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Sample records for flame photometry

  1. Iontophoresis and Flame Photometry: A Hybrid Interdisciplinary Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Duncan; Cottam, Linzi; Bradley, Sarah; Brannigan, Jeanie; Davis, James

    2010-01-01

    The combination of reverse iontophoresis and flame photometry provides an engaging analytical experiment that gives first-year undergraduate students a flavor of modern drug delivery and analyte extraction techniques while reinforcing core analytical concepts. The experiment provides a highly visual demonstration of the iontophoresis technique and…

  2. Releasing effects in flame photometry: Determination of calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinnin, J.I.

    1960-01-01

    Strontium, lanthanum, neodymium, samarium, and yttrium completely release the flame emission of calcium from the depressive effects of sulfate, phosphate, and aluminate. Magnesium, beryllium, barium, and scandium release most of the calcium emission. These cations, when present in high concentration, preferentially form compounds with the depressing anions when the solution is evaporated rapidly in the flame. The mechanism of the interference and releasing effects is explained on the basis of the chemical equilibria in the evaporating droplets of solution and is shown to depend upon the nature of the compounds present in the aqueous phase of the solution. The need for background correction techniques is stressed. The releasing effect is used in the determination of calcium in silicate rocks without the need for separations.

  3. A new principle applied to the determination of calcium in biological materials by flame photometry.

    PubMed

    FAWCETT, J K; WYNN, V

    1961-09-01

    The effect of magnesium sulphate in releasing calcium emission from interference by phosphate and sulphate has been investigated. Samples were diluted in 10 mM MgSO(4), 2 mM NaCl, giving final calcium concentrations of about 0.05 to 0.10 mM. In this diluent, galvanometer readings were proportional to calcium concentrations up to 0.4 mM. The magnesium sulphate released calcium emission from depression by phosphate and sulphate. The excess sodium chloride eliminated enhancement of calcium emission by added sodium and potassium in the sample. Subtraction of background readings excluded direct interference.A 3% correction was made for the effect of the viscosity of 1: 50 plasma dilutions. Satisfactory recoveries of added calcium were obtained from plasma, urine, and faeces using the diluent described above. Results on urine and faeces correlated closely with those obtained by an EDTA titration method. Results on plasma were consistently 2% higher by flame photometry than by EDTA titration. Other methods of calcium determination, depending on the use of radiation buffers or standard addition, were found to be unsatisfactory because of variable interference by phosphate at different calcium levels. PMID:13891877

  4. FLame

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-03-03

    FLAME is data processing software explicitly written to support the ACAP software of DSP Technologies, Inc., of Fremont, CA. ACAP acquires and processes in-cylinder pressure data for reciprocating engines. However, it also has the capability to acquire data for two Sandia-developed technologies, ionization-probe instrumented head gaskets and fiber-optic instrumented spark plugs. FLAME post processes measurements of flame arrival from data files aquired with ACAP. Flame arrival time is determined from analog ionization-probe or visible-emission signals.more »The resulting data files are integrated with the standard ACAP files, providing a common data base for engine development.« less

  5. The application of separated flames in analytical flame spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kirkbright, G F; West, T S

    1968-07-01

    Premixed hydrocarbon-air flames invariably show two separate reaction zones. In the primary zone, the combustible gas mixture burns principally to carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and water, and in the outer mantle, or secondary diffusion flame, the hot gases burn with atmospheric oxygen to carbon dioxide and water. Teclu [J. Prakt. Chem. 44, 246 (1891)] and Smithells and Ingle [Trans. Chem. Soc. 61, 204 (1892)] independently demonstrated the existence of these two zones in various premixed hydrocarbon-air flames, using the flame separator. This device consists of a wide glass or silica tube fitted over the bunsen type burner to form an extension above the inner burner port. The primary combustion then occurs at the inner burner port, while the pale blue secondary diffusion flame is maintained at the top of the outer glass tube. An alternative method of separation of premixed hydrocarbon-air flames consists of sheathing the flame with an inert gas to lift off or separate the secondary diffusonzone. The interconal zone of flames separated by these methods are extended in length and exhibit very low radiative background. The interconal zone also contains the hottest part of the flame, and can be viewed without interference from radiation produced in a secondary diffusion zone that would normally surround it in separated flames. It is the hot interconal zone of premixed flames that is most frequently employed in analytical flame photometry, because it is in this region that the greatest population of atoms occurs when elements are introduced into the flame by nebulization of solutions of their salts. Thus, separated flames may be employed with advantage in thermal emission, atomic absorption, and atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. This paper describes the separation of the air-acetylene and nitrous oxide-acetylene flames, and some applications of these flames in analytical flame spectroscopy. PMID:20068791

  6. Simultaneous determination of organotin compounds in textiles by gas chromatography-flame photometry following liquid/liquid partitioning with tert-butyl ethyl ether after reflux-extraction.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Tetsuo

    2013-10-15

    A rapid and relatively clean method for determining six organotin compounds (OtC) in textile goods with a gas chromatograph equipped with a conventional flame photometric detector (GC-FPD) has been developed. After the reflux-extraction to use methanol containing 1% (v/v) of hydrochloric acid, five hydrophobic OtC (e.g. tributyltin: TBT) and slightly less hydrophobic dibutyltin (DBT) could be drawn out through partitioning between the methanolic buffer solution and tert-butyl ethyl ether instead of hazardous dichloromethane, of which usage is provided by the official-methods notified in Japan, and following the ethylation procedure to use sodium tetraethylborate, the OtC were determined with the GC-FPD. The recoveries of DBT, TBT, tetrabutyltin, triphenyltin, dioctyltin, and trioctyltin from textile products (cloth diaper, socks, and undershirt) were 60-77, 89-98, 86-94, 71-78, 85-109, and 70-79% respectively, and their coefficients of variation were 2.5-16.5%. Calibration curves for OtC were linear (0.01-0.20 ?g as Sn mL(-1)), and the correlation coefficients were 0.9922-1.0000. Their detection limits were estimated to be 2.7-9.7 n gas Sn g(-1). These data suggested that this method would be applicable to their simultaneous determination. Five retailed textile goods were analyzed by this proposed method, and 0.013-0.65 µg as Sn g(-1) of OtC (e.g. DBT) were determined in three. Moreover, a possibility that various OtC including non-targeted species in textile would be specifically detected by applying the studying speciation-technique of controlling signal intensity-flame fuel gas pressures of the GC-FPD was found. PMID:24054605

  7. Basics of Photometry Photometry: Basic Questions

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    Basics of Photometry #12;Photometry: Basic Questions · How do you identify objects in your image type of object you're studying? #12;#12;#12;Topics 1. General Considerations 2. Stellar Photometry 3. Galaxy Photometry #12;I: General Considerations 1. Garbage in, garbage out... 2. Object Detection 3

  8. Flame Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromer, Alan

    1983-01-01

    When salt (NaCl) is introduced into a colorless flame, a bright yellow light (characteristic of sodium) is produced. Why doesn't the chlorine produce a characteristic color of light? The answer to this question is provided, indicating that the flame does not excite the appropriate energy levels in chlorine. (JN)

  9. Stellar Populations Surface photometry

    E-print Network

    Kruit, Piet van der

    Outline Stellar Populations Surface photometry Luminosity distributions Component separation Surface photometry Luminosity distributions Component separation Photometric parameters Elliptical photometry Luminosity distributions Bulge luminosity laws Luminosity distributions in disks Component

  10. Flame Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Scientific Instruments, Inc. has now developed a second generation, commercially available instrument to detect flames in hazardous environments, typically refineries, chemical plants and offshore drilling platforms. The Model 74000 detector incorporates a sensing circuit that detects UV radiation in a 100 degree conical field of view extending as far as 250 feet from the instrument. It operates in a bandwidth that makes it virtually 'blind' to solar radiation while affording extremely high sensitivity to ultraviolet flame detection. A 'windowing' technique accurately discriminates between background UV radiation and ultraviolet emitted from an actual flame, hence the user is assured of no false alarms. Model 7410CP is a combination controller and annunciator panel designed to monitor and control as many as 24 flame detectors. *Model 74000 is no longer being manufactured.

  11. Flames in vortices & tulip-flame inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dold, J. W.

    This article summarises two areas of research regarding the propagation of flames in flows which involve significant fluid-dynamical motion [1]-[3]. The major difference between the two is that in the first study the fluid motion is present before the arrival of any flame and remains unaffected by the flame [1, 2] while, in the second study it is the flame that is responsible for all of the fluid dynamical effects [3]. It is currently very difficult to study flame-motion in which the medium is both highly disturbed before the arrival of a flame and is further influenced by the passage of the flame.

  12. Triple flame structure and diffusion flame stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veynante, D.; Vervisch, L.; Poinsot, T.; Linan, A.; Ruetsch, G.

    1994-01-01

    The stabilization of diffusion flames is studied using asymptotic techniques and numerical tools. The configuration studied corresponds to parallel streams of cold oxidizer and fuel initially separated by a splitter plate. It is shown that stabilization of a diffusion flame may only occur in this situation by two processes. First, the flame may be stabilized behind the flame holder in the wake of the splitter plate. For this case, numerical simulations confirm scalings previously predicted by asymptotic analysis. Second, the flame may be lifted. In this case a triple flame is found at longer distances downstream of the flame holder. The structure and propagation speed of this flame are studied by using an actively controlled numerical technique in which the triple flame is tracked in its own reference frame. It is then possible to investigate the triple flame structure and velocity. It is shown, as suggested from asymptotic analysis, that heat release may induce displacement speeds of the triple flame larger than the laminar flame speed corresponding to the stoichiometric conditions prevailing in the mixture approaching the triple flame. In addition to studying the characteristics of triple flames in a uniform flow, their resistance to turbulence is investigated by subjecting triple flames to different vortical configurations.

  13. Surface photometry STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES

    E-print Network

    Kruit, Piet van der

    Outline Surface photometry Dynamics Formation STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES 9. Elliptical galaxies Piet van van der Kruit, Kapteyn Astronomical Institute Elliptical galaxies #12;Outline Surface photometry Dynamics Formation Outline Surface photometry Luminosity distributions Shells and ripples Color gradients

  14. Aerodynamics of Laminar Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Chung K.

    2000-11-01

    The presentation will review recent advances in the understanding of the structure, dynamics, and geometry of stretched, nonequidiffusive, laminar premixed flames, as exemplified by the unsteady propagation of wrinkled flames in nonuniform flow fields. It is first shown that by considering the effects of aerodynamic stretch on the flame structure, and by allowing for mixture nonequidiffusion, the flame responses, especially the flame propagation speed, can be quantitatively as well as qualitatively modified from the idealized planar limit. Subsequently, by treating the flame as a level surface propagating with the stretch-affected flame speed, problems of increasing complexity are presented to illustrate various features of flame propagation. The illustration first treats the flame as a structureless surface propagating into a constant-density combustible with a constant velocity * the laminar flame speed, and demonstrates the phenomena of cusp formation and volumetric burning rate augmentation through flame wrinkling. By using the stretch-affected flame speed, we then describe the phenomena of cusp broadening as well as tip opening of the Bunsen flame. Finally, by allowing for the density jump across the flame surface, a unified dispersion relation is derived for the intrinsic hydrodynamic, body-force, and nonequidiffusive modes of flame

  15. The Science of Flames.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornia, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Describes an exercise using flames that allows students to explore the complexities of a seemingly simple phenomenon, the lighting of a candle. Contains a foldout that provides facts about natural gas flames and suggestions for classroom use. (ZWH)

  16. Galaxy surface photometry

    E-print Network

    Bo Milvang-Jensen; Inger Jorgensen

    2000-04-04

    We describe galaxy surface photometry based on fitting ellipses to the isophotes of the galaxies. Example galaxies with different isophotal shapes are used to illustrate the process, including how the deviations from elliptical isophotes are quantified using Fourier expansions. We show how the definitions of the Fourier coefficients employed by different authors are linked. As examples of applications of surface photometry we discuss the determination of the relative disk luminosities and the inclinations for E and S0 galaxies. We also describe the color-magnitude and color-color relations. When using both near-infrared and optical photometry, the age-metallicity degeneracy may be broken. Finally we discuss the Fundamental Plane where surface photometry is combined with spectroscopy. It is shown how the FP can be used as a sensitive tool to study galaxy evolution.

  17. THREE DIMENSIONAL FLAME PROPAGATION

    E-print Network

    Heydari, Payam

    & Velocity Vectors ­ Slow Flame Phase 1g, t=2.0s, z=0. Recirculation zone forms allowing fuel vapor accumulation. #12;Temperature Contours & Velocity Vectors ­ Fast Flame Phase 1g, t=1.8s, z=0. LessTHREE DIMENSIONAL FLAME PROPAGATION ABOVE LIQUID FUEL POOLS By Jinsheng Cai, Feng Liu, and William

  18. Flame Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Heidi L. (Inventor); Smith, Harvey S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for imaging a flame and the background scene is discussed. The flame imaging system consists of two charge-coupled-device (CCD) cameras. One camera uses a 800 nm long pass filter which during overcast conditions blocks sufficient background light so the hydrogen flame is brighter than the background light, and the second CCD camera uses a 1100 nm long pass filter, which blocks the solar background in full sunshine conditions such that the hydrogen flame is brighter than the solar background. Two electronic viewfinders convert the signal from the cameras into a visible image. The operator can select the appropriate filtered camera to use depending on the current light conditions. In addition, a narrow band pass filtered InGaAs sensor at 1360 nm triggers an audible alarm and a flashing LED if the sensor detects a flame, providing additional flame detection so the operator does not overlook a small flame.

  19. Prediction of flame velocities of hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L; Simon, Dorothy M

    1954-01-01

    The laminar-flame-velocity data previously reported by the Lewis Laboratory are surveyed with respect to the correspondence between experimental flame velocities and values predicted by semitheoretical and empirical methods. The combustible mixture variables covered are hydrocarbon structure (56 hydrocarbons), equivalence ratio of fuel-air mixture, mole fraction of oxygen in the primary oxygen-nitrogen mixture (0.17 to 0.50), and initial mixture temperature (200 degrees to 615 degrees k). The semitheoretical method of prediction considered are based on three approximate theoretical equations for flame velocity: the Semenov equation, the Tanford-Pease equation, and the Manson equation.

  20. On the Flame Height Definition for Upward Flame Spread 

    E-print Network

    Consalvi, Jean L; Pizzo, Yannick; Porterie, Bernard; Torero, Jose L

    2007-01-01

    Flame height is defined by the experimentalists as the average position of the luminous flame and, consequently is not directly linked with a quantitative value of a physical parameter. To determine flame heights from ...

  1. Flame front geometry in premixed turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, I.G. ); Ashurst, W.T. )

    1991-12-01

    Experimental and numerical determinations of flame front curvature and orientation in premixed turbulent flames are presented. The experimental data is obtained from planar, cross sectional images of stagnation point flames at high Damkoehler number. A direct numerical simulation of a constant energy flow is combined with a zero-thickness, constant density flame model to provide the numerical results. The computational domain is a 32{sup 3} cube with periodic boundary conditions. The two-dimensional curvature distributions of the experiments and numerical simulations compare well at similar q{prime}/S{sub L} values with means close to zero and marked negative skewness. At higher turbulence levels the simulations show that the distributions become symmetric about zero. These features are also found in the three dimensional distributions of curvature. The simulations support assumptions which make it possible to determine the mean direction cosines from the experimental data. This leads to a reduction of 12% in the estimated flame surface area density in the middle of the flame brush. 18 refs.

  2. Flame Holder System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Henry H. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A flame holder system includes a modified torch body and a ceramic flame holder. Catch pin(s) are coupled to and extend radially out from the torch body. The ceramic flame holder has groove(s) formed in its inner wall that correspond in number and positioning to the catch pin(s). Each groove starts at one end of the flame holder and can be shaped to define at least two 90.degree.turns. Each groove is sized to receive one catch pin therein when the flame holder is fitted over the end of the torch body. The flame holder is then manipulated until the catch pin(s) butt up against the end of the groove(s).

  3. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  4. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  5. Acoustic coupling of flames

    SciTech Connect

    Van Harten, A.; Kapila, A.K.; Matkowsky, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    In the limits of large activation energy and small Mach number, the full equations of reactive gas dynamics are reduced to a simpler set which is appropriate for studying acoustic interaction with slender flames. The model is used to study the interaction of a plane, steady flame with a normally incident acoustic wave. Explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the reflection and transmission coefficients, and, in two limiting cases, for the acoustically induced disturbance in the flame speed. 6 references.

  6. Theory of flame propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldovich, Y B

    1951-01-01

    The mechanism of flame propagation has been qualitatively formulated. In accordance with this formulation, the chemical reaction initiated in some layer brings about an increase in the temperature; because of the heat conduction, the temperature is raised in the neighboring layer where in turn the chemical reaction is initiated. In this manner the flame is propagated.

  7. Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) belong to a large class of compounds known as organohalogens. BFRs are currently the largest marketed flame retardant group due to their high performance efficiency and low cost. In the commercial market, more than 75 different BFRs are recogniz...

  8. X-ray photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. J.

    2015-09-01

    I describe a method for synthesizing photometric passbands for use with current and future X-ray instruments. The method permits the standardization of X-ray passbands and thus X-ray photometry between different instruments and missions. The method is illustrated by synthesizing a passband in the XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera pn which is similar to the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter 0.5-2 keV band.

  9. ARCHANGEL: Galaxy Photometry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schombert, James

    2011-07-01

    ARCHANGEL is a Unix-based package for the surface photometry of galaxies. While oriented for large angular size systems (i.e. many pixels), its tools can be applied to any imaging data of any size. The package core contains routines to perform the following critical galaxy photometry functions: sky determinationframe cleaningellipse fittingprofile fittingtotal and isophotal magnitudes The goal of the package is to provide an automated, assembly-line type of reduction system for galaxy photometry of space-based or ground-based imaging data. The procedures outlined in the documentation are flux independent, thus, these routines can be used for non-optical data as well as typical imaging datasets. ARCHANGEL has been tested on several current OS's (RedHat Linux, Ubuntu Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X). A tarball for installation is available at the download page. The main routines are Python and FORTRAN based, therefore, a current installation of Python and a FORTRAN compiler are required. The ARCHANGEL package also contains Python hooks to the PGPLOT package, an XML processor and network tools which automatically link to data archives (i.e. NED, HST, 2MASS, etc) to download images in a non-interactive manner.

