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Sample records for flagellar genes activates

  1. Deduction of upstream sequences of Xanthomonas campestris flagellar genes responding to transcription activation by FleQ

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, R.-M.; Yang, T.-C.; Yang, S.-H.; Tseng, Y.-H. . E-mail: yhtseng@chtai.ctc.edu.tw

    2005-10-07

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), a close relative to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is the pathogen causing black rot in cruciferous plants. In P. aeruginosa, FleQ serves as a cognate activator of {sigma}{sup 54} in transcription from several {sigma}{sup 54}-dependent promoters of flagellar genes. These P. aeruginosa promoters have been analyzed for FleQ-binding sequences; however, no consensus was deduced. Xcc, although lacks fleSR, has a fleQ homologue residing among over 40 contiguously clustered flagellar genes. A fleQ mutant, Xc17fleQ, constructed by insertional mutation is deficient in FleQ protein, non-flagellated, and immobile. Transcriptional fusion assays on six putative {sigma}{sup 54}-dependent promoters of the flagellar genes, fliE, fliQ, fliL, flgG, flgB, and flhF, indicated that each of them is also FleQ dependent. Each of these promoters has a sequence with weak consensus to 5'-gaaacCCgccgCcgctTt-3', immediately upstream of the predicted {sigma}{sup 54}-binding site, with an imperfect inverted repeat containing a GC-rich center flanked by several A and T at 5'- and 3'-ends, respectively. Replacing this region in fliE promoter with a HindIII recognition sequence abolished the transcription, indicating that this region responds to transcription activation by FleQ.

  2. Aeromonas hydrophila Lateral Flagellar Gene Transcriptional Hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelms, Markus; Gonzalez, Victor; Merino, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila AH-3 lateral flagella are not assembled when bacteria grow in liquid media; however, lateral flagellar genes are transcribed. Our results indicate that A. hydrophila lateral flagellar genes are transcribed at three levels (class I to III genes) and share some similarities with, but have many important differences from, genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. A. hydrophila lateral flagellum class I gene transcription is σ70 dependent, which is consistent with the fact that lateral flagellum is constitutively transcribed, in contrast to the characteristics of V. parahaemolyticus. The fact that multiple genes are included in class I highlights that lateral flagellar genes are less hierarchically transcribed than polar flagellum genes. The A. hydrophila lafK-fliEJL gene cluster (where the subscript L distinguishes genes for lateral flagella from those for polar flagella) is exclusively from class I and is in V. parahaemolyticus class I and II. Furthermore, the A. hydrophila flgAMNL cluster is not transcribed from the σ54/LafK-dependent promoter and does not contain class II genes. Here, we propose a gene transcriptional hierarchy for the A. hydrophila lateral flagella. PMID:23335410

  3. Identification of Escherichia coli region III flagellar gene products and description of two new flagellar genes.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D H; Matsumura, P

    1984-01-01

    Region III flagellar genes in Escherichia coli are involved with the assembly and rotation of the flagella, as well as taxis. We subcloned the flaB operon from a lambda fla transducing phage onto plasmid pMK2004. Two additional genes were found at the flaB locus, and we subdivided the flaB gene into flaB1, flaBII, and flaBIII. The cheY suppressor mutations which have previously been mapped to flaB were further localized to flaB11 (Parkinson et al., J. Bacteriol. 155:265-274, 1983). Until now, gene product identification has not been possible for these genes because of their low levels of gene expression. Overexpression of the flagellar genes was accomplished by placing the flaB operon under the control of the lacUV5 or tac promoters. Plasmid-encoded proteins were examined in a minicell expression system. By correlating various deletions and insertions in the flaB operon with the ability to complement specific flagellar mutants and code for polypeptides, we made the following gene product assignments: flaB 1, 60 kilodaltons; flaB 11, 38 kilodaltons; flaB111, 28 kilodaltons; flaC, 56 kilodaltons; fla0, 16 kilodaltons; and flaE, 54 kilodaltons. Images PMID:6094477

  4. Fusions of flagellar operons to lactose genes on a mu lac bacteriophage.

    PubMed Central

    Komeda, Y

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies have defined 29 genes necessary for synthesis of the Escherichia coli flagellar apparatus. This study analyzed the transcriptional control of flagellar genes, using Mu d (Apr lac) phage to generate flagellar mutants by insertion. These mutants contained operon fusions of flagellar genes to the lac genes of the Mu d phage and allowed the measurement of flagellar operon expression by detection of beta-galactosidase activity. These fusion mutants expressed the enzyme activity constitutively, and an autogenous regulation mechanism was not revealed. Lambda transducing phages carrying these chromosomal fla-lac fusions were also isolated and used to examine the effect of different fla mutations on expression of each flagellar operon. The results showed that flagellar operons are divided into six classes; (class 1) the flbB operon, which controls all of the other flagellar operons; (class 2) the flaU and flbC operons, which are controlled by the flbB operon gene products and are not required for the expression of other Fla operons; (class 3) the flbA, flaG, flaD, flaN, flaB, and flaA operons, which are under flbB operon control and are required for the expression of other fla operons; (class4) the flaZ operon, which is controlled by the gene products of the group 1 and 3 operons and is required for hag transcription; (class 5) the mocha and flaS operons, which are controlled by the gene products of the group 1 and 3 operons; and (class 6) the hag operon. These results are discussed with respect to the possible assembly sequence of the fla gene products. PMID:7037746

  5. A Complete Set of Flagellar Genes Acquired by Horizontal Transfer Coexists with the Endogenous Flagellar System in Rhodobacter sphaeroides▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Sebastian; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Fabela, Salvador; Osorio, Aurora; Dreyfus, Georges; Vinuesa, Pablo; Camarena, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria swim in liquid environments by means of a complex rotating structure known as the flagellum. Approximately 40 proteins are required for the assembly and functionality of this structure. Rhodobacter sphaeroides has two flagellar systems. One of these systems has been shown to be functional and is required for the synthesis of the well-characterized single subpolar flagellum, while the other was found only after the genome sequence of this bacterium was completed. In this work we found that the second flagellar system of R. sphaeroides can be expressed and produces a functional flagellum. In many bacteria with two flagellar systems, one is required for swimming, while the other allows movement in denser environments by producing a large number of flagella over the entire cell surface. In contrast, the second flagellar system of R. sphaeroides produces polar flagella that are required for swimming. Expression of the second set of flagellar genes seems to be positively regulated under anaerobic growth conditions. Phylogenic analysis suggests that the flagellar system that was initially characterized was in fact acquired by horizontal transfer from a γ-proteobacterium, while the second flagellar system contains the native genes. Interestingly, other α-proteobacteria closely related to R. sphaeroides have also acquired a set of flagellar genes similar to the set found in R. sphaeroides, suggesting that a common ancestor received this gene cluster. PMID:17293429

  6. Flagellar apparatus gene sequences of Aeromonas hydrophila AL09-73 isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flagellar apparatus genes of recent outbreak Aeromonas hydrophila AL09-73 isolate were sequenced and characterized. Total 28 flagellar genes were identified. The sizes of the genes range from 318 to 2001 nucleotides, which potentially encode different complex flagellar proteins. At nucleotide and...

  7. Flagellar transcriptional activators FlbB and FlaI: gene sequences and 5' consensus sequences of operons under FlbB and FlaI control.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D H; Frantz, B B; Matsumura, P

    1988-01-01

    The regulation of the expression of the operons in the flagella-chemotaxis regulon in Escherichia coli has been shown to be a highly ordered cascade which closely parallels the assembly of the flagellar structure and the chemotaxis machinery (T. Iino, Annu. Rev. Genet. 11:161-182, 1977; Y. Komeda, J. Bacteriol. 168: 1315-1318). The master operon, flbB, has been sequenced, and one of its gene products (FlaI) has been identified. On the basis of the deduced amino acid sequence, the FlbB protein has similarity to an alternate sigma factor which is responsible for expression of flagella in Bacillus subtilis. In addition, we have sequenced the 5' regions of a number of flagellar operons and compared these sequences with the 5' region of flagellar operons directly and indirectly under FlbB and FlaI control. We found both a consensus sequence which has been shown to be in all other flagellar operons (J. D. Helmann and M. J. Chamberlin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:6422-6424) and a derivative consensus sequence, which is found only in the 5' region of operons directly under FlbB and FlaI control. Images PMID:2832369

  8. Identification and characterization of flagellar biosynthetic genes in Yersinia ruckeri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using transposon mutagenesis we have identified a Yersinia ruckeri serovar I mutant defective in both motility and production of secreted lipase activity. Sequence analysis of this mutant revealed a single transposon insertion in an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to flhA, a flagellar biosynt...

  9. Basal Body Structures Differentially Affect Transcription of RpoN- and FliA-Dependent Flagellar Genes in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Flagellar biogenesis in Helicobacter pylori is regulated by a transcriptional hierarchy governed by three sigma factors, RpoD (σ80), RpoN (σ54), and FliA (σ28), that temporally coordinates gene expression with the assembly of the flagellum. Previous studies showed that loss of flagellar protein export apparatus components inhibits transcription of flagellar genes. The FlgS/FlgR two-component system activates transcription of RpoN-dependent genes though an unknown mechanism. To understand better the extent to which flagellar gene regulation is coupled to flagellar assembly, we disrupted flagellar biogenesis at various points and determined how these mutations affected transcription of RpoN-dependent (flaB and flgE) and FliA-dependent (flaA) genes. The MS ring (encoded by fliF) is one of the earliest flagellar structures assembled. Deletion of fliF resulted in the elimination of RpoN-dependent transcripts and an ∼4-fold decrease in flaA transcript levels. FliH is a cytoplasmic protein that functions with the C ring protein FliN to shuttle substrates to the export apparatus. Deletions of fliH and genes encoding C ring components (fliM and fliY) decreased transcript levels of flaB and flgE but had little or no effect on transcript levels of flaA. Transcript levels of flaB and flgE were elevated in mutants where genes encoding rod proteins (fliE and flgBC) were deleted, while transcript levels of flaA was reduced ∼2-fold in both mutants. We propose that FlgS responds to an assembly checkpoint associated with the export apparatus and that FliH and one or more C ring component assist FlgS in engaging this flagellar structure. IMPORTANCE The mechanisms used by bacteria to couple transcription of flagellar genes with assembly of the flagellum are poorly understood. The results from this study identified components of the H. pylori flagellar basal body that either positively or negatively affect expression of RpoN-dependent flagellar genes. Some of these

  10. A mutation that uncouples flagellum assembly from transcription alters the temporal pattern of flagellar gene expression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Mangan, E K; Bartamian, M; Gober, J W

    1995-01-01

    The transcription of flagellar genes in Caulobacter crescentus is regulated by cell cycle events that culminate in the synthesis of a new flagellum once every cell division. Early flagellar gene products regulate the expression of late flagellar genes at two distinct stages of the flagellar trans-acting hierarchy. Here we investigate the coupling of early flagellar biogenesis with middle and late flagellar gene expression. We have isolated mutants (bfa) that do not require early class II flagellar gene products for the transcription of middle or late flagellar genes. bfa mutant strains are apparently defective in a negative regulatory pathway that couples early flagellar biogenesis to late flagellar gene expression. The bfa regulatory pathway functions solely at the level of transcription. Although flagellin promoters are transcribed in class II/bfa double mutants, there is no detectable flagellin protein on immunoblots prepared from mutant cell extracts. This finding suggests that early flagellar biogenesis is coupled to gene expression by two distinct mechanisms: one that negatively regulates transcription, mediated by bfa, and another that functions posttranscriptionally. To determine whether bfa affects the temporal pattern of late flagellar gene expression, cell cycle experiments were performed in bfa mutant strains. In a bfa mutant strain, flagellin expression fails to shut off at its normal time in the cell division cycle. This experimental result indicates that bfa may function as a regulator of flagellar gene transcription late in the cell cycle, after early flagellar structures have been assembled. PMID:7768816

  11. Rcs signalling-activated transcription of rcsA induces strong anti-sense transcription of upstream fliPQR flagellar genes from a weak intergenic promoter: regulatory roles for the anti-sense transcript in virulence and motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingfeng; Harshey, Rasika M

    2009-10-01

    In Salmonella enterica, an activated Rcs signalling system inhibits initiation of transcription of the flhD master operon. Under these conditions, where motility is shut down, microarray experiments showed an increased RNA signal for three flagellar genes -fliPQR- located upstream of rcsA. We show here that it is the anti-sense (AS) strand of these genes that is transcribed, originating at a weak promoter in the intergenic region between fliR and rcsA. RcsA is an auxiliary regulator for the Rcs system, whose transcription is dependent on the response regulator RcsB. Rcs-activated rightward transcription, but not translation, of rcsA is required for stimulation of leftward AS transcription. Our results implicate a combined action of RcsB and rcsA transcription in activating the AS promoter, likely by modulating DNA superhelicity in the intergenic region. We show that the AS transcript regulates many genes in the Rcs regulon, including SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence and stress-response genes. In the wild-type strain the AS transcript is present in low amounts, independent of Rcs signalling. Here, AS transcription modulates complementary sense RNA levels and impacts swarming motility. It appears that the flagellar AS transcript has been co-opted by the Rcs system to regulate virulence. PMID:19703110

  12. Rcs signaling-activated transcription of rcsA induces strong anti-sense transcription of upstream fliPQR flagellar genes from a weak intergenic promoter: regulatory roles for the anti-sense transcript in virulence and motility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingfeng; Harshey, Rasika M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In Salmonella enterica, an activated Rcs signaling system inhibits initiation of transcription of the flhD master operon. Under these conditions, where motility is shut down, microarray experiments showed an increased RNA signal for three flagellar genes - fliPQR - located upstream of rcsA. We show here that it is the anti-sense (AS) strand of these genes that is transcribed, originating at a weak promoter in the intergenic region between fliR and rcsA. RcsA is an auxiliary regulator for the Rcs system, whose transcription is dependent on the response regulator RcsB. Rcs-activated rightward transcription, but not translation, of rcsA is required for stimulation of leftward AS transcription. Our results implicate a combined action of RcsB and rcsA transcription in activating the AS promoter, likely by modulating DNA superhelicity in the intergenic region. We show that the AS transcript regulates many genes in the Rcs regulon, including SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence and stress-response genes. In the wild-type strain the AS transcript is present in low amounts, independent of Rcs signaling. Here, AS transcription modulates complementary sense RNA levels and impacts swarming motility. It appears that the flagellar AS transcript has been co-opted by the Rcs system to regulate virulence. PMID:19703110

  13. Functional Activation of the Flagellar Type III Secretion Export Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andrew M.; Calvo, Rebecca A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Flagella are assembled sequentially from the inside-out with morphogenetic checkpoints that enforce the temporal order of subunit addition. Here we show that flagellar basal bodies fail to proceed to hook assembly at high frequency in the absence of the monotopic protein SwrB of Bacillus subtilis. Genetic suppressor analysis indicates that SwrB activates the flagellar type III secretion export apparatus by the membrane protein FliP. Furthermore, mutants defective in the flagellar C-ring phenocopy the absence of SwrB for reduced hook frequency and C-ring defects may be bypassed either by SwrB overexpression or by a gain-of-function allele in the polymerization domain of FliG. We conclude that SwrB enhances the probability that the flagellar basal body adopts a conformation proficient for secretion to ensure that rod and hook subunits are not secreted in the absence of a suitable platform on which to polymerize. PMID:26244495

  14. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies orthologs of ciliary disease genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2005-01-01

    The important role that cilia and flagella play in human disease creates an urgent need to identify genes involved in ciliary assembly and function. The strong and specific induction of flagellar-coding genes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggests that transcriptional profiling of such cells would reveal new flagella-related genes. We have conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA transcript levels during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas by using maskless photolithography method-produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences for all exons of the 19,803 predicted genes. This analysis represents previously uncharacterized whole-genome transcriptional activity profiling study in this important model organism. Analysis of strongly induced genes reveals a large set of known flagellar components and also identifies a number of important disease-related proteins as being involved with cilia and flagella, including the zebrafish polycystic kidney genes Qilin, Reptin, and Pontin, as well as the testis-expressed tubby-like protein TULP2.

  15. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies orthologs of ciliary disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2005-01-01

    The important role that cilia and flagella play in human disease creates an urgent need to identify genes involved in ciliary assembly and function. The strong and specific induction of flagellar-coding genes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggests that transcriptional profiling of such cells would reveal new flagella-related genes. We have conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA transcript levels during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas by using maskless photolithography method-produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences for all exons of the 19,803 predicted genes. This analysis represents previously uncharacterized whole-genome transcriptional activity profiling study in this important model organism. Analysis of strongly induced genes reveals a large set of known flagellar components and also identifies a number of important disease-related proteins as being involved with cilia and flagella, including the zebrafish polycystic kidney genes Qilin, Reptin, and Pontin, as well as the testis-expressed tubby-like protein TULP2. PMID:15738400

  16. A developmentally regulated Caulobacter flagellar promoter is activated by 3' enhancer and IHF binding elements.

    PubMed Central

    Gober, J W; Shapiro, L

    1992-01-01

    The transcription of a group of flagellar genes is temporally and spatially regulated during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle. These genes all share the same 5' cis-regulatory elements: a sigma 54 promoter, a binding site for integration host factor (IHF), and an enhancer sequence, known as the ftr element. We have partially purified the ftr-binding proteins, and we show that they require the same enhancer sequences for binding as are required for transcriptional activation. We have also partially purified the Caulobacter homolog of IHF and demonstrate that it can facilitate in vitro integrase-mediated lambda recombination. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we provide the first demonstration that natural enhancer sequences and IHF binding elements that reside 3' to the sigma 54 promoter of a bacterial gene, flaNQ, are required for transcription of the operon, in vivo. The IHF protein and the ftr-binding protein is primarily restricted to the predivisional cell, the cell type in which these promoters are transcribed. flaNQ promoter expression is localized to the swarmer pole of the predivisional cell, as are other flagellar promoters that possess these regulatory sequences 5' to the start site. The requirement for an IHF binding site and an ftr-enhancer element in spatially transcribed flagellar promoters indicates that a common mechanism may be responsible for both temporal and polar transcription. Images PMID:1392079

  17. Effects of various agents on flagellar activity, flagellar autotomy and cell viability in four species of Chlamydomonas (chlorophyta: volvocales).

    PubMed

    Lewin, R A; Lee, T H; Fang, L S

    1982-01-01

    Over 200 strains of green algal flagellates, representing about 100 species, were examined for their suitability as experimental organisms for studies of flagellar activity. The cells of all species shed their flagella under unfavourable conditions of temperature or pH, or in the presence of alcohols, detergents or toxic agents of various kinds. For further studies of flagellar activity, motility and autotomy (biologically induced shedding) in particular, we selected four species of Chlamydomonas: C. dysosmos Moewus, C. moewusii Gerloff, C. monoica Strehlow and C. reinhardtii Dangeard. Agents found to inhibit motility without inducing death or flagellar autotomy included azide, arsenite, thiosulphate, cyanide, ferricyanide, hydroxylamine, chloral hydrate, malonate, p-chloro-mercury benzoate and cytochalasin-B, each in a limited range of concentrations which differed according to species and strain. Higher concentrations of these agents caused the flagella to be shed. Since flagellar autotomy is a means by which a cell can quickly reduce the area of its permeable surface, it may have a positive survival value for species liable to be subjected to unfavourable physicochemical conditions. PMID:6764045

  18. T-POP array identifies EcnR and PefI-SrgD as novel regulators of flagellar gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Christopher E; Lee, Changhan; Hughes, Kelly T

    2009-03-01

    The T-POP transposon was employed in a general screen for tetracycline (Tet)-induced chromosomal loci that exhibited Tet-activated or Tet-repressed expression of a fliC-lac transcriptional fusion. Insertions that activated flagellar transcription were located in flagellar genes. T-POP insertions that exhibited Tet-dependent fliC-lac inhibition were isolated upstream of the ecnR, fimZ, pefI-srgD, rcsB, and ydiV genes and in the flagellar gene flgA, which is located upstream of the anti-sigma(28) factor gene flgM. When expressed from the chromosomal P(araBAD) promoter, EcnR, FimZ, PefI-SrgD, and RcsB inhibited the transcription of the flagellar class 1 flhDC operon. YdiV, which is weakly homologous to EAL domain proteins involved in cyclic-di-GMP regulation, appears to act at a step after class 1 transcription. By using a series of deletions of the regulatory genes to try to disrupt each pathway, these regulators were found to act largely independently of one another. These results identify EcnR and PefI-SrgD as additional components of the complex regulatory network controlling flagellar expression. PMID:19114490

  19. T-POP Array Identifies EcnR and PefI-SrgD as Novel Regulators of Flagellar Gene Expression▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Christopher E.; Lee, Changhan; Hughes, Kelly T.

    2009-01-01

    The T-POP transposon was employed in a general screen for tetracycline (Tet)-induced chromosomal loci that exhibited Tet-activated or Tet-repressed expression of a fliC-lac transcriptional fusion. Insertions that activated flagellar transcription were located in flagellar genes. T-POP insertions that exhibited Tet-dependent fliC-lac inhibition were isolated upstream of the ecnR, fimZ, pefI-srgD, rcsB, and ydiV genes and in the flagellar gene flgA, which is located upstream of the anti-σ28 factor gene flgM. When expressed from the chromosomal ParaBAD promoter, EcnR, FimZ, PefI-SrgD, and RcsB inhibited the transcription of the flagellar class 1 flhDC operon. YdiV, which is weakly homologous to EAL domain proteins involved in cyclic-di-GMP regulation, appears to act at a step after class 1 transcription. By using a series of deletions of the regulatory genes to try to disrupt each pathway, these regulators were found to act largely independently of one another. These results identify EcnR and PefI-SrgD as additional components of the complex regulatory network controlling flagellar expression. PMID:19114490

  20. FliZ is a global regulatory protein affecting the expression of flagellar and virulence genes in individual Xenorhabdus nematophila bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Jubelin, Grégory; Lanois, Anne; Severac, Dany; Rialle, Stéphanie; Longin, Cyrille; Gaudriault, Sophie; Givaudan, Alain

    2013-10-01

    Heterogeneity in the expression of various bacterial genes has been shown to result in the presence of individuals with different phenotypes within clonal bacterial populations. The genes specifying motility and flagellar functions are coordinately regulated and form a complex regulon, the flagellar regulon. Complex interplay has recently been demonstrated in the regulation of flagellar and virulence gene expression in many bacterial pathogens. We show here that FliZ, a DNA-binding protein, plays a key role in the insect pathogen, Xenorhabdus nematophila, affecting not only hemolysin production and virulence in insects, but efficient swimming motility. RNA-Seq analysis identified FliZ as a global regulatory protein controlling the expression of 278 Xenorhabdus genes either directly or indirectly. FliZ is required for the efficient expression of all flagellar genes, probably through its positive feedback loop, which controls expression of the flhDC operon, the master regulator of the flagellar circuit. FliZ also up- or downregulates the expression of numerous genes encoding non-flagellar proteins potentially involved in key steps of the Xenorhabdus lifecycle. Single-cell analysis revealed the bimodal expression of six identified markers of the FliZ regulon during exponential growth of the bacterial population. In addition, a combination of fluorescence-activated cell sorting and RT-qPCR quantification showed that this bimodality generated a mixed population of cells either expressing ("ON state") or not expressing ("OFF state") FliZ-dependent genes. Moreover, studies of a bacterial population exposed to a graded series of FliZ concentrations showed that FliZ functioned as a rheostat, controlling the rate of transition between the "OFF" and "ON" states in individuals. FliZ thus plays a key role in cell fate decisions, by transiently creating individuals with different potentials for motility and host interactions. PMID:24204316

  1. Differentiation of Salmonella phase 1 flagellar antigen types by restriction of the amplified fliC gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kilger, G; Grimont, P A

    1993-01-01

    The large antigenic diversity (over 2,300 serotypes) expressed by Salmonella strains can probably be observed at the genetic level. The phase 1 flagellin gene fliC was amplified, and the amplified fragment was cleaved with a mixture of both endonucleases TaqI and ScaI. The restriction patterns observed allowed differentiation of flagellar types b, i, d, j, l,v, and z10. Flagellar group g (g,m, g,p, or g,m,s) could be differentiated from the other flagellar types. Flagellar types r and e,h could not be separated, although they could be distinguished from the other flagellar types studied. Practical applications of flagellar gene restriction are the distinction between serotype Gallinarum-Pullorum, which carries a cryptic gene for flagellar type g,m, and nonmotile Vi-negative variants of serotype Typhi, and the tentative assignation of nonmotile variants of Salmonella serotypes to a flagellar type. Images PMID:8388886

  2. Identification of flagellar motility genes in Yersinia ruckeri by transposon mutagenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we demonstrate that flagellar secretion is required for production of secreted lipase activity in the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri and that neither of these activities is necessary for virulence in rainbow trout. Our results suggest a possible molecular mechanism for the emergence of non-mot...

  3. RpoE may promote flagellar gene expression in Salmonella enterica serovar typhi under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong; Sheng, Xiumei; Zhang, Haifang; Zou, Xin; Ni, Bin; Xu, Shungao; Zhu, Xueming; Xu, Huaxi; Huang, Xinxiang

    2011-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi z66 positive strain contains a fljBA-like operon on a linear plasmid. The operon contains the gene fljB:z66 which encodes the z66 antigen. RpoE is a sigma factor σ(E) that initiates transcription of a series of genes in Escherichia and Salmonella under environmental stresses. To investigate whether the gene fljB:z66 is regulated by RpoE (σ(E)), a rpoE deletion mutant of S. enterica serovar Typhi (ΔrpoE) was prepared in this study. The defective motility of the ΔrpoE was confirmed firstly. Transcriptional expression of flagellar genes was screened using a genomic DNA microarray. Some class-2 and most class-3 flagellar genes were downregulated in the ΔrpoE after 30 min of hyperosmotic stress. The expression of fliA and fljB:z66, a class-2 flagellar gene and a class-3 flagellar gene, obviously decreased; however, expression of the class-1 flagellar genes flhDC did not change obviously in the ΔrpoE compared to the wild-type strain in the same conditions. Results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that the expression levels of fliA and fljB:z66 in the ΔrpoE after 30 min of hyperosmotic stress decreased about five and eightfold, respectively, compared to the wild-type strain. Similar results were observed at 120 min of hyperosmotic stress. Western blotting and qRT-PCR analysis showed that expression of fliA and fljB:z66 was significantly increased after supplemental expression of rpoE with a recombinant plasmid pBADrpoE in the ΔrpoE strain. These results demonstrated that RpoE promoted the expression of class-3 flagellar genes and it might be performed by initiating the expression of fliA in S. enterica serovar Typhi under hyperosmotic stress. PMID:20717675

  4. DNA sequence analysis, gene product identification, and localization of flagellar motor components of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Malakooti, J; Komeda, Y; Matsumura, P

    1989-01-01

    The Escherichia coli operon designated flaA contains seven flagellar genes; among them are two switch protein genes whose products are believed to interface with the motility and chemotaxis machinery of the cell. Complementation analysis using several plasmids carrying different portions of the flaA operon and analysis of expression of these plasmids in minicells allowed the identification of two flagellar gene products. The MotD (now called FliN) protein, a flagellar switch protein, was determined to have an apparent molecular weight of 16,000, and the FlaAI (FliL) protein, encoded by a previously unidentified gene, had an apparent molecular weight of 17,000. DNA sequence analysis of the motD gene revealed an open reading frame of 414 base pairs. There were two possible initiation codons (ATG) for motD translation, the first of which overlapped with the termination codon of the upstream gene, flaAII (fliN). The wild-type flaAI gene on the chromosome was replaced with a flaAI gene mutated in vitro. Loss of the flaAI gene product resulted in a nonmotile and nonflagellated phenotype. The subcellular location for both the MotD and FlaAI proteins was determined; the FlaAI protein partitioned exclusively in the insoluble fraction of a whole minicell sonic extract, whereas the MotD protein remained in both the soluble and insoluble fractions. In addition, we subcloned a 2.2-kilobase-pair DNA fragment capable of complementing the remaining four genes of the flaA operon (flbD [fliO], flaR [fliP], flaQ [fliQ], and flaP [fliR]). Images PMID:2651416

  5. Timing of flagellar gene expression in the Caulobacter cell cycle is determined by a transcriptional cascade of positive regulatory genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, N; Chen, L S; Mullin, D A; Newton, A

    1991-01-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus flagellar (fla) genes are organized in a regulatory hierarchy in which genes at each level are required for expression of those at the next lower level. To determine the role of this hierarchy in the timing of fla gene expression, we have examined the organization and cell cycle regulation of genes located in the hook gene cluster. As shown here, this cluster is organized into four multicistronic transcription units flaN, flbG, flaO, and flbF that contain fla genes plus a fifth transcription unit II.1 of unknown function. Transcription unit II.1 is regulated independently of the fla gene hierarchy, and it is expressed with a unique pattern of periodicity very late in the cell cycle. The flaN, flbG, and flaO operons are all transcribed periodically, and flaO, which is near the top of the hierarchy and required in trans for the activation of flaN and flbG operons, is expressed earlier in the cell cycle than the other two transcription units. We have shown that delaying flaO transcription by fusing it to the II.1 promoter also delayed the subsequent expression of the flbG operon and the 27- and 25-kDa flagellin genes that are at the bottom of the regulatory hierarchy. Thus, the sequence and timing of fla gene expression in the cell cycle are determined in large measure by the positions of these genes in the regulatory hierarchy. These results also suggest that periodic transcription is a general feature of fla gene expression in C. crescentus. Images PMID:1847367

  6. Expression of an early gene in the flagellar regulatory hierarchy is sensitive to an interruption in DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Dingwall, A; Zhuang, W Y; Quon, K; Shapiro, L

    1992-01-01

    Genes involved in the biogenesis of the flagellum in Caulobacter crescentus are expressed in a temporal order and are controlled by a trans-acting regulatory hierarchy. Strains with mutations in one of these genes, flaS, cannot transcribe flagellar structural genes and divide abnormally. This gene was cloned, and it was found that its transcription is initiated early in the cell cycle. Subclones that restored motility to FlaS mutants also restored normal cell division. Although transcription of flaS was not dependent on any other known gene in the flagellar hierarchy, it was autoregulated and subject to mild negative control by other genes at the same level of the hierarchy. An additional level of control was revealed when it was found that an interruption of DNA replication caused the inhibition of flaS transcription. The flaS transcript initiation site was identified, and an apparently unique promoter sequence was found to be highly conserved among the genes at the same level of the hierarchy. The flagellar genes with this conserved 5' region all initiate transcription early in the cell cycle and are all sensitive to a disruption in DNA replication. Mutations in these genes also cause an aberrant cell division phenotype. Therefore, flagellar genes at or near the top of the hierarchy may be controlled, in part, by a unique transcription factor and may be responsive to the same DNA replication cues that mediate other cell cycle events, such as cell division. Images PMID:1372311

  7. Temporal and spatial regulation of fliP, an early flagellar gene of Caulobacter crescentus that is required for motility and normal cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Gober, J W; Boyd, C H; Jarvis, M; Mangan, E K; Rizzo, M F; Wingrove, J A

    1995-01-01

    In Caulobacter crescentus, the genes encoding a single polar flagellum are expressed under cell cycle control. In this report, we describe the characterization of two early class II flagellar genes contained in the orfX-fliP locus. Strains containing mutations in this locus exhibit a filamentous growth phenotype and fail to express class III and IV flagellar genes. A complementing DNA fragment was sequenced and found to contain two potential open reading frames. The first, orfX, is predicted to encode a 105-amino-acid polypeptide that is similar to MopB, a protein which is required for both motility and virulence in Erwinia carotovora. The deduced amino acid sequence of the second open reading frame, fliP, is 264 amino acids in length and shows significant sequence identity with the FliP protein of Escherichia coli as well as virulence proteins of several plant and mammalian pathogens. The FliP homolog in pathogenic organisms has been implicated in the secretion of virulence factors, suggesting that the export of virulence proteins and some flagellar proteins share a common mechanism. The 5' end of orfX-fliP mRNA was determined and revealed an upstream promoter sequence that shares few conserved features with that of other early Caulobacter flagellar genes, suggesting that transcription of orfX-fliP may require a different complement of trans-acting factors. In C. crescentus, orfX-fliP is transcribed under cell cycle control, with a peak of transcriptional activity in the middle portion of the cell cycle. Later in the cell cycle, orfX-fliP expression occurs in both poles of the predivisional cell. Protein fusions to a lacZ reporter gene indicate that FliP is specifically targeted to the swarmer compartment of the predivisional cell. PMID:7601828

  8. The RcsCDB signaling system and swarming motility in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium: dual regulation of flagellar and SPI-2 virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingfeng; Zhao, Yifang; McClelland, Michael; Harshey, Rasika M

    2007-12-01

    The Rcs phosphorelay is a multicomponent signaling system that positively regulates colanic acid synthesis and negatively regulates motility and virulence. We have exploited a spontaneously isolated mutant, IgaA(T191P), that is nearly maximally activated for the Rcs system to identify a vast set of genes that respond to the stimulation, and we report new regulatory properties of this signaling system in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Microarray data show that the Rcs system normally functions as a positive regulator of SPI-2 and other genes important for the growth of Salmonella in macrophages, although when highly activated the system completely represses the SPI-1/SPI-2 virulence, flagellar, and fimbrial biogenesis pathways. The auxiliary protein RcsA, which works with RcsB to positively regulate colanic acid and other target genes, not only stimulates but also antagonizes the positive regulation of many genes in the igaA mutant. We show that RcsB represses motility through the RcsB box in the promoter region of the master operon flhDC and that RcsA is not required for this regulation. Curiously, RcsB selectively stimulates expression of the flagellar type 3 secretion genes fliPQR; an RcsAB box located downstream of fliR influences this regulation. We show that excess colanic acid impairs swimming and inhibits swarming motility, consistent with the inverse regulation of the two pathways by the Rcs system. PMID:17905992

  9. Comprehensive Mapping of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Devon M.; Bonocora, Richard P.; Wade, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellar synthesis is a highly regulated process in all motile bacteria. In Escherichia coli and related species, the transcription factor FlhDC is the master regulator of a multi-tiered transcription network. FlhDC activates transcription of a number of genes, including some flagellar genes and the gene encoding the alternative Sigma factor FliA. Genes whose expression is required late in flagellar assembly are primarily transcribed by FliA, imparting temporal regulation of transcription and coupling expression to flagellar assembly. In this study, we use ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to comprehensively map the E. coli FlhDC and FliA regulons. We define a surprisingly restricted FlhDC regulon, including two novel regulated targets and two binding sites not associated with detectable regulation of surrounding genes. In contrast, we greatly expand the known FliA regulon. Surprisingly, 30 of the 52 FliA binding sites are located inside genes. Two of these intragenic promoters are associated with detectable noncoding RNAs, while the others either produce highly unstable RNAs or are inactive under these conditions. Together, our data redefine the E. coli flagellar regulatory network, and provide new insight into the temporal orchestration of gene expression that coordinates the flagellar assembly process. PMID:25275371

