superimposing the images of the flagella, quantifying the differences using digital image analysis, and computer-assisted sperm analysis revealed differences in the amplitude, periodicity, and propagation of the waves between detergent-modeled sperm treated with either ATP or ADP. Surprisingly, addition of AMP to the incubation medium containing ATP recapitulated the pattern of sperm motility seen with ADP alone. In addition to AK1 and AK2, which we previously demonstrated are present in outer dense fibers and mitochondrial sheath of the mouse sperm tail, we show that another AK, AK8, is present in a third flagellar compartment, the axoneme. These results extend the known regulators of sperm motility to include AMP, which may be operating through an AMP-activated protein kinase. PMID:24740601

  3. Evolution. Evolutionary resurrection of flagellar motility via rewiring of the nitrogen regulation system.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Tiffany B; Mulley, Geraldine; Dills, Alexander H; Alsohim, Abdullah S; McGuffin, Liam J; Studholme, David J; Silby, Mark W; Brockhurst, Michael A; Johnson, Louise J; Jackson, Robert W

    2015-02-27

    A central process in evolution is the recruitment of genes to regulatory networks. We engineered immotile strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens that lack flagella due to deletion of the regulatory gene fleQ. Under strong selection for motility, these bacteria consistently regained flagella within 96 hours via a two-step evolutionary pathway. Step 1 mutations increase intracellular levels of phosphorylated NtrC, a distant homolog of FleQ, which begins to commandeer control of the fleQ regulon at the cost of disrupting nitrogen uptake and assimilation. Step 2 is a switch-of-function mutation that redirects NtrC away from nitrogen uptake and toward its novel function as a flagellar regulator. Our results demonstrate that natural selection can rapidly rewire regulatory networks in very few, repeatable mutational steps. PMID:25722415

  4. CRIS—A Novel cAMP-Binding Protein Controlling Spermiogenesis and the Development of Flagellar Bending

    PubMed Central

    Krähling, Anke Miriam; Alvarez, Luis; Debowski, Katharina; Van, Qui; Gunkel, Monika; Irsen, Stephan; Al-Amoudi, Ashraf; Strünker, Timo; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Krause, Eberhard; Voigt, Ingo; Wörtge, Simone; Waisman, Ari; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Kaupp, Ulrich Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    The second messengers cAMP and cGMP activate their target proteins by binding to a conserved cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). Here, we identify and characterize an entirely novel CNBD-containing protein called CRIS (cyclic nucleotide receptor involved in sperm function) that is unrelated to any of the other members of this protein family. CRIS is exclusively expressed in sperm precursor cells. Cris-deficient male mice are either infertile due to a lack of sperm resulting from spermatogenic arrest, or subfertile due to impaired sperm motility. The motility defect is caused by altered Ca2+ regulation of flagellar beat asymmetry, leading to a beating pattern that is reminiscent of sperm hyperactivation. Our results suggest that CRIS interacts during spermiogenesis with Ca2+-regulated proteins that—in mature sperm—are involved in flagellar bending. PMID:24339785

  5. Identification of a Caulobacter basal body structural gene and a cis-acting site required for activation of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Dingwall, A; Gober, J W; Shapiro, L

    1990-01-01

    The genes that encode the components and regulatory proteins of the Caulobacter crescentus flagellum are transcribed at specific times in the cell cycle. One of these genes, flbN, is required early in the flagellar assembly process. The flbN gene was cloned and sequenced, and the time of transcription activation was determined. The derived amino acid sequence indicates that fibN encodes a 25-kilodalton protein with a cleavable leader peptide. The flbN-encoded protein has 30.8% identity with the protein encoded by the Salmonella typhimurium basal body L-ring gene, flgH. Site-directed mutagenesis and gel mobility shift assays identified a binding site at -100 from the transcription start site for a trans-acting protein, RF-2, that functions to partially activate flbN transcription at a defined time in the cell cycle. The RF-2 binding region is similar to a NifA binding site normally used in the activation of some sigma 54 promoters involved in nitrogen fixation in other bacteria. Transcription of a flbN-reporter gene fusion in an Escherichia coli background was dependent on the presence of a NifA transcription factor supplied by a plasmid-borne Rhizobium meliloti gene encoding NifA. A deletion or base changes in the RF-2 binding region eliminated expression of the flbN gene in E. coli even when a NifA protein was provided in trans, suggesting that a sigma 54 promoter with an upstream activator element is used by the C. crescentus flbN gene. A consensus sequence for a sigma 54 promoter was found at the appropriate distance 5' to one of two identified transcription start sites. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that a conserved nucleotide in this sigma 54 promoter consensus sequence was required for transcription. Deletion of the region 5' to the apparent sigma 54 promoter caused a complete loss of transcription activation. Transcription activation of flbN in C. crescentus involves the combination of several elements: the NifA-like site is required for full

  6. Motility protein interactions in the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed Central

    Garza, A G; Harris-Haller, L W; Stoebner, R A; Manson, M D

    1995-01-01

    Five proteins (MotA, MotB, FliG, FliM, and FliN) have been implicated in energizing flagellar rotation in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. One model for flagellar function envisions that MotA and MotB comprise the stator of a rotary motor and that FliG, FliM, and FliN are part of the rotor. MotA probably functions as a transmembrane proton channel, and MotB has been proposed to anchor MotA to the peptidoglycan of the cell wall. To study interactions between the Mot proteins themselves and between them and other components of the flagellar motor, we attempted to isolate extragenic suppressors of 13 dominant or partially dominant motB missense mutations. Four of these yielded suppressors, which exhibited widely varying efficiencies of suppression. The pattern of suppression was partially alleles-specific, but no suppressor seriously impaired motility in a motB+ strain. Of 20 suppressors from the original selection, 15 were characterized by DNA sequencing. Fourteen of these cause single amino acid changes in MotA. Thirteen alter residues in, or directly adjacent to, the putative periplasmic loops of MotA, and the remaining one alters a residue in the middle of the fourth predicted transmembrane helix of MotA. We conclude that the MotA and MotB proteins form a complex and that their interaction directly involves or is strongly influenced by the periplasmic loops of MotA. The 15th suppressor from the original selection and 2 motB suppressors identified during a subsequent search cause single amino acid substitutions in FliG. This finding suggests that the postulated Mot-protein complex may be in close proximity to FliG at the stator-rotor interface of the flagellar motor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7892209

  7. Direct evidence of flagellar synchronization through hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumley, Douglas; Polin, Marco; Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella exhibit striking coordination, from the synchronous beating of two flagella in Chlamydomonas to the metachronal waves and large-scale flows displayed by carpets of cilia. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for flagellar synchronization remain unclear. We perform a series of experiments involving two individual flagella in a quiescent fluid. Cells are isolated from the colonial alga Volvox carteri, held in place at a fixed distance d, and oriented so that their flagellar beating planes coincide. In this fashion, we are able to explicitly assess the role of hydrodynamics in achieving synchronization. For closely separated cells, the flagella are capable of exhibiting a phase-locked state for thousands of beats at a time, despite significant differences in their intrinsic frequencies. For intermediate values of d, synchronous periods are interrupted by brief phase slips, while for d >> 1 the flagellar phase difference drifts almost linearly with time. The coupling strength extracted through analysis of the synchronization statistics exhibits excellent agreement with hydrodynamic predictions. This study unambiguously reveals that flagella coupled only through hydrodynamics are capable of exhibiting robust synchrony.

  8. Heterogeneity of a Campylobacter jejuni Protein That Is Secreted through the Flagellar Filament▿

    PubMed Central

    Poly, Frédéric; Ewing, Cheryl; Goon, Scarlett; Hickey, Thomas E.; Rockabrand, David; Majam, Gary; Lee, Lanfong; Phan, Julie; Savarino, Nicholas J.; Guerry, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Cj0859c, or FspA, is a small, acidic protein of Campylobacter jejuni that is expressed by a σ28 promoter. Analysis of the fspA gene in 41 isolates of C. jejuni revealed two overall variants of the predicted protein, FspA1 and FspA2. Secretion of FspA occurs in broth-grown bacteria and requires a minimum flagellar structure. The addition of recombinant FspA2, but not FspA1, to INT407 cells in vitro resulted in a rapid induction of apoptosis. These data define a novel C. jejuni virulence factor, and the observed heterogeneity among fspA alleles suggests alternate virulence potential among different strains. PMID:17517862

  9. Anatomical and Molecular Design of the Drosophila Antenna as a Flagellar Auditory Organ

    PubMed Central

    TODI, SOKOL V.; SHARMA, YASHODA; EBERL, DANIEL F.

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis of hearing is less well understood than many other senses. However, recent studies in Drosophila have provided some important steps towards a molecular understanding of hearing. In this report, we summarize these findings and their implications on the relationship between hearing and touch. In Drosophila, hearing is accomplished by Johnston’s Organ, a chordotonal organ containing over 150 scolopidia within the second antennal segment. We will discuss anatomical features of the antenna and how they contribute to the function of this flagellar auditory receptor. The effects of several mutants, identified through mutagenesis screens or as homologues of vertebrate auditory genes, will be summarized. Based on evidence gathered from these studies, we propose a speculative model for how the chordotonal organ might function. PMID:15252880

  10. Bacterial flagellar microhydrodynamics: Laminar flow over complex flagellar filaments, analog archimedean screws and cylinders, and its perturbations.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Shlomo; Fishelov, Dalia; Ben-Artzi, Matania

    2003-09-01

    The flagellar filament, the bacterial organelle of motility, is the smallest rotary propeller known. It consists of 1), a basal body (part of which is the proton driven rotary motor), 2), a hook (universal joint-allowing for off-axial transmission of rotary motion), and 3), a filament (propeller-a long, rigid, supercoiled helical assembly allowing for the conversion of rotary motion into linear thrust). Helically perturbed (so-called "complex") filaments have a coarse surface composed of deep grooves and ridges following the three-start helical lines. These surface structures, reminiscent of a turbine or Archimedean screw, originate from symmetry reduction along the six-start helical lines due to dimerization of the flagellin monomers from which the filament self assembles. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and helical image reconstruction methods, we calculated three-dimensional density maps of the complex filament of Rhizobium lupini H13-3 and determined its surface pattern and boundaries. The helical symmetry of the filament allows viewing it as a stack of identical slices spaced axially and rotated by constant increments. Here we use the closed outlines of these slices to explore, in two dimensions, the hydrodynamic effect of the turbine-like boundaries of the flagellar filament. In particular, we try to determine if, and under what conditions, transitions from laminar to turbulent flow (or perturbations of the laminar flow) may occur on or near the surface of the bacterial propeller. To address these questions, we apply the boundary element method in a manner allowing the handling of convoluted boundaries. We tested the method on several simple, well-characterized cylindrical structures before applying it to real, highly convoluted biological surfaces and to simplified mechanical analogs. Our results indicate that under extreme structural and functional conditions, and at low Reynolds numbers, a deviation from laminar flow might occur on the flagellar

  11. The FLA3 KAP Subunit Is Required for Localization of Kinesin-2 to the Site of Flagellar Assembly and Processive Anterograde Intraflagellar TransportV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Joshua; Perrone, Catherine A.; Bower, Raqual; Cole, Douglas G.; Porter, Mary E.

    2005-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a bidirectional process required for assembly and maintenance of cilia and flagella. Kinesin-2 is the anterograde IFT motor, and Dhc1b/Dhc2 drives retrograde IFT. To understand how either motor interacts with the IFT particle or how their activities might be coordinated, we characterized a ts mutation in the Chlamydomonas gene encoding KAP, the nonmotor subunit of Kinesin-2. The fla3-1 mutation is an amino acid substitution in a conserved C-terminal domain. fla3-1 strains assemble flagella at 21°C, but cannot maintain them at 33°C. Although the Kinesin-2 complex is present at both 21 and 33°C, the fla3-1 Kinesin-2 complex is not efficiently targeted to or retained in the basal body region or flagella. Video-enhanced DIC microscopy of fla3-1 cells shows that the frequency of anterograde IFT particles is significantly reduced. Anterograde particles move at near wild-type velocities, but appear larger and pause more frequently in fla3-1. Transformation with an epitope-tagged KAP gene rescues all of the fla3-1 defects and results in preferential incorporation of tagged KAP complexes into flagella. KAP is therefore required for the localization of Kinesin-2 at the site of flagellar assembly and the efficient transport of anterograde IFT particles within flagella. PMID:15616187

  12. Mapping gene activity of Arabidopsis root hairs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative information on gene activity at single cell-type resolution is essential for the understanding of how cells work and interact. Root hairs, or trichoblasts, tubular-shaped outgrowths of specialized cells in the epidermis, represent an ideal model for cell fate acquisition and differentiation in plants. Results Here, we provide an atlas of gene and protein expression in Arabidopsis root hair cells, generated by paired-end RNA sequencing and LC/MS-MS analysis of protoplasts from plants containing a pEXP7-GFP reporter construct. In total, transcripts of 23,034 genes were detected in root hairs. High-resolution proteome analysis led to the reliable identification of 2,447 proteins, 129 of which were differentially expressed between root hairs and non-root hair tissue. Dissection of pre-mRNA splicing patterns showed that all types of alternative splicing were cell type-dependent, and less complex in EXP7-expressing cells when compared to non-root hair cells. Intron retention was repressed in several transcripts functionally related to root hair morphogenesis, indicative of a cell type-specific control of gene expression by alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. Concordance between mRNA and protein expression was generally high, but in many cases mRNA expression was not predictive for protein abundance. Conclusions The integrated analysis shows that gene activity in root hairs is dictated by orchestrated, multilayered regulatory mechanisms that allow for a cell type-specific composition of functional components. PMID:23800126

  13. A distant homologue of the FlgT protein interacts with MotB and FliL and is essential for flagellar rotation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Fabela, Salvador; Domenzain, Clelia; De la Mora, Javier; Osorio, Aurora; Ramirez-Cabrera, Victor; Poggio, Sebastian; Dreyfus, Georges; Camarena, Laura

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we describe a periplasmic protein that is essential for flagellar rotation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. This protein is encoded upstream of flgA, and its expression is dependent on the flagellar master regulator FleQ and on the class III flagellar activator FleT. Sequence comparisons suggest that this protein is a distant homologue of FlgT. We show evidence that in R. sphaeroides, FlgT interacts with the periplasmic regions of MotB and FliL and with the flagellar protein MotF, which was recently characterized as a membrane component of the flagellum in this bacterium. In addition, the localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-MotF is completely dependent on FlgT. The Mot(-) phenotype of flgT cells was weakly suppressed by point mutants of MotB that presumably keep the proton channel open and efficiently suppress the Mot(-) phenotype of motF and fliL cells, indicating that FlgT could play an additional role beyond the opening of the proton channel. The presence of FlgT in purified filament-hook-basal bodies of the wild-type strain was confirmed by Western blotting, and the observation of these structures under an electron microscope showed that the basal bodies from flgT cells had lost the ring that covers the LP ring in the wild-type structure. Moreover, MotF was detected by immunoblotting in the basal bodies obtained from the wild-type strain but not from flgT cells. From these results, we suggest that FlgT forms a ring around the LP ring, which anchors MotF and stabilizes the stator complex of the flagellar motor. PMID:24056105

  14. Non-viral gene-activated matrices

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Erica G.; Duffy, Garry P.; Cryan, Sally-Ann; Curtin, Caroline M.; O’Brien, Fergal J.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of producing enhanced therapeutics for regenerative medicine, our laboratory develops gene-activated matrices (GAMs) using non-viral gene therapy (GT) in combination with collagen-based scaffolds engineered specifically for tissue repair. Non-viral vectors have been referred to as a minority pursuit in GT but considering the concerns associated with viral vectors and as transient gene expression is such a key consideration, further research is clearly warranted for tissue engineering (TE) applications. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well regarded for their capability in bone regeneration but as primary cells, they are difficult to transfect. We have recently optimised the non-viral vector, polyethyleneimine (PEI), to achieve high transfection efficiencies in MSCs. Subsequently, a series of PEI-based GAMs were developed using collagen, collagen-glycosaminoglycan and collagen-nanohydroxyapatite (collagen-nHa) scaffolds whereby transgene expression was detected up to 21 d with the collagen-nHa scaffold providing the most prolonged expression. Moreover, all PEI-based GAMs contained a low plasmid DNA dose of 2 µg which is far below doses often required in previous GAMs. Having successfully developed these GAMs, the ephrinB2 gene has recently been incorporated to produce a novel therapeutic GAM for bone repair. Herein, we discuss our recent investigations in the development and application of non-viral GAMs. PMID:23538777

  15. Involvement of the flagellar assembly pathway in Vibrio alginolyticus adhesion under environmental stresses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Huang, Lixing; Su, Yongquan; Qin, Yingxue; Kong, Wendi; Ma, Ying; Xu, Xiaojin; Lin, Mao; Zheng, Jiang; Yan, Qingpi

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion is an important virulence factor of Vibrio alginolyticus. This factor may be affected by environmental conditions; however, its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In our previous research, adhesion deficient strains were obtained by culturing V. alginolyticus under stresses including Cu, Pb, Hg, and low pH. With RNA-seq and bioinformatics analysis, we found that all of these stress treatments significantly affected the flagellar assembly pathway, which may play an important role in V. alginolyticus adhesion. Therefore, we hypothesized that the environmental stresses of the flagellar assembly pathway may be one way in which environmental conditions affect adhesion. To verify our hypothesis, a bioinformatics analysis, QPCR, RNAi, in vitro adhesion assay and motility assay were performed. Our results indicated that (1) the flagellar assembly pathway was sensitive to environmental stresses, (2) the flagellar assembly pathway played an important role in V. alginolyticus adhesion, and (3) motility is not the only way in which the flagellar assembly pathway affects adhesion. PMID:26322276

  16. Individual Flagellar Waveform Affects Collective Behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kage, Azusa; Mogami, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    Bioconvection is a form of collective motion that occurs spontaneously in the suspension of swimming microorganisms. In a previous study, we quantitatively described the "pattern transition," a phase transition phenomenon that so far has exclusively been observed in bioconvection of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas. We suggested that the transition could be induced by changes in the balance between the gravitational and shear-induced torques, both of which act to determine the orientation of the organism in the shear flow. As both of the torques should be affected by the geometry of the Chlamydomonas cell, alteration in the flagellar waveform might change the extent of torque generation by altering overall geometry of the cell. Based on this working hypothesis, we examined bioconvection behavior of two flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ida1 and oda2, making reference to the wild type. Flagella of ida1 beat with an abnormal waveform, while flagella of oda2 show a normal waveform but lower beat frequency. As a result, both mutants had swimming speed of less than 50% of the wild type. ida1 formed bioconvection patterns with smaller spacing than those of wild type and oda2. Two-axis view revealed the periodic movement of the settling blobs of ida1, while oda2 showed qualitatively similar behavior to that of wild type. Unexpectedly, ida1 showed stronger negative gravitaxis than did wild type, while oda2 showed relatively weak gravitaxis. These findings suggest that flagellar waveform, not swimming speed or beat frequency, strongly affect bioconvection behavior in C. reinhardtii. PMID:26245228

  17. Second-Chance Signal Transduction Explains Cooperative Flagellar Switching

    PubMed Central

    Zot, Henry G.; Hasbun, Javier E.; Van Minh, Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    The reversal of flagellar motion (switching) results from the interaction between a switch complex of the flagellar rotor and a torque-generating stationary unit, or stator (motor unit). To explain the steeply cooperative ligand-induced switching, present models propose allosteric interactions between subunits of the rotor, but do not address the possibility of a reaction that stimulates a bidirectional motor unit to reverse direction of torque. During flagellar motion, the binding of a ligand-bound switch complex at the dwell site could excite a motor unit. The probability that another switch complex of the rotor, moving according to steady-state rotation, will reach the same dwell site before that motor unit returns to ground state will be determined by the independent decay rate of the excited-state motor unit. Here, we derive an analytical expression for the energy coupling between a switch complex and a motor unit of the stator complex of a flagellum, and demonstrate that this model accounts for the cooperative switching response without the need for allosteric interactions. The analytical result can be reproduced by simulation when (1) the motion of the rotor delivers a subsequent ligand-bound switch to the excited motor unit, thereby providing the excited motor unit with a second chance to remain excited, and (2) the outputs from multiple independent motor units are constrained to a single all-or-none event. In this proposed model, a motor unit and switch complex represent the components of a mathematically defined signal transduction mechanism in which energy coupling is driven by steady-state and is regulated by stochastic ligand binding. Mathematical derivation of the model shows the analytical function to be a general form of the Hill equation (Hill AV (1910) The possible effects of the aggregation of the molecules of haemoglobin on its dissociation curves. J Physiol 40: iv–vii). PMID:22844429

  18. HIFU-induced gene activation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Zhong, Pei; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan

    2001-05-01

    This work investigated the inducible gene activation in cancer cells that were sublethally injured during HIFU treatment. HeLa cells were transfected by an adenovirus vector that encodes GFP under the control of hsp70B promoter, leading to about 65% transfection efficiency. A volume of 10 μL transfected HeLa cells in suspension (5×107 cells/ml) were placed at the bottom of a PCR tube so that the cell suspension could be heated to a peak temperature of 50°C, 60°C, and 70°C for 120, 10, and 1 s, respectively, by a focused 1.1-MHz HIFU transducer operated at a peak negative pressure of -2.7 MPa at different duty cycles. One day after HIFU treatment, cell viability was determined to be 63%, 35%, and 18%, respectively, based on Trypan Blue exclusion test. Importantly, in all test groups, inducible GFP expression was detected in about 40%-50% of the surviving cells with GFP intensity increased by 25-fold based on flow cytometry analysis. These results demonstrate that even under the short exposure duration of HIFU treatment, inducible gene expression could be produced in sublethally injured cell population in vitro. Further studies are underway to explore the optimal HIFU condition for gene activation in vivo.

  19. Induction of the lateral flagellar system of Vibrio shilonii is an early event after inhibition of the sodium ion flux in the polar flagellum.

    PubMed

    González, Yael; Camarena, Laura; Dreyfus, Georges

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we show the induction of lateral flagella by the action of the sodium channel blocker phenamil, in the marine bacterium Vibrio shilonii, a coral pathogen that causes bleaching. We analyzed the growth and morphology of cells treated with phenamil. A time course analysis showed that after 30 min of exposure to the sodium channel blocker, lateral flagella were present and could be detected by electron microscopy. Detection of the mRNA of the master regulator (lafK) and lateral flagellin (lafA) by RT-PCR confirmed the expression of lateral flagellar genes. We show the simultaneous isolation of polar and, for the first time, lateral flagellar hook-basal bodies. This allowed us to compare the dimensions and morphological characteristics of the 2 structures. PMID:25639364

  20. Negative regulatory loci coupling flagellin synthesis to flagellar assembly in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, K L; Hughes, K T

    1991-01-01

    The complex regulation of flagellin gene expression in Salmonella typhimurium was characterized in vivo by using lac transcriptional fusions to the two flagellin structural genes (fliC [H1] and fljB [H2]). Phase variation was measured as the rate of switching of flagellin gene expression. Switching frequencies varied from 1/500 per cell per generation to 1/10,000 per cell per generation depending on the particular insertion and the direction of switching. There is a 4- to 20-fold bias in favor of switching from the fljB(On) to the fljB(Off) orientation. Random Tn10dTc insertions were isolated which failed to express flagellin. While most of these insertions mapped to loci known to be required for flagellin expression, several new loci were identified. The presence of functional copies of all of the genes responsible for complete flagellar assembly, except the hook-associated proteins (flgK, flgL, and fliD gene products), were required for expression of the fliC or fljB flagellin genes. Two novel loci involved in negative regulation of fliC and fljB in fla mutant backgrounds were identified. One of these loci, designated the flgR locus, mapped to the flg operon at 23 min on the Salmonella linkage map. An flgR insertion mutation resulted in relief of repression of the fliC and fljB genes in all fla mutant backgrounds except for mutants in the positive regulatory loci (flhC, flhD, and fliA genes). PMID:1848842

  1. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K.; Nirody, Jasmine A.; Berry, Richard M.; Oster, George

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify roles for two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, whereas steric forces comprise the actual “power stroke.” Specifically, we propose that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline “hinge” residue in a stator α-helix are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions fit well with recent experiments on a single-stator motor. The proposed model provides a mechanical explanation for several fundamental properties of the flagellar motor, including torque–speed and speed–ion motive force relationships, backstepping, variation in step sizes, and the effects of key mutations in the stator. PMID:26216959

  2. An Element of Determinism in a Stochastic Flagellar Motor Switch

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li; Altindal, Tuba; Wu, Xiao-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus uses a single polar flagellum to navigate in an aqueous environment. Similar to Escherichia coli cells, the polar flagellar motor has two states; when the motor is counter-clockwise, the cell swims forward and when the motor is clockwise, the cell swims backward. V. alginolyticus also incorporates a direction randomization step at the start of the forward swimming interval by flicking its flagellum. To gain an understanding on how the polar flagellar motor switch is regulated, distributions of the forward Δf and backward Δb intervals are investigated herein. We found that the steady-state probability density functions, P(Δf) and P(Δb), of freely swimming bacteria are strongly peaked at a finite time, suggesting that the motor switch is not Poissonian. The short-time inhibition is sufficiently strong and long lasting, i.e., several hundred milliseconds for both intervals, which is readily observed and characterized. Treating motor reversal dynamics as a first-passage problem, which results from conformation fluctuations of the motor switch, we calculated P(Δf) and P(Δb) and found good agreement with the measurements. PMID:26554590

  3. Resurrection of the flagellar rotary motor near zero load

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Junhua; Berg, Howard C.

    2008-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, are propelled by helical flagellar filaments, each driven at its base by a reversible rotary motor, powered by a transmembrane proton flux. Torque is generated by the interaction of stator proteins, MotA and MotB, with a rotor protein FliG. The physiology of the motor has been studied extensively in the regime of relatively high load and low speed, where it appears to operate close to thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we describe an assay that allows systematic study of the motor near zero load, where proton translocation and movement of mechanical components are rate limiting. Sixty-nanometer-diameter gold spheres were attached to hooks of cells lacking flagellar filaments, and light scattered from a sphere was monitored at the image plane of a microscope through a small pinhole. Paralyzed motors of cells carrying a motA point mutation were resurrected at 23°C by expression of wild-type MotA, and speeds jumped from zero to a maximum value (≈300 Hz) in one step. Thus, near zero load, the speed of the motor is independent of the number of torque-generating units. Evidently, the units act independently (they do not interfere with one another), and there are no intervals during which a second unit can add to the speed generated by the first (the duty ratio is close to 1). PMID:18202173

  4. Constraints on models for the flagellar rotary motor.

    PubMed

    Berg, H C

    2000-04-29

    Most bacteria that swim are propelled by flagellar filaments, each driven at its base by a rotary motor embedded in the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane. A motor is about 45 nm in diameter and made up of about 20 different kinds of parts. It is assembled from the inside out. It is powered by a proton (or in some species, a sodium-ion) flux. It steps at least 400 times per revolution. At low speeds and high torques, about 1000 protons are required per revolution, speed is proportional to protonmotive force, and torque varies little with temperature or hydrogen isotope. At high speeds and low torques, torque increases with temperature and is sensitive to hydrogen isotope. At room temperature, torque varies remarkably little with speed from about -100 Hz (the present limit of measurement) to about 200 Hz, and then it declines rapidly reaching zero at about 300 Hz. These are facts that motor models should explain. None of the existing models for the flagellar rotary motor completely do so. PMID:10836502

  5. Putative channel components for the fast-rotating sodium-driven flagellar motor of a marine bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Y; Kojima, S; Kato, H; Nishioka, N; Kawagishi, I; Homma, M

    1997-01-01

    The polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus rotates remarkably fast (up to 1,700 revolutions per second) by using a motor driven by sodium ions. Two genes, motX and motY, for the sodium-driven flagellar motor have been identified in marine bacteria, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus. They have no similarity to the genes for proton-driven motors, motA and motB, whose products constitute a proton channel. MotX was proposed to be a component of a sodium channel. Here we identified additional sodium motor genes, pomA and pomB, in V. alginolyticus. Unexpectedly, PomA and PomB have similarities to MotA and MotB, respectively, especially in the predicted transmembrane regions. These results suggest that PomA and PomB may be sodium-conducting channel components of the sodium-driven motor and that the motor part consists of the products of at least four genes, pomA, pomB, motX, and motY. Furthermore, swimming speed was controlled by the expression level of the pomA gene, suggesting that newly synthesized PomA proteins, which are components of a force-generating unit, were successively integrated into the defective motor complexes. These findings imply that Na+-driven flagellar motors may have similar structure and function as proton-driven motors, but with some interesting differences as well, and it is possible to compare and study the coupling mechanisms of the sodium and proton ion flux for the force generation. PMID:9260952

  6. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  7. The flaA locus of Bacillus subtilis is part of a large operon coding for flagellar structures, motility functions, and an ATPase-like polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, A M; Caramori, T; Crabb, W D; Scoffone, F; Galizzi, A

    1991-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced 8.3 kb of Bacillus subtilis DNA corresponding to the flaA locus involved in flagellar biosynthesis, motility, and chemotaxis. The DNA sequence revealed the presence of 10 complete and 2 incomplete open reading frames. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences to data banks showed similarities of nine of the deduced products to a number of proteins of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium for which a role in flagellar functioning has been directly demonstrated. In particular, the sequence data suggest that the flaA operon codes for the M-ring protein, components of the motor switch, and the distal part of the basal-body rod. The gene order is remarkably similar to that described for region III of the enterobacterial flagellar regulon. One of the open reading frames was translated into a protein with 48% amino acid identity to S. typhimurium FliI and 29% identity to the beta subunit of E. coli ATP synthase. PMID:1828465

  8. A Novel Trypanosoma cruzi Protein Associated to the Flagellar Pocket of Replicative Stages and Involved in Parasite Growth

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Ignacio M.; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    The flagellar pocket constitutes an active and strategic site in the body of trypanosomatids (i.e. parasitic protozoa that cause important human and/or livestock diseases), which participates in several important processes such as cell polarity, morphogenesis and replication. Most importantly, the flagellar pocket is the unique site of surface protein export and nutrient uptake in trypanosomatids, and thus constitutes a key portal for the interaction with the host. In this work, we identified and characterized a novel Trypanosoma cruzi protein, termed TCLP 1, that accumulates at the flagellar pocket area of parasite replicative forms, as revealed by biochemical, immuno-cytochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. Different in silico analyses revealed that TCLP 1 is the founding member of a family of chimeric molecules restricted to trypanosomatids bearing, in addition to eukaryotic ubiquitin-like and protein-protein interacting domains, a motif displaying significant structural homology to bacterial multi-cargo chaperones involved in the secretion of virulence factors. Using the fidelity of an homologous expression system we confirmed TCLP 1 sub-cellular distribution and showed that TCLP 1-over-expressing parasites display impaired survival and accelerated progression to late stationary phase under starvation conditions. The reduced endocytic capacity of TCLP 1-over-expressors likely underlies (at least in part) this growth phenotype. TCLP 1 is involved in the uptake of extracellular macromolecules required for nutrition and hence in T. cruzi growth. Due to the bacterial origin, sub-cellular distribution and putative function(s), we propose TCLP 1 and related orthologs in trypanosomatids as appealing therapeutic targets for intervention against these health-threatening parasites. PMID:26086767

  9. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Qin, B.; Gopinath, A.; Yang, J.; Gollub, J. P.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes. PMID:25778677

  10. Composition and sensory function of the trypanosome flagellar membrane

    PubMed Central

    Maric, Danijela; Epting, Conrad L.; Engman, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A cilium is an extension of the cell that contains an axonemal complex of microtubules and associated proteins bounded by a membrane which is contiguous with the cell body membrane. Cilia may be nonmotile or motile, the latter having additional specific roles in cell or fluid movement. The term flagellum refers to the motile cilium of free-living single cells (e.g., bacteria, archaea, spermatozoa and protozoa). In eukaryotes, both nonmotile and motile cilia possess sensory functions. The ciliary interior (cilioplasm) is separated from the cytoplasm by a selective barrier that prevents passive diffusion of molecules between the two domains. The sensory functions of cilia reside largely in the membrane and signals generated in the cilium are transduced into a variety of cellular responses. In this review we discuss the structure and biogenesis of the cilium, with special attention to the trypanosome flagellar membrane, its lipid and protein composition and its proposed roles in sensing and signaling. PMID:20580599

  11. Flagellar kinematics and swimming of algal cells in viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Qin, B; Gopinath, A; Yang, J; Gollub, J P; Arratia, P E

    2015-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes. PMID:25778677

  12. Flagellar generated flow mediates attachment of Giardia lamblia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey; Luo, Haibei; Picou, Theodore; McAllister, Ryan; Elmendorf, Heidi

    2011-03-01

    Giardia lamblia is a protozoan parasite responsible for widespread diarrheal disease in humans and animals worldwide. Attachment to the host intestinal mucosa and resistance to peristalsis is necessary for establishing infection, but the physical basis for this attachment is poorly understood. We report results from TIRF and confocal fluorescence microscopy that demonstrate that the regular beating of the posterior flagella generate a flow through the ventral disk, a suction-cup shaped structure that is against the substrate during attachment. Finite element simulations are used to compare the negative pressure generated by the flow to the measured attachment force and the expected performance of the flagellar pump. NIH grant 1R21AI062934-0.

  13. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, B.; Gopinath, A.; Yang, J.; Gollub, J. P.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-03-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes.

  14. Antiphase Synchronization in a Flagellar-Dominance Mutant of Chlamydomonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leptos, Kyriacos C.; Wan, Kirsty Y.; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Pesci, Adriana I.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-10-01

    Groups of beating flagella or cilia often synchronize so that neighboring filaments have identical frequencies and phases. A prime example is provided by the unicellular biflagellate Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which typically displays synchronous in-phase beating in a low-Reynolds number version of breaststroke swimming. We report the discovery that ptx1, a flagellar-dominance mutant of C. reinhardtii, can exhibit synchronization in precise antiphase, as in the freestyle swimming stroke. High-speed imaging shows that ptx1 flagella switch stochastically between in-phase and antiphase states, and that the latter has a distinct waveform and significantly higher frequency, both of which are strikingly similar to those found during phase slips that stochastically interrupt in-phase beating of the wild-type. Possible mechanisms underlying these observations are discussed.

  15. Flagellar swimmers oscillate between pusher- and puller-type swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klindt, Gary S.; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2015-12-01

    Self-propulsion of cellular microswimmers generates flow signatures, commonly classified as pusher and puller type, which characterize hydrodynamic interactions with other cells or boundaries. Using experimentally measured beat patterns, we compute that the flagellated green alga Chlamydomonas oscillates between pusher and puller, rendering it an approximately neutral swimmer, when averaging over its full beat cycle. Beyond a typical distance of 100 μ m from the cell, inertia attenuates oscillatory microflows. We show that hydrodynamic interactions between cells oscillate in time and are of similar magnitude as stochastic swimming fluctuations. From our analysis, we also find that the rate of hydrodynamic dissipation varies in time, which implies that flagellar beat patterns are not optimized with respect to this measure.

  16. Protein export through the bacterial flagellar type III export pathway.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    For construction of the bacterial flagellum, which is responsible for bacterial motility, the flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes both ATP and proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane and exports flagellar proteins from the cytoplasm to the distal end of the nascent structure. The export apparatus consists of a membrane-embedded export gate made of FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ, and FliR and a water-soluble ATPase ring complex consisting of FliH, FliI, and FliJ. FlgN, FliS, and FliT act as substrate-specific chaperones that do not only protect their cognate substrates from degradation and aggregation in the cytoplasm but also efficiently transfer the substrates to the export apparatus. The ATPase ring complex facilitates the initial entry of the substrates into the narrow pore of the export gate. The export gate by itself is a proton-protein antiporter that uses the two components of proton motive force, the electric potential difference and the proton concentration difference, for different steps of the export process. A specific interaction of FlhA with FliJ located in the center of the ATPase ring complex allows the export gate to efficiently use proton motive force to drive protein export. The ATPase ring complex couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to its assembly-disassembly cycle for rapid and efficient protein export cycle. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey. PMID:24064315

  17. Hybrid-fuel bacterial flagellar motors in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Homma, Michio; Ishijima, Akihiko; Berry, Richard M

    2014-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor rotates driven by an electrochemical ion gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane, either H(+) or Na(+) ions. The motor consists of a rotor ∼50 nm in diameter surrounded by multiple torque-generating ion-conducting stator units. Stator units exchange spontaneously between the motor and a pool in the cytoplasmic membrane on a timescale of minutes, and their stability in the motor is dependent upon the ion gradient. We report a genetically engineered hybrid-fuel flagellar motor in Escherichia coli that contains both H(+)- and Na(+)-driven stator components and runs on both types of ion gradient. We controlled the number of each type of stator unit in the motor by protein expression levels and Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]), using speed changes of single motors driving 1-μm polystyrene beads to determine stator unit numbers. De-energized motors changed from locked to freely rotating on a timescale similar to that of spontaneous stator unit exchange. Hybrid motor speed is simply the sum of speeds attributable to individual stator units of each type. With Na(+) and H(+) stator components expressed at high and medium levels, respectively, Na(+) stator units dominate at high [Na(+)] and are replaced by H(+) units when Na(+) is removed. Thus, competition between stator units for spaces in a motor and sensitivity of each type to its own ion gradient combine to allow hybrid motors to adapt to the prevailing ion gradient. We speculate that a similar process may occur in species that naturally express both H(+) and Na(+) stator components sharing a common rotor. PMID:24550452

  18. The propagation of perturbations in rewired bacterial gene networks

    PubMed Central

    Baumstark, Rebecca; Hänzelmann, Sonja; Tsuru, Saburo; Schaerli, Yolanda; Francesconi, Mirko; Mancuso, Francesco M.; Castelo, Robert; Isalan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    What happens to gene expression when you add new links to a gene regulatory network? To answer this question, we profile 85 network rewirings in E. coli. Here we report that concerted patterns of differential expression propagate from reconnected hub genes. The rewirings link promoter regions to different transcription factor and σ-factor genes, resulting in perturbations that span four orders of magnitude, changing up to ∼70% of the transcriptome. Importantly, factor connectivity and promoter activity both associate with perturbation size. Perturbations from related rewirings have more similar transcription profiles and a statistical analysis reveals ∼20 underlying states of the system, associating particular gene groups with rewiring constructs. We examine two large clusters (ribosomal and flagellar genes) in detail. These represent alternative global outcomes from different rewirings because of antagonism between these major cell states. This data set of systematically related perturbations enables reverse engineering and discovery of underlying network interactions. PMID:26670742

  19. The Histone-Like Nucleoid Structuring Protein (H-NS) Is a Negative Regulator of the Lateral Flagellar System in the Deep-Sea Bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Jian, Huahua; Xu, Guanpeng; Gai, Yingbao; Xu, Jun; Xiao, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    Although the histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) is well known for its involvement in the adaptation of mesophilic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, to cold environments and high-pressure stress, an understanding of the role of H-NS in the cold-adapted benthic microorganisms that live in the deep-sea ecosystem, which covers approximately 60% of the earth's surface, is still lacking. In this study, we characterized the function of H-NS in Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, which was isolated from West Pacific sediment at a depth of 1,914 m. Anhns gene deletion mutant (WP3Δhns) was constructed, and comparative whole-genome microarray analysis was performed. H-NS had a significant influence (fold change, >2) on the expression of a variety of WP3 genes (274 and 280 genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively), particularly genes related to energy production and conversion. Notably, WP3Δhnsexhibited higher expression levels of lateral flagellar genes than WP3 and showed enhanced swarming motility and lateral flagellar production compared to those of WP3. The DNA gel mobility shift experiment showed that H-NS bound specifically to the promoter of lateral flagellar genes. Moreover, the high-affinity binding sequences of H-NS were identified by DNase I protection footprinting, and the results support the "binding and spreading" model for H-NS functioning. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to characterize the function of the universal regulator H-NS in a deep-sea bacterium. Our data revealed that H-NS has a novel function as a repressor of the expression of genes related to the energy-consuming secondary flagellar system and to swarming motility. PMID:26873312

  20. TbFlabarin, a flagellar protein of Trypanosoma brucei, highlights differences between Leishmania and Trypanosoma flagellar-targeting signals.

    PubMed

    Tetaud, Emmanuel; Lefebvre, Michèle; M'Bang-Benet, Diane-Ethna; Crobu, Lucien; Blancard, Corinne; Sterkers, Yvon; Pages, Michel; Bastien, Patrick; Merlin, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    TbFlabarin is the Trypanosoma brucei orthologue of the Leishmania flagellar protein LdFlabarin but its sequence is 33% shorter than LdFlabarin, as it lacks a C-terminal domain that is indispensable for LdFlabarin to localize to the Leishmania flagellum. TbFlabarin is mainly expressed in the procyclic forms of the parasite and localized to the flagellum, but only when two palmitoylable cysteines at positions 3 and 4 are present. TbFlabarin is more strongly attached to the membrane fraction than its Leishmania counterpart, as it resists complete solubilization with as much as 0.5% NP-40. Expression ablation by RNA interference did not change parasite growth in culture, its morphology or apparent motility. Heterologous expression showed that neither TbFlabarin in L. amazonensis nor LdFlabarin in T. brucei localized to the flagellum, revealing non-cross-reacting targeting signals between the two species. PMID:27060615

  1. Real-Time Imaging of Fluorescent Flagellar Filaments of Rhizobium lupini H13-3: Flagellar Rotation and pH-Induced Polymorphic Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    The soil bacterium Rhizobium lupini H13-3 has complex right-handed flagellar filaments with unusual ridged, grooved surfaces. Clockwise (CW) rotation propels the cells forward, and course changes (tumbling) result from changes in filament speed instead of the more common change in direction of rotation. In view of these novelties, fluorescence labeling was used to analyze the behavior of single flagellar filaments during swimming and tumbling, leading to a model for directional changes in R. lupini. Also, flagellar filaments were investigated for helical conformational changes, which have not been previously shown for complex filaments. During full-speed CW rotation, the flagellar filaments form a propulsive bundle that pushes the cell on a straight path. Tumbling is caused by asynchronous deceleration and stops of individual filaments, resulting in dissociation of the propulsive bundle. R. lupini tumbles were not accompanied by helical conformational changes as are tumbles in other organisms including enteric bacteria. However, when pH was experimentally changed, four different polymorphic forms were observed. At a physiological pH of 7, normal flagellar helices were characterized by a pitch angle of 30°, a pitch of 1.36 μm, and a helical diameter of 0.50 μm. As pH increased from 9 to 11, the helices transformed from normal to semicoiled to straight. As pH decreased from 5 to 3, the helices transformed from normal to curly to straight. Transient conformational changes were also noted at high viscosity, suggesting that the R. lupini flagellar filament may adapt to high loads in viscous environments (soil) by assuming hydrodynamically favorable conformations. PMID:12374832

  2. Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T; Paul, Catherine J; Mason, David R; Twine, Susan M; Alston, Mark J; Logan, Susan M; Austin, John W; Peck, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum is the causative agent of botulism, a severe neuroparalytic illness. Given the severity of botulism, surprisingly little is known of the population structure, biology, phylogeny or evolution of C. botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray. Results Whole genome microarray analysis revealed that 63% of the coding sequences (CDSs) present in reference strain ATCC 3502 were common to all 61 widely-representative strains of proteolytic C. botulinum and the closely related C. sporogenes tested. This indicates a relatively stable genome. There was, however, evidence for recombination and genetic exchange, in particular within the neurotoxin gene and cluster (including transfer of neurotoxin genes to C. sporogenes), and the flagellar glycosylation island (FGI). These two loci appear to have evolved independently from each other, and from the remainder of the genetic complement. A number of strains were atypical; for example, while 10 out of 14 strains that formed type A1 toxin gave almost identical profiles in whole genome, neurotoxin cluster and FGI analyses, the other four strains showed divergent properties. Furthermore, a new neurotoxin sub-type (A5) has been discovered in strains from heroin-associated wound botulism cases. For the first time, differences in glycosylation profiles of the flagella could be linked to differences in the gene content of the FGI. Conclusion Proteolytic C. botulinum has a stable genome backbone containing specific regions of genetic heterogeneity. These include the neurotoxin gene cluster and the FGI, each having evolved independently of each other and the remainder of the genetic complement. Analysis of these genetic components provides a high degree of discrimination of strains of proteolytic C. botulinum, and is suitable for clinical and forensic investigations of botulism outbreaks. PMID:19298644

  3. Cloning, expression and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of Helicobacter pylori in Escherichia coli host as a vaccination target

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Helicobacter pylori is a widely distributed gram-negative bacterium that infects the human stomach and duodenum. HpaA is a H. pylori–specific lipoprotein that has been shown to be an effective protective antigen against H. pylori infection. HpaA of H. pylori as a vaccine antigen is fully competent for stimulation of immune responses. The aim of this project is cloning, expression, and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of H. pylori in Escherichia coli host by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) as a vaccination target. Materials and Methods The hpaA gene was inserted into pET28a (+) as cloning and expression vectors respectively. The recombinant plasmid (pET-hpaA) was subjected to sequencing other than polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and digestion analysis. Protein expression was induced by adding 1 mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside to cultures of E. coli strain BL21 transformed with pET-hpaA. Protein expression assessed with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. Protein purification of flagellar sheath adhesion was by FPLC. Results The restriction endonuclease digestion, PCR amplification analysis showed that the hpaA gene of 730 bp was amplified from H. pylori DNA and sequencing analysis of the pET-hpaA confirmed the cloning accuracy and in frame insertion of hpaA fragment. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the expression of an approximately 29,000 Da protein. Conclusion Sequencing results along with SDS-PAGE analysis confirms the expression of recombinant hpaA in the heterologous E. coli BL21. Conclusion A prokaryotic expression system for hpaA gene was successfully constructed. These results indicate that production of a specific recombinant protein is an alternative and potentially more expeditious strategy for development of H. pylori vaccine. PMID:26866020

  4. Correspondence between Resting-State Activity and Brain Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Zhong; Belgard, T Grant; Mao, Deng; Chen, Leslie; Berto, Stefano; Preuss, Todd M; Lu, Hanzhang; Geschwind, Daniel H; Konopka, Genevieve

    2015-11-18

    The relationship between functional brain activity and gene expression has not been fully explored in the human brain. Here, we identify significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and functional activity by comparing fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) from two independent human fMRI resting-state datasets to regional cortical gene expression from a newly generated RNA-seq dataset and two additional gene expression datasets to obtain robust and reproducible correlations. We find significantly more genes correlated with fALFF than expected by chance and identify specific genes correlated with the imaging signals in multiple expression datasets in the default mode network. Together, these data support a population-level relationship between regional steady-state brain gene expression and resting-state brain activity. PMID:26590343

  5. Following the Viterbi Path to Deduce Flagellar Actin-Interacting Proteins of Leishmania spp.: Report on Cofilins and Twinfilins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Ana Carolina L.; Araújo, Fabiana F.; Kamimura, Michel T.; Medeiros, Sarah R.; Viana, Daniel A.; Oliveira, Fátima de Cássia E.; Filho, Raimundo Araújo; Costa, Marcília P.; Oliveira, Diana M.