  10. Third Workshop on Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J. (Editor); Lasher, Lawrence E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The discoveries of extrasolar planets by Wolszczan, Mayor and Queloz, Butler et al., and others have stimulated a widespread effort to obtain a body of data sufficient to understand their occurrence and characteristics. Doppler velocity techniques have found dozens of extrasolar planets with masses similar to that of Jupiter. Approximately ten percent of the stars that show planets with orbital periods of a few days to a week are expected to show transits. With the mass obtained from Doppler velocity measurements and the size from transit photometry, the densities of the planets can be determined. Theoretical models of the structure of "hot Jupiters" (i.e., those planets within a tenth of an astronomical unit (AU) of the parent star) indicate that these planets should be substantially larger in size and lower in density than Jupiter. Thus the combination of transit and Doppler velocity measurements provide a critical test of the theories of planetary structure. Furthermore, because photometry can be done with small-aperture telescopes rather than requiring the use of much larger telescopes, transit photometry should also reduce the cost of discovering extrasolar planets.

  11. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z. G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue CO2 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smokepoint conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smokepoint conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  12. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue C02 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smoke-point conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smoke-point conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous-flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  13. Flame-resistant textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogg, L. C.; Stringham, R. S.; Toy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Flame resistance treatment for acid resistant polyamide fibers involving photoaddition of fluorocarbons to surface has been scaled up to treat 10 yards of commercial width (41 in.) fabric. Process may be applicable to other low cost polyamides, polyesters, and textiles.

  14. DETAIL VIEW IN THE FLAME TRENCH LOOKING NORTH, FLAME DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW IN THE FLAME TRENCH LOOKING NORTH, FLAME DEFLECTOR IN THE FOREGROUND, WATER PIPES AND VALVE ASSEMBLIES ON THE FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  15. Flame Interactions in Turbulent Premixed Twin V-flames

    E-print Network

    Dunstan, T. D.; Swaminathan, N.; Bray, K. N. C.; Kingsbury, N. G.

    2013-01-16

    remains challenging. The sensitivity of these flames to small fluctuations in temperature or composition, and their susceptibility to thermo-acoustic instabilities present difficulties to the modelling and design of lean combustion sys- tems. The role... ., 2005) flames. The flame’s sensitivity to the local thermo-chemical state can also lead to thermo-acoustic instabilities due to coupling between the pressure perturbations and rate of heat release (Balachandran et al., 2005). In addition, novel low...

  16. A Dramatic Flame Test Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kristin A.; Schreiner, Rodney

    2001-01-01

    Flame tests are used for demonstration of atomic structure. Describes a demonstration that uses spray bottles filled with methanol and a variety of salts to produce a brilliantly colored flame. (Contains 11 references.) (ASK)

  17. Flame retardant spandex type polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (inventors)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions were developed, comprised of: (1) spandex type polyurethane having incorporated into the polymer chain, halogen containing polyols; (2) conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture flame retardant additives; and (3) fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives. Methods of preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials are presented and articles of manufacture comprised of the elastomeric materials are mentioned.

  18. NOX FORMATION IN CO FLAMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental study to determine if early NO and NO2 can be observed in CO flames, since prompt NO is not anticipated and since HO2 levels might be expected to be lower in CO flames. (Previous studies of NO and NO2 production in methane flames with a...

  19. Triaxial Burke-Schumann Flames with Applications to Flame Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. H.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Gokoglu, Suleyman (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The problem of a flame generated by three coaxial flows is solved by extending the Burke-Schumann methodology to include a third stream. The solution is particularly relevant to flame synthesis wherein multiple tubes are often employed either to introduce inert as a diffusion barrier or to introduce more than two reactants. The general problem is solved where the inner and outer tubes contain reactants and the middle tube contains either an inert or a third reactant. Relevant examples are considered and the results show that the triaxial Burke-Schumann flame can be substantially more complicated than the traditional Burke-Schumann flame. When the middle flow is inert the flame temperature is no longer constant but increases axially, reaching a maximum at the flame centerline. At the exit the flame does not sit on the tube exit but instead resides between the inner and outer tubes, resulting in an effective barrier for particle build-up on the burner rim. For the case of a third reactant in the middle flow, synthesis chemistry where the inner reaction is endothermic and the outer reaction is exothermic is considered. In addition to showing the flame temperature and flame shape, the results identify conditions wherein reaction is not possible due to insufficient heat transfer from the outer flame to support the inner flame reaction.

  20. Introduction Observations PSF fitting Photometry Results Defocused PSF-fitting Photometry

    E-print Network

    Pinfield, David J.

    Introduction Observations PSF fitting Photometry Results Defocused PSF-fitting Photometry Ro Parviainen Defocused PSF-fitting Photometry #12;Introduction Observations PSF fitting Photometry Results 1 Introduction The light curve Defocused PSF 2 Observations Observations 3 PSF fitting Photometry PSF model 1 PSF

  1. Precision photometry for planetary transits

    E-print Network

    Frederic Pont; Claire Moutou

    2007-02-06

    We review the state of the art in follow-up photometry for planetary transit searches. Three topics are discussed: (1) Photometric monitoring of planets discovered by radial velocity to detect possible transits (2) Follow-up photometry of candidates from photometric transit searches to weed out eclipsing binaries and false positives (3) High-precision lightcurves of known transiting planets to increase the accuracy on the planet parameters.

  2. Visible emission of hydrogen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Schefer, R.W.; Kulatilaka, W.D.; Patterson, B.D.; Settersten, T.B.

    2009-06-15

    The common misconception that hydrogen flames are not visible is examined. Examples are presented of clearly visible emissions from typical hydrogen flames. It is shown that while visible emissions from these flames are considerably weaker than those from comparable hydrocarbon flames, they are indeed visible, albeit at reduced light levels in most cases. Detailed flame spectra are presented to characterize flame emission bands in the ultraviolet, visible and infrared regions of the spectrum that result in a visible hydrogen flame. The visible blue emission is emphasized, and recorded spectra indicate that fine spectral structure is superimposed on a broadband continuum extending from the ultraviolet into the visible region. Tests were performed to show that this emission does not arise from carbon or nitrogen chemistry resulting from carbon-containing impurities (hydrocarbons) in the hydrogen fuel or from CO{sub 2} or N{sub 2} entrainment from the surrounding air. The spectral structure, however, is also observed in methane flames. The magnitude of the broadband emission increases with flame temperature in a highly nonlinear manner while the finer spectral structure is insensitive to temperature. A comparison of diffusion and premixed H{sub 2} flames shows that the fine scale structure is comparable in both flames. (author)

  3. "Magic Eraser" Flame Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, Arthur M.; Davies, Malonne I.; Landis, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Cleaning erasers are used to support methanol-fueled flame tests. This safe demonstration technique requires only small quantities of materials, provides clean colors for up to 45 seconds, and can be used in the classroom or the auditorium. (Contains 1 note.)

  4. Direct Flame Impingement

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    During the DFI process, high velocity flame jets impinge upon the material being heated, creating a high heat transfer rate. As a result, refractory walls and exhaust gases are cooler, which increases thermal efficiency and lowers NOx emissions. Because the jet nozzles are located a few inches from the load, furnace size can be reduced significantly.

  5. Incomplete combustion in nonadiabatic premixed gas flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, L.; Sivashinsky, G.

    1996-06-01

    The inward propagating spherical flame and burner stabilized Bunsen-type flame of low-Lewis-number premixtures are studied numerically. It is shown that reduction of the reaction rate induced by the flame stretch makes the flame vulnerable to the radiative heat losses which may well result in a partial or complete extinction of the flame.

  6. Incomplete combustion in nonadiabatic premixed gas flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, L.; Sivashinsky, G.

    1996-06-01

    The inward propagating spherical flame and burner stabilized Bunsen-type flame of low-Lewis-number premixtures are studied numerically. It is shown that reduction of the reaction rate induced by the flame stretch makes the flame vulnerable to the radiative heat losses which may well result in a partial or complete extinction of the flame. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Flame brush characteristics and burning velocities of premixed turbulent methane/air Bunsen flames

    E-print Network

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Flame brush characteristics and burning velocities of premixed turbulent methane/air Bunsen flames: Premixed turbulent flames Flame brush thickness Turbulent burning velocity a b s t r a c t The flame brush characteristics and turbulent burning velocities of premixed turbulent methane/air flames stabilized on a Bunsen

  8. Photometric Redshifts and Photometry Errors

    E-print Network

    D. Wittman; P. Riechers; V. E. Margoniner

    2007-09-21

    We examine the impact of non-Gaussian photometry errors on photometric redshift performance. We find that they greatly increase the scatter, but this can be mitigated to some extent by incorporating the correct noise model into the photometric redshift estimation process. However, the remaining scatter is still equivalent to that of a much shallower survey with Gaussian photometry errors. We also estimate the impact of non-Gaussian errors on the spectroscopic sample size required to verify the photometric redshift rms scatter to a given precision. Even with Gaussian {\\it photometry} errors, photometric redshift errors are sufficiently non-Gaussian to require an order of magnitude larger sample than simple Gaussian statistics would indicate. The requirements increase from this baseline if non-Gaussian photometry errors are included. Again the impact can be mitigated by incorporating the correct noise model, but only to the equivalent of a survey with much larger Gaussian photometry errors. However, these requirements may well be overestimates because they are based on a need to know the rms, which is particularly sensitive to tails. Other parametrizations of the distribution may require smaller samples.

  9. Detection by Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Jenkins, Jon M.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A periodic sequence of planetary transits provides a valid detection of an orbiting planet and provides the relative size of the planet and its orbital period. Ancillary measurements of the stellar spectrum and the variations of the star's radial velocity or position combined with stellar models allow the absolute size of the planet and its mass to be obtained. The results of this approach have already shown that the planet orbiting HD209458 has only 70% of the mass of Jupiter, but is nearly 50% larger in radius. Based on models of planetary structure, these results imply that the planet must have spent most of its lifetime so close to the star that it has not been able to cool and contract as have the giant planets in our Solar System. Thus its density is much less than Jupiter and Saturn and is actually less than that of water; i.e., about 0.4 gr/cu cm. If more sensitive measurements of the light curve of stars with closely orbiting planets can be made that provide the varying amplitude of the light reflected by the planet at various phases in its orbit, then characteristics of the planetary atmosphere can be obtained. Potentially, these data can identify major molecular species present in the atmosphere and tell us if clouds are present and yield the phase function of the aerosols. Although such detail cannot be obtained for Earth-size planets because their signal amplitudes are too small, it is possible to get data critical to the determination of the structure of extrasolar planetary systems. In particular, the size distributions and their orbital distributions can be measured by the transit photometry missions now in development. The COROT mission should be able to find large terrestrial planets in short-period orbits while the more ambitious Kepler and Eddington missions should be able to detect planets even smaller than the Earth and at orbital distances that place them in the habitable zone of their stars.

  10. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  11. Japan's research on gaseous flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niioka, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    Although research studies on gaseous flames in microgravity in Japan have not been one-sided, they have been limited, for the most part, to comparatively fundamental studies. At present it is only possible to achieve a microgravity field by the use of drop towers, as far as gaseous flames are concerned. Compared with experiments on droplets, including droplet arrays, which have been vigorously performed in Japan, studies on gaseous flames have just begun. Experiments on ignition of gaseous fuel, flammability limits, flame stability, effect of magnetic field on flames, and carbon formation from gaseous flames are currently being carried out in microgravity. Seven subjects related to these topics are introduced and discussed herein.

  12. Candle Flames in Non-Buoyant Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; Shu, Y.; Tien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the behavior of a candle flame in a long-duration, quiescent microgravity environment both on the space Shuttle and the Mir Orbiting Station (OS). On the Shuttle, the flames became dim blue after an initial transient where there was significant yellow (presumably soot) in the flame. The flame lifetimes were typically less than 60 seconds. The safety-mandated candlebox that contained the candle flame inhibited oxygen transport to the flame and thus limited the flame lifetime. 'Me flames on the Mir OS were similar, except that the yellow luminosity persisted longer into the flame lifetime because of a higher initial oxygen concentration. The Mir flames burned for as long as 45 minutes. The difference in the flame lifetime between the Shuttle and Mir flames was primarily the redesigned candlebox that did not inhibit oxygen transport to the flame. In both environments, the flame intensity and the height-to-width ratio gradually decreased as the ambient oxygen content in the sealed chamber slowly decreased. Both sets of experiments showed spontaneous, axisymmetric flame oscillations just prior to extinction. The paper also presents a numerical model of candle flame. The model is detailed in the gas-phase, but uses a simplified liquid/wick phase. 'Me model predicts a steady flame with a shape and size quantitatively similar to the Shuttle and Mir flames. ne model also predicts pre-extinction flame oscillations if the decrease in ambient oxygen is small enough.

  13. Second Workshop on Improvements to Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J. (editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers in these proceedings show that a major effort is under way to improve all aspects of photometry. Astronomical multichannel photometry, photodiodes, analog-to-digital converters, data reduction techniques, interference filters and optical fibers are discussed.

  14. Effects of Flame Structure and Hydrodynamics on Soot Particle Inception and Flame Extinction in Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Chen, R.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Liu, S.; Chao, B. H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent studies of the effects of stoichiometric mixture fraction (structure) and hydrodynamics on soot particle inception and flame extinction in diffusion flames. Microgravity experiments are uniquely suited for these studies because, unlike normal gravity experiments, they allow structural and hydrodynamic effects to be independently studied. As part of this recent flight definition program, microgravity studies have been performed in the 2.2 second drop tower. Normal gravity counterflow studies also have been employed and analytical and numerical models have been developed. A goal of this program is to develop sufficient understanding of the effects of flame structure that flames can be "designed" to specifications - consequently, the program name Flame Design. In other words, if a soot-free, strong, low temperature flame is required, can one produce such a flame by designing its structure? Certainly, as in any design, there will be constraints imposed by the properties of the available "materials." For hydrocarbon combustion, the base materials are fuel and air. Additives could be considered, but for this work only fuel, oxygen and nitrogen are considered. Also, the structure of these flames is "designed" by varying the stoichiometric mixture fraction. Following this line of reasoning, the studies described are aimed at developing the understanding of flame structure that is needed to allow for optimum design.

  15. PSF Photometry Lecture April XX 2004

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    PSF Photometry Lecture April XX 2004 Vitaliy Fadeyev Why do PSF-fitting The simple aperture photometry has an assumption of linearly-varying background in the aperture's vicinity. Choice of (optimal Photometry Lecture April XX 2004 Vitaliy Fadeyev Crowded field example Even when nominally well separated

  16. HD 52452: New BVRI Photometry

    E-print Network

    Sudhanshu Barway; S. K. Pandey

    2004-08-19

    In this paper we report the multi-band BVRI photometry of HD 52452. The comparison of our data with previous observations reported by Messina et al. (2001) shows that there is a variation in amplitude, but the phases of the two minima, thus the positions of the spot, are quite stable during our observations.

  17. Photometry of 40 LMC Cepheids

    E-print Network

    N. R. Tanvir; A. Boyle

    1999-07-01

    We present V and I_c CCD photometry for 40 LMC Cepheids at 1 to 3 epochs. This represents a significant increase in the number of LMC Cepheids with $I$-band data, and, as we show, is a useful addition to the sample which can be used to calibrate the period--luminosity relations in these important bands.

  18. Flame Resistant Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Solimide manufactured by Imi-Tech Corporation, is a lightweight fire resistant material produced under a manufacturing process that allows it to be uniformly foamed. Can be produced in a variety of densities and structural configurations and remains resilient under exposure to temperatures ranging from minus 300 to plus 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Is resistant to open flame and generates virtually no smoke or toxic by-products. Used in aircraft for its superior damping characteristics, lighter weight and fire barrier properties, it's also applicable to ships and surface transportation systems such as transit cars, trains, buses and automobiles.

  19. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.K.

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  20. Turbulent Flame Speed and Self Similarity of Expanding Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Zhu, Delin; Law, Chung

    2011-11-01

    In this study we present experimental turbulent flame speed data measured in constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames, propagating in nearly homogenous isotropic turbulence, in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. The cold flow is characterized by high speed particle image velocimetry while the flame propagation rate is obtained by tracking high speed Schlieren images of unity Lewis number methane-air flames over wide ranges of pressure and turbulence intensity. It is found that the normalized turbulent flame speed as a function of the average radius scales as a turbulent Reynolds number to the one-half power, where the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property, thus showing self-similar propagation. Utilizing this dependence it is found that the turbulent flame speeds from expanding flames and those from Bunsen geometries can be scaled by a single parameter: the turbulent Reynolds number utilizing recent theoretical results obtained by spectral closure of the G equation, after correcting for gas expansion effects.

  1. Flame retardant polyphosphazenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Karle, D. W.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Six polyphosphazene compositions were prepared by reaction of three bis-tertiary phosphines with two phenyl-s-triazine derived diazides. All six polyphosphazenes produced were completely characterized, four of them were furthermore subjected to isothermal gravimetric analysis, smoke density measurements, flammability and oxidative thermal degradation testing. The results of the characterization studies indicate that only low molecular weight oligomers, possibly of a cyclic structure, were obtained in the polymerization reactions. Despite this, however, two of the materials showed no weight loss after 96 hr at 200 C, one did not autoignite at 500 C in air, and all four self extinguished when exposed to a flame as soon as contact between flame and resin was lost. The only toxic decomposition products to be concerned about were found to be hydrogen cyanide and benzene. Under the conditions employed it was proven, however, that the quantities of toxic products are greatly reduced if no ignition takes place, e.g., if thermal decomposition proceeds at a sufficiently low rate.