  10. Molecular Characterization of fliD Gene Encoding Flagellar Cap and Its Expression among Clostridium difficile Isolates from Different Serogroups

    PubMed Central

    Tasteyre, Albert; Karjalainen, Tuomo; Avesani, Véronique; Delmée, Michel; Collignon, Anne; Bourlioux, Pierre; Barc, Marie-Claude

    2001-01-01

    The fliD gene encoding the flagellar cap protein (FliD) of Clostridium difficile was studied in 46 isolates belonging to serogroups A, B, C, D, F, G, H, I, K, X, and S3, including 30 flagellated strains and 16 nonflagellated strains. In all but three isolates, amplification by PCR and reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the fliD gene is present and transcribed in both flagellated and nonflagellated strains. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of amplified fliD gene products revealed interstrain homogeneity, with one of two major patterns (a and b) found in all but one of the strains, which had pattern c. A polyclonal monospecific antiserum raised to the recombinant FliD protein reacted in immunoblots with crude flagellar preparations from 28 of 30 flagellated strains but did not recognize FliD from nonflagellated strains. The fliD genes from five strains representative of the three different RFLP groups were sequenced, and sequencing revealed 100% identity between the strains with the same pattern and 88% identity among strains with different patterns. Our results show that even though FliD is a structure exposed to the outer environment, the flagellar cap protein is very well conserved, and this high degree of conservation suggests that it has a very specific function in attachment to cell or mucus receptors. PMID:11230454

  11. The Helicobacter pylori flbA flagellar biosynthesis and regulatory gene is required for motility and virulence and modulates urease of H. pylori and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    McGee, David J; Coker, Christopher; Testerman, Traci L; Harro, Janette M; Gibson, Susan V; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori and Proteus mirabilis ureases are nickel-requiring metallo-enzymes that hydrolyse urea to NH3 and CO2. In both H. pylori and in an Escherichia coli model of H. pylori urease activity, a high affinity nickel transporter, NixA, is required for optimal urease activity, whereas the urea-dependent UreR positive transcriptional activator governs optimal urease expression in P. mirabilis. The H. pylori flbA gene is a flagellar biosynthesis and regulatory gene that modulates urease activity in the E. coli model of H. pylori urease activity. All flbA mutants of eight strains of H. pylori were non-motile and five had a strain-dependent alteration in urease activity. The flbA gene decreased urease activity 15-fold when expressed in E. coli containing the H. pylori urease locus and the nixA gene; this was reversed by disruption of flbA. The flbA gene decreased nixA transcription. flbA also decreased urease activity three-fold in E. coli containing the P. mirabilis urease locus in a urea- and UreR-dependent fashion. Here the flbA gene repressed the P. mirabilis urease promoter. Thus, FlbA decreased urease activity of both H. pylori and P. mirabilis, but through distinct mechanisms. H. pylori wild-type strain SS1 colonised gerbils at a mean of 5.4 x 10(6) cfu/g of antrum and caused chronic gastritis and lesions in the antrum. In contrast, the flbA mutant did not colonise five of six gerbils and caused no lesions, indicating that motility mediated by flbA was required for colonisation. Because FlbA regulates flagellar biosynthesis and secretion, as well as forming a structural component of the flagellar secretion apparatus, two seemingly unrelated virulence attributes, motility and urease, may be coupled in H. pylori and P. mirabilis and possibly also in other motile, ureolytic bacteria. PMID:12448680

  12. Mutations in the Borrelia burgdorferi Flagellar Type III Secretion System Genes fliH and fliI Profoundly Affect Spirochete Flagellar Assembly, Morphology, Motility, Structure, and Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lihui; Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Jun; Norris, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi migrates to distant sites in the tick vectors and mammalian hosts through robust motility and chemotaxis activities. FliH and FliI are two cytoplasmic proteins that play important roles in the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated export and assembly of flagellar structural proteins. However, detailed analyses of the roles of FliH and FliI in B. burgdorferi have not been reported. In this study, fliH and fliI transposon mutants were utilized to dissect the mechanism of the Borrelia type III secretion system. The fliH and fliI mutants exhibited rod-shaped or string-like morphology, greatly reduced motility, division defects (resulting in elongated organisms with incomplete division points), and noninfectivity in mice by needle inoculation. Mutants in fliH and fliI were incapable of translational motion in 1% methylcellulose or soft agar. Inactivation of either fliH or fliI resulted in the loss of the FliH-FliI complex from otherwise intact flagellar motors, as determined by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Flagellar assemblies were still present in the mutant cells, albeit in lower numbers than in wild-type cells and with truncated flagella. Genetic complementation of fliH and fliI mutants in trans restored their wild-type morphology, motility, and flagellar motor structure; however, full-length flagella and infectivity were not recovered in these complemented mutants. Based on these results, disruption of either fliH or fliI in B. burgdorferi results in a severe defect in flagellar structure and function and cell division but does not completely block the export and assembly of flagellar hook and filament proteins. PMID:25968649

  13. Expression of nipP.w of Pectobacterium wasabiae is dependent on functional flgKL flagellar genes.

    PubMed

    Laasik, Eve; Põllumaa, Lee; Pasanen, Miia; Mattinen, Laura; Pirhonen, Minna; Mäe, Andres

    2014-01-01

    While flagellum-driven motility is hypothesized to play a role in the virulence of Pectobacterium species, there is no direct evidence that genes involved in flagellum assembly regulate the synthesis of virulence factors. The purpose of this study was to identify genes that affect the production or secretion of necrosis-inducing protein (Nip) in the strain SCC3193. Transposon mutagenesis of an RpoS strain overexpressing NipP.w was performed, and a mutant associated with decreased necrosis of tobacco leaves was detected. The mutant contained a transposon in the regulatory region upstream of the flagellar genes flgK and flgL. Additional mutants were generated related to the flagellar genes fliC and fliA. The mutation in flgKL, but not those in fliC and fliA, inhibited nipP.w transcription. Moreover, the regulatory effect of the flgKL mutation on nipP.w transcription was partially dependent on the Rcs phosphorelay. Secretion of NipP.w was also dependent on a type II secretion mechanism. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the flgKL mutation is responsible for reduced motility and lower levels of nipP.w expression. PMID:24173527

  14. Escherichia coli flagellar genes as target sites for integration and expression of genetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Juhas, Mario; Evans, Lewis D B; Frost, Joe; Davenport, Peter W; Yarkoni, Orr; Fraser, Gillian M; Ajioka, James W

    2014-01-01

    E. coli is a model platform for engineering microbes, so genetic circuit design and analysis will be greatly facilitated by simple and effective approaches to introduce genetic constructs into the E. coli chromosome at well-characterised loci. We combined the Red recombinase system of bacteriophage λ and Isothermal Gibson Assembly for rapid integration of novel DNA constructs into the E. coli chromosome. We identified the flagellar region as a promising region for integration and expression of genetic circuits. We characterised integration and expression at four candidate loci, fliD, fliS, fliT, and fliY, of the E. coli flagellar region 3a. The integration efficiency and expression from the four integrations varied considerably. Integration into fliD and fliS significantly decreased motility, while integration into fliT and fliY had only a minor effect on the motility. None of the integrations had negative effects on the growth of the bacteria. Overall, we found that fliT was the most suitable integration site. PMID:25350000

  15. Escherichia coli Flagellar Genes as Target Sites for Integration and Expression of Genetic Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Evans, Lewis D. B.; Frost, Joe; Davenport, Peter W.; Yarkoni, Orr; Fraser, Gillian M.; Ajioka, James W.

    2014-01-01

    E. coli is a model platform for engineering microbes, so genetic circuit design and analysis will be greatly facilitated by simple and effective approaches to introduce genetic constructs into the E. coli chromosome at well-characterised loci. We combined the Red recombinase system of bacteriophage λ and Isothermal Gibson Assembly for rapid integration of novel DNA constructs into the E. coli chromosome. We identified the flagellar region as a promising region for integration and expression of genetic circuits. We characterised integration and expression at four candidate loci, fliD, fliS, fliT, and fliY, of the E. coli flagellar region 3a. The integration efficiency and expression from the four integrations varied considerably. Integration into fliD and fliS significantly decreased motility, while integration into fliT and fliY had only a minor effect on the motility. None of the integrations had negative effects on the growth of the bacteria. Overall, we found that fliT was the most suitable integration site. PMID:25350000

  16. A Protein Methylation Pathway in Chlamydomonas Flagella Is Active during Flagellar Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Mark J.; Ulland, Megan

    2008-01-01

    During intraflagellar transport (IFT), the regulation of motor proteins, the loading and unloading of cargo and the turnover of flagellar proteins all occur at the flagellar tip. To begin an analysis of the protein composition of the flagellar tip, we used difference gel electrophoresis to compare long versus short (i.e., regenerating) flagella. The concentration of tip proteins should be higher relative to that of tubulin (which is constant per unit length of the flagellum) in short compared with long flagella. One protein we have identified is the cobalamin-independent form of methionine synthase (MetE). Antibodies to MetE label flagella in a punctate pattern reminiscent of IFT particle staining, and immunoblot analysis reveals that the amount of MetE in flagella is low in full-length flagella, increased in regenerating flagella, and highest in resorbing flagella. Four methylated proteins have been identified in resorbing flagella, using antibodies specific for asymmetrically dimethylated arginine residues. These proteins are found almost exclusively in the axonemal fraction, and the methylated forms of these proteins are essentially absent in full-length and regenerating flagella. Because most cells resorb cilia/flagella before cell division, these data indicate a link between flagellar protein methylation and progression through the cell cycle. PMID:18701702

  17. pH regulates genes for flagellar motility, catabolism, and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Lisa M; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Bondurant, Sandra S; Radmacher, Michael; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 were compared as a function of steady-state external pH. Cultures were grown to an optical density at 600 nm of 0.3 in potassium-modified Luria-Bertani medium buffered at pH 5.0, 7.0, and 8.7. For each of the three pH conditions, cDNA from RNA of five independent cultures was hybridized to Affymetrix E. coli arrays. Analysis of variance with an alpha level of 0.001 resulted in 98% power to detect genes showing a twofold difference in expression. Normalized expression indices were calculated for each gene and intergenic region (IG). Differential expression among the three pH classes was observed for 763 genes and 353 IGs. Hierarchical clustering yielded six well-defined clusters of pH profiles, designated Acid High (highest expression at pH 5.0), Acid Low (lowest expression at pH 5.0), Base High (highest at pH 8.7), Base Low (lowest at pH 8.7), Neutral High (highest at pH 7.0, lower in acid or base), and Neutral Low (lowest at pH 7.0, higher at both pH extremes). Flagellar and chemotaxis genes were repressed at pH 8.7 (Base Low cluster), where the cell's transmembrane proton potential is diminished by the maintenance of an inverted pH gradient. High pH also repressed the proton pumps cytochrome o (cyo) and NADH dehydrogenases I and II. By contrast, the proton-importing ATP synthase F1Fo and the microaerophilic cytochrome d (cyd), which minimizes proton export, were induced at pH 8.7. These observations are consistent with a model in which high pH represses synthesis of flagella, which expend proton motive force, while stepping up electron transport and ATPase components that keep protons inside the cell. Acid-induced genes, on the other hand, were coinduced by conditions associated with increased metabolic rate, such as oxidative stress. All six pH-dependent clusters included envelope and periplasmic proteins, which directly experience external pH. Overall, this study showed that (i) low pH accelerates acid

  18. Synthetic Cystic Fibrosis Sputum Medium Regulates Flagellar Biosynthesis through the flhF Gene in Burkholderia cenocepacia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Brijesh; Cardona, Silvia T.

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia belongs to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), a group of at least 18 distinct species that establish chronic infections in the lung of people with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). The sputum of CF patients is rich in amino acids and was previously shown to increase flagellar gene expression in B. cenocepacia. We examined flagellin expression and flagellar morphology of B. cenocepacia grown in synthetic cystic fibrosis sputum medium (SCFM) compared to minimal medium. We found that CF nutritional conditions induce increased motility and flagellin expression. Individual amino acids added at the same concentrations as found in SCFM also increased motility but not flagellin expression, suggesting a chemotactic effect of amino acids. Electron microscopy and flagella staining demonstrated that the increase in flagellin corresponds to a change in the number of flagella per cell. In minimal medium, the ratio of multiple: single: aflagellated cells was 2:3.5:4.5; while under SCFM conditions, the ratio was 7:2:1. We created a deletion mutant, ΔflhF, to study whether this putative GTPase regulates the flagellation pattern of B. cenocepacia K56-2 during growth in CF conditions. The ΔflhF mutant exhibited 80% aflagellated, 14% single and 6% multiple flagellated bacterial subpopulations. Moreover, the ratio of multiple to single flagella in WT and ΔflhF was 3.5 and 0.43, respectively in CF conditions. The observed differences suggest that FlhF positively regulates flagellin expression and the flagellation pattern in B. cenocepacia K56-2 during CF nutritional conditions. PMID:27379216

  19. Inactivation of Serpulina hyodysenteriae flaA1 and flaB1 periplasmic flagellar genes by electroporation-mediated allelic exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Rosey, E L; Kennedy, M J; Petrella, D K; Ulrich, R G; Yancey, R J

    1995-01-01

    Serpulina hyodysenteriae, the etiologic agent of swine dysentery, contains complex periplasmic flagella which are composed of multiple class A and class B polypeptides. To examine the role these proteins play in flagellar synthesis, structure, and function and to develop strains which may provide insight into the importance of motility in the etiology of this pathogen, we constructed specific periplasmic flagellar mutations in S. hyodysenteriae B204. The cloned flaA1 and flaB1 genes were disrupted by replacement of internal fragments with chloramphenicol and/or kanamycin gene cassettes. Following delivery of these suicide plasmids into S. hyodysenteriae, homologous recombination and allelic exchange at the targeted chromosomal flaA1 and flaB1 genes was verified by PCR, sequence, and Southern analysis. The utility of a chloramphenicol resistance gene cassette for targeted gene disruption was demonstrated and found more amenable than kanamycin as a selective marker in S. hyodysenteriae. Immunoblots of cell lysates of the flagellar mutants with antiserum raised against purified FlaA or FlaB confirmed the absence of the corresponding sheath or core protein. Both mutations selectively abolished expression of the targeted gene without affecting synthesis of the other flagellar polypeptide. flaA1 and flaB1 mutant strains exhibited altered motility in vitro and were less efficient in movement through a liquid medium. Paradoxically, isogenic strains containing specifically disrupted flaA1 or flaB1 alleles were capable of assembling periplasmic flagella that were morphologically normal as evidenced by electron microscopy. This is the first report of specific inactivation of a motility-associated gene in spirochetes. PMID:7592350

  20. Identification of flgZ as a Flagellar Gene Encoding a PilZ Domain Protein That Regulates Swimming Motility and Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; González de Heredia, Elena; Baena, Irene; Martín-Martín, Irene; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC) and one phosphodiesterase (BifA) implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ. PMID:24504373

  1. Decay of Genes Encoding the Oomycete Flagellar Proteome in the Downy Mildew Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis

    PubMed Central

    Judelson, Howard S.; Shrivastava, Jolly; Manson, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Zoospores are central to the life cycles of most of the eukaryotic microbes known as oomycetes, but some genera have lost the ability to form these flagellated cells. In the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans, genes encoding 257 proteins associated with flagella were identified by comparative genomics. These included the main structural components of the axoneme and basal body, proteins involved in intraflagellar transport, regulatory proteins, enzymes for maintaining ATP levels, and others. Transcripts for over three-quarters of the genes were up-regulated during sporulation, and persisted to varying degrees in the pre-zoospore stage (sporangia) and motile zoospores. Nearly all of these genes had orthologs in other eukaryotes that form flagella or cilia, but not species that lack the organelle. Orthologs of 211 of the genes were also absent from a sister taxon to P. infestans that lost the ability to form flagella, the downy mildew Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Many of the genes retained in H. arabidopsidis were also present in other non-flagellates, suggesting that they play roles both in flagella and other cellular processes. Remnants of the missing genes were often detected in the H. arabidopsidis genome. Degradation of the genes was associated with local compaction of the chromosome and a heightened propensity towards genome rearrangements, as such regions were less likely to share synteny with P. infestans. PMID:23077652

  2. Identification and characterization of the products of six region III flagellar genes (flaAII.3 through flaQII) of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Homma, M; Iino, T; Macnab, R M

    1988-01-01

    A portion of flagellar region III of the Salmonella typhimurium genome has been cloned and shown to contain six genes: flaAII.3, flaAIII, flaS, flaR, flaQI, and flaQII. Of these, all but flaQI were known to exist from mutant studies; the former flaQ has been renamed flaQII. The genes were shown by minicell analysis to encode proteins with apparent molecular masses of 28, 48, 15, 46, 17, and 37 kilodaltons, respectively. The presence of a flagellar-gene-specific promoter in the vicinity of flaQI was established by testing expression of the plasmid-encoded tetracycline resistance gene in artificial constructions. In minicell preparations, the flaAII.3 and flaR products were found principally in the cytoplasmic fraction; the rest were found principally in the membrane fraction. A comparison between the homologous genes of S. typhimurium and Escherichia coli confirmed that their genomic organizations were similar and that their products had similar molecular masses and isoelectric points. Images PMID:2834334

  3. FlgM is secreted by the flagellar export apparatus in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Rebecca A; Kearns, Daniel B

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is assembled from over 20 structural components, and flagellar gene regulation is morphogenetically coupled to the assembly state by control of the anti-sigma factor FlgM. In the Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica, FlgM inhibits late-class flagellar gene expression until the hook-basal body structural intermediate is completed and FlgM is inhibited by secretion from the cytoplasm. Here we demonstrate that FlgM is also secreted in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis and is degraded extracellularly by the proteases Epr and WprA. We further demonstrate that, like in S. enterica, the structural genes required for the flagellar hook-basal body are required for robust activation of σ(D)-dependent gene expression and efficient secretion of FlgM. Finally, we determine that FlgM secretion is strongly enhanced by, but does not strictly require, hook-basal body completion and instead demands a minimal subset of flagellar proteins that includes the FliF/FliG basal body proteins, the flagellar type III export apparatus components FliO, FliP, FliQ, FliR, FlhA, and FlhB, and the substrate specificity switch regulator FliK. PMID:25313396

  4. Listeria monocytogenes DNA Glycosylase AdlP Affects Flagellar Motility, Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Bae, Dongryeoul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is structurally similar to the Bacillus cereus alkyl base DNA glycosylase (AlkD), was identified. This determinant was involved in the transcriptional repression of flagellar motility genes and was named adlP (encoding an AlkD-like protein [AdlP]). Deletion of adlP activated the expression of flagellar motility genes at 37°C and disrupted the temperature-dependent inhibition of L. monocytogenes motility. The adlP null strains demonstrated decreased survival in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and less virulence in mice. Furthermore, the deletion of adlP significantly decreased biofilm formation and impaired the survival of bacteria under several stress conditions, including the presence of a DNA alkylation compound (methyl methanesulfonate), an oxidative agent (H2O2), and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our findings strongly suggest that adlP may encode a bifunctional protein that transcriptionally represses the expression of flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. IMPORTANCE We discovered a novel protein that we named AlkD-like protein (AdlP). This protein affected flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. Our data suggest that AdlP may be a bifunctional protein that represses flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. PMID:27316964

  5. Repression of Flagellar Genes in Exponential Phase by CsgD and CpxR, Two Crucial Modulators of Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Dudin, Omaya; Geiselmann, Johannes; Ogasawara, Hiroshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli adapts its lifestyle to the variations of environmental growth conditions, swapping between swimming motility or biofilm formation. The stationary-phase sigma factor RpoS is an important regulator of this switch, since it stimulates adhesion and represses flagellar biosynthesis. By measuring the dynamics of gene expression, we show that RpoS inhibits the transcription of the flagellar sigma factor, FliA, in exponential growth phase. RpoS also partially controls the expression of CsgD and CpxR, two transcription factors important for bacterial adhesion. We demonstrate that these two regulators repress the transcription of fliA, flgM, and tar and that this regulation is dependent on the growth medium. CsgD binds to the flgM and fliA promoters around their −10 promoter element, strongly suggesting direct repression. We show that CsgD and CpxR also affect the expression of other known modulators of cell motility. We propose an updated structure of the regulatory network controlling the choice between adhesion and motility. PMID:24272779

  6. Incomplete flagellar structures in Escherichia coli mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Komeda, Y

    1981-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants with defects in 29 flagellar genes identified so far were examined by electron microscopy for possession of incomplete flagellar structures in membrane-associated fractions. The results are discussed in consideration of the known transcriptional interaction of flagellar genes. Hook-basal body structures were detected in flaD, flaS, flaT, flbC, and hag mutants. The flaE mutant had a polyhook-basal body structure. An intact basal body appeared in flaK mutants. Putative precursors of the basal body were detected in mutants with defects in flaM, flaU, flaV, and flaY. No structures homologous to the flagellar basal body or its parts were detected in mutants with defects in flaA, flaB, flaC, flaG, flaH, flaI, flaL, flaN, flaO, flaP, flaQ, flaR, flaW, flaX, flbA, flbB, and flbD. One flaZ mutant had an incomplete flagellar basal body structure and another formed no significant structure, suggesting that flaZ is responsible for both basal body assembly and the transcription of the hag gene. Images PMID:7007337

  7. Actin-interacting and flagellar proteins in Leishmania spp.: Bioinformatics predictions to functional assignments in phagosome formation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Several motile processes are responsible for the movement of proteins into and within the flagellar membrane, but little is known about the process by which specific proteins (either actin-associated or not) are targeted to protozoan flagellar membranes. Actin is a major cytoskeleton protein, while polymerization and depolymerization of parasite actin and actin-interacting proteins (AIPs) during both processes of motility and host cell entry might be key events for successful infection. For a better understanding the eukaryotic flagellar dynamics, we have surveyed genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of pathogenic Leishmania spp. to identify pertinent genes/proteins and to build in silico models to properly address their putative roles in trypanosomatid virulence. In a search for AIPs involved in flagellar activities, we applied computational biology and proteomic tools to infer from the biological meaning of coronins and Arp2/3, two important elements in phagosome formation after parasite phagocytosis by macrophages. Results presented here provide the first report of Leishmania coronin and Arp2/3 as flagellar proteins that also might be involved in phagosome formation through actin polymerization within the flagellar environment. This is an issue worthy of further in vitro examination that remains now as a direct, positive bioinformatics-derived inference to be presented. PMID:21637533

  8. Actin-interacting and flagellar proteins in Leishmania spp.: Bioinformatics predictions to functional assignments in phagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Michely C; Costa, Marcília P; Pacheco, Ana C L; Kamimura, Michel T; Silva, Samara C; Carneiro, Laura D G; Sousa, Ana P L; Soares, Carlos E A; Souza, Celeste S F; de Oliveira, Diana Magalhães

    2009-07-01

    Several motile processes are responsible for the movement of proteins into and within the flagellar membrane, but little is known about the process by which specific proteins (either actin-associated or not) are targeted to protozoan flagellar membranes. Actin is a major cytoskeleton protein, while polymerization and depolymerization of parasite actin and actin-interacting proteins (AIPs) during both processes of motility and host cell entry might be key events for successful infection. For a better understanding the eukaryotic flagellar dynamics, we have surveyed genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of pathogenic Leishmania spp. to identify pertinent genes/proteins and to build in silico models to properly address their putative roles in trypanosomatid virulence. In a search for AIPs involved in flagellar activities, we applied computational biology and proteomic tools to infer from the biological meaning of coronins and Arp2/3, two important elements in phagosome formation after parasite phagocytosis by macrophages. Results presented here provide the first report of Leishmania coronin and Arp2/3 as flagellar proteins that also might be involved in phagosome formation through actin polymerization within the flagellar environment. This is an issue worthy of further in vitro examination that remains now as a direct, positive bioinformatics-derived inference to be presented. PMID:21637533

  9. CEP290 tethers flagellar transition zone microtubules to the membrane and regulates flagellar protein content

    PubMed Central

    Craige, Branch; Tsao, Che-Chia; Diener, Dennis R.; Hou, Yuqing; Lechtreck, Karl-Ferdinand; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in human CEP290 cause cilia-related disorders that range in severity from isolated blindness to perinatal lethality. Here, we describe a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant in which most of the CEP290 gene is deleted. Immunoelectron microscopy indicated that CEP290 is located in the flagellar transition zone in close association with the prominent microtubule–membrane links there. Ultrastructural analysis revealed defects in these microtubule–membrane connectors, resulting in loss of attachment of the flagellar membrane to the transition zone microtubules. Biochemical analysis of isolated flagella revealed that the mutant flagella have abnormal protein content, including abnormal levels of intraflagellar transport proteins and proteins associated with ciliopathies. Experiments with dikaryons showed that CEP290 at the transition zone is dynamic and undergoes rapid turnover. The results indicate that CEP290 is required to form microtubule–membrane linkers that tether the flagellar membrane to the transition zone microtubules, and is essential for controlling flagellar protein composition. PMID:20819941

  10. In Helicobacter pylori auto-inducer-2, but not LuxS/MccAB catalysed reverse transsulphuration, regulates motility through modulation of flagellar gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background LuxS may function as a metabolic enzyme or as the synthase of a quorum sensing signalling molecule, auto-inducer-2 (AI-2); hence, the mechanism underlying phenotypic changes upon luxS inactivation is not always clear. In Helicobacter pylori, we have recently shown that, rather than functioning in recycling methionine as in most bacteria, LuxS (along with newly-characterised MccA and MccB), synthesises cysteine via reverse transsulphuration. In this study, we investigated whether and how LuxS controls motility of H. pylori, specifically if it has its effects via luxS-required cysteine metabolism or via AI-2 synthesis only. Results We report that disruption of luxS renders H. pylori non-motile in soft agar and by microscopy, whereas disruption of mccAHp or mccBHp (other genes in the cysteine provision pathway) does not, implying that the lost phenotype is not due to disrupted cysteine provision. The motility defect of the ΔluxSHp mutant was complemented genetically by luxSHp and also by addition of in vitro synthesised AI-2 or 4, 5-dihydroxy-2, 3-pentanedione (DPD, the precursor of AI-2). In contrast, exogenously added cysteine could not restore motility to the ΔluxSHp mutant, confirming that AI-2 synthesis, but not the metabolic effect of LuxS was important. Microscopy showed reduced number and length of flagella in the ΔluxSHp mutant. Immunoblotting identified decreased levels of FlaA and FlgE but not FlaB in the ΔluxSHp mutant, and RT-PCR showed that the expression of flaA, flgE, motA, motB, flhA and fliI but not flaB was reduced. Addition of DPD but not cysteine to the ΔluxSHp mutant restored flagellar gene transcription, and the number and length of flagella. Conclusions Our data show that as well as being a metabolic enzyme, H. pylori LuxS has an alternative role in regulation of motility by modulating flagellar transcripts and flagellar biosynthesis through production of the signalling molecule AI-2. PMID:20691071

  11. Vaccination with recombinant flagellar proteins FlgJ and FliN induce protection against Brucella abortus 544 infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianbo; Xu, Jie; Xie, Yongfei; Qiu, Yefeng; Fu, Simei; Yuan, Xitong; Ke, Yuehua; Yu, Shuang; Du, Xinying; Cui, Mingquan; Chen, Yanfen; Wang, Tongkun; Wang, Zhoujia; Yu, Yaqing; Huang, Kehe; Huang, Liuyu; Peng, Guangneng; Chen, Zeliang; Wang, Yufei

    2012-12-28

    Brucella has been considered as a non-motile, facultative intracellular pathogenic bacterium. However, the genome sequences of different Brucella species reveal the presence of the flagellar genes needed for the construction of a functional flagellum. Due to its roles in the interaction between pathogen and host, we hypothesized that some of the flagellar proteins might induce protective immune responses and these proteins will be good subunit vaccine candidates. This study was conducted to screening of protective antigens among these flagellar proteins. Firstly, according to the putative functional roles, a total of 30 flagellar genes of Brucella abortus were selected for in vitro expression. 15 of these flagellar genes were successfully expressed as his-tagged recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli ER2566. Then, these proteins were purified and used to analyze their T cell immunity induction activity by an in vitro gamma interferon (IFN-γ) assay. Five of the flagellar proteins could stimulate significantly higher levels of IFN-γ secretion in splenocytes from S19 immunized mice, indicating their T cell induction activity. Finally, immunogenicity and protection activity of these 5 flagellar proteins were evaluated in BALB/c mice. Results showed that immunization with FlgJ (BAB1_0260) or FliN (BAB2_0122) plus adjuvant could provide protection against B. abortus 544 infection. Furthermore, mice immunized with FlgJ and FliN developed a vigorous immunoglobulin G response, and in vitro stimulation of their splenocytes with immunizing proteins induced the secretion of IFN-γ. Altogether, these data suggest that flagellar proteins FlgJ and FliN are protective antigens that could produce humoral and cell-mediated responses in mice and candidates for use in future studies of vaccination against brucellosis. PMID:22854331

  12. The Escherichia coli O157 Flagellar Regulatory Gene flhC and Not the Flagellin Gene fliC Impacts Colonization of Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Dobbin, Heather S.; Hovde, Carolyn J.; Williams, Christopher J.; Minnich, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    A virulent European Escherichia coli O157:H− isolate is nonmotile due to a 12-bp deletion in the flagellar regulatory gene flhC. To investigate the contribution of flhC in the relationship between E. coli O157:H7 and cattle, we constructed a similar flhC regulatory mutant in the well-characterized strain ATCC 43894. There was no difference in the growth rate between the wild type and this regulatory mutant, but phenotypic arrays showed substrate utilization differences. Survival in the bovine gastrointestinal tract and colonization of the rectoanal junction mucosa were assessed. Mixtures of both strains were given orally or rectally to steers or administered into the rumen of cattle dually cannulated at the rumen and duodenum. One day post-oral dose, most rectal/fecal isolates (74%) were the regulatory mutant, but by 3 days post-oral dose and throughout the 42-day experiment, ≥80% of the isolates were wild type. Among steers given a rectal application of both strains, wild-type isolates were the majority of isolates recovered on all days. The regulatory mutant survived better than the wild type in both the rumen and duodenum. To test the role of motility, a filament mutant (ΔfliC) was constructed and similar cattle experiments were performed. On all days post-oral dose, the majority of isolates (64% to 98%) were the filament mutant. In contrast, both strains were recovered equally post-rectal application. Thus, the regulatory mutant survived passage through the bovine gastrointestinal tract better than the wild type but failed to efficiently colonize cattle, and the requirement of flhC for colonization was not dependent on a functional flagellum. PMID:16622228

  13. Genetic Analysis and Detection of fliCH1 and fliCH12 Genes Coding for Serologically Closely Related Flagellar Antigens in Human and Animal Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The E. coli flagellar types H1 and H12 show a high serological cross-reactivity and molecular serotyping appears an advantageous method to establish a clear discrimination between these flagellar types. Analysis of fliCH1 and fliCH12 gene sequences showed that they were 97.5% identical at the nucleotide level. Because of this high degree of homology we developed a two-step real-time PCR detection procedure for reliable discrimination of H1 and H12 flagellar types in E. coli. In the first step, a real-time PCR assay for common detection of both fliCH1 and fliCH12 genes is used, followed in a second step by real-time PCR assays for specific detection of fliCH1 and fliCH12, respectively. The real-time PCR for common detection of fliCH1 and fliCH12 demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity as it reacted with all tested E. coli H1 and H12 strains and not with any of the reference strains encoding all the other 51 flagellar antigens. The fliCH1 and fliCH12 gene specific assays detected all E. coli H1 and all E. coli H12 strains, respectively (100% sensitivity). However, both assays showed cross-reactions with some flagellar type reference strains different from H1 and H12. The real-time PCR assays developed in this study can be used in combination for the detection and identification of E. coli H1 and H12 strains isolated from different sources. PMID:26913025

  14. Multiple kinetic states for the flagellar motor switch.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, S C; Koshland, D E

    1989-01-01

    By means of a computerized video processing system, the flagellar motors of Escherichia coli were shown to have multiple kinetic states for each rotational direction. High-resolution analysis of flagellar motors revealed new kinetic states both in wild-type cells and in a strain deleted of other signal-transducing genes to which CheY had been introduced. This strain, RP1091, retained residual kinase activity that could phosphorylate CheY, complicating the biochemical identification of certain kinetic states. The behavioral effect of CheY on single flagellar motors was ultrasensitive, with an apparent Hill coefficient of 5.5 +/- 1.9 (SD) and a half-maximal effect at 10.1 +/- 0.5 (SD) microM CheY. Based on the CheY concentration dependence, a two-state model is clearly excluded, even for the simpler system of CheY-induced rotational reversals in the deletion strain. The data are best described by a four-state model, with two clockwise and two counterclockwise states. Images PMID:2681161

  15. Homologues of the 24-kDa flagellar Ca(2+)-binding protein gene of Trypanosoma cruzi are present in other members of the Trypanosomatidae family.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, R A; Linss, J; Thomaz, N; Olson, C L; Engman, D M; Goldenberg, S

    1997-07-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding the 24-kDa flagellar Ca(2+)-binding protein (FCaBP) of the Dm28c clone of Trypanosoma cruzi was cloned and characterized. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with those of the FCaBPs of other T. cruzi strains revealed greater than 97% sequence conservation. FCaBP-like genes are found in Trypanosoma conorhini, Trypanosoma freitasi, Trypanosoma lewisi, Herpetomonas megaseliae, Leptomonas seymouri, and Phytomonas serpens, but not in Crithidia deanei, Leishmania amazonensis, or Endotrypanum schaudinni: Among various T. cruzi strains, FCaBP genes are located on chromosomes of different size, although all strains possess multiple FCaBP genes organized as tandemly arranged gene families. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that FCaBP mRNAs are produced in all organisms possessing FCaBP-hybridizing sequences, indicating that expression of FCaBP or an FCaBP-like protein is common to a number of trypanosomatid species. PMID:9225770

  16. Negative transcriptional regulation in the Caulobacter flagellar hierarchy.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H; Dingwall, A; Shapiro, L

    1989-01-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus flagellum is formed at a specific time in the cell cycle and its assembly requires the ordered expression of a large number of genes. These genes are controlled in a positive trans-acting hierarchy that reflects the order of assembly of the flagellum. Using plasmids carrying transcriptional fusions of either a neo or a lux reporter gene to the promoters of three flagellar genes representing different ranks in the hierarchy (the hook operon, a basal body gene flbN, and the flaO gene), we have measured the level of chimeric gene expression in 13 flagellar mutant backgrounds. Mutants in the hook operon or in basal body genes caused overproduction of both hook operon and basal body gene chimeric mRNAs, suggesting that negative regulation is superimposed on the positive trans-acting control for these early events in the flagellar hierarchy. Mutants in the structural genes and in genes involved in flagellar assembly had no effect on flaO expression, placing the flaO gene near the top of the hierarchy. However, flaO expression appears to be under negative control by two regulatory genes flaS and flaW. Negative control, as a response to the completion of specific steps in the assembly process, may be an important mechanism used by the cell to turn off flagellar gene expression once the gene product is no longer needed. Images PMID:2771950