    2007-11-01

    For performing vital cellular processes, such as motility, eukaryotic cells rely on the actin cytoskeleton, whose structure and dynamics are tightly controlled by a large number of actin-interacting (AIP) or actin-related/regulating (ARP) proteins. Trypanosomatid protozoa, such as Leishmania, rely on their flagellum for motility and sensory reception, which are believed to allow parasite migration, adhesion, invasion and even persistence on mammalian host tissues to cause disease. Actin can determine cell stiffness and transmit force during mechanotransduction, cytokinesis, cell motility and other cellular shape changes, while the identification and analyses of AIPs can help to improve understanding of their mechanical properties on physiological architectures, such as the present case regarding Leishmania flagellar apparatus. This work conveniently apply bioinformatics tools in some refined pattern recognition techniques (such as hidden Markov models (HMMs) through the Viterbi algorithm/path) in order to improve the recognition of actin-binding/interacting activity through identification of AIPs in genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of Leishmania species. We here report cofilin and twinfilin as putative components of the flagellar apparatus, a direct bioinformatics contribution in the secondary annotation of Leishmania and trypanosomatid genomes.

  6. MotX, the channel component of the sodium-type flagellar motor.

    PubMed Central

    McCarter, L L

    1994-01-01

    Thrust for propulsion of flagellated bacteria is generated by rotation of a propeller, the flagellum. The power to drive the polar flagellar rotary motor of Vibrio parahaemolyticus is derived from the transmembrane potential of sodium ions. Force is generated by the motor on coupling of the movement of ions across the membrane to rotation of the flagellum. A gene, motX, encoding one component of the torque generator has been cloned and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence is 212 amino acids in length. MotX was localized to the membrane and shown to interact with MotY, which is the presumed stationary component of the motor. Overproduction of MotX, but not that of a nonfunctional mutant MotX, was lethal to Escherichia coli. The rate of lysis caused by induction of motX was proportional to the sodium ion concentration. Li+ and K+ substituted for Na+ to promote lysis, while Ca2+ did not enhance lysis. Protection from the lethal effects of induction of motX was afforded by the sodium channel blocker amiloride. The data suggest that MotX forms a sodium channel. The deduced protein sequence for MotX shows no homology to its ion-conducting counterpart in the proton-driven motor; however, in possessing only one hydrophobic domain, it resembles other channels formed by small proteins with single membrane-spanning domains. Images PMID:7928960

  7. Microtubule-severing proteins are involved in flagellar length control and mitosis in Trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Magali; Crobu, Lucien; Blaineau, Christine; Bourgeois, Nathalie; Bastien, Patrick; Pagès, Michel

    2009-03-01

    Microtubules are key players in the biology of Trypanosomatid parasites, not only as classical components of the mitotic spindle, microtubule-organizing centres and flagellum but also as the essential constituent of the cytoskeleton. Their length dynamics are regulated by, among others, microtubule-severing proteins. Four and six genes encoding microtubule-severing proteins can be found bioinformatically in the Leishmania major and Trypanosoma brucei genome respectively. We investigated all these proteins in these organisms, which include the katanin, katanin-like, spastin and fidgetin, and looked at their subcellular localization as well as their putative function by examining 'loss-of-function' phenotypes. The katanin-like KAT60b was found implicated in flagellar length reduction, but not in its size increase, while the katanin p80 subunit appeared clearly involved in cytokinesis. Fidgetin and spastin homologues were both localized in the nucleus: the first as a discrete and variable number of dots during most of the cell cycle, redistributing to the spindle and midbody during mitosis; the second concentrated as < or = 5 perinucleolar punctuations, similar to the electron-dense plaques identified in T. brucei, which were assimilated to kinetochores. This first study of microtubule-severing proteins in 'divergent' eukaryotes gives further insight into the multiple functions of these proteins identified in the hitherto studied models. PMID:19183280

  8. The Gearbox of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor Switch.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Alessandro; Morcos, Faruck; Khan, Shahid

    2016-07-01

    Switching of flagellar motor rotation sense dictates bacterial chemotaxis. Multi-subunit FliM-FliG rotor rings couple signal protein binding in FliM with reversal of a distant FliG C-terminal (FliGC) helix involved in stator contacts. Subunit dynamics were examined in conformer ensembles generated by molecular simulations from the X-ray structures. Principal component analysis extracted collective motions. Interfacial loop immobilization by complex formation coupled elastic fluctuations of the FliM middle (FliMM) and FliG middle (FliGM) domains. Coevolved mutations captured interfacial dynamics as well as contacts. FliGM rotation was amplified via two central hinges to the FliGC helix. Intrinsic flexibility, reported by the FliGMC ensembles, reconciled conformers with opposite FliGC helix orientations. FliG domain stacking deformed the inter-domain linker and reduced flexibility; but conformational changes were not triggered by engineered linker deletions that cause a rotation-locked phenotype. These facts suggest that binary rotation states arise from conformational selection by stacking interactions. PMID:27345932

  9. Polar features in the flagellar propulsion of E. coli bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, S.; Saglimbeni, F.; Lepore, A.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2015-06-01

    E. coli bacteria swim following a run and tumble pattern. In the run state all flagella join in a single helical bundle that propels the cell body along approximately straight paths. When one or more flagellar motors reverse direction the bundle unwinds and the cell randomizes its orientation. This basic picture represents an idealization of a much more complex dynamical problem. Although it has been shown that bundle formation can occur at either pole of the cell, it is still unclear whether these two run states correspond to asymmetric propulsion features. Using holographic microscopy we record the 3D motions of individual bacteria swimming in optical traps. We find that most cells possess two run states characterized by different propulsion forces, total torque, and bundle conformations. We analyze the statistical properties of bundle reversal and compare the hydrodynamic features of forward and backward running states. Our method is naturally multi-particle and opens up the way towards controlled hydrodynamic studies of interacting swimming cells.

  10. Model Studies of the Dynamics of Bacterial Flagellar Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, F; Lo, C; Berry, R; Xing, J

    2009-03-19

    The Bacterial Flagellar Motor is a rotary molecular machine that rotates the helical filaments which propel swimming bacteria. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies exist on the structure, assembly, energy input, power generation and switching mechanism of the motor. In our previous paper, we explained the general physics underneath the observed torque-speed curves with a simple two-state Fokker-Planck model. Here we further analyze this model. In this paper we show (1) the model predicts that the two components of the ion motive force can affect the motor dynamics differently, in agreement with the latest experiment by Lo et al.; (2) with explicit consideration of the stator spring, the model also explains the lack of dependence of the zero-load speed on stator number in the proton motor, recently observed by Yuan and Berg; (3) the model reproduces the stepping behavior of the motor even with the existence of the stator springs and predicts the dwelling time distribution. Predicted stepping behavior of motors with two stators is discussed, and we suggest future experimental verification.

  11. Stoichiometry and turnover of the bacterial flagellar switch protein FliN.

    PubMed

    Delalez, Nicolas J; Berry, Richard M; Armitage, Judith P

    2014-01-01

    Some proteins in biological complexes exchange with pools of free proteins while the complex is functioning. Evidence is emerging that protein exchange can be part of an adaptive mechanism. The bacterial flagellar motor is one of the most complex biological machines and is an ideal model system to study protein dynamics in large multimeric complexes. Recent studies showed that the copy number of FliM in the switch complex and the fraction of FliM that exchanges vary with the direction of flagellar rotation. Here, we investigated the stoichiometry and turnover of another switch complex component, FliN, labeled with the fluorescent protein CyPet, in Escherichia coli. Our results confirm that, in vivo, FliM and FliN form a complex with stoichiometry of 1:4 and function as a unit. We estimated that wild-type motors contained 120 ± 26 FliN molecules. Motors that rotated only clockwise (CW) or counterclockwise (CCW) contained 114 ± 17 and 144 ± 26 FliN molecules, respectively. The ratio of CCW-to-CW FliN copy numbers was 1.26, very close to that of 1.29 reported previously for FliM. We also measured the exchange of FliN molecules, which had a time scale and dependence upon rotation direction similar to those of FliM, consistent with an exchange of FliM-FliN as a unit. Our work confirms the highly dynamic nature of multimeric protein complexes and indicates that, under physiological conditions, these machines might not be the stable, complete structures suggested by averaged fixed methodologies but, rather, incomplete rings that can respond and adapt to changing environments. Importance: The flagellum is one of the most complex structures in a bacterial cell, with the core motor proteins conserved across species. Evidence is now emerging that turnover of some of these motor proteins depends on motor activity, suggesting that turnover is important for function. The switch complex transmits the chemosensory signal to the rotor, and we show, by using single

  12. Chromatin Remodeling Inactivates Activity Genes and Regulates Neural Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kelly K.; Hemberg, Martin; Reddy, Naveen C.; Cho, Ha Y.; Guthrie, Arden N.; Oldenborg, Anna; Heiney, Shane A.; Ohmae, Shogo; Medina, Javier F.; Holy, Timothy E.; Bonni, Azad

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcription influences neuronal connectivity, but the roles and mechanisms of inactivation of activity-dependent genes have remained poorly understood. Genome-wide analyses in the mouse cerebellum revealed that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex deposits the histone variant H2A.z at promoters of activity-dependent genes, thereby triggering their inactivation. Purification of translating mRNAs from synchronously developing granule neurons (Sync-TRAP) showed that conditional knockout of the core NuRD subunit Chd4 impairs inactivation of activity-dependent genes when neurons undergo dendrite pruning. Chd4 knockout or expression of NuRD-regulated activity genes impairs dendrite pruning. Imaging of behaving mice revealed hyperresponsivity of granule neurons to sensorimotor stimuli upon Chd4 knockout. Our findings define an epigenetic mechanism that inactivates activity-dependent transcription and regulates dendrite patterning and sensorimotor encoding in the brain. PMID:27418512

  13. Flagellar apparatus absolute orientations and the phylogeny of the green algae.

    PubMed

    O'Kelly, C J; Floyd, G L

    The absolute orientation of the flagellar apparatus in green algal motile cells is a feature of considerable value in studies of green algal systematics and phylogeny. The absolute orientation patterns found in those algae for which this feature is known or can be deduced are reviewed. Counterclockwise absolute orientation occurs in all classes except the Chlorophyceae and is considered primitive, while the clockwise absolute orientation present in most members of the Chlorophyceae is the result of progressive clockwise rotation of components during evolution. Extant intermediates documenting this rotation include Hafniomonas vegetative cells, which show counterclockwise absolute orientation, and Chaetopeltis quadriflagellate zoospores, in which the flagellar apparatus is strictly cruciate except for a slight clockwise offset of the microtubular rootlets. The V-shaped arrangement of the basal bodies in the flagellar apparatus, as well as the presence of proximal sheaths and of two layers of scales on the cell body, further identifies the Chaetopeltis zoospore as a primitive cell type within the Chlorophyceae . Trends towards the exsertion of basal bodies from a flagellar pit, either apically or laterally, the elimination of quadriflagellate cells, and, in the Chlorophyceae , an increasing amount of basal body offset, indicate advancement within the classes. Absolute orientation is conserved during flagellar apparatus replication and development. Events after flagellar apparatus division in the algae studied may be subdivided into component assembly, which is universal and preserves phylogenetically-useful features, and component reorientation, which occurs in relatively few green algae and adapts the flagellar apparatus to specialized functions. From these flagellar apparatus orientation studies, a major reevaluation of evolution within the Chlorophyceae is proposed, with weakly- thalloid algae possessing desmoschisis (e.g. Chaetopeltis ) considered primitive, and

  14. Giardia Flagellar Motility Is Not Directly Required to Maintain Attachment to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    House, Susan A.; Richter, David J.; Pham, Jonathan K.; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia trophozoites attach to the intestinal microvilli (or inert surfaces) using an undefined “suction-based” mechanism, and remain attached during cell division to avoid peristalsis. Flagellar motility is a key factor in Giardia's pathogenesis and colonization of the host small intestine. Specifically, the beating of the ventral flagella, one of four pairs of motile flagella, has been proposed to generate a hydrodynamic force that results in suction-based attachment via the adjacent ventral disc. We aimed to test this prevailing “hydrodynamic model” of attachment mediated by flagellar motility. We defined four distinct stages of attachment by assessing surface contacts of the trophozoite with the substrate during attachment using TIRF microscopy (TIRFM). The lateral crest of the ventral disc forms a continuous perimeter seal with the substrate, a cytological indication that trophozoites are fully attached. Using trophozoites with two types of molecularly engineered defects in flagellar beating, we determined that neither ventral flagellar beating, nor any flagellar beating, is necessary for the maintenance of attachment. Following a morpholino-based knockdown of PF16, a central pair protein, both the beating and morphology of flagella were defective, but trophozoites could still initiate proper surface contacts as seen using TIRFM and could maintain attachment in several biophysical assays. Trophozoites with impaired motility were able to attach as well as motile cells. We also generated a strain with defects in the ventral flagellar waveform by overexpressing a dominant negative form of alpha2-annexin::GFP (D122A, D275A). This dominant negative alpha2-annexin strain could initiate attachment and had only a slight decrease in the ability to withstand normal and shear forces. The time needed for attachment did increase in trophozoites with overall defective flagellar beating, however. Thus while not directly required for attachment, flagellar motility is

  15. Glucose induces delocalization of a flagellar biosynthesis protein from the flagellated pole.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyoung; Park, Young-Ha; Lee, Chang-Ro; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Seok, Yeong-Jae

    2016-09-01

    To survive in a continuously changing environment, bacteria sense concentration gradients of attractants or repellents, and purposefully migrate until a more favourable habitat is encountered. While glucose is known as the most effective attractant, the flagellar biosynthesis and hence chemotactic motility has been known to be repressed by glucose in some bacteria. To date, the only known regulatory mechanism of the repression of flagellar synthesis by glucose is via downregulation of the cAMP level, as shown in a few members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Here we show that, in Vibrio vulnificus, the glucose-mediated inhibition of flagellar motility operates by a completely different mechanism. In the presence of glucose, EIIA(Glc) is dephosphorylated and inhibits the polar localization of FapA (flagellar assembly protein A) by sequestering it from the flagellated pole. A loss or delocalization of FapA results in a complete failure of the flagellar biosynthesis and motility. However, when glucose is depleted, EIIA(Glc) is phosphorylated and releases FapA such that free FapA can be localized back to the pole and trigger flagellation. Together, these data provide new insight into a bacterial strategy to reach and stay in the glucose-rich area. PMID:27218601

  16. High-speed holographic microscopy of malaria parasites reveals ambidextrous flagellar waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laurence G.; Carter, Lucy M.; Reece, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Axonemes form the core of eukaryotic flagella and cilia, performing tasks ranging from transporting fluid in developing embryos to the propulsion of sperm. Despite their abundance across the eukaryotic domain, the mechanisms that regulate the beating action of axonemes remain unknown. The flagellar waveforms are 3D in general, but current understanding of how axoneme components interact stems from 2D data; comprehensive measurements of flagellar shape are beyond conventional microscopy. Moreover, current flagellar model systems (e.g., sea urchin, human sperm) contain accessory structures that impose mechanical constraints on movement, obscuring the “native” axoneme behavior. We address both problems by developing a high-speed holographic imaging scheme and applying it to the (male) microgametes of malaria (Plasmodium) parasites. These isolated flagella are a unique, mathematically tractable model system for the physics of microswimmers. We reveal the 3D flagellar waveforms of these microorganisms and map the differential shear between microtubules in their axonemes. Furthermore, we overturn claims that chirality in the structure of the axoneme governs the beat pattern [Hirokawa N, et al. (2009) Ann Rev Fluid Mech 41:53–72], because microgametes display a left- or right-handed character on alternate beats. This breaks the link between structural chirality in the axoneme and larger scale symmetry breaking (e.g., in developing embryos), leading us to conclude that accessory structures play a critical role in shaping the flagellar beat. PMID:24194551

  17. Flagellar pocket restructuring through the Leishmania life cycle involves a discrete flagellum attachment zone.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Richard J; Sunter, Jack D; Gull, Keith

    2016-02-15

    Leishmania promastigote parasites have a flagellum, which protrudes from the flagellar pocket at the cell anterior, yet, surprisingly, have homologs of many flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) proteins--proteins used in the related Trypanosoma species to laterally attach the flagellum to the cell body from the flagellar pocket to the cell posterior. Here, we use seven Leishmania mexicana cell lines that expressed eYFP fusions of FAZ protein homologs to show that the Leishmania flagellar pocket includes a FAZ structure. Electron tomography revealed a precisely defined 3D organisation for both the flagellar pocket and FAZ, with striking similarities to those of Trypanosoma brucei. Expression of two T. brucei FAZ proteins in L. mexicana showed that T. brucei FAZ proteins can assemble into the Leishmania FAZ structure. Leishmania therefore have a previously unrecognised FAZ structure, which we show undergoes major structural reorganisation in the transition from the promastigote (sandfly vector) to amastigote (in mammalian macrophages). Morphogenesis of the Leishmania flagellar pocket, a structure important for pathogenicity, is therefore intimately associated with a FAZ; a finding with implications for understanding shape changes involving component modules during evolution. PMID:26746239

  18. Flagellar pocket restructuring through the Leishmania life cycle involves a discrete flagellum attachment zone

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Richard J.; Sunter, Jack D.; Gull, Keith

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leishmania promastigote parasites have a flagellum, which protrudes from the flagellar pocket at the cell anterior, yet, surprisingly, have homologs of many flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) proteins – proteins used in the related Trypanosoma species to laterally attach the flagellum to the cell body from the flagellar pocket to the cell posterior. Here, we use seven Leishmania mexicana cell lines that expressed eYFP fusions of FAZ protein homologs to show that the Leishmania flagellar pocket includes a FAZ structure. Electron tomography revealed a precisely defined 3D organisation for both the flagellar pocket and FAZ, with striking similarities to those of Trypanosoma brucei. Expression of two T. brucei FAZ proteins in L. mexicana showed that T. brucei FAZ proteins can assemble into the Leishmania FAZ structure. Leishmania therefore have a previously unrecognised FAZ structure, which we show undergoes major structural reorganisation in the transition from the promastigote (sandfly vector) to amastigote (in mammalian macrophages). Morphogenesis of the Leishmania flagellar pocket, a structure important for pathogenicity, is therefore intimately associated with a FAZ; a finding with implications for understanding shape changes involving component modules during evolution. PMID:26746239

  19. A MORN Repeat Protein Facilitates Protein Entry into the Flagellar Pocket of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma brucei lives in the bloodstream of infected mammalian hosts, fully exposed to the adaptive immune system. It relies on a very high rate of endocytosis to clear bound antibodies from its cell surface. All endo- and exocytosis occurs at a single site on its plasma membrane, an intracellular invagination termed the flagellar pocket. Coiled around the neck of the flagellar pocket is a multiprotein complex containing the repeat motif protein T. brucei MORN1 (TbMORN1). In this study, the phenotypic effects of TbMORN1 depletion in the mammalian-infective form of T. brucei were analyzed. Depletion of TbMORN1 resulted in a rapid enlargement of the flagellar pocket. Dextran, a polysaccharide marker for fluid phase endocytosis, accumulated inside the enlarged flagellar pocket. Unexpectedly, however, the proteins concanavalin A and bovine serum albumin did not do so, and concanavalin A was instead found to concentrate outside it. This suggests that TbMORN1 may have a role in facilitating the entry of proteins into the flagellar pocket. PMID:26318396

  20. Entosiphon sulcatum (Euglenophyceae): flagellar roots of the basal body complex and reservoir region

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, J.A.; Walne, P.L.; Kivic, P.A.

    1987-03-01

    The flagellar root system of Entosiphon sulcatum (Dujardin) Stein (Euglenophyceae) is described and compared with kinetoplastid and other euglenoid systems. An asymmetric pattern of three microtubular roots, one between the two flagellar basal bodies and one on either side (here called the intermediate, dorsal, and ventral roots), is consistent within the euglenoid flagellates studied thus far. The dorsal root is associated with the basal body of the anterior flagellum (F1) and lies on the left dorsal side of the basal body complex. Originating between the two flagellar basal bodies, and associated with the basal body of the trailing flagellum (F2), the intermediate root is morphologically distinguished by fibrils interconnecting the individual microtubules to one another and to the overlying reservoir membrane. The intermediate root is often borne on a ridge projecting into the reservoir. The ventral root originates near the F2 basal body and lies on the right ventral side of the cell. Fibrillar connections link the membrane of F2 with the reservoir membrane at the reservoir-canal transition level. A large cross-banded fiber joins the two flagellar basal bodies, and a series of smaller striated fibers links the anterior accessory and flagellar basal bodies. Large nonstriated fibers extend from the basal body complex posteriorly into the cytoplasm.

  1. Modeling the Activity of Single Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, Eric; Gibson, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that information is stored in DNA, transcribed to messenger RNA (mRNA) and then translated into proteins. This picture is significantly augmentated when we consider the action of certain proteins in regulating transcription. These transcription factors provide a feedback pathway by which genes can regulate one another's expression as mRNA and then as protein. To review: DNA, RNA and proteins have different functions. DNA is the molecular storehouse of genetic information. When cells divide, the DNA is replicated, so that each daughter cell maintains the same genetic information as the mother cell. RNA acts as a go-between from DNA to proteins. Only a single copy of DNA is present, but multiple copies of the same piece of RNA may be present, allowing cells to make huge amounts of protein. In eukaryotes (organisms with a nucleus), DNA is found in the nucleus only. RNA is copied in the nucleus then translocates(moves) outside the nucleus, where it is transcribed into proteins. Along the way, the RNA may be spliced, i.e., may have pieces cut out. RNA then attaches to ribosomes and is translated to proteins. Proteins are the machinery of the cell other than DNA and RNA, all the complex molecules of the cell are proteins. Proteins are specialized machines, each of which fulfills its own task, which may be transporting oxygen, catalyzing reactions, or responding to extracellular signals, just to name a few. One of the more interesting functions a protein may have is binding directly or indirectly to DNA to perform transcriptional regulation, thus forming a closed feedback loop of gene regulation. The structure of DNA and the central dogma were understood in the 50s; in the early 80s it became possible to make arbitrary modifications to DNA and use cellular machinery to transcribe and translate the resulting genes; more recently, genomes (i.e., the complete DNA sequence) of many organisms have been sequenced. This large

  2. Imprinted control of gene activity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Golic, K G; Golic, M M; Pimpinelli, S

    1998-11-19

    Genetic imprinting is defined as a reversible, differential marking of genes or chromosomes that is determined by the sex of the parent from whom the genetic material is inherited [1]. Imprinting was first observed in insects where, in some species, most notably among the coccoids (scale insects and allies), the differential marking of paternally and maternally transmitted chromosome sets leads to inactivation or elimination of paternal chromosomes [2]. Imprinting is also widespread in plants and mammals [3,4], in which paternally and maternally inherited alleles may be differentially expressed. Despite imprinting having been discovered in insects, clear examples of parental imprinting are scarce in the model insect species Drosophila melanogaster. We describe a case of imprint-mediated control of gene expression in Drosophila. The imprinted gene - the white+ eye-color gene - is expressed at a low level when transmitted by males, and at a high level when transmitted by females. Thus, in common with coccoids, Drosophila is capable of generating an imprint, and can respond to that imprint by silencing the paternal allele. PMID:9822579

  3. Gene Regulatory Networks Activated during Chronic Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic tuberculosis represents a burden for most of world’s population. Several genes were found to be up-regulated at the late stage of chronic tuberculosis when DNA microarray protocol was used to analyze murine tuberculosis. Rv0348 is a potential transcriptional regulator that is highly expresse...

  4. A Luciferase Reporter Gene System for High-Throughput Screening of γ-Globin Gene Activators.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wensheng; Silvers, Robert; Ouellette, Michael; Wu, Zining; Lu, Quinn; Li, Hu; Gallagher, Kathleen; Johnson, Kathy; Montoute, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Luciferase reporter gene assays have long been used for drug discovery due to their high sensitivity and robust signal. A dual reporter gene system contains a gene of interest and a control gene to monitor non-specific effects on gene expression. In our dual luciferase reporter gene system, a synthetic promoter of γ-globin gene was constructed immediately upstream of the firefly luciferase gene, followed downstream by a synthetic β-globin gene promoter in front of the Renilla luciferase gene. A stable cell line with the dual reporter gene was cloned and used for all assay development and HTS work. Due to the low activity of the control Renilla luciferase, only the firefly luciferase activity was further optimized for HTS. Several critical factors, such as cell density, serum concentration, and miniaturization, were optimized using tool compounds to achieve maximum robustness and sensitivity. Using the optimized reporter assay, the HTS campaign was successfully completed and approximately 1000 hits were identified. In this chapter, we also describe strategies to triage hits that non-specifically interfere with firefly luciferase. PMID:27316998

  5. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael N.; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  6. FliG and FliM distribution in the Salmonella typhimurium cell and flagellar basal bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, R; Amsler, C D; Matsumura, P; Khan, S

    1996-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium FliG and FliM are two of three proteins known to be necessary for flagellar morphogenesis as well as energization and switching of flagellar rotation. We have determined FliG and FliM levels in cellular fractions and in extended flagellar basal bodies, using antibodies raised against the purified proteins. Both proteins were found predominantly in the detergent-solubilized particulate fraction containing flagellar structures. Basal flagellar fragments could be separated from partially constructed basal bodies by gel filtration chromatography. FliG and FliM were present in an approximately equimolar ration in all gel-filtered fractions. FliG and FliM copy numbers, estimated relative to that of the hook protein from the early fractions containing long, basal, flagellar fragments, were (means +/- standard errors) 41 +/- 10 and 37 +/- 13 per flagellum, respectively. Extended structures were present in the earliest identifiable basal bodies. Immunoelectron microscopy and immunoblot gel analysis suggested that the FliG and, to a less certain degree, the FliM contents of these structures were the same as those for the complete basal bodies. These facts are consistent with the postulate that FliG and FliM affect flagellar morphogenesis as part of the extended basal structure, formation of which is necessary for assembly of more-distal components of the flagellum. The determined stoichiometries will provide important constraints to modelling energization and switching of flagellar rotation. PMID:8550426

  7. Zipping and entanglement in flagellar bundle of E. coli: Role of motile cell body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhyapak, Tapan Chandra; Stark, Holger

    2015-11-01

    The course of a peritrichous bacterium, such as E. coli, crucially depends on the level of synchronization and self-organization of several rotating flagella. However, the rotation of each flagellum generates countermovements of the body which in turn affect the flagellar dynamics. Using a detailed numerical model of an E. coli, we demonstrate that flagellar entanglement, besides fluid flow relative to the moving body, dramatically changes the dynamics of flagella from that compared to anchored flagella. In particular, bundle formation occurs through a zipping motion in a remarkably rapid time, affected little by initial flagellar orientation. A simplified analytical model supports our observations. Finally, we illustrate how entanglement, hydrodynamic interactions, and body movement contribute to zipping and bundling.

  8. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    PubMed

    Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Petrunia, Igor V; Komarova, Tatiana V; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S; Kiryanov, Gleb I; Dorokhov, Yuri L

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  9. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  10. Using shotgun sequence data to find active restriction enzyme genes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Posfai, Janos; Morgan, Richard D; Vincze, Tamas; Roberts, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequence analysis has become the standard method for beginning to determine a genome sequence. The preparation of the shotgun sequence clones is, in fact, a biological experiment. It determines which segments of the genome can be cloned into Escherichia coli and which cannot. By analyzing the complete set of sequences from such an experiment, it is possible to identify genes lethal to E. coli. Among this set are genes encoding restriction enzymes which, when active in E. coli, lead to cell death by cleaving the E. coli genome at the restriction enzyme recognition sites. By analyzing shotgun sequence data sets we show that this is a reliable method to detect active restriction enzyme genes in newly sequenced genomes, thereby facilitating functional annotation. Active restriction enzyme genes have been identified, and their activity demonstrated biochemically, in the sequenced genomes of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 and Methylococcus capsulatus. PMID:18988632

  11. Knockdown of Inner Arm Protein IC138 in Trypanosoma brucei Causes Defective Motility and Flagellar Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Corinne S.; Chang, Alex J.; Greene, Rebecca; Machado, Sulynn; Parsons, Matthew W.; Takats, Taylor A.; Zambetti, Luke J.; Springer, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Motility in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is conferred by a single flagellum, attached alongside the cell, which moves the cell forward using a beat that is generated from tip-to-base. We are interested in characterizing components that regulate flagellar beating, in this study we extend the characterization of TbIC138, the ortholog of a dynein intermediate chain that regulates axonemal inner arm dynein f/I1. TbIC138 was tagged In situ-and shown to fractionate with the inner arm components of the flagellum. RNAi knockdown of TbIC138 resulted in significantly reduced protein levels, mild growth defect and significant motility defects. These cells tended to cluster, exhibited slow and abnormal motility and some cells had partially or fully detached flagella. Slight but significant increases were observed in the incidence of mis-localized or missing kinetoplasts. To document development of the TbIC138 knockdown phenotype over time, we performed a detailed analysis of flagellar detachment and motility changes over 108 hours following induction of RNAi. Abnormal motility, such as slow twitching or irregular beating, was observed early, and became progressively more severe such that by 72 hours-post-induction, approximately 80% of the cells were immotile. Progressively more cells exhibited flagellar detachment over time, but this phenotype was not as prevalent as immotility, affecting less than 60% of the population. Detached flagella had abnormal beating, but abnormal beating was also observed in cells with no flagellar detachment, suggesting that TbIC138 has a direct, or primary, effect on the flagellar beat, whereas detachment is a secondary phenotype of TbIC138 knockdown. Our results are consistent with the role of TbIC138 as a regulator of motility, and has a phenotype amenable to more extensive structure-function analyses to further elucidate its role in the control of flagellar beat in T. brucei. PMID:26555902

  12. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  13. Physical activity in adulthood: genes and mortality.

    PubMed

    Karvinen, Sira; Waller, Katja; Silvennoinen, Mika; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Kujala, Urho M

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies report a strong inverse relationship between leisure-time physical activity and all-cause mortality. Despite suggestive evidence from population-based associations, scientists have not been able to show a beneficial effect of physical activity on the risk of death in controlled intervention studies among individuals who have been healthy at baseline. On the other hand, high cardiorespiratory fitness is known to be a strong predictor of reduced mortality, even more robust than physical activity level itself. Here, in both animals and/or human twins, we show that the same genetic factors influence physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk of death. Previous observational follow-up studies in humans suggest that increasing fitness through physical activity levels could prolong life; however, our controlled interventional study with laboratory rats bred for low and high intrinsic fitness contrast with these findings. Also, we find no evidence for the suggested association using pairwise analysis among monozygotic twin pairs who are discordant in their physical activity levels. Based on both our animal and human findings, we propose that genetic pleiotropy might partly explain the frequently observed associations between high baseline physical activity and later reduced mortality in humans. PMID:26666586

  14. Physical activity in adulthood: genes and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Karvinen, Sira; Waller, Katja; Silvennoinen, Mika; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Kujala, Urho M.

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies report a strong inverse relationship between leisure-time physical activity and all-cause mortality. Despite suggestive evidence from population-based associations, scientists have not been able to show a beneficial effect of physical activity on the risk of death in controlled intervention studies among individuals who have been healthy at baseline. On the other hand, high cardiorespiratory fitness is known to be a strong predictor of reduced mortality, even more robust than physical activity level itself. Here, in both animals and/or human twins, we show that the same genetic factors influence physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk of death. Previous observational follow-up studies in humans suggest that increasing fitness through physical activity levels could prolong life; however, our controlled interventional study with laboratory rats bred for low and high intrinsic fitness contrast with these findings. Also, we find no evidence for the suggested association using pairwise analysis among monozygotic twin pairs who are discordant in their physical activity levels. Based on both our animal and human findings, we propose that genetic pleiotropy might partly explain the frequently observed associations between high baseline physical activity and later reduced mortality in humans. PMID:26666586

  15. Mechanisms of specificity in neuronal activity-regulated gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Michelle R.; West, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is a highly adaptable organ that is capable of converting sensory information into changes in neuronal function. This plasticity allows behavior to be accommodated to the environment, providing an important evolutionary advantage. Neurons convert environmental stimuli into long-lasting changes in their physiology in part through the synaptic activity-regulated transcription of new gene products. Since the neurotransmitter-dependent regulation of Fos transcription was first discovered nearly 25 years ago, a wealth of studies have enriched our understanding of the molecular pathways that mediate activity-regulated changes in gene transcription. These findings show that a broad range of signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators can be engaged by neuronal activity to sculpt complex programs of stimulus-regulated gene transcription. However, the shear scope of the transcriptional pathways engaged by neuronal activity raises the question of how specificity in the nature of the transcriptional response is achieved in order to encode physiologically relevant responses to divergent stimuli. Here we summarize the general paradigms by which neuronal activity regulates transcription while focusing on the molecular mechanisms that confer differential stimulus-, cell-type-, and developmental-specificity upon activity-regulated programs of neuronal gene transcription. In addition, we preview some of the new technologies that will advance our future understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of activity-regulated gene transcription in the brain. PMID:21620929

  16. Absence of canonical active chromatin marks in developmentally regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated to stable production of RNA, while unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and de-activation during development. In this case, regulation by transcription factors would play a comparatively more important regulatory role. PMID:26280901

  17. Cationic Amino Acid Uptake Constitutes a Metabolic Regulation Mechanism and Occurs in the Flagellar Pocket of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, León A.; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Montserrat, Javier; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosomatids' amino acid permeases are key proteins in parasite metabolism since they participate in the adaptation of parasites to different environments. Here, we report that TcAAP3, a member of a Trypanosoma cruzi multigene family of permeases, is a bona fide arginine transporter. Most higher eukaryotic cells incorporate cationic amino acids through a single transporter. In contrast, T. cruzi can recognize and transport cationic amino acids by mono-specific permeases since a 100-fold molar excess of lysine could not affect the arginine transport in parasites that over-express the arginine permease (TcAAP3 epimastigotes). In order to test if the permease activity regulates downstream processes of the arginine metabolism, the expression of the single T. cruzi enzyme that uses arginine as substrate, arginine kinase, was evaluated in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. In this parasite model, intracellular arginine concentration increases 4-folds and ATP level remains constant until cultures reach the stationary phase of growth, with decreases of about 6-folds in respect to the controls. Interestingly, Western Blot analysis demonstrated that arginine kinase is significantly down-regulated during the stationary phase of growth in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. This decrease could represent a compensatory mechanism for the increase in ATP consumption as a consequence of the displacement of the reaction equilibrium of arginine kinase, when the intracellular arginine concentration augments and the glucose from the medium is exhausted. Using immunofluorescence techniques we also determined that TcAAP3 and the specific lysine transporter TcAAP7 co-localize in a specialized region of the plasma membrane named flagellar pocket, staining a single locus close to the flagellar pocket collar. Taken together these data suggest that arginine transport is closely related to arginine metabolism and cell energy balance. The clinical relevance of studying trypanosomatids' permeases relies on the

  18. Kinetically resolved states of the Halobacterium halobium flagellar motor switch and modulation of the switch by sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed Central

    McCain, D A; Amici, L A; Spudich, J L

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous switching of the rotation sense of the flagellar motor of the archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium and modulation of the switch by attractant and repellent photostimuli were analyzed by using a computerized cell-tracking system with 67-ms resolution coupled to electronic shutters. The data fit a three-state model of the switch, in which a Poisson process governs the transition from state N (nonreversing) to state R (reversing). After a reversal, the switch returns to state N, passing through an intermediate state I (inactive), which produces a ca. 2-s period of low reversal frequency before the state N Poisson rate is restored. The stochastic nature of the H. halobium switch reveals a close similarity to Escherichia coli flagellar motor properties as elucidated previously. Sensory modulation of the switch by both photoattractant and photorepellent signals can be interpreted in terms of modulation of the single forward rate constant of the N to R transition. Insight into the mechanism of modulation by the phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SR-I) was gained by increasing the lifetime of the principal photointermediate of the SR-I photochemical reaction cycle, S373, by replacing the native chromophore, all-trans-retinal, with the acyclic analog, 3,7,11-trimethyl-2,4,6,8-dodecapentaenal. Flash photolysis of analog-containing cells revealed an eightfold decrease in the rate of thermal decay of S373, and behavioral analysis showed longer periods of reversal suppression than that of cells with the native chromophore over similar ranges of illumination intensities. This indicates that attractant signaling is governed by the lifetime of the S373 intermediate rather than by the frequency of photocycling. In this sense, SR-I is similar to rhodopsin, whose function depends on an active photoproduct (Meta-II). PMID:3654583

  19. A novel type bacterial flagellar motor that can use divalent cations as a coupling ion.

    PubMed

    Imazawa, Riku; Takahashi, Yuka; Aoki, Wataru; Sano, Motohiko; Ito, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a sophisticated nanomachine embedded in the cell envelope and powered by an electrochemical gradient of H(+), Na(+), or K(+)across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we describe a new member of the bacterial flagellar stator channel family (MotAB1 of Paenibacillus sp. TCA20 (TCA-MotAB1)) that is coupled to divalent cations (Ca(2+)and Mg(2+)). In the absence of divalent cations of alkaline earth metals, no swimming was observed in Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which grows optimally in Ca(2+)-rich environments. This pattern was confirmed by swimming assays of a stator-free Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1. Both a stator-free and major Mg(2+)uptake system-deleted B. subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1 complemented both growth and motility deficiency under low Mg(2+)conditions and exhibited [Mg(2+)]in identical to that of the wild-type. This is the first report of a flagellar motor that can use Ca(2+)and Mg(2+)as coupling ions. These findings will promote the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity. PMID:26794857

  20. Swimming performance of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is an emergent property of its two flagellar systems.

    PubMed

    Quelas, J Ignacio; Althabegoiti, M Julia; Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Melgarejo, Augusto A; Marconi, Verónica I; Mongiardini, Elías J; Trejo, Sebastián A; Mengucci, Florencia; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Lodeiro, Aníbal R

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species use flagella for self-propulsion in aqueous media. In the soil, which is a complex and structured environment, water is found in microscopic channels where viscosity and water potential depend on the composition of the soil solution and the degree of soil water saturation. Therefore, the motility of soil bacteria might have special requirements. An important soil bacterial genus is Bradyrhizobium, with species that possess one flagellar system and others with two different flagellar systems. Among the latter is B. diazoefficiens, which may express its subpolar and lateral flagella simultaneously in liquid medium, although its swimming behaviour was not described yet. These two flagellar systems were observed here as functionally integrated in a swimming performance that emerged as an epistatic interaction between those appendages. In addition, each flagellum seemed engaged in a particular task that might be required for swimming oriented toward chemoattractants near the soil inner surfaces at viscosities that may occur after the loss of soil gravitational water. Because the possession of two flagellar systems is not general in Bradyrhizobium or in related genera that coexist in the same environment, there may be an adaptive tradeoff between energetic costs and ecological benefits among these different species. PMID:27053439

  1. DRC3 connects the N-DRC to dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Junya; Song, Kangkang; Lin, Jianfeng; King, Stephen M.; Sanderson, Michael J.; Nicastro, Daniela; Witman, George B.

    2015-01-01

    The nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), which is a major hub for the control of flagellar motility, contains at least 11 different subunits. A major challenge is to determine the location and function of each of these subunits within the N-DRC. We characterized a Chlamydomonas mutant defective in the N-DRC subunit DRC3. Of the known N-DRC subunits, the drc3 mutant is missing only DRC3. Like other N-DRC mutants, the drc3 mutant has a defect in flagellar motility. However, in contrast to other mutations affecting the N-DRC, drc3 does not suppress flagellar paralysis caused by loss of radial spokes. Cryo–electron tomography revealed that the drc3 mutant lacks a portion of the N-DRC linker domain, including the L1 protrusion, part of the distal lobe, and the connection between these two structures, thus localizing DRC3 to this part of the N-DRC. This and additional considerations enable us to assign DRC3 to the L1 protrusion. Because the L1 protrusion is the only non-dynein structure in contact with the dynein g motor domain in wild-type axonemes and this is the only N-DRC–dynein connection missing in the drc3 mutant, we conclude that DRC3 interacts with dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform. PMID:26063732

  2. Characterization of polymer release from the flagellar pocket of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Stierhof, Y D; Ilg, T; Russell, D G; Hohenberg, H; Overath, P

    1994-04-01

    Trypanosomatids contain a unique compartment, the flagellar pocket, formed by an invagination of the plasma membrane at the base of the flagellum, which is considered to be the sole cellular site for endocytosis and exocytosis of macromolecules. The culture supernatant of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes, the insect stage of this protozoan parasite, contains two types of polymers: a filamentous acid phosphatase (sAP) composed of a 100-kD phosphoglycoprotein with non-covalently associated proteo high molecular weight phosphoglycan (proteo-HMWPG) and fibrous material termed network consisting of complex phosphoglycans. Secretion of both polymers is investigated using mAbs and a combination of light and electron microscopic techniques. Long filaments of sAP are detectable in the lumen of the flagellar pocket. Both sAP filaments and network material emerge from the ostium of the flagellar pocket. While sAP filaments detach from the cells, the fibrous network frequently remains associated with the anterior end of the parasites and can be found in the center of cell aggregates. The related species L. major forms similar networks. Since polymeric structures cannot be detected in intracellular compartments, it is proposed that monomeric or, possibly, oligomeric subunits synthesized in the cells are secreted into the flagellar pocket. Polymer formation from subunits is suggested to occur in the lumen of the pocket before release into the culture medium or, naturally, into the gut of infected sandflies. PMID:8163549

  3. Swimming performance of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is an emergent property of its two flagellar systems

    PubMed Central

    Quelas, J. Ignacio; Althabegoiti, M. Julia; Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Melgarejo, Augusto A.; Marconi, Verónica I.; Mongiardini, Elías J.; Trejo, Sebastián A.; Mengucci, Florencia; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Lodeiro, Aníbal R.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species use flagella for self-propulsion in aqueous media. In the soil, which is a complex and structured environment, water is found in microscopic channels where viscosity and water potential depend on the composition of the soil solution and the degree of soil water saturation. Therefore, the motility of soil bacteria might have special requirements. An important soil bacterial genus is Bradyrhizobium, with species that possess one flagellar system and others with two different flagellar systems. Among the latter is B. diazoefficiens, which may express its subpolar and lateral flagella simultaneously in liquid medium, although its swimming behaviour was not described yet. These two flagellar systems were observed here as functionally integrated in a swimming performance that emerged as an epistatic interaction between those appendages. In addition, each flagellum seemed engaged in a particular task that might be required for swimming oriented toward chemoattractants near the soil inner surfaces at viscosities that may occur after the loss of soil gravitational water. Because the possession of two flagellar systems is not general in Bradyrhizobium or in related genera that coexist in the same environment, there may be an adaptive tradeoff between energetic costs and ecological benefits among these different species. PMID:27053439

  4. Dual stator dynamics in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Paulick, Anja; Delalez, Nicolas J; Brenzinger, Susanne; Steel, Bradley C; Berry, Richard M; Armitage, Judith P; Thormann, Kai M

    2015-06-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is an intricate nanomachine which converts ion gradients into rotational movement. Torque is created by ion-dependent stator complexes which surround the rotor in a ring. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 expresses two distinct types of stator units: the Na(+)-dependent PomA4 B2 and the H(+)-dependent MotA4 B2. Here, we have explored the stator unit dynamics in the MR-1 flagellar system by using mCherry-labeled PomAB and MotAB units. We observed a total of between 7 and 11 stator units in each flagellar motor. Both types of stator units exchanged between motors and a pool of stator complexes in the membrane, and the exchange rate of MotAB, but not of PomAB, units was dependent on the environmental Na(+)-levels. In 200 mM Na(+), the numbers of PomAB and MotAB units in wild-type motors was determined to be about 7:2 (PomAB:MotAB), shifting to about 6:5 without Na(+). Significantly, the average swimming speed of MR-1 cells at low Na(+) conditions was increased in the presence of MotAB. These data strongly indicate that the S. oneidensis flagellar motors simultaneously use H(+) and Na(+) driven stators in a configuration governed by MotAB incorporation efficiency in response to environmental Na(+) levels. PMID:25727785

  5. Kinesin-13 regulates flagellar, interphase, and mitotic microtubule dynamics in Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Scott C; Sagolla, Meredith S; Mancuso, Joel J; Woessner, David J; House, Susan A; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian; Cande, W Zacheus

    2007-12-01

    Microtubule depolymerization dynamics in the spindle are regulated by kinesin-13, a nonprocessive kinesin motor protein that depolymerizes microtubules at the plus and minus ends. Here we show that a single kinesin-13 homolog regulates flagellar length dynamics, as well as other interphase and mitotic dynamics in Giardia intestinalis, a widespread parasitic diplomonad protist. Both green fluorescent protein-tagged kinesin-13 and EB1 (a plus-end tracking protein) localize to the plus ends of mitotic and interphase microtubules, including a novel localization to the eight flagellar tips, cytoplasmic anterior axonemes, and the median body. The ectopic expression of a kinesin-13 (S280N) rigor mutant construct caused significant elongation of the eight flagella with significant decreases in the median body volume and resulted in mitotic defects. Notably, drugs that disrupt normal interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics also affected flagellar length in Giardia. Our study extends recent work on interphase and mitotic kinesin-13 functioning in metazoans to include a role in regulating flagellar length dynamics. We suggest that kinesin-13 universally regulates both mitotic and interphase microtubule dynamics in diverse microbial eukaryotes and propose that axonemal microtubules are subject to the same regulation of microtubule dynamics as other dynamic microtubule arrays. Finally, the present study represents the first use of a dominant-negative strategy to disrupt normal protein function in Giardia and provides important insights into giardial microtubule dynamics with relevance to the development of antigiardial compounds that target critical functions of kinesins in the giardial life cycle. PMID:17766466

  6. A novel type bacterial flagellar motor that can use divalent cations as a coupling ion

    PubMed Central

    Imazawa, Riku; Takahashi, Yuka; Aoki, Wataru; Sano, Motohiko; Ito, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a sophisticated nanomachine embedded in the cell envelope and powered by an electrochemical gradient of H+, Na+, or K+across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we describe a new member of the bacterial flagellar stator channel family (MotAB1 of Paenibacillus sp. TCA20 (TCA-MotAB1)) that is coupled to divalent cations (Ca2+and Mg2+). In the absence of divalent cations of alkaline earth metals, no swimming was observed in Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which grows optimally in Ca2+-rich environments. This pattern was confirmed by swimming assays of a stator-free Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1. Both a stator-free and major Mg2+uptake system-deleted B. subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1 complemented both growth and motility deficiency under low Mg2+conditions and exhibited [Mg2+]in identical to that of the wild-type. This is the first report of a flagellar motor that can use Ca2+and Mg2+as coupling ions. These findings will promote the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity. PMID:26794857

  7. Archaeal promoter architecture and mechanism of gene activation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Nan; Ao, Xiang; Liang, Yun Xiang; She, Qunxin

    2011-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus islandicus contain several genes exhibiting D-arabinose-inducible expression and these systems are ideal for studying mechanisms of archaeal gene expression. At sequence level, only two highly conserved cis elements are present on the promoters: a regulatory element named ara box directing arabinose-inducible expression and the basal promoter element TATA, serving as the binding site for the TATA-binding protein. Strikingly, these promoters possess a modular structure that allows an essentially inactive basal promoter to be strongly activated. The invoked mechanisms include TFB (transcription factor B) recruitment by the ara-box-binding factor to activate gene expression and modulation of TFB recruitment efficiency to yield differential gene expression. PMID:21265754

  8. Isolation and characterization of flagellar filament from zoospores of Dermatophilus congolensis.

    PubMed

    Hiraizumi, Mieko; Tagawa, Yuichi

    2014-09-17

    Highly motile zoospores from Dermatophilus congolensis bovine isolates from clinical dermatophilosis in Japan were obtained by culturing at 27°C in an ambient atmosphere on heart infusion agar supplemented with 5% defibrinated sheep blood for 72h or in heart infusion broth for 48h with gentle shaking. After vigorous mechanical agitation of the zoospore suspension, the flagellar filaments detached from motile zoospores and were isolated in the clear gelatinous part of the final pellet by differential centrifugation. Typical morphology of a flagellar filament, with a width of approximately 15nm, was observed in the isolated flagellar filament by electron microscopy. A single major protein (flagellin) band with an apparent molecular mass of 35kDa was detected in the flagellar filament of D. congolensis strain AM-1 and that of 33kDa was detected in strain IT-2 by SDS-PAGE. In immunoblot analysis of whole-cell proteins from seven isolates of D. congolensis, antiserum to strain AM-1 zoospores reacted with the 35-kDa antigen band of strain AM-1, but not with any antigen band of other strains in a similar molecular mass range. In contrast, antiserum to strain IT-2 zoospores reacted with antigen bands at 33kDa from six strains, except strain AM-1. Similar strain-specific reactions of these anti-zoospore sera with isolated flagellar filaments from strains AM-1 and IT-2 were confirmed by immunoblot, indicating the presence of antigenic variations of flagellins of D. congolensis zoospores. PMID:25132009

  9. Localization of the Salmonella typhimurium flagellar switch protein FliG to the cytoplasmic M-ring face of the basal body.