  2. The Cool Flames Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard; Neville, Donna; Sheredy, William; Wu, Ming-Shin; Tornabene, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A space-based experiment is currently under development to study diffusion-controlled, gas-phase, low temperature oxidation reactions, cool flames and auto-ignition in an unstirred, static reactor. At Earth's gravity (1g), natural convection due to self-heating during the course of slow reaction dominates diffusive transport and produces spatio-temporal variations in the thermal and thus species concentration profiles via the Arrhenius temperature dependence of the reaction rates. Natural convection is important in all terrestrial cool flame and auto-ignition studies, except for select low pressure, highly dilute (small temperature excess) studies in small vessels (i.e., small Rayleigh number). On Earth, natural convection occurs when the Rayleigh number (Ra) exceeds a critical value of approximately 600. Typical values of the Ra, associated with cool flames and auto-ignitions, range from 104-105 (or larger), a regime where both natural convection and conduction heat transport are important. When natural convection occurs, it alters the temperature, hydrodynamic, and species concentration fields, thus generating a multi-dimensional field that is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to be modeled analytically. This point has been emphasized recently by Kagan and co-workers who have shown that explosion limits can shift depending on the characteristic length scale associated with the natural convection. Moreover, natural convection in unstirred reactors is never "sufficiently strong to generate a spatially uniform temperature distribution throughout the reacting gas." Thus, an unstirred, nonisothermal reaction on Earth does not reduce to that generated in a mechanically, well-stirred system. Interestingly, however, thermal ignition theories and thermokinetic models neglect natural convection and assume a heat transfer correlation of the form: q=h(S/V)(T(bar) - Tw) where q is the heat loss per unit volume, h is the heat transfer coefficient, S/V is the surface to volume ratio, and (T(bar) - Tw ) is the spatially averaged temperature excess. This Newtonian form has been validated in spatially-uniform, well-stirred reactors, provided the effective heat transfer coefficient associated with the unsteady process is properly evaluated. Unfortunately, it is not a valid assumption for spatially-nonuniform temperature distributions induced by natural convection in unstirred reactors. "This is why the analysis of such a system is so difficult." Historically, the complexities associated with natural convection were perhaps recognized as early as 1938 when thermal ignition theory was first developed. In the 1955 text "Diffusion and Heat Exchange in Chemical Kinetics", Frank-Kamenetskii recognized that "the purely conductive theory can be applied at sufficiently low pressure and small dimensions of the vessel when the influence of natural convection can be disregarded." This was reiterated by Tyler in 1966 and further emphasized by Barnard and Harwood in 1974. Specifically, they state: "It is generally assumed that heat losses are purely conductive. While this may be valid for certain low pressure slow combustion regimes, it is unlikely to be true for the cool flame and ignition regimes." While this statement is true for terrestrial experiments, the purely conductive heat transport assumption is valid at microgravity (mu-g). Specifically, buoyant complexities are suppressed at mu-g and the reaction-diffusion structure associated with low temperature oxidation reactions, cool flames and auto-ignitions can be studied. Without natural convection, the system is simpler, does not require determination of the effective heat transfer coefficient, and is a testbed for analytic and numerical models that assume pure diffusive transport. In addition, mu-g experiments will provide baseline data that will improve our understanding of the effects of natural convection on Earth.

  3. A Flamelet Description of Premixed Laminar Flames and the Relation with Flame Stretch

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    known that flame stretch, caused for instance by local velocity gradients near the flame front, may have1 A Flamelet Description of Premixed Laminar Flames and the Relation with Flame Stretch L.P.H. de description is derived for premixed laminar flames. The full set of 3D instationary combustion equations

  4. Candle Flames in Non-Buoyant Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; Shu, Y.; Chang, P.; Tien, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the behavior of a candle flame in a long-duration, quiescent microgravity environment both on the space Shuttle and the Mir Orbiting Station. On the Shuttle, the flames became dim blue after an initial transient where there was significant yellow (presumably soot) in the flame. The flame lifetimes were typically less than 60 seconds. The safety-mandated candlebox that contained the candle flame inhibited oxygen transport to the flame and thus limited the flame lifetime. The flames on the Mir were similar, except that the yellow luminosity persisted longer into the flame lifetime because of a higher initial oxygen concentration, The Mir flames burned for as long as 45 minutes. The difference in the flame lifetime between the Shuttle and Mir flames was primarily the redesigned candlebox that did not inhibit oxygen transport to the flame. In both environments, the flame intensity and the height-to-width ratio gradually decreased as the ambient oxygen content in the sealed chamber slowly decreased. Both sets of experiments showed spontaneous, axisymmetric flame oscillations just prior to extinction. The paper also presents a numerical model of a candle flame. The formulation is two-dimensional and time-dependent in the gas phase with constant specific heats, thermal conductivity and Lewis number (although different species can have different Lewis numbers), one-step finite-rate kinetics, and gas-phase radiative losses from CO2 and H2O. The treatment of the liquid/wick phase assumes that the, fuel evaporates from a constant diameter sphere connected to an inert cone. The model predicts a steady flame with a shape and size quantitatively similar to the Shuttle and Mir flames. The computation predicts that the flame size will increase slightly with increasing ambient oxygen mole fraction. The model also predicts pre-extinction flame oscillations if the rate of decrease in ambient oxygen is small enough, such as that which would occur for a flame burning in a sealed ambient.

  5. Surface photometry of NGC 3077

    E-print Network

    Hamed Abdel-Hamid; Peter Notni

    2000-11-03

    We present surface photometry of the irregular galaxy NGC 3077 using two data sets: photographic plates and CCD images. Isophotal contours, luminosity and colour distributions as well as position angle and ellipticity curves show that NGC 3077 is similar to an elliptical galaxy in the outer regions with a disturbed blue centre. The outer isophotes 22-25 mag/arcsec^2 are approximately centred on the dynamical centre, the inner ones are disturbed by the dominant contribution of a reddened young population.

  6. Electrical Aspects of Impinging Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yu-Chien

    This dissertation examines the use of electric fields as one mechanism for controlling combustion as flames are partially extinguished when impinging on nearby surfaces. Electrical aspects of flames, specifically, the production of chemi-ions in hydrocarbon flames and the use of convective flows driven by these ions, have been investigated in a wide range of applications in prior work but despite this fairly comprehensive effort to study electrical aspects of combustion, relatively little research has focused on electrical phenomena near flame extinguishment, nor for flames near impingement surfaces. Electrical impinging flames have complex properties under global influences of ion-driven winds and flow field disturbances from the impingement surface. Challenges of measurements when an electric field is applied in the system have limited an understanding of changes to the flame behavior and species concentrations caused by the field. This research initially characterizes the ability of high voltage power supplies to respond on sufficiently short time scales to permit real time electrical flame actuation. The study then characterizes the influence of an electric field on the impinging flame shape, ion current and flow field of the thermal plume associated with the flame. The more significant further examinations can be separated into two parts: 1) the potential for using electric fields to control the release of carbon monoxide (CO) from surface-impinging flames, and 2) an investigation of controlling electrically the heat transfer to a plate on which the flame impinges. Carbon monoxide (CO) results from the incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels and, while CO can be desirable in some syngas processes, it is usually a dangerous emission from forest fires, gas heaters, gas stoves, or furnaces where insufficient oxygen in the core reaction does not fully oxidize the fuel to carbon dioxide and water. Determining how carbon monoxide is released and how heat transfer from the flame to the plate can be controlled using the electric field are the two main goals of this research. Multiple diagnostic techniques are employed such as OH chemiluminescence to identify the reaction zone, OH PLIF to characterize the location of this radical species, CO released from the flame, IR imaging and OH PLIF thermometry to understand the surface and gas temperature distribution, respectively. The principal finding is that carbon monoxide release from an impinging diffusion flame results from the escape of carbon monoxide created on the fuel side of the flame along the boundary layer near the surface where it avoids oxidation by OH, which sits to the air side of the reaction sheet interface. In addition, the plate proximity to the flame has a stronger influence on the emission of toxic carbon monoxide than does the electric field strength. There is, however, a narrow region of burner to surface distance where the electric field is most effective. The results also show that heat transfer can be spatially concentrated effectively using an electric field driven ion wind, particularly at some burner to surface distances.

  7. Invisible Flame Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Stennis Space Center uses more than one million gallons of liquid hydrogen per month in its rocket testing program. Firefighters responding to a hydrogen fire had to give the area "the broom test" to determine the presence and location of a fire. This technique has significant safety and accuracy shortfalls. Stennis then developed technology to visually assess the presence, location and extent of hydrogen fires. SafetyScan, LLC. is now manufacturing FIRESCAPE, the first affordable commercial product for invisible (or ashless) fire imaging based on the original technology, to aid firefighters in seeing the invisible flames from alcohol and hydrogen fires during the day and even through smoke. The hand-held device weighs five pounds, is used like a pair of binoculars and can run for up to two hours before recharging.

  8. Structure and stabilization of stretched premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.K.

    1994-12-31

    The present investigation aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, response, and dynamics of premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues such as flame extinction and stabilization. The phenomenology of and results from two specific studies are presented: (1) The temperature and species structure of freely-standing, adiabatic, equidiffusive, aerodynamically-strained, planar premixed flames has been experimentally and computationally investigated. Results show that the structure remains largely similar in response to variations in strain rate, thereby substantiating the concepts that the scalar structure of the flame, and hence the flame thickness, are insensitive to strain rate variations for these purely-strained flames, and that these flames cannot be extinguished by straining alone. (2) The possibility of stabilizing a Bunsen flame without heat loss to the burner rim has been experimentally investigated by examining the temperature at the rim, the temperature gradient between the rim and the flame base, and the standoff distance of the flame base in relation to the flame thickness. Results show that while heat loss remains to be the dominant stabilization mechanism for flames in uniform flows and for strong flames in parabolic flows, adiabatic flame stabilization and blowoff are indeed possible for weak flames in parabolic flows.

  9. Neurotoxicity of brominated flame retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been commonly used as commercial flame retardants in a variety of products including plastics and textiles. Despite their decreasing usage worldwide, congeners continue to accumulate in the environment, including soil, dust, food, anima...

  10. Flame propagation under partially-premixed conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruetsch, Gregory R.

    1994-01-01

    This study concentrates on developing a better understanding of triple flames. We relax the assumption of zero heat release, address the issue of stabilization, and, in order to investigate the role that heat release plays in flame propagation in partially premixed combustion, we return to a simple flow field and investigate the behavior of flames in a laminar environment. We solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in a two-dimensional domain. At the boundaries, we use an inflow boundary condition on the left and nearly-perfect reflective boundary conditions, required to avoid pressure drift, at the outflow and sides. After the flow and flame are initialized, the mixture fraction is varied at the inlet from its uniform stoichiometric value to a tanh profile varying from zero to one. As the mixture fraction gradient reaches the flame surface only the centerline is exposed to the stoichionetric mixture fraction and locally maintains the planar flame speed and reaction rate. Above this point the mixture is fuel rich, and below fuel lean. As a result, these regions of non-unity equivalence ratio burn less, the reaction rate drops, and the local flame speed is reduced. The excess fuel and oxidizer then combine behind the premixed flame along the stoichiometric surface and burn in a trailing diffusion flame. Thus the 'triple' flame refers to the fuel-rich premixed flame, the fuel-lean premixed flame, and the trailing diffusion flame. Due to heat release, the normal velocity across the flame is increased, whereas the tangential component remains unchanged. Far-field flame speed, local flame speed, and their differences are shown as a function of the local mixing thickness. It was also determined that the lateral position of the flame affects stabilization, and the distribution of the reaction rate along the premixed wings of triple flames affects flame propagation.

  11. Edge flame instability in low-strain-rate counterflow diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Park, June Sung; Hwang, Dong Jin; Park, Jeong; Kim, Jeong Soo; Kim, Sungcho; Keel, Sang In; Kim, Tae Kwon; Noh, Dong Soon

    2006-09-15

    Experiments in low-strain-rate methane-air counterflow diffusion flames diluted with nitrogen have been conducted to study flame extinction behavior and edge flame oscillation in which flame length is less than the burner diameter and thus lateral conductive heat loss, in addition to radiative loss, could be high at low global strain rates. The critical mole fraction at flame extinction is examined in terms of velocity ratio and global strain rate. Onset conditions of the edge flame oscillation and the relevant modes are also provided with global strain rate and nitrogen mole fraction in the fuel stream or in terms of fuel Lewis number. It is observed that flame length is intimately relevant to lateral heat loss, and this affects flame extinction and edge flame oscillation considerably. Lateral heat loss causes flame oscillation even at fuel Lewis number less than unity. Edge flame oscillations, which result from the advancing and retreating edge flame motion of the outer flame edge of low-strain-rate flames, are categorized into three modes: a growing, a decaying, and a harmonic-oscillation mode. A flame stability map based on the flame oscillation modes is also provided for low-strain-rate flames. The important contribution of lateral heat loss even to edge flame oscillation is clarified finally. (author)

  12. Flame spread across liquid pools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William A.

    1993-01-01

    For flame spread over liquid fuel pools, the existing literature suggests three gravitational influences: (1) liquid phase buoyant convection, delaying ignition and assisting flame spread; (2) hydrostatic pressure variation, due to variation in the liquid pool height caused by thermocapillary-induced convection; and (3) gas-phase buoyant convection in the opposite direction to the liquid phase motion. No current model accounts for all three influences. In fact, prior to this work, there was no ability to determine whether ignition delay times and flame spread rates would be greater or lesser in low gravity. Flame spread over liquid fuel pools is most commonly characterized by the relationship of the initial pool temperature to the fuel's idealized flash point temperature, with four or five separate characteristic regimes having been identified. In the uniform spread regime, control has been attributed to: (1) gas-phase conduction and radiation; (2) gas-phase conduction only; (3) gas-phase convection and liquid conduction, and most recently (4) liquid convection ahead of the flame. Suggestions were made that the liquid convection was owed to both vuoyancy and thermocapillarity. Of special interest to this work is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread can and will occur in microgravity in the absence of buoyant flows in both phases. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity experiments and advanced diagnostics; (2) microgravity experiments; and (3) numerical modelling at arbitrary gravitational level.

  13. On the theory of turbulent flame velocity

    E-print Network

    Vitaly Bychkov; Vyacheslav Akkerman; Arkady Petchenko

    2012-10-19

    The renormalization ideas of self-similar dynamics of a strongly turbulent flame front are applied to the case of a flame with realistically large thermal expansion of the burning matter. In that case a flame front is corrugated both by external turbulence and the intrinsic flame instability. The analytical formulas for the velocity of flame propagation are obtained. It is demonstrated that the flame instability is of principal importance when the integral turbulent length scale is much larger than the cut off wavelength of the instability. The developed theory is used to analyse recent experiments on turbulent flames propagating in tubes. It is demonstrated that most of the flame velocity increase measured experimentally is provided by the large scale effects like the flame instability, and not by the small-scale external turbulence.

  14. CCD Photometry of M92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruelas-Mayorga, A.; Sánchez, L. J.

    2008-12-01

    We present Johnson B and V photometry for the galactic globular cluster M92. Photometric results for a total of ~30000 stars are obtained and are plotted on a V vs (B - V) diagram. We fit theoretical isochrones to this diagram in order to get an estimate for the age of M92. The age which we find is ~16×10^9 years with the following values for the metallicity and He-abundance: [Fe/H]=-2.03, Y = 0.235. The distance modulus to this cluster turns out to be m - M = 14.6, in accordance with that obtained by Stetson & Harris (1988).

  15. Atmospheric scintillation in astronomical photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, J.; Föhring, D.; Dhillon, V. S.; Wilson, R. W.

    2015-09-01

    Scintillation noise due to the Earth's turbulent atmosphere can be a dominant noise source in high-precision astronomical photometry when observing bright targets from the ground. Here we describe the phenomenon of scintillation from its physical origins to its effect on photometry. We show that Young's scintillation-noise approximation used by many astronomers tends to underestimate the median scintillation noise at several major observatories around the world. We show that using median atmospheric optical turbulence profiles, which are now available for most sites, provides a better estimate of the expected scintillation noise and that real-time turbulence profiles can be used to precisely characterize the scintillation-noise component of contemporaneous photometric measurements. This will enable a better understanding and calibration of photometric noise sources and the effectiveness of scintillation correction techniques. We also provide new equations for calculating scintillation noise, including for extremely large telescopes where the scintillation noise will actually be lower than previously thought. These equations highlight the fact that scintillation noise and shot noise have the same dependence on exposure time and so if an observation is scintillation limited, it will be scintillation limited for all exposure times. The ratio of scintillation noise to shot noise is also only weakly dependent on telescope diameter and so a bigger telescope may not yield a reduction in fractional scintillation noise.

  16. Induction effects for heterochromatic brightness matching, heterochromatic flicker photometry,

    E-print Network

    Dobkins, Karen R.

    Induction effects for heterochromatic brightness matching, heterochromatic flicker photometry flicker photometry (HFP), and minimally distinct border (MDB). For HBM, subjects varied the relative compared with those obtained on two other tasks: hetero- chromatic flicker photometry (HFP) and minimally

  17. Effects of buoyancy on premixed flame stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Bedat, B.; Cheng, R.K.

    1995-10-01

    The stabilization limits of v-flame and conical flames are investigated in normal gravity (+g) and reversed gravity (up-side-down burner, -g) to compare with observations of flame stabilization during microgravity experiments. The results show that buoyancy has most influence on the stabilization of laminar V-flames. Under turbulent conditions, the effects are less significant. For conical flames stabilized with a ring, the stabilization domain of the +g and -g cases are not significantly different. Under reversed gravity, both laminar v-flames and conical flames show flame behaviors that were also found in microgravity. The v-flames reattached to the rim and the conical flame assumed a top-hat shape. One of the special cases of -g conical flame is the buoyancy stabilized laminar flat flame that is detached from the burner. These flame implies a balance between the flow momentum and buoyant forces. The stretch rates of these flames are sufficiently low (< 20 s{sup -1}) such that the displacement speeds S{sub L} are almost equal to the laminar burning speed S{sub L}{sup 0}. An analysis based on evaluating the Richardson number is used to determine the relevant parameters that describe the buoyancy/momentum balance. A perfect balance i.e. Ri = l can be attained when the effect of heat loss from the flame zone is low. For the weaker lean cases, our assumption of adiabaticity tends to overestimate the real flame temperature. This interesting low stretch laminar flame configuration can be useful for fundamental studies of combustion chemistry.

  18. Visible and Infrared Photometry of Six Centaurs

    E-print Network

    Davies, John Keith

    Visible and Infrared Photometry of Six Centaurs John K. Davies Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 N A. Centaurs, Kuiper Belt, Photometry, Infrared, Visible. \\Lambda Present address: Institute of Astronomy Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 N A'ohoku Pl., Hilo, Hawaii, 96720, USA Simon F. Green Unit for Space

  19. Transient Supersonic Methane-Air Flames 

    E-print Network

    Richards, John L.

    2012-07-16

    temperature and pressure environment which propelled a flame through a choked de Laval nozzle. The nozzle accelerated the products of combustion to a Mach number of 1.6, creating an underexpanded transient flame which burned for approximately 25 milliseconds...

  20. Investigation of Flame Stretch in Turbulent Lifted Jet Flame

    E-print Network

    Ruan, S.; Swaminathan, N.; Mizobuchi, Y.

    2014-02-24

    the reactant side. The flame stretch consists of two components: the tangential strain rate, aT , and a contribution from the joint behaviour of the flame surface displacement speed, S d, and its mean curvature, Km. It is to be noted that the above equations... round nozzle into quiescent air was simulated using direct numerical simulation methodology. The jet Mach number is 0.54 and its Reynolds number based on the nozzle diameter is 13,600. A schematic of this flow configuration is shown in Fig. 1a (to...