  17. Roles of cheY and cheZ gene products in controlling flagellar rotation in bacterial chemotaxis of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, S C; Koshland, D E

    1987-01-01

    To understand output control in bacterial chemotaxis, we varied the levels of expression of cellular cheY and cheZ genes and found that the overproduction of the corresponding proteins affected Escherichia coli swimming behavior. In the absence of other signal-transducing gene products, CheY overproduction made free-swimming cells tumble more frequently. A plot of the fraction of the population that are tumbling versus the CheY concentration was hyperbolic, with half of the population tumbling at 30 microM (25,000 copies per cell) CheY monomers in the cytosol. Overproduction of aspartate receptor (Tar) by 30-fold had a negligible effect on CheY-induced tumbling, so Tar does not sequester CheY. CheZ overproduction decreased tumbling in all tumbling mutants except certain flaAII(cheC) mutants. In the absence of other chemotaxis gene products, CheZ overproduction inhibited CheY-induced tumbling. Models for CheY as a tumbling signal and CheZ as a smooth-swimming signal to control flagellar rotation are discussed. Images PMID:3546269

  18. Flagellar dynamics of a connected chain of active, polar, Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Chelakkot, Raghunath; Gopinath, Arvind; Mahadevan, L; Hagan, Michael F

    2014-03-01

    We show that active, self-propelled particles that are connected together to form a single chain that is anchored at one end can produce the graceful beating motions of flagella. Changing the boundary condition from a clamp to a pivot at the anchor leads to steadily rotating tight coils. Strong noise in the system disrupts the regularity of the oscillations. We use a combination of detailed numerical simulations, mean-field scaling analysis and first passage time theory to characterize the phase diagram as a function of the filament length, passive elasticity, propulsion force and noise. Our study suggests minimal experimental tests for the onset of oscillations in an active polar chain. PMID:24352670

  19. Flagellar dynamics of a connected chain of active, polar, Brownian particles

    PubMed Central

    Chelakkot, Raghunath; Gopinath, Arvind; Mahadevan, L.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    We show that active, self-propelled particles that are connected together to form a single chain that is anchored at one end can produce the graceful beating motions of flagella. Changing the boundary condition from a clamp to a pivot at the anchor leads to steadily rotating tight coils. Strong noise in the system disrupts the regularity of the oscillations. We use a combination of detailed numerical simulations, mean-field scaling analysis and first passage time theory to characterize the phase diagram as a function of the filament length, passive elasticity, propulsion force and noise. Our study suggests minimal experimental tests for the onset of oscillations in an active polar chain. PMID:24352670

  20. Xenocin Export by the Flagellar Type III Pathway in Xenorhabdus nematophila

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Preeti; Park, Dongjin; Forst, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The xenocin operon of Xenorhabdus nematophila consists of xciA and ximB genes encoding a 64-kDa xenocin and 42-kDa immunity protein to kill competing microbes in the insect larva. The catalytic domain of xenocin has RNase activity and is responsible for its cytotoxicity. Under SOS conditions, xenocin is produced with immunity protein as a complex. Here, we show that xenocin and immunity protein complex are exported through the flagellar type III system of X. nematophila. Secretion of xenocin complex was abolished in an flhA strain but not in an fliC strain. The xenocin operon is not linked to the flagellar operon transcriptionally. The immunity protein is produced alone from a second, constitutive promoter and is targeted to the periplasm in a flagellum-independent manner. For stable expression of xenocin, coexpression of immunity protein was necessary. To examine the role of immunity protein in xenocin export, an enzymatically inactive protein was produced by site-directed mutagenesis in the active site of the catalytic domain. Toxicity was abolished in D535A and H538A variants of xenocin, which were expressed alone without an immunity domain and secreted in the culture supernatant through flagellar export. Secretion of xenocin through the flagellar pathway has important implications in the evolutionary success of X. nematophila. PMID:23335409

  1. Quorum sensing positively regulates flagellar motility in pathogenic Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Vibrios belonging to the Harveyi clade are among the major pathogens of aquatic organisms. Quorum sensing (QS) is essential for virulence of V. harveyi towards different hosts. However, most virulence factors reported to be controlled by QS to date are negatively regulated by QS, therefore suggesting that their impact on virulence is limited. In this study, we report that QS positively regulates flagellar motility. We found that autoinducer synthase mutants showed significantly lower swimming motility than the wild type, and the swimming motility could be restored by adding synthetic signal molecules. Further, motility of a luxO mutant with inactive QS (LuxO D47E) was significantly lower than that of the wild type and of a luxO mutant with constitutively maximal QS activity (LuxO D47A). Furthermore, we found that the expression of flagellar genes (both early, middle and late genes) was significantly lower in the luxO mutant with inactive QS when compared with wild type and the luxO mutant with maximal QS activity. Motility assays and gene expression also revealed the involvement of the quorum-sensing master regulator LuxR in the QS regulation of motility. Finally, the motility inhibitor phenamil significantly decreased the virulence of V. harveyi towards gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae. PMID:24528485

  2. A chemotactic signaling surface on CheY defined by suppressors of flagellar switch mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Roman, S J; Meyers, M; Volz, K; Matsumura, P

    1992-01-01

    CheY is the response regulator protein that interacts with the flagellar switch apparatus to modulate flagellar rotation during chemotactic signaling. CheY can be phosphorylated and dephosphorylated in vitro, and evidence indicates that CheY-P is the activated form that induces clockwise flagellar rotation, resulting in a tumble in the cell's swimming pattern. The flagellar switch apparatus is a complex macromolecular structure composed of at least three gene products, FliG, FliM, and FliN. Genetic analysis of Escherichia coli has identified fliG and fliM as genes in which mutations occur that allele specifically suppress cheY mutations, indicating interactions among these gene products. We have generated a class of cheY mutations selected for dominant suppression of fliG mutations. Interestingly, these cheY mutations dominantly suppressed both fliG and fliM mutations; this is consistent with the idea that the CheY protein interacts with both switch gene products during signaling. Biochemical characterization of wild-type and suppressor CheY proteins did not reveal altered phosphorylation properties or evidence for phosphorylation-dependent CheY multimerization. These data indicate that suppressor CheY proteins are specifically altered in the ability to transduce chemotactic signals to the switch at some point subsequent to phosphorylation. Physical mapping of suppressor amino acid substitutions on the crystal structure of CheY revealed a high degree of spatial clustering, suggesting that this region of CheY is a signaling surface that transduces chemotactic signals to the switch. Images PMID:1400175

  3. The bacterial flagellar protein export apparatus processively transports flagellar proteins even with extremely infrequent ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Kinoshita, Miki; Aldridge, Phillip D.; Namba, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    For self-assembly of the bacterial flagellum, a specific protein export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) as the energy source to transport component proteins to the distal growing end. The export apparatus consists of a transmembrane PMF-driven export gate and a cytoplasmic ATPase complex composed of FliH, FliI and FliJ. The FliI6FliJ complex is structurally similar to the α3β3γ complex of FOF1-ATPase. FliJ allows the gate to efficiently utilize PMF to drive flagellar protein export but it remains unknown how. Here, we report the role of ATP hydrolysis by the FliI6FliJ complex. The export apparatus processively transported flagellar proteins to grow flagella even with extremely infrequent or no ATP hydrolysis by FliI mutation (E211D and E211Q, respectively). This indicates that the rate of ATP hydrolysis is not at all coupled with the export rate. Deletion of FliI residues 401 to 410 resulted in no flagellar formation although this FliI deletion mutant retained 40% of the ATPase activity, suggesting uncoupling between ATP hydrolysis and activation of the gate. We propose that infrequent ATP hydrolysis by the FliI6FliJ ring is sufficient for gate activation, allowing processive translocation of export substrates for efficient flagellar assembly. PMID:25531309

  4. Regulation of flagellar motility during biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Sarah B.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria swim in liquid or swarm over solid surfaces by synthesizing rotary flagella. The same bacteria that are motile also commonly form non-motile multicellular aggregates held together by an extracellular matrix called biofilms. Biofilms are an important part of the lifestyle of pathogenic bacteria and it is assumed that there is a motility-to-biofilm transition wherein the inhibition of motility promotes biofilm formation. The transition is largely inferred from regulatory mutants that reveal the opposite regulation of the two phenotypes. Here we review the regulation of motility during biofilm formation in Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Escherichia, and we conclude that the motility-to-biofilm transition, if necessary, likely involves two steps. In the short term, flagella are functionally regulated to either inhibit rotation or modulate the basal flagellar reversal frequency. Over the long term, flagellar gene transcription is inhibited and in the absence of de novo synthesis, flagella are likely diluted to extinction through growth. Both short term and long term control is likely important to the motility-to-biofilm transition to stabilize aggregates and optimize resource investment. We emphasize the newly discovered classes of flagellar functional regulators and speculate that others await discovery in the context of biofilm formation. PMID:23480406

  5. Reconstitution of flagellar sliding.

    PubMed

    Alper, Joshua; Geyer, Veikko; Mukundan, Vikram; Howard, Jonathon

    2013-01-01

    The motile structure within eukaryotic cilia and flagella is the axoneme. This structure typically consists of nine doublet microtubules arranged around a pair of singlet microtubules. The axoneme contains more than 650 different proteins that have structural, force-generating, and regulatory functions. Early studies on sea urchin sperm identified the force-generating components, the dynein motors. It was shown that dynein can slide adjacent doublet microtubules in the presence of ATP. How this sliding gives rise to the beating of the axoneme is still unknown. Reconstitution assays provide a clean system, free from cellular effects, to elucidate the underlying beating mechanisms. These assays can be used to identify the components that are both necessary and sufficient for the generation of flagellar beating. PMID:23498749

  6. Molecular Architecture of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The flagellum is one of the most sophisticated self-assembling molecular machines in bacteria. Powered by the proton-motive force, the flagellum rapidly rotates in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction, which ultimately controls bacterial motility and behavior. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica have served as important model systems for extensive genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of the flagellum, providing unparalleled insights into its structure, function, and gene regulation. Despite these advances, our understanding of flagellar assembly and rotational mechanisms remains incomplete, in part because of the limited structural information available regarding the intact rotor–stator complex and secretion apparatus. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) has become a valuable imaging technique capable of visualizing the intact flagellar motor in cells at molecular resolution. Because the resolution that can be achieved by cryo-ET with large bacteria (such as E. coli and S. enterica) is limited, analysis of small-diameter bacteria (including Borrelia burgdorferi and Campylobacter jejuni) can provide additional insights into the in situ structure of the flagellar motor and other cellular components. This review is focused on the application of cryo-ET, in combination with genetic and biophysical approaches, to the study of flagellar structures and its potential for improving the understanding of rotor–stator interactions, the rotational switching mechanism, and the secretion and assembly of flagellar components. PMID:24697492

  7. Insect Stage-Specific Receptor Adenylate Cyclases Are Localized to Distinct Subdomains of the Trypanosoma brucei Flagellar Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Saada, Edwin A.; Kabututu, Z. Pius; Lopez, Miguel; Shimogawa, Michelle M.; Langousis, Gerasimos; Oberholzer, Michael; Riestra, Angelica; Jonsson, Zophonias O.; Wohlschlegel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the Trypanosoma brucei flagellum (synonymous with cilium) plays important roles in host-parasite interactions. Several studies have identified virulence factors and signaling proteins in the flagellar membrane of bloodstream-stage T. brucei, but less is known about flagellar membrane proteins in procyclic, insect-stage parasites. Here we report on the identification of several receptor-type flagellar adenylate cyclases (ACs) that are specifically upregulated in procyclic T. brucei parasites. Identification of insect stage-specific ACs is novel, as previously studied ACs were constitutively expressed or confined to bloodstream-stage parasites. We show that procyclic stage-specific ACs are glycosylated, surface-exposed proteins that dimerize and possess catalytic activity. We used gene-specific tags to examine the distribution of individual AC isoforms. All ACs examined localized to the flagellum. Notably, however, while some ACs were distributed along the length of the flagellum, others specifically localized to the flagellum tip. These are the first transmembrane domain proteins to be localized specifically at the flagellum tip in T. brucei, emphasizing that the flagellum membrane is organized into specific subdomains. Deletion analysis reveals that C-terminal sequences are critical for targeting ACs to the flagellum, and sequence comparisons suggest that differential subflagellar localization might be specified by isoform-specific C termini. Our combined results suggest insect stage-specific roles for a subset of flagellar adenylate cyclases and support a microdomain model for flagellar cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling in T. brucei. In this model, cAMP production is compartmentalized through differential localization of individual ACs, thereby allowing diverse cellular responses to be controlled by a common signaling molecule. PMID:24879126

  8. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  9. Magnetic Propulsion of Microswimmers with DNA-Based Flagellar Bundles.

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander M; Weig, Cornelius; Oswald, Peter; Frey, Erwin; Fischer, Peer; Liedl, Tim

    2016-02-10

    We show that DNA-based self-assembly can serve as a general and flexible tool to construct artificial flagella of several micrometers in length and only tens of nanometers in diameter. By attaching the DNA flagella to biocompatible magnetic microparticles, we provide a proof of concept demonstration of hybrid structures that, when rotated in an external magnetic field, propel by means of a flagellar bundle, similar to self-propelling peritrichous bacteria. Our theoretical analysis predicts that flagellar bundles that possess a length-dependent bending stiffness should exhibit a superior swimming speed compared to swimmers with a single appendage. The DNA self-assembly method permits the realization of these improved flagellar bundles in good agreement with our quantitative model. DNA flagella with well-controlled shape could fundamentally increase the functionality of fully biocompatible nanorobots and extend the scope and complexity of active materials. PMID:26821214

  10. Regulation of Flagellar Length in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nedra F.; Iyer, Janaki Kannan; Buchheim, Julie A.; Meek, William

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has two apically localized flagella that are maintained at an equal and appropriate length. Assembly and maintenance of flagella requires a microtubule-based transport system known as intraflagellar transport (IFT). During IFT, proteins destined for incorporation into or removal from a flagellum are carried along doublet microtubules via IFT particles. Regulation of IFT activity therefore is pivotal in determining the length of a flagellum. Reviewed is our current understanding of the role of IFT and signal transduction pathways in the regulation of flagellar length. PMID:18692148

  11. Step-Wise Loss of Bacterial Flagellar Torsion Confers Progressive Phagocytic Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Lovewell, Rustin R.; Collins, Ryan M.; Acker, Julie L.; O'Toole, George A.; Wargo, Matthew J.; Berwin, Brent

    2011-01-01

    Phagocytosis of bacteria by innate immune cells is a primary method of bacterial clearance during infection. However, the mechanisms by which the host cell recognizes bacteria and consequentially initiates phagocytosis are largely unclear. Previous studies of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa have indicated that bacterial flagella and flagellar motility play an important role in colonization of the host and, importantly, that loss of flagellar motility enables phagocytic evasion. Here we use molecular, cellular, and genetic methods to provide the first formal evidence that phagocytic cells recognize bacterial motility rather than flagella and initiate phagocytosis in response to this motility. We demonstrate that deletion of genes coding for the flagellar stator complex, which results in non-swimming bacteria that retain an initial flagellar structure, confers resistance to phagocytic binding and ingestion in several species of the gamma proteobacterial group of Gram-negative bacteria, indicative of a shared strategy for phagocytic evasion. Furthermore, we show for the first time that susceptibility to phagocytosis in swimming bacteria is proportional to mot gene function and, consequently, flagellar rotation since complementary genetically- and biochemically-modulated incremental decreases in flagellar motility result in corresponding and proportional phagocytic evasion. These findings identify that phagocytic cells respond to flagellar movement, which represents a novel mechanism for non-opsonized phagocytic recognition of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21949654

  12. Flagellar apparatus structure of choanoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Karpov, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    Phylum choanoflagellata is the nearest unicellular neighbor of metazoa at the phylogenetic tree. They are single celled or form the colonies, can be presented by naked cells or live in theca or lorica, but in all cases they have a flagellum surrounded by microvilli of the collar. They have rather uniform and peculiar flagellar apparatus structure with flagellar basal body (FB) producing a flagellum, and non-flagellar basal body (NFB) lying orthogonal to the FB. Long flagellar transition zone contains a unique structure among eukaryotes, the central filament, which connects central microtubules to the transversal plate. Both basal bodies are composed of triplets and interconnected with fibrillar bridge. They also contain the internal arc-shaped connectives between the triplets. The FB has prominent transitional fibers similar to those of chytrid zoospores and choanocytes of sponges, and a radial microtubular root system. The ring-shaped microtubule organizing center (MTOC) produces radial root microtubules, but in some species a MTOC is represented by separate foci. The NFB has a narrow fibrillar root directed towards the Golgi apparatus in association with membrane-bounded sac. Prior to cell division, the basal bodies replicate and migrate to poles of elongated nucleus. The basal bodies serve as MTOCs for the spindle microtubules during nuclear division by semiopen orthomitosis. PMID:27148446

  13. Studies on the mechanism of bacterial flagellar rotation and the flagellar number regulation.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Many motile bacteria have the motility organ, the flagellum. It rotates by the rotary motor driven by the ion-motive force and is embedded in the cell surface at the base of each flagellar filament. Many researchers have been studying its rotary mechanism for years, but most of the energy conversion processes have been remained in mystery. We focused on the flagellar stator, which works at the core process of energy conversion, and found that the periplasmic region of the stator changes its conformation to be activated only when the stator units are incorporated into the motor and anchored at the cell wall. Meanwhile, the physiologically important supramolecular complex is localized in the cell at the right place and the right time with a proper amount. How the cell achieves such a proper localization is the fundamental question for life science, and we undertake this problem by analyzing the mechanism for biogenesis of a single polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus. Here I describe the molecular mechanism of how the flagellum is generated at the specific place with a proper number, and also how the flagellar stator is incorporated into the motor to complete the functional motor assembly, based on our studies. PMID:27581279

  14. Structural diversity of bacterial flagellar motors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songye; Beeby, Morgan; Murphy, Gavin E; Leadbetter, Jared R; Hendrixson, David R; Briegel, Ariane; Li, Zhuo; Shi, Jian; Tocheva, Elitza I; Müller, Axel; Dobro, Megan J; Jensen, Grant J

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is one of nature's most amazing and well-studied nanomachines. Its cell-wall-anchored motor uses chemical energy to rotate a microns-long filament and propel the bacterium towards nutrients and away from toxins. While much is known about flagellar motors from certain model organisms, their diversity across the bacterial kingdom is less well characterized, allowing the occasional misrepresentation of the motor as an invariant, ideal machine. Here, we present an electron cryotomographical survey of flagellar motor architectures throughout the Bacteria. While a conserved structural core was observed in all 11 bacteria imaged, surprisingly novel and divergent structures as well as different symmetries were observed surrounding the core. Correlating the motor structures with the presence and absence of particular motor genes in each organism suggested the locations of five proteins involved in the export apparatus including FliI, whose position below the C-ring was confirmed by imaging a deletion strain. The combination of conserved and specially-adapted structures seen here sheds light on how this complex protein nanomachine has evolved to meet the needs of different species. PMID:21673657

  15. DksA and ppGpp Directly Regulate Transcription of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Justin J.; Durfee, Tim; Gourse, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    The components of the Escherichia coli flagella apparatus are synthesized in a three-level transcriptional cascade activated by the master regulator FlhDC. The cascade coordinates the synthesis rates of a large number of gene products with each other and with nutritional conditions. Recent genome-wide studies have reported that flagellar transcription is altered in cells lacking the transcription regulators DksA or ppGpp, but some or all reported effects could be indirect, and some are contradictory. We report here that the activities of promoters at all three levels of the cascade are much higher in strains lacking dksA, resulting in overproduction of flagellin and hyperflagellated cells. In vitro, DksA/ppGpp inhibits the flhDC promoter and the σ70-dependent fliA promoter transcribing the gene for σ28. However, DksA and ppGpp do not affect the σ28-dependent fliA promoter or the σ28-dependent fliC promoter in vitro, suggesting that the dramatic effects on expression of those genes in vivo are mediated indirectly through direct effects of DksA/ppGpp on FlhDC and σ28 expression. We conclude that DksA/ppGpp inhibits expression of the flagellar cascade during stationary phase and following starvation, thereby coordinating flagella and ribosome assembly and preventing expenditure of scarce energy resources on synthesis of two of the cell’s largest macromolecular complexes. PMID:19889089

  16. Transcriptional analysis of the MrpJ network: modulation of diverse virulence-associated genes and direct regulation of mrp fimbrial and flhDC flagellar operons in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Bode, Nadine J; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-06-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence. PMID:25847961

  17. Transcriptional Analysis of the MrpJ Network: Modulation of Diverse Virulence-Associated Genes and Direct Regulation of mrp Fimbrial and flhDC Flagellar Operons in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Nadine J.; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence. PMID:25847961

  18. Biochemical, immunological, metabolic, and molecular studies on flagellar development in Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Levasseur, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The emergent flagellum of Euglena gracilis arises from an anterior invagination of the organism and possesses, along with the typical eukaryotic axoneme, a glycoprotein surface layer, a complement of structurally complex mastigonemes and a paraxial rod. Nonionic detergent extraction of isolated flagella yielded a fraction containing 21% of the flagellar protein. This fraction contained at least 25 components. In vivo radiolabeling experiments indicated that Euglena possessed a pool of flagellar precursors. This was evidence by the observation that flagellar proteins radiolabeled during an initial regeneration could be mobilized to flagella of a subsequent regeneration. At least one component in the pool was present in sufficient quantity to support an entire regeneration. This protein was tentatively identified as a mastigonemal protein of M{sub r} {approximately} 220,000. A cDNA library was constructed to investigate flagellar gene expression in Euglena.

  19. RflM mediates target specificity of the RcsCDB phosphorelay system for transcriptional repression of flagellar synthesis in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Kühne, Caroline; Singer, Hanna M; Grabisch, Eva; Codutti, Luca; Carlomagno, Teresa; Scrima, Andrea; Erhardt, Marc

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial flagellum enables directed movement of Salmonella enterica towards favorable conditions in liquid environments. Regulation of flagellar synthesis is tightly controlled by various environmental signals at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The flagellar master regulator FlhD4 C2 resides on top of the flagellar transcriptional hierarchy and is under autogenous control by FlhD4 C2 -dependent activation of the repressor rflM. The inhibitory activity of RflM depends on the presence of RcsB, the response regulator of the RcsCDB phosphorelay system. In this study, we elucidated the molecular mechanism of RflM-dependent repression of flhDC. We show that RcsB and RflM form a heterodimer that coordinately represses flhDC transcription independent of RcsB phosphorylation. RcsB-RflM complex binds to a RcsB box downstream the P1 transcriptional start site of the flhDC promoter with increased affinity compared to RcsB in the absence of RflM. We propose that RflM stabilizes binding of unphosphorylated RcsB to the flhDC promoter in absence of environmental cues. Thus, RflM is a novel auxiliary regulatory protein that mediates target specificity of RcsB for flhDC repression. The cooperative action of the RcsB-RflM repressor complex allows Salmonella to fine-tune initiation of flagellar gene expression and adds another level to the complex regulation of flagellar synthesis. PMID:27206164

  20. Motility and Flagellar Glycosylation in Clostridium difficile▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Twine, Susan M.; Reid, Christopher W.; Aubry, Annie; McMullin, David R.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Austin, John; Logan, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, intact flagellin proteins were purified from strains of Clostridium difficile and analyzed using quadrupole time of flight and linear ion trap mass spectrometers. Top-down studies showed the flagellin proteins to have a mass greater than that predicted from the corresponding gene sequence. These top-down studies revealed marker ions characteristic of glycan modifications. Additionally, diversity in the observed masses of glycan modifications was seen between strains. Electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry was used to demonstrate that the glycan was attached to the flagellin protein backbone in O linkage via a HexNAc residue in all strains examined. Bioinformatic analysis of C. difficile genomes revealed diversity with respect to glycan biosynthesis gene content within the flagellar biosynthesis locus, likely reflected by the observed flagellar glycan diversity. In C. difficile strain 630, insertional inactivation of a glycosyltransferase gene (CD0240) present in all sequenced genomes resulted in an inability to produce flagellar filaments at the cell surface and only minor amounts of unmodified flagellin protein. PMID:19749038

  1. Flagellar Cap Protein FliD Mediates Adherence of Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to Enterocyte Microvilli.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Suely C F; Luiz, Wilson B; Vieira, Mônica A M; Ferreira, Rita C C; Garcia, Bruna G; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Sampaio, Jorge L M; Ferreira, Luís C S; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2016-04-01

    The expression of flagella correlates with different aspects of bacterial pathogenicity, ranging from adherence to host cells to activation of inflammatory responses by the innate immune system. In the present study, we investigated the role of flagella in the adherence of an atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strain (serotype O51:H40) to human enterocytes. Accordingly, isogenic mutants deficient in flagellin (FliC), the flagellar structural subunit; the flagellar cap protein (FliD); or the MotAB proteins, involved in the control of flagellar motion, were generated and tested for binding to differentiated Caco-2 cells. Binding of the aEPEC strain to enterocytes was significantly impaired in strains with the fliCa nd fliD genes deleted, both of which could not form flagella on the bacterial surface. A nonmotile but flagellated MotAB mutant also showed impaired adhesion to Caco-2 cells. In accordance with these observations, adhesion of a EPEC strain 1711-4 to Caco-2 cells was drastically reduced after the treatment of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD. In addition, incubation of a EPEC bacteria with specific anti-FliD serum impaired binding to Caco-2 cells. Finally, incubation of Caco-2 cells with purified FliD, followed by immunolabeling, showed that the protein was specifically bound to the microvillus tips of differentiated Caco-2 cells. The a EPEC FliD or anti-FliD serum also reduced the adherence of prototype typical enteropathogenic, enterohemorrhagic, and enterotoxigenic E. coli strains to Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings further strengthened the role of flagella in the adherence of a EPEC to human enterocytes and disclosed the relevant structural and functional involvement of FliD in the adhesion process. PMID:26831466

  2. Xylan-Degrading Catalytic Flagellar Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ágnes; Szabó, Veronika; Kovács, Mátyás; Patkó, Dániel; Tóth, Balázs; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    Flagellin, the main component of flagellar filaments, is a protein possessing polymerization ability. In this work, a novel fusion construct of xylanase A from B. subtilis and Salmonella flagellin was created which is applicable to build xylan-degrading catalytic nanorods of high stability. The FliC-XynA chimera when overexpressed in a flagellin deficient Salmonella host strain was secreted into the culture medium by the flagellum-specific export machinery allowing easy purification. Filamentous assemblies displaying high surface density of catalytic sites were produced by ammonium sulfate-induced polymerization. FliC-XynA nanorods were resistant to proteolytic degradation and preserved their enzymatic activity for a long period of time. Furnishing enzymes with self-assembling ability to build catalytic nanorods offers a promising alternative approach to enzyme immobilization onto nanostructured synthetic scaffolds. PMID:25966869

  3. Alternative flagellar filament types in the haloarchaeon Haloarcula marismortui.

    PubMed

    Pyatibratov, Michael G; Beznosov, Sergey N; Rachel, Reinhard; Tiktopulo, Elizabeth I; Surin, Alexei K; Syutkin, Alexei S; Fedorov, Oleg V

    2008-10-01

    Many Archaea use rotation of helical flagellar filaments for swimming motility. We isolated and characterized the flagellar filaments of Haloarcula marismortui, an archaeal species previously considered to be nonmotile. Two Haloarcula marismortui phenotypes were discriminated--their filaments are composed predominantly of either FlaB or FlaA2 flagellin, and the corresponding genes are located on different replicons. FlaB and FlaA2 filaments differ in antigenicity and thermostability. FlaA2 filaments are distinctly thicker (20-22 nm) than FlaB filaments (16-18 nm). The observed filaments are nearly twice as thick as those of other characterized euryarchaeal filaments. The results suggest that the helicity of Haloarcula marismortui filaments is provided by a mechanism different from that in the related haloarchaeon Halobacterium salinarum, where 2 different flagellin molecules present in comparable quantities are required to form a helical filament. PMID:18923552

  4. Reduced Protein Synthesis Fidelity Inhibits Flagellar Biosynthesis and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongqiang; Evans, Christopher R.; Ling, Jiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Accurate translation of the genetic information from DNA to protein is maintained by multiple quality control steps from bacteria to mammals. Genetic and environmental alterations have been shown to compromise translational quality control and reduce fidelity during protein synthesis. The physiological impact of increased translational errors is not fully understood. While generally considered harmful, translational errors have recently been shown to benefit cells under certain stress conditions. In this work, we describe a novel regulatory pathway in which reduced translational fidelity downregulates expression of flagellar genes and suppresses bacterial motility. Electron microscopy imaging shows that the error-prone Escherichia coli strain lacks mature flagella. Further genetic analyses reveal that translational errors upregulate expression of a small RNA DsrA through enhancing its transcription, and deleting DsrA from the error-prone strain restores motility. DsrA regulates expression of H-NS and RpoS, both of which regulate flagellar genes. We demonstrate that an increased level of DsrA in the error-prone strain suppresses motility through the H-NS pathway. Our work suggests that bacteria are capable of switching on and off the flagellar system by altering translational fidelity, which may serve as a previously unknown mechanism to improve fitness in response to environmental cues. PMID:27468805

  5. Flagellar flows around bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauparas, Justas; Lauga, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Flagellated bacteria on nutrient-rich substrates can differentiate into a swarming state and move in dense swarms across surfaces. A recent experiment measured the flow in the fluid around an Escherichia coli swarm [Wu, Hosu, and Berg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 4147 (2011)], 10.1073/pnas.1016693108. A systematic chiral flow was observed in the clockwise direction (when viewed from above) ahead of the swarm with flow speeds of about 10 μ m /s , about 3 times greater than the radial velocity at the edge of the swarm. The working hypothesis is that this flow is due to the action of cells stalled at the edge of a colony that extend their flagellar filaments outward, moving fluid over the virgin agar. In this work we quantitatively test this hypothesis. We first build an analytical model of the flow induced by a single flagellum in a thin film and then use the model, and its extension to multiple flagella, to compare with experimental measurements. The results we obtain are in agreement with the flagellar hypothesis. The model provides further quantitative insight into the flagella orientations and their spatial distributions as well as the tangential speed profile. In particular, the model suggests that flagella are on average pointing radially out of the swarm and are not wrapped tangentially.

  6. Genetic Diversity of the fliC Genes Encoding the Flagellar Antigen H19 of Escherichia coli and Application to the Specific Identification of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli O121:H19

    PubMed Central

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O121:H19 belong to a specific clonal type distinct from other classical EHEC and major enteropathogenic E. coli groups and is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. Sequencing of the fliC genes associated with the flagellar antigen H19 (fliCH19) revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH19 gene sequences in E. coli. A cluster analysis of 12 fliCH19 sequences, 4 from O121 and 8 from non-O121 E. coli strains, revealed five different genotypes. All O121:H19 strains fell into one cluster, whereas a second cluster was formed by five non-O121:H19 strains. Cluster 1 and cluster 2 strains differ by 27 single nucleotide exchanges in their fliCH19 genes (98.5% homology). Based on allele discrimination of the fliCH19 genes, a real-time PCR test was designed for specific identification of EHEC O121:H19. The O121 fliCH19 PCR tested negative in 73 E. coli H19 strains that belonged to serogroups other than O121, including 28 different O groups, O-nontypeable H19, and O-rough:H19 strains. The O121 fliCH19 PCR reacted with all 16 tested O121:H19 strains and 1 O-rough:H19 strain which was positive for the O121 wzx gene. A cross-reaction was observed only with E. coli H32 strains which share sequence similarities in the target region of the O121 fliCH19 PCR. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O121 wzx) and the detection of O121 fliCH19 allele type contributes to improving the identification and molecular serotyping of EHEC O121:H19 motile and nonmotile strains and variants of these strains lacking stx genes. PMID:25862232

  7. Approaches for functional analysis of flagellar proteins in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Oberholzer, Michael; Lopez, Miguel A.; Ralston, Katherine S.; Hill, Kent L.

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum is a highly conserved organelle serving motility, sensory and transport functions. Although genetic, genomic and proteomic studies have led to the identification of hundreds of flagellar and putative flagellar proteins, precisely how these proteins function individually and collectively to drive flagellum motility and other functions remains to be determined. In this chapter we provide an overview of tools and approaches available for studying flagellum protein function in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. We begin by outlining techniques for in vitro cultivation of both T. brucei lifecycle stages, as well as transfection protocols for the delivery of DNA constructs. We then describe specific assays used to assess flagellum function including flagellum preparation and quantitative motility assays. We conclude the chapter with a description of molecular genetic approaches for manipulating gene function. In summary, the availability of potent molecular tools, as well as the health and economic relevance of T. brucei as a pathogen, combine to make the parasite an attractive and integral experimental system for the functional analysis of flagellar proteins. PMID:20409810

  8. Incomplete flagellar structures in nonflagellate mutants of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Iino, T; Horiguchi, T; Yamaguchi, S

    1978-01-01

    Incomplete flagellar structures were detected in osmotically shocked cells or membrane-associated fraction of many nonflagellate mutants of Salmonella typhimurium by electron microscopy. The predominant types of these structures in the mutants were cistron specific. The incomplete basal bodies were detected in flaFI, flaFIV, flaFVIII, and flaFIX mutants, the structure homologous to a basal body in flaFV mutants, the polyhook-basal body complex in flaR mutants, and the hook-basal body complex in flaL and flaU mutants. No structures homologous to flagellar bases or their parts were detected in the early-fla group nonflagellate mutants of flaAI, flaAII, flaAIII, flaB, flaC, flaD, flaE, flaFII, flaFIII, flaFVI, flaFVII, flaFX, flaK, and flaM. From these observations, a process of flagellar morphogenesis was postulated. The functions of the early-fla group are essential to the formation of S ring-M ring-rod complexes bound to the membrane. The completion of basal bodies requires succeeding functions of flaFI, flaFIV, flaFVIII, and flaFIX. Next, the formation of hooks attached to basal bodies proceeds by the function of flaFV and by flaR, which controls the hook length. Flagellar filaments appear at the tips of hooks because of the functions of flaL, flaU, and flagellin genes. Images PMID:342514

  9. Sequence Variations in the Flagellar Antigen Genes fliCH25 and fliCH28 of Escherichia coli and Their Use in Identification and Characterization of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O145:H25 and O145:H28

    PubMed Central

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) serogroup O145 is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. EHEC O145 encompasses motile and non-motile strains of serotypes O145:H25 and O145:H28. Sequencing the fliC-genes associated with the flagellar antigens H25 and H28 revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH25 and fliCH28 gene sequences in E. coli. Based on allele discrimination of these fliC-genes real-time PCR tests were designed for identification of EHEC O145:H25 and O145:H28. The fliCH25 genes present in O145:H25 were found to be very similar to those present in E. coli serogroups O2, O100, O165, O172 and O177 pointing to their common evolution but were different from fliCH25 genes of a multiple number of other E. coli serotypes. In a similar way, EHEC O145:H28 harbor a characteristic fliCH28 allele which, apart from EHEC O145:H28, was only found in enteropathogenic (EPEC) O28:H28 strains that shared some common traits with EHEC O145:H28. The real time PCR-assays targeting these fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] alleles allow better characterization of EHEC O145:H25 and EHEC O145:H28. Evaluation of these PCR assays in spiked ready-to eat salad samples resulted in specific detection of both types of EHEC O145 strains even when low spiking levels of 1–10 cfu/g were used. Furthermore these PCR assays allowed identification of non-motile E. coli strains which are serologically not typable for their H-antigens. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O145wzy) and detection of the respective fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] allele types contributes to improve identification and molecular serotyping of E. coli O145 isolates. PMID:26000885

  10. The role of the Kinesin-13 family protein TbKif13-2 in flagellar length control of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kuan Yoow; Ersfeld, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    TbKif13-2, a member of the microtubule-depolymerising Kinesin-13 family was localised at the tip of the flagellum in Trypanosoma brucei. Its predicted activity suggested a role in the regulation of axonemal length. However, using gene deletion and overexpression of TbKif13-2 we show that, in procyclic T. brucei, this kinesin has only a very limited effect on flagellar length. Gene deletion resulted in no significant elongation of the flagellum and overexpression only slightly decreased flagellar length and the rate of growth of a new flagellum during cell division. This is in contrast to studies in Leishmania major, where overexpression of the TbKif13-2 homologue resulted in a significant length reduction of the flagellum. Knockout of TbKif13-2 has, however, an effect on the initial growth of the emerging new flagellum. In conclusion, we show that TbKif13-2 has only a marginal impact on flagellar length in T. brucei. PMID:20728476

  11. Transcriptional regulation of coordinate changes in flagellar mRNAs during differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amoebae into flagellates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Walsh, C.J.