    PubMed Central

    Francis, N R; Irikura, V M; Yamaguchi, S; DeRosier, D J; Macnab, R M

    1992-01-01

    The direction of rotation of the bacterial flagellum is determined by the flagellar switch. We have localized FliG, one of the switch proteins of Salmonella typhimurium, to the cytoplasmic face of the M ring of the flagellar basal body. This localization was made possible by the discovery of two spontaneous mutants in which the fliF (M ring) and fliG (switch) genes were fused in-frame. In the first mutant, a deletion of 7 base pairs at the 3' end of fliF resulted in an essentially full-length fusion protein. In the second mutant, a larger deletion resulted in a fusion in which 56 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus of FliF and 94 amino acids from the amino terminus of FliG were lost. Both strains were motile and underwent switching; the first strain had a clockwise bias, and the second strain had a counterclockwise bias. Gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting of isolated hook-basal-body complexes verified that they contained the fusion proteins. Electron microscopy revealed additional mass at the cytoplasmic face of the M ring, which could be decorated with anti-FliG antibody. We conclude that the natural location for FliG is at the cytoplasmic face of the M ring and that the stoichiometric ratio between FliF and FliG in wild-type cells is probably 1:1. Images PMID:1631122

  10. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound induced Gene Activation in Solid Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan; Zhong, Pei

    2006-05-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to activate trans-gene expression in a mouse tumor model was investigated. 4T1 cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously in the hind limbs of Balb/C mice and adenovirus luciferase gene vectors under the control of heat shock protein 70B promoter (Adeno-hsp70B-Luc) were injected intratumoraly for gene transfection. One day following the virus injection, the transfected tumors were heated to a peak temperature of 55, 65, 75, and 85°C, respectively, in 10s at multiple sites around the center of the tumor using a HIFU transducer operated at either 1.1-MHz (fundamental) or 3.3-MHz (3rd harmonic) frequency. Inducible luciferase gene expression was found to vary from 15-fold to 120-fold of the control group following 1.1-MHz HIFU exposure. The maximum gene activation was produced at a peak temperature of 65˜75°C one day following HIFU exposure and decayed gradually to baseline level within 7 days. The inducible gene activation produced by 3.3-MHz HIFU exposure (75°C-10s) was found to be comparable to that produced by hyperthermia (42°C-30min). Altogether, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using HIFU as a simple and versatile physical means to regulate trans-gene expression in vivo. This unique feature may be explored in the future for a synergistic combination of HIFU-induced thermal ablation with heat-induced gene therapy for improved cancer therapy.

  11. Systematic identification of signal-activated stochastic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Neuert, Gregor; Munsky, Brian; Tan, Rui Zhen; Teytelman, Leonid; Khammash, Mustafa; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    Although much has been done to elucidate the biochemistry of signal transduction and gene regulatory pathways, it remains difficult to understand or predict quantitative responses. We integrate single-cell experiments with stochastic analyses, to identify predictive models of transcriptional dynamics for the osmotic stress response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We generate models with varying complexity and use parameter estimation and cross-validation analyses to select the most predictive model. This model yields insight into several dynamical features, including multistep regulation and switchlike activation for several osmosensitive genes. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts the transcriptional dynamics of cells in response to different environmental and genetic perturbations. Because our approach is general, it should facilitate a predictive understanding for signal-activated transcription of other genes in other pathways or organisms. PMID:23372015

  12. ARMADA: Using motif activity dynamics to infer gene regulatory networks from gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Pemberton-Ross, Peter J; Pachkov, Mikhail; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of gene expression data remains one of the most promising avenues toward reconstructing genome-wide gene regulatory networks. However, the large dimensionality of the problem prohibits the fitting of explicit dynamical models of gene regulatory networks, whereas machine learning methods for dimensionality reduction such as clustering or principal component analysis typically fail to provide mechanistic interpretations of the reduced descriptions. To address this, we recently developed a general methodology called motif activity response analysis (MARA) that, by modeling gene expression patterns in terms of the activities of concrete regulators, accomplishes dramatic dimensionality reduction while retaining mechanistic biological interpretations of its predictions (Balwierz, 2014). Here we extend MARA by presenting ARMADA, which models the activity dynamics of regulators across a time course, and infers the causal interactions between the regulators that drive the dynamics of their activities across time. We have implemented ARMADA as part of our ISMARA webserver, ismara.unibas.ch, allowing any researcher to automatically apply it to any gene expression time course. To illustrate the method, we apply ARMADA to a time course of human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with TNF. Remarkably, ARMADA is able to reproduce the complex observed motif activity dynamics using a relatively small set of interactions between the key regulators in this system. In addition, we show that ARMADA successfully infers many of the key regulatory interactions known to drive this inflammatory response and discuss several novel interactions that ARMADA predicts. In combination with ISMARA, ARMADA provides a powerful approach to generating plausible hypotheses for the key interactions between regulators that control gene expression in any system for which time course measurements are available. PMID:26164700

  13. Hypomethylation and activation of syncytin-1 gene in endometriotic tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyuan; Li, Jinping; Podratz, Karl C; Tipton, Tracy; Marzolf, Susan; Chen, Hai Bin; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Syncytin-1 plays a critical role in the maintenance of normal pregnancy by mediating the formation of syncytiotrophoblasts through a fosugenic action. Encoded by the human endogenous retrovirus envelope gene HERV-W, syncytin-1 trophoblast-specific expression is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms. In non-placental tissues, the syncytin-1 gene is suppressed by hypermethylation in the LTR promoter region. Hypomethylated and activated syncytin-1 gene is found in placental trophoblast lineages and malignant cells. We here demonstrate that while syncytin-1 gene remains silenced in the eutopic endometrium from endometriotic patients, syncytin-1 mRNA and protein are detected in ectopic, endometriotic lesions; particularly the endometrioid glandular endothelial cells. LINE-1 COBRA assay and immunohistochemistry using the 5-MC-specific antibody did not detect any changes in global DNA methylation in the endometriotic tissues. However, results from COBRA and bisulfite sequencing indicated that the LTR region of the syncytin-1 promoter is hypomethylated in endometriotic tissues, highlighting the significance of DNA demethylation in syncytin-1 gene activation. Analysis of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) mRNA levels revealed that DNMT3B3, an isoform carrying methyltransferase activity, is downregulated; whereas DNMT3B7, the isoform without enzymatic activity, is upregulated in the endometriotic tissues, pointing to positive and negative regulatory functions, respectively, of these isoforms on syncytin-1 methylation. These results have provided the first evidence supporting the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms for syncytin-1 upregulation in endometriotic tissues. Considering recent findings on the nonfusogenic activity of syncytin-1, its expression in endometriotic tissues suggests that this multifunctional protein may be implicated in the pathogenesis and/or progression of endometriosis. PMID:23888948

  14. Synapsins are late activity-induced genes regulated by birdsong

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Tarciso A. F.; Mello, Claudio V.

    2008-01-01

    The consolidation of long-lasting sensory memories requires the activation of gene expression programs in the brain. In spite of considerable knowledge about the early components of this response, little is known about late components (i.e. genes regulated 2-6 hr after stimulation) and the relationship between early and late genes. Birdsong represents one of the best natural behaviors to study sensory-induced gene expression in awake, freely behaving animals. Here we show that the expression of several isoforms of synapsins, a group of phosphoproteins thought to regulate the dynamics of synaptic vesicle storage and release, is induced by auditory stimulation with birdsong in the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM) of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) brain. This induction occurs mainly in excitatory (non-GABAergic) neurons and is modulated (suppressed) by early song-inducible proteins. We also show that ZENK, an early song-inducible transcription factor, interacts with the syn3 promoter in vivo, consistent with a direct regulatory effect and an emerging novel view of ZENK action. These results demonstrate that synapsins are a late component of the genomic response to neuronal activation and that their expression depends on a complex set of regulatory interactions between early and late regulated genes. PMID:19005052

  15. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials - towards an efficient lithium battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznosov, Sergei N.; Veluri, Pavan S.; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Macfarlane, Douglas R.; Fedorov, Oleg V.; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g-1 at 5 A g-1 (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future.

  16. Rotational speed control of Na +-driven flagellar motor by dual pipettes.

    PubMed

    Nogawa, Kousuke; Kojima, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2009-12-01

    Single cell analysis has attracted much attention to reveal the detailed and localized biological information. Local environmental control technique is desired to analyze the detailed and localized properties of single cells. In this paper, we propose the local environmental control system with nano/micro dual pipettes to control the local reagent concentration dynamically and arbitrarily. Local environmental control by dual pipettes is applied to the rotational speed control of bacterial flagellar motor, which is a rotary molecular machine. We demonstrate quick response and iterative rotational speed control of Na (+)-driven flagellar motor in both accelerating and relaxing directions by switching the local spout between Na (+)-containing and Na (+) -free solutions with dual pipettes. It is shown that the rotational speed might be controllable by changing the spouting velocity of Na (+)-containing solution with multiplying the applied dc voltage. PMID:19887330

  17. The phylogeny of swimming kinematics: The environment controls flagellar waveforms in sperm motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Burton, Lisa; Zimmer, Richard; Hosoi, Anette; Stocker, Roman

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, phylogenetic and molecular analyses have dominated the study of ecology and evolution. However, physical interactions between organisms and their environment, a fundamental determinant of organism ecology and evolution, are mediated by organism form and function, highlighting the need to understand the mechanics of basic survival strategies, including locomotion. Focusing on spermatozoa, we combined high-speed video microscopy and singular value decomposition analysis to quantitatively compare the flagellar waveforms of eight species, ranging from marine invertebrates to humans. We found striking similarities in sperm swimming kinematics between genetically dissimilar organisms, which could not be uncovered by phylogenetic analysis. The emergence of dominant waveform patterns across species are suggestive of biological optimization for flagellar locomotion and point toward environmental cues as drivers of this convergence. These results reinforce the power of quantitative kinematic analysis to understand the physical drivers of evolution and as an approach to uncover new solutions for engineering applications, such as micro-robotics.

  18. Amphipathic helical ordering of the flagellar secretion signal of Salmonella flagellin.

    PubMed

    Tőke, Orsolya; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2016-08-01

    Export of external flagellar proteins requires a signal located within their N-terminal disordered part, however, these regions do not share any significant sequence similarity suggesting that the secondary/tertiary structure might be important for recognition by the export gate. NMR experiments were performed to reveal the conformational properties of the flagellin signal sequence in vitro. It assumed a largely disordered fluctuating structure in aqueous environment, but acquired a folded structure containing an amphipathic helical portion in 50% MeOH or upon addition of SDS micelles which are known to promote hydrophobic interactions. Our observations raise the possibility that the signal sequence may partially undergo amphipathic helical ordering upon interaction with the recognition unit of the flagellar export machinery in a similar way as revealed for protein import into intracellular eukaryotic organelles mediated by targeting signals of high diversity. PMID:27264954

  19. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials - towards an efficient lithium battery anode.

    PubMed

    Beznosov, Sergei N; Veluri, Pavan S; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G; Chatterjee, Abhijit; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Fedorov, Oleg V; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g(-1) after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g(-1) at 5 A g(-1) (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future. PMID:25583370

  20. Arsenate arrests flagellar rotation in cytoplasm-free envelopes of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Y; Barak, R; Eisenbach, M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of arsenate on flagellar rotation in cytoplasm-free flagellated envelopes of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium was investigated. Flagellar rotation ceased as soon as the envelopes were exposed to arsenate. Inclusion of phosphate intracellularly (but not extracellular) prevented the inhibition by arsenate. In a parallel experiment, the rotation was not affected by inclusion of an ATP trap (hexokinase and glucose) within the envelopes. It is concluded that arsenate affects the motor in a way other than reversible deenergization. This may be an irreversible damage to the cell or direct inhibition of the motor by arsenate. The latter possibility suggests that a process of phosphorylation or phosphate binding is involved in the motor function. PMID:8071237

  1. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials – towards an efficient lithium battery anode

    PubMed Central

    Beznosov, Sergei N.; Veluri, Pavan S.; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; MacFarlane, Douglas R.; Fedorov, Oleg V.; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g−1 after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g−1 at 5 A g−1 (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future. PMID:25583370

  2. A novel flagellar sheath protein, FcpA, determines filament coiling, translational motility and virulence for the Leptospira spirochete.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Elsio A; Figueira, Cláudio P; Benaroudj, Nadia; Hu, Bo; Tong, Brian A; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Liu, Jun; Reis, Mitermayer G; Charon, Nyles W; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Picardeau, Mathieu; Ko, Albert I

    2016-08-01

    Leptospira are unique among bacteria based on their helical cell morphology with hook-shaped ends and the presence of periplasmic flagella (PF) with pronounced spontaneous supercoiling. The factors that provoke such supercoiling, as well as the role that PF coiling plays in generating the characteristic hook-end cell morphology and motility, have not been elucidated. We have now identified an abundant protein from the pathogen L. interrogans, exposed on the PF surface, and named it Flagellar-coiling protein A (FcpA). The gene encoding FcpA is highly conserved among Leptospira and was not found in other bacteria. fcpA(-) mutants, obtained from clinical isolates or by allelic exchange, had relatively straight, smaller-diameter PF, and were not able to produce translational motility. These mutants lost their ability to cause disease in the standard hamster model of leptospirosis. Complementation of fcpA restored the wild-type morphology, motility and virulence phenotypes. In summary, we identified a novel Leptospira 36-kDa protein, the main component of the spirochete's PF sheath, and a key determinant of the flagella's coiled structure. FcpA is essential for bacterial translational motility and to enable the spirochete to penetrate the host, traverse tissue barriers, disseminate to cause systemic infection and reach target organs. PMID:27113476

  3. Bio-Hybrid Micro/Nanodevices Powered by Flagellar Motor: Challenges and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Tung, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Molecular motors, which are precision engineered by nature, offer exciting possibilities for bio-hybrid engineered systems. They could enable real applications ranging from micro/nano fluidics, to biosensing, to medical diagnoses. This review describes the fundamental biological insights and fascinating potentials of these remarkable sensing and actuation machines, in particular, bacterial flagellar motors, as well as their engineering perspectives with regard to applications in bio-engineered hybrid systems. PMID:26284237

  4. Tbx16 regulates hox gene activation in mesodermal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Payumo, Alexander Y; McQuade, Lindsey E; Walker, Whitney J; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor T-box 16 (Tbx16, or Spadetail) is an essential regulator of paraxial mesoderm development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Mesodermal progenitor cells (MPCs) fail to differentiate into trunk somites in tbx16 mutants and instead accumulate within the tailbud in an immature state. However, the mechanisms by which Tbx16 controls mesoderm patterning have remained enigmatic. We describe here the use of photoactivatable morpholino oligonucleotides to determine the Tbx16 transcriptome in MPCs. We identified 124 Tbx16-regulated genes that were expressed in zebrafish gastrulae, including several developmental signaling proteins and regulators of gastrulation, myogenesis and somitogenesis. Unexpectedly, we observed that a loss of Tbx16 function precociously activated posterior hox genes in MPCs, and overexpression of a single posterior hox gene was sufficient to disrupt MPC migration. Our studies support a model in which Tbx16 regulates the timing of collinear hox gene activation to coordinate the anterior-posterior fates and positions of paraxial MPCs. PMID:27376691

  5. Flagellar phenotypic plasticity in volvocalean algae correlates with Péclet number.

    PubMed

    Solari, Cristian A; Drescher, Knut; Ganguly, Sujoy; Kessler, John O; Michod, Richard E; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2011-10-01

    Flagella-generated fluid stirring has been suggested to enhance nutrient uptake for sufficiently large micro-organisms, and to have played a role in evolutionary transitions to multicellularity. A corollary to this predicted size-dependent benefit is a propensity for phenotypic plasticity in the flow-generating mechanism to appear in large species under nutrient deprivation. We examined four species of volvocalean algae whose radii and flow speeds differ greatly, with Péclet numbers (Pe) separated by several orders of magnitude. Populations of unicellular Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and one- to eight-celled Gonium pectorale (Pe ∼ 0.1-1) and multicellular Volvox carteri and Volvox barberi (Pe ∼ 100) were grown in diluted and undiluted media. For C. reinhardtii and G. pectorale, decreasing the nutrient concentration resulted in smaller cells, but had no effect on flagellar length and propulsion force. In contrast, these conditions induced Volvox colonies to grow larger and increase their flagellar length, separating the somatic cells further. Detailed studies on V. carteri found that the opposing effects of increasing beating force and flagellar spacing balance, so the fluid speed across the colony surface remains unchanged between nutrient conditions. These results lend further support to the hypothesized link between the Péclet number, nutrient uptake and the evolution of biological complexity in the Volvocales. PMID:21367778

  6. Correlation between Supercoiling and Conformational Motions of the Bacterial Flagellar Filament

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Andreas M.; Unruh, Tobias; Namba, Keiichi; Samatey, Fadel; Zaccai, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar filament is a very large macromolecular assembly of a single protein, flagellin. Various supercoiled states of the filament exist, which are formed by two structurally different conformations of flagellin in different ratios. We investigated the correlation between supercoiling of the protofilaments and molecular dynamics in the flagellar filament using quasielastic and elastic incoherent neutron scattering on the picosecond and nanosecond timescales. Thermal fluctuations in the straight L- and R-type filaments were measured and compared to the resting state of the wild-type filament. Amplitudes of motion on the picosecond timescale were found to be similar in the different conformational states. Mean-square displacements and protein resilience on the 0.1 ns timescale demonstrate that the L-type state is more flexible and less resilient than the R-type, whereas the wild-type state lies in between. Our results provide strong support that supercoiling of the protofilaments in the flagellar filament is determined by the strength of molecular forces in and between the flagellin subunits. PMID:24209861

  7. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold.

    PubMed

    Beeby, Morgan; Ribardo, Deborah A; Brennan, Caitlin A; Ruby, Edward G; Jensen, Grant J; Hendrixson, David R

    2016-03-29

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes. PMID:26976588

  8. Flagellar Biosynthesis Exerts Temporal Regulation of Secretion of Specific Campylobacter jejuni Colonization and Virulence Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Barrero-Tobon, Angelica M.; Hendrixson, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The Campylobacter jejuni flagellum exports both proteins that form the flagellar organelle for swimming motility and colonization and virulence factors that promote commensal colonization of the avian intestinal tract or invasion of human intestinal cells, respectively. We explored how the C. jejuni flagellum is a versatile secretory organelle by examining molecular determinants that allow colonization and virulence factors to exploit the flagellum for their own secretion. Flagellar biogenesis was observed to exert temporal control of secretion of these proteins, indicating that a bolus of secretion of colonization and virulence factors occurs during hook biogenesis with filament polymerization itself reducing secretion of these factors. Furthermore, we found that intramolecular and intermolecular requirements for flagellar-dependent secretion of these proteins were most reminiscent to those for flagellin secretion. Importantly, we discovered that secretion of one colonization and virluence factor, CiaI, was not required for invasion of human colonic cells, which counters previous hypotheses for how this protein functions during invasion. Instead, secretion of CiaI was essential for C. jejuni to facilitate commensal colonization of the natural avian host. Our work provides insight into the versatility of the bacterial flagellum as a secretory machine that can export proteins promoting diverse biological processes. PMID:25041103

  9. Flagellar cells and ciliary cells in the renal tubule of elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Lacy, E R; Luciano, L; Reale, E

    1989-01-01

    Flagella or cilia are present on most epithelial cells in the renal tubule of elasmobranch fishes (little skate, spiny dogfish, smooth dogfish, Atlantic sharpnose, scalloped hammerhead, cow-nosed ray). Flagellar cells, those with numerous flagella ordered in one, two, or more rows on the luminal surface, are shown here for the first time in a vertebrate. The flagellar cells are intercalated among other epithelial cells, each bearing a single cilium, from Bowman's capsule to the third subdivision of the intermediate segment of the nephron. The flagella form undulated ribbons up to 55 microns long. In every ribbon the axis of the central pair of microtubules in the axoneme is oriented parallel to the long axis of the flagellar row. This suggests a beat perpendicular to these two axes. The arrangement of the flagella in ribbons most likely promotes movement of glomerular filtrate down the renal tubule. Cells bearing numerous cilia occur in the large collecting ducts of spiny dogfish but without apparent preferential orientation of the cilia. PMID:2575649

  10. Selective Purification of Recombinant Neuroactive Peptides Using the Flagellar Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Hanna M.; Erhardt, Marc; Steiner, Andrew M.; Zhang, Min-Min; Yoshikami, Doju; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Hughes, Kelly T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The structure, assembly, and function of the bacterial flagellum involves about 60 different proteins, many of which are selectively secreted via a specific type III secretion system (T3SS) (J. Frye et al., J. Bacteriol. 188:2233–2243, 2006). The T3SS is reported to secrete proteins at rates of up to 10,000 amino acid residues per second. In this work, we showed that the flagellar T3SS of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium could be manipulated to export recombinant nonflagellar proteins through the flagellum and into the surrounding medium. We translationally fused various neuroactive peptides and proteins from snails, spiders, snakes, sea anemone, and bacteria to the flagellar secretion substrate FlgM. We found that all tested peptides of various sizes were secreted via the bacterial flagellar T3SS. We subsequently purified the recombinant μ-conotoxin SIIIA (rSIIIA) from Conus striatus by affinity chromatography and confirmed that T3SS-derived rSIIIA inhibited mammalian voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.2 comparably to chemically synthesized SIIIA. PMID:22647788

  11. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Ribardo, Deborah A.; Brennan, Caitlin A.; Ruby, Edward G.; Jensen, Grant J.; Hendrixson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes. PMID:26976588

  12. Bimodal rheotactic behavior reflects flagellar beat asymmetry in human sperm cells

    PubMed Central

    Bukatin, Anton; Kukhtevich, Igor; Stoop, Norbert; Dunkel, Jörn; Kantsler, Vasily

    2015-01-01

    Rheotaxis, the directed response to fluid velocity gradients, has been shown to facilitate stable upstream swimming of mammalian sperm cells along solid surfaces, suggesting a robust physical mechanism for long-distance navigation during fertilization. However, the dynamics by which a human sperm orients itself relative to an ambient flow is poorly understood. Here, we combine microfluidic experiments with mathematical modeling and 3D flagellar beat reconstruction to quantify the response of individual sperm cells in time-varying flow fields. Single-cell tracking reveals two kinematically distinct swimming states that entail opposite turning behaviors under flow reversal. We constrain an effective 2D model for the turning dynamics through systematic large-scale parameter scans, and find good quantitative agreement with experiments at different shear rates and viscosities. Using a 3D reconstruction algorithm to identify the flagellar beat patterns causing left or right turning, we present comprehensive 3D data demonstrating the rolling dynamics of freely swimming sperm cells around their longitudinal axis. Contrary to current beliefs, this 3D analysis uncovers ambidextrous flagellar waveforms and shows that the cell’s turning direction is not defined by the rolling direction. Instead, the different rheotactic turning behaviors are linked to a broken mirror symmetry in the midpiece section, likely arising from a buckling instability. These results challenge current theoretical models of sperm locomotion. PMID:26655343

  13. Structure and Function of the Bi-Directional Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Minamino, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is a locomotive organelle that propels the bacterial cell body in liquid environments. The flagellum is a supramolecular complex composed of about 30 different proteins and consists of at least three parts: a rotary motor, a universal joint, and a helical filament. The flagellar motor of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica is powered by an inward-directed electrochemical potential difference of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane. The flagellar motor consists of a rotor made of FliF, FliG, FliM and FliN and a dozen stators consisting of MotA and MotB. FliG, FliM and FliN also act as a molecular switch, enabling the motor to spin in both counterclockwise and clockwise directions. Each stator is anchored to the peptidoglycan layer through the C-terminal periplasmic domain of MotB and acts as a proton channel to couple the proton flow through the channel with torque generation. Highly conserved charged residues at the rotor–stator interface are required not only for torque generation but also for stator assembly around the rotor. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of the structure and function of the proton-driven bacterial flagellar motor. PMID:24970213

  14. Periplasmic Flagellar Export Apparatus Protein, FliH, Is Involved in Post-Transcriptional Regulation of FlaB, Motility and Virulence of the Relapsing Fever Spirochete Borrelia hermsii

    PubMed Central

    Guyard, Cyril; Raffel, Sandra J.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Dahlstrom, Eric; Sturdevant, Daniel; Ricklefs, Stacy M.; Martens, Craig; Hayes, Stanley F.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Hansen, Bryan T.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2013-01-01

    Spirochetes are bacteria characterized in part by rotating periplasmic flagella that impart their helical or flat-wave morphology and motility. While most other bacteria rely on a transcriptional cascade to regulate the expression of motility genes, spirochetes employ post-transcriptional mechanism(s) that are only partially known. In the present study, we characterize a spontaneous non-motile mutant of the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia hermsii that was straight, non-motile and deficient in periplasmic flagella. We used next generation DNA sequencing of the mutant’s genome, which when compared to the wild-type genome identified a 142 bp deletion in the chromosomal gene encoding the flagellar export apparatus protein FliH. Immunoblot and transcription analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was linked to the posttranscriptional deficiency in the synthesis of the major periplasmic flagellar filament core protein FlaB. Despite the lack of FlaB, the amount of FlaA produced by the fliH mutant was similar to the wild-type level. The turnover of the residual pool of FlaB produced by the fliH mutant was comparable to the wild-type spirochete. The non-motile mutant was not infectious in mice and its inoculation did not induce an antibody response. Trans-complementation of the mutant with an intact fliH gene restored the synthesis of FlaB, a normal morphology, motility and infectivity in mice. Therefore, we propose that the flagellar export apparatus protein regulates motility of B. hermsii at the post-transcriptional level by influencing the synthesis of FlaB. PMID:24009690

  15. Adaptation of muscle gene expression to changes in contractile activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Babij, P.; Thomason, D. B.; Wong, T. S.; Morrison, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the existing literature regarding the effects of different types of physical activities on the gene expression of adult skeletal muscles leads us to conclude that each type of exercise training program has, as a result, a different phenotype, which means that there are multiple mechanisms, each producing a unique phenotype. A portion of the facts which support this position is presented and interpreted here. [Abstract translated from the original French by NASA].

  16. Differentially expressed genes in embryonic cardiac tissues of mice lacking Folr1 gene activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huiping; Cabrera, Robert M; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Bozinov, Daniel; Wang, Deli; Schwartz, Robert J; Finnell, Richard H

    2007-01-01

    redox status, which may contribute to cardiovascular abnormalities in mouse embryos lacking Folr1 gene activity. PMID:18028541

  17. Metronidazole activation and isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum electron transport genes.

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, J D; Jones, D T; Woods, D R

    1991-01-01

    An Escherichia coli F19 recA, nitrate reductase-deficient mutant was constructed by transposon mutagenesis and shown to be resistant to metronidazole. This mutant was a most suitable host for the isolation of Clostridium acetobutylicum genes on recombinant plasmids, which activated metronidazole and rendered the E. coli F19 strain sensitive to metronidazole. Twenty-five E. coli F19 clones containing different recombinant plasmids were isolated and classified into five groups on the basis of their sensitivity to metronidazole. The clones were tested for nitrate reductase, pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and hydrogenase activities. DNA hybridization and restriction endonuclease mapping revealed that four of the C. acetobutylicum insert DNA fragments on recombinant plasmids were linked in an 11.1-kb chromosomal fragment. DNA sequencing and amino acid homology studies indicated that this DNA fragment contained a flavodoxin gene which encoded a protein of 160 amino acids that activated metronidazole and made the E. coli F19 mutant very sensitive to metronidazole. The flavodoxin and hydrogenase genes which are involved in electron transfer systems were linked on the 11.1-kb DNA fragment from C. acetobutylicum. Images PMID:1991710

  18. IRF1 marks activated genes in SLE and can induce target gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Shi, Lihua; Song, Li; Ephrem, Elshaddai; Petri, Michelle; Sullivan, Kathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective IRF1 both mediates responses to type I interferons and the induction of interferons. It has been implicated in murine lupus models as a critical mediator of inflammation. A previous study of chromatin modifications in SLE patient monocytes implicated IRF1 as associated with increased histone acetylation in SLE patients. This study directly investigated IRF1 binding sites on chromatin using ChIP-seq. Methods Nine female SLE patients and seven female controls were examined. Monocytes were purified from peripheral blood and subjected to library preparation using a validated antibody to IRF1. The effect of IRF1 on target gene expression was confirmed using an overexpression system in cell lines and co-immunoprecipitation was used to define protein interactions. Results IRF1 binding around transcribed regions was increased in SLE patient monocytes but histone modifications at potential IRF1 binding sites without detectable IRF1 binding were also increased. IRF1 overexpression was sufficient to drive transcription of target genes. IRF1 overexpression was also able to alter histone modifications at a focus set of target genes and the use of an IRF1 inhibitor decreased both expression and histone modifications at target genes. IRF1 was found to interact with a select set of histone modifying enzymes and other transcription factors. Conclusions IRF1 is an important signaling protein in the interferon pathway. IRF1 not only activates gene expression as a transcription factor but may perpetuate disease by leading to a dysregulated epigenome. PMID:25418955

  19. Dynamic multiphosphorylation passwords for activity-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Deisseroth, Karl; Tsien, Richard W

    2002-04-11

    Synapse-to-nucleus signaling leading to CREB-mediated transcription is important for neuronal plasticity. Nuclear CREB phosphorylation at Ser133 allows convergence of multiple kinase pathways driven by neuronal activity and links them to transcriptional activation. But, can various pathways share a common effector mechanism (phosphorylating Ser133) while generating distinct patterns of gene expression? We review three Neuron articles that highlight novel ways Ca(2+) signals can trigger multiple phosphorylation events working in combination to control CREB and its interaction with coactivator molecules. PMID:11970860

  20. Recurrent epimutations activate gene body promoters in primary glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Raman P; Zhang, Bo; Bell, Robert J A; Johnson, Brett E; Olshen, Adam B; Sundaram, Vasavi; Li, Daofeng; Graham, Ashley E; Diaz, Aaron; Fouse, Shaun D; Smirnov, Ivan; Song, Jun; Paris, Pamela L; Wang, Ting; Costello, Joseph F

    2014-05-01

    Aberrant DNA hypomethylation may play an important role in the growth rate of glioblastoma (GBM), but the functional impact on transcription remains poorly understood. We assayed the GBM methylome with MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq, adjusting for copy number differences, in a small set of non-glioma CpG island methylator phenotype (non-G-CIMP) primary tumors. Recurrent hypomethylated loci were enriched within a region of chromosome 5p15 that is specified as a cancer amplicon and also encompasses TERT, encoding telomerase reverse transcriptase, which plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. Overall, 76 gene body promoters were recurrently hypomethylated, including TERT and the oncogenes GLI3 and TP73. Recurring hypomethylation also affected previously unannotated alternative promoters, and luciferase reporter assays for three of four of these promoters confirmed strong promoter activity in GBM cells. Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) ChIP-seq on tissue from the GBMs uncovered peaks that coincide precisely with tumor-specific decrease of DNA methylation at 200 loci, 133 of which are in gene bodies. Detailed investigation of TP73 and TERT gene body hypomethylation demonstrated increased expression of corresponding alternate transcripts, which in TP73 encodes a truncated p73 protein with oncogenic function and in TERT encodes a putative reverse transcriptase-null protein. Our findings suggest that recurring gene body promoter hypomethylation events, along with histone H3K4 trimethylation, alter the transcriptional landscape of GBM through the activation of a limited number of normally silenced promoters within gene bodies, in at least one case leading to expression of an oncogenic protein. PMID:24709822

  1. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  2. Insertional activation of a promoterless thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, S.; Hengstler, M.; Kunze, M.; Knippers, R.

    1988-08-01

    A plasmid carrying a promoterless herpes complex virus thymidine kinase gene was transfected via calcium phosphate precipitation into LM (tk/sup -/) mouse fibroblast cells. The transfected gene was efficiently expressed, as the transfected cells grew perfectly well in selective hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium, suggesting that the thymidine kinase-coding region became linked to a promoterlike element on integration into the recipient genome. To investigate the structure of the surrogate promoter, the authors first isolated the integrated gene from a genomic library. The nucleotide sequence of the DNA adjacent to the thymidine kinase-coding sequence was then determined. They found, first, that the integration of the transfected DNA apparently occurred by a blunt end ligation mechanism involving no obvious sequence similarities between integrated and recipient DNA and, second, that the 5'-flanking region included a TATA box, to CCAAT boxes, and a GC box element. However, the TATA box motif and the most proximal CCAAT box appeared to be sufficient of full promoter activity, as determined by the transfection efficiencies of appropriate plasmid constructs. Except for these canonical promoter elements, the surrogate promoter had no obvious similarities to known thymidine kinase gene promoters.

  3. Titanium nanotubes activate genes related to bone formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pozio, Alfonso; Palmieri, Annalisa; Girardi, Ambra; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Titanium is used worldwide to make osseointegrable devices, thanks to its favorable characteristics as mechanical proprieties and biocompatibility, demonstrated by in vivo studies with animal models and clinical trials over a forty-year period. However, the exact genetic effect of the titanium layer on cells is still not well characterized. Materials and Methods: To investigate how titanium nanotubes stimulate osteoblasts differentiation and proliferation, some osteoblast genes (SP7, RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL, SPP1 and FOSL1) were analyzed by quantitative Real Time RT- PCR. Results: After 15 days, osteoblasts cultivated on titanium naotube showed the up-regulation of bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and SPP1 and the down-regulation of RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, and ALPL. After 30 days of treatment, the bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and RUNX2 were up-regulated while COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL and SPP1 were down-regulated. Conclusions: Our results, demonstrates that titanium nanotubes can lead to osteoblast differentiation and extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization in dental pulp stem cells by the activation of osteoblast related genes SPP1, FOSL1 and RUNX2. PMID:23814577

  4. Contributions to gene activation by multiple functions of Bicoid.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, X; Yuan, D; Scarborough, T; Ma, J

    1999-01-01

    Bicoid is a Drosophila morphogenetic protein required for the development of anterior structures in the embryo. To gain a better understanding of how Bicoid works as a transcriptional activator, we systematically analysed various functions of Bicoid required for gene activation. We provide evidence suggesting that Bicoid is an intrinsically weak activator. First, our biochemical experiments demonstrate that the Bicoid-DNA complexes are very unstable, suggesting a weak DNA-binding function of Bicoid. This idea is further supported by our experiments demonstrating that the same number of LexA-Bicoid fusion molecules can activate transcription more effectively from LexA sites than from Bicoid sites. Secondly, we demonstrate that transcriptional activation by the weak activator Bicoid is readily influenced by the local enhancer environment. These influences are decreased when the Bicoid function is enforced by attaching to it either a known dimerization domain or the strong activation domain VP16. VP16 can also compensate for the loss of some Bicoid sites in an enhancer element. Our experiments demonstrate that the outcome of transcriptional activation by Bicoid is determined by multiple weak functions that are interconnected, a finding that can further help us to understand how this morphogenetic protein achieves its molecular functions. PMID:10024522

  5. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Teodorov, E.; Ferrari, M.F.R.; Fior-Chadi, D.R.; Camarini, R.; Felício, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc) or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg) and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05) because a lower percentage of U69593 group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05) and lactating female rats (P < 0.01), with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in female

  6. Metallothionein gene activation in the earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus)

    PubMed Central

    Höckner, M.; Dallinger, R.; Stürzenbaum, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    In order to cope with changing environmental conditions, organisms require highly responsive stress mechanisms. Heavy metal stress is handled by metallothioneins (MTs), the regulation of which is evolutionary conserved in insects and vertebrates and involves the binding of metal transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) to metal responsive elements (MREs) positioned in the promoter of MT genes. However, in most invertebrate phyla, the transcriptional activation of MTs is different and the exact mechanism is still unknown. Interestingly, although MREs are typically present also in invertebrate MT gene promoters, MTF-1 is notably absent. Here we use Lumbricus rubellus, the red earthworm, to study the elusive mechanism of wMT-2 activation in control and Cd-exposed conditions. EMSA and DNase I footprinting approaches were used to pinpoint functional binding sites within the wMT-2 promoter region, which revealed that the cAMP responsive element (CRE) is a promising candidate which may act as a transcriptional activator of invertebrate MTs. PMID:25797623

  7. Flagellar Movement in Two Bacteria of the Family Rickettsiaceae: A Re-Evaluation of Motility in an Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Claudia; Boscaro, Vittorio; Ferrantini, Filippo; Benken, Konstantin A.; Mironov, Timofei I.; Schweikert, Michael; Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Fokin, Sergei I.; Sabaneyeva, Elena V.; Petroni, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae have always been largely studied not only for their importance in the medical field, but also as model systems in evolutionary biology. In fact, they share a recent common ancestor with mitochondria. The most studied species, belonging to genera Rickettsia and Orientia, are hosted by terrestrial arthropods and include many human pathogens. Nevertheless, recent findings show that a large part of Rickettsiaceae biodiversity actually resides outside the group of well-known pathogenic bacteria. Collecting data on these recently described non-conventional members of the family is crucial in order to gain information on ancestral features of the whole group. Although bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae, and of the whole order Rickettsiales, are formally described as non-flagellated prokaryotes, some recent findings renewed the debate about this feature. In this paper we report the first finding of members of the family displaying numerous flagella and active movement inside their host cells. These two new taxa are hosted in aquatic environments by protist ciliates and are described here by means of ultrastructural and molecular characterization. Data here reported suggest that the ancestor of Rickettsiales displayed flagellar movement and re-evaluate the hypothesis that motility played a key-role in the origin of mitochondria. Moreover, our study highlights that the aquatic environment represents a well exploited habitat for bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae. Our results encourage a deep re-consideration of ecological and morphological traits of the family and of the whole order. PMID:24505307

  8. Analysis of the swimming activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using photonic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chia-Han; Chang, Bo-Jui; Huang, Ying-Jung; Fan, Chia-Chieh; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chi, Sien; Hsu, Long

    2005-08-01

    Swimming activity of flagella is a main factor of the motility of bacteria. Flagella expressed on the surface of bacterial species serve as a primary means of motility including swimming. We propose to use optical tweezers to analyze the swimming activity of bacteria. The sample bacteria in the work is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and it is a gram-negative bacterium and often causes leading to burn wound infections, urinary-tract infections, and pneumonia. The single polar flagellum of P. aeruginosa has been demonstrated to be important virulence and colonization factor of this opportunistic pathogen. We demonstrate a gene to regulate the bacterial swimming activity in P. aeruginosa PAO1 by biological method. However, the change of flagellar morphology was not observed by electron microscopy analysis, suggesting that the gene regulates the flagellar rotation that could not be detected by biological method. PFM exhibits a spatial resolution of a few nanometers to detect the relative position of the probe at an acquisition rate over 1 MHz. By binding a probe such as a bead or a quantum dot on the flagella, we expect the rotation of the probe due to the flagella could be detected. It is expected that the study of the swimming activity of P. aeruginosa provide potent method for the pathogenic role of the flagella in P. aeruginosa.