  1. Radiant Extinction Of Gaseous Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berhan, S.; Chernovsky, M.; Atreya, A.; Baum, Howard R.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2003-01-01

    The absence of buoyancy-induced flows in microgravity (mu:g) and the resulting increase in the reactant residence time significantly alters the fundamentals of many combustion processes. Substantial differences between normal gravity (ng) and :g flames have been reported in experiments on candle flames [1, 2], flame spread over solids [3, 4], droplet combustion [5,6], and others. These differences are more basic than just in the visible flame shape. Longer residence times and higher concentration of combustion products in the flame zone create a thermochemical environment that changes the flame chemistry and the heat and mass transfer processes. Processes such as flame radiation, that are often ignored in ng, become very important and sometimes even controlling. Furthermore, microgravity conditions considerably enhance flame radiation by: (i) the build-up of combustion products in the high-temperature reaction zone which increases the gas radiation, and (ii) longer residence times make conditions appropriate for substantial amounts of soot to form which is also responsible for radiative heat loss. Thus, it is anticipated that radiative heat loss may eventually extinguish the Aweak@ (low burning rate per unit flame area) :g diffusion flame. Yet, space shuttle experiments on candle flames show that in an infinite ambient atmosphere, the hemispherical candle flame in :g will burn indefinitely [1]. This may be because of the coupling between the fuel production rate and the flame via the heat-feedback mechanism for candle flames, flames over solids and fuel droplet flames. Thus, to focus only on the gas-phase phenomena leading to radiative extinction, aerodynamically stabilized gaseous diffusion flames are examined. This enables independent control of the fuel flow rate to help identify conditions under which radiative extinction occurs. Also, spherical geometry is chosen for the :g experiments and modeling because: (i) It reduces the complexity by making the problem one-dimensional. (ii) The spherical diffusion flame completely encloses the soot which is formed on the fuel rich side of the reaction zone. This increases the importance of flame radiation because now both soot and gaseous combustion products co-exist inside the high temperature spherical diffusion flame. (iii) For small fuel injection velocities, as is usually the case for a pyrolyzing solid, the diffusion flame in :g around the solid naturally develops spherical symmetry. Thus, spherical diffusion flames are of interest to fires in :g and identifying conditions that lead to radiation-induced extinction is important for spacecraft fire safety.

  2. Displacement speeds in turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Marcus S.; Shepherd, Ian G.; Bell, J.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    The theory of turbulent premixed flames is based on acharacterization of the flame as a discontinuous surface propagatingthrough the fluid. The displacement speed, defined as the local speed ofthe flame front normal to itself, relative to the unburned fluid,provides one characterization of the burning velocity. In this paper, weintroduce a geometric approach to computing displacement speed anddiscuss the efficacy of the displacement speed for characterizing aturbulent flame.

  3. Oscillatory Extinction Of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Yoo, S. W.; Christianson, E. W.

    2003-01-01

    Since extinction has been observed in an oscillatory manner in Le greater than 1 premixed flames, it is not unreasonable to expect that extinction could occur in an unsteady manner for diffusion flames. Indeed, near-limit oscillations have been observed experimentally under microgravity conditions for both candle flames and droplet flames. Furthermore, the analysis of Cheatham and Matalon on the unsteady behavior of diffusion flames with heat loss, identified an oscillatory regime which could be triggered by either a sufficiently large Lewis number (even without heat loss) or an appreciable heat loss (even for Le=1). In light of these recent understanding, the present investigation aims to provide a well-controlled experiment that can unambiguously demonstrate the oscillation of diffusion flames near both the transport- and radiation-induced limits. That is, since candle and jet flames are stabilized through flame segments that are fundamentally premixed in nature, and since premixed flames are prone to oscillate, there is the possibility that the observed oscillation of these bulk diffusion flames could be triggered and sustained by the oscillation of the premixed flame segments. Concerning the observed oscillatory droplet extinction, it is well-known that gas-phase oscillation in heterogeneous burning can be induced by and is thereby coupled with condensed-phase unsteadiness. Consequently, a convincing experiment on diffusion flame oscillation must exclude any ingredients of premixed flames and other sources that may either oscillate themselves or promote the oscillation of the diffusion flame. The present experiment on burner-generated spherical flames with a constant reactant supply endeavored to accomplish this goal. The results are further compared with those from computational simulation for further understanding and quantification of the flame dynamics and extinction.

  4. Production Of Fullerenic Soot In Flames

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Jack B. (Winchester, MA); Vander Sande, John B. (Newbury, MA); Chowdhury, K. Das (Cambridge, MA)

    2000-12-19

    A method for the production of fullerenic nanostructures is described in which unsaturated hydrocarbon fuel and oxygen are combusted in a burner chamber at a sub-atmospheric pressure, thereby establishing a flame. The condensibles of the flame are collected at a post-flame location. The condensibles contain fullerenic nanostructures, such as single and nested nanotubes, single and nested nanoparticles and giant fullerenes. The method of producing fullerenic soot from flames is also described.

  5. Production of fullerenic nanostructures in flames

    DOEpatents

    Howard, Jack B. (Winchester, MA); Vander Sande, John B. (Newbury, MA); Chowdhury, K. Das (Cambridge, MA)

    1999-01-01

    A method for the production of fullerenic nanostructures is described in which unsaturated hydrocarbon fuel and oxygen are combusted in a burner chamber at a sub-atmospheric pressure, thereby establishing a flame. The condensibles of the flame are collected at a post-flame location. The condensibles contain fullerenic nanostructures, such as single and nested nanotubes, single and nested nanoparticles and giant fullerenes. The method of producing fullerenic soot from flames is also described.

  6. Studies of Flame Structure in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Sung, C. J.; Zhu, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    The present research endeavor is concerned with gaining fundamental understanding of the configuration, structure, and dynamics of laminar premixed and diffusion flames under conditions of negligible effects of gravity. Of particular interest is the potential to establish and hence study the properties of spherically- and cylindrically-symmetric flames and their response to external forces not related to gravity. For example, in an earlier experimental study of the burner-stabilized cylindrical premixed flames, the possibility of flame stabilization through flow divergence was established, while the resulting one-dimensional, adiabatic, stretchless flame also allowed an accurate means of determining the laminar flame speeds of combustible mixtures. We have recently extended our studies of the flame structure in microgravity along the following directions: (1) Analysis of the dynamics of spherical premixed flames; (2) Analysis of the spreading of cylindrical diffusion flames; (3) Experimental observation of an interesting dual luminous zone structure of a steady-state, microbuoyancy, spherical diffusion flame of air burning in a hydrogen/methane mixture environment, and its subsequent quantification through computational simulation with detailed chemistry and transport; (4) Experimental quantification of the unsteady growth of a spherical diffusion flame; and (5) Computational simulation of stretched, diffusionally-imbalanced premixed flames near and beyond the conventional limits of flammability, and the substantiation of the concept of extended limits of flammability. Motivation and results of these investigations are individually discussed.

  7. 30 CFR 14.20 - Flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... test determined by MSHA to be equivalent under 30 CFR §§ 6.20 and 14.4(e). ... MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical Requirements § 14.20 Flame resistance. Conveyor belts for use in underground coal mines must be flame-resistant...

  8. 30 CFR 14.20 - Flame resistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... test determined by MSHA to be equivalent under 30 CFR §§ 6.20 and 14.4(e). ... MINING PRODUCTS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE APPROVAL OF FLAME-RESISTANT CONVEYOR BELTS Technical Requirements § 14.20 Flame resistance. Conveyor belts for use in underground coal mines must be flame-resistant...

  9. Flame and Soot Boundaries of Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) or steady weakly buoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue CO2 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K. ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet-exit Reynolds numbers of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9, and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at microgravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smoke-point conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smoke-point conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary-layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous-flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 of the lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions because of the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  10. Flame Speed and Spark Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randolph, D W; Silsbee, F B

    1925-01-01

    This report describes a series of experiments undertaken to determine whether or not the electrical characteristics of the igniting spark have any effect on the rapidity of flame spread in the explosive gas mixtures which it ignites. The results show very clearly that no such effect exists. The flame velocity in carbon-monoxide oxygen, acetylene oxygen, and gasoline-air mixtures was found to be unaffected by changes in spark intensity from sparks which were barely able to ignite the mixture up to intense condenser discharge sparks having fifty time this energy. (author)

  11. Flame stabilizer for stagnation flow reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hahn, David W. (Dublin, CA); Edwards, Christopher F. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A method of stabilizing a strained flame in a stagnation flow reactor. By causing a highly strained flame to be divided into a large number of equal size segments it is possible to stablize a highly strained flame that is on the verge of extinction, thereby providing for higher film growth rates. The flame stabilizer is an annular ring mounted coaxially and coplanar with the substrate upon which the film is growing and having a number of vertical pillars mounted on the top surface, thereby increasing the number of azimuthal nodes into which the flame is divided and preserving an axisymmetric structure necessary for stability.

  12. KSC Launch Pad Flame Trench Environment Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes conditions in the Launch Complex 39 (LC-39) flame trenches during a Space Shuttle Launch, as they have been measured to date. Instrumentation of the flame trench has been carried out by NASA and United Space Alliance for four Shuttle launches. Measurements in the flame trench are planned to continue for the duration of the Shuttle Program. The assessment of the launch environment is intended to provide guidance in selecting appropriate test methods for refractory materials used in the flame trench and to provide data used to improve models of the launch environment in the flame trench.

  13. Hysteresis and transition in swirling nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Tummers, M.J.; Huebner, A.W.; van Veen, E.H.; Hanjalic, K.; van der Meer, T.H.

    2009-02-15

    Strongly swirling nonpremixed flames are known to exhibit a hysteresis when transiting from an attached long, sooty, yellow flame to a short lifted blue flame, and vice versa. The upward transition (by increasing the air and fuel flow rates) corresponds to a vortex breakdown, i.e. an abrupt change from an attached swirling flame (unidirectional or with a weak bluff-body recirculation), to a lifted flame with a strong toroidal vortex occupying the bulk of the flame. Despite dramatic differences in their structures, mixing intensities and combustion performance, both flame types can be realised at identical flow rates, equivalence ratio and swirl intensity. We report here on comprehensive investigations of the two flame regimes at the same conditions in a well-controlled experiment in which the swirl was generated by the rotating outer pipe of the annular burner air passage. Fluid velocity measured with PIV (particle image velocimetry), the qualitative detection of reaction zones from OH PLIF (planar laser-induced fluorescence) and the temperature measured by CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy) revealed major differences in vortical structures, turbulence, mixing and reaction intensities in the two flames. We discuss the transition mechanism and arguments for the improved mixing, compact size and a broader stability range of the blue flame in comparison to the long yellow flame. (author)

  14. Imaging Invisible Flames Without Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J.

    1996-01-01

    Image intensifiers, video cameras, and image-data-processing computers used to study combustion. Possible to view and analyze methane, hydrogen, and other flames dim or invisible to human eye and difficult to image by use of conventional photographic and video cameras.

  15. PARAMETRIC STUDIES OFACOUSTIC RADIATIONFROMPREMIXED FLAMES

    E-print Network

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    understanding of flow and combustion noise. The first explicit analysis and modeling of the combustion noise of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute ofTechnology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA Turbulent premixed combustion function. Keywords: combustion noise, turbulent flames, unsteady combustion Received 14 November 2002

  16. Burning Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence was taken July 15, 1997, MET:14/10:34 (approximate) and shows the ignition and extinction of this flame. LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel -- like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (518KB, 20-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300182.html.

  17. Flex-flame burner and combustion method

    DOEpatents

    Soupos, Vasilios (Chicago, IL); Zelepouga, Serguei (Hoffman Estates, IL); Rue, David M. (Chicago, IL); Abbasi, Hamid A. (Naperville, IL)

    2010-08-24

    A combustion method and apparatus which produce a hybrid flame for heating metals and metal alloys, which hybrid flame has the characteristic of having an oxidant-lean portion proximate the metal or metal alloy and having an oxidant-rich portion disposed above the oxidant lean portion. This hybrid flame is produced by introducing fuel and primary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber containing the metal or metal alloy in a substoichiometric ratio to produce a fuel-rich flame and by introducing a secondary combustion oxidant into the furnace chamber above the fuel-rich flame in a manner whereby mixing of the secondary combustion oxidant with the fuel-rich flame is delayed for a portion of the length of the flame.

  18. An Introduction to Astronomical Photometry Using CCDs W. Romanishin

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    An Introduction to Astronomical Photometry Using CCDs W. Romanishin University of Oklahoma wjr for the college astrophysics major to photometry in the optical region of the spectrum of astronomical objects telescope time as photometry. That said, it is still obvious that imaging photometry is an important part

  19. An Introduction to Astronomical Photometry Using CCDs W. Romanishin

    E-print Network

    Zallen, Richard

    An Introduction to Astronomical Photometry Using CCDs W. Romanishin University of Oklahoma wjr astrophysics major to photometry in the optical region of the spectrum of astronomical objects using CCD telescope time as photometry. That said, it is still obvious that imaging photometry is an important part

  20. Nonlinear effects in the extraction of laminar flame speeds from expanding spherical flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, A.P.; Law, C.K.

    2009-09-15

    Various factors affecting the determination of laminar flames speeds from outwardly propagating spherical flames in a constant-pressure combustion chamber were considered, with emphasis on the nonlinear variation of the stretched flame speed to the flame stretch rate, and the associated need to nonlinearly extrapolate the stretched flame speed to yield an accurate determination of the laminar flame speed and Markstein length. Experiments were conducted for lean and rich n-butane/air flames at 1atm initial pressure, demonstrating the complex and nonlinear nature of the dynamics of flame evolution, and the strong influences of the ignition transient and chamber confinement during the initial and final periods of the flame propagation, respectively. These experimental data were analyzed using the nonlinear relation between the stretched flame speed and stretch rate, yielding laminar flame speeds that agree well with data determined from alternate flame configurations. It is further suggested that the fidelity in the extraction of the laminar flame speed from expanding spherical flames can be facilitated by using small ignition energy and a large combustion chamber. (author)

  1. Experimental study of turbulent flame kernel propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Mohy; Peters, Norbert; Schrader, Lars-Uve

    2008-07-15

    Flame kernels in spark ignited combustion systems dominate the flame propagation and combustion stability and performance. They are likely controlled by the spark energy, flow field and mixing field. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the structure and propagation of the flame kernel in turbulent premixed methane flow using advanced laser-based techniques. The spark is generated using pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 20 mJ pulse energy in order to avoid the effect of the electrodes on the flame kernel structure and the variation of spark energy from shot-to-shot. Four flames have been investigated at equivalence ratios, {phi}{sub j}, of 0.8 and 1.0 and jet velocities, U{sub j}, of 6 and 12 m/s. A combined two-dimensional Rayleigh and LIPF-OH technique has been applied. The flame kernel structure has been collected at several time intervals from the laser ignition between 10 {mu}s and 2 ms. The data show that the flame kernel structure starts with spherical shape and changes gradually to peanut-like, then to mushroom-like and finally disturbed by the turbulence. The mushroom-like structure lasts longer in the stoichiometric and slower jet velocity. The growth rate of the average flame kernel radius is divided into two linear relations; the first one during the first 100 {mu}s is almost three times faster than that at the later stage between 100 and 2000 {mu}s. The flame propagation is slightly faster in leaner flames. The trends of the flame propagation, flame radius, flame cross-sectional area and mean flame temperature are related to the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The relations obtained in the present work allow the prediction of any of these parameters at different conditions. (author)

  2. Flame generation of ceramic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Large quantities of TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, and mixed TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} powders are produced annually by combustion of their chloride precursors for use as catalysts and as paint opacifiers. We have studied the formation of flame synthesized oxides using a counterflow diffusion flame burner. It has enabled us to obtain desired morphologies and crystalline structures by varying process variables such as flame temperature and precursor concentration ratio, and by selecting the appropriate feed stream. For example, over the ranges of TiCl{sub 4} (the TiO{sub 2} precursor) concentrations tested, feeding it only into the oxidizer stream yields mainly anatase TiO{sub 2} powders, while feeding only into the fuel stream yields mainly rutile TiO{sub 2} powders. By adding TiCl{sub 4} and SiCl{sub 4} simultaneously to the same flame and choosing conditions such that the TiO{sub 2} condenses before the SiO{sub 2}, we obtained SiO{sub 2} attached to, or coated onto, TiO{sub 2} particles in a single step process. Oxide particles produced in the counterflow diffusion flame burner are in the 10 to 100 manometer range. Their high surface area makes them potentially useful as catalysts. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-TiO{sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are well-known catalysts for the selective oxidation of o-xylene to phthalic anhydride, and V-P-O oxides are widely used catalysts for the selective oxidation of butene and n-butane to maleic anhydride. Several V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based mixed oxide powders were produced in the burner. 21 refs.

  3. WFPC2 aperture photometry and PSF modelling

    E-print Network

    N. R. Tanvir; D. R. T. Robinson; T. von Hippel

    1995-03-22

    Since the WFPC-2 undersamples the PSF, aperture photometry can produce results which are competetive with profile fitting in many situations. This article reports and investigation of aperture corrections using both real data and PSF models.

  4. Classification of stars with WBVR photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskiy, S. G.; Mironov, A. V.; Malkov, O. Yu.

    2013-10-01

    We present a method of obtaining the most reliable stellar spectral type based on multi-color photometry. The method also allows us to estimate color excess EB-V and distance to the star. Approbation of the method using bright stars with known spectral classification and W BV R photometry permits to estimate its reliability. Stellar spectra models from Pickles (1998) library and Fluks et al. (1994) interstellar extinction law were used in the application of the method.

  5. WFPC2 Stellar Photometry with HSTphot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2000-01-01

    HSTphot, a photometry package designed to handle the undersampled PSFs found in WFPC2 images, is introduced and described, as well as some of the considerations that have to be made in order to obtain accurate PSF-fitting stellar photometry with WFPC2 data. Tests of HSTphot's internal reliability are made using multiple observations of the same field, and tests of external reliability are made by comparing with DoPHOT reductions of the same data. Subject headz'ngs: techniques: photometric

  6. WFPC2 Stellar Photometry with HSTphot

    E-print Network

    Andrew E. Dolphin

    2000-06-15

    HSTphot, a photometry package designed to handle the undersampled PSFs found in WFPC2 images, is introduced and described, as well as some of the considerations that have to be made in order to obtain accurate PSF-fitting stellar photometry with WFPC2 data. Tests of HSTphot's internal reliability are made using multiple observations of the same field, and tests of external reliability are made by comparing with DoPHOT reductions of the same data.