    1988-06-01

    The nuclear run-on technique was used to measure the rate of transcription of flagellar genes during the differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amebae into flagellates. Synthesis of mRNAs for the axonemal proteins ..cap alpha..- and BETA-tubulin and flagellar calmodulin, as well as a coordinately regulated poly(A)/sup +/ RNA that codes for an unidentified protein, showed transient increases averaging 22-fold. The rate of synthesis of two poly(A)/sup +/ RNAs common to ameobae and flagellates was low until the transcription of the flagellar genes began to decline, at which time synthesis of the RNAs found in ameobae increased 3- to 10-fold. The observed changes in the rate of transcription can account quantitatively for the 20-fold increase in flagellar mRNA concentration during the differentiation. The data for the flagellar calmodulin gene demonstrate transcriptional regulation for a nontubulin axonemal protein. The data also demonstrate at least two programs of transcriptional regulation during the differentiation and raise the intriguing possibility that some significant fraction of the nearly 200 different proteins of the flagellar axoneme is transcriptionally regulated during the 1 h it takes N. gruberi amebae to form visible flagella.

  12. Modulation of toxin production by the flagellar regulon in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Annie; Hussack, Greg; Chen, Wangxue; KuoLee, Rhonda; Twine, Susan M; Fulton, Kelly M; Foote, Simon; Carrillo, Catherine D; Tanha, Jamshid; Logan, Susan M

    2012-10-01

    We show in this study that toxin production in Clostridium difficile is altered in cells which can no longer form flagellar filaments. The impact of inactivation of fliC, CD0240, fliF, fliG, fliM, and flhB-fliR flagellar genes upon toxin levels in culture supernatants was assessed using cell-based cytotoxicity assay, proteomics, immunoassay, and immunoblotting approaches. Each of these showed that toxin levels in supernatants were significantly increased in a fliC mutant compared to that in the C. difficile 630 parent strain. In contrast, the toxin levels in supernatants secreted from other flagellar mutants were significantly reduced compared with that in the parental C. difficile 630 strain. Transcriptional analysis of the pathogenicity locus genes (tcdR, tcdB, tcdE, and tcdA) revealed a significant increase of all four genes in the fliC mutant strain, while transcription of all four genes was significantly reduced in fliM, fliF, fliG, and flhB-fliR mutants. These results demonstrate that toxin transcription in C. difficile is modulated by the flagellar regulon. More significantly, mutant strains showed a corresponding change in virulence compared to the 630 parent strain when tested in a hamster model of C. difficile infection. This is the first demonstration of differential flagellum-related transcriptional regulation of toxin production in C. difficile and provides evidence for elaborate regulatory networks for virulence genes in C. difficile. PMID:22851750

  13. Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirody, Jasmine; Berry, Richard; Oster, George

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) drives swimming in a wide variety of bacterial species, making it crucial for several fundamental biological processes including chemotaxis and community formation. Recent experiments have shown that the structure of this nanomachine is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating units (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding invalidates the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. Here, we put forward a model for the torque generation mechanism of this motor and propose that the maximum speed of the motor increases as additional torque-generators are recruited. This is contrary to the current widely-held belief that there is a universal upper limit to the speed of the BFM. Our result arises from the assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence and consolidate our predictions with arguments that a processive motor must have a high duty ratio at high loads.

  14. Energy source of flagellar type III secretion.

    PubMed

    Paul, Koushik; Erhardt, Marc; Hirano, Takanori; Blair, David F; Hughes, Kelly T

    2008-01-24

    Bacterial flagella contain a specialized secretion apparatus that functions to deliver the protein subunits that form the filament and other structures to outside the membrane. This apparatus is related to the injectisome used by many gram-negative pathogens and symbionts to transfer effector proteins into host cells; in both systems this export mechanism is termed 'type III' secretion. The flagellar secretion apparatus comprises a membrane-embedded complex of about five proteins, and soluble factors, which include export-dedicated chaperones and an ATPase, FliI, that was thought to provide the energy for export. Here we show that flagellar secretion in Salmonella enterica requires the proton motive force (PMF) and does not require ATP hydrolysis by FliI. The export of several flagellar export substrates was prevented by treatment with the protonophore CCCP, with no accompanying decrease in cellular ATP levels. Weak swarming motility and rare flagella were observed in a mutant deleted for FliI and for the non-flagellar type-III secretion ATPases InvJ and SsaN. These findings show that the flagellar secretion apparatus functions as a proton-driven protein exporter and that ATP hydrolysis is not essential for type III secretion. PMID:18216859

  15. Listeria monocytogenes DNA glycosylase AdiP affects flagellar motility, biofilm formation, virulence, and stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is struct...

  16. Isolation and characterization of flagellar filaments from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    Isolated flagellar filaments from the type strain of Bacillus cereus, ATCC 14579, were shown to consist of 34, 32 and 31 kDa proteins in similar proportions as judged by band intensities on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of these three proteins of strain ATCC 14579 were identical with the deduced sequences of three flagellin genes BC1657, BC1658 and BC1659 in the whole genome sequence. Strain ATCC 14579 was classified into serotype T2 by a flagellar serotyping scheme for B. cereus strains that are untypeable into known flagellar serotypes H1 to H23. Flagellar filaments from a reference strain of serotype T2 contained two protein bands at 34 and 32 kDa, but a single protein band at 39 kDa was detected in flagellar filaments of a reference strain of serotype H1. Two murine monoclonal antibodies, 1A5 and 2A5, which recognize both the 34 and 32 kDa flagellins and a single flagellin of 32 kDa, respectively, were specifically reactive with B. cereus strains ATCC 14579 and serotype T2 in whole-cell ELISA and bacterial motility inhibition tests. In immunoelectron microscopy with monoclonal antibodies 1A5 and 2A5, colloidal gold spheres were shown to localize almost evenly over the entire part of flagellar filaments. Since strain ATCC 14579, and presumably strain serotype T2, are unusual among B. cereus strains in possessing multiple genes that encode flagellin subunits, a possible unique mechanism may contribute to assembly of multiple flagellin subunits into the filament over its entire length. PMID:25227778

  17. Identification of a 35-kilodalton serovar-cross-reactive flagellar protein, FlaB, from Leptospira interrogans by N-terminal sequencing, gene cloning, and sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, M; Surujballi, O; Nielsen, K; Nadin-Davis, S; Randall, G

    1997-01-01

    During the screening of antibodies to pathogenic leptospires, a murine monoclonal antibody (designated M138) was found to react with various serovars. An antigen of approximately 35 kDa from Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona, which reacted strongly with M138, was characterized by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and identified as a flagellin, a class B polypeptide subunit (FlaB) of the periplasmic flagella. The gene encoding the FlaB protein, flaB, was amplified from the genomic DNA of several pathogenic serovars by PCR with a single pair of oligonucleotide primers, suggesting that FlaB is highly conserved among these serovars. Cloning and sequence analysis of flaB from serovar pomona revealed that it contains an 849-bp open reading frame with a G + C content of 46.88% which encodes a 283-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 31.297 kDa and a predicted pI of 9.065. A sequence comparison of flagellin proteins revealed that the amino acid sequence is most variable in the central portion of the serovar pomona FlaB, which is believed to contain specific sequence information and which may thus be useful in the design of DNA or synthetic peptide probes suitable for the detection of infection with pathogenic leptospires. PMID:9317049

  18. Flagellar waveform analysis of swimming algal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtuldu, Huseyin; Johnson, Karl; Gollub, Jerry

    2011-11-01

    The twin flagella of the green alga Chlamydomas reinhardtii are driven by dynein molecular motors to oscillate at about 50-60 Hz in a breaststroke motion. For decades, Chlamydomas has been used as a model organism for studies of flagellar motility, and of genetic disorders of ciliary motion. However, little is known experimentally about the flagellar waveforms, and the resulting time-dependent force distribution along the 250 nm diameter flagella. Here, we study flagellar dynamics experimentally by confining cells in quasi-2D liquid films. From simultaneous measurements of the cell body velocity and the time-dependent velocities along the center lines of the two flagella, we determine the drag coefficients, and estimate the power expended by the body and the flagella, comparing our findings with measurements based on the induced fluid flow field. We contrast the results for the quite different beating patterns of synchronous and asynchronous flagella, respectively. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-0803153.

  19. Hydrodynamic interaction of bacterial flagella - flagellar bundling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sookkyung

    2013-11-01

    Flagellar bundling is an important aspect of locomotion in bacteria such as Escherichia coli. To study the hydrodynamic behavior of helical flagella, we present a computational model that is based on the geometry of the bacterial flagellar filament at the micrometer scale. We consider two model flagella, each of which has a rotary motor at its base with the rotation rate of the motor set at 100 Hz. Bundling occurs when both flagella are left-handed helices turning counterclockwise (when viewed from the nonmotor end of the flagellum looking back toward the motor) or when both flagella are right-handed helices turning clockwise. Helical flagella of the other combinations of handedness and rotation direction do not bundle. In this work we use the generalized immersed boundary method combined with the unconstrained Kirchhoff rod theory, which allows us to study the complicated hydrodynamics of flagellar behavior. This is a joint work with Charlie Peskin at NYU. NSF

  20. Mesoscopic modeling of bacterial flagellar microhydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gebremichael, Yeshitila; Ayton, Gary S; Voth, Gregory A

    2006-11-15

    A particle-based hybrid method of elastic network model and smooth-particle hydrodynamics has been employed to describe the propulsion of bacterial flagella in a viscous hydrodynamic environment. The method explicitly models the two aspects of bacterial propulsion that involve flagellar flexibility and long-range hydrodynamic interaction of low-Reynolds-number flow. The model further incorporates the molecular organization of the flagellar filament at a coarse-grained level in terms of the 11 protofilaments. Each of these protofilaments is represented by a collection of material points that represent the flagellin proteins. A computational model of a single flexible helical segment representing the filament of a bacterial flagellum is presented. The propulsive dynamics and the flow fields generated by the motion of the model filament are examined. The nature of flagellar deformation and the influence of hydrodynamics in determining the shape of deformations are examined based on the helical filament. PMID:16935949

  1. Rhythmicity, recurrence, and recovery of flagellar beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum beats with apparently unfailing periodicity, yet responds rapidly to stimuli. Like the human heartbeat, flagellar oscillations are now known to be noisy. Using the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we explore three aspects of nonuniform flagellar beating. We report the existence of rhythmicity, waveform noise peaking at transitions between power and recovery strokes, and fluctuations of interbeat intervals that are correlated and even recurrent, with memory extending to hundreds of beats. These features are altered qualitatively by physiological perturbations. Further, we quantify the recovery of periodic breaststroke beating from transient hydrodynamic forcing. These results will help constrain microscopic theories on the origins and regulation of flagellar beating. Financial support is acknowledged from the EPSRC, ERC Advanced Investigator Grant No. 247333, and a Senior Investigator Award from the Wellcome Trust.

  2. Flagellar region 3b supports strong expression of integrated DNA and the highest chromosomal integration efficiency of the Escherichia coli flagellar regions

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli is routinely used as the chassis for a variety of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Identification and analysis of reliable chromosomal integration and expression target loci is crucial for E. coli engineering. Chromosomal loci differ significantly in their ability to support integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuits. In this study, we investigate E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions 2 and 3b. Integration of the genetic circuit into seven and nine highly conserved genes of the flagellar regions 2 (motA, motB, flhD, flhE, cheW, cheY and cheZ) and 3b (fliE, F, G, J, K, L, M, P, R), respectively, showed significant variation in their ability to support chromosomal integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuit. While not reducing the growth of the engineered strains, the integrations into all 16 target sites led to the loss of motility. In addition to high expression, the flagellar region 3b supports the highest efficiency of integration of all E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions and is therefore potentially the most suitable for the integration of synthetic genetic circuits. PMID:26074421

  3. Sodium-driven energy conversion for flagellar rotation of the earliest divergent hyperthermophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Takekawa, Norihiro; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kaneseki, Tsuyoshi; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a hyperthermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing and carbon-fixing bacterium that can grow at temperatures up to 95 °C. A. aeolicus has an almost complete set of flagellar genes that are conserved in bacteria. Here we observed that A. aeolicus has polar flagellum and can swim with a speed of 90 μm s(-1) at 85 °C. We expressed the A. aeolicus mot genes (motA and motB), which encode the torque generating stator proteins of the flagellar motor, in a corresponding mot nonmotile mutant of Escherichia coli. Its motility was slightly recovered by expression of A. aeolicus MotA and chimeric MotB whose periplasmic region was replaced with that of E. coli. A point mutation in the A. aeolicus MotA cytoplasmic region remarkably enhanced the motility. Using this system in E. coli, we demonstrate that the A. aeolicus motor is driven by Na(+). As motor proteins from hyperthermophilic bacteria represent the earliest motor proteins in evolution, this study strongly suggests that ancient bacteria used Na(+) for energy coupling of the flagellar motor. The Na(+)-driven flagellar genes might have been laterally transferred from early-branched bacteria into late-branched bacteria and the interaction surfaces of the stator and rotor seem not to change in evolution. PMID:26244427

  4. Sodium-driven energy conversion for flagellar rotation of the earliest divergent hyperthermophilic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Takekawa, Norihiro; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kaneseki, Tsuyoshi; Kanai, Tamotsu; Atomi, Haruyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a hyperthermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing and carbon-fixing bacterium that can grow at temperatures up to 95 °C. A. aeolicus has an almost complete set of flagellar genes that are conserved in bacteria. Here we observed that A. aeolicus has polar flagellum and can swim with a speed of 90 μm s−1 at 85 °C. We expressed the A. aeolicus mot genes (motA and motB), which encode the torque generating stator proteins of the flagellar motor, in a corresponding mot nonmotile mutant of Escherichia coli. Its motility was slightly recovered by expression of A. aeolicus MotA and chimeric MotB whose periplasmic region was replaced with that of E. coli. A point mutation in the A. aeolicus MotA cytoplasmic region remarkably enhanced the motility. Using this system in E. coli, we demonstrate that the A. aeolicus motor is driven by Na+. As motor proteins from hyperthermophilic bacteria represent the earliest motor proteins in evolution, this study strongly suggests that ancient bacteria used Na+ for energy coupling of the flagellar motor. The Na+-driven flagellar genes might have been laterally transferred from early-branched bacteria into late-branched bacteria and the interaction surfaces of the stator and rotor seem not to change in evolution. PMID:26244427

  5. Flagellar Glycosylation in Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia thailandensis▿

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Andrew E.; Twine, Susan M.; Fulton, Kelly M.; Titball, Richard W.; Essex-Lopresti, Angela E.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Prior, Joann L.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylation of proteins is known to impart novel physical properties and biological roles to proteins from both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In this study, gel-based glycoproteomics were used to identify glycoproteins of the potential biothreat agent Burkholderia pseudomallei and the closely related but nonpathogenic B. thailandensis. Top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry (MS) analyses identified that the flagellin proteins of both species were posttranslationally modified by novel glycans. Analysis of proteins from two strains of each species demonstrated that B. pseudomallei flagellin proteins were modified with a glycan with a mass of 291 Da, while B. thailandensis flagellin protein was modified with related glycans with a mass of 300 or 342 Da. Structural characterization of the B. thailandensis carbohydrate moiety suggests that it is an acetylated hexuronic acid. In addition, we have identified through mutagenesis a gene from the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen biosynthetic cluster which is involved in flagellar glycosylation, and inactivation of this gene eliminates flagellar glycosylation and motility in B. pseudomallei. This is the first report to conclusively demonstrate the presence of a carbohydrate covalently linked to a protein in B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis, and it suggests new avenues to explore in order to examine the marked differences in virulence between these two species. PMID:21602339

  6. A novel non-homologous recombination-mediated mechanism for Escherichia coli unilateral flagellar phase variation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Hu, Bo; Zhou, Zhemin; Guo, Dan; Guo, Xi; Ding, Peng; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2012-05-01

    Flagella contribute to the virulence of bacteria through chemotaxis, adhesion to and invasion of host surfaces. Flagellar phase variation is believed to facilitate bacterial evasion of the host immune response. In this study, the flnA gene that encodes Escherichia coli H17 flagellin was examined by whole genome sequencing and genetic deletion analysis. Unilateral flagellar phase variation has been reported in E. coli H3, H47 and H17 strains, although the mechanism for phase variation in the H17 strain has not been previously understood. Analysis of phase variants indicated that the flagellar phase variation in the H17 strain was caused by the deletion of an ∼35 kb DNA region containing the flnA gene from diverse excision sites. The presence of covalently closed extrachromosomal circular forms of this excised 35 kb region was confirmed by the two-step polymerase chain reaction. The deletion and complementation test revealed that the Int1157 integrase, a tyrosine recombinase, mediates the excision of this region. Unlike most tyrosine recombinases, Int1157 is suggested to recognize diverse sites and mediate recombination between non-homologous DNA sequences. This is the first report of non-homologous recombination mediating flagellar phase variation. PMID:22287625

  7. Interacting Protein Kinases Involved in the Regulation of Flagellar Length

    PubMed Central

    Erdmann, Maja; Scholz, Anne; Melzer, Inga M.; Schmetz, Christel; Wiese, Martin

    2006-01-01

    A striking difference of the life stages of the protozoan parasite Leishmania is a long flagellum in the insect stage promastigotes and a rudimentary organelle in the mammalian amastigotes. LmxMKK, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase from Leishmania mexicana, is required for growth of a full-length flagellum. We identified LmxMPK3, a MAP kinase homologue, with a similar expression pattern as LmxMKK being not detectable in amastigotes, up-regulated during the differentiation to promastigotes, constantly expressed in promastigotes, and shut down during the differentiation to amastigotes. LmxMPK3 null mutants resemble the LmxMKK knockouts with flagella reduced to one-fifth of the wild-type length, stumpy cell bodies, and vesicles and membrane fragments in the flagellar pocket. A constitutively activated recombinant LmxMKK activates LmxMPK3 in vitro. Moreover, LmxMKK is likely to be directly involved in the phosphorylation of LmxMPK3 in vivo. Finally, LmxMPK3 is able to phosphorylate LmxMKK, indicating a possible feedback regulation. This is the first time that two interacting components of a signaling cascade have been described in the genus Leishmania. Moreover, we set the stage for the analysis of reversible phosphorylation in flagellar morphogenesis. PMID:16467378

  8. Torque-generating units of the bacterial flagellar motor step independently.

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, A D; Berg, H C

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the variance in rotation period of tethered cells as a function of mean rotation rate have shown that the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a stepping motor. Here, by measurement of the variance in rotation period as a function of the number of active torque-generating units, it is shown that each unit steps independently. PMID:8842231

  9. Flagellar Synchronization Independent of Hydrodynamic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Jülicher, Frank

    2012-09-01

    Inspired by the coordinated beating of the flagellar pair of the green algae Chlamydomonas, we study theoretically a simple, mirror-symmetric swimmer, which propels itself at low Reynolds number by a revolving motion of a pair of spheres. We show that perfect synchronization between these two driven spheres can occur due to the motion of the swimmer and local hydrodynamic friction forces. Hydrodynamic interactions, though crucial for net propulsion, contribute little to synchronization for this free-moving swimmer.

  10. Protein turbines. I: The bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed Central

    Elston, T C; Oster, G

    1997-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is driven by a flux of ions between the cytoplasm and the periplasmic lumen. Here we show how an electrostatic mechanism can convert this ion flux into a rotary torque. We demonstrate that, with reasonable parameters, the model can reproduce many of the experimental measurements. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 p720-a PMID:9251788

  11. Monitoring bacterial chemotaxis by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer: Absence of feedback from the flagellar motors

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Thomas S.; Delalez, Nicolas; Pichler, Klemens; Berg, Howard C.

    2006-01-01

    We looked for a feedback system in Escherichia coli that might sense the rotational bias of flagellar motors and regulate the activity of the chemotaxis receptor kinase. Our search was based on the assumption that any machinery that senses rotational bias will be perturbed if flagellar rotation stops. We monitored the activity of the kinase in swimming cells by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between Renilla luciferase fused to the phosphatase, CheZ, and yellow fluorescent protein fused to the response regulator, CheY. Then we jammed the flagellar motors by adding an antifilament antibody that crosslinks adjacent filaments in flagellar bundles. At steady state, the rate of phosphorylation of CheY is equal to the rate of dephosphorylation of CheY-P, which is proportional to the degree of association between CheZ and CheY-P, the quantity sensed by BRET. No changes were observed, even upon addition of an amount of antibody that stopped the swimming of >95% of cells within a few seconds. So, the kinase does not appear to be sensitive to motor output. The BRET technique is complementary to one based on FRET, described previously. Its reliability was confirmed by measurements of the response of cells to the addition of attractants. PMID:16452163

  12. Studies on flagellar shortening in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Cherniack, J.

    1985-01-01

    Flagellar shortening of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was promoted by sodium chloride, pyrophosphate (sodium, potassium and ammonium salts), EDTA and EGTA, succinate, citrate and oxalate (sodium salts), caffeine and aminophylline. Removal of calcium from the medium potentiated the effects of these agents in inducing shortening. Investigations of the release of phosphorylated compounds to the medium during pyrophosphate-induced flagellar shortening of cells pre-labelled with /sup 32/P, revealed an as yet unidentified /sup 32/P-labelled compound with distinct chromatographic properties. Chromatography and electrophoresis indicates that it is a small, highly polar molecule with a high charge to mass ratio, containing thermo- and acid-labile phosphate linkages. Investigations showed of the release of /sup 35/S-labelled protein to the medium from cells pre-labelled with /sup 35/S-sulfate showed that flagellated cells released two prominent polypeptides which comigrated with ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-flagellar tubulin on SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, while deflagellated cells did not.

  13. Self-Sustained Oscillatory Sliding Movement of Doublet Microtubules and Flagellar Bend Formation.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the basis for flagellar and ciliary movements is ATP-dependent sliding between adjacent doublet microtubules. However, the mechanism for converting microtubule sliding into flagellar and ciliary movements has long remained unresolved. The author has developed new sperm models that use bull spermatozoa divested of their plasma membrane and midpiece mitochondrial sheath by Triton X-100 and dithiothreitol. These models enable the observation of both the oscillatory sliding movement of activated doublet microtubules and flagellar bend formation in the presence of ATP. A long fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by synchronous sliding of the sperm flagella and a short fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by metachronal sliding exhibited spontaneous oscillatory movements and constructed a one beat cycle of flagellar bending by alternately actuating. The small sliding displacement generated by metachronal sliding formed helical bends, whereas the large displacement by synchronous sliding formed planar bends. Therefore, the resultant waveform is a half-funnel shape, which is similar to ciliary movements. PMID:26863204

  14. Self-Sustained Oscillatory Sliding Movement of Doublet Microtubules and Flagellar Bend Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ishijima, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the basis for flagellar and ciliary movements is ATP-dependent sliding between adjacent doublet microtubules. However, the mechanism for converting microtubule sliding into flagellar and ciliary movements has long remained unresolved. The author has developed new sperm models that use bull spermatozoa divested of their plasma membrane and midpiece mitochondrial sheath by Triton X-100 and dithiothreitol. These models enable the observation of both the oscillatory sliding movement of activated doublet microtubules and flagellar bend formation in the presence of ATP. A long fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by synchronous sliding of the sperm flagella and a short fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by metachronal sliding exhibited spontaneous oscillatory movements and constructed a one beat cycle of flagellar bending by alternately actuating. The small sliding displacement generated by metachronal sliding formed helical bends, whereas the large displacement by synchronous sliding formed planar bends. Therefore, the resultant waveform is a half-funnel shape, which is similar to ciliary movements. PMID:26863204

  15. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A; Porter, Mary E

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  16. Cross talk between type III secretion and flagellar assembly systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Soscia, Chantal; Hachani, Abderrahman; Bernadac, Alain; Filloux, Alain; Bleves, Sophie

    2007-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytotoxicity is linked to a type III secretion system (T3SS) that delivers effectors into the host cell. We show here that a negative cross-control exists between T3SS and flagellar assembly. We observed that, in a strain lacking flagella, T3SS gene expression, effector secretion, and cytotoxicity were increased. Conversely, we revealed that flagellar-gene expression and motility were decreased in a strain overproducing ExsA, the T3SS master regulator. Interestingly, a nonmotile strain lacking the flagellar filament (DeltafliC) presented a hyperefficient T3SS and a nonmotile strain assembling flagella (DeltamotAB) did not. More intriguingly, a strain lacking motCD genes is a flagellated strain with a slight defect in swimming. However, in this strain, T3SS gene expression was up-regulated. These results suggest that flagellar assembly and/or mobility antagonizes the T3SS and that a negative cross talk exists between these two systems. An illustration of this is the visualization by electron microscopy of T3SS needles in a nonmotile P. aeruginosa strain, needles which otherwise are not detected. The molecular basis of the cross talk is complex and remains to be elucidated, but proteins like MotCD might have a crucial role in signaling between the two processes. In addition, we found that the GacA response regulator negatively affects the T3SS. In a gacA mutant, the T3SS effector ExoS is hypersecreted. Strikingly, GacA was previously reported as a positive regulator for motility. Globally, our data document the idea that some virulence factors are coordinately but inversely regulated, depending on the bacterial colonization phase and infection types. PMID:17307856

  17. The Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirody, Jasmine A.; Berry, Richard M.; Oster, George

    2016-08-01

    Recent experiments on the bacterial flagellar motor have shown that the structure of this nanomachine, which drives locomotion in a wide range of bacterial species, is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating units (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding invalidates the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. Here, we propose that, contrary to previous assumptions, the maximum speed of the motor is not universal, but rather increases as additional torque-generators are recruited. This result arises from our assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence and consolidate our predictions with arguments that a processive motor must have a high duty ratio at high loads.

  18. The Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor.

    PubMed

    Nirody, Jasmine A; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

    2016-08-01

    Recent experiments on the bacterial flagellar motor have shown that the structure of this nanomachine, which drives locomotion in a wide range of bacterial species, is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating complexes (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding brings under scrutiny the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. In this study, we propose that, contrary to previous assumptions, the maximum speed of the motor increases as additional stators are recruited. This result arises from our assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence in chimeric motors, as well as with the requirement that a processive motor driving a large load via an elastic linkage must have a high duty ratio. PMID:27508439

  19. The Bacterial Flagellar Type III Export Gate Complex Is a Dual Fuel Engine That Can Use Both H+ and Na+ for Flagellar Protein Export

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Tohru; Morimoto, Yusuke V.; Hara, Noritaka; Aldridge, Phillip D.; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes ATP and proton motive force (PMF) to transport flagellar proteins to the distal end of the growing flagellar structure for self-assembly. The transmembrane export gate complex is a H+–protein antiporter, of which activity is greatly augmented by an associated cytoplasmic ATPase complex. Here, we report that the export gate complex can use sodium motive force (SMF) in addition to PMF across the cytoplasmic membrane to drive protein export. Protein export was considerably reduced in the absence of the ATPase complex and a pH gradient across the membrane, but Na+ increased it dramatically. Phenamil, a blocker of Na+ translocation, inhibited protein export. Overexpression of FlhA increased the intracellular Na+ concentration in the presence of 100 mM NaCl but not in its absence, suggesting that FlhA acts as a Na+ channel. In wild-type cells, however, neither Na+ nor phenamil affected protein export, indicating that the Na+ channel activity of FlhA is suppressed by the ATPase complex. We propose that the export gate by itself is a dual fuel engine that uses both PMF and SMF for protein export and that the ATPase complex switches this dual fuel engine into a PMF-driven export machinery to become much more robust against environmental changes in external pH and Na+ concentration. PMID:26943926

  20. Genome sequence of Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans strain 4834-R reveals that flagellar motility is not a general feature of xanthomonads

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Xanthomonads are plant-associated bacteria responsible for diseases on economically important crops. Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans (Xff) is one of the causal agents of common bacterial blight of bean. In this study, the complete genome sequence of strain Xff 4834-R was determined and compared to other Xanthomonas genome sequences. Results Comparative genomics analyses revealed core characteristics shared between Xff 4834-R and other xanthomonads including chemotaxis elements, two-component systems, TonB-dependent transporters, secretion systems (from T1SS to T6SS) and multiple effectors. For instance a repertoire of 29 Type 3 Effectors (T3Es) with two Transcription Activator-Like Effectors was predicted. Mobile elements were associated with major modifications in the genome structure and gene content in comparison to other Xanthomonas genomes. Notably, a deletion of 33 kbp affects flagellum biosynthesis in Xff 4834-R. The presence of a complete flagellar cluster was assessed in a collection of more than 300 strains representing different species and pathovars of Xanthomonas. Five percent of the tested strains presented a deletion in the flagellar cluster and were non-motile. Moreover, half of the Xff strains isolated from the same epidemic than 4834-R was non-motile and this ratio was conserved in the strains colonizing the next bean seed generations. Conclusions This work describes the first genome of a Xanthomonas strain pathogenic on bean and reports the existence of non-motile xanthomonads belonging to different species and pathovars. Isolation of such Xff variants from a natural epidemic may suggest that flagellar motility is not a key function for in planta fitness. PMID:24195767

  1. Life with eight flagella: flagellar assembly and division in Giardia

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Scott C.; House, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances Flagellar movement in Giardia, a common intestinal parasitic protist, is critical to its survival in the host. Each axoneme is unique in possessing a long, cytoplasmic portion as well as a membrane-bound portion. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for the assembly of membrane-bound regions, yet the cytoplasmic regions may be assembled by IFT-independent mechanisms. Steady-state axoneme length is maintained by IFT and by intrinsic and active microtubule dynamics. Following mitosis and prior to their segregation, giardial flagella undergo a multigenerational division cycle in which the parental eight flagella migrate and reposition to different cellular locations; eight new flagella are assembled de novo. Each daughter cell thus inherits four mature and four newly synthesized flagella. PMID:20580308

  2. Function of FlhB, a membrane protein implicated in the bacterial flagellar type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A; Barker, Clive S; Kostyukova, Alla S; Samatey, Fadel A

    2013-01-01

    The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system, and it plays an active role in the regulation of protein export. In this study conserved properties of FlhB that are important for its function were investigated. Replacing the flhB gene (or part of the gene) in Salmonella typhimurium with the flhB gene of the distantly related bacterium Aquifex aeolicus greatly reduces motility. However, motility can be restored to some extent by spontaneous mutations in the part of flhB gene coding for the cytoplasmic domain of Aquifex FlhB. Structural analysis suggests that these mutations destabilize the structure. The secondary structure and stability of the mutated cytoplasmic fragments of FlhB have been studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results suggest that conformational flexibility could be important for FlhB function. An extragenic suppressor mutation in the fliS gene, which decreases the affinity of FliS to FliC, partially restores motility of the FlhB substitution mutants. PMID:23874605

  3. Flagellar synchronization through direct hydrodynamic interactions.

    PubMed

    Brumley, Douglas R; Wan, Kirsty Y; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01

    Flows generated by ensembles of flagella are crucial to development, motility and sensing, but the mechanisms behind this striking coordination remain unclear. We present novel experiments in which two micropipette-held somatic cells of Volvox carteri, with distinct intrinsic beating frequencies, are studied by high-speed imaging as a function of their separation and orientation. Analysis of time series shows that the interflagellar coupling, constrained by lack of connections between cells to be hydrodynamical, exhibits a spatial dependence consistent with theory. At close spacings it produces robust synchrony for thousands of beats, while at increasing separations synchrony is degraded by stochastic processes. Manipulation of the relative flagellar orientation reveals in-phase and antiphase states, consistent with dynamical theories. Flagellar tracking with exquisite precision reveals waveform changes that result from hydrodynamic coupling. This study proves unequivocally that flagella coupled solely through a fluid can achieve robust synchrony despite differences in their intrinsic properties.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02750.001. PMID:25073925

  4. Flagellar synchronization through direct hydrodynamic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brumley, Douglas R; Wan, Kirsty Y; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01

    Flows generated by ensembles of flagella are crucial to development, motility and sensing, but the mechanisms behind this striking coordination remain unclear. We present novel experiments in which two micropipette-held somatic cells of Volvox carteri, with distinct intrinsic beating frequencies, are studied by high-speed imaging as a function of their separation and orientation. Analysis of time series shows that the interflagellar coupling, constrained by lack of connections between cells to be hydrodynamical, exhibits a spatial dependence consistent with theory. At close spacings it produces robust synchrony for thousands of beats, while at increasing separations synchrony is degraded by stochastic processes. Manipulation of the relative flagellar orientation reveals in-phase and antiphase states, consistent with dynamical theories. Flagellar tracking with exquisite precision reveals waveform changes that result from hydrodynamic coupling. This study proves unequivocally that flagella coupled solely through a fluid can achieve robust synchrony despite differences in their intrinsic properties. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02750.001 PMID:25073925

  5. Flagellar motor based micro hybrid devices.

    PubMed

    Tung, S; Kim, J-W

    2004-01-01

    We are in the process of developing a series of micro hybrid devices based on tethered flagellar motors. Examples of the devices include a microfluidic pump and a micro AC dynamo. The microfluidic pump is realized through the tethering of a harmless strain of Escherichia coli cells to a MEMS based micro channel. Each E. coli cell is about 3 mum long and 1 mum in diameter, with several flagella that are driven at the base by molecular rotary motors. The operational principle of the micro pump is based on the viscous pumping effect where continuous rotation of the tethered cells forms a fluidic conveyor belt that 'drags' fluid from one end of the channel to the other. We used hydrodynamic loading to synchronize cell rotation in order to maximize the fluid pumping capability. The micro dynamo is realized through the integration of tethered flagellar motors with micro ferromagnetic beads and micro copper coils. The micro dynamo generates AC power by using the tethered cells to create a rotating magnetic field around the copper coils. Preliminary result indicates a high power density when compared to other biologically based micro power generators. PMID:17270806