  9. Inhibiting activator protein-1 activity alters cocaine-induced gene expression and potentiates sensitization.

    PubMed

    Paletzki, R F; Myakishev, M V; Polesskaya, O; Orosz, A; Hyman, S E; Vinson, C

    2008-04-01

    We have expressed A-FOS, an inhibitor of activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding, in adult mouse striatal neurons. We observed normal behavior including locomotion and exploratory activities. Following a single injection of cocaine, locomotion increased similarly in both the A-FOS expressing and littermate controls. However, following repeated injections of cocaine, the A-FOS expressing mice showed increased locomotion relative to littermate controls, an increase that persisted following a week of withdrawal and subsequent cocaine administration. These results indicate that AP-1 suppresses this behavioral response to cocaine. We analyzed mRNA from the striatum before and 4 and 24 h after a single cocaine injection in both A-FOS and control striata using Affymetrix microarrays (430 2.0 Array) to identify genes mis-regulated by A-FOS that may mediate the increased locomotor sensitization to cocaine. A-FOS expression did not change gene expression in the basal state or 4 h following cocaine treatment relative to controls. However, 24 h after an acute cocaine treatment, 84 genes were identified that were differentially expressed between the A-FOS and control mice. Fifty-six genes are down-regulated while 28 genes are up-regulated including previously identified candidates for addiction including brain-derived neurotrophic factor and period homolog 1. Using a random sample of identified genes, quantitative PCR was used to verify the microarray studies. The chromosomal location of these 84 genes was compared with human genome scans of addiction to identify potential genes in humans that are involved in addiction. PMID:18355967

  10. A Bayesian Framework for the Classification of Microbial Gene Activity States

    PubMed Central

    Disselkoen, Craig; Greco, Brian; Cook, Kaitlyn; Koch, Kristin; Lerebours, Reginald; Viss, Chase; Cape, Joshua; Held, Elizabeth; Ashenafi, Yonatan; Fischer, Karen; Acosta, Allyson; Cunningham, Mark; Best, Aaron A.; DeJongh, Matthew; Tintle, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous methods for classifying gene activity states based on gene expression data have been proposed for use in downstream applications, such as incorporating transcriptomics data into metabolic models in order to improve resulting flux predictions. These methods often attempt to classify gene activity for each gene in each experimental condition as belonging to one of two states: active (the gene product is part of an active cellular mechanism) or inactive (the cellular mechanism is not active). These existing methods of classifying gene activity states suffer from multiple limitations, including enforcing unrealistic constraints on the overall proportions of active and inactive genes, failing to leverage a priori knowledge of gene co-regulation, failing to account for differences between genes, and failing to provide statistically meaningful confidence estimates. We propose a flexible Bayesian approach to classifying gene activity states based on a Gaussian mixture model. The model integrates genome-wide transcriptomics data from multiple conditions and information about gene co-regulation to provide activity state confidence estimates for each gene in each condition. We compare the performance of our novel method to existing methods on both simulated data and real data from 907 E. coli gene expression arrays, as well as a comparison with experimentally measured flux values in 29 conditions, demonstrating that our method provides more consistent and accurate results than existing methods across a variety of metrics. PMID:27555837

  11. Porcine E. coli: Virulence-Associated Genes, Resistance Genes and Adhesion and Probiotic Activity Tested by a New Screening Method

    PubMed Central

    Schierack, Peter; Rödiger, Stefan; Kuhl, Christoph; Hiemann, Rico; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Li, Ganwu; Weinreich, Jörg; Berger, Enrico; Nolan, Lisa K.; Nicholson, Bryon; Römer, Antje; Frömmel, Ulrike; Wieler, Lothar H.; Schröder, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We established an automated screening method to characterize adhesion of Escherichia coli to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and their probiotic activity against infection by enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). 104 intestinal E. coli isolates from domestic pigs were tested by PCR for the occurrence of virulence-associated genes, genes coding for resistances to antimicrobial agents and metals, and for phylogenetic origin by PCR. Adhesion rates and probiotic activity were examined for correlation with the presence of these genes. Finally, data were compared with those from 93 E. coli isolates from wild boars. Isolates from domestic pigs carried a broad variety of all tested genes and showed great diversity in gene patterns. Adhesions varied with a maximum of 18.3 or 24.2 mean bacteria adherence per epithelial cell after 2 or 6 hours respectively. Most isolates from domestic pigs and wild boars showed low adherence, with no correlation between adhesion/probiotic activity and E. coli genes or gene clusters. The gene sfa/foc, encoding for a subunit of F1C fimbriae did show a positive correlative association with adherence and probiotic activity; however E. coli isolates from wild boars with the sfa/foc gene showed less adhesion and probiotic activity than E. coli with the sfa/foc gene isolated from domestic pigs after 6 hour incubation. In conclusion, screening porcine E. coli for virulence associated genes genes, adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, and probiotic activity revealed a single important adhesion factor, several probiotic candidates, and showed important differences between E. coli of domestic pigs and wild boars. PMID:23658605

  12. Chicken STING Mediates Activation of the IFN Gene Independently of the RIG-I Gene.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Sun, Yingjie; Wang, Hengan; Yan, Yaxian; Ding, Chan; Sun, Jianhe

    2015-10-15

    Stimulator of IFN genes (STING) is an adaptor that functions downstream of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) in mammalian cells; however, RIG-I is absent in chickens. We identified chicken STING (chSTING) as a critical mediator of virus-triggered type I IFN signaling in RIG-I-null chicken cells. Overexpression of chSTING in DF-1 cells inhibited Newcastle disease virus and avian influenza virus (AIV) viral replication and activated IRF-7 and NF-κB to induce expression of type I IFNs. Knockdown of endogenous chSTING abolished virus-triggered activation of IRF-7 and IFN-β and increased viral yield. chSTING was a critical component in the virus-triggered IRF-7 activation pathway and the cellular antiviral response. chSTING predominantly localized to the outer membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum and was also found in the mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, knockdown of chSTING blocked polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid-, poly(deoxyadenylic-deoxythymidylic) acid-, and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5)-stimulated induction of IFN-β. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that chicken MDA5 could interact with chSTING, and this interaction was enhanced by ectopically expressed chicken mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein. Together, these results indicated that chSTING is an important regulator of chicken innate immune signaling and might be involved in the MDA5 signaling pathway in chicken cells. These results help with understanding the biological role of STING in innate immunity during evolution. PMID:26392466

  13. Biochemical Characterization of the Flagellar Rod Components of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: Properties and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Osorio-Valeriano, Manuel; de la Mora, Javier; Camarena, Laura

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The flagellar basal body is a rotary motor that spans the cytoplasmic and outer membranes. The rod is a drive shaft that transmits torque generated by the motor through the hook to the filament that propels the bacterial cell. The assembly and structure of the rod are poorly understood. In a first attempt to characterize this structure in the alphaproteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we overexpressed and purified FliE and the four related rod proteins (FlgB, FlgC, FlgF, and FlgG), and we analyzed their ability to form homo-oligomers. We found that highly purified preparations of these proteins formed high-molecular-mass oligomers that tended to dissociate in the presence of NaCl. As predicted by in silico modeling, the four rod proteins share architectural features. Using affinity blotting, we detected the heteromeric interactions between these proteins. In addition, we observed that deletion of the N- and C-terminal regions of FlgF and FlgG severely affected heteromeric but not homomeric interactions. On the basis of our findings, we propose a model of rod assembly in this bacterium. IMPORTANCE Despite the considerable amount of research on the structure and assembly of other flagellar axial structures that has been conducted, the rod has been barely studied. An analysis of the biochemical characteristics of the flagellar rod components of the Fla1 system of R. sphaeroides is presented in this work. We also analyze the interactions of these proteins with each other and with their neighbors, and we propose a model for the order in which they are assembled. PMID:26574514

  14. Genes Important for Catalase Activity in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Baureder, Michael; Hederstedt, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Little in general is known about how heme proteins are assembled from their constituents in cells. The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme and does not depend on it for growth. However, when supplied with heme in the growth medium the cells can synthesize two heme proteins; catalase (KatA) and cytochrome bd (CydAB). To identify novel factors important for catalase biogenesis libraries of E. faecalis gene insertion mutants were generated using two different types of transposons. The libraries of mutants were screened for clones deficient in catalase activity using a colony zymogram staining procedure. Analysis of obtained clones identified, in addition to katA (encoding the catalase enzyme protein), nine genes distributed over five different chromosomal loci. No factors with a dedicated essential role in catalase biogenesis or heme trafficking were revealed, but the results indicate the RNA degradosome (srmB, rnjA), an ABC-type oligopeptide transporter (oppBC), a two-component signal transducer (etaR), and NADH peroxidase (npr) as being important for expression of catalase activity in E. faecalis. It is demonstrated that catalase biogenesis in E. faecalis is independent of the CydABCD proteins and that a conserved proline residue in the N-terminal region of KatA is important for catalase assembly. PMID:22590595

  15. Production of the Ramoplanin Activity Analogue by Double Gene Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jungang; Chen, Junsheng; Shao, Lei; Zhang, Junliang; Dong, Xiaojing; Liu, Pengyu; Chen, Daijie

    2016-01-01

    Glycopeptides such as vancomycin and telavancin are essential for treating infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. But the dwindling availability of new antibiotics and the emergence of resistant bacteria are making effective antibiotic treatment increasingly difficult. Ramoplanin, an inhibitor of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, is a highly effective antibiotic against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-intermediate resistant Clostridium difficile and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. Here, two tailoring enzyme genes in the biosynthesis of ramoplanin were deleted by double in-frame gene knockouts to produce new ramoplanin derivatives. The deschlororamoplanin A2 aglycone was purified and its structure was identified with LC-MS/MS. Deschlororamoplanin A2 aglycone and ramoplanin aglycone showed similar activity to ramoplanin A2. The results showed that α-1,2-dimannosyl disaccharide at Hpg11 and chlorination at Chp17 in the ramoplanin structure are not essential for its antimicrobial activity. This work provides new precursor compounds for the semisynthetic modification of ramoplanin. PMID:27149627

  16. A Non-Poissonian Flagellar Motor Switch Increases Bacterial Chemotactic Potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; He, Jing; Altindal, Tuba; Xie, Li; Wu, Xiao-Lun

    2015-09-01

    We investigate bacterial chemotactic strategies using run-tumble and run-reverse-flick motility patterns. The former is typically observed in enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella and the latter was recently observed in the marine bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus and is possibly exhibited by other polar flagellated species. It is shown that although the three-step motility pattern helps the bacterium to localize near hot spots, an exploitative behavior, its exploratory potential in short times can be significantly enhanced by employing a non-Poissonian regulation scheme for its flagellar motor switches. PMID:26331263

  17. Isolation and characterization of a novel B cell activation gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.X.; Wilson, G.L.; Fox, C.H.; Kehrl, J.H. )

    1993-05-01

    Using subtractive cDNA cloning, the authors have isolated a series of cDNA clones that are differentially expressed between B and T lymphocytes. Whereas some of the isolated cDNA are from known B cell-specific genes, many of them represent previously uncharacterized genes. One of these unknown genes was denoted as BL34. Northern blot analysis performed with the BL34 cDNA revealed a 1.6-kb mRNA transcript that was present at low levels in RNA extracted from resting B lymphocytes, but whose expression was markedly increased in RNA prepared from mitogen-activated B cells. Similarly, RNA prepared from several B cell lines treated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) contained high levels of BL34 mRNA. In contrast, RNA from purified T cells treated with phytohemagglutinin and PMA had undetectable amounts of BL34 mRNA. In addition, high levels of BL34 mRNA were detected in RNA purified from PBMC of a patient with B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Southern blot analysis of human DNA from various tissues and cells lines demonstrated that BL34 is a single-copy gene without evidence of rearrangement. Two full length BL34 cDNA were sequenced, and an open reading frame of 588 bp was identified that was predicted to encode for a 196 amino acid protein. Searches of several protein data bases failed to find any homologous proteins. To directly analyze the expression of BL34 mRNA in lymphoid tissues in situ, hybridization studies with human tonsil tissue sections were performed. BL34 mRNA was detected in a portion of the cells in the germinal center region and adjacent to the mantle region. Further characterization of the BL34 gene and its protein should lead to insights to its role in B cell function and the consequences of its over-expression in acute lymphocytic leukemia. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Histone acetyltransferase activity of yeast Gcn5p is required for the activation of target genes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Min-Hao; Zhou, Jianxin; Jambeck, Per; Churchill, Mair E.A.; Allis, C. David

    1998-01-01

    Gcn5p is a transcriptional coactivator required for correct expression of various genes in yeast. Several transcriptional regulators, including Gcn5p, possess intrinsic histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity in vitro. However, whether the HAT activity of any of these proteins is required for gene activation remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the HAT activity of Gcn5p is critical for transcriptional activation of target genes in vivo. Core histones are hyperacetylated in cells overproducing functional Gcn5p, and promoters of Gcn5p-regulated genes are associated with hyperacetylated histones upon activation by low-copy Gcn5p. Point mutations within the Gcn5p catalytic domain abolish both promoter-directed histone acetylation and Gcn5p-mediated transcriptional activation. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that promoter-specific histone acetylation, catalyzed by functional Gcn5p, plays a critical role in gene activation. PMID:9499399

  19. Polyphenols from Chilean Propolis and Pinocembrin Reduce MMP-9 Gene Expression and Activity in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Nicolás; Cuevas, Alejandro; Cavalcante, Marcela F.; Dörr, Felipe A.; Saavedra, Kathleen; Zambrano, Tomás; Abdalla, Dulcineia S. P.; Salazar, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols from diverse sources have shown anti-inflammatory activity. In the context of atherosclerosis, macrophages play important roles including matrix metalloproteinases synthesis involved in degradation of matrix extracellular components affecting the atherosclerotic plaque stability. We prepared a propolis extract and pinocembrin in ethanol solution. Propolis extract was chemically characterized using LC-MS. The effect of treatments on gene expression and proteolytic activity was measured in vitro using murine macrophages activated with LPS. Cellular toxicity associated with both treatments and the vehicle was determined using MTT and apoptosis/necrosis detection assays. MMP-9 gene expression and proteolytic activity were measured using qPCR and zymography, respectively. Thirty-two compounds were identified in the propolis extract, including pinocembrin among its major components. Treatment with either ethanolic extract of propolis or pinocembrin inhibits MMP-9 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, an inhibitory effect was observed in proteolytic activity. However, the effect showed by ethanolic extract of propolis was higher than the effect of pinocembrin, suggesting that MMP-9 inhibition results from a joint contribution between the components of the extract. These data suggest a potential role of polyphenols from Chilean propolis in the control of extracellular matrix degradation in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27119082

  20. Direct optical monitoring of flow generated by bacterial flagellar rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, Silke R.; Nedev, Spas; Carretero-Palacios, Sol; Lohmüller, Theobald E-mail: feldmann@lmu.de; Feldmann, Jochen E-mail: feldmann@lmu.de; Mader, Andreas; Opitz, Madeleine

    2014-03-03

    We report on a highly sensitive approach to measure and quantify the time dependent changes of the flow generated by the flagella bundle rotation of single bacterial cells. This is achieved by observing the interactions between a silica particle and a bacterium, which are both trapped next to each other in a dual beam optical tweezer. In this configuration, the particle serves as a sensitive detector where the fast-Fourier analysis of the particle trajectory renders, it possible to access information about changes of bacterial activity.

  1. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation. PMID:26689875

  2. Dynamics of a tightly coupled mechanism for flagellar rotation. Bacterial motility, chemiosmotic coupling, protonmotive force.

    PubMed

    Meister, M; Caplan, S R; Berg, H C

    1989-05-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a molecular engine that couples the flow of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane to rotation of the flagellar filament. We analyze the steady-state behavior of an explicit mechanical model in which a fixed number of protons carries the filament through one revolution. Predictions of this model are compared with experimentally determined relationships between protonmotive force, proton flux, torque, and speed. All such tightly coupled mechanisms produce the same torque when the motor is stalled but vary greatly in their behavior at high speed. The speed at zero load predicted by our model is limited by the rates of association and dissociation of protons at binding sites on the rotor and by the mobility of force generators containing transmembrane channels that interact with these sites. Our analysis suggests that more could be learned about the motor if it were driven by an externally applied torque backwards (at negative speed) or forwards at speeds greater than the zero-load speed. PMID:2720081

  3. A “Mechanistic” Explanation of the Multiple Helical Forms Adopted by Bacterial Flagellar Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Calladine, C.R.; Luisi, B.F.; Pratap, J.V.

    2013-01-01

    The corkscrew-like flagellar filaments emerging from the surface of bacteria such as Salmonella typhimurium propel the cells toward nutrient and away from repellents. This kind of motility depends upon the ability of the flagellar filaments to adopt a range of distinct helical forms. A filament is typically constructed from ~ 30,000 identical flagellin molecules, which self-assemble into a tubular structure containing 11 near-longitudinal protofilaments. A “mechanical” model, in which the flagellin building block has the capacity to switch between two principal interfacial states, predicts that the filament can assemble into a “canonical” family of 12 distinct helical forms, each having unique curvature and twist: these include two “extreme” straight forms having left- and right-handed twists, respectively, and 10 intermediate helical forms. Measured shapes of the filaments correspond well with predictions of the model. This report is concerned with two unanswered questions. First, what properties of the flagellin determine which of the 12 discrete forms is preferred? Second, how does the interfacial “switch” work, at a molecular level? Our proposed solution of these problems is based mainly on a detailed examination of differences between the available electron cryo-microscopy structures of the straight L and R filaments, respectively. PMID:23274110

  4. Nonlinear instability in flagellar dynamics: a novel modulation mechanism in sperm migration?

    PubMed Central

    Gadêlha, H.; Gaffney, E. A.; Smith, D. J.; Kirkman-Brown, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout biology, cells and organisms use flagella and cilia to propel fluid and achieve motility. The beating of these organelles, and the corresponding ability to sense, respond to and modulate this beat is central to many processes in health and disease. While the mechanics of flagellum–fluid interaction has been the subject of extensive mathematical studies, these models have been restricted to being geometrically linear or weakly nonlinear, despite the high curvatures observed physiologically. We study the effect of geometrical nonlinearity, focusing on the spermatozoon flagellum. For a wide range of physiologically relevant parameters, the nonlinear model predicts that flagellar compression by the internal forces initiates an effective buckling behaviour, leading to a symmetry-breaking bifurcation that causes profound and complicated changes in the waveform and swimming trajectory, as well as the breakdown of the linear theory. The emergent waveform also induces curved swimming in an otherwise symmetric system, with the swimming trajectory being sensitive to head shape—no signalling or asymmetric forces are required. We conclude that nonlinear models are essential in understanding the flagellar waveform in migratory human sperm; these models will also be invaluable in understanding motile flagella and cilia in other systems. PMID:20462879

  5. Metachronal waves in the flagellar beating of Volvox and their hydrodynamic origin

    PubMed Central

    Brumley, Douglas R.; Polin, Marco; Pedley, Timothy J.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    Groups of eukaryotic cilia and flagella are capable of coordinating their beating over large scales, routinely exhibiting collective dynamics in the form of metachronal waves. The origin of this behaviour—possibly influenced by both mechanical interactions and direct biological regulation—is poorly understood, in large part due to a lack of quantitative experimental studies. Here we characterize in detail flagellar coordination on the surface of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, an emerging model organism for flagellar dynamics. Our studies reveal for the first time that the average metachronal coordination observed is punctuated by periodic phase defects during which synchrony is partial and limited to specific groups of cells. A minimal model of hydrodynamically coupled oscillators can reproduce semi-quantitatively the characteristics of the average metachronal dynamics, and the emergence of defects. We systematically study the model's behaviour by assessing the effect of changing intrinsic rotor characteristics, including oscillator stiffness and the nature of their internal driving force, as well as their geometric properties and spatial arrangement. Our results suggest that metachronal coordination follows from deformations in the oscillators' limit cycles induced by hydrodynamic stresses, and that defects result from sufficiently steep local biases in the oscillators' intrinsic frequencies. Additionally, we find that random variations in the intrinsic rotor frequencies increase the robustness of the average properties of the emergent metachronal waves. PMID:26040592

  6. Differentiation of the major flagellar antigens of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the slide coagglutination technique.

    PubMed

    Ansorg, R A; Knoche, M E; Spies, A F; Kraus, C J

    1984-07-01

    Antisera against the two major flagellar antigens of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were obtained by immunization of rabbits with isolated flagella and absorption of contaminating antisomatic antibodies. In the conventional slide agglutination test, the pure H antisera did not agglutinate the flagellated cells of the homologous strains. The addition of protein A-bearing staphylococci to H antiserum and homologous flagellated cells, the so-called slide coagglutination, results in a rapid development of flaky clumps. H coagglutination tests of reference strains, which formerly have been H typed by long-term tube agglutination and by the indirect fluorescent-antibody technique, yielded exactly the same subdivision of the strains in H type a and H type b as the more laborious and time-consuming methods. O grouping and H typing of 181 isolates from clinical specimens revealed a free combination of the somatic and flagellar antigens. 25 OH serovars were found. The simple and rapid coagglutination technique can promote the serovar determination of P. aeruginosa, particularly for the purpose of hospital infection control. PMID:6430957

  7. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein—TbBILBO1

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton. PMID:26950156

  8. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein-TbBILBO1.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R

    2016-01-01

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton. PMID:26950156

  9. Unexpected flagellar movement patterns and epithelial binding behavior of mouse sperm in the oviduct.

    PubMed

    Chang, Haixin; Suarez, Susan S

    2012-05-01

    In order to better understand how sperm movement is regulated in the oviduct, we mated wild-type female mice with Acr-EGFP males that produce sperm with fluorescent acrosomes. The fluorescence improved our ability to detect sperm within the oviduct. Oviducts were removed shortly before or after ovulation and placed in chambers on a warm microscope stage for video recording. Hyperactivated sperm in the isthmic reservoir detached frequently from the epithelium and then reattached. Unexpectedly, most sperm found in the ampulla remained bound to epithelium throughout the observation period of several minutes. In both regions, most sperm produced deep flagellar bends in the direction opposite the hook of the sperm head. This was unexpected, because mouse sperm incubated under capacitating conditions in vitro primarily hyperactivate by producing deep flagellar bends in the same direction as the hook of the head. In vitro, sperm that are treated with thimerosal to release Ca(2+) from internal stores produce deep anti-hook bends; however, physical factors such as viscous oviduct fluid could also have influenced bending in oviductal sperm. Some sperm detached from epithelium in both the ampulla and isthmus during strong contractions of the oviduct. Blockage of oviduct contractions with nicardipine, however, did not stop sperm from forming a storage reservoir in the isthmus or prevent sperm from reaching the ampulla. These observations indicate that sperm continue to bind to oviductal epithelium after they leave the isthmic reservoir and that sperm motility is crucial in the transport of sperm to the fertilization site. PMID:22337334

  10. Metachronal waves in the flagellar beating of Volvox and their hydrodynamic origin.

    PubMed

    Brumley, Douglas R; Polin, Marco; Pedley, Timothy J; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2015-07-01

    Groups of eukaryotic cilia and flagella are capable of coordinating their beating over large scales, routinely exhibiting collective dynamics in the form of metachronal waves. The origin of this behavior--possibly influenced by both mechanical interactions and direct biological regulation--is poorly understood, in large part due to a lack of quantitative experimental studies. Here we characterize in detail flagellar coordination on the surface of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, an emerging model organism for flagellar dynamics. Our studies reveal for the first time that the average metachronal coordination observed is punctuated by periodic phase defects during which synchrony is partial and limited to specific groups of cells. A minimal model of hydrodynamically coupled oscillators can reproduce semi-quantitatively the characteristics of the average metachronal dynamics, and the emergence of defects. We systematically study the model's behaviour by assessing the effect of changing intrinsic rotor characteristics, including oscillator stiffness and the nature of their internal driving force, as well as their geometric properties and spatial arrangement. Our results suggest that metachronal coordination follows from deformations in the oscillators' limit cycles induced by hydrodynamic stresses, and that defects result from sufficiently steep local biases in the oscillators' intrinsic frequencies. Additionally, we find that random variations in the intrinsic rotor frequencies increase the robustness of the average properties of the emergent metachronal waves. PMID:26040592

  11. Activity-dependent genes in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Fischl, Adrian M; Heron, Paula M; Stromberg, Arnold J; McClintock, Timothy S

    2014-06-01

    Activity-dependent survival of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) may allow animals to tune their olfactory systems to match their odor environment. Activity-dependent genes should play important roles in this process, motivating experiments to identify them. Both unilateral naris occlusion of mice for 6 days and genetic silencing of OSNs decreased S100A5, Lrrc3b, Kirrel2, Slc17a6, Rasgrp4, Pcp4l1, Plcxd3, and Kcnn2 while increasing Kirrel3. Naris occlusion also decreased Eml5, Ptprn, and Nphs1. OSN number was unchanged and stress-response mRNAs were unaffected after 6 days of naris occlusion. This leaves odor stimulation as the most likely cause of differential abundance of these mRNAs, but through a mechanism that is slow or indirect for most because 30-40 min of odor stimulation increased only 3 of 11 mRNAs decreased by naris occlusion: S100A5, Lrrc3b, and Kirrel2. Odorant receptor (OR) mRNAs were significantly more variable than the average mRNA, consistent with difficulty in reliably detecting changes in these mRNAs after 6 days of naris occlusion. One OR mRNA, Olfr855, was consistently decreased, however. These results suggest that the latency from the cessation of odor stimulation to effects on activity-dependent OSN survival must be a week or more in juvenile mice. PMID:24692514

  12. Activity-Dependent Genes in Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Activity-dependent survival of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) may allow animals to tune their olfactory systems to match their odor environment. Activity-dependent genes should play important roles in this process, motivating experiments to identify them. Both unilateral naris occlusion of mice for 6 days and genetic silencing of OSNs decreased S100A5, Lrrc3b, Kirrel2, Slc17a6, Rasgrp4, Pcp4l1, Plcxd3, and Kcnn2 while increasing Kirrel3. Naris occlusion also decreased Eml5, Ptprn, and Nphs1. OSN number was unchanged and stress-response mRNAs were unaffected after 6 days of naris occlusion. This leaves odor stimulation as the most likely cause of differential abundance of these mRNAs, but through a mechanism that is slow or indirect for most because 30–40min of odor stimulation increased only 3 of 11 mRNAs decreased by naris occlusion: S100A5, Lrrc3b, and Kirrel2. Odorant receptor (OR) mRNAs were significantly more variable than the average mRNA, consistent with difficulty in reliably detecting changes in these mRNAs after 6 days of naris occlusion. One OR mRNA, Olfr855, was consistently decreased, however. These results suggest that the latency from the cessation of odor stimulation to effects on activity-dependent OSN survival must be a week or more in juvenile mice. PMID:24692514

  13. Post-transcriptional gene silencing activity of human GIGYF2.

    PubMed

    Kryszke, Marie-Hélène; Adjeriou, Badia; Liang, Feifei; Chen, Hong; Dautry, François

    2016-07-01

    In mammalian post-transcriptional gene silencing, the Argonaute protein AGO2 indirectly recruits translation inhibitors, deadenylase complexes, and decapping factors to microRNA-targeted mRNAs, thereby repressing mRNA translation and accelerating mRNA decay. However, the exact composition and assembly pathway of the microRNA-induced silencing complex are not completely elucidated. As the GYF domain of human GIGYF2 was shown to bind AGO2 in pulldown experiments, we wondered whether GIGYF2 could be a novel protein component of the microRNA-induced silencing complex. Here we show that full-length GIGYF2 coimmunoprecipitates with AGO2 in human cells, and demonstrate that, upon tethering to a reporter mRNA, GIGYF2 exhibits strong, dose-dependent silencing activity, involving both mRNA destabilization and translational repression. PMID:27157137

  14. Protein kinase C is likely to be involved in zoosporogenesis and maintenance of flagellar motility in the peronosporomycete zoospores.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Tofazzal; von Tiedemann, Andreas; Laatsch, Hartmut

    2011-08-01

    The motility of zoospores is critical in the disease cycles of Peronosporomycetes that cause devastating diseases in plants, fishes, vertebrates, and microbes. In the course of screening for secondary metabolites, we found that ethyl acetate extracts of a marine Streptomyces sp. strain B5136 rapidly impaired the motility of zoospores of the grapevine downy mildew pathogen Plasmopara viticola at 0.1 μg/ml. The active principle in the extracts was identified as staurosporine, a known broad-spectrum inhibitor of protein kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC). In the presence of staurosporine (2 nM), zoospores moved very slowly in their axis or spun in tight circles, instead of displaying straight swimming in a helical fashion. Compounds such as K-252a, K-252b, and K-252c structurally related to staurosporine also impaired the motility of zoospores in a similar manner but at varying doses. Among the 22 known kinase inhibitors tested, the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine was the most potent to arrest the motility of zoospores at concentrations starting from 5 nM. Inhibitors that targeted kinase pathways other than PKC pathways did not practically show any activity in impairing zoospore motility. Interestingly, both staurosporine (5 nM) and chelerythrine (10 nM) also inhibited the release of zoospores from the P. viticola sporangia in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, staurosporine completely suppressed downy mildew disease in grapevine leaves at 2 μM, suggesting the potential of small-molecule PKC inhibitors for the control of peronosporomycete phytopathogens. Taken together, these results suggest that PKC is likely to be a key signaling mediator associated with zoosporogenesis and the maintenance of flagellar motility in peronosporomycete zoospores. PMID:21486142

  15. Chemoreceptors and Flagellar Motors Are Subterminally Located in Close Proximity at the Two Cell Poles in Spirochetes ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongbin; Raddi, Gianmarco; Liu, Jun; Charon, Nyles W.; Li, Chunhao

    2011-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions, immunofluorescence microscopy, and cryo-electron tomography revealed that the chemoreceptors of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi form long, thin arrays near both cell poles. These arrays are in close proximity to the flagellar motors. This information provides a basis for further understanding motility, chemotaxis, and protein localization in spirochetes. PMID:21441520

  16. Cohesin and Polycomb Proteins Functionally Interact to Control Transcription at Silenced and Active Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Cheri A.; Misulovin, Ziva; Gause, Maria; Koenig, Amanda; Gohara, David W.; Watson, Audrey; Dorsett, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Cohesin is crucial for proper chromosome segregation but also regulates gene transcription and organism development by poorly understood mechanisms. Using genome-wide assays in Drosophila developing wings and cultured cells, we find that cohesin functionally interacts with Polycomb group (PcG) silencing proteins at both silenced and active genes. Cohesin unexpectedly facilitates binding of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) to many active genes, but their binding is mutually antagonistic at silenced genes. PRC1 depletion decreases phosphorylated RNA polymerase II and mRNA at many active genes but increases them at silenced genes. Depletion of cohesin reduces long-range interactions between Polycomb Response Elements in the invected-engrailed gene complex where it represses transcription. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized role for PRC1 in facilitating productive gene transcription and provide new insights into how cohesin and PRC1 control development. PMID:23818863

  17. Urokinase plasminogen activator gene deficiency inhibits fracture cartilage remodeling.

    PubMed

    Popa, Nicoleta L; Wergedal, Jon E; Lau, K-H William; Mohan, Subburaman; Rundle, Charles H

    2014-03-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates a proteolytic cascade of extracellular matrix degradation that functions in tissue development and tissue repair. The development and remodeling of the skeletal extracellular matrix during wound healing suggests that uPA might regulate bone development and repair. To determine whether uPA functions regulate bone development and repair, we examined the basal skeletal phenotype and endochondral bone fracture repair in uPA-deficient mice. The skeletal phenotype of uPA knockout mice was compared with that of control mice under basal conditions by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-CT analysis, and during femur fracture repair by micro-CT and histological examination of the fracture callus. No effects of uPA gene deficiency were observed in the basal skeletal phenotype of the whole body or the femur. However, uPA gene deficiency resulted in increased fracture callus cartilage abundance during femur fracture repair at 14 days healing. The increase in cartilage corresponded to reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining for osteoclasts in the uPA knockout fracture callus at this time, consistent with impaired osteoclast-mediated remodeling of the fracture cartilage. CD31 staining was reduced in the knockout fracture tissues at this time, suggesting that angiogenesis was also reduced. Osteoclasts also colocalized with CD31 expression in the endothelial cells of the fracture tissues during callus remodeling. These results indicate that uPA promotes remodeling of the fracture cartilage by osteoclasts that are associated with angiogenesis and suggest that uPA promotes angiogenesis and remodeling of the fracture cartilage at this time of bone fracture repair. PMID:23700285

  18. Transcriptome analysis reveals dysregulation of innate immune response genes and neuronal activity-dependent genes in autism

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Simone; Ellis, Shannon E.; Ashar, Foram N.; Moes, Anna; Bader, Joel S.; Zhan, Jianan; West, Andrew B.; Arking, Dan E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies of genomic variation associated with autism have suggested the existence of extreme heterogeneity. Large-scale transcriptomics should complement these results to identify core molecular pathways underlying autism. Here we report results from a large-scale RNA sequencing effort, utilizing region-matched autism and control brains to identify neuronal and microglial genes robustly dysregulated in autism cortical brain. Remarkably, we note that a gene expression module corresponding to M2-activation states in microglia is negatively correlated with a differentially expressed neuronal module, implicating dysregulated microglial responses in concert with altered neuronal activity-dependent genes in autism brains. These observations provide pathways and candidate genes that highlight the interplay between innate immunity and neuronal activity in the aetiology of autism. PMID:25494366

  19. Functional mapping of a trans-activating gene required for expression of a baculovirus delayed-early gene.

    PubMed Central

    Guarino, L A; Summers, M D

    1986-01-01

    The temporal regulation of an early gene of the baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus was examined. We constructed a plasmid (plasmid 39CAT) in which the bacterial gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was placed under the control of the promoter for the gene for a A. californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus 39,000-dalton protein (39K). A transient expression assay of plasmid 39CAT revealed that the 39K gene was expressed in infected cells but not in uninfected cells, indicating that the 39K gene should be classified as a delayed-early gene. The 39K promoter also efficiently directed the synthesis of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase when the plasmid was cotransfected with viral DNA which had been restricted with several restriction enzymes. To map the location of the gene(s) required for the synthesis of 39K, plasmid 39CAT was cotransfected with purified restriction fragments of A. californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA. Fragments which mapped between 90.7 and 100.8 map units induced plasmid 39CAT. Plasmid pEcoRI-B, containing EcoRI fragment B (90 to 100 map units), activated plasmid 39CAT. Functional mapping of plasmid pEcoRI-B indicated that the essential region was located between 95.0 and 97.5 map units. The 5' end of this gene was mapped, and the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was inserted under the control of its promoter. Transient assay experiments indicated that the trans-acting regulatory gene was expressed in uninfected cells and is therefore an immediate-early gene. This gene was named IE-1. Images PMID:3944847

  20. Comparison of gene activation by two TAL effectors from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis reveals candidate host susceptibility genes in cassava.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Megan; Morbitzer, Robert; Lahaye, Thomas; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2016-08-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam) employs transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors to promote bacterial growth and symptom formation during infection of cassava. TAL effectors are secreted via the bacterial type III secretion system into plant cells, where they are directed to the nucleus, bind DNA in plant promoters and activate the expression of downstream genes. The DNA-binding activity of TAL effectors is carried out by a central domain which contains a series of repeat variable diresidues (RVDs) that dictate the sequence of bound nucleotides. TAL14Xam668 promotes virulence in Xam strain Xam668 and has been shown to activate multiple cassava genes. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to identify the full target repertoire of TAL14Xam668 in cassava, which includes over 50 genes. A subset of highly up-regulated genes was tested for activation by TAL14CIO151 from Xam strain CIO151. Although TAL14CIO151 and TAL14Xam668 differ by only a single RVD, they display differential activation of gene targets. TAL14CIO151 complements the TAL14Xam668 mutant defect, implying that shared target genes are important for TAL14Xam668 -mediated disease susceptibility. Complementation with closely related TAL effectors is a novel approach to the narrowing down of biologically relevant susceptibility genes of TAL effectors with multiple targets. This study provides an example of how TAL effector target activation by two strains within a single species of Xanthomonas can be dramatically affected by a small change in RVD-nucleotide affinity at a single site, and reflects the parameters of RVD-nucleotide interaction determined using designer TAL effectors in transient systems. PMID:26575863

  1. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  2. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.; Roessler, P.G.

    1999-07-27

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities. 8 figs.

  3. Characterization of four esterase genes and esterase activity from the gut of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four esterase genes and general esterase activity were investigated in the gut of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes. Two genes (RfEst1 and RfEst2) share significant translated identity with a number of insect JH esterases. The two remaining genes (RfEst3 and RfEst4) apparently code for much shorte...

  4. Chromatin remodeling during Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH2 gene activation.

    PubMed

    Verdone, L; Camilloni, G; Di Mauro, E; Caserta, M

    1996-05-01

    We have analyzed at both low and high resolution the distribution of nucleosomes over the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADH2 promoter region in its chromosomal location, both under repressing (high-glucose) conditions and during derepression. Enzymatic treatments (micrococcal nuclease and restriction endonucleases) were used to probe the in vivo chromatin structure during ADH2 gene activation. Under glucose-repressed conditions, the ADH2 promoter was bound by a precise array of nucleosomes, the principal ones positioned at the RNA initiation sites (nucleosome +1), at the TATA box (nucleosome -1), and upstream of the ADR1-binding site (UAS1) (nucleosome -2). The UAS1 sequence and the adjacent UAS2 sequence constituted a nucleosome-free region. Nucleosomes -1 and +1 were destabilized soon after depletion of glucose and had become so before the appearance of ADH2 mRNA. When the transcription rate was high, nucleosomes -2 and +2 also underwent rearrangement. When spheroplasts were prepared from cells grown in minimal medium, detection of this chromatin remodeling required the addition of a small amount of glucose. Cells lacking the ADR1 protein did not display any of these chromatin modifications upon glucose depletion. Since the UAS1 sequence to which Adr1p binds is located immediately upstream of nucleosome -1, Adr1p is presumably required for destabilization of this nucleosome and for aiding the TATA-box accessibility to the transcription machinery. PMID:8628264

  5. Human cord blood contains an IGM antibody to the 41KD flagellar antigen of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Cooke, W D; Orr, A S; Wiseman, B L; Rouse, S B; Murray, W C; Ranck, S G

    1993-10-01

    Natural antibodies are the IgM products of fetal and neonatal B cells. These are germline encoded low affinity antibodies with multiple specificities to self and exogenous antigens. Lyme borreliosis is the disease resulting from infection with the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. The humoral response to this organism is brisk, directed at multiple proteins, and persistent. Antibody to the 41kd flagellar antigen is found early in disease, but may also be found in non-exposed individuals. These properties suggest that the anti-41kd antibody may be a natural antibody. We report here the finding of an IgM anti-41kd reactivity in 29% of cord blood samples from patients in an area non-endemic for Lyme disease. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that antibody to flagellin may be a germline encoded natural antibody, and could be important in the immunopathogenesis of Lyme arthritis and other arthritides. PMID:8211003

  6. Viscous Dynamics of Lyme Disease and Syphilis Spirochetes Reveal Flagellar Torque and Drag

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Michael; Vig, Dhruv K.; Radolf, Justin D.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    The spirochetes that cause Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi) and syphilis (Treponema pallidum) swim through viscous fluids, such as blood and interstitial fluid, by undulating their bodies as traveling, planar waves. These undulations are driven by rotation of the flagella within the periplasmic space, the narrow (∼20–40 nm in width) compartment between the inner and outer membranes. We show here that the swimming speeds of B. burgdorferi and T. pallidum decrease with increases in viscosity of the external aqueous milieu, even though the flagella are entirely intracellular. We then use mathematical modeling to show that the measured changes in speed are consistent with the exertion of constant torque by the spirochetal flagellar motors. Comparison of simulations, experiments, and a simple model for power dissipation allows us to estimate the torque and resistive drag that act on the flagella of these major spirochetal pathogens. PMID:24268139

  7. A common assembly module in injectisome and flagellar type III secretion sorting platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notti, Ryan Q.; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Lilic, Mirjana; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2015-05-01

    Translocating proteins across the double membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, type III secretion systems (T3SS) occur in two evolutionarily related forms: injectisomes, delivering virulence factors into host cells, and the flagellar system, secreting the polymeric filament used for motility. While both systems share related elements of a cytoplasmic sorting platform that facilitates the hierarchical secretion of protein substrates, its assembly and regulation remain unclear. Here we describe a module mediating the assembly of the sorting platform in both secretion systems, and elucidate the structural basis for segregation of homologous components among these divergent T3SS subtypes sharing a common cytoplasmic milieu. These results provide a foundation for the subtype-specific assembly of T3SS sorting platforms and will support further mechanistic analysis and anti-virulence drug design.

  8. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming Behavior of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, Paulo; Yang, Jing; Gollub, Jerry

    2013-11-01

    The motility behavior of microorganisms can be significantly affected by the rheology of their fluidic environment. In this talk, we experimentally investigate the effects of fluid elasticity on both the flagella kinematics and swimming dynamics of the microscopic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We find that the flagellar beating frequency and wave speed are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Interestingly, the swimming speeds during the alga power and recovery strokes are enhanced by fluid elasticity for De>1. Despite such enhancements, however, the alga net forward speed is hindered by fluid elasticity by as much as 30% compared to Newtonian fluids of similar shear viscosities. The motility enhancements could be explained by the mechanism of stress accumulation in the viscoelastic fluid. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation - DMR-1104705.

  9. Coordinated Switching of Bacterial Flagellar Motors in a Single E. Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-03-01

    The swimming of Escherichia coli is propelled by its multiple flagellar motors. Each motor spins either clockwise or counterclockwise, under the control of an intracellular regulator, CheY-P. A long standing question is whether these motors work independently or not. There can be two mechanisms (extrinsic and intrinsic) to coordinate the switching of bacterial motors. The extrinsic one arises from the fact that different motors in the same cell sense a common biochemical signal (CheY-P) which fluctuates near the motors' response threshold. An alternative, intrinsic mechanism is direct motor-motor coupling which makes synchronized switching energetically favorable. Here, we develop simple models for both mechanisms and uncover their different hallmarks. A quantitative comparison to the recent experiments suggest that the direct coupling mechanism may be accountable for the observed sharp correlation between motors in a single E. coli. Possible origins of this coupling are discussed. This research is supported by the NIH Grant GM081747

  10. Coordinated Switching of Bacterial Flagellar Motors: Evidence for Direct Motor-Motor Coupling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-04-01

    The swimming of Escherichia coli is powered by its multiple flagellar motors. Each motor spins either clockwise or counterclockwise, under the control of an intracellular regulator, CheY-P. There can be two mechanisms (extrinsic and intrinsic) to coordinate the switching of bacterial motors. The extrinsic one arises from the fact that different motors in the same cell sense a common input (CheY-P) which fluctuates near the motors’ response threshold. An alternative, intrinsic mechanism is direct motor-motor coupling which makes synchronized switching energetically favorable. Here, we develop simple models for both mechanisms and uncover their different hallmarks. A quantitative comparison to the recent experiments suggests that the direct coupling mechanism may be accountable for the observed sharp correlation between motors in a single Escherichia coli. Possible origins of this coupling (e.g., hydrodynamic interaction) are discussed.

  11. Flagellar hydrodynamics. A comparison between resistive-force theory and slender-body theory.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R E; Brokaw, C J

    1979-01-01

    This paper investigates the accuracy of the resistive-force theory (Gray and Hancock method) which is commonly used for hydrodynamic analysis of swimming flagella. We made a comparison between the forces, bending moments, and shear moments calculated by resistive-force theory and by the more accurate slender-body theory for large-amplitude, planar wave forms computed for a flagellar model. By making an upward empirical adjustment, by about 35%, of the classical drag coefficient values used in the resistive-force theory calculations, we obtained good agreement between the distributions of the forces and moments along the length of the flagellum predicted by the two methods when the flagellum has no cell body attached. After this adjustment, we found the rate of energy expenditure calculated by the two methods for the few typical test cases to be almost identical. The resistive-force theory is thus completely satisfactory for use in analysis of mechanisms for the control of flagellar bending, at the current level of sophistication of this analysis. We also examined the effects of the presence of a cell body attached to one end of the flagellum, which modifies the flow field experienced by the flagellum. This interaction, which is not considered in resistive-force theory, is probably insignificant for small cell bodies, such as the heads of simple spermatozoa, but for larger cell bodies, or cell bodies that have large-amplitude motions transverse to the swimming direction, use of slender-body theory is required for accurate analysis. PMID:262381

  12. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication?

    PubMed Central

    Imhof, Simon; Fragoso, Cristina; Hemphill, Andrew; von Schubert, Conrad; Li, Dong; Legant, Wesley; Betzig, Eric; Roditi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute) was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature. PMID:27239276

  13. Activation tag screening to identify novel genes for trichothecene resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of our research is to identify plant genes which enhance trichothecene resistance and, ultimately, Fusarium Head Blight resistance in wheat and barley. We are taking a two pronged approach using Arabidopsis to identify plant genes which confer resistance to trichothecenes. The first approac...

  14. Luciferase as a reporter of gene activity in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since their development and introduction in the early days of plant genetic engineering, reporter genes have established a proven track record as effective tools for exploring the molecular underpinnings of gene regulation. When driven by appropriate genetic control systems (e.g. transcriptional pr...