  7. First photometry results from Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the Gaia Photometric Processing is presented. The Gaia photometry consists of the white light (330-1050 nm) G-band, and low resolution spectrophotometry realized by two prisms dispersing all the light entering the field of view. One disperser - called BP for Blue Photometer- operates in the wavelength range 330-680 nm; the other - called RP for Red Photometer - covers the wavelength range 640-1050 nm. The light collected by BP and RP can also be integrated into two broad bands, G_BP and G_RP.This photometric data reduction is based on the overall principle of a self-calibrating system improved by iteration. The input data includes flux (G, G_BP, G_RP) and the low-resolution spectral data. The calibration models and algorithms used are described. Initial validation results are shown which indicate the photometric quality of the preliminary calibrated data. Expectations for the quality of the photometric data to be included in the first public data release (mid-2016) are discussed.

  8. Meteor44 Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Meteor44 is a software system developed at MSFC for the calibration and analysis of video meteor data. The dynamic range of the (8bit) video data is extended by approximately 4 magnitudes for both meteors and stellar images using saturation compensation. Camera and lens specific saturation compensation coefficients are derived from artificial variable star laboratory measurements. Saturation compensation significantly increases the number of meteors with measured intensity and improves the estimation of meteoroid mass distribution. Astrometry is automated to determine each image's plate coefficient using appropriate star catalogs. The images are simultaneously intensity calibrated from the contained stars to determine the photon sensitivity and the saturation level referenced above the atmosphere. The camera s spectral response is used to compensate for stellar color index and typical meteor spectra in order to report meteor light curves in traditional visual magnitude units. Recent efforts include improved camera calibration procedures, long focal length 'streak' meteor photometry and two-station track determination. Meteor44 has been used to analyze data from the 2001, 2002 and 2003 MSFC Leonid observational campaigns as well as several lesser showers. The software is interactive and can be demonstrated using data from recent Leonid campaigns.

  9. Calibration of the MACHO Photometry Database

    E-print Network

    C. Alcock; R. A. Allsman; D. R. Alves; T. S. Axelrod; A. C. Becker; D. P. Bennett; K. H. Cook; A. J. Drake; K. C. Freeman; K. Griest; M. J. Lehner; S. L. Marshall; D. Minniti; B. A. Peterson; M. R. Pratt; C. A. Nelson; P. J. Quinn; C. W. Stubbs; W. Sutherland; A. B. Tomaney; D. L. Welch

    1999-09-14

    The MACHO Project is a microlensing survey that monitors the brightnesses of 60 million stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Small Magellanic Cloud, and Galactic bulge. Our database presently contains about 80 billion photometric measurements, a significant fraction of all astronomical photometry. We describe the calibration of MACHO two-color photometry and transformation to the standard Kron-Cousins V and R system. Calibrated MACHO photometry may be properly compared with all other observations on the Kron-Cousins standard system, enhancing the astrophysical value of these data. For 9 million stars in the LMC bar, independent photometric measurements of 20,000 stars with V photometry with published photometric sequences and new Hubble Space Telescope observations shows agreement. The current calibration zero-point uncertainty for the remainder of the MACHO photometry database is estimated to be +- 0.10 mag in V or R and +-0.04 mag in (V-R). We describe the first application of calibrated MACHO photometry data: the construction of a color-magnitude diagram used to calculate our experimental sensitivity to detect microlensing in the LMC.

  10. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a ``tulip flame`` in the literature, occurred. The ``tulip flame`` was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  11. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a tulip flame'' in the literature, occurred. The tulip flame'' was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  12. The initial development of a tulip flame

    SciTech Connect

    Matalon, M.; Mcgreevy, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    The initial development of a ``tulip flame``, often observed during flame propagation in closed tubes, is attributed to a combustion instability. The roles of hydrodynamic and of the diffusional-thermal processes on the onset of instability are investigated through a linear stability analysis in which the growth or decay of small disturbances, superimposed on an otherwise smooth and planar flame front, are followed. A range of the Markstein parameter, related to the mixture composition through an appropriately defined Lewis number, has been identified where a tulip flame could be observed. For a given value of the Markstein parameter within this range, a critical wavelength is identified as the most unstable mode. This wavelength is directly related to the minimal aspect ratio of the tube where a tulip flame could be observed. The time of onset of instability is identified as the time when the most unstable disturbance, associated with the critical wavelength, grows at a faster rate than the flame front itself and exceeds a certain threshold. This occurs after the flame has propagated a certain distance down the tube: a value which has been explicitly determined in terms of the relevant parameters. Experimental records on the tulip flame phenomenon support the finding of the analysis. That is, the tulip flame forms after the flame has traveled half the tube`s length, it does not form in short tubes, and its formation depends on the mixture composition and on the initial pressure in the tube.

  13. A numerical study of thin flame representations

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.A.; Pindera, M.Z.

    1989-08-11

    In studies of reacting flows, the flame may be viewed as a moving discontinuity endowed with certain properties; notably, it acts as a source of velocity and vorticity. Asymptotic analysis shows this to be justified provided that the flame curvature is small compared to the flame thickness. Such an approach is useful when one is interested in the hydrodynamic effects of the flame on the surrounding flowfield. In numerical models of this kind it is customary to treat the discontinuity as a collection of discrete velocity blobs. In this study, we show that the velocities associated with such a representation can be very non-smooth, particularly very near to the flame surface. As an alternative, we propose the use of a finite line source as the basic flame element. Comparisons of the two flame representations are made for several simple test cases as well as for a flame propagating through an enclosure forming the tulip shape. The results show that the use of line sources eliminates spurious fluctuations in nearfield velocities thus allowing for a more accurate calculation of flame propagation and flame-flowfield interactions. 7 refs., 15 figs.

  14. Premixed flames in closed cylindrical tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzener, Philippe; Matalon, Moshe

    2001-09-01

    We consider the propagation of a premixed flame, as a two-dimensional sheet separating unburned gas from burned products, in a closed cylindrical tube. A nonlinear evolution equation, that describes the motion of the flame front as a function of its mean position, is derived. The equation contains a destabilizing term that results from the gas motion induced by thermal expansion and has a memory term associated with vorticity generation. Numerical solutions of this equation indicate that, when diffusion is stabilizing, the flame evolves into a non-planar form whose shape, and its associated symmetry properties, are determined by the Markstein parameter, and by the initial data. In particular, we observe the development of convex axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric flames, tulip flames and cellular flames.

  15. Laminar Jet Diffusion Flame Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence, using propane fuel, was taken STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:2/05:30 (approximate). LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel-like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (983KB, 9-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300184.html.

  16. The role of shock-flame interactions on flame acceleration in an obstacle laden channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccarelli, Gaby; Johansen, Craig T.; Parravani, Michael

    2010-11-15

    Flame acceleration was investigated in an obstructed, square-cross-section channel. Flame acceleration was promoted by an array of top and bottom surface mounted obstacles that were distributed along the entire channel length at an equal spacing corresponding to one channel height. This work is based on a previous investigation of the effects of blockage ratio on the early stage of flame acceleration. This study is focused on the later stage of flame acceleration when compression waves, and eventually a shock wave, form ahead of the flame. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of obstacle blockage on the rate of flame acceleration and on the final quasi-steady flame-tip velocity. Schlieren photography was used to track the development of the shock-flame complex. It was determined that the interaction between the flame front and the reflected shock waves produced from contact of the lead shock wave with the channel top, channel bottom, and obstacle surfaces govern the late stage of flame acceleration process. The shock-flame interactions produce oscillations in the flame-tip velocity similar to that observed in the early stage of flame acceleration, but only much larger in magnitude. Eventually the flame achieves a globally quasi-steady velocity. For the lowest blockage obstacles, the velocity approaches the speed of sound of the combustion products. The final quasi-steady flame velocity was lower in tests with the higher obstacle blockage. In the quasi-steady propagation regime with the lowest blockage obstacles, burning pockets of gas extended only a few obstacles back from the flame-tip, whereas burning pockets were observed further back in tests with the higher obstacle blockage. (author)

  17. Modeling of hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaac, Kakkattukuzhy

    1988-01-01

    The present research objective is to determine the effects of contaminants on extinction limits of simple, well defined, counterflow Hydrogen 2-air diffusion flames, with combustion at 1 atmosphere. Results of extinction studies and other flame characterizations, with appropriate mechanistic modeling (presently underway), will be used to rationalize the observed effects of contamination over a reasonably wide range of diffusion flame conditions. The knowledge gained should help efforts to anticipate the effects of contaminants on combustion processes in Hydrogen 2-fueled scramjets.

  18. Kinetics of Chemical Reactions in Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldovich, Y.; Semenov, N.

    1946-01-01

    In part I of the paper the theory of flame propagation is developed along the lines followed by Frank-Kamenetsky and one of the writers. The development of chain processes in flames is considered. A basis is given for the application of the method of stationary concentrations to reactions in flames; reactions with branching chains are analyzed. The case of a diffusion coefficient different from the coefficient of temperature conductivity is considered.

  19. Soot growth in laminar premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fang

    The objectives of the present investigation were to study soot processes in laminar premixed flames. Both experimental and computational methods were used: the experiments involved observations of the flame and soot properties of laminar premixed flames stabilized on flat-flame burners at atmospheric pressure, the computations involved predictions of flame structure using detailed mechanisms of transport and chemical kinetics as well as predictions of soot surface growth rate using existing mechanisms in the literature. The experiments considered soot-containing ethylene/air flames having fuel-equivalence ratios of 2.34--2.94 and soot-containing methane/oxygen flames having fuel-equivalence ratios of 2.20--2.60. The following properties were measured along the axes of the test flames: soot volume fractions, soot primary particle diameters, soot and gas temperatures, concentrations of major gas species, H atom concentrations, concentrations of condensable hydrocarbon species and gas velocities. Flame structure was predicted using the detailed chemical mechanisms of Frenklach and coworkers (1992) and Leung and Lindstedt (1995). Predictions of flame structure in the soot growth region were in good agreement with measurements. Prediction of H atom concentrations were also in good agreement with the measurements and showed that H atom was in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Present measurements were used to find soot surface growth rates and primary particle nucleation rates along the axes of the flames. These results were used to evaluate the Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms of Frenklach and coworkers (1995) and Colket and Hall (1994). The agreement between measured and predicted soot growth rates was excellent for both HACA mechanisms. These results imply that reduced soot surface growth rates with increasing residence time were mainly caused by reduced rates of surface activation due to reduced H atom concentrations as temperatures decrease from radiative heat losses; therefore, temperature reductions due to radiative heat losses from soot itself ultimately controls maximum soot concentrations in these flames.

  20. Microgravity Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A gas-jet diffusion flame is similar to the flame on a Bunsen burner, where a gaseous fuel (e.g., propane) flows from a nozzle into an oxygen-containing atmosphere (e.g., air). The difference is that a Bunsen burner allows for (partial) premixing of the fuel and the air, whereas a diffusion flame is not premixed and gets its oxygen (principally) by diffusion from the atmosphere around the flame. Simple gas-jet diffusion flames are often used for combustion studies because they embody the mechanisms operating in accidental fires and in practical combustion systems. However, most practical combustion is turbulent (i.e., with random flow vortices), which enhances the fuel/air mixing. These turbulent flames are not well understood because their random and transient nature complicates analysis. Normal gravity studies of turbulence in gas-jet diffusion flames can be impeded by buoyancy-induced instabilities. These gravitycaused instabilities, which are evident in the flickering of a candle flame in normal gravity, interfere with the study of turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames. By conducting experiments in microgravity, where buoyant instabilities are avoided, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center hope to improve our understanding of turbulent combustion. Ultimately, this could lead to improvements in combustor design, yielding higher efficiency and lower pollutant emissions. Gas-jet diffusion flames are often researched as model flames, because they embody mechanisms operating in both accidental fires and practical combustion systems (see the first figure). In normal gravity laboratory research, buoyant air flows, which are often negligible in practical situations, dominate the heat and mass transfer processes. Microgravity research studies, however, are not constrained by buoyant air flows, and new, unique information on the behavior of gas-jet diffusion flames has been obtained.

  1. Flame Suppression Agent, System and Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous droplets encapsulated in a flame retardant polymer are useful in suppressing combustion. Upon exposure to a flame, the encapsulated aqueous droplets rupture and vaporize, removing heat and displacing oxygen to retard the combustion process. The polymer encapsulant, through decomposition, may further add free radicals to the combustion atmosphere, thereby further retarding the combustion process. The encapsulated aqueous droplets may be used as a replacement to halon, water mist and dry powder flame suppression systems.

  2. Oscillatory Flame Response in Acoustically Coupled Fuel Droplet Combustion

    E-print Network

    Sevilla Esparza, Cristhian Israel

    2013-01-01

    premixed flames of variable burning velocity. Combustion andfluctuating pressures and velocities and the flame response.flame front distance from droplet center r s droplet radius t time T a acoustic time period u velocity

  3. Flow/Soot-Formation Interactions in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report of a research program considering interactions between flow and soot properties within laminar diffusion flames. Laminar diffusion flames were considered because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for theoretical and experimental studies than more practical turbulent diffusion flames. In particular, understanding the transport and chemical reaction processes of laminar flames is a necessary precursor to understanding these processes in practical turbulent flames and many aspects of laminar diffusion flames have direct relevance to turbulent diffusion flames through application of the widely recognized laminar flamelet concept of turbulent diffusion flames. The investigation was divided into three phases, considering the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in still air, the shapes of nonbuoyant round laminar jet diffusion flames in coflowing air, and the hydrodynamic suppression of soot formation in laminar diffusion flames.

  4. Intrinsic Disturbed Flame Equations and Stretched Premixed Flamelet Model: Two Descriptions of Premixed FlameFlow

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    . This includes burning velocity relations, stability and predictions of a triple flame. The description seemsIntrinsic Disturbed Flame Equations and Stretched Premixed Flamelet Model: Two Descriptions of Premixed Flame­Flow Interaction A.G. Class # , L.P.H. de Goey + , A.Y. Klimenko # and J.H.M. ten Thije

  5. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Global properties and internal flame structure

    SciTech Connect

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S.

    2010-05-15

    We study the dynamics and properties of a turbulent flame, formed in the presence of subsonic, high-speed, homogeneous, isotropic Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system. Direct numerical simulations are performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture. The system being modeled represents turbulent combustion with the Damkoehler number Da=0.05 and with the turbulent velocity at the energy injection scale 30 times larger than the laminar flame speed. The simulations show that flame interaction with high-speed turbulence forms a steadily propagating turbulent flame with a flame brush width approximately twice the energy injection scale and a speed four times the laminar flame speed. A method for reconstructing the internal flame structure is described and used to show that the turbulent flame consists of tightly folded flamelets. The reaction zone structure of these is virtually identical to that of the planar laminar flame, while the preheat zone is broadened by approximately a factor of two. Consequently, the system evolution represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. The turbulent cascade fails to penetrate the internal flame structure, and thus the action of small-scale turbulence is suppressed throughout most of the flame. Finally, our results suggest that for stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixtures, any substantial flame broadening by the action of turbulence cannot be expected in all subsonic regimes. (author)

  6. The Dynamics of Flame Flicker in Conical Premixed Flames: An Experimental and Numerical Study

    E-print Network

    Bell, John B.

    and phase-averaged velocity fields, centerline axial velocities and the flame flicker frequency (10.2 Hz near the flame front and the rotating vortex motion. The phase-averaged velocity data provided. As the inlet flow velocity increases these vortex interactions produce progressively more chaotic flame tip

  7. Mechanisms and enhancement of flame stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.K.

    1993-01-01

    During the reporting period, useful contributions have been made in understanding the structure of laminar premixed and diffusion flames, with emphasis on the influence of aerodynamics and chemical kinetics. These contributions include (1) derivation of the missing closure condition for the activation energy asymptotic analysis of premixed flames, (2) identification of a dual extinction mode for radiation-affected flames, (3) formulation of a unified theory of fundamental flammability limits, and (4) demonstration that flame stabilization can be achieved in the absence of heat loss. These investigations have been conducted via experimental, analytical and computational approaches, with strong coupling between the individual components.

  8. Experimental investigation of self-turbulent flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almarcha, Christophe; Quinard, Joel

    2012-11-01

    When propagating downwards, premixed flames undergo hydrodynamic instabilities. The resulting dynamics exhibits multiple corrugations of the light emitting reaction zone. By changing the reactive mixture composition or the shape of the propagation volume, the characteristic lengths of perturbation are changed. We present here the experimental study of propane-air and methane-air flames propagating in vertical circular tubes and in vertically oriented Hele-Shaw cells. This last configuration allows comparison with two dimensional numerical models. The thermo acoustic instability, usually acting when flames propagate in confined volume, is damped thanks to an acoustic absorber, allowing the study of wide flames at the meter scale.

  9. Spark ignition of lifted turbulent jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.F.; Mastorakos, E.

    2006-07-15

    This paper presents experiments on ignition and subsequent edge flame propagation in turbulent nonpremixed methane jets in air. The spark position, energy, duration, electrode diameter and gap, and the jet velocity and air premixing of the fuel stream are examined to study their effects on the ignition probability defined as successful flame establishment. The flame is visualized by a high-speed camera and planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH. It was found that after an initially spherical shape, the flame took a cylindrical shape with a propagating edge upstream. The probability of successful ignition increases with high spark energy, thin electrode diameter and wide gap, but decreases with increasing dilution of the jet with air. The flame kernel growth rate is high when the ignition probability is high for all parameters, except for jet velocity. Increasing the jet velocity decreases the ignition probability at all locations. The average flame position as a function of time from the spark was measured and the data were used to estimate a net propagation speed, which then resulted in an estimate of the average edge flame speed relative to the incoming flow. This was about 3 to 6 laminar burning velocities of a stoichiometric mixture. The measurements can assist theoretical models for the probability of ignition of nonpremixed flames and for edge flame propagation in turbulent inhomogeneous mixtures, both of which determine the success of ignition in practical combustion systems. (author)

  10. Conditions for a split diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, J.R.

    1997-05-01

    An unusual phenomenon has been observed in a methane jet diffusion flame subjected to axial acoustic forcing. At specific excitation frequencies and amplitudes, the driven flame splits into a central jet and one or two side jets. The splitting is accompanied by a partial detachment of the flame from the nozzle exit, a shortening of the flame by a factor of 2, and a change from the common yellow color of soot radiation to a clear blue flame. Such a phenomenon may be useful for the control of soot production or product species. The splitting is intermittent in time, bifurcating between the split flame and an ordinary single jet diffusion flame. The experiment consists of an unconfined axisymmetric methane jet formed by a short length of 0.4 cm diameter pipe. The pipe is connected to a large plenum surrounding a bass reflex loudspeaker enclosure that provides the excitation. Conditions producing split and bifurcated flames are presented. The drive frequencies required to cause bifurcation correspond to the first two peaks in the system`s frequency response curve. Bifurcating behavior was observed at a wide range of flow rates, ranging from very small flames of Reynolds number 240 up to turbulent lift-off, at Re = 1,000, based on the inner pipe diameter. It was not sensitive to nozzle length, but the details of the nozzle tip, such as orifice or pipe geometry, can affect the frequency range.