  6. Complex spatial organization and flagellin composition of flagellar propeller from marine magnetotactic ovoid strain MO-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Jia; Santini, Claire-Lise; Bernadac, Alain; Ruan, Juanfang; Zhang, Sheng-Da; Kato, Takayuki; Li, Ying; Namba, Keiichi; Wu, Long-Fei

    2012-03-01

    Marine magnetotactic ovoid bacterium MO-1 is capable of swimming along the geomagnetic field lines by means of its two sheathed flagellar bundles at a speed up to 300 μm/s. In this study, by using electron microscopy, we showed that, in each bundle, six individual flagella were organized in hexagon with a seventh in the middle. We identified 12 flagellin paralogs and 2 putative flagellins in the genome of MO-1. Among them, 13 were tandemly located on an ~ 17-kb segment while the 14th was on a separated locus. Using reverse transcription PCR and quantitative PCR, we found that all the 14 flagellin or putative flagellin genes were transcribed and that 2 of them were more abundantly expressed than others. A nLC (nanoliquid chromatography)-ESI (electrospray ionization)-MS/MS (mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) mass spectrometry analysis identified all the 12 flagellin proteins in three glycosylated polypeptide bands resolved by one-dimensional denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 10 of them in 21 spots obtained by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis of flagellar extracts. Most spots contained more than one flagellin, and eight of the ten identified flagellins existed in multiple isoforms. Taken together, these results show unprecedented complexity in the spatial organization and flagellin composition of the flagellar propeller. Such architecture is observed only for ovoid-coccoid, bilophotrichously flagellated magnetotactic bacteria living in marine sediments, suggesting a species and environmental specificity. PMID:22245577

  7. Analysis of an engineered Salmonella flagellar fusion protein, FliR-FlhB.

    PubMed

    Van Arnam, John S; McMurry, Jonathan L; Kihara, May; Macnab, Robert M

    2004-04-01

    Salmonella FliR and FlhB are membrane proteins necessary for flagellar export. In Clostridium a fliR-flhB fusion gene exists. We constructed a similar Salmonella fusion gene which is able to complement fliR, flhB, and fliR flhB null strains. Western blotting revealed that the FliR-FlhB fusion protein retains the FlhB protein's cleavage properties. We conclude that the FliR and FlhB proteins are physically associated in the wild-type Salmonella basal body, probably in a 1:1 ratio. PMID:15060055

  8. Characterization of Escherichia coli Flagellar Mutants That are Insensitive to Catabolite Repression

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Michael; Simon, Melvin

    1974-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the synthesis of the flagellar organelle is sensitive to catabolite repression. Synthesis requires the presence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate receptor protein (Crp) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP); i.e., mutants that lack Crp or adenylcyclase (Cya) synthesize no flagella. We isolated and characterized a series of mutants (cfs) that restored flagella-forming ability in a Crp strain of E. coli. The mutations in these strains were transferred onto episomes and they were then introduced into a variety of other strains. The presence of the mutation resulted in flagella synthesis in Cya and Crp strains as well as in the wild type grown under conditions of catabolite repression. Deletion analysis and other genetic studies indicated that: (i) the cfs mutations had a dominant effect when they were in the transconfiguration in merodiploids: (ii) they occurred in or very close to the flaI gene: and (iii) their expression required the presence of an intact flaI gene adjacent to the cfs mutation. Biochemical studies showed that the synthesis of at least two flagellar polypeptides, the hook subunit and an amber fragment of flagellin, were absent in strains that carried a cya mutation. Their synthesis was depressed in strains grown under conditions of catabolite repression. The presence of the cfs mutation restored the specific synthesis of these two polypeptides. We suggest that the formation of the flaI gene product is the step in flagellar synthesis that is catabolite sensitive and requires cAMP. We propose a regulatory function for the product of the flaI gene. Images PMID:4373438

  9. Loss of the lac operon contributes to Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through derepression of flagellar synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lingyan; Ni, Zhiwei; Wang, Lei; Feng, Lu; Liu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella, a genus that is closely related to Escherichia coli, includes many pathogens of humans and other animals. A notable feature that distinguishes Salmonella from E. coli is lactose negativity, because the lac operon is lost in most Salmonella genomes. Here, we expressed the lac operon in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and compared the virulence of the Lac(+) strain to that of the wild-type strain in a murine model, invasion assays, and macrophage replication assays. We showed that the Lac(+) strain is attenuated in vivo and the attenuation of virulence is caused by its defect in epithelial cell invasion. However, the invasion-defective phenotype is unrelated to lactose utilization. Through sequencing and the comparison of the transcriptome profile between the Lac(+) and wild-type strains during invasion, we found that most flagellar genes were markedly downregulated in the Lac(+) strain, while other genes associated with invasion, such as the majority of genes encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1, were not differentially expressed. Moreover, we discovered that lacA is the major repressor of flagellar gene expression in the lac operon. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the lac operon decreases Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through repression of flagellar biosynthesis. As the ability to invade epithelial cells is a critical virulence determinant of Salmonella, our results provide important evidence that the loss of the lac operon contributes to the evolution of Salmonella pathogenicity. PMID:25362512

  10. Exchange of rotor components in functioning bacterial flagellar motor

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuoka, Hajime; Inoue, Yuichi; Terasawa, Shun; Takahashi, Hiroto; Ishijima, Akihiko

    2010-03-26

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a rotary motor driven by the electrochemical potential of a coupling ion. The interaction between a rotor and stator units is thought to generate torque. The overall structure of flagellar motor has been thought to be static, however, it was recently proved that stators are exchanged in a rotating motor. Understanding the dynamics of rotor components in functioning motor is important for the clarifying of working mechanism of bacterial flagellar motor. In this study, we focused on the dynamics and the turnover of rotor components in a functioning flagellar motor. Expression systems for GFP-FliN, FliM-GFP, and GFP-FliG were constructed, and each GFP-fusion was functionally incorporated into the flagellar motor. To investigate whether the rotor components are exchanged in a rotating motor, we performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. After photobleaching, in a tethered cell producing GFP-FliN or FliM-GFP, the recovery of fluorescence at the rotational center was observed. However, in a cell producing GFP-FliG, no recovery of fluorescence was observed. The transition phase of fluorescence intensity after full or partially photobleaching allowed the turnover of FliN subunits to be calculated as 0.0007 s{sup -1}, meaning that FliN would be exchanged in tens of minutes. These novel findings indicate that a bacterial flagellar motor is not a static structure even in functioning state. This is the first report for the exchange of rotor components in a functioning bacterial flagellar motor.

  11. Pseudomonas syringae Coordinates Production of a Motility-Enabling Surfactant with Flagellar Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Adrien Y.; Shimada, Briana K.; Mullin, Sean W. A.; Dunlap, Christopher A.; Bowman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Using a sensitive assay, we observed low levels of an unknown surfactant produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a that was not detected by traditional methods yet enabled swarming motility in a strain that exhibited deficient production of syringafactin, the main characterized surfactant produced by P. syringae. Random mutagenesis of the syringafactin-deficient strain revealed an acyltransferase with homology to rhlA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that was required for production of this unidentified surfactant, subsequently characterized by mass spectrometry as 3-(3-hydroxyalkanoyloxy) alkanoic acid (HAA). Analysis of other mutants with altered surfactant production revealed that HAA is coordinately regulated with the late-stage flagellar gene encoding flagellin; mutations in genes involved in early flagellar assembly abolish or reduce HAA production, while mutations in flagellin or flagellin glycosylation genes increase its production. When colonizing a hydrated porous surface, the bacterium increases production of both flagellin and HAA. P. syringae was defective in porous-paper colonization without functional flagella and was slightly inhibited in this movement when it lacked surfactant production. Loss of HAA production in a syringafactin-deficient strain had no effect on swimming but abolished swarming motility. In contrast, a strain that lacked HAA but retained syringafactin production exhibited broad swarming tendrils, while a syringafactin-producing strain that overproduced HAA exhibited slender swarming tendrils. On the basis of further analysis of mutants altered in HAA production, we discuss its regulation in Pseudomonas syringae. PMID:22194459

  12. Flagellar localization of a novel isoform of myosin, myosin XXI, in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Katta, Santharam S; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A; Gupta, Chhitar M

    2009-04-01

    Leishmania major genome analysis revealed the presence of putative genes corresponding to two myosins, which have been designated to class IB and a novel class, class XXI, specifically present in kinetoplastids. To characterize these myosin homologs in Leishmania, we have cloned and over-expressed the full-length myosin XXI gene and variable region of myosin IB gene in bacteria, purified the corresponding proteins, and then used the affinity purified anti-sera to analyze the expression and intracellular distribution of these proteins. Whereas myosin XXI was expressed in both the promastigote and amastigote stages, no expression of myosin IB could be detected in any of the two stages of these parasites. Further, myosin XXI expression was more predominant in the promastigote stage where it was preferentially localized in the proximal region of the flagellum. The observed flagellar localization was not dependent on the myosin head region or actin but was exclusively determined by the myosin tail region, as judged by over-expressing GFP conjugates of full-length myosin XXI, its head domain and its tail domain separately in Leishmania. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immuno-gold electron microscopy analyses revealed that this protein was partly associated with paraflagellar rod proteins but not with tubulins in the flagellar axoneme. Our results, for the first time, report the expression and detailed analysis of cellular localization of a novel class of myosin, myosin XXI in trypanosomatids. PMID:19121339

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Salmonella FliI, the ATPase component of the type III flagellar protein-export apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Minamino, Tohru; Imada, Katsumi; Tahara, Aiko; Kihara, May; Macnab, Robert M.; Namba, Keiichi

    2006-10-01

    Crystals of an N-terminally truncated variant of the Salmonella flagellar ATPase FliI, which exports substrate proteins into the central channel of the growing flagellar structure by utilizing the energy of ATP hydrolysis, have been obtained and characterized by X-ray diffraction. Most of the structural components making up the bacterial flagellum are translocated through the central channel of the growing flagellar structure by the type III flagellar protein-export apparatus in an ATPase-driven manner and are assembled at the growing end. FliI is the ATPase that drives flagellar protein export using the energy of ATP hydrolysis. FliI forms an oligomeric ring structure in order to attain maximum ATPase activity. In this study, FliI(Δ1–18), an N-terminally truncated variant of FliI lacking the first 18 residues, was purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique with PEG 8000 as a precipitant. FliI(Δ1–18) crystals grew in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 48, b = 73, c = 126 Å, β = 94°, and diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution. Anomalous difference Patterson maps of Os-derivative and Pt-derivative crystals showed significant peaks in their Harker sections, indicating that both derivatives are suitable for structure determination.

  14. Flagellar force production during regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukich, John N.; Clodfelter, Catherine; Bernd, Karen K.

    2009-11-01

    Several respiratory, digestive, and reproductive disorders originate with motional dysfunction of cilia and flagella. The usefulness of cilia and flagella is understood, but the internal mechanism for creating their breast stroke-like motion is not. This study reports on standardization of calibration, trapping and cell movement recording methods. Our techniques permit us to measure the flagellar swimming force of Chlamydomonas during flagella regeneration. We find that as flagella length increases, the flagellar force is maximized after 50% of full length is achieved except for a significant dip at 75% of full length. These results raise many questions regarding the flagella infrastructure.

  15. High hydrostatic pressure induces counterclockwise to clockwise reversals of the Escherichia coli flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Kimura, Yoshifumi; Homma, Michio; Ishijima, Akihiko; Terazima, Masahide

    2013-04-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a reversible rotary machine that rotates a left-handed helical filament, allowing bacteria to swim toward a more favorable environment. The direction of rotation reverses from counterclockwise (CCW) to clockwise (CW), and vice versa, in response to input from the chemotaxis signaling circuit. CW rotation is normally caused by binding of the phosphorylated response regulator CheY (CheY-P), and strains lacking CheY are typically locked in CCW rotation. The detailed mechanism of switching remains unresolved because it is technically difficult to regulate the level of CheY-P within the concentration range that produces flagellar reversals. Here, we demonstrate that high hydrostatic pressure can induce CW rotation even in the absence of CheY-P. The rotation of single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli cells with the cheY gene deleted was monitored at various pressures and temperatures. Application of >120 MPa pressure induced a reversal from CCW to CW at 20°C, although at that temperature, no motor rotated CW at ambient pressure (0.1 MPa). At lower temperatures, pressure-induced changes in direction were observed at pressures of <120 MPa. CW rotation increased with pressure in a sigmoidal fashion, as it does in response to increasing concentrations of CheY-P. Application of pressure generally promotes the formation of clusters of ordered water molecules on the surfaces of proteins. It is possible that hydration of the switch complex at high pressure induces structural changes similar to those caused by the binding of CheY-P. PMID:23417485

  16. Two Distinct Ca2+ Signaling Pathways Modulate Sperm Flagellar Beating Patterns in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Haixin; Suarez, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperactivation, a swimming pattern of mammalian sperm in the oviduct, is essential for fertilization. It is characterized by asymmetrical flagellar beating and an increase of cytoplasmic Ca2+. We observed that some mouse sperm swimming in the oviduct produce high-amplitude pro-hook bends (bends in the direction of the hook on the head), whereas other sperm produce high-amplitude anti-hook bends. Switching direction of the major bends could serve to redirect sperm toward oocytes. We hypothesized that different Ca2+ signaling pathways produce high-amplitude pro-hook and anti-hook bends. In vitro, sperm that hyperactivated during capacitation (because of activation of CATSPER plasma membrane Ca2+ channels) developed high-amplitude pro-hook bends. The CATSPER activators procaine and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) also induced high-amplitude pro-hook bends. Thimerosal, which triggers a Ca2+ release from internal stores, induced high-amplitude anti-hook bends. Activation of CATSPER channels is facilitated by a pH rise, so both Ca2+ and pH responses to treatments with 4-AP and thimerosal were monitored. Thimerosal triggered a Ca2+ increase that initiated at the base of the flagellum, whereas 4-AP initiated a rise in the proximal principal piece. Only 4-AP triggered a flagellar pH rise. Proteins were extracted from sperm for examination of phosphorylation patterns induced by Ca2+ signaling. Procaine and 4-AP induced phosphorylation of proteins on threonine and serine, whereas thimerosal primarily induced dephosphorylation of proteins. Tyrosine phosphorylation was unaffected. We concluded that hyperactivation, which is associated with capacitation, can be modulated by release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores to reverse the direction of the dominant flagellar bend and, thus, redirect sperm. PMID:21389347

  17. Novel Components of the Flagellar System in Epsilonproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Beile; Lara-Tejero, Maria; Lefebre, Matthew; Goodman, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Motility is essential for the pathogenesis of many bacterial species. Most bacteria move using flagella, which are multiprotein filaments that rotate propelled by a cell wall-anchored motor using chemical energy. Although some components of the flagellar apparatus are common to many bacterial species, recent studies have shown significant differences in the flagellar structures of different bacterial species. The molecular bases for these differences, however, are not understood. The flagella from epsilonproteobacteria, which include the bacterial pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pylori, are among the most divergent. Using next-generation sequencing combined with transposon mutagenesis, we have conducted a comprehensive high-throughput genetic screen in Campylobacter jejuni, which identified several novel components of its flagellar system. Biochemical analyses detected interactions between the identified proteins and known components of the flagellar machinery, and in vivo imaging located them to the bacterial poles, where flagella assemble. Most of the identified new components are conserved within but restricted to epsilonproteobacteria. These studies provide insight into the divergent flagella of this group of bacteria and highlight the complexity of this remarkable structure, which has adapted to carry out its conserved functions in the context of widely diverse bacterial species. PMID:24961693

  18. Divalent Cation Control of Flagellar Motility in African Trypanosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westergard, Anna M.; Hutchings, Nathan R.

    2005-03-01

    Changes in calcium concentration have been shown to dynamically affect flagellar motility in several eukaryotic systems. The African trypanosome is a monoflagellated protozoan parasite and the etiological agent of sleeping sickness. Although cell motility has been implicated in disease progression, very little is currently known about biochemical control of the trypanosome flagellum. In this study, we assess the effects of extracellular changes in calcium and nickel concentration on trypanosome flagellar movement. Using a flow through chamber, we determine the relative changes in motility in individual trypanosomes in response to various concentrations of calcium and nickel, respectively. Extracellular concentrations of calcium and nickel (as low as 100 micromolar) significantly inhibit trypanosome cell motility. The effects are reversible, as indicated by the recovery of motion after removal of the calcium or nickel from the chamber. We are currently investigating the specific changes in flagellar oscillation and coordination that result from calcium and nickel, respectively. These results verify the presence of a calcium-responsive signaling mechanism(s) that regulates flagellar beat in trypanosomes.

  19. Flagellar motility is necessary for Aeromonas hydrophila adhesion.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yingxue; Lin, Guifang; Chen, Wenbo; Xu, Xiaojin; Yan, Qingpi

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion to host surface or cells is the initial step in bacterial pathogenesis, and the adhesion mechanisms of the fish pathogenic bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila were investigated in this study. First, a mutagenesis library of A. hydrophila that contained 332 random insertion mutants was constructed via mini-Tn10 Km mutagenesis. Four mutants displayed the most attenuated adhesion. Sequence analysis revealed that the mini-Tn10 insertion sites in the four mutant strains were flgC(GenBank accession numbers KX261880), cytb4(GenBank accession numbers JN133621), rbsR(GenBank accession numbers KX261881) and flgE(GenBank accession numbers JQ974982). To further study the roles of flgC and flgE in the adhesion of A. hydrophila, some biological characteristics of the wild-type strain B11, the mutants M121 and M240, and the complemented strains C121 and C240 were investigated. The results showed that the mutation in flgC or flgE led to the flagellar motility of A. hydrophila significant reduction or abolishment. flgC was not necessary for flagellar biosynthesis but was necessary for the full motility of A. hydrophila, flgE was involved in both flagellar biosynthesis and motility. The flagellar motility is necessary for A. hydrophila to adhere to the host mucus, which suggests flagellar motility plays crucial roles in the early infection process of this bacterium. PMID:27432325

  20. Preparation and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of crystals of bacterial flagellar sigma factor σ{sup 28} in complex with the σ{sup 28}-binding region of its antisigma factor, FlgM

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Kengo; Ichihara, Hisako; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Ishihama, Akira; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2007-03-01

    A complex of E. coli flagellar and chemotaxis-specific sigma factor σ{sup 28} bound to the σ{sup 28}-binding region of its antisigma factor FlgM was crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å. The sigma 28 kDa (σ{sup 28}) factor is a transcription factor specific for the expression of bacterial flagellar and chemotaxis genes. Its antisigma factor, FlgM, binds σ{sup 28} factor and inhibits its activity as a transcription factor. In this study, crystals of the complex between Escherichia coli σ{sup 28} and the C-terminal σ{sup 28}-binding region of FlgM were obtained. The crystals belong to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.7 (2), c = 51.74 (3) Å, containing one complex in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. An X-ray intensity data set was collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å.

  1. Defects in the Flagellar Motor Increase Synthesis of Poly-γ-Glutamate in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jia Mun; Guttenplan, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis swims in liquid media and swarms over solid surfaces, and it encodes two sets of flagellar stator homologs. Here, we show that B. subtilis requires only the MotA/MotB stator during swarming motility and that the residues required for stator force generation are highly conserved from the Proteobacteria to the Firmicutes. We further find that mutants that abolish stator function also result in an overproduction of the extracellular polymer poly-γ-glutamate (PGA) to confer a mucoid colony phenotype. PGA overproduction appeared to be the result of an increase in the expression of the pgs operon that encodes genes for PGA synthesis. Transposon mutagenesis was conducted to identify insertions that abolished colony mucoidy and disruptions in known transcriptional regulators of PGA synthesis (Com and Deg two-component systems) as well as mutants defective in transcription-coupled DNA repair (Mfd)-reduced expression of the pgs operon. A final class of insertions disrupted proteins involved in the assembly of the flagellar filament (FliD, FliT, and FlgL), and these mutants did not reduce expression of the pgs operon, suggesting a second mechanism of PGA control. PMID:24296669

  2. Adenine Nucleotide Metabolism and a Role for AMP in Modulating Flagellar Waveforms in Mouse Sperm1

    PubMed Central

    Vadnais, Melissa L.; Cao, Wenlei; Aghajanian, Haig K.; Haig-Ladewig, Lisa; Lin, Angel M.; Al-Alao, Osama; Gerton, George L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT While most ATP, the main energy source driving sperm motility, is derived from glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, the metabolic demands of the cell require the efficient use of power stored in high-energy phosphate bonds. In times of high energy consumption, adenylate kinase (AK) scavenges one ATP molecule by transphosphorylation of two molecules of ADP, simultaneously yielding one molecule of AMP as a by-product. Either ATP or ADP supported motility of detergent-modeled cauda epididymal mouse sperm, indicating that flagellar AKs are functional. However, the ensuing flagellar waveforms fueled by ATP or ADP were qualitatively different. Motility driven by ATP was rapid but restricted to the distal region of the sperm tail, whereas ADP produced slower and more fluid waves that propagated down the full flagellum. Characterization of wave patterns by tracing and superimposing the images of the flagella, quantifying the differences using digital image analysis, and computer-assisted sperm analysis revealed differences in the amplitude, periodicity, and propagation of the waves between detergent-modeled sperm treated with either ATP or ADP. Surprisingly, addition of AMP to the incubation medium containing ATP recapitulated the pattern of sperm motility seen with ADP alone. In addition to AK1 and AK2, which we previously demonstrated are present in outer dense fibers and mitochondrial sheath of the mouse sperm tail, we show that another AK, AK8, is present in a third flagellar compartment, the axoneme. These results extend the known regulators of sperm motility to include AMP, which may be operating through an AMP-activated protein kinase. PMID:24740601

  3. Evolution. Evolutionary resurrection of flagellar motility via rewiring of the nitrogen regulation system.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Tiffany B; Mulley, Geraldine; Dills, Alexander H; Alsohim, Abdullah S; McGuffin, Liam J; Studholme, David J; Silby, Mark W; Brockhurst, Michael A; Johnson, Louise J; Jackson, Robert W

    2015-02-27

    A central process in evolution is the recruitment of genes to regulatory networks. We engineered immotile strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens that lack flagella due to deletion of the regulatory gene fleQ. Under strong selection for motility, these bacteria consistently regained flagella within 96 hours via a two-step evolutionary pathway. Step 1 mutations increase intracellular levels of phosphorylated NtrC, a distant homolog of FleQ, which begins to commandeer control of the fleQ regulon at the cost of disrupting nitrogen uptake and assimilation. Step 2 is a switch-of-function mutation that redirects NtrC away from nitrogen uptake and toward its novel function as a flagellar regulator. Our results demonstrate that natural selection can rapidly rewire regulatory networks in very few, repeatable mutational steps. PMID:25722415

  4. CRIS—A Novel cAMP-Binding Protein Controlling Spermiogenesis and the Development of Flagellar Bending

    PubMed Central

    Krähling, Anke Miriam; Alvarez, Luis; Debowski, Katharina; Van, Qui; Gunkel, Monika; Irsen, Stephan; Al-Amoudi, Ashraf; Strünker, Timo; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Krause, Eberhard; Voigt, Ingo; Wörtge, Simone; Waisman, Ari; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Kaupp, Ulrich Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    The second messengers cAMP and cGMP activate their target proteins by binding to a conserved cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). Here, we identify and characterize an entirely novel CNBD-containing protein called CRIS (cyclic nucleotide receptor involved in sperm function) that is unrelated to any of the other members of this protein family. CRIS is exclusively expressed in sperm precursor cells. Cris-deficient male mice are either infertile due to a lack of sperm resulting from spermatogenic arrest, or subfertile due to impaired sperm motility. The motility defect is caused by altered Ca2+ regulation of flagellar beat asymmetry, leading to a beating pattern that is reminiscent of sperm hyperactivation. Our results suggest that CRIS interacts during spermiogenesis with Ca2+-regulated proteins that—in mature sperm—are involved in flagellar bending. PMID:24339785

  5. Identification of a Caulobacter basal body structural gene and a cis-acting site required for activation of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Dingwall, A; Gober, J W; Shapiro, L

    1990-01-01

    The genes that encode the components and regulatory proteins of the Caulobacter crescentus flagellum are transcribed at specific times in the cell cycle. One of these genes, flbN, is required early in the flagellar assembly process. The flbN gene was cloned and sequenced, and the time of transcription activation was determined. The derived amino acid sequence indicates that fibN encodes a 25-kilodalton protein with a cleavable leader peptide. The flbN-encoded protein has 30.8% identity with the protein encoded by the Salmonella typhimurium basal body L-ring gene, flgH. Site-directed mutagenesis and gel mobility shift assays identified a binding site at -100 from the transcription start site for a trans-acting protein, RF-2, that functions to partially activate flbN transcription at a defined time in the cell cycle. The RF-2 binding region is similar to a NifA binding site normally used in the activation of some sigma 54 promoters involved in nitrogen fixation in other bacteria. Transcription of a flbN-reporter gene fusion in an Escherichia coli background was dependent on the presence of a NifA transcription factor supplied by a plasmid-borne Rhizobium meliloti gene encoding NifA. A deletion or base changes in the RF-2 binding region eliminated expression of the flbN gene in E. coli even when a NifA protein was provided in trans, suggesting that a sigma 54 promoter with an upstream activator element is used by the C. crescentus flbN gene. A consensus sequence for a sigma 54 promoter was found at the appropriate distance 5' to one of two identified transcription start sites. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that a conserved nucleotide in this sigma 54 promoter consensus sequence was required for transcription. Deletion of the region 5' to the apparent sigma 54 promoter caused a complete loss of transcription activation. Transcription activation of flbN in C. crescentus involves the combination of several elements: the NifA-like site is required for full

  6. Motility protein interactions in the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed Central

    Garza, A G; Harris-Haller, L W; Stoebner, R A; Manson, M D

    1995-01-01

    Five proteins (MotA, MotB, FliG, FliM, and FliN) have been implicated in energizing flagellar rotation in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. One model for flagellar function envisions that MotA and MotB comprise the stator of a rotary motor and that FliG, FliM, and FliN are part of the rotor. MotA probably functions as a transmembrane proton channel, and MotB has been proposed to anchor MotA to the peptidoglycan of the cell wall. To study interactions between the Mot proteins themselves and between them and other components of the flagellar motor, we attempted to isolate extragenic suppressors of 13 dominant or partially dominant motB missense mutations. Four of these yielded suppressors, which exhibited widely varying efficiencies of suppression. The pattern of suppression was partially alleles-specific, but no suppressor seriously impaired motility in a motB+ strain. Of 20 suppressors from the original selection, 15 were characterized by DNA sequencing. Fourteen of these cause single amino acid changes in MotA. Thirteen alter residues in, or directly adjacent to, the putative periplasmic loops of MotA, and the remaining one alters a residue in the middle of the fourth predicted transmembrane helix of MotA. We conclude that the MotA and MotB proteins form a complex and that their interaction directly involves or is strongly influenced by the periplasmic loops of MotA. The 15th suppressor from the original selection and 2 motB suppressors identified during a subsequent search cause single amino acid substitutions in FliG. This finding suggests that the postulated Mot-protein complex may be in close proximity to FliG at the stator-rotor interface of the flagellar motor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7892209

  7. Direct evidence of flagellar synchronization through hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumley, Douglas; Polin, Marco; Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella exhibit striking coordination, from the synchronous beating of two flagella in Chlamydomonas to the metachronal waves and large-scale flows displayed by carpets of cilia. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for flagellar synchronization remain unclear. We perform a series of experiments involving two individual flagella in a quiescent fluid. Cells are isolated from the colonial alga Volvox carteri, held in place at a fixed distance d, and oriented so that their flagellar beating planes coincide. In this fashion, we are able to explicitly assess the role of hydrodynamics in achieving synchronization. For closely separated cells, the flagella are capable of exhibiting a phase-locked state for thousands of beats at a time, despite significant differences in their intrinsic frequencies. For intermediate values of d, synchronous periods are interrupted by brief phase slips, while for d >> 1 the flagellar phase difference drifts almost linearly with time. The coupling strength extracted through analysis of the synchronization statistics exhibits excellent agreement with hydrodynamic predictions. This study unambiguously reveals that flagella coupled only through hydrodynamics are capable of exhibiting robust synchrony.

  8. Heterogeneity of a Campylobacter jejuni Protein That Is Secreted through the Flagellar Filament▿

    PubMed Central

    Poly, Frédéric; Ewing, Cheryl; Goon, Scarlett; Hickey, Thomas E.; Rockabrand, David; Majam, Gary; Lee, Lanfong; Phan, Julie; Savarino, Nicholas J.; Guerry, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Cj0859c, or FspA, is a small, acidic protein of Campylobacter jejuni that is expressed by a σ28 promoter. Analysis of the fspA gene in 41 isolates of C. jejuni revealed two overall variants of the predicted protein, FspA1 and FspA2. Secretion of FspA occurs in broth-grown bacteria and requires a minimum flagellar structure. The addition of recombinant FspA2, but not FspA1, to INT407 cells in vitro resulted in a rapid induction of apoptosis. These data define a novel C. jejuni virulence factor, and the observed heterogeneity among fspA alleles suggests alternate virulence potential among different strains. PMID:17517862

  9. Anatomical and Molecular Design of the Drosophila Antenna as a Flagellar Auditory Organ

    PubMed Central

    TODI, SOKOL V.; SHARMA, YASHODA; EBERL, DANIEL F.

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis of hearing is less well understood than many other senses. However, recent studies in Drosophila have provided some important steps towards a molecular understanding of hearing. In this report, we summarize these findings and their implications on the relationship between hearing and touch. In Drosophila, hearing is accomplished by Johnston’s Organ, a chordotonal organ containing over 150 scolopidia within the second antennal segment. We will discuss anatomical features of the antenna and how they contribute to the function of this flagellar auditory receptor. The effects of several mutants, identified through mutagenesis screens or as homologues of vertebrate auditory genes, will be summarized. Based on evidence gathered from these studies, we propose a speculative model for how the chordotonal organ might function. PMID:15252880

  10. Bacterial flagellar microhydrodynamics: Laminar flow over complex flagellar filaments, analog archimedean screws and cylinders, and its perturbations.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Shlomo; Fishelov, Dalia; Ben-Artzi, Matania

    2003-09-01

    The flagellar filament, the bacterial organelle of motility, is the smallest rotary propeller known. It consists of 1), a basal body (part of which is the proton driven rotary motor), 2), a hook (universal joint-allowing for off-axial transmission of rotary motion), and 3), a filament (propeller-a long, rigid, supercoiled helical assembly allowing for the conversion of rotary motion into linear thrust). Helically perturbed (so-called "complex") filaments have a coarse surface composed of deep grooves and ridges following the three-start helical lines. These surface structures, reminiscent of a turbine or Archimedean screw, originate from symmetry reduction along the six-start helical lines due to dimerization of the flagellin monomers from which the filament self assembles. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and helical image reconstruction methods, we calculated three-dimensional density maps of the complex filament of Rhizobium lupini H13-3 and determined its surface pattern and boundaries. The helical symmetry of the filament allows viewing it as a stack of identical slices spaced axially and rotated by constant increments. Here we use the closed outlines of these slices to explore, in two dimensions, the hydrodynamic effect of the turbine-like boundaries of the flagellar filament. In particular, we try to determine if, and under what conditions, transitions from laminar to turbulent flow (or perturbations of the laminar flow) may occur on or near the surface of the bacterial propeller. To address these questions, we apply the boundary element method in a manner allowing the handling of convoluted boundaries. We tested the method on several simple, well-characterized cylindrical structures before applying it to real, highly convoluted biological surfaces and to simplified mechanical analogs. Our results indicate that under extreme structural and functional conditions, and at low Reynolds numbers, a deviation from laminar flow might occur on the flagellar

  11. The FLA3 KAP Subunit Is Required for Localization of Kinesin-2 to the Site of Flagellar Assembly and Processive Anterograde Intraflagellar TransportV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Joshua; Perrone, Catherine A.; Bower, Raqual; Cole, Douglas G.; Porter, Mary E.