  15. A Single-Domain FlgJ Contributes to Flagellar Hook and Filament Formation in the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Tong, Brian A.; Liu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    FlgJ plays a very important role in flagellar assembly. In the enteric bacteria, flgJ null mutants fail to produce the flagellar rods, hooks, and filaments but still assemble the integral membrane-supramembrane (MS) rings. These mutants are nonmotile. The FlgJ proteins consist of two functional domains. The N-terminal rod-capping domain acts as a scaffold for rod assembly, and the C-terminal domain acts as a peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolase (PGase), which allows the elongating flagellar rod to penetrate through the PG layer. However, the FlgJ homologs in several bacterial phyla (including spirochetes) often lack the PGase domain. The function of these single-domain FlgJ proteins remains elusive. Herein, a single-domain FlgJ homolog (FlgJBb) was studied in the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cryo-electron tomography analysis revealed that the flgJBb mutant still assembled intact flagellar basal bodies but had fewer and disoriented flagellar hooks and filaments. Consistently, Western blots showed that the levels of flagellar hook (FlgE) and filament (FlaB) proteins were substantially decreased in the flgJBb mutant. Further studies disclosed that the decreases of FlgE and FlaB in the mutant occurred at the posttranscriptional level. Microscopic observation and swarm plate assay showed that the motility of the flgJBb mutant was partially deficient. The altered phenotypes were completely restored when the mutant was complemented. Collectively, these results indicate that FlgJBb is involved in the assembly of the flagellar hook and filament but not the flagellar rod in B. burgdorferi. The observed phenotype is different from that of flgJ mutants in the enteric bacteria. PMID:22155773

  16. Correlation between upstream human activities and riverine antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Pruden, Amy; Arabi, Mazdak; Storteboom, Heather N

    2012-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance remains a serious and growing human health challenge. The water environment may represent a key dissemination pathway of resistance elements to and from humans. However, quantitative relationships between landscape features and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have not previously been identified. The objective of this study was to examine correlations between ARGs and putative upstream anthropogenic sources in the watershed. sul1 (sulfonamide) and tet(W) (tetracycline) were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in bed and suspended sediment within the South Platte River Basin, which originates from a pristine region in the Rocky Mountains and runs through a gradient of human activities. A geospatial database was constructed to delineate surface water pathways from animal feeding operations, wastewater treatment plants, and fish hatchery and rearing units to river monitoring points. General linear regression models were compared. Riverine sul1 correlated with upstream capacities of animal feeding operations (R(2) = 0.35, p < 0.001) and wastewater treatment plants (R(2) = 0.34, p < 0.001). Weighting for the inverse distances from animal feeding operations along transport pathways strengthened the observed correlations (R(2) = 0.60-0.64, p < 0.001), suggesting the importance of these pathways in ARG dissemination. Correlations were upheld across the four sampling events during the year, and averaging sul1 measurements in bed and suspended sediments over all events yielded the strongest correlation (R(2) = 0.92, p < 0.001). Conversely, a significant relationship with landscape features was not evident for tet(W), which, in contrast to sul1, is broadly distributed in the pristine region and also relatively more prevalent in animal feeding operation lagoons. The findings highlight the need to focus attention on quantifying the contribution of water pathways to the antibiotic resistance disease burden in humans and offer insight

  17. Identification and characterization of the activation domain of Ifh1, an activator of model TATA-less genes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Peipei; Melcher, Karsten

    2010-01-29

    In yeast, TATA box-binding protein TBP can be delivered to protein-coding genes by direct interactions with two different coactivators: TFIID, which delivers TBP preferentially to TATA-less promoters, and SAGA, which strongly favors TATA box-containing promoters. Transcriptional activators of SAGA-dependant genes are characterized by prototypic acidic activation domains (ADs) that efficiently recruit SAGA, but not TFIID, to UAS elements even in the absence of a core promoter. In contrast to the well-studied acidic activation domains, little is known about the activation domains of activators of TFIID-dependent genes, even though these genes constitute more than 80% of eukaryotic protein-coding genes. The paradigm for TATA-less genes are the ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). Here we have identified the AD of the RPG activator Ifh1p and demonstrate that a minimal Ifh1 AD represents a new class of AD that significantly differs from acidic ADs in amino acid signature, relative coactivator affinities, and core promoter selectivity. PMID:20059977

  18. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-03-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals. PMID:26950874

  19. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals. PMID:26950874

  20. Elevated Gene Copy Number Does Not Always Explain Elevated Amylase Activities in Fishes.

    PubMed

    German, Donovan P; Foti, Dolly M; Heras, Joseph; Amerkhanian, Hooree; Lockwood, Brent L

    2016-01-01

    Amylase activity variation in the guts of several model organisms appears to be explained by amylase gene copy number variation. We tested the hypothesis that amylase gene copy number is always elevated in animals with high amylolytic activity. We therefore sequenced the amylase genes and examined amylase gene copy number in prickleback fishes (family Stichaeidae) with different diets including two species of convergently evolved herbivores with the elevated amylase activity phenotype. We found elevated amylase gene copy number (six haploid copies) with sequence variation among copies in one herbivore (Cebidichthys violaceus) and modest gene copy number (two to three haploid copies) with little sequence variation in the remaining taxa, which included herbivores, omnivores, and a carnivore. Few functional differences in amylase biochemistry were observed, and previous investigations showed similar digestibility among the convergently evolved herbivores with differing amylase genetics. Hence, the phenotype of elevated amylase activity can be achieved by different mechanisms (i.e., elevated expression of fewer genes, increased gene copy number, or expression of more efficient amylase proteins) with similar results. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of available fish amylase genes show mostly lineage-specific duplication events leading to gene copy number variation, although a whole-genome duplication event or chromosomal translocation may have produced multiple amylase copies in the Ostariophysi, again showing multiple routes to the same result. PMID:27327179

  1. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-01-01

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  2. Lysogen stability is determined by the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chenghang; So, Lok-hang; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Skinner, Samuel O; Golding, Ido

    2010-11-30

    The ability of living cells to maintain an inheritable memory of their gene-expression state is key to cellular differentiation. Bacterial lysogeny serves as a simple paradigm for long-term cellular memory. In this study, we address the following question: in the absence of external perturbation, how long will a cell stay in the lysogenic state before spontaneously switching away from that state? We show by direct measurement that lysogen stability exhibits a simple exponential dependence on the frequency of activity bursts from the fate-determining gene, cI. We quantify these gene-activity bursts using single-molecule-resolution mRNA measurements in individual cells, analyzed using a stochastic mathematical model of the gene-network kinetics. The quantitative relation between stability and gene activity is independent of the fine details of gene regulation, suggesting that a quantitative prediction of cell-state stability may also be possible in more complex systems. PMID:21119634

  3. Transposable Elements Contribute to Activation of Maize Genes in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Makarevitch, Irina; Waters, Amanda J.; West, Patrick T.; Stitzer, Michelle; Hirsch, Candice N.; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Springer, Nathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for a large portion of the genome in many eukaryotic species. Despite their reputation as “junk” DNA or genomic parasites deleterious for the host, TEs have complex interactions with host genes and the potential to contribute to regulatory variation in gene expression. It has been hypothesized that TEs and genes they insert near may be transcriptionally activated in response to stress conditions. The maize genome, with many different types of TEs interspersed with genes, provides an ideal system to study the genome-wide influence of TEs on gene regulation. To analyze the magnitude of the TE effect on gene expression response to environmental changes, we profiled gene and TE transcript levels in maize seedlings exposed to a number of abiotic stresses. Many genes exhibit up- or down-regulation in response to these stress conditions. The analysis of TE families inserted within upstream regions of up-regulated genes revealed that between four and nine different TE families are associated with up-regulated gene expression in each of these stress conditions, affecting up to 20% of the genes up-regulated in response to abiotic stress, and as many as 33% of genes that are only expressed in response to stress. Expression of many of these same TE families also responds to the same stress conditions. The analysis of the stress-induced transcripts and proximity of the transposon to the gene suggests that these TEs may provide local enhancer activities that stimulate stress-responsive gene expression. Our data on allelic variation for insertions of several of these TEs show strong correlation between the presence of TE insertions and stress-responsive up-regulation of gene expression. Our findings suggest that TEs provide an important source of allelic regulatory variation in gene response to abiotic stress in maize. PMID:25569788

  4. Antisense long noncoding RNAs regulate var gene activation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Amit-Avraham, Inbar; Pozner, Guy; Eshar, Shiri; Fastman, Yair; Kolevzon, Netanel; Yavin, Eylon; Dzikowski, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of human malaria, is attributed to its ability to evade human immunity through antigenic variation. These parasites alternate between expression of variable antigens, encoded by members of a multicopy gene family named var. Immune evasion through antigenic variation depends on tight regulation of var gene expression, ensuring that only a single var gene is expressed at a time while the rest of the family is maintained transcriptionally silent. Understanding how a single gene is chosen for activation is critical for understanding mutually exclusive expression but remains a mystery. Here, we show that antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) initiating from var introns are associated with the single active var gene at the time in the cell cycle when the single var upstream promoter is active. We demonstrate that these antisense transcripts are incorporated into chromatin, and that expression of these antisense lncRNAs in trans triggers activation of a silent var gene in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, interference with these lncRNAs using complement peptide nucleic acid molecules down-regulated the active var gene, erased the epigenetic memory, and induced expression switching. Altogether, our data provide evidence that these antisense lncRNAs play a key role in regulating var gene activation and mutually exclusive expression. PMID:25691743

  5. Inactivation of a putative flagellar motor switch protein FliG1 prevents Borrelia burgdorferi from swimming in highly viscous media and blocks its infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhao; Xu, Hongbin; Zhang, Kai; Liang, Fang Ting

    2015-01-01

    Summary The flagellar motor switch complex protein FliG plays an essential role in flagella biosynthesis and motility. In most motile bacteria, only one fliG homologue is present in the genome. However, several spirochete species have two putative fliG genes (referred to as fliG1 and fliG2) and their roles in flagella assembly and motility remain unknown. In this report, the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi was used as a genetic model to investigate the roles of these two fliG homologues. It was found that fliG2 encodes a typical motor switch complex protein that is required for the flagellation and motility of B. burgdorferi. In contrast, the function of fliG1 is quite unique. Disruption of fliG1 did not affect flagellation and the mutant was still motile but failed to translate in highly viscous media. GFP-fusion and motion tracking analyses revealed that FliG1 asymmetrically locates at one end of cells and the loss of fliG1 somehow impacted one bundle of flagella rotation. In addition, animal studies demonstrated that the fliG1− mutant was quickly cleared after inoculation into the murine host, which highlights the importance of the ability to swim in highly viscous media in the infectivity of B. burgdorferi and probably other pathogenic spirochetes. PMID:20180908

  6. Probing the Monophyly of the Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae) Using Data From Five Genes.

    PubMed

    Tippery, Nicholas P; Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Paul O; Lewis, Louise A

    2012-12-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analyses have had a major impact on the classification of the green algal class Chlorophyceae, corroborating some previous evolutionary hypotheses, but primarily promoting new interpretations of morphological evolution. One set of morphological traits that feature prominently in green algal systematics is the absolute orientation of the flagellar apparatus in motile cells, which correlates strongly with taxonomic classes and orders. The order Sphaeropleales includes diverse green algae sharing the directly opposite (DO) flagellar apparatus orientation of their biflagellate motile cells. However, algae across sphaeroplealean families differ in specific components of the DO flagellar apparatus, and molecular phylogenetic studies often have failed to provide strong support for the monophyly of the order. To test the monophyly of Sphaeropleales and of taxa with the DO flagellar apparatus, we conducted a molecular phylogenetic study of 16 accessions representing all known families and diverse affiliated lineages within the order, with data from four plastid genes (psaA, psaB, psbC, rbcL) and one nuclear ribosomal gene (18S). Although single-gene analyses varied in topology and support values, analysis of combined data strongly supported a monophyletic Sphaeropleales. Our results also corroborated previous phylogenetic hypotheses that were based on chloroplast genome data from relatively few taxa. Specifically, our data resolved Volvocales, algae possessing predominantly biflagellate motile cells with clockwise (CW) flagellar orientation, as the monophyletic sister lineage to Sphaeropleales, and an alliance of Chaetopeltidales, Chaetophorales, and Oedogoniales, orders having multiflagellate motile cells with distinct flagellar orientations involving the DO and CW forms. PMID:27009998

  7. The rolB gene activates the expression of genes encoding microRNA processing machinery.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, Victor P; Veremeichik, Galina N; Shkryl, Yuri N

    2015-04-01

    The rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes renders cells more tolerant of environmental stresses and increases their defense potential. However, these effects, coupled with the developmental abnormalities caused by rolB, have not yet been explained. In rolB-transformed Arabidopsis thaliana cells, we detected a 2.2 to 7-fold increase in the expression of genes encoding core and accessory proteins (DCL1, SE, HYL1, AGO1, TGH, DDL, HEN1, AGO4 and RDR2) of the microRNA processing machinery. However, the rolB gene did not affect the expression of DCL2, DCL3 and HST. The diverse and complex effects of rolB on transformed plant cells may be attributable to changes caused by this gene in particular RNA silencing pathways. PMID:25491479

  8. Estimation of the adhesive force distribution for the flagellar adhesion of Escherichia coli on a glass surface.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Akinori; Nobuhira, Noritaka; Narahara, Hisaya; Toyoda, Syunsuke; Tokumoto, Hayato; Konishi, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Toshiyuki

    2015-07-01

    The effects of the presence or absence of microbial flagella and the microbial motility on the colloidal behaviors of microbial cells were quantitatively evaluated. The microbial cell attachment and detachment processes on a glass surface were observed directly using a parallel-plate flow chamber. Wild-type, flagellar paralyzed, and nonflagellated Escherichia coli strains were used as model microbial cells. In the cell attachment tests, the microbial adhesion rate in a 160mM NaCl solution was approximately 10 times higher than that in a 10mM solution, for all E. coli strains. The colloidal behavior of the microbial cells agreed well with the predictions of the DLVO theory. In addition, the microbial flagella and motility did not significantly affect the cell attachment, regardless of the existence of a potential barrier between the cell and the glass substratum. In the cell detachment tests, the cumulative number of microbial cells detached from the glass substratum with increasing flow rate was fit well with the Weibull distribution function. The list of strains arranged in order of increasing median drag force required to remove them was nonflagellated strain, flagellar paralyzed strain, and wild-type strain. These results indicated that the flagella and the flagellar motility inhibited the cell detachment from the glass substratum. Furthermore, a large external force would likely be required to inhibit the microbial adhesion in the early stage of the biofilm formation. PMID:25956746

  9. Cell cycle-controlled proteolysis of a flagellar motor protein that is asymmetrically distributed in the Caulobacter predivisional cell.

    PubMed Central

    Jenal, U; Shapiro, L

    1996-01-01

    Flagellar biogenesis and release are developmental events tightly coupled to the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. A single flagellum is assembled at the swarmer pole of the predivisional cell and is released later in the cell cycle. Here we show that the MS-ring monomer FliF, a central motor component that anchors the flagellum in the cell membrane, is synthesized only in the predivisional cell and is integrated into the membrane at the incipient swarmer cell pole, where it initiates flagellar assembly. FliF is proteolytically turned over during swarmer-to-stalked cell differentiation, coinciding with the loss of the flagellum, suggesting that its degradation is coupled to flagellar release. The membrane topology of FliF was determined and a region of the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain was shown to be required for the interaction with a component of the motor switch. The very C-terminal end of FliF contains a turnover determinant, required for the cell cycle-dependent degradation of the MS-ring. The cell cycle-dependent proteolysis of FliF and the targeting of FliF to the swarmer pole together contribute to the asymmetric localization of the MS-ring in the predivisional cell. Images PMID:8665847

  10. mef2 activity levels differentially affect gene expression during Drosophila muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Elgar, Stuart J.; Han, Jun; Taylor, Michael V.

    2008-01-01

    Cell differentiation is controlled by key transcription factors, and a major question is how they orchestrate cell-type-specific genetic programs. Muscle differentiation is a well studied paradigm in which the conserved Mef2 transcription factor plays a pivotal role. Recent genomic studies have identified a large number of mef2-regulated target genes with distinct temporal expression profiles during Drosophila myogenesis. However, the question remains as to how a single transcription factor can control such diverse patterns of gene expression. In this study we used a strategy combining genomics and developmental genetics to address this issue in vivo during Drosophila muscle development. We found that groups of mef2-regulated genes respond differently to changes in mef2 activity levels: some require higher levels for their expression than others. Furthermore, this differential requirement correlates with when the gene is first expressed during the muscle differentiation program. Genes that require higher levels are activated later. These results implicate mef2 in the temporal regulation of muscle gene expression, and, consistent with this, we show that changes in mef2 activity levels can alter the start of gene expression in a predictable manner. Together these results indicate that Mef2 is not an all-or-none regulator; rather, its action is more subtle, and levels of its activity are important in the differential expression of muscle genes. This suggests a route by which mef2 can orchestrate the muscle differentiation program and contribute to the stringent regulation of gene expression during myogenesis. PMID:18198273

  11. Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that the ferric uptake regulatory protein (Fur) functions as a transcriptional repressor in diverse microorganisms. Recent studies demonstrated that Fur also functions as a transcriptional activator. In this study we defined Fur-mediated activation of gene transcription in the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Analysis of 37 genes which were previously determined to be iron induced and which contained putative Fur boxes revealed that only 30 of these genes exhibited reduced transcription in a gonococcal fur mutant strain. Fur-mediated activation was established by examining binding of Fur to the putative promoter regions of 16 Fur-activated genes with variable binding affinities observed. Only ∼50% of the newly identified Fur-regulated genes bound Fur in vitro, suggesting that additional regulatory circuits exist which may function through a Fur-mediated indirect mechanism. The gonococcal Fur-activated genes displayed variable transcription patterns in a fur mutant strain, which correlated with the position of the Fur box in each (promoter) region. These results suggest that Fur-mediated direct transcriptional activation is fulfilled by multiple mechanisms involving either competing with a repressor or recruiting RNA polymerase. Collectively, our studies have established that gonococcal Fur functions as an activator of gene transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:22287521

  12. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Afsar U.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Hannigan, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  13. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Afsar U; Williams, Bryan R G; Hannigan, Gregory E

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding. PMID:26569329

  14. Process and genes for expression and overexpression of active [FeFe] hydrogenases

    DOEpatents

    Seibert, Michael; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Posewitz, Matthew C; Smolinski, Sharon L

    2014-09-16

    A process for expression of active [FeFe]-hydrogenase in a host organism that does not contain either the structural gene(s) for [FeFe]-hydrogenases and/or homologues for the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HyG, comprising: cloning the structural hydrogenase gene(s) and/or the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HydG from an organisms that contains these genes into expression plasmids; transferring the plasmids into an organism that lacks a native [FeFe]-hydrogenase or that has a disrupted [FeFe]-hydrogenase and culturing it aerobically; and inducing anaerobiosis to provide [FeFe] hydrogenase biosynthesis and H?2#191 production.

  15. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W; Baldwin, Ransom L; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  16. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W.; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  17. Profiling Gene Expression Induced by Protease-Activated Receptor 2 (PAR2) Activation in Human Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suen, Jacky Y.; Gardiner, Brooke; Grimmond, Sean; Fairlie, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Protease-Activated Receptor-2 (PAR2) has been implicated through genetic knockout mice with cytokine regulation and arthritis development. Many studies have associated PAR2 with inflammatory conditions (arthritis, airways inflammation, IBD) and key events in tumor progression (angiogenesis, metastasis), but they have relied heavily on the use of single agonists to identify physiological roles for PAR2. However such probes are now known not to be highly selective for PAR2, and thus precisely what PAR2 does and what mechanisms of downstream regulation are truly affected remain obscure. Effects of PAR2 activation on gene expression in Human Embryonic Kidney cells (HEK293), a commonly studied cell line in PAR2 research, were investigated here by comparing 19,000 human genes for intersecting up- or down-regulation by both trypsin (an endogenous protease that activates PAR2) and a PAR2 activating hexapeptide (2f-LIGRLO-NH2). Among 2,500 human genes regulated similarly by both agonists, there were clear associations between PAR2 activation and cellular metabolism (1,000 genes), the cell cycle, the MAPK pathway, HDAC and sirtuin enzymes, inflammatory cytokines, and anti-complement function. PAR-2 activation up-regulated four genes more than 5 fold (DUSP6, WWOX, AREG, SERPINB2) and down-regulated another six genes more than 3 fold (TXNIP, RARG, ITGB4, CTSD, MSC and TM4SF15). Both PAR2 and PAR1 activation resulted in up-regulated expression of several genes (CD44, FOSL1, TNFRSF12A, RAB3A, COPEB, CORO1C, THBS1, SDC4) known to be important in cancer. This is the first widespread profiling of specific activation of PAR2 and provides a valuable platform for better understanding key mechanistic roles of PAR2 in human physiology. Results clearly support the development of both antagonists and agonists of human PAR2 as potential disease modifying therapeutic agents. PMID:21072196

  18. A Cbx8-containing polycomb complex facilitates the transition to gene activation during ES cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Creppe, Catherine; Palau, Anna; Malinverni, Roberto; Valero, Vanesa; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2014-12-01

    Polycomb proteins play an essential role in maintaining the repression of developmental genes in self-renewing embryonic stem cells. The exact mechanism allowing the derepression of polycomb target genes during cell differentiation remains unclear. Our project aimed to identify Cbx8 binding sites in differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells. Therefore, we used a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation of endogenous Cbx8 coupled to direct massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq). Our analysis identified 171 high confidence peaks. By crossing our data with previously published microarray analysis, we show that several differentiation genes transiently recruit Cbx8 during their early activation. Depletion of Cbx8 partially impairs the transcriptional activation of these genes. Both interaction analysis, as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments support the idea that activating Cbx8 acts in the context of an intact PRC1 complex. Prolonged gene activation results in eviction of PRC1 despite persisting H3K27me3 and H2A ubiquitination. The composition of PRC1 is highly modular and changes when embryonic stem cells commit to differentiation. We further demonstrate that the exchange of Cbx7 for Cbx8 is required for the effective activation of differentiation genes. Taken together, our results establish a function for a Cbx8-containing complex in facilitating the transition from a Polycomb-repressed chromatin state to an active state. As this affects several key regulatory differentiation genes this mechanism is likely to contribute to the robust execution of differentiation programs. PMID:25500566

  19. BRAIN NETWORKS. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-06-12

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  20. Cluster Analysis of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Canine Leukocytes Identifies Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Julie-Anne; Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system undergo activation and subsequent proliferation in the normal course of an immune response. Infrequently, the molecular and cellular events that underlie the mechanisms of proliferation are dysregulated and may lead to oncogenesis, leading to tumor formation. The most common forms of immunological cancers are lymphomas, which in dogs account for 8%–20% of all cancers, affecting up to 1.2% of the dog population. Key genes involved in negatively regulating proliferation of lymphocytes include a group classified as tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). These genes are also known to be associated with progression of lymphoma in humans, mice, and dogs and are potential candidates for pathological grading and diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze TSG profiles in stimulated leukocytes from dogs to identify genes that discriminate an activated phenotype. A total of 554 TSGs and three gene set collections were analyzed from microarray data. Cluster analysis of three subsets of genes discriminated between stimulated and unstimulated cells. These included 20 most upregulated and downregulated TSGs, TSG in hallmark gene sets significantly enriched in active cells, and a selection of candidate TSGs, p15 (CDKN2B), p18 (CDKN2C), p19 (CDKN1A), p21 (CDKN2A), p27 (CDKN1B), and p53 (TP53) in the third set. Analysis of two subsets suggested that these genes or a subset of these genes may be used as a specialized PCR set for additional analysis. PMID:27478369

  1. Gene-Specific Involvement of β-Oxidation in Wound-Activated Responses in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, M. Cruz; Martínez, Cristina; Buchala, Antony; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; León, José

    2004-01-01

    The coordinated induced expression of β-oxidation genes is essential to provide the energy supply for germination and postgerminative development. However, very little is known about other functions of β-oxidation in nonreserve organs. We have identified a gene-specific pattern of induced β-oxidation gene expression in wounded leaves of Arabidopsis. Mechanical damage triggered the local and systemic induction of only ACX1 among acyl-coenzyme A oxidase (ACX) genes, and KAT2/PED1 among 3-ketoacyl-coenzyme A thiolase (KAT) genes in Arabidopsis. In turn, wounding induced KAT5/PKT2 only systemically. Although most of the β-oxidation genes were activated by wound-related factors such as dehydration and abscisic acid, jasmonic acid (JA) induced only ACX1 and KAT5. Reduced expression of ACX1 or KAT2 genes, in transgenic plants expressing their corresponding mRNAs in antisense orientation, correlated with defective wound-activated synthesis of JA and with reduced expression of JA-responsive genes. Induced expression of JA-responsive genes by exogenous application of JA was unaffected in those transgenic plants, suggesting that ACX1 and KAT2 play a major role in driving wound-activated responses by participating in the biosynthesis of JA in wounded Arabidopsis plants. PMID:15141068

  2. A dual activation mechanism for Myb-responsive genes in myelomonocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Yamkamon, Vichanan; Ivanova, Olga; Braas, Daniel; Chayka, Olesya; Patmasiriwat, Pimpicha; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    The retroviral oncogene v-myb encodes a transcription factor (v-Myb) which is responsible for the transformation of myelomonocytic cells by avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV). v-Myb is thought to exert its biological effects by deregulating the expression of specific target genes. Here we have used DNaseI hypersensitive site mapping and reporter gene assays to study the activation of three Myb target genes--mim-1, the lysozyme gene and the C/EBPbeta gene--all of which are activated by Myb in myelomonocytic cells but not in other hematopoietic lineages. We have found that these genes are activated by Myb via more than one cis-regulatory region. Our data suggest that all three genes are activated by Myb by dual mechanisms involving the promoters as well as enhancers. Using a cell line that expresses an estrogen-inducible v-Myb/estrogen receptor fusion protein we have also determined the effect of Myb on the expression of the C/EBPalpha gene. Our results show that C/EBPalpha expression is down-regulated by v-Myb. Thus, v-Myb affects the expression of two C/EBP family members in opposite directions. PMID:17950008

  3. Identification of two peanut germin-like genes and the potential superoxide dismutase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Germin and germin-like protein (GLP) genes are members of large multigene families. These genes have been reported to play a role directly or indirectly in plant defense response. A number of GLPs have been demonstrated to have superoxidase dismutase (SOD) or oxalate oxidase (OxO) activity, leading ...

  4. ACTIVATION OF THE LAC GENES OF TN951 BY INSERTION SEQUENCES FROM PSUEDOMONAS CEPACIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have identified several transposable gene-activating elements from Psuedomonas cepacia on the basis of their ability to increase expression of the genes of the broad-hos-range plasmid pGC9l.14. hen introduced into auxotrophic derivatives of P. cepacia 249 (ATCC 17616), this pl...

  5. Effect Of Simulated Microgravity On Activated T Cell Gene Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Maureen A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of T lymphocytes under the shear stress environment of clinorotation have demonstrated an inhibition of activation in response to TCR mediated signaling. These results mimic those observed during space flight. This work investigates the molecular signaling events of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation. Purified human T lymphocytes and the T cell clone Jurkat exhibit an uncoupling of signaling as mediated through the TCR. Activation of the transcription factor AP-1 is inhibited while activation of NFAT occurs. NFAT dephosphorylation and activation is dependent on sustained Ca(++) influx. Alternatively, AP-1, which consists of two transcription factors, jun and fos, is activated by PKC and Ras mediated pathways. TCR signaling is known to be dependent on cytoskeletal rearrangements, in particular, raft aggregation is critical. Raft aggregation, as mediated through GM, crosslinking, overcomes the inhibition of T lymphocyte activation with clinorotation, indicating that the block is occurring upstream of raft aggregation. Clinorotation is shown to have an effect similar to a weak TCR signal.

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing of Apoptotic DNA Breakpoints Reveals Association with Actively Transcribed Genes and Gene Translocations

    PubMed Central

    Fullwood, Melissa J.; Lee, Joanne; Lin, Lifang; Li, Guoliang; Huss, Mikael; Ng, Patrick; Sung, Wing-Kin; Shenolikar, Shirish

    2011-01-01

    DNA fragmentation is a well-recognized hallmark of apoptosis. However, the precise DNA sequences cleaved during apoptosis triggered by distinct mechanisms remain unclear. We used next-generation sequencing of DNA fragments generated in Actinomycin D-treated human HL-60 leukemic cells to generate a high-throughput, global map of apoptotic DNA breakpoints. These data highlighted that DNA breaks are non-random and show a significant association with active genes and open chromatin regions. We noted that transcription factor binding sites were also enriched within a fraction of the apoptotic breakpoints. Interestingly, extensive apoptotic cleavage was noted within genes that are frequently translocated in human cancers. We speculate that the non-random fragmentation of DNA during apoptosis may contribute to gene translocations and the development of human cancers. PMID:22087219

  7. Manganese peroxidase gene transcription in Phanerochaete chrysosporium: Activation by manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.; Alic, M. Gold, M.H. )

    1991-07-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on Mn, and initial work suggested that Mn regulates transcription of the mnp gene. In this study, using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of kinetic, dose-response, and inhibitor experiments, the authors demonstrate unequivocally that Mn regulates mnp gene transcription. The amount of mnp mRNA in cells of 4-day-old nitrogen-limited cultures is a direct function of the concentration of Mn in the culture medium up to a maximum of 180 {mu}M. Addition of Mn to nitrogen-limited Mn-deficient secondary metabolic (4-, 5-, and 6-day-old) cultures results in the appearance of mnp mRNA within 40 min. The appearance of this message is completely inhibited by the RNA synthesis inhibitor dactinomycin but not by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore, the amount of mnp mRNA produced is a direct function of the concentration of added Mn. In contrast, addition of Mn to low-nitrogen Mn-deficient 2- or 3-day-old cultures does not result in the appearance of mnp mRNA. Manganese peroxidase protein is detected by specific immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of poly(A) RNA isolated from Mn-supplemented (but nor from Mn-deficient) cells. All of these results demonstrate that Mn, the substrate for the enzyme, regulates mnp gene transcription via a growth-stage-specific and concentration-dependent mechanism.

  8. Bacterial flagellar motility on hydrated rough surfaces controlled by aqueous film thickness and connectedness.

    PubMed

    Tecon, Robin; Or, Dani

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that rates of bacterial dispersion in soils are controlled by hydration conditions that define size and connectivity of the retained aqueous phase. Despite the ecological implications of such constraints, microscale observations of this phenomenon remain scarce. Here, we quantified aqueous film characteristics and bacterial flagellated motility in response to systematic variations in microhydrological conditions on porous ceramic surfaces that mimic unsaturated soils. We directly measured aqueous film thickness and documented its microscale heterogeneity. Flagellar motility was controlled by surface hydration conditions, as cell velocity decreased and dispersion practically ceased at water potentials exceeding -2 kPa (resulting in thinner and disconnected liquid films). The fragmentation of aquatic habitats was delineated indirectly through bacterial dispersal distances within connected aqueous clusters. We documented bacterial dispersal radii ranging from 100 to 10 μm as the water potential varied from 0 to -7 kPa, respectively. The observed decrease of flagellated velocity and dispersal ranges at lower matric potentials were in good agreement with mechanistic model predictions. Hydration-restricted habitats thus play significant role in bacterial motility and dispersal, which has potentially important impact on soil microbial ecology and diversity. PMID:26757676

  9. The flagellar motor of Caulobacter crescentus generates more torque when a cell swims backwards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Roland, Thibault; Shrivastava, Abhishek; Chen, Yihao; Berg, Howard C.

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus swims by rotating a single right-handed helical filament. These cells have two swimming modes: a pusher mode, in which clockwise (CW) rotation of the filament thrusts the cell body forwards, and a puller mode, in which counterclockwise (CCW) rotation pulls it backwards. The situation is reversed in Escherichia coli, a bacterium that rotates several left-handed filaments CCW to drive the cell body forwards. The flagellar motor in E. coli generates more torque in the CCW direction than the CW direction in swimming cells. However, C. crescentus and other bacteria with single filaments swim forwards and backwards at similar speeds, prompting the assumption that motor torques in the two modes are the same. Here, we present evidence that motors in C. crescentus develop higher torques in the puller mode than in the pusher mode, and suggest that the anisotropy in torque generation is similar in the two species, despite the differences in filament handedness and motor bias.

  10. Stochastic and Deterministic Flagellar Dynamics Provide a Mechanism for Eukaryotic Swimming Reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond

    2009-03-01

    The biflagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a good model organism to study the origin of flagellar synchronization. Here we employ high-speed imaging to study the beating of the two flagella of Chlamydomonas, and show that a single cell can alternate between two distinct dynamical regimes: asynchronous and synchronous. The asynchronous state is characterized by a large interflagellar frequency difference. In the synchronous state, the flagella beat in phase for lengthy periods, interrupted episodically by an extra beat of either flagellum. The statistics of these events are consistent with a model of hydrodynamically coupled noisy oscillators. Previous observations have suggested that the two flagella have well separated intrinsic beat frequencies, and are synchronized by their mutual coupling. Our analysis shows instead that the synchronized state is incompatible with coupling-induced synchronization of flagella with those intrinsic frequencies. This suggests that the beat frequencies themselves are under the control of the cell. Moreover, high-resolution three-dimensional tracking of swimming cells provides strong evidence that these dynamical states are related to non-phototactic reorientation events in the trajectories, yielding a eukaryotic equivalent of the ``run and tumble'' motion of peritrichously flagellated bacteria.

  11. Independent Control of the Static and Dynamic Components of the Chlamydomonas Flagellar Beat.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Veikko F; Sartori, Pablo; Friedrich, Benjamin M; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-04-25

    When the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii swims, it uses the breaststroke beat of its two flagella to pull itself forward [1]. The flagellar waveform can be decomposed into a static component, corresponding to an asymmetric time-averaged shape, and a dynamic component, corresponding to the time-varying wave [2]. Extreme lightening conditions photoshock the cell, converting the breaststroke beat into a symmetric sperm-like beat, which causes a reversal of the direction of swimming [3]. Waveform conversion is achieved by a reduction in magnitude of the static component, whereas the dynamic component remains unchanged [2]. The coupling between static and dynamic components, however, is poorly understood, and it is not known whether the static component requires the dynamic component or whether it can exist independently. We used isolated and reactivated axonemes [4] to investigate the relation between the two beat components. We discovered that, when reactivated in the presence of low ATP concentrations, axonemes displayed the static beat component in absence of the dynamic component. Furthermore, we found that the amplitudes of the two components depend on ATP in qualitatively different ways. These results show that the decomposition into static and dynamic components is not just a mathematical concept but that the two components can independently control different aspects of cell motility: the static component controls swimming direction, whereas the dynamic component provides propulsion. PMID:27040779

  12. The flagellar motor of Caulobacter crescentus generates more torque when a cell swims backward

    PubMed Central

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Roland, Thibault; Shrivastava, Abhishek; Chen, Yihao; Berg, Howard C.

    2016-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus, a monotrichous bacterium, swims by rotating a single right-handed helical filament. CW motor rotation thrusts the cell forward 1, a mode of motility known as the pusher mode; CCW motor rotation pulls the cell backward, a mode of motility referred to as the puller mode 2. The situation is opposite in E. coli, a peritrichous bacterium, where CCW rotation of multiple left-handed filaments drives the cell forward. The flagellar motor in E. coli generates more torque in the CCW direction than the CW direction in swimming cells 3,4. However, monotrichous bacteria including C. crescentus swim forward and backward at similar speeds, prompting the assumption that motor torques in the two modes are the same 5,6. Here, we present evidence that motors in C. crescentus develop higher torques in the puller mode than in the pusher mode, and suggest that the anisotropy in torque-generation is similar in two species, despite the differences in filament handedness and motor bias (probability of CW rotation). PMID:27499800

  13. Fluctuations in rotation rate of the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kara-Ivanov, M; Eisenbach, M; Caplan, S R

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the changes in rotation rate of the bacterial motor and to try to discriminate between various sources of these changes with the aim of understanding the mechanism of force generation better. To this end Escherichia coli cells were tethered and videotaped with brief stroboscopic light flashes. The records were scanned by means of a computerized motion analysis system, yielding cell size, radius of rotation, and accumulated angle of rotation as functions of time for each cell selected. In conformity with previous studies, fluctuations in the rotation rate of the flagellar motor were invariably found. Employing an exclusively counterclockwise rotating mutant ("gutted" RP1091 strain) and using power spectral density, autocorrelation and residual mean square angle analysis, we found that a simple superposition of rotational diffusion on a steady rotary motion is insufficient to describe the observed rotation. We observed two additional rotational components, one fluctuating (0.04-0.6 s) and one oscillating (0.8-7 s). However, the effective rotational diffusion coefficient obtained after taking these two components into account generally exceeded that calculated from external friction by two orders of magnitude. This is consistent with a model incorporating association and dissociation of force-generating units. PMID:7669902

  14. Energy transduction in the bacterial flagellar motor. Effects of load and pH.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, S; Dapice, M; Humayun, I

    1990-01-01

    The effect of load and pH on the relation between proton potential and flagellar rotation has been studied in cells of a smooth-swimming Streptococcus strain. The driving potential, speeds of free-swimming bacteria, and rotation rates of bacteria tethered to glass by a single flagellum were measured. The relation between rotation rate of tethered bacteria and potential was remarkably linear up to nearly -200 mV. The relation between swimming speed and potential exhibited both saturation and threshold, as previously observed in other species. The form of these relations depended on pH. The equivalence of the electrical and chemical potential components of the proton potential in enabling swimming depended on the voltage. Our observations may be most simply accommodated by a kinetic scheme that links transmembrane proton transits to a tightly coupled work cycle. The properties of this scheme were elucidated by computer simulations of the experimental plots. These simulations indicated that the protonable groups that participate in the rate limiting reactions have a fractional electrical distance between three-fourths to all of the way toward the cytoplasm with a corresponding mean proton binding affinity of 10(-7.3)-10(-7.0) M, respectively. PMID:2160845

  15. Temperature dependences of torque generation and membrane voltage in the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuichi; Baker, Matthew A B; Fukuoka, Hajime; Takahashi, Hiroto; Berry, Richard M; Ishijima, Akihiko

    2013-12-17

    In their natural habitats bacteria are frequently exposed to sudden changes in temperature that have been shown to affect their swimming. With our believed to be new methods of rapid temperature control for single-molecule microscopy, we measured here the thermal response of the Na(+)-driven chimeric motor expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Motor torque at low load (0.35 μm bead) increased linearly with temperature, twofold between 15°C and 40°C, and torque at high load (1.0 μm bead) was independent of temperature, as reported for the H(+)-driven motor. Single cell membrane voltages were measured by fluorescence imaging and these were almost constant (∼120 mV) over the same temperature range. When the motor was heated above 40°C for 1-2 min the torque at high load dropped reversibly, recovering upon cooling below 40°C. This response was repeatable over as many as 10 heating cycles. Both increases and decreases in torque showed stepwise torque changes with unitary size ∼150 pN nm, close to the torque of a single stator at room temperature (∼180 pN nm), indicating that dynamic stator dissociation occurs at high temperature, with rebinding upon cooling. Our results suggest that the temperature-dependent assembly of stators is a general feature of flagellar motors. PMID:24359752

  16. Switching of Bacterial Flagellar Motors Is Triggered by Mutant FliG

    PubMed Central

    Lele, Pushkar P.; Berg, Howard C.

    2015-01-01

    Binding of the chemotaxis response regulator CheY-P promotes switching between rotational states in flagellar motors of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Here, we induced switching in the absence of CheY-P by introducing copies of a mutant FliG locked in the clockwise (CW) conformation (FliGCW). The composition of the mixed FliG ring was estimated via fluorescence imaging, and the probability of CW rotation (CWbias) was determined from the rotation of tethered cells. The results were interpreted in the framework of a 1D Ising model. The data could be fit by assuming that mutant subunits are more stable in the CW conformation than in the counterclockwise conformation. We found that CWbias varies depending on the spatial arrangement of the assembled subunits in the FliG ring. This offers a possible explanation for a previous observation of hysteresis in the switch function in analogous mixed FliM motors—in motors containing identical fractions of mutant FliMCW in otherwise wild-type motors, the CWbias differed depending on whether mutant subunits were expressed in strains with native motors or native subunits were expressed in strains with mutant motors. PMID:25762339

  17. Temperature Dependences of Torque Generation and Membrane Voltage in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yuichi; Baker, Matthew A.B.; Fukuoka, Hajime; Takahashi, Hiroto; Berry, Richard M.; Ishijima, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    In their natural habitats bacteria are frequently exposed to sudden changes in temperature that have been shown to affect their swimming. With our believed to be new methods of rapid temperature control for single-molecule microscopy, we measured here the thermal response of the Na+-driven chimeric motor expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Motor torque at low load (0.35 μm bead) increased linearly with temperature, twofold between 15°C and 40°C, and torque at high load (1.0 μm bead) was independent of temperature, as reported for the H+-driven motor. Single cell membrane voltages were measured by fluorescence imaging and these were almost constant (∼120 mV) over the same temperature range. When the motor was heated above 40°C for 1–2 min the torque at high load dropped reversibly, recovering upon cooling below 40°C. This response was repeatable over as many as 10 heating cycles. Both increases and decreases in torque showed stepwise torque changes with unitary size ∼150 pN nm, close to the torque of a single stator at room temperature (∼180 pN nm), indicating that dynamic stator dissociation occurs at high temperature, with rebinding upon cooling. Our results suggest that the temperature-dependent assembly of stators is a general feature of flagellar motors. PMID:24359752

  18. Mechanics of the eukaryotic flagellar axoneme: Evidence for structural distortion during bending.

    PubMed

    Lesich, Kathleen A; dePinho, Tania G; Pelle, Dominic W; Lindemann, Charles B

    2016-05-01

    The sliding doublet mechanism is the established explanation that allows us to understand the process of ciliary and flagellar bending. In this study, we apply the principles of the sliding doublet mechanism to analyze the mechanics of the counterbend phenomenon in sea urchin sperm flagella. When a passive, vanadate-treated, flagellum is forced into a bend with a glass microprobe, the portion of the flagellum distal to the probe exhibits a bend of opposite curvature (counterbend) to the imposed bend. This phenomenon was shown to be caused by the induction of inter-doublet shear and is dependent on the presence of an inter-doublet shear resistance. Here we report that in sea urchin flagella there is systematically less shear induced in the distal flagellum than is predicted by the sliding doublet mechanism, if we follow the assumption that the diameter of the flagellum is uniform. To account for the reduced shear that is observed, the likeliest and most direct interpretation is that the portion of the axoneme that is forced to bend undergoes substantial compression of the axoneme in the bending plane. A compression of 30-50 nm would be sufficient to account for the shear reduction from a bend of 2 radians. A compression of this magnitude would require considerable flexibility in the axoneme structure. This would necessitate that the radial spokes and/or the central pair apparatus are easily compressed by transverse stress. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27001352

  19. Bacterial flagellar motility on hydrated rough surfaces controlled by aqueous film thickness and connectedness

    PubMed Central

    Tecon, Robin; Or, Dani

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that rates of bacterial dispersion in soils are controlled by hydration conditions that define size and connectivity of the retained aqueous phase. Despite the ecological implications of such constraints, microscale observations of this phenomenon remain scarce. Here, we quantified aqueous film characteristics and bacterial flagellated motility in response to systematic variations in microhydrological conditions on porous ceramic surfaces that mimic unsaturated soils. We directly measured aqueous film thickness and documented its microscale heterogeneity. Flagellar motility was controlled by surface hydration conditions, as cell velocity decreased and dispersion practically ceased at water potentials exceeding –2 kPa (resulting in thinner and disconnected liquid films). The fragmentation of aquatic habitats was delineated indirectly through bacterial dispersal distances within connected aqueous clusters. We documented bacterial dispersal radii ranging from 100 to 10 μm as the water potential varied from 0 to –7 kPa, respectively. The observed decrease of flagellated velocity and dispersal ranges at lower matric potentials were in good agreement with mechanistic model predictions. Hydration-restricted habitats thus play significant role in bacterial motility and dispersal, which has potentially important impact on soil microbial ecology and diversity. PMID:26757676

  20. Maf-dependent bacterial flagellin glycosylation occurs before chaperone binding and flagellar T3SS export

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jennifer L; Lowry, Rebecca C; Couto, Narciso A S; Wright, Phillip C; Stafford, Graham P; Shaw, Jonathan G

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial swimming is mediated by rotation of a filament that is assembled via polymerization of flagellin monomers after secretion via a dedicated flagellar Type III secretion system. Several bacteria decorate their flagellin with sialic acid related sugars that is essential for motility. Aeromonas caviae is a model organism for this process as it contains a genetically simple glycosylation system and decorates its flagellin with pseudaminic acid (Pse). The link between flagellin glycosylation and export has yet to be fully determined. We examined the role of glycosylation in the export and assembly process in a strain lacking Maf1, a protein involved in the transfer of Pse onto flagellin at the later stages of the glycosylation pathway. Immunoblotting, established that glycosylation is not required for flagellin export but is essential for filament assembly since non-glycosylated flagellin is still secreted. Maf1 interacts directly with its flagellin substrate in vivo, even in the absence of pseudaminic acid. Flagellin glycosylation in a flagellin chaperone mutant (flaJ) indicated that glycosylation occurs in the cytoplasm before chaperone binding and protein secretion. Preferential chaperone binding to glycosylated flagellin revealed its crucial role, indicating that this system has evolved to favour secretion of the polymerization competent glycosylated form. PMID:24527847

  1. An energy transduction mechanism used in bacterial flagellar type III protein export

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Hara, Noritaka; Namba, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Flagellar proteins of bacteria are exported by a specific export apparatus. FliI ATPase forms a complex with FliH and FliJ and escorts export substrates from the cytoplasm to the export gate complex, which is made up of six membrane proteins. The export gate complex utilizes proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane for protein translocation, but the mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that the export gate complex by itself is a proton–protein antiporter that uses the two components of proton motive force, Δψ and ΔpH, for different steps of the protein export process. However, in the presence of FliH, FliI and FliJ, a specific binding of FliJ with an export gate membrane protein, FlhA, is brought about by the FliH–FliI complex, which turns the export gate into a highly efficient, Δψ-driven protein export apparatus. PMID:21934659

  2. Regulation and biological function of a flagellar glucose transporter in Leishmania mexicana: a potential glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; Aslan, Hamide; Feng, Xiuhong; Tran, Khoa; Yates, Phillip A; Kamhawi, Shaden; Landfear, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    In Leishmania mexicana parasites, a unique glucose transporter, LmxGT1, is selectively targeted to the flagellar membrane, suggesting a possible sensory role that is often associated with ciliary membrane proteins. Expression of LmxGT1 is down-regulated ∼20-fold by increasing cell density but is up-regulated ∼50-fold by depleting glucose from the medium, and the permease is strongly down-regulated when flagellated insect-stage promastigotes invade mammalian macrophages and transform into intracellular amastigotes. Regulation of LmxGT1 expression by glucose and during the lifecycle operates at the level of protein stability. Significantly, a ∆lmxgt1 null mutant, grown in abundant glucose, undergoes catastrophic loss of viability when parasites deplete glucose from the medium, a property not exhibited by wild-type or add-back lines. These results suggest that LmxGT1 may function as a glucose sensor that allows parasites to enter the stationary phase when they deplete glucose and that in the absence of this sensor, parasites do not maintain viability when they run out of glucose. However, alternate roles for LmxGT1 in monitoring glucose availability are considered. The absence of known sensory receptors with defined ligands and biologic functions in Leishmania and related kinetoplastid parasites underscores the potential significance of these observations. PMID:25300620

  3. Quantitative ultrastructural analysis of sperm tails reveals flagellar defects associated with persistent asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Wilton, L J; Temple-Smith, P D; de Kretser, D M