  11. Detection of Terrestrial Planets Using Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Witteborn, Fred; Jenkins, Jon; Dunham, Edward; Boruci, William; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Transit photometry detection of planets offers many advantages: an ability to detect terrestrial size planets, direct determination of the planet's size, applicability to all main-sequence stars, and a differential brightness change of the periodic signature being independent of stellar distance or planetary orbital semi-major axis. Ground and space based photometry have already been successful in detecting transits of the giant planet HD209458b. However, photometry 100 times better is required to detect terrestrial planets. We present results of laboratory measurements of an end-to-end photometric system incorporating all of the important confounding noise features of both the sky and a space based photometer including spacecraft jitter. In addition to demonstrating an instrumental noise of less than 10 ppm (an Earth transit of a solar-like star is 80 ppm), the brightnesses of individual stars were dimmed to simulate Earth-size transit signals. These 'transits' were reliably detected as part of the tests.

  12. Tulip flames: changes in shape of premixed flames propagating in closed tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn-Rankin, D.; Sawyer, R. F.

    The experimental results that are the subject of this communication provide high-speed schlieren images of the closed-tube flame shape that has come to be known as the tulip flame. The schlieren images, along with in-chamber pressure records, help demonstrate the effects of chamber length, equivalence ratio, and igniter geometry on formation of the tulip flame. The pressure/time records show distinct features which correlate with flame shape changes during the transition to tulip. The measurements indicate that the basic tulip flame formation is a robust phenomenon that depends on little except the overall geometry of the combustion vessel.

  13. Unsteady planar diffusion flames: Ignition, travel, burnout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fendell, F.; Wu, F.

    1995-01-01

    In microgravity, a thin planar diffusion flame is created and thenceforth travels so that the flame is situated at all times at an interface at which the hydrogen and oxygen meet in stoichiometric proportion. If the initial amount of hydrogen is deficient relative to the initial amount of oxygen, then the planar flame will travel further and further into the half volume initially containing hydrogen, until the hydrogen is (virtually) fully depleted. Of course, when the amount of residual hydrogen becomes small, the diffusion flame is neither vigorous nor thin; in practice, the flame is extinguished before the hydrogen is fully depleted, owing to the finite rate of the actual chemical-kinetic mechanism. The rate of travel of the hydrogen-air diffusion flame is much slower than the rate of laminar flame propagation through a hydrogen-air mixture. This slow travel facilitates diagnostic detection of the flame position as a function of time, but the slow travel also means that the time to burnout (extinction) probably far exceeds the testing time (typically, a few seconds) available in earth-sited facilities for microgravity-environment experiments. We undertake an analysis to predict (1) the position and temperature of the diffusion flame as a function of time, (2) the time at which extinction of the diffusion flame occurs, and (3) the thickness of quench layers formed on side walls (i.e., on lateral boundaries, with normal vectors parallel to the diffusion-flame plane), and whether, prior to extinction, water vapor formed by burning will condense on these cold walls.

  14. Photometry of the old nova HZ Pup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassanelli, Tomas; Abbott, Tim

    2016-01-01

    This study of the old nova HZ Pup involved obtaining image data, removing the instrumental signature, performing photometry on the stellar images present, and generating light curves. Relative photometry between the target star and other stars in the image was used to remove atmospheric effects. A periodogram of this light curve shows the historically known periodicity close to 20 minutes. However, other periodicities are also present and it is not clear from the data which are real and which are artifacts of the sampling. These data will be combined with data from other telescopes collected contemporaneously in order to resolve this ambiguity.

  15. Time-resolved photometry of cataclysmic variables

    E-print Network

    C. Papadaki; H. M. J. Boffin; J. Cuypers; V. Stanishev; Z. Kraicheva; V. Genkov

    2003-12-18

    We present time-resolved photometry of two cataclysmic variables whose CCD photometric observations were obtained with the 1m telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory in October 2002 and August 2003 and with the 1m telescope at Hoher List in Germany. Concerning MCT 2347-3144 we detect for the first time a period of 6.65h. For V1193 Ori the 3.96 h periodicity has for the first time been confirmed through time-resolved photometry.

  16. Flame surface properties of premixed flames in isotropic turbulence; Measurements and numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.; Wu, M.S.; Driscoll, J.F.; Faeth, G.M. )

    1992-02-01

    In this paper an experimental and theoretical investigation of free turbulent premixed flames propagating in isotropic turbulence at neutrally stable preferential diffusion conditions is described. Experiments were limited to the wrinkled thin laminar flamelet regime and involved mixtures of hydrogen, air, and nitrogen ignited within a fan-stirred combustion chamber. Measurements included flame tomography for flame surface statistics and tow-point laser velocimetry for unburned gas turbulence properties. Flame surface properties were numerically simulated using a two-dimensional flame propagation algorithm combined with statistical time series simulation of unburned gas velocities along the flame surface. Measurements showed progressively increasing flame radius fluctuations, flame surface fractal dimensions, and turbulent/laminar flame perimeters with increasing means frame radius. The rate of increase of these properties all increased with increasing turbulence intensities relative to the laminar flame speed. Simulated flame properties duplicated these trends but underestimated the effects of turbulence-a deficiency mainly attributed to the limitations of a two-dimensional simulation. Extension of the method to a three-dimensional simulation, to obtain a more definitive evaluation of the simulation, appears to be computationally feasible.

  17. Effect of Reynolds Number in Turbulent-Flow Range on Flame Speeds of Bunsen Burner Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollinger, Lowell M; Williams, David T

    1949-01-01

    The effect of flow conditions on the geometry of the turbulent Bunsen flame was investigated. Turbulent flame speed is defined in terms of flame geometry and data are presented showing the effect of Reynolds number of flow in the range of 3000 to 35,000 on flame speed for burner diameters from 1/4 to 1 1/8 inches and three fuels -- acetylene, ethylene, and propane. The normal flame speed of an explosive mixture was shown to be an important factor in determining its turbulent flame speed, and it was deduced from the data that turbulent flame speed is a function of both the Reynolds number of the turbulent flow in the burner tube and of the tube diameter.

  18. Generating Light Curves from Forced PSF-fit Photometry on PTFIDE Difference-images

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    1 Generating Light Curves from Forced PSF-fit Photometry on PTFIDE ancillary forced Aperture Photometry 6 ­ Other quality checks for PSF-fit photometry ­ Putting it all together: conversion to magnitudes 9 ­ AC­to­DC Photometry

  19. Extrasolar planet transit photometry at Wallace Astrophysical Observatory

    E-print Network

    Fong, Wen-fai

    2008-01-01

    Extrasolar planet transit photometry is a relatively new astronomical technique developed over the past decade. Transit photometry is the measurement of a star's brightness as an orbiting planet passes in front of the star ...

  20. Propagation of a Free Flame in a Turbulent Gas Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickelsen, William R; Ernstein, Norman E

    1956-01-01

    Effective flame speeds of free turbulent flames were measured by photographic, ionization-gap, and photomultiplier-tube methods, and were found to have a statistical distribution attributed to the nature of the turbulent field. The effective turbulent flame speeds for the free flame were less than those previously measured for flames stabilized on nozzle burners, Bunsen burners, and bluff bodies. The statistical spread of the effective turbulent flame speeds was markedly wider in the lean and rich fuel-air-ratio regions, which might be attributed to the greater sensitivity of laminar flame speed to flame temperature in those regions. Values calculated from the turbulent free-flame-speed analysis proposed by Tucker apparently form upper limits for the statistical spread of free-flame-speed data. Hot-wire anemometer measurements of the longitudinal velocity fluctuation intensity and longitudinal correlation coefficient were made and were employed in the comparison of data and in the theoretical calculation of turbulent flame speed.

  1. Public health implications of components of plastics manufacture. Flame retardants.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, E M; Liepins, R

    1975-01-01

    The four processes involved in the flammability of materials are described and related to the various flame retardance mechanisms that may operate. Following this the four practical approaches used in improving flame retardance of materials are described. Each approach is illustrated with a number of typical examples of flame retardants or synthetic procedures used. This overview of flammability, flame retardance, and flame retardants used is followed by a more detailed examination of most of the plastics manufactured in the United States during 1973, their consumption patterns, and the primary types of flame retardants used in the flame retardance of the most used plastics. The main types of flame retardants are illustrated with a number of typical commercial examples. Statistical data on flame retardant market size, flame retardant growth in plastics, and price ranges of common flame retardants are presented. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:1175568

  2. Active control for turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-03-26

    Many turbulent premixed flames of practical interest are statistically stationary. They occur in combustors that have anchoring mechanisms to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. As a result, typical detailed simulations are performed in simplified model configurations such as decaying isotropic turbulence or inflowing turbulence. In these configurations, the turbulence seen by the flame either decays or, in the latter case, increases as the flame accelerates toward the turbulent inflow. This limits the duration of the eddy evolutions experienced by the flame at a given level of turbulent intensity, so that statistically valid observations cannot be made. In this paper, we apply a feedback control to computationally stabilize an otherwise unstable turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. For the simulations, we specify turbulent in flow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm. We use the simulations to study the propagation and the local chemical variability of turbulent flame chemistry.

  3. Simple Flame Test Techniques Using Cotton Swabs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.; Phelps, Amy J.; Banks, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Three alternative methods for performing flame tests using cheaply and easily available cotton swabs are described. These flame tests are useful for chemical demonstrations or laboratory experiments because they are quick and easy to perform with easy cleanup and disposal methods.

  4. Analysis of Stabilization Mechanisms in Lifted Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Martinez, S.; Kronenburg, A.

    2009-12-01

    Flame stabilization and the mechanisms that govern the dynamics at the flame base have been subject to numerous studies in recent years. Recent results using a combined Large Eddy Simulation-Conditional Moment Closure (LES-CMC) approach to model the turbulent flow field and the turbulence-chemistry interactions has been successful in predicting flame ignition and stabilization by auto-ignition, but LES-CMCs capability of the accurate modelling of the competition between turbulent quenching and laminar and turbulent flame propagation at the anchor point has not been resolved. This paper will consolidate LES-CMC results by analysing a wide range of lifted flame geometries with different prevailing stabilization mechanisms. The simulations allow a clear distinction of the prevailing stabilization mechanisms for the different flames, LES-CMC accurately predicts the competition between turbulence and chemistry during the auto-ignition process, however, the dynamics of the extinction process and turbulent flame propagation are not well captured. The averaging process inherent in the CMC methods does not allow for an instant response of the transported conditionally averaged reactive species to the changes in the flow conditions and any response of the scalars will therefore be delayed. Stationary or quasi-stationary conditions, however, can be well predicted for all flame configurations.

  5. Dynamics of premixed confined swirling flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palies, P.; Durox, D.; Schuller, T.; Morenton, P.; Candel, S.

    2009-06-01

    Considerable effort is currently being extended to examine the fundamental mechanisms of combustion instabilities and develop methods allowing predictions of these phenomena. One central aspect of this problem is the dynamical response of the flame to incoming perturbations. This question is examined in the present article, which specifically considers the response of premixed swirling flames to perturbations imposed on the upstream side of the flame in the feeding manifold. The flame response is characterized by measuring the unsteady heat release induced by imposed velocity perturbations. A flame describing function is defined by taking the ratio of the relative heat release rate fluctuation to the relative velocity fluctuation. This quantity is determined for a range of frequencies and for different levels of incoming velocity perturbations. The flame dynamics is also documented by calculating conditional phase averages of the light emission from the flame and taking the Abel transform of these average images to obtain the flame geometry at various instants during the cycle of oscillation. These data can be useful to the determination of possible regimes of instability. To cite this article: P. Palies et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  6. On adiabatic stabilization and geometry of Bunsen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.J.; Sung, C.J.; Law, C.K.

    1994-12-31

    Two aspects of stretched flame dynamics are investigated via the model problem of the stabilization and geometry of Bunsen flames. Specifically, the possibility of stabilizing a Bunsen flame without heat loss to the burner rim is experimentally investigated by examining the temperature of the rim, the temperature gradient between the rim and the flame base, and the standoff distance of the flame base in relation to the flame thickness. Results show that, while heat loss is still the dominant stabilization mechanism for flames in uniform flows and for strong flames in parabolic flow, adiabatic stabilization and, subsequently, blowoff are indeed possible for weak flames in parabolic flows. The adiabatically stabilized flame is then modeled by using the scalar field formulation and by allowing for the effects of curvature and aerodynamic straining on the local flame speed. The calculated flame configuration agrees well with the experiment for the adiabatically stabilized flame but not for the nonadiabatic flame. Results further show that active modification of the flame curvature is the dominant cause for the flame to maintain adiabatic stabilization. Implications of the present results on turbulent flame modeling are discussed.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames -- Fast or Faster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, E. P.

    2015-04-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable flames play a key role in the explosions of supernovae Ia. However, the dynamics of these flames are still not well understood. RT unstable flames are affected by both the RT instability of the flame front and by RT-generated turbulence. The coexistence of these factors complicates the choice of flame speed subgrid models for full-star Type Ia simulations. Both processes can stretch and wrinkle the flame surface, increasing its area and, therefore, the burning rate. In past research, subgrid models have been based on either the RT instability or turbulence setting the flame speed. We evaluate both models, checking their assumptions and their ability to correctly predict the turbulent flame speed. Specifically, we analyze a large parameter study of 3D direct numerical simulations of RT unstable model flames. This study varies both the simulation domain width and the gravity in order to probe a wide range of flame behaviors. We show that RT unstable flames are different from traditional turbulent flames: they are thinner rather than thicker when turbulence is stronger. We also show that none of the several different types of turbulent flame speed models accurately predicts measured flame speeds. In addition, we find that the RT flame speed model only correctly predicts the measured flame speed in a certain parameter regime. Finally, we propose that the formation of cusps may be the factor causing the flame to propagate more quickly than predicted by the RT model.

  8. Interaction Between Flames and Electric Fields Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between flames and electric fields has long been an interesting research subject that has theoretical importance as well as practical significance. Many of the reactions in a flame follow an ionic pathway: that is, positive and negative ions are formed during the intermediate steps of the reaction. When an external electric field is applied, the ions move according to the electric force (the Coulomb force) exerted on them. The motion of the ions modifies the chemistry because the reacting species are altered, it changes the velocity field of the flame, and it alters the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame will change its shape and location to meet all thermal, chemical, and electrical constraints. In normal gravity, the strong buoyant effect often makes the flame multidimensional and, thus, hinders the detailed study of the problem.

  9. Edge Diffusion Flame Propagation and Stabilization Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2004-01-01

    In most practical combustion systems or fires, fuel and air are initially unmixed, thus forming diffusion flames. As a result of flame-surface interactions, the diffusion flame often forms an edge, which may attach to burner walls, spread over condensed fuel surfaces, jump to another location through the fuel-air mixture formed, or extinguish by destabilization (blowoff). Flame holding in combustors is necessary to achieve design performance and safe operation of the system. Fires aboard spacecraft behave differently from those on Earth because of the absence of buoyancy in microgravity. This ongoing in-house flame-stability research at the NASA Glenn Research Center is important in spacecraft fire safety and Earth-bound combustion systems.

  10. Propagating edge-flame response to multiple stoichiometry gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Kostka, Stanislav Jr.; Carnell, William F. Jr.; Renfro, Michael W.

    2008-07-15

    A five-slot contoured nozzle burner was used to create multiple lifted partially premixed flames in close proximity. The burner permits the stoichiometry gradient below each edge flame and the separation distance between stabilization points of the flames to be separately controlled. In previous work, we showed that edge-flame interactions lead to a bifurcation in the flame stabilization, where the liftoff height of neighboring edge flames differs even in symmetric flow fields. As the composition gradient below each flame is decreased, the edge flames broaden. Flow around the edge flames leads to an aerodynamic interaction, where upstream conditions below one flame are modified by the neighboring flame. These interactions cause a liftoff height difference between the two flames. Further reduction of stoichiometry gradient causes the neighboring flames to merge and approach the structure of a single premixed flame. In this work, the equivalence ratio gradient and separation distance between stoichiometric points were varied by controlling the burner slot equivalence ratios, so that these interactions could be studied in greater detail. Rayleigh scattering was used to measure flame curvature and calculate local stoichiometry gradients below each flame stabilization point. Planar laser-induced fluorescence signals of hydroxyl and formaldehyde were measured to provide qualitative comparisons of relative reaction rates between flames. Neighboring edge flames were found to behave based solely on local conditions below each flame. Only aerodynamic interactions were observed and no chemical or thermal interactions, caused by heat or radical transport between flames, were observed. The bifurcated flame response can be described simply from the effects that flow around the flame structure has on local velocities and scalar dissipation rates. (author)

  11. Aperture Photometry Uncertainties assuming Priors and Correlated Noise

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    1 Aperture Photometry Uncertainties assuming Priors and Correlated Noise F. Masci, version 2.0, 10 aperture photometry assuming (i) prior pixel-flux uncertainties are available for the image (e.g., computed photometry is being performed. One way to do this is to compare the uncertainties with the local RMS pixel

  12. Time Series Photometry Data: Standard Access, Standard Formats

    E-print Network

    Holl, András

    Time Series Photometry Data: Standard Access, Standard Formats Andr#19; as Holl Konkoly Observatory a discussion on data access and #12;le format aspects of photometry. Introduction Presently there is time series photometry data available in public databases, but the access to these varies from one collection

  13. VALIDATION OF SPECTRAL UNMIXING METHODS USING PHOTOMETRY AND TOPOGRAPHY INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    VALIDATION OF SPECTRAL UNMIXING METHODS USING PHOTOMETRY AND TOPOGRAPHY INFORMATION Rubén Marrero1 topography and photometry of the scene. The validation of the different methods and deconvolution processes topography and most importantly photometry are precisely known. On the other hand better distribution maps

  14. NIR photometry of M31LRN 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Stefan; Pessev, Peter

    2015-10-01

    A new epoch JHKs NIR photometry of the stellar merger candidate MASTER OT J004207.99+405501.1 / M31N 2015-01a / M31LRN 2015 (Kurtenkov et al. 2015, Williams et al. 2015, ATel #6911, ATel #7150) has been obtained.