    2005-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a bidirectional process required for assembly and maintenance of cilia and flagella. Kinesin-2 is the anterograde IFT motor, and Dhc1b/Dhc2 drives retrograde IFT. To understand how either motor interacts with the IFT particle or how their activities might be coordinated, we characterized a ts mutation in the Chlamydomonas gene encoding KAP, the nonmotor subunit of Kinesin-2. The fla3-1 mutation is an amino acid substitution in a conserved C-terminal domain. fla3-1 strains assemble flagella at 21°C, but cannot maintain them at 33°C. Although the Kinesin-2 complex is present at both 21 and 33°C, the fla3-1 Kinesin-2 complex is not efficiently targeted to or retained in the basal body region or flagella. Video-enhanced DIC microscopy of fla3-1 cells shows that the frequency of anterograde IFT particles is significantly reduced. Anterograde particles move at near wild-type velocities, but appear larger and pause more frequently in fla3-1. Transformation with an epitope-tagged KAP gene rescues all of the fla3-1 defects and results in preferential incorporation of tagged KAP complexes into flagella. KAP is therefore required for the localization of Kinesin-2 at the site of flagellar assembly and the efficient transport of anterograde IFT particles within flagella. PMID:15616187

  12. Mapping gene activity of Arabidopsis root hairs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative information on gene activity at single cell-type resolution is essential for the understanding of how cells work and interact. Root hairs, or trichoblasts, tubular-shaped outgrowths of specialized cells in the epidermis, represent an ideal model for cell fate acquisition and differentiation in plants. Results Here, we provide an atlas of gene and protein expression in Arabidopsis root hair cells, generated by paired-end RNA sequencing and LC/MS-MS analysis of protoplasts from plants containing a pEXP7-GFP reporter construct. In total, transcripts of 23,034 genes were detected in root hairs. High-resolution proteome analysis led to the reliable identification of 2,447 proteins, 129 of which were differentially expressed between root hairs and non-root hair tissue. Dissection of pre-mRNA splicing patterns showed that all types of alternative splicing were cell type-dependent, and less complex in EXP7-expressing cells when compared to non-root hair cells. Intron retention was repressed in several transcripts functionally related to root hair morphogenesis, indicative of a cell type-specific control of gene expression by alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. Concordance between mRNA and protein expression was generally high, but in many cases mRNA expression was not predictive for protein abundance. Conclusions The integrated analysis shows that gene activity in root hairs is dictated by orchestrated, multilayered regulatory mechanisms that allow for a cell type-specific composition of functional components. PMID:23800126

  13. A distant homologue of the FlgT protein interacts with MotB and FliL and is essential for flagellar rotation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Fabela, Salvador; Domenzain, Clelia; De la Mora, Javier; Osorio, Aurora; Ramirez-Cabrera, Victor; Poggio, Sebastian; Dreyfus, Georges; Camarena, Laura

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we describe a periplasmic protein that is essential for flagellar rotation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. This protein is encoded upstream of flgA, and its expression is dependent on the flagellar master regulator FleQ and on the class III flagellar activator FleT. Sequence comparisons suggest that this protein is a distant homologue of FlgT. We show evidence that in R. sphaeroides, FlgT interacts with the periplasmic regions of MotB and FliL and with the flagellar protein MotF, which was recently characterized as a membrane component of the flagellum in this bacterium. In addition, the localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-MotF is completely dependent on FlgT. The Mot(-) phenotype of flgT cells was weakly suppressed by point mutants of MotB that presumably keep the proton channel open and efficiently suppress the Mot(-) phenotype of motF and fliL cells, indicating that FlgT could play an additional role beyond the opening of the proton channel. The presence of FlgT in purified filament-hook-basal bodies of the wild-type strain was confirmed by Western blotting, and the observation of these structures under an electron microscope showed that the basal bodies from flgT cells had lost the ring that covers the LP ring in the wild-type structure. Moreover, MotF was detected by immunoblotting in the basal bodies obtained from the wild-type strain but not from flgT cells. From these results, we suggest that FlgT forms a ring around the LP ring, which anchors MotF and stabilizes the stator complex of the flagellar motor. PMID:24056105

  14. Non-viral gene-activated matrices

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Erica G.; Duffy, Garry P.; Cryan, Sally-Ann; Curtin, Caroline M.; O’Brien, Fergal J.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of producing enhanced therapeutics for regenerative medicine, our laboratory develops gene-activated matrices (GAMs) using non-viral gene therapy (GT) in combination with collagen-based scaffolds engineered specifically for tissue repair. Non-viral vectors have been referred to as a minority pursuit in GT but considering the concerns associated with viral vectors and as transient gene expression is such a key consideration, further research is clearly warranted for tissue engineering (TE) applications. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well regarded for their capability in bone regeneration but as primary cells, they are difficult to transfect. We have recently optimised the non-viral vector, polyethyleneimine (PEI), to achieve high transfection efficiencies in MSCs. Subsequently, a series of PEI-based GAMs were developed using collagen, collagen-glycosaminoglycan and collagen-nanohydroxyapatite (collagen-nHa) scaffolds whereby transgene expression was detected up to 21 d with the collagen-nHa scaffold providing the most prolonged expression. Moreover, all PEI-based GAMs contained a low plasmid DNA dose of 2 µg which is far below doses often required in previous GAMs. Having successfully developed these GAMs, the ephrinB2 gene has recently been incorporated to produce a novel therapeutic GAM for bone repair. Herein, we discuss our recent investigations in the development and application of non-viral GAMs. PMID:23538777

  15. Involvement of the flagellar assembly pathway in Vibrio alginolyticus adhesion under environmental stresses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Huang, Lixing; Su, Yongquan; Qin, Yingxue; Kong, Wendi; Ma, Ying; Xu, Xiaojin; Lin, Mao; Zheng, Jiang; Yan, Qingpi

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion is an important virulence factor of Vibrio alginolyticus. This factor may be affected by environmental conditions; however, its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In our previous research, adhesion deficient strains were obtained by culturing V. alginolyticus under stresses including Cu, Pb, Hg, and low pH. With RNA-seq and bioinformatics analysis, we found that all of these stress treatments significantly affected the flagellar assembly pathway, which may play an important role in V. alginolyticus adhesion. Therefore, we hypothesized that the environmental stresses of the flagellar assembly pathway may be one way in which environmental conditions affect adhesion. To verify our hypothesis, a bioinformatics analysis, QPCR, RNAi, in vitro adhesion assay and motility assay were performed. Our results indicated that (1) the flagellar assembly pathway was sensitive to environmental stresses, (2) the flagellar assembly pathway played an important role in V. alginolyticus adhesion, and (3) motility is not the only way in which the flagellar assembly pathway affects adhesion. PMID:26322276

  16. Individual Flagellar Waveform Affects Collective Behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kage, Azusa; Mogami, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    Bioconvection is a form of collective motion that occurs spontaneously in the suspension of swimming microorganisms. In a previous study, we quantitatively described the "pattern transition," a phase transition phenomenon that so far has exclusively been observed in bioconvection of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas. We suggested that the transition could be induced by changes in the balance between the gravitational and shear-induced torques, both of which act to determine the orientation of the organism in the shear flow. As both of the torques should be affected by the geometry of the Chlamydomonas cell, alteration in the flagellar waveform might change the extent of torque generation by altering overall geometry of the cell. Based on this working hypothesis, we examined bioconvection behavior of two flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ida1 and oda2, making reference to the wild type. Flagella of ida1 beat with an abnormal waveform, while flagella of oda2 show a normal waveform but lower beat frequency. As a result, both mutants had swimming speed of less than 50% of the wild type. ida1 formed bioconvection patterns with smaller spacing than those of wild type and oda2. Two-axis view revealed the periodic movement of the settling blobs of ida1, while oda2 showed qualitatively similar behavior to that of wild type. Unexpectedly, ida1 showed stronger negative gravitaxis than did wild type, while oda2 showed relatively weak gravitaxis. These findings suggest that flagellar waveform, not swimming speed or beat frequency, strongly affect bioconvection behavior in C. reinhardtii. PMID:26245228

  17. Second-Chance Signal Transduction Explains Cooperative Flagellar Switching

    PubMed Central

    Zot, Henry G.; Hasbun, Javier E.; Van Minh, Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    The reversal of flagellar motion (switching) results from the interaction between a switch complex of the flagellar rotor and a torque-generating stationary unit, or stator (motor unit). To explain the steeply cooperative ligand-induced switching, present models propose allosteric interactions between subunits of the rotor, but do not address the possibility of a reaction that stimulates a bidirectional motor unit to reverse direction of torque. During flagellar motion, the binding of a ligand-bound switch complex at the dwell site could excite a motor unit. The probability that another switch complex of the rotor, moving according to steady-state rotation, will reach the same dwell site before that motor unit returns to ground state will be determined by the independent decay rate of the excited-state motor unit. Here, we derive an analytical expression for the energy coupling between a switch complex and a motor unit of the stator complex of a flagellum, and demonstrate that this model accounts for the cooperative switching response without the need for allosteric interactions. The analytical result can be reproduced by simulation when (1) the motion of the rotor delivers a subsequent ligand-bound switch to the excited motor unit, thereby providing the excited motor unit with a second chance to remain excited, and (2) the outputs from multiple independent motor units are constrained to a single all-or-none event. In this proposed model, a motor unit and switch complex represent the components of a mathematically defined signal transduction mechanism in which energy coupling is driven by steady-state and is regulated by stochastic ligand binding. Mathematical derivation of the model shows the analytical function to be a general form of the Hill equation (Hill AV (1910) The possible effects of the aggregation of the molecules of haemoglobin on its dissociation curves. J Physiol 40: iv–vii). PMID:22844429

  18. HIFU-induced gene activation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Zhong, Pei; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan

    2001-05-01

    This work investigated the inducible gene activation in cancer cells that were sublethally injured during HIFU treatment. HeLa cells were transfected by an adenovirus vector that encodes GFP under the control of hsp70B promoter, leading to about 65% transfection efficiency. A volume of 10 μL transfected HeLa cells in suspension (5×107 cells/ml) were placed at the bottom of a PCR tube so that the cell suspension could be heated to a peak temperature of 50°C, 60°C, and 70°C for 120, 10, and 1 s, respectively, by a focused 1.1-MHz HIFU transducer operated at a peak negative pressure of -2.7 MPa at different duty cycles. One day after HIFU treatment, cell viability was determined to be 63%, 35%, and 18%, respectively, based on Trypan Blue exclusion test. Importantly, in all test groups, inducible GFP expression was detected in about 40%-50% of the surviving cells with GFP intensity increased by 25-fold based on flow cytometry analysis. These results demonstrate that even under the short exposure duration of HIFU treatment, inducible gene expression could be produced in sublethally injured cell population in vitro. Further studies are underway to explore the optimal HIFU condition for gene activation in vivo.

  19. Induction of the lateral flagellar system of Vibrio shilonii is an early event after inhibition of the sodium ion flux in the polar flagellum.

    PubMed

    González, Yael; Camarena, Laura; Dreyfus, Georges

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we show the induction of lateral flagella by the action of the sodium channel blocker phenamil, in the marine bacterium Vibrio shilonii, a coral pathogen that causes bleaching. We analyzed the growth and morphology of cells treated with phenamil. A time course analysis showed that after 30 min of exposure to the sodium channel blocker, lateral flagella were present and could be detected by electron microscopy. Detection of the mRNA of the master regulator (lafK) and lateral flagellin (lafA) by RT-PCR confirmed the expression of lateral flagellar genes. We show the simultaneous isolation of polar and, for the first time, lateral flagellar hook-basal bodies. This allowed us to compare the dimensions and morphological characteristics of the 2 structures. PMID:25639364

  20. Negative regulatory loci coupling flagellin synthesis to flagellar assembly in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, K L; Hughes, K T

    1991-01-01

    The complex regulation of flagellin gene expression in Salmonella typhimurium was characterized in vivo by using lac transcriptional fusions to the two flagellin structural genes (fliC [H1] and fljB [H2]). Phase variation was measured as the rate of switching of flagellin gene expression. Switching frequencies varied from 1/500 per cell per generation to 1/10,000 per cell per generation depending on the particular insertion and the direction of switching. There is a 4- to 20-fold bias in favor of switching from the fljB(On) to the fljB(Off) orientation. Random Tn10dTc insertions were isolated which failed to express flagellin. While most of these insertions mapped to loci known to be required for flagellin expression, several new loci were identified. The presence of functional copies of all of the genes responsible for complete flagellar assembly, except the hook-associated proteins (flgK, flgL, and fliD gene products), were required for expression of the fliC or fljB flagellin genes. Two novel loci involved in negative regulation of fliC and fljB in fla mutant backgrounds were identified. One of these loci, designated the flgR locus, mapped to the flg operon at 23 min on the Salmonella linkage map. An flgR insertion mutation resulted in relief of repression of the fliC and fljB genes in all fla mutant backgrounds except for mutants in the positive regulatory loci (flhC, flhD, and fliA genes). PMID:1848842

  1. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor

    PubMed Central

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K.; Nirody, Jasmine A.; Berry, Richard M.; Oster, George

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify roles for two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, whereas steric forces comprise the actual “power stroke.” Specifically, we propose that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline “hinge” residue in a stator α-helix are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions fit well with recent experiments on a single-stator motor. The proposed model provides a mechanical explanation for several fundamental properties of the flagellar motor, including torque–speed and speed–ion motive force relationships, backstepping, variation in step sizes, and the effects of key mutations in the stator. PMID:26216959

  2. Constraints on models for the flagellar rotary motor.

    PubMed

    Berg, H C

    2000-04-29

    Most bacteria that swim are propelled by flagellar filaments, each driven at its base by a rotary motor embedded in the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane. A motor is about 45 nm in diameter and made up of about 20 different kinds of parts. It is assembled from the inside out. It is powered by a proton (or in some species, a sodium-ion) flux. It steps at least 400 times per revolution. At low speeds and high torques, about 1000 protons are required per revolution, speed is proportional to protonmotive force, and torque varies little with temperature or hydrogen isotope. At high speeds and low torques, torque increases with temperature and is sensitive to hydrogen isotope. At room temperature, torque varies remarkably little with speed from about -100 Hz (the present limit of measurement) to about 200 Hz, and then it declines rapidly reaching zero at about 300 Hz. These are facts that motor models should explain. None of the existing models for the flagellar rotary motor completely do so. PMID:10836502

  3. Resurrection of the flagellar rotary motor near zero load

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Junhua; Berg, Howard C.

    2008-01-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, are propelled by helical flagellar filaments, each driven at its base by a reversible rotary motor, powered by a transmembrane proton flux. Torque is generated by the interaction of stator proteins, MotA and MotB, with a rotor protein FliG. The physiology of the motor has been studied extensively in the regime of relatively high load and low speed, where it appears to operate close to thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we describe an assay that allows systematic study of the motor near zero load, where proton translocation and movement of mechanical components are rate limiting. Sixty-nanometer-diameter gold spheres were attached to hooks of cells lacking flagellar filaments, and light scattered from a sphere was monitored at the image plane of a microscope through a small pinhole. Paralyzed motors of cells carrying a motA point mutation were resurrected at 23°C by expression of wild-type MotA, and speeds jumped from zero to a maximum value (≈300 Hz) in one step. Thus, near zero load, the speed of the motor is independent of the number of torque-generating units. Evidently, the units act independently (they do not interfere with one another), and there are no intervals during which a second unit can add to the speed generated by the first (the duty ratio is close to 1). PMID:18202173

  4. An Element of Determinism in a Stochastic Flagellar Motor Switch

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li; Altindal, Tuba; Wu, Xiao-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus uses a single polar flagellum to navigate in an aqueous environment. Similar to Escherichia coli cells, the polar flagellar motor has two states; when the motor is counter-clockwise, the cell swims forward and when the motor is clockwise, the cell swims backward. V. alginolyticus also incorporates a direction randomization step at the start of the forward swimming interval by flicking its flagellum. To gain an understanding on how the polar flagellar motor switch is regulated, distributions of the forward Δf and backward Δb intervals are investigated herein. We found that the steady-state probability density functions, P(Δf) and P(Δb), of freely swimming bacteria are strongly peaked at a finite time, suggesting that the motor switch is not Poissonian. The short-time inhibition is sufficiently strong and long lasting, i.e., several hundred milliseconds for both intervals, which is readily observed and characterized. Treating motor reversal dynamics as a first-passage problem, which results from conformation fluctuations of the motor switch, we calculated P(Δf) and P(Δb) and found good agreement with the measurements. PMID:26554590

  5. Putative channel components for the fast-rotating sodium-driven flagellar motor of a marine bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Y; Kojima, S; Kato, H; Nishioka, N; Kawagishi, I; Homma, M

    1997-01-01

    The polar flagellum of Vibrio alginolyticus rotates remarkably fast (up to 1,700 revolutions per second) by using a motor driven by sodium ions. Two genes, motX and motY, for the sodium-driven flagellar motor have been identified in marine bacteria, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus. They have no similarity to the genes for proton-driven motors, motA and motB, whose products constitute a proton channel. MotX was proposed to be a component of a sodium channel. Here we identified additional sodium motor genes, pomA and pomB, in V. alginolyticus. Unexpectedly, PomA and PomB have similarities to MotA and MotB, respectively, especially in the predicted transmembrane regions. These results suggest that PomA and PomB may be sodium-conducting channel components of the sodium-driven motor and that the motor part consists of the products of at least four genes, pomA, pomB, motX, and motY. Furthermore, swimming speed was controlled by the expression level of the pomA gene, suggesting that newly synthesized PomA proteins, which are components of a force-generating unit, were successively integrated into the defective motor complexes. These findings imply that Na+-driven flagellar motors may have similar structure and function as proton-driven motors, but with some interesting differences as well, and it is possible to compare and study the coupling mechanisms of the sodium and proton ion flux for the force generation. PMID:9260952

  6. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  7. The flaA locus of Bacillus subtilis is part of a large operon coding for flagellar structures, motility functions, and an ATPase-like polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, A M; Caramori, T; Crabb, W D; Scoffone, F; Galizzi, A

    1991-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced 8.3 kb of Bacillus subtilis DNA corresponding to the flaA locus involved in flagellar biosynthesis, motility, and chemotaxis. The DNA sequence revealed the presence of 10 complete and 2 incomplete open reading frames. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences to data banks showed similarities of nine of the deduced products to a number of proteins of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium for which a role in flagellar functioning has been directly demonstrated. In particular, the sequence data suggest that the flaA operon codes for the M-ring protein, components of the motor switch, and the distal part of the basal-body rod. The gene order is remarkably similar to that described for region III of the enterobacterial flagellar regulon. One of the open reading frames was translated into a protein with 48% amino acid identity to S. typhimurium FliI and 29% identity to the beta subunit of E. coli ATP synthase. PMID:1828465

  8. A Novel Trypanosoma cruzi Protein Associated to the Flagellar Pocket of Replicative Stages and Involved in Parasite Growth

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Ignacio M.; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    The flagellar pocket constitutes an active and strategic site in the body of trypanosomatids (i.e. parasitic protozoa that cause important human and/or livestock diseases), which participates in several important processes such as cell polarity, morphogenesis and replication. Most importantly, the flagellar pocket is the unique site of surface protein export and nutrient uptake in trypanosomatids, and thus constitutes a key portal for the interaction with the host. In this work, we identified and characterized a novel Trypanosoma cruzi protein, termed TCLP 1, that accumulates at the flagellar pocket area of parasite replicative forms, as revealed by biochemical, immuno-cytochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. Different in silico analyses revealed that TCLP 1 is the founding member of a family of chimeric molecules restricted to trypanosomatids bearing, in addition to eukaryotic ubiquitin-like and protein-protein interacting domains, a motif displaying significant structural homology to bacterial multi-cargo chaperones involved in the secretion of virulence factors. Using the fidelity of an homologous expression system we confirmed TCLP 1 sub-cellular distribution and showed that TCLP 1-over-expressing parasites display impaired survival and accelerated progression to late stationary phase under starvation conditions. The reduced endocytic capacity of TCLP 1-over-expressors likely underlies (at least in part) this growth phenotype. TCLP 1 is involved in the uptake of extracellular macromolecules required for nutrition and hence in T. cruzi growth. Due to the bacterial origin, sub-cellular distribution and putative function(s), we propose TCLP 1 and related orthologs in trypanosomatids as appealing therapeutic targets for intervention against these health-threatening parasites. PMID:26086767

  9. Flagellar kinematics and swimming of algal cells in viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Qin, B; Gopinath, A; Yang, J; Gollub, J P; Arratia, P E

    2015-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes. PMID:25778677

  10. Flagellar generated flow mediates attachment of Giardia lamblia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey; Luo, Haibei; Picou, Theodore; McAllister, Ryan; Elmendorf, Heidi

    2011-03-01

    Giardia lamblia is a protozoan parasite responsible for widespread diarrheal disease in humans and animals worldwide. Attachment to the host intestinal mucosa and resistance to peristalsis is necessary for establishing infection, but the physical basis for this attachment is poorly understood. We report results from TIRF and confocal fluorescence microscopy that demonstrate that the regular beating of the posterior flagella generate a flow through the ventral disk, a suction-cup shaped structure that is against the substrate during attachment. Finite element simulations are used to compare the negative pressure generated by the flow to the measured attachment force and the expected performance of the flagellar pump. NIH grant 1R21AI062934-0.

  11. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Qin, B.; Gopinath, A.; Yang, J.; Gollub, J. P.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes. PMID:25778677

  12. Composition and sensory function of the trypanosome flagellar membrane

    PubMed Central

    Maric, Danijela; Epting, Conrad L.; Engman, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A cilium is an extension of the cell that contains an axonemal complex of microtubules and associated proteins bounded by a membrane which is contiguous with the cell body membrane. Cilia may be nonmotile or motile, the latter having additional specific roles in cell or fluid movement. The term flagellum refers to the motile cilium of free-living single cells (e.g., bacteria, archaea, spermatozoa and protozoa). In eukaryotes, both nonmotile and motile cilia possess sensory functions. The ciliary interior (cilioplasm) is separated from the cytoplasm by a selective barrier that prevents passive diffusion of molecules between the two domains. The sensory functions of cilia reside largely in the membrane and signals generated in the cilium are transduced into a variety of cellular responses. In this review we discuss the structure and biogenesis of the cilium, with special attention to the trypanosome flagellar membrane, its lipid and protein composition and its proposed roles in sensing and signaling. PMID:20580599

  13. Flagellar swimmers oscillate between pusher- and puller-type swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klindt, Gary S.; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2015-12-01

    Self-propulsion of cellular microswimmers generates flow signatures, commonly classified as pusher and puller type, which characterize hydrodynamic interactions with other cells or boundaries. Using experimentally measured beat patterns, we compute that the flagellated green alga Chlamydomonas oscillates between pusher and puller, rendering it an approximately neutral swimmer, when averaging over its full beat cycle. Beyond a typical distance of 100 μ m from the cell, inertia attenuates oscillatory microflows. We show that hydrodynamic interactions between cells oscillate in time and are of similar magnitude as stochastic swimming fluctuations. From our analysis, we also find that the rate of hydrodynamic dissipation varies in time, which implies that flagellar beat patterns are not optimized with respect to this measure.

  14. Flagellar Kinematics and Swimming of Algal Cells in Viscoelastic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, B.; Gopinath, A.; Yang, J.; Gollub, J. P.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-03-01

    The motility of microorganisms is influenced greatly by their hydrodynamic interactions with the fluidic environment they inhabit. We show by direct experimental observation of the bi-flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that fluid elasticity and viscosity strongly influence the beating pattern - the gait - and thereby control the propulsion speed. The beating frequency and the wave speed characterizing the cyclical bending are both enhanced by fluid elasticity. Despite these enhancements, the net swimming speed of the alga is hindered for fluids that are sufficiently elastic. The origin of this complex response lies in the interplay between the elasticity-induced changes in the spatial and temporal aspects of the flagellar cycle and the buildup and subsequent relaxation of elastic stresses during the power and recovery strokes.

  15. Antiphase Synchronization in a Flagellar-Dominance Mutant of Chlamydomonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leptos, Kyriacos C.; Wan, Kirsty Y.; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Pesci, Adriana I.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-10-01

    Groups of beating flagella or cilia often synchronize so that neighboring filaments have identical frequencies and phases. A prime example is provided by the unicellular biflagellate Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which typically displays synchronous in-phase beating in a low-Reynolds number version of breaststroke swimming. We report the discovery that ptx1, a flagellar-dominance mutant of C. reinhardtii, can exhibit synchronization in precise antiphase, as in the freestyle swimming stroke. High-speed imaging shows that ptx1 flagella switch stochastically between in-phase and antiphase states, and that the latter has a distinct waveform and significantly higher frequency, both of which are strikingly similar to those found during phase slips that stochastically interrupt in-phase beating of the wild-type. Possible mechanisms underlying these observations are discussed.

  16. Protein export through the bacterial flagellar type III export pathway.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    For construction of the bacterial flagellum, which is responsible for bacterial motility, the flagellar type III export apparatus utilizes both ATP and proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane and exports flagellar proteins from the cytoplasm to the distal end of the nascent structure. The export apparatus consists of a membrane-embedded export gate made of FlhA, FlhB, FliO, FliP, FliQ, and FliR and a water-soluble ATPase ring complex consisting of FliH, FliI, and FliJ. FlgN, FliS, and FliT act as substrate-specific chaperones that do not only protect their cognate substrates from degradation and aggregation in the cytoplasm but also efficiently transfer the substrates to the export apparatus. The ATPase ring complex facilitates the initial entry of the substrates into the narrow pore of the export gate. The export gate by itself is a proton-protein antiporter that uses the two components of proton motive force, the electric potential difference and the proton concentration difference, for different steps of the export process. A specific interaction of FlhA with FliJ located in the center of the ATPase ring complex allows the export gate to efficiently use proton motive force to drive protein export. The ATPase ring complex couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to its assembly-disassembly cycle for rapid and efficient protein export cycle. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey. PMID:24064315

  17. Hybrid-fuel bacterial flagellar motors in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Homma, Michio; Ishijima, Akihiko; Berry, Richard M

    2014-03-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor rotates driven by an electrochemical ion gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane, either H(+) or Na(+) ions. The motor consists of a rotor ∼50 nm in diameter surrounded by multiple torque-generating ion-conducting stator units. Stator units exchange spontaneously between the motor and a pool in the cytoplasmic membrane on a timescale of minutes, and their stability in the motor is dependent upon the ion gradient. We report a genetically engineered hybrid-fuel flagellar motor in Escherichia coli that contains both H(+)- and Na(+)-driven stator components and runs on both types of ion gradient. We controlled the number of each type of stator unit in the motor by protein expression levels and Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]), using speed changes of single motors driving 1-μm polystyrene beads to determine stator unit numbers. De-energized motors changed from locked to freely rotating on a timescale similar to that of spontaneous stator unit exchange. Hybrid motor speed is simply the sum of speeds attributable to individual stator units of each type. With Na(+) and H(+) stator components expressed at high and medium levels, respectively, Na(+) stator units dominate at high [Na(+)] and are replaced by H(+) units when Na(+) is removed. Thus, competition between stator units for spaces in a motor and sensitivity of each type to its own ion gradient combine to allow hybrid motors to adapt to the prevailing ion gradient. We speculate that a similar process may occur in species that naturally express both H(+) and Na(+) stator components sharing a common rotor. PMID:24550452

  18. The propagation of perturbations in rewired bacterial gene networks

    PubMed Central

    Baumstark, Rebecca; Hänzelmann, Sonja; Tsuru, Saburo; Schaerli, Yolanda; Francesconi, Mirko; Mancuso, Francesco M.; Castelo, Robert; Isalan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    What happens to gene expression when you add new links to a gene regulatory network? To answer this question, we profile 85 network rewirings in E. coli. Here we report that concerted patterns of differential expression propagate from reconnected hub genes. The rewirings link promoter regions to different transcription factor and σ-factor genes, resulting in perturbations that span four orders of magnitude, changing up to ∼70% of the transcriptome. Importantly, factor connectivity and promoter activity both associate with perturbation size. Perturbations from related rewirings have more similar transcription profiles and a statistical analysis reveals ∼20 underlying states of the system, associating particular gene groups with rewiring constructs. We examine two large clusters (ribosomal and flagellar genes) in detail. These represent alternative global outcomes from different rewirings because of antagonism between these major cell states. This data set of systematically related perturbations enables reverse engineering and discovery of underlying network interactions. PMID:26670742

  19. The Histone-Like Nucleoid Structuring Protein (H-NS) Is a Negative Regulator of the Lateral Flagellar System in the Deep-Sea Bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Jian, Huahua; Xu, Guanpeng; Gai, Yingbao; Xu, Jun; Xiao, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    Although the histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) is well known for its involvement in the adaptation of mesophilic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, to cold environments and high-pressure stress, an understanding of the role of H-NS in the cold-adapted benthic microorganisms that live in the deep-sea ecosystem, which covers approximately 60% of the earth's surface, is still lacking. In this study, we characterized the function of H-NS in Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, which was isolated from West Pacific sediment at a depth of 1,914 m. Anhns gene deletion mutant (WP3Δhns) was constructed, and comparative whole-genome microarray analysis was performed. H-NS had a significant influence (fold change, >2) on the expression of a variety of WP3 genes (274 and 280 genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively), particularly genes related to energy production and conversion. Notably, WP3Δhnsexhibited higher expression levels of lateral flagellar genes than WP3 and showed enhanced swarming motility and lateral flagellar production compared to those of WP3. The DNA gel mobility shift experiment showed that H-NS bound specifically to the promoter of lateral flagellar genes. Moreover, the high-affinity binding sequences of H-NS were identified by DNase I protection footprinting, and the results support the "binding and spreading" model for H-NS functioning. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to characterize the function of the universal regulator H-NS in a deep-sea bacterium. Our data revealed that H-NS has a novel function as a repressor of the expression of genes related to the energy-consuming secondary flagellar system and to swarming motility. PMID:26873312

  20. TbFlabarin, a flagellar protein of Trypanosoma brucei, highlights differences between Leishmania and Trypanosoma flagellar-targeting signals.

    PubMed

    Tetaud, Emmanuel; Lefebvre, Michèle; M'Bang-Benet, Diane-Ethna; Crobu, Lucien; Blancard, Corinne; Sterkers, Yvon; Pages, Michel; Bastien, Patrick; Merlin, Gilles

    2016-07-01

    TbFlabarin is the Trypanosoma brucei orthologue of the Leishmania flagellar protein LdFlabarin but its sequence is 33% shorter than LdFlabarin, as it lacks a C-terminal domain that is indispensable for LdFlabarin to localize to the Leishmania flagellum. TbFlabarin is mainly expressed in the procyclic forms of the parasite and localized to the flagellum, but only when two palmitoylable cysteines at positions 3 and 4 are present. TbFlabarin is more strongly attached to the membrane fraction than its Leishmania counterpart, as it resists complete solubilization with as much as 0.5% NP-40. Expression ablation by RNA interference did not change parasite growth in culture, its morphology or apparent motility. Heterologous expression showed that neither TbFlabarin in L. amazonensis nor LdFlabarin in T. brucei localized to the flagellum, revealing non-cross-reacting targeting signals between the two species. PMID:27060615

  1. Real-Time Imaging of Fluorescent Flagellar Filaments of Rhizobium lupini H13-3: Flagellar Rotation and pH-Induced Polymorphic Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Birgit

    2002-01-01

    The soil bacterium Rhizobium lupini H13-3 has complex right-handed flagellar filaments with unusual ridged, grooved surfaces. Clockwise (CW) rotation propels the cells forward, and course changes (tumbling) result from changes in filament speed instead of the more common change in direction of rotation. In view of these novelties, fluorescence labeling was used to analyze the behavior of single flagellar filaments during swimming and tumbling, leading to a model for directional changes in R. lupini. Also, flagellar filaments were investigated for helical conformational changes, which have not been previously shown for complex filaments. During full-speed CW rotation, the flagellar filaments form a propulsive bundle that pushes the cell on a straight path. Tumbling is caused by asynchronous deceleration and stops of individual filaments, resulting in dissociation of the propulsive bundle. R. lupini tumbles were not accompanied by helical conformational changes as are tumbles in other organisms including enteric bacteria. However, when pH was experimentally changed, four different polymorphic forms were observed. At a physiological pH of 7, normal flagellar helices were characterized by a pitch angle of 30°, a pitch of 1.36 μm, and a helical diameter of 0.50 μm. As pH increased from 9 to 11, the helices transformed from normal to semicoiled to straight. As pH decreased from 5 to 3, the helices transformed from normal to curly to straight. Transient conformational changes were also noted at high viscosity, suggesting that the R. lupini flagellar filament may adapt to high loads in viscous environments (soil) by assuming hydrodynamically favorable conformations. PMID:12374832

  2. Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T; Paul, Catherine J; Mason, David R; Twine, Susan M; Alston, Mark J; Logan, Susan M; Austin, John W; Peck, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum is the causative agent of botulism, a severe neuroparalytic illness. Given the severity of botulism, surprisingly little is known of the population structure, biology, phylogeny or evolution of C. botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray. Results Whole genome microarray analysis revealed that 63% of the coding sequences (CDSs) present in reference strain ATCC 3502 were common to all 61 widely-representative strains of proteolytic C. botulinum and the closely related C. sporogenes tested. This indicates a relatively stable genome. There was, however, evidence for recombination and genetic exchange, in particular within the neurotoxin gene and cluster (including transfer of neurotoxin genes to C. sporogenes), and the flagellar glycosylation island (FGI). These two loci appear to have evolved independently from each other, and from the remainder of the genetic complement. A number of strains were atypical; for example, while 10 out of 14 strains that formed type A1 toxin gave almost identical profiles in whole genome, neurotoxin cluster and FGI analyses, the other four strains showed divergent properties. Furthermore, a new neurotoxin sub-type (A5) has been discovered in strains from heroin-associated wound botulism cases. For the first time, differences in glycosylation profiles of the flagella could be linked to differences in the gene content of the FGI. Conclusion Proteolytic C. botulinum has a stable genome backbone containing specific regions of genetic heterogeneity. These include the neurotoxin gene cluster and the FGI, each having evolved independently of each other and the remainder of the genetic complement. Analysis of these genetic components provides a high degree of discrimination of strains of proteolytic C. botulinum, and is suitable for clinical and forensic investigations of botulism outbreaks. PMID:19298644

  3. Cloning, expression and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of Helicobacter pylori in Escherichia coli host as a vaccination target

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Helicobacter pylori is a widely distributed gram-negative bacterium that infects the human stomach and duodenum. HpaA is a H. pylori–specific lipoprotein that has been shown to be an effective protective antigen against H. pylori infection. HpaA of H. pylori as a vaccine antigen is fully competent for stimulation of immune responses. The aim of this project is cloning, expression, and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of H. pylori in Escherichia coli host by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) as a vaccination target. Materials and Methods The hpaA gene was inserted into pET28a (+) as cloning and expression vectors respectively. The recombinant plasmid (pET-hpaA) was subjected to sequencing other than polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and digestion analysis. Protein expression was induced by adding 1 mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside to cultures of E. coli strain BL21 transformed with pET-hpaA. Protein expression assessed with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. Protein purification of flagellar sheath adhesion was by FPLC. Results The restriction endonuclease digestion, PCR amplification analysis showed that the hpaA gene of 730 bp was amplified from H. pylori DNA and sequencing analysis of the pET-hpaA confirmed the cloning accuracy and in frame insertion of hpaA fragment. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the expression of an approximately 29,000 Da protein. Conclusion Sequencing results along with SDS-PAGE analysis confirms the expression of recombinant hpaA in the heterologous E. coli BL21. Conclusion A prokaryotic expression system for hpaA gene was successfully constructed. These results indicate that production of a specific recombinant protein is an alternative and potentially more expeditious strategy for development of H. pylori vaccine. PMID:26866020

  4. Correspondence between Resting-State Activity and Brain Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Zhong; Belgard, T Grant; Mao, Deng; Chen, Leslie; Berto, Stefano; Preuss, Todd M; Lu, Hanzhang; Geschwind, Daniel H; Konopka, Genevieve

    2015-11-18

    The relationship between functional brain activity and gene expression has not been fully explored in the human brain. Here, we identify significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and functional activity by comparing fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) from two independent human fMRI resting-state datasets to regional cortical gene expression from a newly generated RNA-seq dataset and two additional gene expression datasets to obtain robust and reproducible correlations. We find significantly more genes correlated with fALFF than expected by chance and identify specific genes correlated with the imaging signals in multiple expression datasets in the default mode network. Together, these data support a population-level relationship between regional steady-state brain gene expression and resting-state brain activity. PMID:26590343

  5. Following the Viterbi Path to Deduce Flagellar Actin-Interacting Proteins of Leishmania spp.: Report on Cofilins and Twinfilins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Ana Carolina L.; Araújo, Fabiana F.; Kamimura, Michel T.; Medeiros, Sarah R.; Viana, Daniel A.; Oliveira, Fátima de Cássia E.; Filho, Raimundo Araújo; Costa, Marcília P.; Oliveira, Diana M.

    2007-11-01

    For performing vital cellular processes, such as motility, eukaryotic cells rely on the actin cytoskeleton, whose structure and dynamics are tightly controlled by a large number of actin-interacting (AIP) or actin-related/regulating (ARP) proteins. Trypanosomatid protozoa, such as Leishmania, rely on their flagellum for motility and sensory reception, which are believed to allow parasite migration, adhesion, invasion and even persistence on mammalian host tissues to cause disease. Actin can determine cell stiffness and transmit force during mechanotransduction, cytokinesis, cell motility and other cellular shape changes, while the identification and analyses of AIPs can help to improve understanding of their mechanical properties on physiological architectures, such as the present case regarding Leishmania flagellar apparatus. This work conveniently apply bioinformatics tools in some refined pattern recognition techniques (such as hidden Markov models (HMMs) through the Viterbi algorithm/path) in order to improve the recognition of actin-binding/interacting activity through identification of AIPs in genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes of Leishmania species. We here report cofilin and twinfilin as putative components of the flagellar apparatus, a direct bioinformatics contribution in the secondary annotation of Leishmania and trypanosomatid genomes.