    1992-04-01

    Sperm tail morphology was examined in 10 infertile asthenozoospermic men to determine whether poor sperm motility was caused by ultrastructural defects of the flagellum. In this quantitative analysis, the numbers of outer doublet and central pair microtubules, outer and inner dynein arms and radial spokes were counted in transverse sections of 75 axonemes from each patient and compared with similar data previously collected from 10 men with normal semen characteristics. Four patients had axonemal defects: two had severe microtubule abnormalities and two had more subtle but statistically significant deficiencies of dynein arms. These abnormalities would not have been detected by more commonly used qualitative examination. Three patients had no detectable ultrastructural abnormalities of the sperm tail, possibly indicating a metabolic deficiency. A further three patients had mid-piece abnormalities. Two had few, if any, flagellar mitochondria and the third patient had irregular and disorganized mitochondria. Quantitative ultrastructural analysis has revealed axonemal abnormalities in seven of 10 patients with previously unexplained asthenozoospermia. PMID:1522195

  4. Flagellar antigen based CI-ELISA for sero-surveillance of surra.

    PubMed

    Ligi, M; Sengupta, P P; Rudramurthy, G R; Rahman, H

    2016-03-30

    Trypanosoma evansi causes a disease known as 'surra' in wide range of domesticated and wild animals including cattle, buffaloes, horses, camels etc. The disease is transmitted through the bites of haematophagous tabanid flies and is characterized by undulating fever, chronic progressive weakness, and hypoglycemia leading to low productivity in animals. In the present study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been produced (IgG3 sub-type) against purified flagellar (FLA) protein of T. evansi and its immunoreactivity was evaluated by serological tests. MAb and purified protein were then exploited in the development of CI-ELISA and the diagnostic potentiality of the new ELISA test has been evaluated using 1230 sera samples from field animals including cattle, buffaloes, camels, horses and donkeys. The statistical analysis of the data showed optimum combination of sensitivity and specificity at 95.8 and 94.4, respectively. The positive-negative cut off percentage inhibition (PI) value was found to be >55, with a Cohen's Kappa value of 0.83. The study showed that the new assay has potential for application in sero-diagnosis as well as sero-surveillance of surra. PMID:26921034

  5. Identification of novel target genes specifically activated by deregulated E2F in human normal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Hodaka; Ozono, Eiko; Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P; Okuno, Junko; Shimizu, Emi; Kurayoshi, Kenta; Kugawa, Kazuyuki; Toh, Hiroyuki; Ohtani, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The transcription factor E2F is the principal target of the tumor suppressor pRB. E2F plays crucial roles not only in cell proliferation by activating growth-related genes but also in tumor suppression by activating pro-apoptotic and growth-suppressive genes. We previously reported that, in human normal fibroblasts, the tumor suppressor genes ARF, p27(Kip1) and TAp73 are activated by deregulated E2F activity induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but not by physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. In contrast, growth-related E2F targets are activated by both E2F activities, underscoring the roles of deregulated E2F in tumor suppression in the context of dysfunctional pRB. In this study, to further understand the roles of deregulated E2F, we explored new targets that are specifically activated by deregulated E2F using DNA microarray. The analysis identified nine novel targets (BIM, RASSF1, PPP1R13B, JMY, MOAP1, RBM38, ABTB1, RBBP4 and RBBP7), many of which are involved in the p53 and RB tumor suppressor pathways. Among these genes, the BIM gene was shown to be activated via atypical E2F-responsive promoter elements and to contribute to E2F1-mediated apoptosis. Our results underscore crucial roles of deregulated E2F in growth suppression to counteract loss of pRB function. PMID:26201719

  6. Distinct DNA-based epigenetic switches trigger transcriptional activation of silent genes in human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pandian, Ganesh N.; Taniguchi, Junichi; Junetha, Syed; Sato, Shinsuke; Han, Le; Saha, Abhijit; AnandhaKumar, Chandran; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Vaijayanthi, Thangavel; Taylor, Rhys D.; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The influential role of the epigenome in orchestrating genome-wide transcriptional activation instigates the demand for the artificial genetic switches with distinct DNA sequence recognition. Recently, we developed a novel class of epigenetically active small molecules called SAHA-PIPs by conjugating selective DNA binding pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (PIPs) with the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA. Screening studies revealed that certain SAHA-PIPs trigger targeted transcriptional activation of pluripotency and germ cell genes in mouse and human fibroblasts, respectively. Through microarray studies and functional analysis, here we demonstrate for the first time the remarkable ability of thirty-two different SAHA-PIPs to trigger the transcriptional activation of exclusive clusters of genes and noncoding RNAs. QRT-PCR validated the microarray data, and some SAHA-PIPs activated therapeutically significant genes like KSR2. Based on the aforementioned results, we propose the potential use of SAHA-PIPs as reagents capable of targeted transcriptional activation. PMID:24457603

  7. Xenobiotics shape the physiology and gene expression of the active human gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, Corinne Ferrier; Haiser, Henry Joseph; Turnbaugh, Peter James

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The human gut contains trillions of microorganisms that influence our health by metabolizing xenobiotics, including host-targeted drugs and antibiotics. Recent efforts have characterized the diversity of this host-associated community, but it remains unclear which microorganisms are active and what perturbations influence this activity. Here, we combine flow cytometry, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and metatranscriptomics to demonstrate that the gut contains a distinctive set of active microorganisms, primarily Firmicutes. Short-term exposure to a panel of xenobiotics significantly affected the physiology, structure, and gene expression of this active gut microbiome. Xenobiotic-responsive genes were found across multiple bacterial phyla, encoding antibiotic resistance, drug metabolism, and stress response pathways. These results demonstrate the power of moving beyond surveys of microbial diversity to better understand metabolic activity, highlight the unintended consequences of xenobiotics, and suggest that attempts at personalized medicine should consider inter-individual variations in the active human gut microbiome. PMID:23332745

  8. Mutational analysis of the hepatitis B virus P gene product: domain structure and RNase H activity.

    PubMed Central

    Radziwill, G; Tucker, W; Schaller, H

    1990-01-01

    To correlate the hepatitis B virus P gene with the enzymatic activities predicted to participate in hepadnavirus reverse transcription, a series of P gene mutants containing missense mutations, in-phase insertions, and in-phase deletions was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. These mutants were tested in the context of otherwise intact hepatitis B virus genomes for the ability to produce core particles containing the virus-associated polymerase activity. The results obtained suggest that the P protein consists of three functional domains and a nonessential spacer arranged in the following order: terminal protein, spacer, reverse transcriptase/DNA polymerase, and RNase H. The first two domains are separated by a spacer region which could be deleted to a large extent without significant loss of endogenous polymerase activity. In cotransfection experiments, all P gene mutants could be complemented in trans by constructs expressing the wild-type gene product but not by a second P gene mutant. This indicates that the multifunctional P gene is expressed as a single translational unit and independent of the core gene and furthermore that the gene product is freely diffusible and not processed before core assembly. Images PMID:2153228

  9. Ectopic Activation of Germline and Placental Genes Identifies Aggressive Metastasis-Prone Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rousseaux, Sophie; Debernardi, Alexandra; Jacquiau, Baptiste; Vitte, Anne-Laure; Vesin, Aurélien; Nagy-Mignotte, Hélène; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Brichon, Pierre-Yves; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Hainaut, Pierre; Laffaire, Julien; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Beer, David G.; Timsit, Jean-François; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Khochbin, Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Activation of normally silent tissue-specific genes and the resulting cell “identity crisis” are the unexplored consequences of malignant epigenetic reprogramming. We designed a strategy for investigating this reprogramming, which consisted of identifying a large number of tissue-restricted genes that are epigenetically silenced in normal somatic cells and then detecting their expression in cancer. This approach led to the demonstration that large-scale “off-context” gene activations systematically occur in a variety of cancer types. In our series of 293 lung tumors, we identified an ectopic gene expression signature associated with a subset of highly aggressive tumors, which predicted poor prognosis independently of the TNM (tumor size, node positivity, and metastasis) stage or histological subtype. The ability to isolate these tumors allowed us to reveal their common molecular features characterized by the acquisition of embryonic stem cell/germ cell gene expression profiles and the down-regulation of immune response genes. The methodical recognition of ectopic gene activations in cancer cells could serve as a basis for gene signature–guided tumor stratification, as well as for the discovery of oncogenic mechanisms, and expand the understanding of the biology of very aggressive tumors. PMID:23698379

  10. Insights into GATA-1 Mediated Gene Activation versus Repression via Genome-wide Chromatin Occupancy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ming; Riva, Laura; Xie, Huafeng; Schindler, Yocheved; Moran, Tyler B.; Cheng, Yong; Yu, Duonan; Hardison, Ross; Weiss, Mitchell J; Orkin, Stuart H.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Fraenkel, Ernest; Cantor, Alan B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor GATA-1 is required for terminal erythroid maturation and functions as an activator or repressor depending on gene context. Yet its in vivo site selectivity and ability to distinguish between activated versus repressed genes remain incompletely understood. In this study, we performed GATA-1 ChIP-seq in erythroid cells and compared it to GATA-1 induced gene expression changes. Bound and differentially expressed genes contain a greater number of GATA binding motifs, a higher frequency of palindromic GATA sites, and closer occupancy to the transcriptional start site versus non-differentially expressed genes. Moreover, we show that the transcription factor Zbtb7a occupies GATA-1 bound regions of some direct GATA-1 target genes, that the presence of SCL/TAL1 helps distinguish transcriptional activation versus repression, and that Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is involved in epigenetic silencing of a subset of GATA-1 repressed genes. These data provide insights into GATA-1 mediated gene regulation in vivo. PMID:19941827

  11. Type 1 plaminogen activator inhibitor gene: Functional analysis and glucocorticoid regulation of its promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zonneveld, A.J.; Curriden, S.A.; Loskutoff, D.J. )

    1988-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 is an important component of the fibrinolytic system and its biosynthesis is subject to complex regulation. To study this regulation at the level of transcription, the authors have identified and sequenced the promoter of the human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene. Nuclease protection experiments were performed by using endothelial cell mRNA and the transcription initiation (cap) site was established. Sequence analysis of the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene revealed a perfect TATA box at position {minus}28 to position {minus}23, the conserved distance from the cap site. Comparative functional studies with the firefly luciferase gene as a reporter gene showed that fragments derived from this 5{prime} flanking region exhibited high promoter activity when transfected into bovine aortic endothelial cells and mouse Ltk{sup {minus}} fibroblasts but were inactive when introduced into HeLa cells. These studies indicate that the fragments contain the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 promoter and that it is expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Although the fragments were also silent in rat FTO2B hepatoma cells, their promoter activity could be induced up to 40-fold with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Promoter deletion mapping experiments and studies involving the fusion of promoter fragments to a heterologous gene indicated that dexamethasone induction is mediated by a glucocorticoid responsive element with enhancer-like properties located within the region between nucleotides {minus}305 and +75 of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene.

  12. Transcriptomic Analysis of Musca domestica to Reveal Key Genes of the Prophenoloxidase-Activating System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dianxiang; Liang, Yongli; Wang, Xianwei; Wang, Lei; Qi, Mei; Yu, Yang; Luan, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    The proPO system regulates melanization in arthropods. However, the genes that are involved in the proPO system in housefly Musca domestica remain unclear. Thus, this study analyzed the combined transcriptome obtained from M. domestica larvae, pupae, and adults that were either normal or bacteria-challenged by an Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus mixture. A total of 54,821,138 clean reads (4.93 Gb) were yielded by Illumina sequencing, which were de novo assembled into 89,842 unigenes. Of the 89,842 unigenes, based on a similarity search with known genes in other insects, 24 putative genes related to the proPO system were identified. Eight of the identified genes encoded for peptidoglycan recognition receptors, two encoded for prophenoloxidases, three encoded for prophenoloxidase-activating enzymes, and 11 encoded for serine proteinase inhibitors. The expression levels of these identified genes were investigated by qRT-PCR assay, which were consistent with expected activation process of the proPO system, and their activation functions were confirmed by the measurement of phenoloxidase activity in bacteria-infected larvae after proPO antibody blockage, suggesting these candidate genes might have potentially different roles in the activation of proPO system. Collectively, this study has provided the comprehensive transcriptomic data of an insect and some fundamental basis toward achieving understanding of the activation mechanisms and immune functions of the proPO system in M. domestica. PMID:26156588

  13. Collinear activation of Hoxb genes during gastrulation is linked to mesoderm cell ingression.

    PubMed

    Iimura, Tadahiro; Pourquié, Olivier

    2006-08-01

    The vertebral column exhibits segmentation and regionalization along the antero-posterior axis. During embryogenesis, the rhythmic production of the precursors of the vertebrae, the somites, imposes a segmented aspect to the spine, whereas the spine's regional differentiation is controlled by Hox genes. Here we show that in the paraxial mesoderm, Hoxb genes are first activated in a temporal collinear fashion in precursors located in the epiblast lateral to the primitive streak. Our data suggest that collinear activation of Hoxb genes regulates the flux of cells from the epiblast to the streak and thus directly controls the establishment of the genes' characteristic nested expression domains in the somites. This suggests that establishment of the spatial co-linearity in the embryo is directly controlled by the Hox genes themselves. PMID:16760928

  14. Activated α2-Macroglobulin Regulates Transcriptional Activation of c-MYC Target Genes through Cell Surface GRP78 Protein.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Udhayakumar; Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2016-05-13

    Activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*) signals predominantly through cell surface GRP78 (CS-GRP78) to promote proliferation and survival of cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanism remains obscure. c-MYC is an essential transcriptional regulator that controls cell proliferation. We hypothesize that α2M*/CS-GRP78-evoked key signaling events are required for transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes. Activation of CS-GRP78 by α2M* requires ligation of the GRP78 primary amino acid sequence (Leu(98)-Leu(115)). After stimulation with α2M*, CS-GRP78 signaling activates 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) to induce phosphorylation of PLK1, which in turn induces c-MYC transcription. We demonstrate that PLK1 binds directly to c-MYC and promotes its transcriptional activity by phosphorylating Ser(62) Moreover, activated c-MYC is recruited to the E-boxes of target genes FOSL1 and ID2 by phosphorylating histone H3 at Ser(10) In addition, targeting the carboxyl-terminal domain of CS-GRP78 with a mAb suppresses transcriptional activation of c-MYC target genes and impairs cell proliferation. This work demonstrates that α2M*/CS-GRP78 acts as an upstream regulator of the PDK1/PLK1 signaling axis to modulate c-MYC transcription and its target genes, suggesting a therapeutic strategy for targeting c-MYC-associated malignant progression. PMID:27002159

  15. The Dynein Gene Family in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Porter, M. E.; Knott, J. A.; Myster, S. H.; Farlow, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    To correlate dynein heavy chain (Dhc) genes with flagellar mutations and gain insight into the function of specific dynein isoforms, we placed eight members of the Dhc gene family on the genetic map of Chlamydomonas. Using a PCR-based strategy, we cloned 11 Dhc genes from Chlamydomonas. Comparisons with other Dhc genes indicate that two clones correspond to genes encoding the alpha and beta heavy chains of the outer dynein arm. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequences spanning the nucleotide binding site indicates that the remaining nine clones can be subdivided into three groups that are likely to include representatives of the inner-arm Dhc isoforms. Gene-specific probes reveal that each clone represents a single-copy gene that is expressed as a transcript of the appropriate size (>13 kb) sufficient to encode a high molecular weight Dhc polypeptide. The expression of all nine genes is upregulated in response to deflagellation, suggesting a role in axoneme assembly or motility. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms between divergent C. reinhardtii strains have been used to place each Dhc gene on the genetic map of Chlamydomonas. These studies lay the groundwork for correlating defects in different Dhc genes with specific flagellar mutations. PMID:8889521

  16. Expression of essential B cell genes and immunoglobulin isotypes suggests active development and gene recombination during equine gestation.

    PubMed

    Tallmadge, Rebecca L; McLaughlin, Kristin; Secor, Erica; Ruano, Diana; Matychak, Mary Beth; Flaminio, M Julia B F

    2009-09-01

    Many features of the equine immune system develop during fetal life, yet the naïve or immature immune state of the neonate renders the foal uniquely susceptible to particular pathogens. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical experiments investigated the progressive expression of developmental B cell markers and immunoglobulins in lymphoid tissues from equine fetus, pre-suckle neonate, foal, and adult horses. Serum IgM, IgG isotype, and IgA concentrations were also quantified in pre-suckle foals and adult horses. The expression of essential B cell genes suggests active development and gene recombination during equine gestation, including immunoglobulin isotype switching. The corresponding production of IgM and IgG proteins is detectable in a limited scale at birth. Although the equine neonate humoral response seems competent, B cell activation factors derived from antigen presenting cells and T cells may control critical developmental regulation and immunoglobulin production during the initial months of life. PMID:19442687

  17. Bifidobacterium bifidum actively changes the gene expression profile induced by Lactobacillus acidophilus in murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Gudrun; Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen Fink, Lisbeth; Jarmer, Hanne; Nøhr Nielsen, Birgit; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal regulatory role in activation of both the innate as well as the adaptive immune system by responding to environmental microorganisms. We have previously shown that Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a strong production of the pro-inflammatory and Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12 in DC, whereas bifidobacteria do not induce IL-12 but inhibit the IL-12 production induced by lactobacilli. In the present study, genome-wide microarrays were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of murine DC stimulated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium bifidum Z9. L. acidophilus NCFM strongly induced expression of interferon (IFN)-beta, other virus defence genes, and cytokine and chemokine genes related to the innate and the adaptive immune response. By contrast, B. bifidum Z9 up-regulated genes encoding cytokines and chemokines related to the innate immune response. Moreover, B. bifidum Z9 inhibited the expression of the Th1-promoting genes induced by L. acidophilus NCFM and had an additive effect on genes of the innate immune response and Th2 skewing genes. The gene encoding Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a transcription factor regulating the activation of JNK, was one of the few genes only induced by B. bifidum Z9. Neutralization of IFN-beta abrogated L. acidophilus NCFM-induced expression of Th1-skewing genes, and blocking of the JNK pathway completely inhibited the expression of IFN-beta. Our results indicate that B. bifidum Z9 actively inhibits the expression of genes related to the adaptive immune system in murine dendritic cells and that JPD2 via blocking of IFN-beta plays a central role in this regulatory mechanism. PMID:20548777

  18. Differential gene expression in high- and low-active inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Michelle; Moore-Harrison, Trudy; Hamilton, Alicia T; Ceaser, Tyrone; Kochan, Kelli J; Riggs, Penny K; Lightfoot, J Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Numerous candidate genes have been suggested in the recent literature with proposed roles in regulation of voluntary physical activity, with little evidence of these genes' functional roles. This study compared the haplotype structure and expression profile in skeletal muscle and brain of inherently high- (C57L/J) and low- (C3H/HeJ) active mice. Expression of nine candidate genes [Actn2, Actn3, Casq1, Drd2, Lepr, Mc4r, Mstn, Papss2, and Glut4 (a.k.a. Slc2a4)] was evaluated via RT-qPCR. SNPs were observed in regions of Actn2, Casq1, Drd2, Lepr, and Papss2; however, no SNPs were located in coding sequences or associated with any known regulatory sequences. In mice exposed to a running wheel, Casq1 (P = 0.0003) and Mstn (P = 0.002) transcript levels in the soleus were higher in the low-active mice. However, when these genes were evaluated in naïve animals, differential expression was not observed, demonstrating a training effect. Among naïve mice, no genes in either tissue exhibited differential expression between strains. Considering that no obvious SNP mechanisms were determined or differential expression was observed, our results indicate that genomic structural variation or gene expression data alone is not adequate to establish any of these genes' candidacy or causality in relation to regulation of physical activity. PMID:24551844

  19. A gene encoding a new cold-active lipase from an Antarctic isolate of Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Suja; Te'o, Junior; Nevalainen, Helena

    2013-08-01

    Cold-active lipases are of significant interest as biocatalysts in industrial processes. We have identified a lipase that displayed activity towards long carbon-chain-p-nitrophenyl substrates (C12-C18) at 25 °C from the culture supernatant of an Antarctic Penicillium expansum strain assigned P. expansum SM3. Zymography revealed a protein band of around 30 kDa with activity towards olive oil. DNA fragments of a lipase gene designated as lipPE were isolated from the genomic DNA of P. expansum SM3 by genomic walking PCR. Subsequently, the complete genomic lipPE gene was amplified using gene-specific primers designed from the 5'- and 3'-regions. Reverse transcription PCR was used to amplify the lipPE cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of 285 residues that included a predicted signal peptide. Three peptides identified by LC/MS/MS analysis of the proteins in the culture supernatant of P. expansum were also present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the lipPE gene suggesting that this gene encoded the lipase identified by initial zymogram activity analysis. Full analysis of the nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences indicated that the lipPE gene encodes a novel P. expansum lipase. The lipPE gene was expressed in E. coli for further characterization of the enzyme with a view of assessing its suitability for industrial applications. PMID:23779196

  20. Controlling nuclear JAKs and STATs for specific gene activation by IFNγ

    PubMed Central

    Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Dabelic, Rea; Canton, Johnathan; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed that gamma interferon (IFNγ) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interacted with the promoter region of IFNγ-activated genes along with transcription factor STAT1α. Recent studies have suggested that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also played a role in gene activation by phosphorylation of histone H3 on tyrosine 41. This study addresses the question of the role of activated JAKs in specific gene activation by IFNγ. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR in IFNγ treated WISH cells and showed association of pJAK1, pJAK2, IFNGR1, and STAT1 on the same DNA sequence of the IRF-1 gene promoter. The β-actin gene, which is not activated by IFNγ, did not show this association. The movement of activated JAK to the nucleus and the IRF-1 promoter was confirmed by the combination of nuclear fractionation, confocal microscopy and DNA precipitation analysis using the biotinylated GAS promoter. Activated JAKs in the nucleus was associated with phosphorylated tyrosine 41 on histone H3 in the region of the GAS promoter. Unphosphorylated JAK2 was found to be constitutively present in the nucleus and was capable of undergoing activation in IFNγ treated cells, most likely via nuclear IFNGR1. Association of pJAK2 and IFNGR1 with histone H3 in IFNγ treated cells was demonstrated by histone H3 immunoprecipitation. Unphosphorylated STAT1 protein was associated with histone H3 of untreated cells. IFNγ treatment resulted in its disassociation and then re-association as pSTAT1. The results suggest a novel role for activated JAKs in epigenetic events for specific gene activation. PMID:21689637

  1. Chlamydomonas IFT70/CrDYF-1 is a core component of IFT particle complex B and is required for flagellar assembly.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Behal, Robert H; Geimer, Stefan; Wang, Zhaohui; Williamson, Shana M; Zhang, Haili; Cole, Douglas G; Qin, Hongmin

    2010-08-01

    DYF-1 is a highly conserved protein essential for ciliogenesis in several model organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans, DYF-1 serves as an essential activator for an anterograde motor OSM-3 of intraflagellar transport (IFT), the ciliogenesis-required motility that mediates the transport of flagellar precursors and removal of turnover products. In zebrafish and Tetrahymena DYF-1 influences the cilia tubulin posttranslational modification and may have more ubiquitous function in ciliogenesis than OSM-3. Here we address how DYF-1 biochemically interacts with the IFT machinery by using the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, in which the anterograde IFT does not depend on OSM-3. Our results show that this protein is a stoichiometric component of the IFT particle complex B and interacts directly with complex B subunit IFT46. In concurrence with the established IFT protein nomenclature, DYF-1 is also named IFT70 after the apparent size of the protein. IFT70/CrDYF-1 is essential for the function of IFT in building the flagellum because the flagella of IFT70/CrDYF-1-depleted cells were greatly shortened. Together, these results demonstrate that IFT70/CrDYF-1 is a canonical subunit of IFT particle complex B and strongly support the hypothesis that the IFT machinery has species- and tissue-specific variations with functional ramifications. PMID:20534810

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a C-terminal fragment of FlgJ, a putative flagellar rod cap protein from Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Yuki; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Yamane, Midori; Imada, Katsumi; Namba, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    The formation of the bacterial flagellar axial structure, including the filament, the hook and the rod, requires the attachment of a cap complex to the distal end of the growing structure. Because the rod penetrates the peptidoglycan (PG) layer, the rod cap complex is thought to have PG-hydrolyzing activity. FlgJ is a putative rod cap protein whose C-terminal region shows sequence similarity to known muramidases. In this study, FlgJ120–316, a C-terminal fragment of FlgJ which contains the muramidase region, was overproduced, purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using PEG 3350 as a crystallizing agent and belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.8, b = 43.9, c = 108.5 Å. Anomalous difference Patterson maps calculated from the diffraction data set of a selenomethionine-labelled crystal showed significant peaks in the Harker sections, indicating that the data were suitable for structure determination. PMID:19153448

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a C-terminal fragment of FlgJ, a putative flagellar rod cap protein from Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuki; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Yamane, Midori; Imada, Katsumi; Namba, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    The formation of the bacterial flagellar axial structure, including the filament, the hook and the rod, requires the attachment of a cap complex to the distal end of the growing structure. Because the rod penetrates the peptidoglycan (PG) layer, the rod cap complex is thought to have PG-hydrolyzing activity. FlgJ is a putative rod cap protein whose C-terminal region shows sequence similarity to known muramidases. In this study, FlgJ(120-316), a C-terminal fragment of FlgJ which contains the muramidase region, was overproduced, purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using PEG 3350 as a crystallizing agent and belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 38.8, b = 43.9, c = 108.5 A. Anomalous difference Patterson maps calculated from the diffraction data set of a selenomethionine-labelled crystal showed significant peaks in the Harker sections, indicating that the data were suitable for structure determination. PMID:19153448

  4. Crystal structure of the flagellar accessory protein FlaH of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii suggests a regulatory role in archaeal flagellum assembly.

    PubMed

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A; Wolf, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Archaeal flagella are unique structures that share functional similarity with bacterial flagella, but are structurally related to bacterial type IV pili. The flagellar accessory protein FlaH is one of the conserved components of the archaeal motility system. However, its function is not clearly understood. Here, we present the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of FlaH from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. The protein has a characteristic RecA-like fold, which has been found previously both in archaea and bacteria. We show that FlaH binds to immobilized ATP-however, it lacks ATPase activity. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrates that ATP affects the interaction between FlaH and the archaeal motor protein FlaI. In the presence of ATP, the FlaH-FlaI interaction becomes significantly weaker. A database search revealed similarity between FlaH and several DNA-binding proteins of the RecA superfamily. The closest structural homologs of FlaH are KaiC-like proteins, which are archaeal homologs of the circadian clock protein KaiC from cyanobacteria. We propose that one of the functions of FlaH may be the regulation of archaeal motor complex assembly. PMID:27060465

  5. Mobilisation of Ca2+ stores and flagellar regulation in human sperm by S-nitrosylation: a role for NO synthesised in the female tract

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Oliveira, Gisela; Lefièvre, Linda; Ford, Christopher; Herrero, M Belen; Barratt, Christopher; Connolly, Thomas J; Nash, Katherine; Morales-Garcia, Aduen; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson; Publicover, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Summary Generation of NO by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is implicated in gamete interaction and fertilisation. Exposure of human spermatozoa to NO donors caused mobilisation of stored Ca2+ by a mechanism that did not require activation of guanylate cyclase but was mimicked by S-nitroso-glutathione (GSNO; an S-nitrosylating agent). Application of dithiothreitol, to reduce protein –SNO groups, rapidly reversed the actions of NO and GSNO on [Ca2+]i. The effects of NO, GSNO and dithiothreitol on sperm protein S-nitrosylation, assessed using the biotin switch method, closely paralleled their actions on [Ca2+]i. Immunofluorescent staining revealed constitutive and inducible NOS in human oviduct and cumulus (the cellular layer investing the oocyte). 4,5-diaminofluorescein (DAF) staining demonstrated production of NO by these tissues. Incubation of human sperm with oviduct explants induced sperm protein S-nitrosylation resembling that induced by NO donors and GSNO. Progesterone (a product of cumulus cells) also mobilises stored Ca2+ in human sperm. Pre-treatment of sperm with NO greatly enhanced the effect of progesterone on [Ca2+]i, resulting in a prolonged increase in flagellar excursion. We conclude that NO regulates mobilisation of stored Ca2+ in human sperm by protein S-nitrosylation, that this action is synergistic with progesterone and that this synergism is potentially highly significant in gamete interactions leading to fertilisation. PMID:18842814

  6. Gene Activation in Eukaryotes: Are Nuclear Acidic Proteins the Cause or the Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    1974-01-01

    Nuclear acidic proteins have been implicated in the positive control of gene transcription in eukaryotes. This hypothesis was examined in greater detail by analysis of these proteins during experimental gene activation by a technique for fractionating nuclei into chromatin and the ribonucleoprotein particles that contain heterogeneous nuclear RNA. When synthesis of rat-liver heterogeneous nuclear RNA was stimulated by administration of hydrocortisone, there was a parallel increase in the labeling of acidic proteins in ribonucleoprotein particles. However, there was no detectable effect on the labeling of either acidic chromatin proteins or histones. Thus, the nuclear acidic proteins that respond to the hormone are concerned with a post-transcriptional event, namely the assembly and processing of ribonucleoprotein particles that contain heterogeneous RNA, rather than with direct gene activation. Increases in synthesis of “chromatin” acidic proteins during gene activation observed by others may reflect the presence of these ribonucleoprotein particles in crude chromatin preparations. Images PMID:4522777

  7. An optogenetic gene expression system with rapid activation and deactivation kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Motta-Mena, Laura B.; Reade, Anna; Mallory, Michael J.; Glantz, Spencer; Weiner, Orion D.; Lynch, Kristen W.; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetic gene expression systems can control transcription with spatial and temporal detail unequaled with traditional inducible promoter systems. However, current eukaryotic light-gated transcription systems are limited by toxicity, dynamic range, or slow activation/deactivation. Here we present an optogenetic gene expression system that addresses these shortcomings and demonstrate its broad utility. Our approach utilizes an engineered version of EL222, a bacterial Light-Oxygen-Voltage (LOV) protein that binds DNA when illuminated with blue light. The system has a large (>100-fold) dynamic range of protein expression, rapid activation (< 10 s) and deactivation kinetics (< 50 s), and a highly linear response to light. With this system, we achieve light-gated transcription in several mammalian cell lines and intact zebrafish embryos with minimal basal gene activation and toxicity. Our approach provides a powerful new tool for optogenetic control of gene expression in space and time. PMID:24413462

  8. REST-VP16 activates multiple neuronal differentiation genes in human NT2 cells.

    PubMed

    Immaneni, A; Lawinger, P; Zhao, Z; Lu, W; Rastelli, L; Morris, J H; Majumder, S

    2000-09-01

    The RE1-silencing transcription factor (REST)/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) can repress transcription of a battery of neuronal differentiation genes in non-neuronal cells by binding to a specific consensus DNA sequence present in their regulatory regions. However, REST/NRSF(-/-) mice suggest that the absence of REST/NRSF-dependent repression alone is not sufficient for the expression of these neuronal differentiation genes and that the presence of other promoter/enhancer-specific activators is required. Here we describe the construction of a recombinant transcription factor, REST-VP16, by replacing repressor domains of REST/NRSF with the activation domain of a viral activator VP16. In transient transfection experiments, REST-VP16 was found to operate through RE1 binding site/neuron-restrictive enhancer element (RE1/NRSE), activate plasmid-encoded neuronal promoters in various mammalian cell types and activate cellular REST/NRSF target genes, even in the absence of factors that are otherwise required to activate such genes. Efficient expression of REST-VP16 through adenoviral vectors in NT2 cells, which resemble human committed neuronal progenitor cells, was found to cause activation of multiple neuronal genes that are characteristic markers for neuronal differentiation. Thus, REST-VP16 could be used as a unique tool to study neuronal differentiation pathways and neuronal diseases that arise due to the deregulation of this process. PMID:10954611

  9. The Tightly Controlled Deubiquitination Activity of the Human SAGA Complex Differentially Modifies Distinct Gene Regulatory Elements▿

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Guillaume; Bonnet, Jacques; Umlauf, David; Karmodiya, Krishanpal; Koffler, Jennifer; Stierle, Matthieu; Devys, Didier; Tora, László

    2011-01-01

    The multisubunit SAGA coactivator complex facilitates access of general transcription factors to DNA through histone acetylation mediated by GCN5. USP22 (ubiquitin-specific protease 22) was recently described as a subunit of the human SAGA complex that removes ubiquitin from monoubiquitinated histone H2B and H2A in vitro. Here we demonstrate an allosteric regulation of USP22 through multiple interactions with different domains of other subunits of the SAGA deubiquitination module (ATXN7, ATXN7L3, and ENY2). Downregulation of ATXN7L3 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) specifically inactivated the SAGA deubiquitination activity, leading to a strong increase of global H2B ubiquitination and a moderate increase of H2A ubiquitination. Thus, SAGA is the major H2Bub deubiquitinase in human cells, and this activity cannot be fully compensated by other deubiquitinases. Here we show that the deubiquitination activity of SAGA is required for full activation of SAGA-dependent inducible genes. Interestingly, the reduction of the SAGA deubiquitination activity and the parallel increase in H2B ubiquitation at inducible target genes before activation do not induce aberrant gene expression. Our data together indicate that different dynamic equilibriums of H2B ubiquitination/deubiquitination are established at different gene regulatory elements and that H2B ubiquitination changes are necessary but not sufficient to trigger parallel activation of gene expression. PMID:21746879

  10. Controlling nuclear JAKs and STATs for specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Dabelic, Rea; Canton, Johnathan; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interact with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-associated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. {yields} We show that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also associate with IFNGR1 in the nucleus. {yields} The activated Janus kinases are responsible for phosphorylation of tyrosine 41 on histone H3, an important epigenetic event for specific gene activation. -- Abstract: We previously showed that gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interacted with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-activated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. Recent studies have suggested that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also played a role in gene activation by phosphorylation of histone H3 on tyrosine 41. This study addresses the question of the role of activated JAKs in specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR in IFN{gamma} treated WISH cells and showed association of pJAK1, pJAK2, IFNGR1, and STAT1 on the same DNA sequence of the IRF-1 gene promoter. The {beta}-actin gene, which is not activated by IFN{gamma}, did not show this association. The movement of activated JAK to the nucleus and the IRF-1 promoter was confirmed by the combination of nuclear fractionation, confocal microscopy and DNA precipitation analysis using the biotinylated GAS promoter. Activated JAKs in the nucleus was associated with phosphorylated tyrosine 41 on histone H3 in the region of the GAS promoter. Unphosphorylated JAK2 was found to be constitutively present in the nucleus and was capable of undergoing activation in IFN{gamma} treated cells, most likely via nuclear IFNGR1. Association of pJAK2 and IFNGR1 with histone H3 in IFN{gamma} treated cells was demonstrated by histone H3 immunoprecipitation. Unphosphorylated STAT1 protein was associated with histone H3 of untreated cells. IFN

  11. The yeast Hot1 transcription factor is critical for activating a single target gene, STL1

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Chen; Tesker, Masha; Engelberg, David

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors are commonly activated by signal transduction cascades and induce expression of many genes. They therefore play critical roles in determining the cell's fate. The yeast Hog1 MAP kinase pathway is believed to control the transcription of hundreds of genes via several transcription factors. To identify the bona fide target genes of Hog1, we inducibly expressed the spontaneously active variant Hog1D170A+F318L in cells lacking the Hog1 activator Pbs2. This system allowed monitoring the effects of Hog1 by itself. Expression of Hog1D170A+F318L in pbs2∆ cells imposed induction of just 105 and suppression of only 26 transcripts by at least twofold. We looked for the Hog1-responsive element within the promoter of the most highly induced gene, STL1 (88-fold). A novel Hog1 responsive element (HoRE) was identified and shown to be the direct target of the transcription factor Hot1. Unexpectedly, we could not find this HoRE in any other yeast promoter. In addition, the only gene whose expression was abolished in hot1∆ cells was STL1. Thus Hot1 is essential for transcription of just one gene, STL1. Hot1 may represent a class of transcription factors that are essential for transcription of a very few genes or even just one. PMID:25904326

  12. Gene expression analysis during acute hepatitis C virus infection associates dendritic cell activation with viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Aintzane; Riezu-Boj, Jose-Ignacio; Larrea, Esther; Villanueva, Lorea; Lasarte, Juan Jose; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Fisicaro, Paola; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Missale, Gabriele; Ferrari, Carlo; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Prieto, Jesús; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Viral clearance during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the induction of potent antiviral T-cell responses. Since dendritic cells (DC) are essential in the activation of primary T-cell responses, gene expression was analyzed in DC from patients during acute HCV infection. By using microarrays, gene expression was compared in resting and activated peripheral blood plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid (mDC) DC from acute HCV resolving patients (AR) and from patients who become chronically infected (ANR), as well as in healthy individuals (CTRL) and chronically-infected patients (CHR). For pDC, a high number of upregulated genes was found in AR patients, irrespective of DC stimulation. However, for mDC, most evident differences were detected after DC stimulation, again corresponding to upregulated genes in AR patients. Divergent behavior of ANR was also observed when analyzing DC from CTRL and CHR, with ANR patients clustering again apart from these groups. These differences corresponded to metabolism-associated genes and genes belonging to pathways relevant for DC activation and cytokine responses. Thus, upregulation of relevant genes in DC during acute HCV infection may determine viral clearance, suggesting that dysfunctional DC may be responsible for the lack of efficient T-cell responses which lead to chronic HCV infection. PMID:26447929

  13. Evolution of the perlecan/HSPG2 gene and its activation in regenerating Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Warren, Curtis R; Kassir, Elias; Spurlin, James; Martinez, Jerahme; Putnam, Nicholas H; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2015-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 (HSPG2)/perlecan gene is ancient and conserved in all triploblastic species. Its presence maintains critical cell boundaries in tissue and its large (up to ~900 kDa) modular structure has prompted speculation about the evolutionary origin of the gene. The gene's conservation amongst basal metazoans is unclear. After the recent sequencing of their genomes, the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens have become favorite models for studying tissue regeneration and the evolution of multicellularity. More ancient basal metazoan phyla include the poriferan and ctenophore, whose evolutionary relationship has been clarified recently. Our in silico and PCR-based methods indicate that the HSPG2 gene is conserved in both the placozoan and cnidarian genomes, but not in those of the ctenophores and only partly in poriferan genomes. HSPG2 also is absent from published ctenophore and Capsaspora owczarzaki genomes. The gene in T. adhaerens is encoded as two separate but genetically juxtaposed genes that house all of the constituent pieces of the mammalian HSPG2 gene in tandem. These genetic constituents are found in isolated genes of various poriferan species, indicating a possible intronic recombinatory mechanism for assembly of the HSPG2 gene. Perlecan's expression during wound healing and boundary formation is conserved, as expression of the gene was activated during tissue regeneration and reformation of the basement membrane of N. vectensis. These data indicate that the complex HSPG2 gene evolved concurrently in a common ancestor of placozoans, cnidarians and bilaterians, likely along with the development of differentiated cell types separated by acellular matrices, and is activated to reestablish these tissue borders during wound healing. PMID:25876075

  14. Genetic characterization of conserved charged residues in the bacterial flagellar type III export protein FlhA.

    PubMed

    Hara, Noritaka; Namba, Keiichi; Minamino, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    For assembly of the bacterial flagellum, most of flagellar proteins are transported to the distal end of the flagellum by the flagellar type III protein export apparatus powered by proton motive force (PMF) across the cytoplasmic membrane. FlhA is an integral membrane protein of the export apparatus and is involved in an early stage of the export process along with three soluble proteins, FliH, FliI, and FliJ, but the energy coupling mechanism remains unknown. Here, we carried out site-directed mutagenesis of eight, highly conserved charged residues in putative juxta- and trans-membrane helices of FlhA. Only Asp-208 was an essential acidic residue. Most of the FlhA substitutions were tolerated, but resulted in loss-of-function in the ΔfliH-fliI mutant background, even with the second-site flhB(P28T) mutation that increases the probability of flagellar protein export in the absence of FliH and FliI. The addition of FliH and FliI allowed the D45A, R85A, R94K and R270A mutant proteins to work even in the presence of the flhB(P28T) mutation. Suppressor analysis of a flhA(K203W) mutation showed an interaction between FlhA and FliR. Taken all together, we suggest that Asp-208 is directly involved in PMF-driven protein export and that the cooperative interactions of FlhA with FlhB, FliH, FliI, and FliR drive the translocation of export substrate. PMID:21811603

  15. Gate-controlled proton diffusion and protonation-induced ratchet motion in the stator of the bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Yasutaka; Kitao, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The proton permeation process of the stator complex MotA/B in the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli was investigated. The atomic model structure of the transmembrane part of MotA/B was constructed based on the previously published disulfide cross-linking and tryptophan scanning mutations. The dynamic permeation of hydronium/sodium ions and water molecule through the channel formed in MotA/B was observed using a steered molecular dynamics simulation. During the simulation, Leu46 of MotB acts as the gate for hydronium ion permeation, which induced the formation of water wire that may mediate the proton transfer to Asp32 on MotB. Free energy profiles for permeation were calculated by umbrella sampling. The free energy barrier for H3O+ permeation was consistent with the proton transfer rate deduced from the flagellar rotational speed and number of protons per rotation, which suggests that the gating is the rate-limiting step. Structure and dynamics of the MotA/B with nonprotonated and protonated Asp32, Val43Met, and Val43Leu mutants in MotB were investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. A narrowing of the channel was observed in the mutants, which is consistent with the size-dependent ion selectivity. In MotA/B with the nonprotonated Asp32, the A3 segment in MotA maintained a kink whereas the protonation induced a straighter shape. Assuming that the cytoplasmic domain not included in the atomic model moves as a rigid body, the protonation/deprotonation of Asp32 is inferred to induce a ratchet motion of the cytoplasmic domain, which may be correlated to the motion of the flagellar rotor. PMID:26056313

  16. Gate-controlled proton diffusion and protonation-induced ratchet motion in the stator of the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Yasutaka; Kitao, Akio

    2015-06-23

    The proton permeation process of the stator complex MotA/B in the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli was investigated. The atomic model structure of the transmembrane part of MotA/B was constructed based on the previously published disulfide cross-linking and tryptophan scanning mutations. The dynamic permeation of hydronium/sodium ions and water molecule through the channel formed in MotA/B was observed using a steered molecular dynamics simulation. During the simulation, Leu46 of MotB acts as the gate for hydronium ion permeation, which induced the formation of water wire that may mediate the proton transfer to Asp32 on MotB. Free energy profiles for permeation were calculated by umbrella sampling. The free energy barrier for H3O(+) permeation was consistent with the proton transfer rate deduced from the flagellar rotational speed and number of protons per rotation, which suggests that the gating is the rate-limiting step. Structure and dynamics of the MotA/B with nonprotonated and protonated Asp32, Val43Met, and Val43Leu mutants in MotB were investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. A narrowing of the channel was observed in the mutants, which is consistent with the size-dependent ion selectivity. In MotA/B with the nonprotonated Asp32, the A3 segment in MotA maintained a kink whereas the protonation induced a straighter shape. Assuming that the cytoplasmic domain not included in the atomic model moves as a rigid body, the protonation/deprotonation of Asp32 is inferred to induce a ratchet motion of the cytoplasmic domain, which may be correlated to the motion of the flagellar rotor. PMID:26056313

  17. Assembly and stoichiometry of FliF and FlhA in Salmonella flagellar basal body.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yusuke V; Ito, Mariko; Hiraoka, Koichi D; Che, Yong-Suk; Bai, Fan; Kami-Ike, Nobunori; Namba, Keiichi; Minamino, Tohru

    2014-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar export apparatus is required for the construction of the bacterial flagella beyond the cytoplasmic membrane. The membrane-embedded part of the export apparatus, which consists of FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ and FliR, is located in the central pore of the MS ring formed by 26 copies of FliF. The C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of FlhA is located in the centre of the cavity within the C ring made of FliG, FliM and FliN. FlhA interacts with FliF, but its assembly mechanism remains unclear. Here, we fused yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to the C-termini of FliF and FlhA and investigated their subcellular localization by fluorescence microscopy. The punctate pattern of FliF-YFP localization required FliG but neither FliM, FliN, FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ nor FliR. In contrast, FlhA-CFP localization required FliF, FliG, FliO, FliP, FliQ and FliR. The number of FlhA-YFP molecules associated with the MS ring was estimated to be about nine. We suggest that FlhA assembles into the export gate along with other membrane components during the MS ring complex formation in a co-ordinated manner. PMID:24450479

  18. Exercise and gene expression: physiological regulation of the human genome through physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Frank W; Chakravarthy, Manu V; Spangenburg, Espen E

    2002-01-01

    The current human genome was moulded and refined through generations of time. We propose that the basic framework for physiologic gene regulation was selected during an era of obligatory physical activity, as the survival of our Late Palaeolithic (50 000–10 000 BC) ancestors depended on hunting and gathering. A sedentary lifestyle in such an environment probably meant elimination of that individual organism. The phenotype of the present day Homo sapiens genome is much different from that of our ancient ancestors, primarily as a consequence of expressing evolutionarily programmed Late Palaeolithic genes in an environment that is predominantly sedentary. In this sense, our current genome is maladapted, resulting in abnormal gene expression, which in turn frequently manifests itself as clinically overt disease. We speculate that some of these genes still play a role in survival by causing premature death from chronic diseases produced by physical inactivity. We also contend that the current scientific evidence supports the notion that disruptions in cellular homeostasis are diminished in magnitude in physically active individuals compared with sedentary individuals due to the natural selection of gene expression that supports the physically active lifestyle displayed by our ancestors. We speculate that genes evolved with the expectation of requiring a certain threshold of physical activity for normal physiologic gene expression, and thus habitual exercise in sedentary cultures restores perturbed homeostatic mechanisms towards the normal physiological range of the Palaeolithic Homo sapiens. This hypothesis allows us to ask the question of whether normal physiological values change as a result of becoming sedentary. In summary, in sedentary cultures, daily physical activity normalizes gene expression towards patterns established to maintain the survival in the Late Palaeolithic era. PMID:12205177

  19. Transcriptional activation of jun and actin genes by estrogen during mitogenic stimulation of rat uterine cells.

    PubMed

    Cicatiello, L; Ambrosino, C; Coletta, B; Scalona, M; Sica, V; Bresciani, F; Weisz, A

    1992-03-01

    Estrogens induce transcriptional activation of c-fos and c-myc proto-oncogenes during mitogenic stimulation of human, chicken, mouse and rat cells in vivo and in vitro. In this paper we show that 17 beta-estradiol injected into adult ovariectomized rats increases c-jun, jun-B and jun-D gene transcription in the uterus. Kinetics and amplitude of response are different for each gene, since c-jun is activated first, within 30 min after injection, followed by jun-D and jun-B, 60 and 90 min after injection, respectively. Maximal activation of jun-B marks a drop in transcription of all the jun genes. Furthermore, transcriptional activation by 17 beta-estradiol of the growth-regulated beta- and gamma-cytoskeletal actin genes is prevented by an inhibitor of protein synthesis, indicating that it is a secondary response to the hormone. These data support the hypothesis that during growth stimulation of target cells the estrogen receptor induces transcription of regulatory genes, triggering in this way a cascade of gene regulation events that results in progression through the cell cycle. PMID:1373300

  20. Assessment of anaerobic toluene biodegradation activity by bssA transcript/gene ratios.

    PubMed

    Brow, Christina N; O'Brien Johnson, Reid; Johnson, Richard L; Simon, Holly M

    2013-09-01

    Benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) genes associated with toluene degradation were profiled across a groundwater contaminant plume under nitrate-reducing conditions and were detected in significant numbers throughout the plume. However, differences between groundwater and core sediment samples suggested that microbial transport, rather than local activity, was the underlying cause of the high copy numbers within the downgradient plume. Both gene transcript and reactant concentrations were consistent with this hypothesis. Expression of bssA genes from denitrifying toluene degraders was induced by toluene but only in the presence of nitrate, and transcript abundance dropped rapidly following the removal of either toluene or nitrate. The drop in bssA transcripts following the removal of toluene could be described by an exponential decay function with a half-life on the order of 1 h. Interestingly, bssA transcripts never disappeared completely but were always detected at some level if either inducer was present. Therefore, the detection of transcripts alone may not be sufficient evidence for contaminant degradation. To avoid mistakenly associating basal-level gene expression with actively degrading microbial populations, an integrated approach using the ratio of functional gene transcripts to gene copies is recommended. This approach minimizes the impact of microbial transport on activity assessment and allows reliable assessments of microbial activity to be obtained from water samples. PMID:23811506

  1. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  2. Sucrose Represses the Developmentally Controlled Transient Activation of the Plastocyanin Gene in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Dijkwel, P. P.; Kock, PAM.; Bezemer, R.; Weisbeek, P. J.; Smeekens, SCM.