  15. Photometry from online Digitized Sky Survey Plates

    E-print Network

    A. Bacher; S. Kimeswenger; P. Teutsch

    2005-07-22

    Online Digital Sky Survey (DSS) material is often used to obtain information on newly discovered variable stars for older epochs (e.g. Nova progenitors, flare stars, ...). We present here the results of an investigation of photometry on online digital sky survey material in small fields calibrated by CCD sequences. We compared different source extraction mechanisms and found, that even down near to the sensitivity limit, despite the H-compression used for the online material, photometry with an accuracy better than 0\\fm1 rms is possible on DSS-II. Our investigation shows that the accuracy depends strongly on the source extraction method. The SuperCOSMOS scans, although retrieved with an higher spatial resolution, do not give us better results. The methods and parameters presented here, allow the user to obtain good plate photometry in small fields down to the Schmidt plate survey limits with a few bright CCD calibrators, which may be calibrated with amateur size telescopes. Especially for the events mentioned above, new field photometry for calibration purposes mostly exists, but the progenitors were not measured photometrically before. Also the follow up whether stellar concentrations are newly detected clusters or similar work may be done without using mid size telescopes. The calibration presented here is a "local" one for small fields. We show that this method presented here gives higher accuracies than "global" calibrations of surveys (e.g. GSC-II, SuperCOSMOS and USNO-B)

  16. Flame Structure and Emissions of Strongly-Pulsed Turbulent Diffusion Flames with Swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Hao

    This work studies the turbulent flame structure, the reaction-zone structure and the exhaust emissions of strongly-pulsed, non-premixed flames with co-flow swirl. The fuel injection is controlled by strongly-pulsing the fuel flow by a fast-response solenoid valve such that the fuel flow is completely shut off between pulses. This control strategy allows the fuel injection to be controlled over a wide range of operating conditions, allowing the flame structure to range from isolated fully-modulated puffs to interacting puffs to steady flames. The swirl level is controlled by varying the ratio of the volumetric flow rate of the tangential air to that of the axial air. For strongly-pulsed flames, both with and without swirl, the flame geometry is strongly impacted by the injection time. Flames appear to exhibit compact, puff-like structures for short injection times, while elongated flames, similar in behaviors to steady flames, occur for long injection times. The flames with swirl are found to be shorter for the same fuel injection conditions. The separation/interaction level between flame puffs in these flames is essentially governed by the jet-off time. The separation between flame puffs decreases as swirl is imposed, consistent with the decrease in flame puff celerity due to swirl. The decreased flame length and flame puff celerity are consistent with an increased rate of air entrainment due to swirl. The highest levels of CO emissions are generally found for compact, isolated flame puffs, consistent with the rapid quenching due to rapid dilution with excess air. The imposition of swirl generally results in a decrease in CO levels, suggesting more rapid and complete fuel/air mixing by imposing swirl in the co-flow stream. The levels of NO emissions for most cases are generally below the steady-flame value. The NO levels become comparable to the steady-flame value for sufficiently short jet-off time. The swirled co-flow air can, in some cases, increase the NO emissions. The elevated NO emissions are due to a longer combustion residence time due to the flow recirculation within the swirl-induced recirculation zone. The reaction zone structure, based on OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is broadly consistent with the observation of luminous flame structure for these types of flames. In many cases, the reaction zone exhibits discontinuities at the instantaneous flame tip in the early period of fuel injection. These discontinuities in the reaction zone likely result from the non-ignition of injected fuel, due to a relatively slower reaction rate in comparison with the mixing rate. The discontinuity in the OH zone is generally seen to diminish with increased swirl level. Statistics generated from the OH PLIF signals show that the reaction zone area generally increases with increased swirl level, consistent with a broader and more convoluted OH-zone structure for flames with swirl. The reaction zone area for swirled flames generally exhibits a higher degree of fluctuation, suggesting a relatively stronger impact of flow turbulence on the flame structure for flames with swirl.

  17. The Effects of Flame Structure on Extinction of CH4-O2-N2 Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, J.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Gokoglu, S. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The effects of flame structure on the extinction limits of CH4-O2-N2 counterflow diffusion flames were investigated experimentally and numerically by varying the stoichiometric mixture fraction Z(sub st), Z(sub st) was varied by varying free-stream concentrations, while the adiabatic flame temperature T(sub ad) was held fixed by maintaining a fixed amount of nitrogen at the flame. Z(sub st) was varied between 0.055 (methane-air flame) and 0.78 (diluted- methane-oxygen flame). The experimental results yielded an extinction strain rate K(sub ext) of 375/s for the methane-air flame, increasing monotonically to 1042/s for the diluted-methane-oxygen flame. Numerical results with a 58-step Cl mechanism yielded 494/s and 1488/s, respectively. The increase in K(sub ext) with Z(sub st) for a fixed T(sub ad) is explained by the shift in the O2 profile toward the region of maximum temperature and the subsequent increase in rates for chain-branching reactions. The flame temperature at extinction reached a minimum at Z(sub st) = 0.65, where it was 200 C lower than that of the methane-air flame. This significant increase in resistance to extinction is seen to correspond to the condition in which the OH and O production zones are centered on the location of maximum temperature.

  18. Scaling of turbulent flame speed for expanding flames with Markstein diffusion considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Law, Chung K.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we clarify the role of Markstein diffusivity, which is the product of the planar laminar flame speed and the Markstein length, on the turbulent flame speed and its scaling, based on experimental measurements on constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames. Turbulent flame propagation data are presented for premixed flames of mixtures of hydrogen, methane, ethylene, n-butane, and dimethyl ether with air, in near-isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. For each individual fuel-air mixture presented in this work and the recently published iso-octane data from Leeds, normalized turbulent flame speed data of individual fuel-air mixtures approximately follow a ReT,f0.5 scaling, for which the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property of the turbulence Reynolds number. At a given ReT,f, it is experimentally observed that the normalized turbulent flame speed decreases with increasing Markstein number, which could be explained by considering Markstein diffusivity as the leading dissipation mechanism for the large wave number flame surface fluctuations. Consequently, by replacing thermal diffusivity with the Markstein diffusivity in the turbulence Reynolds number definition above, it is found that normalized turbulent flame speeds could be scaled by ReT,M0.5 irrespective of the fuel, equivalence ratio, pressure, and turbulence intensity for positive Markstein number flames.

  19. Scaling of turbulent flame speed for expanding flames with Markstein diffusion considerations.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Wu, Fujia; Law, Chung K

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we clarify the role of Markstein diffusivity, which is the product of the planar laminar flame speed and the Markstein length, on the turbulent flame speed and its scaling, based on experimental measurements on constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames. Turbulent flame propagation data are presented for premixed flames of mixtures of hydrogen, methane, ethylene, n-butane, and dimethyl ether with air, in near-isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. For each individual fuel-air mixture presented in this work and the recently published iso-octane data from Leeds, normalized turbulent flame speed data of individual fuel-air mixtures approximately follow a Re_{T,f}^{0.5} scaling, for which the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property of the turbulence Reynolds number. At a given Re_{T,f}^{}, it is experimentally observed that the normalized turbulent flame speed decreases with increasing Markstein number, which could be explained by considering Markstein diffusivity as the leading dissipation mechanism for the large wave number flame surface fluctuations. Consequently, by replacing thermal diffusivity with the Markstein diffusivity in the turbulence Reynolds number definition above, it is found that normalized turbulent flame speeds could be scaled by Re_{T,M}^{0.5} irrespective of the fuel, equivalence ratio, pressure, and turbulence intensity for positive Markstein number flames. PMID:24125342

  20. On the extraction of laminar flame speed and Markstein length from outwardly propagating spherical flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zheng

    2011-02-15

    Large discrepancies among the laminar flame speeds and Markstein lengths of methane/air mixtures measured by different researchers using the same constant-pressure spherical flame method are observed. As an effort to reduce these discrepancies, one linear model (LM, the stretched flame speed changes linearly with the stretch rate) and two non-linear models (NM I and NM II, the stretched flame speed changes non-linearly with the stretch rate) for extracting the laminar flame speed and Markstein length from propagating spherical flames are investigated. The accuracy and performance of the LM, NM I, and NM II are found to strongly depend on the Lewis number. It is demonstrated that NM I is the most accurate for mixtures with large Lewis number (positive Markstein length) while NM II is the most accurate for mixtures with small Lewis number (negative Markstein length). Therefore, in order to get accurate laminar flame speed and Markstein length from spherical flame experiments, different non-linear models should be used for different mixtures. The validity of the theoretical results is further demonstrated by numerical and experimental studies. The results of this study can be used directly in spherical flame experiments measuring the laminar flame speed and Markstein length. (author)

  1. On the "Tulip Flame" Phenomenon CHRISTOPHE CLANET and GEOFFREY SEARBY'

    E-print Network

    Clanet, Christophe

    On the "Tulip Flame" Phenomenon CHRISTOPHE CLANET and GEOFFREY SEARBY' Insitut de Recherche sur les, France We present an experimental study of the "tulip flame" phenomenon using high-speed photography and the gas dynamics. In particular, the tulip flame results from an inversion of the flame front curvature

  2. Prandtl-number dependence of turbulent flame propagation.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, A R

    2001-12-01

    Inertial-range cascade phenomenology is used to predict Prandtl-number (Pr) dependencies of turbulent flame properties. A unified picture of turbulent flame structure and burning velocity is developed that encompasses all Pr regimes. Implications of the analysis for gaseous flames (Pr near unity), autocatalytic fronts in liquids (high Pr), and astrophysical flames (low Pr) are noted. PMID:11736275

  3. Transfer function of acoustically perturbed Bunsen flames. Theoretical investigation

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    to the boundary and, consequently, the behaviour of the flame response to velocity perturbations. PACS: 43.28.Kt]. The response of a Bunsen flame to velocity perturbations is evaluated in terms of the flame transfer function. In this model the movement of the flame front under the action of the perturbed flow velocity v

  4. Aalborg Universitet Large eddy simulation of one diffusion swirling flame

    E-print Network

    Berning, Torsten

    is to stabi- lize flame in the wake of bluff-body, and one is to stabilize flame in the low-velocity regionAalborg Universitet Large eddy simulation of one diffusion swirling flame Yang, Yang; Kær, Søren, S. K., & Yin, C. (2011). Large eddy simulation of one diffusion swirling flame. Poster session

  5. Laminar Soot Processes Experiment Shedding Light on Flame Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment investigated soot processes in nonturbulent, round gas jet diffusion flames in still air. The soot processes within these flames are relevant to practical combustion in aircraft propulsion systems, diesel engines, and furnaces. However, for the LSP experiment, the flames were slowed and spread out to allow measurements that are not tractable for practical, Earth-bound flames.

  6. Role of compressibility in moderating flame acceleration in tubes.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, Vitaly; Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Valiev, Damir; Law, Chung K

    2010-02-01

    The effect of gas compression on spontaneous flame acceleration leading to deflagration-to-detonation transition is studied theoretically for small Reynolds number flame propagation from the closed end of a tube. The theory assumes weak compressibility through expansion in small Mach number. Results show that the flame front accelerates exponentially during the initial stage of propagation when the Mach number is negligible. With continuous increase in the flame velocity with respect to the tube wall, the flame-generated compression waves subsequently moderate the acceleration process by affecting the flame shape and velocity, as well as the flow driven by the flame. PMID:20365653

  7. Flame image segmentation algorithm based on background subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xikang; Lv, Ming

    Considering the defect and imperfection of flame pixel point extraction and the bad environmental adaptability in the field of the present fire flame image segmentation algorithm, we put forward a kind of new algorithm based on the background difference method and fire flame color criterion. The adaptive background differencing method can detect and find objects which are moving or changing in the view field. The color criterion of fire flame can judge the color of flame of the moving objects, and then extract the flame image. Finally, the experimental results show that this algorithm has better adapt to the changing environment, and the flame extracting more accurately, perfect and stable.

  8. Soot formation in diffusion flames of fuel/oxygen mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hura, H.S.; Glassman, I.

    1989-01-01

    Soothing trends have been measured as a function of equivalence ratio of fuel/oxygen mixtures over the range of infinity (pure diffusion flames) to low values (double flames; an inner premixed flame and an outer diffusion flame combination). All interesting observations have been explained on the basis of changes due to oxygen addition in the fuel pyrolysis chemistry, flame structure, and interaction of double flames. This effect of oxygen addition to the fuel on soot formation has been studied in coflow and counterflow diffusion flames of ethene and propane by performing smoke height, laser light extinction, temperature, and velocity measurements.

  9. Structure of Propagating and Attached Hydrocarbon Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath

    2004-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations with C3-chemistry and radiative heat-loss models have been performed to reveal the internal structure of propagating and attached flames in an axisymmetric fuel jet of methane, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, or propane in air under normal and zero gravity. Observations of the flames were also made at the NASA Glenn 2.2-Second Drop Tower. In computations, the fuel issued into quasi-quiescent air for a fixed mixing time before it was ignited along the centerline at stoichiometry. The edge of the flame propagated through a flammable layer at the laminar flame speed of the stoichiometric fuel-air mixture independent of gravity. For all cases, a peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, was formed in the flame base, thereby holding a trailing diffusion flame. The location of the reaction kernel in the attached flames depended inversely on the reactivity. The reaction-kernel correlations between the reactivity and the velocity were developed further using variables related to local Damkahler and Peclet numbers.

  10. Progress and challenges in swirling flame dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, Sébastien; Durox, Daniel; Schuller, Thierry; Palies, Paul; Bourgouin, Jean-François; Moeck, Jonas P.

    2012-11-01

    In many continuous combustion processes the flame is stabilized by swirling the injected flow. This is the case for example in aeroengine combustors or in gas turbines where aerodynamic injectors impart a rotating component to the flow to create a central recirculation zone which anchors the flame. Swirling flame dynamics is of technical interest and also gives rise to interesting scientific issues. Some of the recent progress in this field will be reviewed. It is first shown that the swirler response to incident acoustic perturbations generates a vorticity wave which is convected by the flow. A result of this process is that the swirl number fluctuates. It is then shown that the flame response is defined by a combination of heat release rate fluctuations induced by the incoming acoustic and convective perturbations. This is confirmed by experimental measurements and by large eddy simulations of the reactive flow. Measured flame describing functions (FDFs) are then used to characterize the nonlinear response of swirling flames to incident perturbations and determine the regimes of instability of a generic system comprising an upstream manifold, an injector equipped with a swirler and a combustion chamber confining the flame. The last part of this article is concerned with interactions of the precessing vortex core (PVC) with incoming acoustic perturbations. The PVC is formed at high swirl number and this hydrodynamic helical instability gives rise to some interesting nonlinear interactions between the acoustic frequency, the PVC frequency and their difference frequency.

  11. Numerical study of turbulent flame velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Bychkov, Vitaly; Eriksson, Lars-Erik

    2007-11-15

    A premixed flame propagating through a combination of vortices in a tube/channel is studied using direct numerical simulations of the complete set of combustion equations including thermal conduction, diffusion, viscosity, and chemical kinetics. Two cases are considered, a single-mode vortex array and a multimode combination of vortices obeying the Kolmogorov spectrum. It is shown that the velocity of flame propagation depends strongly on the vortex intensity and size. The dependence on the vortex intensity is almost linear in agreement with the general belief. The dependence on the vortex size may be imitated by a power law {proportional_to}D{sup 2/3}. This result is different from theoretical predictions, which creates a challenge for the theory. In the case of the Kolmogorov spectrum of vortices, the velocity of flame propagation is noticeably smaller than for a single-mode vortex array. The flame velocity depends weakly on the thermal expansion of burning matter within the domain of realistically large expansion factors. Comparison to the experimental data indicates that small-scale turbulence is not the only effect that influences the flame velocity in the experimental flows. Large-scale processes, such as the Darrieus-Landau instability and flame-wall interaction, contribute considerably to the velocity of flame propagation. Still, on small scales, the Darrieus-Landau instability becomes important only for a sufficiently low vortex intensity. (author)

  12. Laminar Premixed and Diffusion Flames (Ground-Based Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Ground-based studies of soot processes in laminar flames proceeded in two phases, considering laminar premixed flames and laminar diffusion flames, in turn. The test arrangement for laminar premixed flames involved round flat flame burners directed vertically upward at atmospheric pressure. The test arrangement for laminar jet diffusion flames involved a round fuel port directed vertically upward with various hydrocarbon fuels burning at atmospheric pressure in air. In both cases, coflow was used to prevent flame oscillations and measurements were limited to the flame axes. The measurements were sufficient to resolve soot nucleation, growth and oxidation rates, as well as the properties of the environment needed to evaluate mechanisms of these processes. The experimental methods used were also designed to maintain capabilities for experimental methods used in corresponding space-based experiments. This section of the report will be limited to consideration of flame structure for both premixed and diffusion flames.

  13. Flame Oscillations In Non-Premixed Systems Diffusion Flames and Edge-Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matalon, Moshe

    2003-01-01

    Diffusive-thermal instabilities are well known features of premixed and diffusion flames. In one of its form the instability appears as spontaneous oscillations. In premixed systems oscillations are predicted to occur when the effective Lewis number, defined as the ratio of the thermal diffusivity of the mixture to the mass diffusivity of the deficient component, is sufficiently larger than one. Oscillations would therefore occur in mixtures that are deficient in the less mobile reactant, namely in lean hydrocarbon-air or rich hydrogen-air mixtures. The theoretical predictions summarized above are in general agreement with experimental results; see for example [5] where a jet configuration was used and experiments were conducted for various inert-diluted propane and methane flames burning in inert-diluted oxygen. Nitrogen, argon and SF6 were used as inert in order to produce conditions of substantially different Lewis numbers and mixture strength. In accord with the predicted trend, it was found that oscillations arise at near extinction conditions, that for oscillations to occur it suffices that one of the two Lewis numbers be sufficiently large, and that oscillations are more likely to be observed when is relatively large.

  14. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  15. Infrared Photometry for Automated Telescopes: Passband Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, Gene; Young, Andrew T.