  6. Microtubule-severing proteins are involved in flagellar length control and mitosis in Trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Magali; Crobu, Lucien; Blaineau, Christine; Bourgeois, Nathalie; Bastien, Patrick; Pagès, Michel

    2009-03-01

    Microtubules are key players in the biology of Trypanosomatid parasites, not only as classical components of the mitotic spindle, microtubule-organizing centres and flagellum but also as the essential constituent of the cytoskeleton. Their length dynamics are regulated by, among others, microtubule-severing proteins. Four and six genes encoding microtubule-severing proteins can be found bioinformatically in the Leishmania major and Trypanosoma brucei genome respectively. We investigated all these proteins in these organisms, which include the katanin, katanin-like, spastin and fidgetin, and looked at their subcellular localization as well as their putative function by examining 'loss-of-function' phenotypes. The katanin-like KAT60b was found implicated in flagellar length reduction, but not in its size increase, while the katanin p80 subunit appeared clearly involved in cytokinesis. Fidgetin and spastin homologues were both localized in the nucleus: the first as a discrete and variable number of dots during most of the cell cycle, redistributing to the spindle and midbody during mitosis; the second concentrated as < or = 5 perinucleolar punctuations, similar to the electron-dense plaques identified in T. brucei, which were assimilated to kinetochores. This first study of microtubule-severing proteins in 'divergent' eukaryotes gives further insight into the multiple functions of these proteins identified in the hitherto studied models. PMID:19183280

  7. MotX, the channel component of the sodium-type flagellar motor.

    PubMed Central

    McCarter, L L

    1994-01-01

    Thrust for propulsion of flagellated bacteria is generated by rotation of a propeller, the flagellum. The power to drive the polar flagellar rotary motor of Vibrio parahaemolyticus is derived from the transmembrane potential of sodium ions. Force is generated by the motor on coupling of the movement of ions across the membrane to rotation of the flagellum. A gene, motX, encoding one component of the torque generator has been cloned and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence is 212 amino acids in length. MotX was localized to the membrane and shown to interact with MotY, which is the presumed stationary component of the motor. Overproduction of MotX, but not that of a nonfunctional mutant MotX, was lethal to Escherichia coli. The rate of lysis caused by induction of motX was proportional to the sodium ion concentration. Li+ and K+ substituted for Na+ to promote lysis, while Ca2+ did not enhance lysis. Protection from the lethal effects of induction of motX was afforded by the sodium channel blocker amiloride. The data suggest that MotX forms a sodium channel. The deduced protein sequence for MotX shows no homology to its ion-conducting counterpart in the proton-driven motor; however, in possessing only one hydrophobic domain, it resembles other channels formed by small proteins with single membrane-spanning domains. Images PMID:7928960

  8. The Gearbox of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor Switch.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Alessandro; Morcos, Faruck; Khan, Shahid

    2016-07-01

    Switching of flagellar motor rotation sense dictates bacterial chemotaxis. Multi-subunit FliM-FliG rotor rings couple signal protein binding in FliM with reversal of a distant FliG C-terminal (FliGC) helix involved in stator contacts. Subunit dynamics were examined in conformer ensembles generated by molecular simulations from the X-ray structures. Principal component analysis extracted collective motions. Interfacial loop immobilization by complex formation coupled elastic fluctuations of the FliM middle (FliMM) and FliG middle (FliGM) domains. Coevolved mutations captured interfacial dynamics as well as contacts. FliGM rotation was amplified via two central hinges to the FliGC helix. Intrinsic flexibility, reported by the FliGMC ensembles, reconciled conformers with opposite FliGC helix orientations. FliG domain stacking deformed the inter-domain linker and reduced flexibility; but conformational changes were not triggered by engineered linker deletions that cause a rotation-locked phenotype. These facts suggest that binary rotation states arise from conformational selection by stacking interactions. PMID:27345932

  9. Polar features in the flagellar propulsion of E. coli bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, S.; Saglimbeni, F.; Lepore, A.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2015-06-01

    E. coli bacteria swim following a run and tumble pattern. In the run state all flagella join in a single helical bundle that propels the cell body along approximately straight paths. When one or more flagellar motors reverse direction the bundle unwinds and the cell randomizes its orientation. This basic picture represents an idealization of a much more complex dynamical problem. Although it has been shown that bundle formation can occur at either pole of the cell, it is still unclear whether these two run states correspond to asymmetric propulsion features. Using holographic microscopy we record the 3D motions of individual bacteria swimming in optical traps. We find that most cells possess two run states characterized by different propulsion forces, total torque, and bundle conformations. We analyze the statistical properties of bundle reversal and compare the hydrodynamic features of forward and backward running states. Our method is naturally multi-particle and opens up the way towards controlled hydrodynamic studies of interacting swimming cells.

  10. Model Studies of the Dynamics of Bacterial Flagellar Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, F; Lo, C; Berry, R; Xing, J

    2009-03-19

    The Bacterial Flagellar Motor is a rotary molecular machine that rotates the helical filaments which propel swimming bacteria. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies exist on the structure, assembly, energy input, power generation and switching mechanism of the motor. In our previous paper, we explained the general physics underneath the observed torque-speed curves with a simple two-state Fokker-Planck model. Here we further analyze this model. In this paper we show (1) the model predicts that the two components of the ion motive force can affect the motor dynamics differently, in agreement with the latest experiment by Lo et al.; (2) with explicit consideration of the stator spring, the model also explains the lack of dependence of the zero-load speed on stator number in the proton motor, recently observed by Yuan and Berg; (3) the model reproduces the stepping behavior of the motor even with the existence of the stator springs and predicts the dwelling time distribution. Predicted stepping behavior of motors with two stators is discussed, and we suggest future experimental verification.

  11. Stoichiometry and turnover of the bacterial flagellar switch protein FliN.

    PubMed

    Delalez, Nicolas J; Berry, Richard M; Armitage, Judith P

    2014-01-01

    Some proteins in biological complexes exchange with pools of free proteins while the complex is functioning. Evidence is emerging that protein exchange can be part of an adaptive mechanism. The bacterial flagellar motor is one of the most complex biological machines and is an ideal model system to study protein dynamics in large multimeric complexes. Recent studies showed that the copy number of FliM in the switch complex and the fraction of FliM that exchanges vary with the direction of flagellar rotation. Here, we investigated the stoichiometry and turnover of another switch complex component, FliN, labeled with the fluorescent protein CyPet, in Escherichia coli. Our results confirm that, in vivo, FliM and FliN form a complex with stoichiometry of 1:4 and function as a unit. We estimated that wild-type motors contained 120 ± 26 FliN molecules. Motors that rotated only clockwise (CW) or counterclockwise (CCW) contained 114 ± 17 and 144 ± 26 FliN molecules, respectively. The ratio of CCW-to-CW FliN copy numbers was 1.26, very close to that of 1.29 reported previously for FliM. We also measured the exchange of FliN molecules, which had a time scale and dependence upon rotation direction similar to those of FliM, consistent with an exchange of FliM-FliN as a unit. Our work confirms the highly dynamic nature of multimeric protein complexes and indicates that, under physiological conditions, these machines might not be the stable, complete structures suggested by averaged fixed methodologies but, rather, incomplete rings that can respond and adapt to changing environments. Importance: The flagellum is one of the most complex structures in a bacterial cell, with the core motor proteins conserved across species. Evidence is now emerging that turnover of some of these motor proteins depends on motor activity, suggesting that turnover is important for function. The switch complex transmits the chemosensory signal to the rotor, and we show, by using single

  12. Chromatin Remodeling Inactivates Activity Genes and Regulates Neural Coding

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kelly K.; Hemberg, Martin; Reddy, Naveen C.; Cho, Ha Y.; Guthrie, Arden N.; Oldenborg, Anna; Heiney, Shane A.; Ohmae, Shogo; Medina, Javier F.; Holy, Timothy E.; Bonni, Azad

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent transcription influences neuronal connectivity, but the roles and mechanisms of inactivation of activity-dependent genes have remained poorly understood. Genome-wide analyses in the mouse cerebellum revealed that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex deposits the histone variant H2A.z at promoters of activity-dependent genes, thereby triggering their inactivation. Purification of translating mRNAs from synchronously developing granule neurons (Sync-TRAP) showed that conditional knockout of the core NuRD subunit Chd4 impairs inactivation of activity-dependent genes when neurons undergo dendrite pruning. Chd4 knockout or expression of NuRD-regulated activity genes impairs dendrite pruning. Imaging of behaving mice revealed hyperresponsivity of granule neurons to sensorimotor stimuli upon Chd4 knockout. Our findings define an epigenetic mechanism that inactivates activity-dependent transcription and regulates dendrite patterning and sensorimotor encoding in the brain. PMID:27418512

  13. Flagellar apparatus absolute orientations and the phylogeny of the green algae.

    PubMed

    O'Kelly, C J; Floyd, G L

    The absolute orientation of the flagellar apparatus in green algal motile cells is a feature of considerable value in studies of green algal systematics and phylogeny. The absolute orientation patterns found in those algae for which this feature is known or can be deduced are reviewed. Counterclockwise absolute orientation occurs in all classes except the Chlorophyceae and is considered primitive, while the clockwise absolute orientation present in most members of the Chlorophyceae is the result of progressive clockwise rotation of components during evolution. Extant intermediates documenting this rotation include Hafniomonas vegetative cells, which show counterclockwise absolute orientation, and Chaetopeltis quadriflagellate zoospores, in which the flagellar apparatus is strictly cruciate except for a slight clockwise offset of the microtubular rootlets. The V-shaped arrangement of the basal bodies in the flagellar apparatus, as well as the presence of proximal sheaths and of two layers of scales on the cell body, further identifies the Chaetopeltis zoospore as a primitive cell type within the Chlorophyceae . Trends towards the exsertion of basal bodies from a flagellar pit, either apically or laterally, the elimination of quadriflagellate cells, and, in the Chlorophyceae , an increasing amount of basal body offset, indicate advancement within the classes. Absolute orientation is conserved during flagellar apparatus replication and development. Events after flagellar apparatus division in the algae studied may be subdivided into component assembly, which is universal and preserves phylogenetically-useful features, and component reorientation, which occurs in relatively few green algae and adapts the flagellar apparatus to specialized functions. From these flagellar apparatus orientation studies, a major reevaluation of evolution within the Chlorophyceae is proposed, with weakly- thalloid algae possessing desmoschisis (e.g. Chaetopeltis ) considered primitive, and

  14. Giardia Flagellar Motility Is Not Directly Required to Maintain Attachment to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    House, Susan A.; Richter, David J.; Pham, Jonathan K.; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia trophozoites attach to the intestinal microvilli (or inert surfaces) using an undefined “suction-based” mechanism, and remain attached during cell division to avoid peristalsis. Flagellar motility is a key factor in Giardia's pathogenesis and colonization of the host small intestine. Specifically, the beating of the ventral flagella, one of four pairs of motile flagella, has been proposed to generate a hydrodynamic force that results in suction-based attachment via the adjacent ventral disc. We aimed to test this prevailing “hydrodynamic model” of attachment mediated by flagellar motility. We defined four distinct stages of attachment by assessing surface contacts of the trophozoite with the substrate during attachment using TIRF microscopy (TIRFM). The lateral crest of the ventral disc forms a continuous perimeter seal with the substrate, a cytological indication that trophozoites are fully attached. Using trophozoites with two types of molecularly engineered defects in flagellar beating, we determined that neither ventral flagellar beating, nor any flagellar beating, is necessary for the maintenance of attachment. Following a morpholino-based knockdown of PF16, a central pair protein, both the beating and morphology of flagella were defective, but trophozoites could still initiate proper surface contacts as seen using TIRFM and could maintain attachment in several biophysical assays. Trophozoites with impaired motility were able to attach as well as motile cells. We also generated a strain with defects in the ventral flagellar waveform by overexpressing a dominant negative form of alpha2-annexin::GFP (D122A, D275A). This dominant negative alpha2-annexin strain could initiate attachment and had only a slight decrease in the ability to withstand normal and shear forces. The time needed for attachment did increase in trophozoites with overall defective flagellar beating, however. Thus while not directly required for attachment, flagellar motility is

  15. A MORN Repeat Protein Facilitates Protein Entry into the Flagellar Pocket of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma brucei lives in the bloodstream of infected mammalian hosts, fully exposed to the adaptive immune system. It relies on a very high rate of endocytosis to clear bound antibodies from its cell surface. All endo- and exocytosis occurs at a single site on its plasma membrane, an intracellular invagination termed the flagellar pocket. Coiled around the neck of the flagellar pocket is a multiprotein complex containing the repeat motif protein T. brucei MORN1 (TbMORN1). In this study, the phenotypic effects of TbMORN1 depletion in the mammalian-infective form of T. brucei were analyzed. Depletion of TbMORN1 resulted in a rapid enlargement of the flagellar pocket. Dextran, a polysaccharide marker for fluid phase endocytosis, accumulated inside the enlarged flagellar pocket. Unexpectedly, however, the proteins concanavalin A and bovine serum albumin did not do so, and concanavalin A was instead found to concentrate outside it. This suggests that TbMORN1 may have a role in facilitating the entry of proteins into the flagellar pocket. PMID:26318396

  16. High-speed holographic microscopy of malaria parasites reveals ambidextrous flagellar waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laurence G.; Carter, Lucy M.; Reece, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Axonemes form the core of eukaryotic flagella and cilia, performing tasks ranging from transporting fluid in developing embryos to the propulsion of sperm. Despite their abundance across the eukaryotic domain, the mechanisms that regulate the beating action of axonemes remain unknown. The flagellar waveforms are 3D in general, but current understanding of how axoneme components interact stems from 2D data; comprehensive measurements of flagellar shape are beyond conventional microscopy. Moreover, current flagellar model systems (e.g., sea urchin, human sperm) contain accessory structures that impose mechanical constraints on movement, obscuring the “native” axoneme behavior. We address both problems by developing a high-speed holographic imaging scheme and applying it to the (male) microgametes of malaria (Plasmodium) parasites. These isolated flagella are a unique, mathematically tractable model system for the physics of microswimmers. We reveal the 3D flagellar waveforms of these microorganisms and map the differential shear between microtubules in their axonemes. Furthermore, we overturn claims that chirality in the structure of the axoneme governs the beat pattern [Hirokawa N, et al. (2009) Ann Rev Fluid Mech 41:53–72], because microgametes display a left- or right-handed character on alternate beats. This breaks the link between structural chirality in the axoneme and larger scale symmetry breaking (e.g., in developing embryos), leading us to conclude that accessory structures play a critical role in shaping the flagellar beat. PMID:24194551

  17. Flagellar pocket restructuring through the Leishmania life cycle involves a discrete flagellum attachment zone.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Richard J; Sunter, Jack D; Gull, Keith

    2016-02-15

    Leishmania promastigote parasites have a flagellum, which protrudes from the flagellar pocket at the cell anterior, yet, surprisingly, have homologs of many flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) proteins--proteins used in the related Trypanosoma species to laterally attach the flagellum to the cell body from the flagellar pocket to the cell posterior. Here, we use seven Leishmania mexicana cell lines that expressed eYFP fusions of FAZ protein homologs to show that the Leishmania flagellar pocket includes a FAZ structure. Electron tomography revealed a precisely defined 3D organisation for both the flagellar pocket and FAZ, with striking similarities to those of Trypanosoma brucei. Expression of two T. brucei FAZ proteins in L. mexicana showed that T. brucei FAZ proteins can assemble into the Leishmania FAZ structure. Leishmania therefore have a previously unrecognised FAZ structure, which we show undergoes major structural reorganisation in the transition from the promastigote (sandfly vector) to amastigote (in mammalian macrophages). Morphogenesis of the Leishmania flagellar pocket, a structure important for pathogenicity, is therefore intimately associated with a FAZ; a finding with implications for understanding shape changes involving component modules during evolution. PMID:26746239

  18. Glucose induces delocalization of a flagellar biosynthesis protein from the flagellated pole.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyoung; Park, Young-Ha; Lee, Chang-Ro; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Seok, Yeong-Jae

    2016-09-01

    To survive in a continuously changing environment, bacteria sense concentration gradients of attractants or repellents, and purposefully migrate until a more favourable habitat is encountered. While glucose is known as the most effective attractant, the flagellar biosynthesis and hence chemotactic motility has been known to be repressed by glucose in some bacteria. To date, the only known regulatory mechanism of the repression of flagellar synthesis by glucose is via downregulation of the cAMP level, as shown in a few members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Here we show that, in Vibrio vulnificus, the glucose-mediated inhibition of flagellar motility operates by a completely different mechanism. In the presence of glucose, EIIA(Glc) is dephosphorylated and inhibits the polar localization of FapA (flagellar assembly protein A) by sequestering it from the flagellated pole. A loss or delocalization of FapA results in a complete failure of the flagellar biosynthesis and motility. However, when glucose is depleted, EIIA(Glc) is phosphorylated and releases FapA such that free FapA can be localized back to the pole and trigger flagellation. Together, these data provide new insight into a bacterial strategy to reach and stay in the glucose-rich area. PMID:27218601

  19. Flagellar pocket restructuring through the Leishmania life cycle involves a discrete flagellum attachment zone

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Richard J.; Sunter, Jack D.; Gull, Keith

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leishmania promastigote parasites have a flagellum, which protrudes from the flagellar pocket at the cell anterior, yet, surprisingly, have homologs of many flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) proteins – proteins used in the related Trypanosoma species to laterally attach the flagellum to the cell body from the flagellar pocket to the cell posterior. Here, we use seven Leishmania mexicana cell lines that expressed eYFP fusions of FAZ protein homologs to show that the Leishmania flagellar pocket includes a FAZ structure. Electron tomography revealed a precisely defined 3D organisation for both the flagellar pocket and FAZ, with striking similarities to those of Trypanosoma brucei. Expression of two T. brucei FAZ proteins in L. mexicana showed that T. brucei FAZ proteins can assemble into the Leishmania FAZ structure. Leishmania therefore have a previously unrecognised FAZ structure, which we show undergoes major structural reorganisation in the transition from the promastigote (sandfly vector) to amastigote (in mammalian macrophages). Morphogenesis of the Leishmania flagellar pocket, a structure important for pathogenicity, is therefore intimately associated with a FAZ; a finding with implications for understanding shape changes involving component modules during evolution. PMID:26746239

  20. Entosiphon sulcatum (Euglenophyceae): flagellar roots of the basal body complex and reservoir region

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, J.A.; Walne, P.L.; Kivic, P.A.

    1987-03-01

    The flagellar root system of Entosiphon sulcatum (Dujardin) Stein (Euglenophyceae) is described and compared with kinetoplastid and other euglenoid systems. An asymmetric pattern of three microtubular roots, one between the two flagellar basal bodies and one on either side (here called the intermediate, dorsal, and ventral roots), is consistent within the euglenoid flagellates studied thus far. The dorsal root is associated with the basal body of the anterior flagellum (F1) and lies on the left dorsal side of the basal body complex. Originating between the two flagellar basal bodies, and associated with the basal body of the trailing flagellum (F2), the intermediate root is morphologically distinguished by fibrils interconnecting the individual microtubules to one another and to the overlying reservoir membrane. The intermediate root is often borne on a ridge projecting into the reservoir. The ventral root originates near the F2 basal body and lies on the right ventral side of the cell. Fibrillar connections link the membrane of F2 with the reservoir membrane at the reservoir-canal transition level. A large cross-banded fiber joins the two flagellar basal bodies, and a series of smaller striated fibers links the anterior accessory and flagellar basal bodies. Large nonstriated fibers extend from the basal body complex posteriorly into the cytoplasm.

  1. Modeling the Activity of Single Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, Eric; Gibson, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that information is stored in DNA, transcribed to messenger RNA (mRNA) and then translated into proteins. This picture is significantly augmentated when we consider the action of certain proteins in regulating transcription. These transcription factors provide a feedback pathway by which genes can regulate one another's expression as mRNA and then as protein. To review: DNA, RNA and proteins have different functions. DNA is the molecular storehouse of genetic information. When cells divide, the DNA is replicated, so that each daughter cell maintains the same genetic information as the mother cell. RNA acts as a go-between from DNA to proteins. Only a single copy of DNA is present, but multiple copies of the same piece of RNA may be present, allowing cells to make huge amounts of protein. In eukaryotes (organisms with a nucleus), DNA is found in the nucleus only. RNA is copied in the nucleus then translocates(moves) outside the nucleus, where it is transcribed into proteins. Along the way, the RNA may be spliced, i.e., may have pieces cut out. RNA then attaches to ribosomes and is translated to proteins. Proteins are the machinery of the cell other than DNA and RNA, all the complex molecules of the cell are proteins. Proteins are specialized machines, each of which fulfills its own task, which may be transporting oxygen, catalyzing reactions, or responding to extracellular signals, just to name a few. One of the more interesting functions a protein may have is binding directly or indirectly to DNA to perform transcriptional regulation, thus forming a closed feedback loop of gene regulation. The structure of DNA and the central dogma were understood in the 50s; in the early 80s it became possible to make arbitrary modifications to DNA and use cellular machinery to transcribe and translate the resulting genes; more recently, genomes (i.e., the complete DNA sequence) of many organisms have been sequenced. This large

  2. Gene Regulatory Networks Activated during Chronic Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic tuberculosis represents a burden for most of world’s population. Several genes were found to be up-regulated at the late stage of chronic tuberculosis when DNA microarray protocol was used to analyze murine tuberculosis. Rv0348 is a potential transcriptional regulator that is highly expresse...

  3. Imprinted control of gene activity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Golic, K G; Golic, M M; Pimpinelli, S

    1998-11-19

    Genetic imprinting is defined as a reversible, differential marking of genes or chromosomes that is determined by the sex of the parent from whom the genetic material is inherited [1]. Imprinting was first observed in insects where, in some species, most notably among the coccoids (scale insects and allies), the differential marking of paternally and maternally transmitted chromosome sets leads to inactivation or elimination of paternal chromosomes [2]. Imprinting is also widespread in plants and mammals [3,4], in which paternally and maternally inherited alleles may be differentially expressed. Despite imprinting having been discovered in insects, clear examples of parental imprinting are scarce in the model insect species Drosophila melanogaster. We describe a case of imprint-mediated control of gene expression in Drosophila. The imprinted gene - the white+ eye-color gene - is expressed at a low level when transmitted by males, and at a high level when transmitted by females. Thus, in common with coccoids, Drosophila is capable of generating an imprint, and can respond to that imprint by silencing the paternal allele. PMID:9822579

  4. A Luciferase Reporter Gene System for High-Throughput Screening of γ-Globin Gene Activators.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wensheng; Silvers, Robert; Ouellette, Michael; Wu, Zining; Lu, Quinn; Li, Hu; Gallagher, Kathleen; Johnson, Kathy; Montoute, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Luciferase reporter gene assays have long been used for drug discovery due to their high sensitivity and robust signal. A dual reporter gene system contains a gene of interest and a control gene to monitor non-specific effects on gene expression. In our dual luciferase reporter gene system, a synthetic promoter of γ-globin gene was constructed immediately upstream of the firefly luciferase gene, followed downstream by a synthetic β-globin gene promoter in front of the Renilla luciferase gene. A stable cell line with the dual reporter gene was cloned and used for all assay development and HTS work. Due to the low activity of the control Renilla luciferase, only the firefly luciferase activity was further optimized for HTS. Several critical factors, such as cell density, serum concentration, and miniaturization, were optimized using tool compounds to achieve maximum robustness and sensitivity. Using the optimized reporter assay, the HTS campaign was successfully completed and approximately 1000 hits were identified. In this chapter, we also describe strategies to triage hits that non-specifically interfere with firefly luciferase. PMID:27316998

  5. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael N.; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  6. FliG and FliM distribution in the Salmonella typhimurium cell and flagellar basal bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, R; Amsler, C D; Matsumura, P; Khan, S

    1996-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium FliG and FliM are two of three proteins known to be necessary for flagellar morphogenesis as well as energization and switching of flagellar rotation. We have determined FliG and FliM levels in cellular fractions and in extended flagellar basal bodies, using antibodies raised against the purified proteins. Both proteins were found predominantly in the detergent-solubilized particulate fraction containing flagellar structures. Basal flagellar fragments could be separated from partially constructed basal bodies by gel filtration chromatography. FliG and FliM were present in an approximately equimolar ration in all gel-filtered fractions. FliG and FliM copy numbers, estimated relative to that of the hook protein from the early fractions containing long, basal, flagellar fragments, were (means +/- standard errors) 41 +/- 10 and 37 +/- 13 per flagellum, respectively. Extended structures were present in the earliest identifiable basal bodies. Immunoelectron microscopy and immunoblot gel analysis suggested that the FliG and, to a less certain degree, the FliM contents of these structures were the same as those for the complete basal bodies. These facts are consistent with the postulate that FliG and FliM affect flagellar morphogenesis as part of the extended basal structure, formation of which is necessary for assembly of more-distal components of the flagellum. The determined stoichiometries will provide important constraints to modelling energization and switching of flagellar rotation. PMID:8550426

  7. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  8. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    PubMed

    Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Petrunia, Igor V; Komarova, Tatiana V; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S; Kiryanov, Gleb I; Dorokhov, Yuri L

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  9. Zipping and entanglement in flagellar bundle of E. coli: Role of motile cell body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhyapak, Tapan Chandra; Stark, Holger

    2015-11-01

    The course of a peritrichous bacterium, such as E. coli, crucially depends on the level of synchronization and self-organization of several rotating flagella. However, the rotation of each flagellum generates countermovements of the body which in turn affect the flagellar dynamics. Using a detailed numerical model of an E. coli, we demonstrate that flagellar entanglement, besides fluid flow relative to the moving body, dramatically changes the dynamics of flagella from that compared to anchored flagella. In particular, bundle formation occurs through a zipping motion in a remarkably rapid time, affected little by initial flagellar orientation. A simplified analytical model supports our observations. Finally, we illustrate how entanglement, hydrodynamic interactions, and body movement contribute to zipping and bundling.

  10. Using shotgun sequence data to find active restriction enzyme genes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Posfai, Janos; Morgan, Richard D; Vincze, Tamas; Roberts, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequence analysis has become the standard method for beginning to determine a genome sequence. The preparation of the shotgun sequence clones is, in fact, a biological experiment. It determines which segments of the genome can be cloned into Escherichia coli and which cannot. By analyzing the complete set of sequences from such an experiment, it is possible to identify genes lethal to E. coli. Among this set are genes encoding restriction enzymes which, when active in E. coli, lead to cell death by cleaving the E. coli genome at the restriction enzyme recognition sites. By analyzing shotgun sequence data sets we show that this is a reliable method to detect active restriction enzyme genes in newly sequenced genomes, thereby facilitating functional annotation. Active restriction enzyme genes have been identified, and their activity demonstrated biochemically, in the sequenced genomes of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 and Methylococcus capsulatus. PMID:18988632

  11. Knockdown of Inner Arm Protein IC138 in Trypanosoma brucei Causes Defective Motility and Flagellar Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Corinne S.; Chang, Alex J.; Greene, Rebecca; Machado, Sulynn; Parsons, Matthew W.; Takats, Taylor A.; Zambetti, Luke J.; Springer, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Motility in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is conferred by a single flagellum, attached alongside the cell, which moves the cell forward using a beat that is generated from tip-to-base. We are interested in characterizing components that regulate flagellar beating, in this study we extend the characterization of TbIC138, the ortholog of a dynein intermediate chain that regulates axonemal inner arm dynein f/I1. TbIC138 was tagged In situ-and shown to fractionate with the inner arm components of the flagellum. RNAi knockdown of TbIC138 resulted in significantly reduced protein levels, mild growth defect and significant motility defects. These cells tended to cluster, exhibited slow and abnormal motility and some cells had partially or fully detached flagella. Slight but significant increases were observed in the incidence of mis-localized or missing kinetoplasts. To document development of the TbIC138 knockdown phenotype over time, we performed a detailed analysis of flagellar detachment and motility changes over 108 hours following induction of RNAi. Abnormal motility, such as slow twitching or irregular beating, was observed early, and became progressively more severe such that by 72 hours-post-induction, approximately 80% of the cells were immotile. Progressively more cells exhibited flagellar detachment over time, but this phenotype was not as prevalent as immotility, affecting less than 60% of the population. Detached flagella had abnormal beating, but abnormal beating was also observed in cells with no flagellar detachment, suggesting that TbIC138 has a direct, or primary, effect on the flagellar beat, whereas detachment is a secondary phenotype of TbIC138 knockdown. Our results are consistent with the role of TbIC138 as a regulator of motility, and has a phenotype amenable to more extensive structure-function analyses to further elucidate its role in the control of flagellar beat in T. brucei. PMID:26555902

  12. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  13. Physical activity in adulthood: genes and mortality.

    PubMed

    Karvinen, Sira; Waller, Katja; Silvennoinen, Mika; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Kujala, Urho M

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies report a strong inverse relationship between leisure-time physical activity and all-cause mortality. Despite suggestive evidence from population-based associations, scientists have not been able to show a beneficial effect of physical activity on the risk of death in controlled intervention studies among individuals who have been healthy at baseline. On the other hand, high cardiorespiratory fitness is known to be a strong predictor of reduced mortality, even more robust than physical activity level itself. Here, in both animals and/or human twins, we show that the same genetic factors influence physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk of death. Previous observational follow-up studies in humans suggest that increasing fitness through physical activity levels could prolong life; however, our controlled interventional study with laboratory rats bred for low and high intrinsic fitness contrast with these findings. Also, we find no evidence for the suggested association using pairwise analysis among monozygotic twin pairs who are discordant in their physical activity levels. Based on both our animal and human findings, we propose that genetic pleiotropy might partly explain the frequently observed associations between high baseline physical activity and later reduced mortality in humans. PMID:26666586

  14. Physical activity in adulthood: genes and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Karvinen, Sira; Waller, Katja; Silvennoinen, Mika; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kainulainen, Heikki; Kujala, Urho M.

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies report a strong inverse relationship between leisure-time physical activity and all-cause mortality. Despite suggestive evidence from population-based associations, scientists have not been able to show a beneficial effect of physical activity on the risk of death in controlled intervention studies among individuals who have been healthy at baseline. On the other hand, high cardiorespiratory fitness is known to be a strong predictor of reduced mortality, even more robust than physical activity level itself. Here, in both animals and/or human twins, we show that the same genetic factors influence physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk of death. Previous observational follow-up studies in humans suggest that increasing fitness through physical activity levels could prolong life; however, our controlled interventional study with laboratory rats bred for low and high intrinsic fitness contrast with these findings. Also, we find no evidence for the suggested association using pairwise analysis among monozygotic twin pairs who are discordant in their physical activity levels. Based on both our animal and human findings, we propose that genetic pleiotropy might partly explain the frequently observed associations between high baseline physical activity and later reduced mortality in humans. PMID:26666586

  15. Mechanisms of specificity in neuronal activity-regulated gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Michelle R.; West, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is a highly adaptable organ that is capable of converting sensory information into changes in neuronal function. This plasticity allows behavior to be accommodated to the environment, providing an important evolutionary advantage. Neurons convert environmental stimuli into long-lasting changes in their physiology in part through the synaptic activity-regulated transcription of new gene products. Since the neurotransmitter-dependent regulation of Fos transcription was first discovered nearly 25 years ago, a wealth of studies have enriched our understanding of the molecular pathways that mediate activity-regulated changes in gene transcription. These findings show that a broad range of signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators can be engaged by neuronal activity to sculpt complex programs of stimulus-regulated gene transcription. However, the shear scope of the transcriptional pathways engaged by neuronal activity raises the question of how specificity in the nature of the transcriptional response is achieved in order to encode physiologically relevant responses to divergent stimuli. Here we summarize the general paradigms by which neuronal activity regulates transcription while focusing on the molecular mechanisms that confer differential stimulus-, cell-type-, and developmental-specificity upon activity-regulated programs of neuronal gene transcription. In addition, we preview some of the new technologies that will advance our future understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of activity-regulated gene transcription in the brain. PMID:21620929

  16. Absence of canonical active chromatin marks in developmentally regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Romero, Marina; Corominas, Montserrat; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of active and repressive histone modifications is assumed to play a key role in the regulation of gene expression. In contrast to this generally accepted view, we show that transcription of genes temporally regulated during fly and worm development occurs in the absence of canonically active histone modifications. Conversely, strong chromatin marking is related to transcriptional and post-transcriptional stability, an association that we also observe in mammals. Our results support a model in which chromatin marking is associated to stable production of RNA, while unmarked chromatin would permit rapid gene activation and de-activation during development. In this case, regulation by transcription factors would play a comparatively more important regulatory role. PMID:26280901

  17. Cationic Amino Acid Uptake Constitutes a Metabolic Regulation Mechanism and Occurs in the Flagellar Pocket of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, León A.; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Montserrat, Javier; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosomatids' amino acid permeases are key proteins in parasite metabolism since they participate in the adaptation of parasites to different environments. Here, we report that TcAAP3, a member of a Trypanosoma cruzi multigene family of permeases, is a bona fide arginine transporter. Most higher eukaryotic cells incorporate cationic amino acids through a single transporter. In contrast, T. cruzi can recognize and transport cationic amino acids by mono-specific permeases since a 100-fold molar excess of lysine could not affect the arginine transport in parasites that over-express the arginine permease (TcAAP3 epimastigotes). In order to test if the permease activity regulates downstream processes of the arginine metabolism, the expression of the single T. cruzi enzyme that uses arginine as substrate, arginine kinase, was evaluated in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. In this parasite model, intracellular arginine concentration increases 4-folds and ATP level remains constant until cultures reach the stationary phase of growth, with decreases of about 6-folds in respect to the controls. Interestingly, Western Blot analysis demonstrated that arginine kinase is significantly down-regulated during the stationary phase of growth in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. This decrease could represent a compensatory mechanism for the increase in ATP consumption as a consequence of the displacement of the reaction equilibrium of arginine kinase, when the intracellular arginine concentration augments and the glucose from the medium is exhausted. Using immunofluorescence techniques we also determined that TcAAP3 and the specific lysine transporter TcAAP7 co-localize in a specialized region of the plasma membrane named flagellar pocket, staining a single locus close to the flagellar pocket collar. Taken together these data suggest that arginine transport is closely related to arginine metabolism and cell energy balance. The clinical relevance of studying trypanosomatids' permeases relies on the

  18. Kinetically resolved states of the Halobacterium halobium flagellar motor switch and modulation of the switch by sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed Central

    McCain, D A; Amici, L A; Spudich, J L

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous switching of the rotation sense of the flagellar motor of the archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium and modulation of the switch by attractant and repellent photostimuli were analyzed by using a computerized cell-tracking system with 67-ms resolution coupled to electronic shutters. The data fit a three-state model of the switch, in which a Poisson process governs the transition from state N (nonreversing) to state R (reversing). After a reversal, the switch returns to state N, passing through an intermediate state I (inactive), which produces a ca. 2-s period of low reversal frequency before the state N Poisson rate is restored. The stochastic nature of the H. halobium switch reveals a close similarity to Escherichia coli flagellar motor properties as elucidated previously. Sensory modulation of the switch by both photoattractant and photorepellent signals can be interpreted in terms of modulation of the single forward rate constant of the N to R transition. Insight into the mechanism of modulation by the phototaxis receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SR-I) was gained by increasing the lifetime of the principal photointermediate of the SR-I photochemical reaction cycle, S373, by replacing the native chromophore, all-trans-retinal, with the acyclic analog, 3,7,11-trimethyl-2,4,6,8-dodecapentaenal. Flash photolysis of analog-containing cells revealed an eightfold decrease in the rate of thermal decay of S373, and behavioral analysis showed longer periods of reversal suppression than that of cells with the native chromophore over similar ranges of illumination intensities. This indicates that attractant signaling is governed by the lifetime of the S373 intermediate rather than by the frequency of photocycling. In this sense, SR-I is similar to rhodopsin, whose function depends on an active photoproduct (Meta-II). PMID:3654583

  19. Archaeal promoter architecture and mechanism of gene activation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Nan; Ao, Xiang; Liang, Yun Xiang; She, Qunxin

    2011-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus islandicus contain several genes exhibiting D-arabinose-inducible expression and these systems are ideal for studying mechanisms of archaeal gene expression. At sequence level, only two highly conserved cis elements are present on the promoters: a regulatory element named ara box directing arabinose-inducible expression and the basal promoter element TATA, serving as the binding site for the TATA-binding protein. Strikingly, these promoters possess a modular structure that allows an essentially inactive basal promoter to be strongly activated. The invoked mechanisms include TFB (transcription factor B) recruitment by the ara-box-binding factor to activate gene expression and modulation of TFB recruitment efficiency to yield differential gene expression. PMID:21265754

  20. Characterization of polymer release from the flagellar pocket of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Stierhof, Y D; Ilg, T; Russell, D G; Hohenberg, H; Overath, P

    1994-04-01

    Trypanosomatids contain a unique compartment, the flagellar pocket, formed by an invagination of the plasma membrane at the base of the flagellum, which is considered to be the sole cellular site for endocytosis and exocytosis of macromolecules. The culture supernatant of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes, the insect stage of this protozoan parasite, contains two types of polymers: a filamentous acid phosphatase (sAP) composed of a 100-kD phosphoglycoprotein with non-covalently associated proteo high molecular weight phosphoglycan (proteo-HMWPG) and fibrous material termed network consisting of complex phosphoglycans. Secretion of both polymers is investigated using mAbs and a combination of light and electron microscopic techniques. Long filaments of sAP are detectable in the lumen of the flagellar pocket. Both sAP filaments and network material emerge from the ostium of the flagellar pocket. While sAP filaments detach from the cells, the fibrous network frequently remains associated with the anterior end of the parasites and can be found in the center of cell aggregates. The related species L. major forms similar networks. Since polymeric structures cannot be detected in intracellular compartments, it is proposed that monomeric or, possibly, oligomeric subunits synthesized in the cells are secreted into the flagellar pocket. Polymer formation from subunits is suggested to occur in the lumen of the pocket before release into the culture medium or, naturally, into the gut of infected sandflies. PMID:8163549

  1. A novel type bacterial flagellar motor that can use divalent cations as a coupling ion.

    PubMed

    Imazawa, Riku; Takahashi, Yuka; Aoki, Wataru; Sano, Motohiko; Ito, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a sophisticated nanomachine embedded in the cell envelope and powered by an electrochemical gradient of H(+), Na(+), or K(+)across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we describe a new member of the bacterial flagellar stator channel family (MotAB1 of Paenibacillus sp. TCA20 (TCA-MotAB1)) that is coupled to divalent cations (Ca(2+)and Mg(2+)). In the absence of divalent cations of alkaline earth metals, no swimming was observed in Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which grows optimally in Ca(2+)-rich environments. This pattern was confirmed by swimming assays of a stator-free Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1. Both a stator-free and major Mg(2+)uptake system-deleted B. subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1 complemented both growth and motility deficiency under low Mg(2+)conditions and exhibited [Mg(2+)]in identical to that of the wild-type. This is the first report of a flagellar motor that can use Ca(2+)and Mg(2+)as coupling ions. These findings will promote the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity. PMID:26794857

  2. Swimming performance of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is an emergent property of its two flagellar systems.