    1996-01-01

    The plastocyanin (PC) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is activated independently of light during early seedling development. In etiolated seedlings, PC mRNA levels increase transiently and a maximum dark level is reached after 2 d of growth in darkness. In etiolated transgenic seedlings carrying a chimeric PC-promoter: luciferase fusion gene, luciferase activity is similarly increased after 2 d of growth. The transient increase in PC mRNA and luciferase activity levels can be repressed by sucrose. Nonmetabolizable sugars and polyethylene glycol do not have a major effect on PC gene expression. Also, light-grown seedlings show a similar transient and sucrose-sensitive increase in PC mRNA levels and luciferase activity, as in dark-grown seedlings, but here expression levels are 15- fold higher. These findings suggest the presence of a sucrose-sensitive, developmentally controlled expression mechanism that operates independently of light. PMID:12226197

  3. Influence of redox-active compounds and PXR-activators on human MRP1 and MRP2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Hans Martin; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Zöller, Heike; Benz, Anke; Vorderstemann, Birgit; Webster, Jeanette I; Schrenk, Dieter

    2002-02-28

    In the present study, we investigated the inducibility of the drug conjugate transporter genes MRP1 and MRP2 by redox-active compounds such as tertiary butylated hydroquinone (tBHQ) and quercetin and by chemicals known to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR) such as rifampicin and clotrimazol and by the metalloid compound arsenite. The human MRP2 gene was found to be inducible in HepG2 cells by rifampicin, clotrimazol, arsenite and tBHQ. As MRP1 expression is extremely low in HepG2 cells, its inducibility was studied in MCF-7 cells. However, only tBHQ and quercetin acted as inducers, but not the other compounds investigated. Reporter gene assays demonstrated that proximal promoter regions of the genes contribute to the induction by tBHQ, quercetin (MRP1) and clotrimazol (MRP2). However, the deletion of binding sites supposed to mediate the induction process (a PXR-binding element-like sequence for the clotrimazol effect and an ARE (antioxidative response element) for the tBHQ/quercetin effect) did not result in a significant decrease in the induction factor indicating that other parts of the promoter are probably involved in the induction process. In summary, expression of both genes can be up-regulated by redox-active compounds, while the other compounds tested induced only MRP2 but not MRP1 expression. PMID:11836020

  4. Cloning and biochemical characterization of a novel lipolytic gene from activated sludge metagenome, and its gene product

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a putative esterase, designated EstMY, was isolated from an activated sludge metagenomic library. The lipolytic gene was subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 using the pET expression system. The gene estMY contained a 1,083 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 360 amino acids with a molecular mass of 38 kDa. Sequence analysis indicated that it showed 71% and 52% amino acid identity to esterase/lipase from marine metagenome (ACL67845) and Burkholderia ubonensis Bu (ZP_02382719), respectively; and several conserved regions were identified, including the putative active site, GDSAG, a catalytic triad (Ser203, Asp301, and His327) and a HGGG conserved motif (starting from His133). The EstMY was determined to hydrolyse p-nitrophenyl (NP) esters of fatty acids with short chain lengths (≤C8). This EstMY exhibited the highest activity at 35°C and pH 8.5 respectively, by hydrolysis of p-NP caprylate. It also exhibited the same level of activity over wide temperature and pH spectra and in the presence of metal ions or detergents. The high level of stability of esterase EstMY with unique substrate specificities makes it highly valuable for downstream biotechnological applications. PMID:21054894

  5. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Thomas, Russell S.; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Corton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher’s algorithm (p-value ≤ 10-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  6. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium.

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Thomas, Russell S; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D; Corton, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher's algorithm (p-value ≤ 10(-4))) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  7. Redox-activated expression of the cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase gene in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Hérouart, D; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1993-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs; superoxide: superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) play a key role in protection against oxygen radicals, and SOD gene expression is highly induced during environmental stress. To determine the conditions of SOD induction, the promoter of the cytosolic copper/zinc SOD (Cu/ZnSODcyt) gene was isolated in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Oxidative stress is likely to alter the cellular redox in favor of the oxidized status. Surprisingly, the expression of the Cu/ZnSODcyt gene is induced by sulfhydryl antioxidants such as reduced glutathione, cysteine, and dithiothreitol, whereas the oxidized forms of glutathione and cysteine have no effect. It is therefore possible that reduced glutathione directly acts as an antioxidant and simultaneously activates the Cu/ZnSODcyt gene during oxidative stress. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8464930

  8. Transcriptional activation of the human cytotoxic serine protease gene CSP-B in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R D; Ley, T J

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxic serine protease B (CSP-B) gene is activated during cytotoxic T-lymphocyte maturation. In this report, we demonstrate that the PEER T-cell line (bearing gamma/delta T-cell receptors) accumulates CSP-B mRNA following exposure to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and N6-2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (bt2cAMP) because of transcriptional activation of the CSP-B gene. TPA and bt2cAMP act synergistically to induce CSP-B expression, since neither agent alone causes activation of CSP-B transcription or mRNA accumulation. Chromatin upstream from the CSP-B gene is resistant to DNase I digestion in untreated PEER cells, but becomes sensitive following TPA-bt2cAMP treatment. Upon activation of PEER cells, a DNase I-hypersensitive site forms upstream from the CSP-B gene within a region that is highly conserved in the mouse. Transient transfection of CSP-B promoter constructs identified two regulatory regions in the CSP-B 5'-flanking sequence, located at positions -609 to -202 and positions -202 to -80. The region from -615 to -63 is sufficient to activate a heterologous promoter in activated PEER cells, but activation is orientation specific, suggesting that this region behaves as an upstream promoter element rather than a classical enhancer. Consensus AP-1, AP-2, and cAMP response elements are found upstream from the CSP-B gene (as are several T-cell-specific consensus elements), but the roles of these elements in CSP-B gene activation have yet to be determined. Images PMID:2233710

  9. Genome-wide analysis of antiviral signature genes in porcine macrophages at different activation statuses.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yongming; Brichalli, Wyatt; Rowland, Raymond R R; Blecha, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages (MФs) can be polarized to various activation statuses, including classical (M1), alternative (M2), and antiviral states. To study the antiviral activation status of porcine MФs during porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection, we used RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) for transcriptomic analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Sequencing assessment and quality evaluation showed that our RNA-Seq data met the criteria for genome-wide transcriptomic analysis. Comparisons of any two activation statuses revealed more than 20,000 DEGs that were normalized to filter out 153-5,303 significant DEGs [false discovery rate (FDR) ≤0.001, fold change ≥2] in each comparison. The highest 5,303 significant DEGs were found between lipopolysaccharide- (LPS) and interferon (IFN)γ-stimulated M1 cells, whereas only 153 significant DEGs were detected between interleukin (IL)-10-polarized M2 cells and control mock-activated cells. To identify signature genes for antiviral regulation pertaining to each activation status, we identified a set of DEGs that showed significant up-regulation in only one activation state. In addition, pathway analyses defined the top 20-50 significantly regulated pathways at each activation status, and we further analyzed DEGs pertinent to pathways mediated by AMP kinase (AMPK) and epigenetic mechanisms. For the first time in porcine macrophages, our transcriptomic analyses not only compared family-wide differential expression of most known immune genes at different activation statuses, but also revealed transcription evidence of multiple gene families. These findings show that using RNA-Seq transcriptomic analyses in virus-infected and status-synchronized macrophages effectively profiled signature genes and gene response pathways for antiviral regulation, which may provide a framework for optimizing antiviral immunity and immune homeostasis. PMID:24505295

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of Antiviral Signature Genes in Porcine Macrophages at Different Activation Statuses

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Brichalli, Wyatt; Rowland, Raymond R. R.; Blecha, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages (MФs) can be polarized to various activation statuses, including classical (M1), alternative (M2), and antiviral states. To study the antiviral activation status of porcine MФs during porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection, we used RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) for transcriptomic analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Sequencing assessment and quality evaluation showed that our RNA-Seq data met the criteria for genome-wide transcriptomic analysis. Comparisons of any two activation statuses revealed more than 20,000 DEGs that were normalized to filter out 153–5,303 significant DEGs [false discovery rate (FDR) ≤0.001, fold change ≥2] in each comparison. The highest 5,303 significant DEGs were found between lipopolysaccharide- (LPS) and interferon (IFN)γ-stimulated M1 cells, whereas only 153 significant DEGs were detected between interleukin (IL)-10-polarized M2 cells and control mock-activated cells. To identify signature genes for antiviral regulation pertaining to each activation status, we identified a set of DEGs that showed significant up-regulation in only one activation state. In addition, pathway analyses defined the top 20–50 significantly regulated pathways at each activation status, and we further analyzed DEGs pertinent to pathways mediated by AMP kinase (AMPK) and epigenetic mechanisms. For the first time in porcine macrophages, our transcriptomic analyses not only compared family-wide differential expression of most known immune genes at different activation statuses, but also revealed transcription evidence of multiple gene families. These findings show that using RNA-Seq transcriptomic analyses in virus-infected and status-synchronized macrophages effectively profiled signature genes and gene response pathways for antiviral regulation, which may provide a framework for optimizing antiviral immunity and immune homeostasis. PMID:24505295

  11. Targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor enhances gene transfer to human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Drapkin, Paola T.; O’Riordan, Catherine R.; Yi, Su Min; Chiorini, John A.; Cardella, Jonathan; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has been hindered by limited binding and endocytosis of vectors by human airway epithelia. Here we show that the apical membrane of airway epithelia express the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), or a 7-residue peptide derived from this protein (u7-peptide), bound the receptor and stimulated apical endocytosis. Both ligands enhanced gene transfer by nonspecifically bound adenovirus and adeno-associated virus vectors and by a modified adenovirus vector that had been coupled to the u7-peptide. These data provide the first evidence that targeting an apical receptor can circumvent the two most important barriers to gene transfer in airway epithelia. Thus, the uPA/uPAR system may offer significant advantages for delivering genes and other pharmaceuticals to airway epithelia. PMID:10712430

  12. Targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor enhances gene transfer to human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Drapkin, P T; O'Riordan, C R; Yi, S M; Chiorini, J A; Cardella, J; Zabner, J; Welsh, M J

    2000-03-01

    Developing gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has been hindered by limited binding and endocytosis of vectors by human airway epithelia. Here we show that the apical membrane of airway epithelia express the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), or a 7-residue peptide derived from this protein (u7-peptide), bound the receptor and stimulated apical endocytosis. Both ligands enhanced gene transfer by nonspecifically bound adenovirus and adeno-associated virus vectors and by a modified adenovirus vector that had been coupled to the u7-peptide. These data provide the first evidence that targeting an apical receptor can circumvent the two most important barriers to gene transfer in airway epithelia. Thus, the uPA/uPAR system may offer significant advantages for delivering genes and other pharmaceuticals to airway epithelia. PMID:10712430

  13. Transcriptional activation by heterodimers of the achaete-scute and daughterless gene products of Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, C V; Alonso, M C

    1991-01-01

    The achaete-scute complex (AS-C) and the daughterless (da) genes encode helix-loop-helix proteins which have been shown to interact in vivo and to be required for neurogenesis. We show in vitro that heterodimers of three AS-C products with DA bind DNA strongly, whereas DA homodimers bind weakly and homo or heterocombinations of AS-C products not at all. Proteins unable to dimerize did not bind DNA. Target sequences for the heterodimers were found in the promoters of the hunchback and the achaete genes. Using sequences of the former we show that the DNA binding results obtained in vitro fully correlate with the ability of different combinations to activate the expression of a reporter gene in yeast. Embryos deficient for the lethal of scute gene fail to activate hunchback in some neural lineages in a pattern consistent with the lack of a member of a multigene family. Images PMID:1915272

  14. Actin-dependent intranuclear repositioning of an active gene locus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dundr, Miroslav; Ospina, Jason K.; Sung, Myong-Hee; John, Sam; Upender, Madhvi; Ried, Thomas; Hager, Gordon L.; Matera, A. Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Although bulk chromatin is thought to have limited mobility within the interphase eukaryotic nucleus, directed long-distance chromosome movements are not unknown. Cajal bodies (CBs) are nuclear suborganelles that nonrandomly associate with small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and histone gene loci in human cells during interphase. However, the mechanism responsible for this association is uncertain. In this study, we present an experimental system to probe the dynamic interplay of CBs with a U2 snRNA target gene locus during transcriptional activation in living cells. Simultaneous four-dimensional tracking of CBs and U2 genes reveals that target loci are recruited toward relatively stably positioned CBs by long-range chromosomal motion. In the presence of a dominant-negative mutant of β-actin, the repositioning of activated U2 genes is markedly inhibited. This supports a model in which nuclear actin is required for these rapid, long-range chromosomal movements. PMID:18070915

  15. Genome Annotation of Burkholderia sp. SJ98 with Special Focus on Chemotaxis Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shailesh; Vikram, Surendra; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 has the chemotactic activity towards nitroaromatic and chloronitroaromatic compounds. Recently our group published draft genome of strain SJ98. In this study, we further sequence and annotate the genome of stain SJ98 to exploit the potential of this bacterium. We specifically annotate its chemotaxis genes and methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins. Genome of Burkholderia sp. SJ98 was annotated using PGAAP pipeline that predicts 7,268 CDSs, 52 tRNAs and 3 rRNAs. Our analysis based on phylogenetic and comparative genomics suggest that Burkholderia sp. YI23 is closest neighbor of the strain SJ98. The genes involved in the chemotaxis of strain SJ98 were compared with genes of closely related Burkholderia strains (i.e. YI23, CCGE 1001, CCGE 1002, CCGE 1003) and with well characterized bacterium E. coli K12. It was found that strain SJ98 has 37 che genes including 19 methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins that involved in sensing of different attractants. Chemotaxis genes have been found in a cluster along with the flagellar motor proteins. We also developed a web resource that provides comprehensive information on strain SJ98 that includes all analysis data (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/genomesrs/burkholderia/). PMID:23940608

  16. Identification of Legionella pneumophila Genes Important for Infection of Amoebas by Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Polesky, Andrea H.; Ross, Julianna T. D.; Falkow, Stanley; Tompkins, Lucy S.

    2001-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular gram-negative rod that causes pneumonia in humans. Free-living amoebas are thought to serve as a reservoir for Legionella infections. Signature-tagged mutagenesis was employed to identify Legionella pneumophila genes necessary for survival in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. Six mutant strains were defective in assays of invasion and intracellular growth. Four mutants also exhibited invasion and replication defects in Hartmannella vermiformis, an amoeba linked to hospital outbreaks of Legionella pneumonia. The six mutants also were tested in macrophages derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Two mutants had intracellular replication defects, and two different strains entered cells less efficiently. Two transposon insertions were in known L. pneumophila genes, lspK and aroB. The other four were in novel genes. One gene has similarity to a cytochrome c-type biogenesis protein of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Another has similarity to a transcriptional activator regulating flagellar biosynthesis in Vibrio cholera. The third is similar to traA of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234, which is involved in conjugal transfer of DNA. The fourth has no homology. By using survival in amoeba as a selection, we have isolated mutant strains with a range of phenotypes; and we have potentially identified new L. pneumophila virulence genes. PMID:11159993

  17. Evolution of the Perlecan/HSPG2 Gene and Its Activation in Regenerating Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Curtis R.; Kassir, Elias; Spurlin, James; Martinez, Jerahme; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2 (HSPG2)/perlecan gene is ancient and conserved in all triploblastic species. Its presence maintains critical cell boundaries in tissue and its large (up to ~900 kDa) modular structure has prompted speculation about the evolutionary origin of the gene. The gene’s conservation amongst basal metazoans is unclear. After the recent sequencing of their genomes, the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens have become favorite models for studying tissue regeneration and the evolution of multicellularity. More ancient basal metazoan phyla include the poriferan and ctenophore, whose evolutionary relationship has been clarified recently. Our in silico and PCR-based methods indicate that the HSPG2 gene is conserved in both the placozoan and cnidarian genomes, but not in those of the ctenophores and only partly in poriferan genomes. HSPG2 also is absent from published ctenophore and Capsaspora owczarzaki genomes. The gene in T. adhaerens is encoded as two separate but genetically juxtaposed genes that house all of the constituent pieces of the mammalian HSPG2 gene in tandem. These genetic constituents are found in isolated genes of various poriferan species, indicating a possible intronic recombinatory mechanism for assembly of the HSPG2 gene. Perlecan’s expression during wound healing and boundary formation is conserved, as expression of the gene was activated during tissue regeneration and reformation of the basement membrane of N. vectensis. These data indicate that the complex HSPG2 gene evolved concurrently in a common ancestor of placozoans, cnidarians and bilaterians, likely along with the development of differentiated cell types separated by acellular matrices, and is activated to reestablish these tissue borders during wound healing. PMID:25876075

  18. The single functional blast resistance gene Pi54 activates a complex defence mechanism in rice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Rai, Amit Kumar; Kanwar, Shamsher Singh; Chand, Duni; Singh, Nagendera Kumar; Sharma, Tilak Raj

    2012-01-01

    The Pi54 gene (Pi-k(h)) confers a high degree of resistance to diverse strains of the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. In order to understand the genome-wide co-expression of genes in the transgenic rice plant Taipei 309 (TP) containing the Pi54 gene, microarray analysis was performed at 72 h post-inoculation of the M. oryzae strain PLP-1. A total of 1154 differentially expressing genes were identified in TP-Pi54 plants. Of these, 587 were up-regulated, whereas 567 genes were found to be down-regulated. 107 genes were found that were exclusively up-regulated and 58 genes that were down- regulated in the case of TP-Pi54. Various defence response genes, such as callose, laccase, PAL, and peroxidase, and genes related to transcription factors like NAC6, Dof zinc finger, MAD box, bZIP, and WRKY were found to be up-regulated in the transgenic line. The enzymatic activities of six plant defence response enzymes, such as peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, β-glucosidase, β-1,3-glucanase, and chitinase, were found to be significantly high in TP-Pi54 at different stages of inoculation by M. oryzae. The total phenol content also increased significantly in resistant transgenic plants after pathogen inoculation. This study suggests the activation of defence response and transcription factor-related genes and a higher expression of key enzymes involved in the defence response pathway in the rice line TP-Pi54, thus leading to incompatible host-pathogen interaction. PMID:22058403

  19. A flower-specific Myb protein activates transcription of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Sablowski, R W; Moyano, E; Culianez-Macia, F A; Schuch, W; Martin, C; Bevan, M

    1994-01-01

    Synthesis of flavonoid pigments in flowers requires the co-ordinated expression of genes encoding enzymes in th phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway. Some cis-elements involved in the transcriptional control of these genes have been defined. We report binding of petal-specific activities from tobacco and Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon) to an element conserved in promoters of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and implicated in expression in flowers. These binding activities were inhibited by antibodies raised against Myb305, a flower-specific Myb protein previously cloned from Antirrhinum by sequence homology. Myb305 bound to the same element and formed a DNA-protein complex with the same mobility as the Antirrhinum petal protein in electrophoretic mobility shift experiments. Myb305 activated expression from its binding site in yeast and in tobacco protoplasts. In protoplasts, activation also required a G-box-like element, suggesting co-operation with other elements and factors. The results strongly suggest a role for Myb305-related proteins in the activation of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes in flowers. This is consistent with the genetically demonstrated role of plant Myb proteins in the regulation of genes involved in flavonoid synthesis. PMID:8306956

  20. Encoding four gene expression programs in the activation dynamics of a single transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders S; O'Shea, Erin K

    2016-04-01

    Cellular signaling response pathways often exhibit a bow-tie topology [1,2]: multiple upstream stress signals converge on a single shared transcription factor, which is thought to induce different downstream gene expression programs (Figure 1A). However, if several different signals activate the same transcription factor, can each signal then induce a specific gene expression response? A growing body of literature supports a temporal coding theory where information about environmental signals can be encoded, at least partially, in the temporal dynamics of the shared transcription factor [1,2]. For example, in the case of the budding yeast transcription factor Msn2, different stresses induce distinct Msn2 activation dynamics: Msn2 shows pulsatile nuclear activation with dose-dependent frequency under glucose limitation, but sustained nuclear activation with dose-dependent amplitude under oxidative stress [3]. These dynamic patterns can then lead to differential gene expression responses [3-5], but it is not known how much specificity can be obtained. Thus, a major question of this temporal coding theory is how many gene response programs or cellular functions can be robustly encoded by dynamic control of a single transcription factor. Here we provide the first direct evidence that, simply by regulating the activation dynamics of a single transcription factor, it is possible to preferentially induce four distinct gene expression programs. PMID:27046808

  1. E proteins are required to activate germline transcription of the TCR Vbeta8.2 gene.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingquan; Dai, Meifang; Zhuang, Yuan

    2008-10-01

    Each TCR Vbeta gene is regulated by an individual Vbeta promoter, which becomes active prior to V(D) J recombination and drives germline transcription. It has been shown that Vbeta gene locus activation and recombination are dependent on the Vbeta promoter. However, transcription factors that regulate Vbeta germline transcription remain largely undefined. A major challenge in studying Vbeta gene germline transcription is the quantitative assessment of relatively low-level transcripts in T-cell progenitors. Here we used the established Vbeta8.2(CD2) knock-in mouse model to assess functions of E-protein transcription factors in Vbeta8.2 germline transcription. We show that E proteins are required for the activation but not the maintenance of the Vbeta8.2 germline transcription during thymocyte development. The activation of Vbeta8.2 germline transcription depends more on the E proteins encoded by the E2A gene than by the HEB gene. We further show that IL-7 receptor (IL-7R)-mediated signals are essential for Vbeta8.2 germline transcription. We provide evidence that IL-7R expression is only partially controlled by E2A, suggesting a role for E2A in driving Vbeta8.2 germline transcription independent of IL-7R activation. PMID:18958875

  2. Differential activation of a Candida albicans virulence gene family during infection

    PubMed Central

    Staib, Peter; Kretschmar, Marianne; Nichterlein, Thomas; Hof, Herbert; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2000-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a harmless commensal in most healthy people, but it causes superficial as well as life-threatening systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans can colonize or infect virtually all body sites because of its high adaptability to different host niches, which involves the activation of appropriate sets of genes in response to complex environmental signals. We have used an in vivo expression technology that is based on genetic recombination as a reporter of gene expression to monitor the differential activation of individual members of a gene family encoding secreted aspartic proteinases (Saps), which have been implicated in C. albicans virulence, at various stages of the infection process. Our results demonstrate that SAP expression depends on the type of infection, with different SAP isogenes being activated during systemic disease as compared with mucosal infection. In addition, the activation of individual SAP genes depends on the progress of the infection, some members of the gene family being induced immediately after contact with the host, whereas others are expressed only after dissemination into deep organs. In the latter case, the number of invading organisms determines whether induction of a virulence gene is necessary for successful infection. The in vivo expression technology allows the elucidation of gene expression patterns at different stages of the fungus–host interaction, thereby revealing regulatory adaptation mechanisms that make C. albicans the most successful fungal pathogen of humans and, at the same time, identifying the stage of an infection at which certain virulence genes may play a role. PMID:10811913

  3. The C-terminal periplasmic domain of MotB is responsible for load-dependent control of the number of stators of the bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, David J.; Nakamura, Shuichi; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Che, Yong-Suk; Kami-ike, Nobunori; Kudo, Seishi; Minamino, Tohru; Namba, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is made of a rotor and stators. In Salmonella it is thought that about a dozen MotA/B complexes are anchored to the peptidoglycan layer around the motor through the C-terminal peptidoglycan-binding domain of MotB to become active stators as well as proton channels. MotB consists of 309 residues, forming a single transmembrane helix (30–50), a stalk (51–100) and a C-terminal peptidoglycan-binding domain (101–309). Although the stalk is dispensable for torque generation by the motor, it is required for efficient motor performance. Residues 51 to 72 prevent premature proton leakage through the proton channel prior to stator assembly into the motor. However, the role of residues 72–100 remains unknown. Here, we analyzed the torque-speed relationship of the MotB(Δ72–100) motor. At a low speed near stall, this mutant motor produced torque at the wild-type level. Unlike the wild-type motor, however, torque dropped off drastically by slight decrease in external load and then showed a slow exponential decay over a wide range of load by its further reduction. Since it is known that the stator is a mechano-sensor and that the number of active stators changes in a load-dependent manner, we interpreted this unusual torque-speed relationship as anomaly in load-dependent control of the number of active stators. The results suggest that residues 72–100 of MotB is required for proper load-dependent control of the number of active stators around the rotor.

  4. Functional activation of the egr-1 (early growth response-1) gene by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Nose, K; Ohba, M

    1996-06-01

    The redox-based regulation of gene expression is one of the fundamental mechanisms of cellular functions, and hydrogen peroxide seems to act as an intracellular second messenger of signal transduction of cytokines. Hydrogen peroxide at non-toxic doses induced the accumulation of mRNA for the early growth response-1 (egr-1) gene in mouse osteoblastic cells. The Egr-1 protein is a transcription factor that binds the GCGGGGGCG sequence and contains a zinc-finger structure that is essential for DNA binding. Egr-1 protein is sensitive to oxidative stress and loses specific DNA-binding activity when exposed to high levels of oxidative stress. Incubating cells with hydrogen peroxide at about 50 microM, however, increased the accumulation of Egr-1 protein, and the Egr-1 product seemed to be functional, judging by its binding activity to the GCGGGGGCG sequence and its ability to activate the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene under the control of the human thymidine kinase enhancer containing the Egr-1 binding sequence. It was reported that the activity of Egr-1 protein as a transcription factor was negatively regulated by active oxygens. However, with appropriate concentrations of active oxygen, its capacity to bind a specific DNA sequence and to enhance the transcriptional activity of target genes is thought to be elevated. PMID:8687376

  5. SATB1 packages densely-looped, transciptionally-active chromatinfor coordinated expression of cytokine genes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Shutao; Lee, Charles C.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2006-05-23

    SATB1 is an important regulator of nuclear architecture that anchors specialized DNA sequences onto its cage-like network and recruits chromatin remodeling/modifying factors to control gene transcription. We studied the role of SATB1 in regulating the coordinated expression of Il5, Il4, and Il13 from the 200kb cytokine gene cluster region of mouse chromosome 11 during T-helper 2 (Th2)-cell activation. We show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is rapidly induced to form a unique transcriptionally-active chromatin structure that includes the cytokine gene region. Chromatin is folded into numerous small loops all anchored by SATB1, is histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9/14, and associated with Th2-specific factors, GATA3, STAT6, c-Maf, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme Brg-1, and RNA polymerase II across the 200kb region. Before activation, the chromatin displays some of these features, such as association with GATA3 and STAT6, but these were insufficient for cytokine gene expression. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is not only required for chromatin folding into dense loops, but also for c-Maf induction and subsequently for Il4, Il5, and Il13 transcription. Our results show that SATB1 is an important determinant for chromatin architecture that constitutes a novel higher-order, transcriptionally-active chromatin structure upon Th2-cell activation.

  6. Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Flagellin Genes fliC, fljB, and flpA from Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    McQuiston, J. R.; Parrenas, R.; Ortiz-Rivera, M.; Gheesling, L.; Brenner, F.; Fields, P. I.

    2004-01-01

    Salmonella isolates have traditionally been classified by serotyping, the serologic identification of two surface antigens, O-polysaccharide and flagellin protein. Serotyping has been of great value in understanding the epidemiology of Salmonella and investigating disease outbreaks; however, production and quality control of the hundreds of antisera required for serotyping is difficult and time-consuming. To circumvent the problems associated with antiserum production, we began the development of a system for determination of serotype in Salmonella based on DNA markers. To identify flagellar antigen-specific sequences, we sequenced 280 alleles of the three genes that are known to encode flagellin in Salmonella, fliC, fljB, and flpA, representing 67 flagellar antigen types. Analysis of the data indicated that the sequences from fliC, fljB, and flpA clustered by the antigen(s) they encode not by locus. The sequences grouped into four clusters based on their conserved regions. Three of the four clusters included multiple flagellar antigen types and were designated the G complex, the Z4 complex, and the α cluster. The fourth cluster contained a single antigen type, H:z29. The amino acid sequences of the conserved regions within each cluster have greater than 95% amino acid identity, whereas the conserved regions differ substantially between clusters (75 to 85% identity). Substantial sequence heterogeneity existed between alleles encoding different flagellar antigens while alleles encoding the same flagellar antigen were homologous, suggesting that flagellin genes may be useful targets for the molecular determination of flagellar antigen type. PMID:15131150

  7. Genome-wide distribution of Auts2 binding localizes with active neurodevelopmental genes

    PubMed Central

    Oksenberg, N; Haliburton, G D E; Eckalbar, W L; Oren, I; Nishizaki, S; Murphy, K; Pollard, K S; Birnbaum, R Y; Ahituv, N

    2014-01-01

    The autism susceptibility candidate 2 gene (AUTS2) has been associated with multiple neurological diseases including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Previous studies showed that AUTS2 has an important neurodevelopmental function and is a suspected master regulator of genes implicated in ASD-related pathways. However, the regulatory role and targets of Auts2 are not well known. Here, by using ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing) and RNA-seq on mouse embryonic day 16.5 forebrains, we elucidated the gene regulatory networks of Auts2. We find that the majority of promoters bound by Auts2 belong to genes highly expressed in the developing forebrain, suggesting that Auts2 is involved in transcriptional activation. Auts2 non-promoter-bound regions significantly overlap developing brain-associated enhancer marks and are located near genes involved in neurodevelopment. Auts2-marked sequences are enriched for binding site motifs of neurodevelopmental transcription factors, including Pitx3 and TCF3. In addition, we characterized two functional brain enhancers marked by Auts2 near NRXN1 and ATP2B2, both ASD-implicated genes. Our results implicate Auts2 as an active regulator of important neurodevelopmental genes and pathways and identify novel genomic regions that could be associated with ASD and other neurodevelopmental diseases. PMID:25180570

  8. Identification of activity-dependent gene expression profiles reveals specific subsets of genes induced by different routes of Ca(2+) entry in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guangxin; Pan, Liangbin; Xing, Wanli; Zhang, Liang; Huang, Lihua; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Jianping; Cheng, Jing; Zhou, Yuxiang

    2007-07-01

    Neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription is a key feature of long-lasting synaptic strengthening associated with learning and memory, as well as activity-dependent neuroprotection. To comprehensively determine the molecular alterations, we carried out genome-wide microarray analysis in cultured rat cortical neurons treated with specific pharmacological agents, a model with alterations in neuronal activity, which were monitored by multi-site electrophysiological recordings. Of the approximately 27,000 genes, the expression of 248 genes was strongly changed in response to enhanced activity. These genes encompass a large number of members of distinct families, including synaptic vesicle proteins, ion channels, signal transduction molecules, synaptic growth regulators, and others. Two subsets of these genes were further confirmed to be specifically induced by Ca(2+) influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). In addition, those genes dynamically regulated by the enhanced activity were also elucidated, as well as those candidate genes associated with synaptic plasticity and neuroprotection. Our findings therefore would help define the molecular mechanisms that occur in response to neuronal activity and identify specific clusters of genes that contribute to activity-dependent and Ca(2+)-inducible modulation of brain development and function. PMID:17443680

  9. TAP1, a yeast gene that activates the expression of a tRNA gene with a defective internal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Di Segni, G; McConaughy, B L; Shapiro, R A; Aldrich, T L; Hall, B D

    1993-01-01

    We developed a genetic selection system based on nonsense suppression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify mutations in proteins involved in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase III. A SUP4 tRNA(Tyr) internal promoter mutation (A53T61) that was unable to suppress ochre mutations in vivo and was incapable of binding TFIIIC in vitro was used as the target for selection of trans-acting compensatory mutations. We identified two such mutations in the same gene, which we named TAP1 (for transcription activation protein). The level of the SUP4A53T61 transcript was threefold higher in the tap1-1 mutant than in the wild type. The tap1-1 mutant strain was also temperature sensitive for growth. The thermosensitive character cosegregated with the restorer of suppression activity, as shown by meiotic linkage analysis and coreversion of the two traits. At 1 to 2 h after a shift to the restrictive temperature, RNA synthesis was strongly inhibited in the tap1-1 mutant, preceding any effect upon protein synthesis or growth. A marked decrease in tRNA and 5S rRNA synthesis was seen, and shortly after that, rRNA synthesis was inhibited. By complementation of the ts- growth defect, we cloned the wild-type TAP1 gene. It is essential for yeast growth. We show in the accompanying report (T. L. Aldrich, G. Di Segni, B. L. McConaughy, N. J. Keen, S. Whelen, and B. D. Hall, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:3434-3444, 1993) that TAP1 is identical to RAT1, a yeast gene implicated in poly(A)+ RNA export and that the TAP1/RAT1 gene product has extensive sequence similarity to the protein encoded by another yeast gene (variously named DST2, KEM1, RAR5, SEP1, or XRN1) having exonuclease and DNA strand transfer activity (reviewed by Kearsey and Kipling [Trends Cell Biol. 1:110-112, 1991]). Images PMID:8497259

  10. Characterization of gene expression and activated signaling pathways in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Park, Minhee; Kim, Minhyung; Hwang, Daehee; Park, Misun; Kim, Won Kyu; Kim, Sang Kyum; Shin, Jihye; Park, Eun Sung; Kang, Chang Moo; Paik, Young-Ki; Kim, Hoguen

    2014-04-01

    Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm is an uncommon pancreatic tumor with distinct clinicopathologic features. Solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms are characterized by mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1. However, little is known about the gene and microRNA expression profiles of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. Thus, we sought to characterize solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm-specific gene expression and identify the signaling pathways activated in these tumors. Comparisons of gene expression in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm to pancreatic ductal carcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, and non-neoplastic pancreatic tissues identified solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm-specific mRNA and microRNA profiles. By analyzing 1686 (1119 upregulated and 567 downregulated) genes differentially expressed in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm, we found that the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, and androgen receptor signaling pathways, as well as genes involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition, are activated in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. We validated these results experimentally by assessing the expression of β-catenin, WIF-1, GLI2, androgen receptor, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related markers with western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our analysis also revealed 17 microRNAs, especially the miR-200 family and miR-192/215, closely associated with the upregulated genes associated with the three pathways activated in solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm and epithelial mesenchymal transition. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm tumorigenesis and its characteristic less epithelial cell differentiation than the other common pancreatic tumors. PMID:24072181

  11. Genes of phenylpropanoid pathway are activated in early response to Fusarium attack in flax plants.

    PubMed

    Kostyn, Kamil; Czemplik, Magdalena; Kulma, Anna; Bortniczuk, Małgorzata; Skała, Jacek; Szopa, Jan

    2012-07-01

    Fusarium is the most common flax pathogen causing serious plant diseases and in most cases leading to plant death. To protect itself, the plant activates a number of genes and metabolic pathways, both to counteract the effects of the pathogen, and to eliminate the threat. The identification of the plant genes which respond to infection is the approach, that has been used in this study. Forty-seven flax genes have been identified by means of cDNA subtraction method as those, which respond to pathogen infection. Subtracted genes were classified into several classes and the prevalence of the genes involved in the broad spectrum of antioxidants biosynthesis has been noticed. By means of semi-quantitative RT-PCR and metabolite profiling, the involvement of subtracted genes controlling phenylpropanoid pathway in flax upon infection was positively verified. We identified the key genes of the synthesis of these compounds. At the same time we determined the level of the metabolites produced in the phenylpropanoid pathway (flavonoids, phenolic acids) in early response to Fusarium attack by means of GC-MS technique. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report to describe genes and metabolites of early flax response to pathogens studied in a comprehensive way. PMID:22608524

  12. Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories

    PubMed Central

    Mahy, Nicola L.; Perry, Paul E.; Gilchrist, Susan; Baldock, Richard A.; Bickmore, Wendy A.

    2002-01-01

    The position of genes within the nucleus has been correlated with their transcriptional activity. The interchromosome domain model of nuclear organization suggests that genes preferentially locate at the surface of chromosome territories. Conversely, high resolution analysis of chromatin fibers suggests that chromosome territories do not present accessibility barriers to transcription machinery. To clarify the relationship between the organization of chromosome territories and gene expression, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to analyze the spatial organization of a contiguous ∼1 Mb stretch of the Wilms' tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, mental retardation syndrome region of the human genome and the syntenic region in the mouse. These regions contain constitutively expressed genes, genes with tissue-restricted patterns of expression, and substantial regions of intergenic DNA. We find that there is a spatial organization within territories that is conserved between mouse and humans: certain sequences do preferentially locate at the periphery of the chromosome territories in both species. However, we do not detect genes necessarily at the periphery of chromosome territories or at the surface of subchromosomal domains. Intraterritory organization is not different among cell types that express different combinations of the genes under study. Our data demonstrate that transcription of both ubiquitous and tissue-restricted genes is not confined to the periphery of chromosome territories, suggesting that the basal transcription machinery and transcription factors can readily gain access to the chromosome interior. PMID:11994314

  13. Absence of missense mutations in activated c-myc genes in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Hayward, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    The authors determined the nucleotide sequences of two independent DNA clones which contained the activated c-myc genes from avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas. Neither of these c-myce genes contained missense mutations. This strongly supports the notion that the c-myc photo-oncogene in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas can be oncogenically activated by altered expression of the gene without a change in the primary structure of the gene product.

  14. Role of the Ada adaptor complex in gene activation by the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, A; Almlöf, T; Ford, J; McEwan, I J; Gustafsson, J A; Wright, A P

    1997-01-01

    We have shown that the Ada adaptor complex is important for the gene activation capacity of the glucocorticoid receptor in yeast. The recently isolated human Ada2 protein also increases the potency of the receptor protein in mammalian cells. The Ada pathway is of key significance for the tau1 core transactivation domain (tau1c) of the receptor, which requires Ada for activity in vivo and in vitro. Ada2 can be precipitated from nuclear extracts by a glutathione S-transferase-tau1 fusion protein coupled to agarose beads, and a direct interaction between Ada2 and tau1c can be shown by using purified proteins. This interaction is strongly reduced by a mutation in tau1c that reduces transactivation activity. Mutations affecting the Ada complex do not reverse transcriptional squelching by the tau1 domain, as they do for the VP16 transactivation domain, and thus these powerful acidic activators differ in at least some important aspects of gene activation. Mutations that reduce the activity of the tau1c domain in wild-type yeast strains cause similar reductions in ada mutants that contain little or no Ada activity. Thus, gene activation mechanisms, in addition to the Ada pathway, are involved in the activity of the tau1c domain. PMID:9154805

  15. Genetic Evidence for Transcriptional Activation by the Yeast Ime1 Gene Product

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H. E.; Driscoll, S. E.; Sia, RAL.; Yuan, H. E.; Mitchell, A. P.

    1993-01-01

    IME1 is required in yeast for meiosis and for expression of IME2 and other early meiotic genes. IME1 is a 360-amino acid polypeptide with central and C-terminal tyrosine-rich regions. We report here that a fusion protein composed of the lexA DNA-binding domain and IME1 activates transcription in vivo of a reporter gene containing upstream lexA binding sites. Activation by the fusion protein shares several features with natural IME1 activity: both are dependent on the RIM11 gene product; both are impaired by the same ime1 missense mutations; both are restored by intragenic suppressors. The central tyrosine-rich region is sufficient to activate transcription when fused to lexA. Deletion of this putative activation domain results in a defective IME1 derivative. Function of the deletion derivative is restored by fusion to the acidic Herpesvirus VP16 activation domain. The C-terminal tyrosine-rich region is dispensable for transcriptional activation; rather it renders activation dependent upon starvation and RIM11. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that an IME1-lacZ fusion protein is concentrated in the nucleus. These observations are consistent with a model in which IME1 normally stimulates IME2 expression by providing a transcriptional activation domain at the IME2 5' regulatory region. PMID:8462841

  16. The chromatin remodelling factor Brg-1 interacts with β-catenin to promote target gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Nick; Hurlstone, Adam; Musisi, Hannah; Miles, Antony; Bienz, Mariann; Clevers, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Wnt-induced formation of nuclear Tcf–β-catenin complexes promotes transcriptional activation of target genes involved in cell fate decisions. Inappropriate expression of Tcf target genes resulting from mutational activation of this pathway is also implicated in tumorigenesis. The C-terminus of β-catenin is indispensable for the transactivation function, which probably reflects the presence of binding sites for essential transcriptional coactivators such as p300/CBP. However, the precise mechanism of transactivation remains unclear. Here we demonstrate an interaction between β-catenin and Brg-1, a component of mammalian SWI/SNF and Rsc chromatin-remodelling complexes. A functional consequence of reintroduction of Brg-1 into Brg-1-deficient cells is enhanced activity of a Tcf-responsive reporter gene. Consistent with this, stable expression of inactive forms of Brg-1 in colon carcinoma cell lines specifically inhibits expression of endogenous Tcf target genes. In addition, we observe genetic interactions between the Brg-1 and β-catenin homologues in flies. We conclude that β-catenin recruits Brg-1 to Tcf target gene promoters, facilitating chromatin remodelling as a prerequisite for transcriptional activation. PMID:11532957

  17. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-03-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses.

  18. Methylation of the mouse hprt gene differs on the active and inactive X chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, L F; Melton, D W; Caskey, C T; Martin, G R

    1986-01-01

    It has been proposed that DNA methylation is involved in the mechanism of X inactivation, the process by which equivalence of levels of X-linked gene products is achieved in female (XX) and male (XY) mammals. In this study, Southern blots of female and male DNA digested with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases and hybridized to various portions of the cloned mouse hprt gene were compared, and sites within the mouse hprt gene were identified that are differentially methylated in female and male cells. The extent to which these sites are methylated when carried on the active and inactive X chromosomes was directly determined in a similar analysis of DNA from clonal cell lines established from a female embryo derived from a mating of two species of mouse, Mus musculus and Mus caroli. The results revealed two regions of differential methylation in the mouse hprt gene. One region, in the first intron of the gene, includes four sites that are completely unmethylated when carried on the active X and extensively methylated when carried on the inactive X. These same sites are extensively demethylated in hprt genes reactivated either spontaneously or after 5-azacytidine treatment. The second region includes several sites in the 3' 20kilobases of the gene extending from exon 3 to exon 9 that show the converse pattern; i.e., they are completely methylated when carried on the active X and completely unmethylated when carried on the inactive X. At least one of these sites does not become methylated after reactivation of the gene. The results of this study, together with the results of previous studies by others of the human hprt gene, indicate that these regions of differential methylation on the active and inactive X are conserved between mammalian species. Furthermore, the data described here are consistent with the idea that at least the sites in the 5' region of the gene play a role in the X inactivation phenomenon and regulation of expression of the mouse hprt

  19. Mediator Kinase Inhibition Further Activates Super-Enhancer Associated Genes in AML

    PubMed Central

    Nitulescu, Ioana I.; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C.; Da Silva, Diogo H.; Caruso, Brittany T.; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L.; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V.; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Myers, Andrew G.; Kohl, Nancy E.; Kung, Andrew L.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Shair, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors (TFs), and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling TFs and oncogenes 1, 2. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription3,4,5. In contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we report that Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We determined that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibited Mediator kinases, had antileukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induced upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the TFs CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 6, 7, 8. The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has antileukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing expression of these TFs suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  20. Mediator kinase inhibition further activates super-enhancer-associated genes in AML.