    PubMed

    Quelas, J Ignacio; Althabegoiti, M Julia; Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Melgarejo, Augusto A; Marconi, Verónica I; Mongiardini, Elías J; Trejo, Sebastián A; Mengucci, Florencia; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Lodeiro, Aníbal R

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species use flagella for self-propulsion in aqueous media. In the soil, which is a complex and structured environment, water is found in microscopic channels where viscosity and water potential depend on the composition of the soil solution and the degree of soil water saturation. Therefore, the motility of soil bacteria might have special requirements. An important soil bacterial genus is Bradyrhizobium, with species that possess one flagellar system and others with two different flagellar systems. Among the latter is B. diazoefficiens, which may express its subpolar and lateral flagella simultaneously in liquid medium, although its swimming behaviour was not described yet. These two flagellar systems were observed here as functionally integrated in a swimming performance that emerged as an epistatic interaction between those appendages. In addition, each flagellum seemed engaged in a particular task that might be required for swimming oriented toward chemoattractants near the soil inner surfaces at viscosities that may occur after the loss of soil gravitational water. Because the possession of two flagellar systems is not general in Bradyrhizobium or in related genera that coexist in the same environment, there may be an adaptive tradeoff between energetic costs and ecological benefits among these different species. PMID:27053439

  3. DRC3 connects the N-DRC to dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Junya; Song, Kangkang; Lin, Jianfeng; King, Stephen M.; Sanderson, Michael J.; Nicastro, Daniela; Witman, George B.

    2015-01-01

    The nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), which is a major hub for the control of flagellar motility, contains at least 11 different subunits. A major challenge is to determine the location and function of each of these subunits within the N-DRC. We characterized a Chlamydomonas mutant defective in the N-DRC subunit DRC3. Of the known N-DRC subunits, the drc3 mutant is missing only DRC3. Like other N-DRC mutants, the drc3 mutant has a defect in flagellar motility. However, in contrast to other mutations affecting the N-DRC, drc3 does not suppress flagellar paralysis caused by loss of radial spokes. Cryo–electron tomography revealed that the drc3 mutant lacks a portion of the N-DRC linker domain, including the L1 protrusion, part of the distal lobe, and the connection between these two structures, thus localizing DRC3 to this part of the N-DRC. This and additional considerations enable us to assign DRC3 to the L1 protrusion. Because the L1 protrusion is the only non-dynein structure in contact with the dynein g motor domain in wild-type axonemes and this is the only N-DRC–dynein connection missing in the drc3 mutant, we conclude that DRC3 interacts with dynein g to regulate flagellar waveform. PMID:26063732

  4. Kinesin-13 regulates flagellar, interphase, and mitotic microtubule dynamics in Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Scott C; Sagolla, Meredith S; Mancuso, Joel J; Woessner, David J; House, Susan A; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian; Cande, W Zacheus

    2007-12-01

    Microtubule depolymerization dynamics in the spindle are regulated by kinesin-13, a nonprocessive kinesin motor protein that depolymerizes microtubules at the plus and minus ends. Here we show that a single kinesin-13 homolog regulates flagellar length dynamics, as well as other interphase and mitotic dynamics in Giardia intestinalis, a widespread parasitic diplomonad protist. Both green fluorescent protein-tagged kinesin-13 and EB1 (a plus-end tracking protein) localize to the plus ends of mitotic and interphase microtubules, including a novel localization to the eight flagellar tips, cytoplasmic anterior axonemes, and the median body. The ectopic expression of a kinesin-13 (S280N) rigor mutant construct caused significant elongation of the eight flagella with significant decreases in the median body volume and resulted in mitotic defects. Notably, drugs that disrupt normal interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics also affected flagellar length in Giardia. Our study extends recent work on interphase and mitotic kinesin-13 functioning in metazoans to include a role in regulating flagellar length dynamics. We suggest that kinesin-13 universally regulates both mitotic and interphase microtubule dynamics in diverse microbial eukaryotes and propose that axonemal microtubules are subject to the same regulation of microtubule dynamics as other dynamic microtubule arrays. Finally, the present study represents the first use of a dominant-negative strategy to disrupt normal protein function in Giardia and provides important insights into giardial microtubule dynamics with relevance to the development of antigiardial compounds that target critical functions of kinesins in the giardial life cycle. PMID:17766466

  5. Swimming performance of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is an emergent property of its two flagellar systems

    PubMed Central

    Quelas, J. Ignacio; Althabegoiti, M. Julia; Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Melgarejo, Augusto A.; Marconi, Verónica I.; Mongiardini, Elías J.; Trejo, Sebastián A.; Mengucci, Florencia; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Lodeiro, Aníbal R.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial species use flagella for self-propulsion in aqueous media. In the soil, which is a complex and structured environment, water is found in microscopic channels where viscosity and water potential depend on the composition of the soil solution and the degree of soil water saturation. Therefore, the motility of soil bacteria might have special requirements. An important soil bacterial genus is Bradyrhizobium, with species that possess one flagellar system and others with two different flagellar systems. Among the latter is B. diazoefficiens, which may express its subpolar and lateral flagella simultaneously in liquid medium, although its swimming behaviour was not described yet. These two flagellar systems were observed here as functionally integrated in a swimming performance that emerged as an epistatic interaction between those appendages. In addition, each flagellum seemed engaged in a particular task that might be required for swimming oriented toward chemoattractants near the soil inner surfaces at viscosities that may occur after the loss of soil gravitational water. Because the possession of two flagellar systems is not general in Bradyrhizobium or in related genera that coexist in the same environment, there may be an adaptive tradeoff between energetic costs and ecological benefits among these different species. PMID:27053439

  6. Dual stator dynamics in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Paulick, Anja; Delalez, Nicolas J; Brenzinger, Susanne; Steel, Bradley C; Berry, Richard M; Armitage, Judith P; Thormann, Kai M

    2015-06-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is an intricate nanomachine which converts ion gradients into rotational movement. Torque is created by ion-dependent stator complexes which surround the rotor in a ring. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 expresses two distinct types of stator units: the Na(+)-dependent PomA4 B2 and the H(+)-dependent MotA4 B2. Here, we have explored the stator unit dynamics in the MR-1 flagellar system by using mCherry-labeled PomAB and MotAB units. We observed a total of between 7 and 11 stator units in each flagellar motor. Both types of stator units exchanged between motors and a pool of stator complexes in the membrane, and the exchange rate of MotAB, but not of PomAB, units was dependent on the environmental Na(+)-levels. In 200 mM Na(+), the numbers of PomAB and MotAB units in wild-type motors was determined to be about 7:2 (PomAB:MotAB), shifting to about 6:5 without Na(+). Significantly, the average swimming speed of MR-1 cells at low Na(+) conditions was increased in the presence of MotAB. These data strongly indicate that the S. oneidensis flagellar motors simultaneously use H(+) and Na(+) driven stators in a configuration governed by MotAB incorporation efficiency in response to environmental Na(+) levels. PMID:25727785

  7. A novel type bacterial flagellar motor that can use divalent cations as a coupling ion

    PubMed Central

    Imazawa, Riku; Takahashi, Yuka; Aoki, Wataru; Sano, Motohiko; Ito, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a sophisticated nanomachine embedded in the cell envelope and powered by an electrochemical gradient of H+, Na+, or K+across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we describe a new member of the bacterial flagellar stator channel family (MotAB1 of Paenibacillus sp. TCA20 (TCA-MotAB1)) that is coupled to divalent cations (Ca2+and Mg2+). In the absence of divalent cations of alkaline earth metals, no swimming was observed in Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which grows optimally in Ca2+-rich environments. This pattern was confirmed by swimming assays of a stator-free Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1. Both a stator-free and major Mg2+uptake system-deleted B. subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1 complemented both growth and motility deficiency under low Mg2+conditions and exhibited [Mg2+]in identical to that of the wild-type. This is the first report of a flagellar motor that can use Ca2+and Mg2+as coupling ions. These findings will promote the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity. PMID:26794857

  8. Isolation and characterization of flagellar filament from zoospores of Dermatophilus congolensis.

    PubMed

    Hiraizumi, Mieko; Tagawa, Yuichi

    2014-09-17

    Highly motile zoospores from Dermatophilus congolensis bovine isolates from clinical dermatophilosis in Japan were obtained by culturing at 27°C in an ambient atmosphere on heart infusion agar supplemented with 5% defibrinated sheep blood for 72h or in heart infusion broth for 48h with gentle shaking. After vigorous mechanical agitation of the zoospore suspension, the flagellar filaments detached from motile zoospores and were isolated in the clear gelatinous part of the final pellet by differential centrifugation. Typical morphology of a flagellar filament, with a width of approximately 15nm, was observed in the isolated flagellar filament by electron microscopy. A single major protein (flagellin) band with an apparent molecular mass of 35kDa was detected in the flagellar filament of D. congolensis strain AM-1 and that of 33kDa was detected in strain IT-2 by SDS-PAGE. In immunoblot analysis of whole-cell proteins from seven isolates of D. congolensis, antiserum to strain AM-1 zoospores reacted with the 35-kDa antigen band of strain AM-1, but not with any antigen band of other strains in a similar molecular mass range. In contrast, antiserum to strain IT-2 zoospores reacted with antigen bands at 33kDa from six strains, except strain AM-1. Similar strain-specific reactions of these anti-zoospore sera with isolated flagellar filaments from strains AM-1 and IT-2 were confirmed by immunoblot, indicating the presence of antigenic variations of flagellins of D. congolensis zoospores. PMID:25132009

  9. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound induced Gene Activation in Solid Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan; Zhong, Pei

    2006-05-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to activate trans-gene expression in a mouse tumor model was investigated. 4T1 cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously in the hind limbs of Balb/C mice and adenovirus luciferase gene vectors under the control of heat shock protein 70B promoter (Adeno-hsp70B-Luc) were injected intratumoraly for gene transfection. One day following the virus injection, the transfected tumors were heated to a peak temperature of 55, 65, 75, and 85°C, respectively, in 10s at multiple sites around the center of the tumor using a HIFU transducer operated at either 1.1-MHz (fundamental) or 3.3-MHz (3rd harmonic) frequency. Inducible luciferase gene expression was found to vary from 15-fold to 120-fold of the control group following 1.1-MHz HIFU exposure. The maximum gene activation was produced at a peak temperature of 65˜75°C one day following HIFU exposure and decayed gradually to baseline level within 7 days. The inducible gene activation produced by 3.3-MHz HIFU exposure (75°C-10s) was found to be comparable to that produced by hyperthermia (42°C-30min). Altogether, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using HIFU as a simple and versatile physical means to regulate trans-gene expression in vivo. This unique feature may be explored in the future for a synergistic combination of HIFU-induced thermal ablation with heat-induced gene therapy for improved cancer therapy.

  10. Localization of the Salmonella typhimurium flagellar switch protein FliG to the cytoplasmic M-ring face of the basal body.

    PubMed Central

    Francis, N R; Irikura, V M; Yamaguchi, S; DeRosier, D J; Macnab, R M

    1992-01-01

    The direction of rotation of the bacterial flagellum is determined by the flagellar switch. We have localized FliG, one of the switch proteins of Salmonella typhimurium, to the cytoplasmic face of the M ring of the flagellar basal body. This localization was made possible by the discovery of two spontaneous mutants in which the fliF (M ring) and fliG (switch) genes were fused in-frame. In the first mutant, a deletion of 7 base pairs at the 3' end of fliF resulted in an essentially full-length fusion protein. In the second mutant, a larger deletion resulted in a fusion in which 56 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus of FliF and 94 amino acids from the amino terminus of FliG were lost. Both strains were motile and underwent switching; the first strain had a clockwise bias, and the second strain had a counterclockwise bias. Gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting of isolated hook-basal-body complexes verified that they contained the fusion proteins. Electron microscopy revealed additional mass at the cytoplasmic face of the M ring, which could be decorated with anti-FliG antibody. We conclude that the natural location for FliG is at the cytoplasmic face of the M ring and that the stoichiometric ratio between FliF and FliG in wild-type cells is probably 1:1. Images PMID:1631122

  11. Systematic identification of signal-activated stochastic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Neuert, Gregor; Munsky, Brian; Tan, Rui Zhen; Teytelman, Leonid; Khammash, Mustafa; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    Although much has been done to elucidate the biochemistry of signal transduction and gene regulatory pathways, it remains difficult to understand or predict quantitative responses. We integrate single-cell experiments with stochastic analyses, to identify predictive models of transcriptional dynamics for the osmotic stress response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We generate models with varying complexity and use parameter estimation and cross-validation analyses to select the most predictive model. This model yields insight into several dynamical features, including multistep regulation and switchlike activation for several osmosensitive genes. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts the transcriptional dynamics of cells in response to different environmental and genetic perturbations. Because our approach is general, it should facilitate a predictive understanding for signal-activated transcription of other genes in other pathways or organisms. PMID:23372015

  12. ARMADA: Using motif activity dynamics to infer gene regulatory networks from gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Pemberton-Ross, Peter J; Pachkov, Mikhail; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of gene expression data remains one of the most promising avenues toward reconstructing genome-wide gene regulatory networks. However, the large dimensionality of the problem prohibits the fitting of explicit dynamical models of gene regulatory networks, whereas machine learning methods for dimensionality reduction such as clustering or principal component analysis typically fail to provide mechanistic interpretations of the reduced descriptions. To address this, we recently developed a general methodology called motif activity response analysis (MARA) that, by modeling gene expression patterns in terms of the activities of concrete regulators, accomplishes dramatic dimensionality reduction while retaining mechanistic biological interpretations of its predictions (Balwierz, 2014). Here we extend MARA by presenting ARMADA, which models the activity dynamics of regulators across a time course, and infers the causal interactions between the regulators that drive the dynamics of their activities across time. We have implemented ARMADA as part of our ISMARA webserver, ismara.unibas.ch, allowing any researcher to automatically apply it to any gene expression time course. To illustrate the method, we apply ARMADA to a time course of human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with TNF. Remarkably, ARMADA is able to reproduce the complex observed motif activity dynamics using a relatively small set of interactions between the key regulators in this system. In addition, we show that ARMADA successfully infers many of the key regulatory interactions known to drive this inflammatory response and discuss several novel interactions that ARMADA predicts. In combination with ISMARA, ARMADA provides a powerful approach to generating plausible hypotheses for the key interactions between regulators that control gene expression in any system for which time course measurements are available. PMID:26164700

  13. Hypomethylation and activation of syncytin-1 gene in endometriotic tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyuan; Li, Jinping; Podratz, Karl C; Tipton, Tracy; Marzolf, Susan; Chen, Hai Bin; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Syncytin-1 plays a critical role in the maintenance of normal pregnancy by mediating the formation of syncytiotrophoblasts through a fosugenic action. Encoded by the human endogenous retrovirus envelope gene HERV-W, syncytin-1 trophoblast-specific expression is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms. In non-placental tissues, the syncytin-1 gene is suppressed by hypermethylation in the LTR promoter region. Hypomethylated and activated syncytin-1 gene is found in placental trophoblast lineages and malignant cells. We here demonstrate that while syncytin-1 gene remains silenced in the eutopic endometrium from endometriotic patients, syncytin-1 mRNA and protein are detected in ectopic, endometriotic lesions; particularly the endometrioid glandular endothelial cells. LINE-1 COBRA assay and immunohistochemistry using the 5-MC-specific antibody did not detect any changes in global DNA methylation in the endometriotic tissues. However, results from COBRA and bisulfite sequencing indicated that the LTR region of the syncytin-1 promoter is hypomethylated in endometriotic tissues, highlighting the significance of DNA demethylation in syncytin-1 gene activation. Analysis of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) mRNA levels revealed that DNMT3B3, an isoform carrying methyltransferase activity, is downregulated; whereas DNMT3B7, the isoform without enzymatic activity, is upregulated in the endometriotic tissues, pointing to positive and negative regulatory functions, respectively, of these isoforms on syncytin-1 methylation. These results have provided the first evidence supporting the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms for syncytin-1 upregulation in endometriotic tissues. Considering recent findings on the nonfusogenic activity of syncytin-1, its expression in endometriotic tissues suggests that this multifunctional protein may be implicated in the pathogenesis and/or progression of endometriosis. PMID:23888948

  14. Synapsins are late activity-induced genes regulated by birdsong

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Tarciso A. F.; Mello, Claudio V.

    2008-01-01

    The consolidation of long-lasting sensory memories requires the activation of gene expression programs in the brain. In spite of considerable knowledge about the early components of this response, little is known about late components (i.e. genes regulated 2-6 hr after stimulation) and the relationship between early and late genes. Birdsong represents one of the best natural behaviors to study sensory-induced gene expression in awake, freely behaving animals. Here we show that the expression of several isoforms of synapsins, a group of phosphoproteins thought to regulate the dynamics of synaptic vesicle storage and release, is induced by auditory stimulation with birdsong in the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM) of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) brain. This induction occurs mainly in excitatory (non-GABAergic) neurons and is modulated (suppressed) by early song-inducible proteins. We also show that ZENK, an early song-inducible transcription factor, interacts with the syn3 promoter in vivo, consistent with a direct regulatory effect and an emerging novel view of ZENK action. These results demonstrate that synapsins are a late component of the genomic response to neuronal activation and that their expression depends on a complex set of regulatory interactions between early and late regulated genes. PMID:19005052

  15. Arsenate arrests flagellar rotation in cytoplasm-free envelopes of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Y; Barak, R; Eisenbach, M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of arsenate on flagellar rotation in cytoplasm-free flagellated envelopes of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium was investigated. Flagellar rotation ceased as soon as the envelopes were exposed to arsenate. Inclusion of phosphate intracellularly (but not extracellular) prevented the inhibition by arsenate. In a parallel experiment, the rotation was not affected by inclusion of an ATP trap (hexokinase and glucose) within the envelopes. It is concluded that arsenate affects the motor in a way other than reversible deenergization. This may be an irreversible damage to the cell or direct inhibition of the motor by arsenate. The latter possibility suggests that a process of phosphorylation or phosphate binding is involved in the motor function. PMID:8071237

  16. Rotational speed control of Na +-driven flagellar motor by dual pipettes.

    PubMed

    Nogawa, Kousuke; Kojima, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2009-12-01

    Single cell analysis has attracted much attention to reveal the detailed and localized biological information. Local environmental control technique is desired to analyze the detailed and localized properties of single cells. In this paper, we propose the local environmental control system with nano/micro dual pipettes to control the local reagent concentration dynamically and arbitrarily. Local environmental control by dual pipettes is applied to the rotational speed control of bacterial flagellar motor, which is a rotary molecular machine. We demonstrate quick response and iterative rotational speed control of Na (+)-driven flagellar motor in both accelerating and relaxing directions by switching the local spout between Na (+)-containing and Na (+) -free solutions with dual pipettes. It is shown that the rotational speed might be controllable by changing the spouting velocity of Na (+)-containing solution with multiplying the applied dc voltage. PMID:19887330

  17. The phylogeny of swimming kinematics: The environment controls flagellar waveforms in sperm motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Burton, Lisa; Zimmer, Richard; Hosoi, Anette; Stocker, Roman

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, phylogenetic and molecular analyses have dominated the study of ecology and evolution. However, physical interactions between organisms and their environment, a fundamental determinant of organism ecology and evolution, are mediated by organism form and function, highlighting the need to understand the mechanics of basic survival strategies, including locomotion. Focusing on spermatozoa, we combined high-speed video microscopy and singular value decomposition analysis to quantitatively compare the flagellar waveforms of eight species, ranging from marine invertebrates to humans. We found striking similarities in sperm swimming kinematics between genetically dissimilar organisms, which could not be uncovered by phylogenetic analysis. The emergence of dominant waveform patterns across species are suggestive of biological optimization for flagellar locomotion and point toward environmental cues as drivers of this convergence. These results reinforce the power of quantitative kinematic analysis to understand the physical drivers of evolution and as an approach to uncover new solutions for engineering applications, such as micro-robotics.

  18. Amphipathic helical ordering of the flagellar secretion signal of Salmonella flagellin.

    PubMed

    Tőke, Orsolya; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2016-08-01

    Export of external flagellar proteins requires a signal located within their N-terminal disordered part, however, these regions do not share any significant sequence similarity suggesting that the secondary/tertiary structure might be important for recognition by the export gate. NMR experiments were performed to reveal the conformational properties of the flagellin signal sequence in vitro. It assumed a largely disordered fluctuating structure in aqueous environment, but acquired a folded structure containing an amphipathic helical portion in 50% MeOH or upon addition of SDS micelles which are known to promote hydrophobic interactions. Our observations raise the possibility that the signal sequence may partially undergo amphipathic helical ordering upon interaction with the recognition unit of the flagellar export machinery in a similar way as revealed for protein import into intracellular eukaryotic organelles mediated by targeting signals of high diversity. PMID:27264954

  19. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials - towards an efficient lithium battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznosov, Sergei N.; Veluri, Pavan S.; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Macfarlane, Douglas R.; Fedorov, Oleg V.; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g-1 at 5 A g-1 (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future.

  20. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials – towards an efficient lithium battery anode

    PubMed Central

    Beznosov, Sergei N.; Veluri, Pavan S.; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; MacFarlane, Douglas R.; Fedorov, Oleg V.; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g−1 after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g−1 at 5 A g−1 (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future. PMID:25583370

  1. Flagellar filament bio-templated inorganic oxide materials - towards an efficient lithium battery anode.

    PubMed

    Beznosov, Sergei N; Veluri, Pavan S; Pyatibratov, Mikhail G; Chatterjee, Abhijit; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Fedorov, Oleg V; Mitra, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Designing a new generation of energy-intensive and sustainable electrode materials for batteries to power a variety of applications is an imperative task. The use of biomaterials as a nanosized structural template for these materials has the potential to produce hitherto unachievable structures. In this report, we have used genetically modified flagellar filaments of the extremely halophilic archaea species Halobacterium salinarum to synthesize nanostructured iron oxide composites for use as a lithium-ion battery anode. The electrode demonstrated a superior electrochemical performance compared to existing literature results, with good capacity retention of 1032 mAh g(-1) after 50 cycles and with high rate capability, delivering 770 mAh g(-1) at 5 A g(-1) (~5 C) discharge rate. This unique flagellar filament based template has the potential to provide access to other highly structured advanced energy materials in the future. PMID:25583370

  2. A novel flagellar sheath protein, FcpA, determines filament coiling, translational motility and virulence for the Leptospira spirochete.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Elsio A; Figueira, Cláudio P; Benaroudj, Nadia; Hu, Bo; Tong, Brian A; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Liu, Jun; Reis, Mitermayer G; Charon, Nyles W; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Picardeau, Mathieu; Ko, Albert I

    2016-08-01

    Leptospira are unique among bacteria based on their helical cell morphology with hook-shaped ends and the presence of periplasmic flagella (PF) with pronounced spontaneous supercoiling. The factors that provoke such supercoiling, as well as the role that PF coiling plays in generating the characteristic hook-end cell morphology and motility, have not been elucidated. We have now identified an abundant protein from the pathogen L. interrogans, exposed on the PF surface, and named it Flagellar-coiling protein A (FcpA). The gene encoding FcpA is highly conserved among Leptospira and was not found in other bacteria. fcpA(-) mutants, obtained from clinical isolates or by allelic exchange, had relatively straight, smaller-diameter PF, and were not able to produce translational motility. These mutants lost their ability to cause disease in the standard hamster model of leptospirosis. Complementation of fcpA restored the wild-type morphology, motility and virulence phenotypes. In summary, we identified a novel Leptospira 36-kDa protein, the main component of the spirochete's PF sheath, and a key determinant of the flagella's coiled structure. FcpA is essential for bacterial translational motility and to enable the spirochete to penetrate the host, traverse tissue barriers, disseminate to cause systemic infection and reach target organs. PMID:27113476

  3. Bio-Hybrid Micro/Nanodevices Powered by Flagellar Motor: Challenges and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Tung, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Molecular motors, which are precision engineered by nature, offer exciting possibilities for bio-hybrid engineered systems. They could enable real applications ranging from micro/nano fluidics, to biosensing, to medical diagnoses. This review describes the fundamental biological insights and fascinating potentials of these remarkable sensing and actuation machines, in particular, bacterial flagellar motors, as well as their engineering perspectives with regard to applications in bio-engineered hybrid systems. PMID:26284237

  4. Tbx16 regulates hox gene activation in mesodermal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Payumo, Alexander Y; McQuade, Lindsey E; Walker, Whitney J; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor T-box 16 (Tbx16, or Spadetail) is an essential regulator of paraxial mesoderm development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Mesodermal progenitor cells (MPCs) fail to differentiate into trunk somites in tbx16 mutants and instead accumulate within the tailbud in an immature state. However, the mechanisms by which Tbx16 controls mesoderm patterning have remained enigmatic. We describe here the use of photoactivatable morpholino oligonucleotides to determine the Tbx16 transcriptome in MPCs. We identified 124 Tbx16-regulated genes that were expressed in zebrafish gastrulae, including several developmental signaling proteins and regulators of gastrulation, myogenesis and somitogenesis. Unexpectedly, we observed that a loss of Tbx16 function precociously activated posterior hox genes in MPCs, and overexpression of a single posterior hox gene was sufficient to disrupt MPC migration. Our studies support a model in which Tbx16 regulates the timing of collinear hox gene activation to coordinate the anterior-posterior fates and positions of paraxial MPCs. PMID:27376691

  5. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold.

    PubMed

    Beeby, Morgan; Ribardo, Deborah A; Brennan, Caitlin A; Ruby, Edward G; Jensen, Grant J; Hendrixson, David R

    2016-03-29

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes. PMID:26976588

  6. Flagellar phenotypic plasticity in volvocalean algae correlates with Péclet number.

    PubMed

    Solari, Cristian A; Drescher, Knut; Ganguly, Sujoy; Kessler, John O; Michod, Richard E; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2011-10-01

    Flagella-generated fluid stirring has been suggested to enhance nutrient uptake for sufficiently large micro-organisms, and to have played a role in evolutionary transitions to multicellularity. A corollary to this predicted size-dependent benefit is a propensity for phenotypic plasticity in the flow-generating mechanism to appear in large species under nutrient deprivation. We examined four species of volvocalean algae whose radii and flow speeds differ greatly, with Péclet numbers (Pe) separated by several orders of magnitude. Populations of unicellular Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and one- to eight-celled Gonium pectorale (Pe ∼ 0.1-1) and multicellular Volvox carteri and Volvox barberi (Pe ∼ 100) were grown in diluted and undiluted media. For C. reinhardtii and G. pectorale, decreasing the nutrient concentration resulted in smaller cells, but had no effect on flagellar length and propulsion force. In contrast, these conditions induced Volvox colonies to grow larger and increase their flagellar length, separating the somatic cells further. Detailed studies on V. carteri found that the opposing effects of increasing beating force and flagellar spacing balance, so the fluid speed across the colony surface remains unchanged between nutrient conditions. These results lend further support to the hypothesized link between the Péclet number, nutrient uptake and the evolution of biological complexity in the Volvocales. PMID:21367778

  7. Correlation between Supercoiling and Conformational Motions of the Bacterial Flagellar Filament

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Andreas M.; Unruh, Tobias; Namba, Keiichi; Samatey, Fadel; Zaccai, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar filament is a very large macromolecular assembly of a single protein, flagellin. Various supercoiled states of the filament exist, which are formed by two structurally different conformations of flagellin in different ratios. We investigated the correlation between supercoiling of the protofilaments and molecular dynamics in the flagellar filament using quasielastic and elastic incoherent neutron scattering on the picosecond and nanosecond timescales. Thermal fluctuations in the straight L- and R-type filaments were measured and compared to the resting state of the wild-type filament. Amplitudes of motion on the picosecond timescale were found to be similar in the different conformational states. Mean-square displacements and protein resilience on the 0.1 ns timescale demonstrate that the L-type state is more flexible and less resilient than the R-type, whereas the wild-type state lies in between. Our results provide strong support that supercoiling of the protofilaments in the flagellar filament is determined by the strength of molecular forces in and between the flagellin subunits. PMID:24209861

  8. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Ribardo, Deborah A.; Brennan, Caitlin A.; Ruby, Edward G.; Jensen, Grant J.; Hendrixson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes. PMID:26976588

  9. Selective Purification of Recombinant Neuroactive Peptides Using the Flagellar Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Hanna M.; Erhardt, Marc; Steiner, Andrew M.; Zhang, Min-Min; Yoshikami, Doju; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Hughes, Kelly T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The structure, assembly, and function of the bacterial flagellum involves about 60 different proteins, many of which are selectively secreted via a specific type III secretion system (T3SS) (J. Frye et al., J. Bacteriol. 188:2233–2243, 2006). The T3SS is reported to secrete proteins at rates of up to 10,000 amino acid residues per second. In this work, we showed that the flagellar T3SS of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium could be manipulated to export recombinant nonflagellar proteins through the flagellum and into the surrounding medium. We translationally fused various neuroactive peptides and proteins from snails, spiders, snakes, sea anemone, and bacteria to the flagellar secretion substrate FlgM. We found that all tested peptides of various sizes were secreted via the bacterial flagellar T3SS. We subsequently purified the recombinant μ-conotoxin SIIIA (rSIIIA) from Conus striatus by affinity chromatography and confirmed that T3SS-derived rSIIIA inhibited mammalian voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.2 comparably to chemically synthesized SIIIA. PMID:22647788

  10. Flagellar Biosynthesis Exerts Temporal Regulation of Secretion of Specific Campylobacter jejuni Colonization and Virulence Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Barrero-Tobon, Angelica M.; Hendrixson, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The Campylobacter jejuni flagellum exports both proteins that form the flagellar organelle for swimming motility and colonization and virulence factors that promote commensal colonization of the avian intestinal tract or invasion of human intestinal cells, respectively. We explored how the C. jejuni flagellum is a versatile secretory organelle by examining molecular determinants that allow colonization and virulence factors to exploit the flagellum for their own secretion. Flagellar biogenesis was observed to exert temporal control of secretion of these proteins, indicating that a bolus of secretion of colonization and virulence factors occurs during hook biogenesis with filament polymerization itself reducing secretion of these factors. Furthermore, we found that intramolecular and intermolecular requirements for flagellar-dependent secretion of these proteins were most reminiscent to those for flagellin secretion. Importantly, we discovered that secretion of one colonization and virluence factor, CiaI, was not required for invasion of human colonic cells, which counters previous hypotheses for how this protein functions during invasion. Instead, secretion of CiaI was essential for C. jejuni to facilitate commensal colonization of the natural avian host. Our work provides insight into the versatility of the bacterial flagellum as a secretory machine that can export proteins promoting diverse biological processes. PMID:25041103