    PubMed

    Pelish, Henry E; Liau, Brian B; Nitulescu, Ioana I; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C; Da Silva, Diogo H; Caruso, Brittany T; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C; Bronson, Roderick T; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Myers, Andrew G; Kohl, Nancy E; Kung, Andrew L; Armstrong, Scott A; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Taatjes, Dylan J; Shair, Matthew D

    2015-10-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling transcription factors and oncogenes. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription. By contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we show that the Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We report that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibits Mediator kinases, has anti-leukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induces upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the transcription factors CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 (refs 6-8). The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has anti-leukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing the expression of these transcription factors suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to the dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types, and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  1. A Homeodomain Transcription Factor Gene, PfMSX, Activates Expression of Pif Gene in the Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mi; He, Maoxian; Huang, Xiande; Wang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    We reported pearl oyster Pinctada fucata cDNA and genomic characterization of a new homeobox-containing protein, PfMSX. The PfMSX gene encodes a transcription factor that was localized to the nucleus. Analyses of PfMSX mRNA in tissues and developmental stages showed high expressions in mantle or D-shaped larvae. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) PfMSX binded to MSX consensus binding sites in the 5′ flanking region of the Pif promoter. In co-transfection experiment PfMSX transactivated reporter constructs containing Pif promoter sequences, and mutation of the MSX-binding sites attenuated transactivation. A knockdown experiment using PfMSX dsRNA showed decreased Pif mRNA and unregular crystallization of the nacreous layer using scanning electron microscopy. Our results suggested that PfMSX was a conserved homeodomain transcription factor gene, which can activate Pif gene expression through MSX binding site, and was then involved in the mineralization process in pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Our data provided important clues about mechanisms regulating biomineralization in pearl oyster. PMID:25099698

  2. GATA2 Mediates Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone-Induced Transcriptional Activation of the Thyrotropin β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Kenji; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Shingo; Ishizuka, Keiko; Misawa, Hiroko; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2011-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) activates not only the secretion of thyrotropin (TSH) but also the transcription of TSHβ and α-glycoprotein (αGSU) subunit genes. TSHβ expression is maintained by two transcription factors, Pit1 and GATA2, and is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone (T3). Our prior studies suggest that the main activator of the TSHβ gene is GATA2, not Pit1 or unliganded T3 receptor (TR). In previous studies on the mechanism of TRH-induced activation of the TSHβ gene, the involvements of Pit1 and TR have been investigated, but the role of GATA2 has not been clarified. Using kidney-derived CV1 cells and pituitary-derived GH3 and TαT1 cells, we demonstrate here that TRH signaling enhances GATA2-dependent activation of the TSHβ promoter and that TRH-induced activity is abolished by amino acid substitution in the GATA2-Zn finger domain or mutation of GATA-responsive element in the TSHβ gene. In CV1 cells transfected with TRH receptor expression plasmid, GATA2-dependent transactivation of αGSU and endothelin-1 promoters was enhanced by TRH. In the gel shift assay, TRH signal potentiated the DNA-binding capacity of GATA2. While inhibition by T3 is dominant over TRH-induced activation, unliganded TR or the putative negative T3-responsive element are not required for TRH-induced stimulation. Studies using GH3 cells showed that TRH-induced activity of the TSHβ promoter depends on protein kinase C but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase, suggesting that the signaling pathway is different from that in the prolactin gene. These results indicate that GATA2 is the principal mediator of the TRH signaling pathway in TSHβ expression. PMID:21533184

  3. Analysis of the cytoplasmic domains of Salmonella FlhA and interactions with components of the flagellar export machinery.

    PubMed

    McMurry, Jonathan L; Van Arnam, John S; Kihara, May; Macnab, Robert M

    2004-11-01

    Most flagellar proteins are exported via a type III export apparatus which, in part, consists of the membrane proteins FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ, and FliR and is housed within the membrane-supramembrane ring formed by FliF subunits. Salmonella FlhA is a 692-residue integral membrane protein with eight predicted transmembrane spans. Its function is not understood, but it is necessary for flagellar export. We have created mutants in which potentially important sequences were deleted. FlhA lacking the amino-terminal sequence prior to the first transmembrane span failed to complement and was dominant negative, suggesting that the sequence is required for function. Similar effects were seen in a variant lacking a highly conserved domain (FHIPEP) within a putative cytoplasmic loop. Scanning deletion analysis of the cytoplasmic domain (FlhAc) demonstrated that substantially all of FlhAc is required for efficient function. Affinity blotting showed that FlhA interacts with several other export apparatus membrane proteins. The implications of these findings are discussed, and a model of FlhA within the export apparatus is presented. PMID:15516571

  4. Depletion of plasma membrane PtdIns(4,5)P2 reveals essential roles for phosphoinositides in flagellar biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ho-Chun; Rollins, Janet; Fabian, Lacramioara; Hayes, Madeline; Polevoy, Gordon; Bazinet, Christopher; Brill, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Axonemes are microtubule-based organelles of crucial importance in the structure and function of eukaryotic cilia and flagella. Despite great progress in understanding how axonemes are assembled, the signals that initiate axoneme outgrowth remain unknown. Here, we identified phosphatidylinositol phosphates (phosphoinositides) as key regulators of early stages of axoneme outgrowth in Drosophila melanogaster spermatogenesis. In a study of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] function in developing Drosophila male germ cells, we depleted PtdIns(4,5)P2 by expression of a potent phosphoinositide phosphatase. Phosphatase expression dramatically inhibited sperm tail formation and perturbed microtubule organization in a manner reversible by co-expression of a PtdIns 4-phosphate 5-kinase. Depletion of PtdIns(4,5)P2 caused increased levels of basal body γ-tubulin and altered the distribution of proteins known to be required for axoneme assembly. Examination of PtdIns(4,5)P2-depleted spermatids by transmission electron microscopy revealed defects in basal body docking to the nuclear envelope, and in axoneme architecture and integrity of the developing flagellar axoneme and axial sheath. Our results provide the first evidence that phosphoinositides act at several steps during flagellar biogenesis, coordinately regulating microtubule and membrane organization. They further suggest that phosphoinositides play evolutionarily conserved roles in flagella and cilia, across phyla and in structurally diverse cell types. PMID:18334551

  5. Intracellular Na+ kinetically interferes with the rotation of the Na(+)-driven flagellar motors of Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Sugiyama, S; Hojo, Y; Tokuda, H; Imae, Y

    1990-11-25

    To understand the mechanism of Na+ movement through the force-generating units of the Na(+)-driven flagellar motors of Vibrio alginolyticus, the effect of intracellular Na+ concentration on motor rotation was investigated. Control cells containing about 50 mM Na+ showed good motility even at 10 mM Na+ in the medium, i.e. in the absence of an inwardly directed Na+ gradient. In contrast, Na(+)-loaded cells containing about 400 mM Na+ showed very poor motility at 500 mM Na+ in the medium, i.e. even in the presence of an inwardly directed Na+ gradient. The membrane potential of the cells, which is a major driving force for the motor under these conditions, was not detectably altered, and consistently with this, Na(+)-coupled sucrose transport was only partly reduced in the Na(+)-loaded cells. Motility of the Na(+)-loaded cells was restored by decreasing the intracellular Na+ concentration, and the rate of restoration of motility correlated with the rate of the Na+ decrease. These results indicate that the absolute concentration of the intracellular Na+ is a determinant of the rotation rate of the Na(+)-driven flagellar motors of V. alginolyticus. A simple explanation for this phenomenon is that the force-generating unit of the motor has an intracellular Na(+)-binding site, at which the intracellular Na+ kinetically interferes with the rate of Na+ influx for motor rotation. PMID:2243095

  6. Differential gene expression of activating Fcγ receptor classifies active tuberculosis regardless of human immunodeficiency virus status or ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, J S; Loxton, A G; Haks, M C; Kassa, D; Ambrose, L; Lee, J-S; Ran, L; van Baarle, D; Maertzdorf, J; Howe, R; Mayanja-Kizza, H; Boom, W H; Thiel, B A; Crampin, A C; Hanekom, W; Ota, M O C; Dockrell, H; Walzl, G; Kaufmann, S H E; Ottenhoff, T H M

    2014-04-01

    New diagnostics and vaccines for tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed, but require an understanding of the requirements for protection from/susceptibility to TB. Previous studies have used unbiased approaches to determine gene signatures in single-site populations. The present study utilized a targeted approach, reverse transcriptase multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (RT-MLPA), to validate these genes in a multisite study. We analysed ex vivo whole blood RNA from a total of 523 participants across four sub-Saharan countries (Ethiopia, Malawi, South Africa, and The Gambia) with differences in TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status. We found a number of genes that were expressed at significantly lower levels in participants with active disease than in those with latent TB infection (LTBI), with restoration following successful TB treatment. The most consistent classifier of active disease was FCGR1A (high-affinity IgG Fc receptor 1 (CD64)), which was the only marker expressed at significantly higher levels in participants with active TB than in those with LTBI before treatment regardless of HIV status or genetic background. This is the first study to identify a biomarker for TB that is not affected by HIV status or geo-genetic differences. These data provide valuable clues for understanding TB pathogenesis, and also provide a proof-of-concept for the use of RT-MLPA in rapid and inexpensive validation of unbiased gene expression findings. PMID:24205913

  7. [Construction of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata strains with high riboflavin kinase activity using gene engineering].

    PubMed

    Ishchuk, O P; Iatsyshyn, V Iu; Dmytruk, K V; Voronovs'kyĭ, A Ia; Fedorovych, D V; Sybirnyĭ, A A

    2006-01-01

    The recombinant strains of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata, which contain the DNA fragment consisting of the FMN1 gene (encoding the riboflavin kinase, enzyme that converts riboflavin to flavinmononucleotide) driven by the strong promoters (the regulated RIB1 or constitutive TEF1 promoter) were isolated. Riboflavin kinase activity in the isolated transformants was tested. The 6-8-fold increase of the riboflavin kinase activity was shown in the recombinant strains containing the integrated Debaryomyces hansenii FMN1 gene under the strong constitutive TEF1 promoter. The recombinant strains can be used for the following construction of flavinmononucleotide overproducers. PMID:17290783

  8. Simultaneous analysis of the bidirectional African cassava mosaic virus promoter activity using two different luciferase genes.

    PubMed

    Frey, P M; Schärer-Hernández, N G; Fütterer, J; Potrykus, I; Puonti-Kaerlas, J

    2001-03-01

    The expression of geminivirus genes is controlled by bidirectional promoters which are located in the large intergenic region of the circular DNA genomes and specifically regulated by virus encoded proteins. In order to study the simultaneous regulation of both orientations of the DNA A and DNA B promoters of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV), they were cloned between two different luciferase genes with the firefly luciferase gene in complementary-sense and the Renilla luciferase gene in virion-sense orientation. The regulation of the ACMV promoters by proteins encoded by the complete DNA A, as well as by the individually expressed transactivator (TrAP) or replication-associated (Rep) proteins was assessed in tobacco and cassava protoplasts using dual luciferase assays. In addition, the regulation of the DNA A promoter integrated into tobacco genome was also assessed. The results show that TrAP activates virion-sense expression strongly both in cassava and tobacco protoplasts, but not in transgenic tobacco plants. In contrast to this, DNA A encoded proteins activate virion-sense expression both in protoplasts and in transgenic plants. At the same time they reduce the expression of the complementary-sense Rep gene on DNA A but activate the expression of the complementary-sense movement protein (MPB) gene on DNA B. The degree of MBP activation is higher in cassava than in tobacco protoplasts, indicating that the plant host also influences the promoter strength. Transient transformation experiments using linearized DNA indicate that the different regulation of the ACMV DNA A promoter in protoplasts and transgenic plants could be due to different DNA curvature in free plasmids and in genes integrated in plant genomic DNA. PMID:11324760

  9. Constitutive activation of L-fucose genes by an unlinked mutation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y M; Chakrabarti, T; Lin, E C

    1984-01-01

    Wild-type Escherichia coli cannot grow on L-1,2-propanediol; mutants that can do so have increased basal activity of an NAD-linked L-1,2-propanediol oxidoreductase. This enzyme belongs to the L-fucose system and functions normally as L-lactaldehyde reductase during fermentation of the methylpentose. In wild-type cells, the activity of this enzyme is fully induced only anaerobically. Continued aerobic selection for mutants with an improved growth rate on L-1,2-propanediol inevitably leads to full constitutive expression of the oxidoreductase activity. When this occurs, L-fuculose 1-phosphate aldolase concomitantly becomes constitutive, whereas L-fucose permease, L-fucose isomerase, and L-fuculose kinase become noninducible. It is shown in this study that the noninducibility of the three proteins can be changed by two different kinds of suppressor mutations: one mapping external to and the other within the fuc gene cluster. Both mutations result in constitutive synthesis of the permease, the isomerase, and the kinase, without affecting synthesis of the oxidoreductase and the aldolase. Since expression of the fuc structural genes is activated by a protein specified by the regulator gene fucR, and since all the known genes of the fuc system are clustered at minute 60.2 of the chromosome, the external gene in which the suppressor mutation can occur probably has an unrelated function in the wild-type strain. The internal suppressor mutation might be either in fucR or in the promoter region of the genes encoding the permease, the isomerase, and the kinase, if these genes belong to the same operon. PMID:6378890

  10. Diversity of laccase-like multicopper oxidase genes in Morchellaceae: identification of genes potentially involved in extracellular activities related to plant litter decay.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Buscot, François

    2007-07-01

    Despite the important role played by soil-inhabiting ascomycetes in plant litter decay processes, studies on the diversity and function of their laccase-like multicopper oxidase (LMCO) genes are scarce. In the present work, the LMCO gene diversity in 15 strains representing nine Morchellaceae and one Discinaceae species was evaluated by PCR. One to six different genes were found within the species, representing 26 different sequence types. Cluster analysis revealed LMCO genes belonging to four main gene families encoding different protein classes (Class I-IV). To identify the genes related to extracellular activities and potentially involved in litter decay processes, liquid cultures were induced by different aromatic compounds. Morchella conica and Verpa conica showed the strongest LMCO activity enhancement in the presence of the naturally occurring phenolic compound guaiacol, and their expressed LMCO genes were identified by sequencing. Only genes belonging to the gene families encoding the Class II and III proteins were expressed. Both genes (Class II and III) of the mycorrhizal-like strain M. conica were exclusively expressed in the presence of guaiacol. In contrast to the saprotrophic strain V. conica, the gene encoding the Class III protein was constitutively expressed as it was also found in control cultures without guaiacol. PMID:17466024

  11. The rolB gene activates secondary metabolism in Arabidopsis calli via selective activation of genes encoding MYB and bHLH transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, Victor P; Veremeichik, Galina N; Grigorchuk, Valeria P; Rybin, Viacheslav G; Shkryl, Yuri N

    2016-05-01

    It is known that the rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes increases the production of secondary metabolites in transformed plant cells, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this report, we demonstrate that rolB expression in Arabidopsis thaliana calli led to the activation of most genes encoding secondary metabolism-specific MYB and bHLH transcription factors (TFs), such as MYB11, MYB12, MYB28, MYB76, MYB34, MYB51, MYB122, TT2 and TT8. Accordingly, a higher transcript abundance of main biosynthetic genes related to these factors was detected. The rolB-transformed calli produced 3-fold higher levels of indolic glucosinolates (GSs) compared with normal calli but did not produce secondary metabolites from other groups. Enhanced accumulation of indolic GSs was caused by activation of MYB34, MYB51 and MYB122, and the absence of aliphatic GSs in transformed calli was caused by the inability of rolB to induce MYB29. The inability of rolB-calli to produce flavonoids was caused by the lack of MYB111 expression, induced by the rolB-mediated conversion of MYB expression from cotyledon-specific to root-specific patterns. The high specificity of rolB on secondary metabolism-specific TFs was demonstrated for the first time. PMID:26913794

  12. Krüppel-like Factor 4 activates HBG gene expression in primary erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Inderdeep S.; Alam, Md M.; Choudhary, Pankaj K.; Pace, Betty S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The SP1/Krüppel-like Factor (SP1/KLF) family of transcription factors plays a role in diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation and control of gene transcription. The discovery of KLF1 (EKLF), a key regulator of HBB (β-globin) gene expression, expanded our understanding of the role of KLFs in erythropoiesis. In this study, we investigated a mechanism of HBG (γ-globin) regulation by KLF4. siRNA-mediated gene silencing and enforced expression of KLF4 in K562 cells substantiated the ability of KLF4 to positively regulate endogenous HBG gene transcription. The physiological significance of this finding was confirmed in primary erythroid cells, where KLF4 knockdown at day 11 significantly attenuated HBG mRNA levels and enforced expression at day 28 stimulated the silenced HBG genes. In vitro binding characterization using the γ-CACCC and β-CACCC probes demonstrated KLF4 preferentially binds the endogenous γ-CACCC, while CREB binding protein (CREBBP) binding was not selective. Co-immunoprecipitation studies confirmed protein-protein interaction between KLF4 and CREBBP. Furthermore, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed co-localization of both factors in the γ-CACCC region. Subsequent luciferase reporter studies demonstrated that KLF4 trans-activated HBG promoter activity and that CREBBP enforced expression resulted in gene repression. Our data supports a model of antagonistic interaction of KLF4/CREBBP trans-factors in HBG regulation. PMID:21539536

  13. Coevolved Mutations Reveal Distinct Architectures for Two Core Proteins in the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Kleinjung, Jens; Rasool, Shafqat; Khan, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Switching of bacterial flagellar rotation is caused by large domain movements of the FliG protein triggered by binding of the signal protein CheY to FliM. FliG and FliM form adjacent multi-subunit arrays within the basal body C-ring. The movements alter the interaction of the FliG C-terminal (FliGC) “torque” helix with the stator complexes. Atomic models based on the Salmonella entrovar C-ring electron microscopy reconstruction have implications for switching, but lack consensus on the relative locations of the FliG armadillo (ARM) domains (amino-terminal (FliGN), middle (FliGM) and FliGC) as well as changes during chemotaxis. The generality of the Salmonella model is challenged by the variation in motor morphology and response between species. We studied coevolved residue mutations to determine the unifying elements of switch architecture. Residue interactions, measured by their coevolution, were formalized as a network, guided by structural data. Our measurements reveal a common design with dedicated switch and motor modules. The FliM middle domain (FliMM) has extensive connectivity most simply explained by conserved intra and inter-subunit contacts. In contrast, FliG has patchy, complex architecture. Conserved structural motifs form interacting nodes in the coevolution network that wire FliMM to the FliGC C-terminal, four-helix motor module (C3-6). FliG C3-6 coevolution is organized around the torque helix, differently from other ARM domains. The nodes form separated, surface-proximal patches that are targeted by deleterious mutations as in other allosteric systems. The dominant node is formed by the EHPQ motif at the FliMMFliGM contact interface and adjacent helix residues at a central location within FliGM. The node interacts with nodes in the N-terminal FliGc α-helix triad (ARM-C) and FliGN. ARM-C, separated from C3-6 by the MFVF motif, has poor intra-network connectivity consistent with its variable orientation revealed by structural data. ARM-C could

  14. Characterization of Calflagin, a Flagellar Calcium-Binding Protein from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Eyford, Brett A.; Kaufman, Laura; Salama-Alber, Orly; Loveless, Bianca; Pope, Matthew E.; Burke, Robert D.; Matovu, Enock; Boulanger, Martin J.; Pearson, Terry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of species-specific trypanosome molecules is important for laboratory- and field-based research into epidemiology and disease diagnosis. Although Trypanosoma congolense is the most important trypanosome pathogen of cattle in Africa, no species-specific molecules found in infective bloodstream forms (BSF) of the parasites have been identified, thus limiting development of diagnostic tests. Methods Immuno-mass spectrometric methods were used to identify a protein that is recognized by a T. congolense-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) Tc6/42.6.4. The identified molecule was expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli and was tested in several immunoassays for its ability to interact with the mAb. The three dimensional structure of the protein was modeled and compared to crystal- and NMR-structures of the homologous proteins from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, in order to examine structural differences leading to the different immunoreactivity of the T. congolense molecule. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure antibodies produced by trypanosome-infected African cattle in order to assess the potential for use of T. congolense calflagin in a serodiagnostic assay. Results The antigen recognized by the T. congolense-specific mAb Tc6/42.6.4 was identified as a flagellar calcium-binding protein, calflagin. The recombinant molecule showed immunoreactivity with the T. congolense-specific mAb confirming that it is the cognate antigen. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed that Ca2+ modulated the localization of the calflagin molecule in trypanosomes. Structural modelling and comparison with calflagin homologues from other trypanosomatids revealed four non-conserved regions on the surface of the T. congolense molecule that due to differences in surface chemistry and structural topography may form species-specific epitopes. ELISAs using the recombinant calflagin as antigen to detect antibodies in trypanosome

  15. Timing and Variability of Galactose Metabolic Gene Activation Depend on the Rate of Environmental Change

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bo; Ott, William; Josić, Krešimir; Bennett, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of gene network activity allows cells to respond to changes in environmental conditions. For example, the galactose utilization network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by the presence of galactose but repressed by glucose. If both sugars are present, the yeast will first metabolize glucose, depleting it from the extracellular environment. Upon depletion of glucose, the genes encoding galactose metabolic proteins will activate. Here, we show that the rate at which glucose levels are depleted determines the timing and variability of galactose gene activation. Paradoxically, we find that Gal1p, an enzyme needed for galactose metabolism, accumulates more quickly if glucose is depleted slowly rather than taken away quickly. Furthermore, the variability of induction times in individual cells depends non-monotonically on the rate of glucose depletion and exhibits a minimum at intermediate depletion rates. Our mathematical modeling suggests that the dynamics of the metabolic transition from glucose to galactose are responsible for the variability in galactose gene activation. These findings demonstrate that environmental dynamics can determine the phenotypic outcome at both the single-cell and population levels. PMID:26200924

  16. CRISPR-on system for the activation of the endogenous human INS gene.

    PubMed

    Giménez, C A; Ielpi, M; Mutto, A; Grosembacher, L; Argibay, P; Pereyra-Bonnet, F

    2016-06-01

    Advances in the field of epigenetics have allowed the design of new therapeutic strategies to address complex diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-on is a novel and powerful RNA-guided transcriptional activator system that can turn on specific gene expression; however, it remains unclear whether this system can be widely used or whether its use will be restricted depending on cell types, methylation promoter statuses or the capacity to modulate chromatin state. Our results revealed that the CRISPR-on system fused with transcriptional activators (dCas9-VP160) activated endogenous human INS, which is a silenced gene with a fully methylated promoter. Similarly, we observed a synergistic effect on gene activation when multiple single guide RNAs were used, and the transcriptional activation was maintained until day 21. Regarding the epigenetic profile, the targeted promoter gene did not exhibit alteration in its methylation status but rather exhibited altered levels of H3K9ac following treatment. Importantly, we showed that dCas9-VP160 acts on patients' cells in vitro, particularly the fibroblasts of patients with T1D. PMID:27052801

  17. Helix-loop-helix transcription factors mediate activation and repression of the p75LNGFR gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaramello, A; Neuman, K; Palm, K; Metsis, M; Neuman, T

    1995-01-01

    Sequence analysis of rat and human low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor p75LNGFR gene promoter regions revealed a single E-box cis-acting element, located upstream of the major transcription start sites. Deletion analysis of the E-box sequence demonstrated that it significantly contributes to p75LNGFR promoter activity. This E box has a dual function; it mediates either activation or repression of the p75LNGFR promoter activity, depending on the interacting transcription factors. We showed that the two isoforms of the class A basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor ME1 (ME1a and ME1b), the murine homolog of the human HEB transcription factor, specifically repress p75LNGFR promoter activity. This repression can be released by coexpression of the HLH Id2 transcriptional regulator. In vitro analyses demonstrated that ME1a forms a stable complex with the p75LNGFR E box and likely competes with activating E-box-binding proteins. By using ME1a-overexpressing PC12 cells, we showed that the endogenous p75LNGFR gene is a target of ME1a repression. Together, these data demonstrate that the p75LNGFR E box and the interacting bHLH transcription factors are involved in the regulation of p75LNGFR gene expression. These results also show that class A bHLH transcription factors can repress and Id-like negative regulators can stimulate gene expression. PMID:7565756

  18. SOX2 primes the epigenetic landscape in neural precursors enabling proper gene activation during hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Cimadamore, Flavio; Huang, Chun-Teng; Wright, Rebecca; Lewis, Susan; Gage, Fred H.; Terskikh, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Newborn granule neurons generated from neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the adult hippocampus play a key role in spatial learning and pattern separation. However, the molecular mechanisms that control activation of their neurogenic program remain poorly understood. Here, we report a novel function for the pluripotency factor sex-determining region Y (SRY)-related HMG box 2 (SOX2) in regulating the epigenetic landscape of poised genes activated at the onset of neuronal differentiation. We found that SOX2 binds to bivalently marked promoters of poised proneural genes [neurogenin 2 (Ngn2) and neurogenic differentiation 1 (NeuroD1)] and a subset of neurogenic genes [e.g., SRY-box 21 (Sox21), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf), and growth arrest and DNA-damage–inducible, beta (Gadd45b)] where it functions to maintain the bivalent chromatin state by preventing excessive polycomb repressive complex 2 activity. Conditional ablation of SOX2 in adult hippocampal NPCs impaired the activation of proneural and neurogenic genes, resulting in increased neuroblast death and functionally aberrant newborn neurons. We propose that SOX2 sets a permissive epigenetic state in NPCs, thus enabling proper activation of the neuronal differentiation program under neurogenic cue. PMID:25825708

  19. Preferential Repair of DNA Double-strand Break at the Active Gene in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Priyasri; Sen, Rwik; Pandita, Tej K.; Bhaumik, Sukesh R.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled nucleotide/base excision repair. We report here for the first time that DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is also coupled to transcription. We generated a yeast strain by introducing a homing (Ho) endonuclease cut site followed by a nucleotide sequence for multiple Myc epitopes at the 3′ end of the coding sequence of a highly active gene, ADH1. This yeast strain also contains the Ho cut site at the nearly silent or poorly active mating type α (MATα) locus and expresses Ho endonuclease under the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter. Using this strain, DSBs were generated at the ADH1 and MATα loci in galactose-containing growth medium that induced HO expression. Subsequently, yeast cells were transferred to dextrose-containing growth medium to stop HO expression, and the DSB repair was monitored at the ADH1 and MATα loci by PCR, using the primer pairs flanking the Ho cut sites. Our results revealed a faster DSB repair at the highly active ADH1 than that at the nearly silent MATα locus, hence implicating a transcription-coupled DSB repair at the active gene in vivo. Subsequently, we extended this study to another gene, PHO5 (carrying the Ho cut site at its coding sequence), under transcriptionally active and inactive growth conditions. We found a fast DSB repair at the active PHO5 gene in comparison to its inactive state. Collectively, our results demonstrate a preferential DSB repair at the active gene, thus supporting transcription-coupled DSB repair in living cells. PMID:22910905

  20. Xantivin suppresses the activity of EGF-CFC genes to regulate nodal signaling.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, Kousuke; Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Yokota, Chika; Takahashi, Shuji; Asashima, Makoto

    2004-06-01

    Lefty, antivin and related genes act in a feedback inhibition mechanism for nodal signaling at a number of stages of vertebrate embryogenesis. To analyze the function of the feedback inhibitor of nodal signaling, Xantivin in Xenopus embryos, we designed a morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (XatvMO) for this gene. XatvMO caused the expansion of mesodermal tissue and head defects. XatvMO-injected gastrulae showed up-regulated expression of the mesodermal markers Xbra, Xwnt8, Xnot, and Chordin, suggesting expansion of the trunk-tail organizer. As expected, depletion of Xantivin also up-regulated nodal signaling as confirmed by the enhanced ectopic expression of Xantivin mRNA, a known target gene of nodal signaling. Furthermore, we investigated the relationship between Xantivin and the EGF-CFC gene FRL-1, which is a component of the nodal receptor. In animal cap assays, FRL-1 could not induce expression of nodal-responsive genes, but could up-regulate expression of these genes when FRL-1 was coinjected with a low dose of Xnr1; coinjection of Xantivin suppressed this up-regulation by FRL-1. We also found that Xantivin can rescue the caudalized phenotype induced by overexpression of FRL-1. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that Xantivin interacted with the EGF-CFC proteins, FRL-1 and cripto. Taken together, these results suggest that Xantivin opposes the activity of EGF-CFC genes and thereby antagonizes nodal signaling. PMID:15300508

  1. Requirement for metabolic activation of acetylaminofluorene to induce multidrug gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gant, T W; Schrenk, D; Silverman, J A; Thorgeirsson, S S

    1994-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that several xenobiotics can induce multidrug (mdr) gene expression in cultures of primary isolated hepatocytes. One of the best of these xenobiotic inducers in rat hepatocytes is 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), which induces mdr expression by an enhancement of mdr gene transcription. In all species studied to date, AAF is extensively and variously metabolized. In this study we have sought to determine if AAF per se or a metabolite is responsible for mediating the increase in mdr gene transcription and expression. This study demonstrates that AAF per se is not active, but that the effect of AAF we have observed on mdr gene transcription and expression in the rat is due to the formation of a reactive metabolite(s). Our data indicate that this reactive metabolite is probably N-acetoxy-2-aminofluorene or the sulfate ester of N-hydroxy-AAF. The requirement for the formation of one of these metabolites may explain the differences in species response to AAF, in terms of mdr gene expression, that we have observed. We hypothesize that the mechanism by which mdr gene transcription is increased in response to AAF involves a covalent interaction between a reactive metabolite and an mdr gene regulatory protein. Our current work is concerned with the exploration of this hypothesis. PMID:7889850

  2. Evolution of high cellulolytic activity in symbiotic Streptomyces through selection of expanded gene content and coordinated gene expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Book, Adam J.; Lewin, Gina R.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Doering, Drew T.; Suh, Steven; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Fox, Brian G.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2016-06-08

    In this study, the evolution of cellulose degradation was a defining event in the history of life. Without efficient decomposition and recycling, dead plant biomass would quickly accumulate and become inaccessible to terrestrial food webs and the global carbon cycle. On land, the primary drivers of plant biomass deconstruction are fungi and bacteria in the soil or associated with herbivorous eukaryotes. While the ecological importance of plant-decomposing microbes is well established, little is known about the distribution or evolution of cellulolytic activity in any bacterial genus. Here we show that in Streptomyces, a genus of Actinobacteria abundant in soil andmore » symbiotic niches, the ability to rapidly degrade cellulose is largely restricted to two clades of host-associated strains and is not a conserved characteristic of the Streptomyces genus or host-associated strains. Our comparative genomics identify that while plant biomass degrading genes (CAZy) are widespread in Streptomyces, key enzyme families are enriched in highly cellulolytic strains. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that cellulolytic strains express a suite of multi-domain CAZy enzymes that are coregulated by the CebR transcriptional regulator. Using targeted gene deletions, we verify the importance of a highly expressed cellulase (GH6 family cellobiohydrolase) and the CebR transcriptional repressor to the cellulolytic phenotype. Evolutionary analyses identify complex genomic modifications that drive plant biomass deconstruction in Streptomyces, including acquisition and selective retention of CAZy genes and transcriptional regulators. Our results suggest that host-associated niches have selected some symbiotic Streptomyces for increased cellulose degrading activity and that symbiotic bacteria are a rich biochemical and enzymatic resource for biotechnology.« less

  3. Evolution of High Cellulolytic Activity in Symbiotic Streptomyces through Selection of Expanded Gene Content and Coordinated Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Book, Adam J; Lewin, Gina R; McDonald, Bradon R; Takasuka, Taichi E; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Doering, Drew T; Suh, Steven; Raffa, Kenneth F; Fox, Brian G; Currie, Cameron R

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of cellulose degradation was a defining event in the history of life. Without efficient decomposition and recycling, dead plant biomass would quickly accumulate and become inaccessible to terrestrial food webs and the global carbon cycle. On land, the primary drivers of plant biomass deconstruction are fungi and bacteria in the soil or associated with herbivorous eukaryotes. While the ecological importance of plant-decomposing microbes is well established, little is known about the distribution or evolution of cellulolytic activity in any bacterial genus. Here we show that in Streptomyces, a genus of Actinobacteria abundant in soil and symbiotic niches, the ability to rapidly degrade cellulose is largely restricted to two clades of host-associated strains and is not a conserved characteristic of the Streptomyces genus or host-associated strains. Our comparative genomics identify that while plant biomass degrading genes (CAZy) are widespread in Streptomyces, key enzyme families are enriched in highly cellulolytic strains. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that cellulolytic strains express a suite of multi-domain CAZy enzymes that are coregulated by the CebR transcriptional regulator. Using targeted gene deletions, we verify the importance of a highly expressed cellulase (GH6 family cellobiohydrolase) and the CebR transcriptional repressor to the cellulolytic phenotype. Evolutionary analyses identify complex genomic modifications that drive plant biomass deconstruction in Streptomyces, including acquisition and selective retention of CAZy genes and transcriptional regulators. Our results suggest that host-associated niches have selected some symbiotic Streptomyces for increased cellulose degrading activity and that symbiotic bacteria are a rich biochemical and enzymatic resource for biotechnology. PMID:27276034

  4. Evolution of High Cellulolytic Activity in Symbiotic Streptomyces through Selection of Expanded Gene Content and Coordinated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Bradon R.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Doering, Drew T.; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Fox, Brian G.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of cellulose degradation was a defining event in the history of life. Without efficient decomposition and recycling, dead plant biomass would quickly accumulate and become inaccessible to terrestrial food webs and the global carbon cycle. On land, the primary drivers of plant biomass deconstruction are fungi and bacteria in the soil or associated with herbivorous eukaryotes. While the ecological importance of plant-decomposing microbes is well established, little is known about the distribution or evolution of cellulolytic activity in any bacterial genus. Here we show that in Streptomyces, a genus of Actinobacteria abundant in soil and symbiotic niches, the ability to rapidly degrade cellulose is largely restricted to two clades of host-associated strains and is not a conserved characteristic of the Streptomyces genus or host-associated strains. Our comparative genomics identify that while plant biomass degrading genes (CAZy) are widespread in Streptomyces, key enzyme families are enriched in highly cellulolytic strains. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrate that cellulolytic strains express a suite of multi-domain CAZy enzymes that are coregulated by the CebR transcriptional regulator. Using targeted gene deletions, we verify the importance of a highly expressed cellulase (GH6 family cellobiohydrolase) and the CebR transcriptional repressor to the cellulolytic phenotype. Evolutionary analyses identify complex genomic modifications that drive plant biomass deconstruction in Streptomyces, including acquisition and selective retention of CAZy genes and transcriptional regulators. Our results suggest that host-associated niches have selected some symbiotic Streptomyces for increased cellulose degrading activity and that symbiotic bacteria are a rich biochemical and enzymatic resource for biotechnology. PMID:27276034

  5. Association of differentially expressed genes with activation of mouse hepatic stellate cells by high-density cDNA mircoarray

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Yang, Li; Luo, Feng-Ming; Wu, Hong-Bin; Qu-Qiang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the gene expression profiles associated with activation of mouse hepatic stellate cell (HSC) and provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. METHODS: Mice HSCs were isolated from BALB/c mice by in situ perfusion of collagenase and pronase and single-step density Nycodenz gradient. Total RNA and mRNA of quiescent HSC and culture-activated HSC were extracted, quantified and reversely transcripted into cDNA. cDNAs from activated HSC were labeled with Cy5 and cDNAs from the quiescent HSC were labeled with Cy3, which were mixed with equal quantity, then hybridized with cDNA chips containing 4000 genes. Chips were washed, scanned and analyzed. Increased expression of 4 genes and decreased expression of one gene in activated HSC were confirmed by reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: A total of 835 differentially expressed genes were identified by cDNA chip between activated and quiescent HSC, and 465 genes were highly expressed in activated HSC. The differentially expressed genes included those involved in protein synthesis, cell-cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA damage response. CONCLUSION: Many genes implicated in intrahepatic inflammation, fibrosis and proliferation were up-regulated in activated HSC. cDNA microarray is an effective technique in screening for differentially expressed genes between two different situations of the HSC. Further analysis of the obtained genes will help understand the molecular mechanism of activation of HSC and hepatic fibrosis. PMID:15162533

  6. Activated macrophages for treating skin ulceration: gene expression in human monocytes after hypo-osmotic shock

    PubMed Central

    FRENKEL, O; SHANI, E; BEN-BASSAT, I; BROK-SIMONI, F; ROZENFELD-GRANOT, G; KAJAKARO, G; RECHAVI, G; AMARIGLIO, N; SHINAR, E; DANON, D

    2002-01-01

    Macrophages play a major role in almost all stages of the complex process of wound healing. It has been previously shown that the incorporation of a hypo-osmotic shock step, in the process of monocyte-concentrate preparation from a blood unit, induces monocyte/macrophage activation. As the macrophages are produced using a unique, closed and sterile system, they are suitable for local application on ulcers in elderly and paraplegic patients. Enhanced phagocytosis by the activated cells, as well as increased secretion of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, were detected in a recent study which are in accord with the very encouraging clinical results. In the present study, we used DNA microarrays to analyse the differential gene expressions of the hypo-osmotic shock-activated monocytes/macrophages and compare them to non-treated cells. Of the genes that exhibited differences of expression in the activated cell population, 94% (68/72) displayed increased activity. The mRNA levels of 43/68 of these genes (63%) were found to be 1·5-fold or higher (1·5–7·98) in the activated macrophages cell population as compared to the non-treated cells. Only four genes were found to have lower mRNA levels in the activated cells, with ratios of expression of 0·62–0·8, which may suggest that the changes are insignificant. A significant number of the genes that showed increased levels of expression is known to be directly involved in macrophage function and wound healing. This may correlate with the increased secretion of different cytokines by the activated macrophages depicted previously. Other groups of genes expressed are known to be involved in important pathways such as neuronal growth and function, developmental defects and cancer. The hypo-osmotic shock induces a gene expression profile of cytokines and receptors in the activated cells. These may evoke potential abilities to produce a variety of protein products needed in the wound healing process and may bring to light

  7. The full-length transcript of a caulimovirus is a polycistronic mRNA whose genes are trans activated by the product of gene VI.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1992-05-01

    Gene expression of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, was investigated by electroporation of Nicotiana edwardsonii cell suspension protoplasts with cloned viral constructs in which a reporter gene was inserted at various positions on the genome. The results showed that the genome of FMV contains two promoters; one is used for the production of a full-length RNA and another initiates synthesis of a separate monocistronic RNA for gene VI. Evidence is provided that the full-length transcript, the probable template for reverse transcription, can serve as a polycistronic mRNA for translation of genes I through V and perhaps also gene VI. Expression of all the genes on the polycistronic mRNA is trans activated by the gene VI protein. Reporter gene expression appears most efficient when its start codon is in close proximity to the stop codon of the preceding gene, as for the native genes of caulimoviruses. We propose that the gene VI product enables expression of the polycistronic mRNA by promoting reinitiation of ribosomes to give translational coupling of individual genes. PMID:1560539

  8. Genetic characterization of the homeodomain-independent activity of the Drosophila fushi tarazu gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Hyduk, D.; Percival-Smith, A.

    1996-02-01

    The gene products of fushi tarazu (FTZ) has a homeodomain (HD)-independent activity. Ectopic expression of a FTZ protein that lacks half the HD in embryos results in the anti-ftz phenotype. We have characterized this FTZ HD-independent activity further. Ectopic expression of the HD-independent FTZ activity, in the absence of FTZ activity expressed from the endogenous ftz gene, was sufficient to result in the anti-ftz phenotype. Since the anti-ftz phenotype is first instar larvae composed nearly entirely of FTZ-dependent cuticular structures derived from the even-numbered parasegments, this result suggests that expression of the HD-independent FTZ activity is sufficient to establish FTZ-dependent cuticle. Activation of FTZ-dependent Engrailed (EN) expression and activation of the ftz enhancer were HD-independent. The ftz enhancer element, AE-1, was activated by the HD-independent FTZ activity; however, the ftz enhancer element, AE-BS2CCC, which is the same as AE-1 except for the inactivation of two FTZ HD DNA-binding sites, was not. Activation of the ftz enhancer by ectopic expression of FTZ activity was effective only during gastrulation and germ band extension. In the discussion, we propose an explanation for these results. 42 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Trans-activation of human immunodeficiency virus gene expression is mediated by nuclear events

    SciTech Connect

    Hauber, J.; Perkins, A.; Heimer, E.P.; Cullen, B.R.

    1987-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus encodes a gene product termed tat that is able to activate viral gene expression when present in trans. The mechanism of action of the tat gene product appears to be bimodal, resulting in both an increase in the steady-state level of viral mRNA and the enhanced translation of that RNA. In this report, the authors have examined the mechanism by which tat elevates viral mRNA levels. Data are presented demonstrating that tat acts by increasing the rate of viral transcription, rather than by modulating the stability of viral mRNA. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to show that tat is predominantly localized in the nucleus of expressing cells, a location consistent with a role in the regulation of viral transcription. These results suggest that tat could play a role in human immunodeficiency virus replication essentially similar to that proposed for the trans-acting nuclear gene products described for several other virus species.

  10. Acetohydroxyacid synthase activity and transcripts profiling reveal tissue-specific regulation of ahas genes in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Ochogavía, Ana C; Breccia, Gabriela; Vega, Tatiana; Felitti, Silvina A; Picardi, Liliana A; Nestares, Graciela

    2014-07-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) is the target site of several herbicides and catalyses the first step in the biosynthesis of branched chain amino acid. Three genes coding for AHAS catalytic subunit (ahas1, ahas2 and ahas3) have been reported for sunflower. The aim of this work was to study the expression pattern of ahas genes family and AHAS activity in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Different organs (leaves, hypocotyls, roots, flowers and embryos) were evaluated at several developmental stages. The transcriptional profile was studied through RT-qPCR. The highest expression for ahas1 was shown in leaves, where all the induced and natural gene mutations conferring herbicide resistance were found. The maximal expression of ahas2 and ahas3 occurred in immature flowers and embryos. The highest AHAS activity was found in leaves and immature embryos. Correlation analysis among ahas gene expression and AHAS activity was discussed. Our results show that differences in ahas genes expression are tissue-specific and temporally regulated. Moreover, the conservation of multiple AHAS isoforms in sunflower seems to result from different expression requirements controlled by tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms at different developmental stages. PMID:24908515

  11. Histone H4 Lys 20 monomethylation by histone methylase SET8 mediates Wnt target gene activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenfei; Nie, Fen; Wang, Sheng; Li, Lin

    2011-02-22

    Histone methylation has an important role in transcriptional regulation. However, unlike H3K4 and H3K9 methylation, the role of H4K20 monomethylation (H4K20me-1) in transcriptional regulation remains unclear. Here, we show that Wnt3a specifically stimulates H4K20 monomethylation at the T cell factor (TCF)-binding element through the histone methylase SET8. Additionally, SET8 is crucial for activation of the Wnt reporter gene and target genes in both mammalian cells and zebrafish. Furthermore, SET8 interacts with lymphoid enhancing factor-1 (LEF1)/TCF4 directly, and this interaction is regulated by Wnt3a. Therefore, we conclude that SET8 is a Wnt signaling mediator and is recruited by LEF1/TCF4 to regulate the transcription of Wnt-activated genes, possibly through H4K20 monomethylation at the target gene promoters. Our findings also indicate that H4K20me-1 is a marker for gene transcription activation, at least in canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:21282610

  12. Four enzymes cooperate to displace histone H1 during the first minute of hormonal gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Vicent, Guillermo Pablo; Nacht, A. Silvina; Font-Mateu, Jofre; Castellano, Giancarlo; Gaveglia, Laura; Ballaré, Cecilia; Beato, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Gene regulation by external signals requires access of transcription factors to DNA sequences of target genes, which is limited by the compaction of DNA in chromatin. Although we have gained insight into how core histones and their modifications influence this process, the role of linker histones remains unclear. Here we show that, within the first minute of progesterone action, a complex cooperation between different enzymes acting on chromatin mediates histone H1 displacement as a requisite for gene induction and cell proliferation. First, activated progesterone receptor (PR) recruits the chromatin remodeling complexes NURF and ASCOM (ASC-2 [activating signal cointegrator-2] complex) to hormone target genes. The trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys 4 by the MLL2/MLL3 subunits of ASCOM, enhanced by the hormone-induced displacement of the H3K4 demethylase KDM5B, stabilizes NURF binding. NURF facilitates the PR-mediated recruitment of Cdk2/CyclinA, which is required for histone H1 displacement. Cooperation of ATP-dependent remodeling, histone methylation, and kinase activation, followed by H1 displacement, is a prerequisite for the subsequent displacement of histone H2A/H2B catalyzed by PCAF and BAF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and sequencing (ChIP-seq) and expression arrays show that H1 displacement is required for hormone induction of most hormone target genes, some of which are involved in cell proliferation. PMID:21447625

  13. Stem cell-based gene therapy activated using magnetic hyperthermia to enhance the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Perry T; Shah, Shreyas; Pasquale, Nicholas J; Garbuzenko, Olga B; Minko, Tamara; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-03-01

    Stem cell-based gene therapies, wherein stem cells are genetically engineered to express therapeutic molecules, have shown tremendous potential for cancer applications owing to their innate ability to home to tumors. However, traditional stem cell-based gene therapies are hampered by our current inability to control when the therapeutic genes are actually turned on, thereby resulting in detrimental side effects. Here, we report the novel application of magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for the dual purpose of delivering and activating a heat-inducible gene vector that encodes TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs). By combining the tumor tropism of the AD-MSCs with the spatiotemporal MCNP-based delivery and activation of TRAIL expression, this platform provides an attractive means with which to enhance our control over the activation of stem cell-based gene t