    2011-03-01

    The high precision that photometry in the near and intermediate infrared region can provide has not been achieved, partly because of technical challenges (including cryogenics, which most IR detectors require), and partly because the filters in common use are not optimized to avoid water-vapor absorptions, which are the principal impediment to precise ground-based IR photometry. We review the IRWG filters that achieve this goal, and the trials that were undertaken to demonstrate their superiority. We focus especially on the near IR set and, for high elevation sites, the passbands in the N window. We also discuss the price to be paid for the improved precision, in the form of lower throughput, and why it should be paid: to achieve not only higher precision (i.e., improved signal-to-noise ratio), but also lower extinction, thus producing higher accuracy in extra-atmospheric magnitudes. The edges of the IRWG passbands are not defined by the edges of the atmospheric windows: therefore, they admit no flux from these (constantly varying) edges. The throughput cost and the lack of a large body of data already obtained in these passbands are principal reasons why the IRWG filters are not in wide use at observatories around the world that currently do IR work. Yet a measure of the signal-to-noise ratio varies inversely with both extinction and with a measure of the Forbes effect. So, the small loss of raw throughput is recouped in signal-to-noise gain. We illustrate these points with passbands of both near and intermediate IR passbands. There is also the matter of cost for small production runs of these filters; reduced costs can be realized through bulk orders with uniform filter specifications. As a consequence, the near-IR IRWG passbands offer the prospect of being able to do photometry in those passbands at both high and low elevation sites that are capable of supporting precise photometry, thereby freeing infrared photometry from the need to access exclusively high and dry elevation sites, although photometry done at those sites can also benefit from improved accuracy and transformability. We suggest that if the IRWG passbands are made available, they will be used! New automated systems making use of these passbands have the advantage of establishing the system more widely, creating a larger body of data to which future observations will be fully transformable, and will be cheaper to purchase. This work has been supported in part by grants to EFM by the Canadian Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

  16. Heat release and flame structure measurements of self-excited acoustically-driven premixed methane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp-Vaughan, Kristin M.; Tuttle, Steven G.; Renfro, Michael W.; King, Galen B.

    2009-10-15

    An open-open organ pipe burner (Rijke tube) with a bluff-body ring was used to create a self-excited, acoustically-driven, premixed methane-air conical flame, with equivalence ratios ranging from 0.85 to 1.05. The feed tube velocities corresponded to Re = 1780-4450. Coupled oscillations in pressure, velocity, and heat release from the flame are naturally encouraged at resonant frequencies in the Rijke tube combustor. This coupling creates sustainable self-excited oscillations in flame front area and shape. The period of the oscillations occur at the resonant frequency of the combustion chamber when the flame is placed {proportional_to}1/4 of the distance from the bottom of the tube. In this investigation, the shape of these acoustically-driven flames is measured by employing both OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and chemiluminescence imaging and the images are correlated to simultaneously measured pressure in the combustor. Past research on acoustically perturbed flames has focused on qualitative flame area and heat release relationships under imposed velocity perturbations at imposed frequencies. This study reports quantitative empirical fits with respect to pressure or phase angle in a self-generated pressure oscillation. The OH-PLIF images were single temporal shots and the chemiluminescence images were phase averaged on chip, such that 15 exposures were used to create one image. Thus, both measurements were time resolved during the flame oscillation. Phase-resolved area and heat release variations throughout the pressure oscillation were computed. A relation between flame area and the phase angle before the pressure maximum was derived for all flames in order to quantitatively show that the Rayleigh criterion was satisfied in the combustor. Qualitative trends in oscillating flame area were found with respect to feed tube flow rates. A logarithmic relation was found between the RMS pressure and both the normalized average area and heat release rate for all flames. (author)

  17. Flame resistant nontoxic polymer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Karle, D. W.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    A number of homopolymers, copolymers, and terpolymers were synthesized employing styrene and four derivatives of diphenyl-p-styrylphosphine. The various polymeric compositions were prepared by two processes, (1) monomer bulk polymerizations and (2) substitution of preformed polydiphenyl-p-styrylphosphine. Results indicate that the majority of the compositions exhibit superior melting and flame retardant characteristics as compared to polystyrene, but are inferior in molding and film forming capability. Terpolymerization appears to result in the materials with the best overall combination of properties. Toxicological evaluation of three representative basic compositions in the form of molded washers showed that no mortalities occurred among the test animals exposed to the products of the oxidative thermal decomposition of the three materials.

  18. Flame tolerant secondary fuel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Wu, Chunyang; Zuo, Baifang; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2015-02-24

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a plurality of primary nozzles configured to diffuse or premix fuel into an air flow through the combustor; and a secondary nozzle configured to premix fuel with the air flow. Each premixing nozzle includes a center body, at least one vane, a burner tube provided around the center body, at least two cooling passages, a fuel cooling passage to cool surfaces of the center body and the at least one vane, and an air cooling passage to cool a wall of the burner tube. The cooling passages prevent the walls of the center body, the vane(s), and the burner tube from overheating during flame holding events.

  19. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Turbulent flame speed

    SciTech Connect

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S.

    2011-02-15

    Direct numerical simulations of the interaction of a premixed flame with driven, subsonic, homogeneous, isotropic, Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system are used to study the mechanisms determining the turbulent flame speed, S{sub T}, in the thin reaction zone regime. High intensity turbulence is considered with the r.m.s. velocity 35 times the laminar flame speed, S{sub L}, resulting in the Damkoehler number Da=0.05. The simulations were performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive-flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model, based on the one-step Arrhenius kinetics, represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture under the assumption of the Lewis number Le=1. Global properties and the internal structure of the flame were analyzed in an earlier paper, which showed that this system represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. This paper demonstrates that: (1) The flame brush has a complex internal structure, in which the isosurfaces of higher fuel mass fractions are folded on progressively smaller scales. (2) Global properties of the turbulent flame are best represented by the structure of the region of peak reaction rate, which defines the flame surface. (3) In the thin reaction zone regime, S{sub T} is predominantly determined by the increase of the flame surface area, A{sub T}, caused by turbulence. (4) The observed increase of S{sub T} relative to S{sub L} exceeds the corresponding increase of A{sub T} relative to the surface area of the planar laminar flame, on average, by {approx}14%, varying from only a few percent to as high as {approx}30%. (5) This exaggerated response is the result of tight flame packing by turbulence, which causes frequent flame collisions and formation of regions of high flame curvature >or similar 1/{delta}{sub L}, or ''cusps,'' where {delta}{sub L} is the thermal width of the laminar flame. (6) The local flame speed in the cusps substantially exceeds its laminar value, which results in a disproportionately large contribution of cusps to S{sub T} compared with the flame surface area in them. (7) A criterion is established for transition to the regime significantly influenced by cusp formation. In particular, at Karlovitz numbers Ka >or similar 20, flame collisions provide an important mechanism controlling S{sub T}, in addition to the increase of A{sub T} by large-scale motions and the potential enhancement of diffusive transport by small-scale turbulence. (author)

  20. High pressure flame system for pollution studies with results for methane-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.; Maahs, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    A high pressure flame system was designed and constructed for studying nitrogen oxide formation in fuel air combustion. Its advantages and limitations were demonstrated by tests with a confined laminar methane air diffusion flame over the pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The methane issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port concentrically into a stream of air contained within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. As the combustion pressure is increased, the flame changes in shape from wide and convex to slender and concave, and there is a marked increase in the amount of luminous carbon. The height of the flame changes only moderately with pressure.

  1. Effect of cylindrical confinement on the determination of laminar flame speeds using outwardly propagating flames

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Michael P.; Chen, Zheng; Ju, Yiguang; Dryer, Frederick L.

    2009-04-15

    The effect of nonspherical (i.e. cylindrical) bomb geometry on the evolution of outwardly propagating flames and the determination of laminar flame speeds using the conventional constant-pressure technique is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cylindrical chamber boundary modifies the propagation rate through the interaction of the wall with the flow induced by thermal expansion across the flame (even with constant pressure), which leads to significant distortion of the flame surface for large flame radii. These departures from the unconfined case, especially the resulting nonzero burned gas velocities, can lead to significant errors in flame speeds calculated using the conventional assumptions, especially for large flame radii. For example, at a flame radius of 0.5 times the wall radius, the flame speed calculated neglecting confinement effects can be low by {proportional_to}15% (even with constant pressure). A methodology to estimate the effect of nonzero burned gas velocities on the measured flame speed in cylindrical chambers is presented. Modeling and experiments indicate that the effect of confinement can be neglected for flame radii less than 0.3 times the wall radius while still achieving acceptable accuracy (within 3%). The methodology is applied to correct the flame speed for nonzero burned gas speeds, in order to extend the range of flame radii useful for flame speed measurements. Under the proposed scaling, the burned gas speed can be well approximated as a function of only flame radius for a given chamber geometry - i.e. the correction function need only be determined once for an apparatus and then it can be used for any mixture. Results indicate that the flow correction can be used to extract flame speeds for flame radii up to 0.5 times the wall radius with somewhat larger, yet still acceptable uncertainties for the cases studied. Flow-corrected burning velocities are measured for hydrogen and syngas mixtures at atmospheric and elevated pressures. Flow-corrected flame speeds in the small cylindrical chamber used here agree well with previously reported flame speeds from large spherical chambers. Previous papers presenting burning velocities from cylindrical chambers report performing data analysis on flame radii less than 0.5 or 0.6 times the wall radius, where the flame speed calculated neglecting confinement effects may be low by {proportional_to}15 or 20%, respectively. For cylindrical chambers, data analysis should be restricted to flame radii less than 0.3 times the wall radius or a flow correction should be employed to account for the burned gas motions. With regard to the design of future vessels, larger vessels that minimize the flow aberrations for the same flame radius are preferred. Larger vessels maximize the relatively unaffected region of data allowing for a more straightforward approach to interpret the experimental data. (author)

  2. Laminar Diffusion Flame Studies (Ground- and Space-Based Studies)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Laminar diffusion flames are of interest because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for analysis and experiments than more practical turbulent diffusion flames. Certainly, understanding flame processes within laminar diffusion flames must precede understanding these processes in more complex turbulent diffusion flames. In addition, many properties of laminar diffusion flames are directly relevant to turbulent diffusion flames using laminar flamelet concepts. Laminar jet diffusion flame shapes (luminous flame boundaries) have been of particular interest since the classical study of Burke and Schumann because they are a simple nonintrusive measurement that is convenient for evaluating flame structure predictions. Thus, consideration of laminar flame shapes is undertaken in the following, emphasizing conditions where effects of gravity are small, due to the importance of such conditions to practical applications. Another class of interesting properties of laminar diffusion flames are their laminar soot and smoke point properties (i.e., the flame length, fuel flow rate, characteristic residence time, etc., at the onset of soot appearance in the flame (the soot point) and the onset of soot emissions from the flame (the smoke point)). These are useful observable soot properties of nonpremixed flames because they provide a convenient means to rate several aspects of flame sooting properties: the relative propensity of various fuels to produce soot in flames; the relative effects of fuel structure, fuel dilution, flame temperature and ambient pressure on the soot appearance and emission properties of flames; the relative levels of continuum radiation from soot in flames; and effects of the intrusion of gravity (or buoyant motion) on emissions of soot from flames. An important motivation to define conditions for soot emissions is that observations of laminar jet diffusion flames in critical environments, e.g., space shuttle and space station facilities, cannot involve soot emitting flames in order to ensure that test chamber windows used for experimental observations are not blocked by soot deposits, thereby compromising unusually valuable experimental results. Another important motivation to define conditions where soot is present in diffusion flames is that flame chemistry, transport and radiation properties are vastly simplified when soot is absent, making such flames far more tractable for detailed numerical simulations than corresponding soot-containing flames. Motivated by these observations, the objectives of this phase of the investigation were as follows: (1) Observe flame-sheet shapes (the location of the reaction zone near phi=1) of nonluminous (soot free) laminar jet diffusion flames in both still and coflowing air and use these results to develop simplified models of flame-sheet shapes for these conditions; (2) Observe luminous flame boundaries of luminous (soot-containing) laminar jet diffusion flames in both still and coflowing air and use these results to develop simplified models of luminous flame boundaries for these conditions. In order to fix ideas here, maximum luminous flame boundaries at the laminar smoke point conditions were sought, i.e., luminous flame boundaries at the laminar smoke point; (3) Observe effects of coflow on laminar soot- and smoke-point conditions because coflow has been proposed as a means to control soot emissions and minimize the presence of soot in diffusion flames.

  3. One Percent Strömvil Photometry in M 67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. D.; Boyle, R. P.; Janusz, R.

    2005-05-01

    The Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope on Mt. Graham is being used in a program of CCD photometry of open and globular clusters. We are using the Ströomvil System (Straižys et al. 1996), a combination of the Strömgren and Vilnius Systems. This system allows stars to be classified as to temperature, surface gravity, metallicity and reddening from the photometric measures alone. However, to make accurate estimates of the stellar parameters the photometry should be accurate to 1 or 1.5 percent. In our initial runs on the VATT we did not achieve this accuracy. The problem turned out to be scattered light in the telescope and this has now been reduced so we can do accurate photometry. Boyle has written a routine in IRAF which allows us to correct the flats for any differences. We take rotated frames and also frames which are offset in position by one third of a frame, east-west and north-south. Measures of the offset stars give us the corrections that need to be made to the flat. Robert Janusz has written a program, the CommandLog, which allows us to paste IRAF commands in the correct order to reduce measures made on a given observing run. There is an automatic version where one can test various parameters and get a set of solutions. Now we have a set of Strömvil frames in the open cluster, M 67 and we compare our color-magnitude diagram with those of BATC (Fan et al. 1996) and Vilnius (Boyle et al. 1998). A preliminary report of the M 67 photometry will be found in Laugalys et al. (2004). Here we report on a selected set of stars in the M 67 frames, those with errors 1 percent or less.

  4. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2016 January-March

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2016-01-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and have no or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  5. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2015 October-December

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2015-10-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  6. Flame balls - Past, present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Ronney, P.; Smooke, M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses analytical and numerical work that has been carried out in order to understand flame-balls and related phenomena that have been observed in microgravity experiments. The importance of heat losses is identified, whether from conduction, convection, or radiation. Accurate numerical simulations for hydrogen-air mixtures with radiation losses reveal a flammability limit of 3.5 percent of hydrogen by volume, a value close to the experimental one. The important role of stability analyses is emphasized, with particular attention to the role of three-dimensional instabilities in explaining unsteady spheroidal flames and flame-strings, objects that are observed in the experiments. We speculate that the dynamics of flame-strings is affected by in-depth radiation absorption for mixtures containing SF6, and report on some preliminary calculations in which this phenomenon is accounted for.

  7. Environmentally Benign Flame Retardant Nanocoatings for Fabric 

    E-print Network

    Li, Yu-Chin

    2012-07-16

    and environmental impact, which has created a need for alternative flame retardant chemistries and approaches. Polymer nanocomposites typically exhibit reduced mass loss and heat release rates, along with anti-dripping behavior, all of which are believed to be due...

  8. Flame Spectral Analysis for Boiler Control 

    E-print Network

    Metcalfe, C. I.; Cole, W. E.; Batra, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    range from the flames and using these measurements to determine the burner operating conditions. Two prototype instruments have been installed on package boilers at a Con Edison powerplant and Polaroid facility, and their performance has been evaluated...

  9. Brominated Flame Retardants and Perfluorinated Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) belong to a large class of chemicals known as organohalogens. It is believed that both BFRs and PFCs saved lives by reducing flammability of materials commonly used and bactericidal (biocidal) properties. Thes...

  10. PCBs, PBBs and Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter introduces selected organohalogen chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB5), polychiorinated biphenyls (PBBs), and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) with emphasis on the background, physicochemical properties, environmental levels, health effects and possib...

  11. Light collection device for flame emission detectors

    DOEpatents

    Woodruff, Stephen D. (Morgantown, WV); Logan, Ronald G. (Morgantown, WV); Pineault, Richard L. (Morgantown, WV)

    1990-01-01

    A light collection device for use in a flame emission detection system such as an on-line, real-time alkali concentration process stream monitor is disclosed which comprises a sphere coated on its interior with a highly diffuse reflective paint which is positioned over a flame emission source, and one or more fiber optic cables which transfer the light generated at the interior of the sphere to a detecting device. The diffuse scattering of the light emitted by the flame uniformly distributes the light in the sphere, and the collection efficiency of the device is greater than that obtainable in the prior art. The device of the present invention thus provides enhanced sensitivity and reduces the noise associated with flame emission detectors, and can achieve substantial improvements in alkali detection levels.

  12. CCD Strömvil Photometry of M 37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, R. P.; Janusz, R.; Kazlauskas, A.; Philip, A. G. Davis

    2001-12-01

    We have been working on a program of setting up standards in the Strömvil photometric system and have been doing CCD photometry of globular and open clusters. A previous paper (Boyle et al. BAAS, AAS Meeting #193, #68.08) described the results of observations made in the open cluster M 67, which we are setting up as one of the prime standard fields for Strömvil photometry. Now we discuss our observations of M 37, made on the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope on Mt. Graham, Arizona. One of us (R.J.) has automated the data processing by a novel method. The Strömvil group is multinational. By use of this innovative automated, yet interactive processing method, one systematically applies the same processing steps to run in IRAF by capturing them as presented in html files and submitting them to the IRAF command language. Use of the mouse avoids errors and accelerates the processing from raw data frames to calibrated photometry. From several G2 V stars in M 67 we have calculated their mean color indices and compare them to stars in M 37 to identify candidate G2 V stars there. Identifying such stars relates to the search for terrestrial exoplanets. Ultimately we will use the calibrated Strömvil indices to make photometric determinations of log g and Teff.

  13. Simulation of spherically expanding turbulent premixed flames

    E-print Network

    Ahmed, I.; Swaminathan, N.

    2013-09-16

    investigation is helpful to understand combustion in prac- tical devices such as the spark ignited internal combustion engine, modern stratified charge engines and accidental explosions of fuel vapour cloud. Although it is a classi- cal problem our current... that this flame is representative of combustion in spark-ignition engines (Pope, 1987). This flame was also considered in earlier computational studies (Pope and Cheng, 1986; Schmid et al., 1998; Lipatnikov and Chomiak, 2000). Table 1: Experimental conditions...

  14. Flame resistant fibrous materials. [developed from chlorofluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Four chlorofluoropolymer systems were developed that satisfactorily met the criteria for classification as self-extinguishing. Three of these systems consisted of Halar (a copolymer of chlorotrifluoroethylene and ethylene) and tin-based flame retardants. The fourth system was a copolymer of chlorotrifluoroethylene and tetrafluoroethylene with no flame retardants added. Production of fibers from all four candidates, by melt extrusion, was demonstrated. Fibers produced from the chlorotrifluoroethylene tetrafluoroethylene copolymer showed the most promise.

  15. Reduced Kinetic Mechanisms for Acetylene Diffusion Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstedt, R. P.; Mauss, F.

    Previous studies of acetylene combustion have predominantly focussed on premixed flames, e.g. Frenklach and Warnatz [14.1] and Miller and Melius [14.2], while little attention has been given to non-premixed combustion or a systematic reduction of the chemical kinetics for either case. For premixed flames the latter is the topic of Chap. 7 of the current book while the present study is using the planar counterflow geometry to investigate the structure of acetylene-air diffusion flames. The counterflow geometry forms an ideal and computationally efficient configuration for theoretical investigations of chemical kinetics in diffusion flames and many past studies have been performed for alkane fuels. Among these are the numerical studies of the structure of counterflow methane-air and propane-air diffusion flames with detailed [14.3,14.4] and simplified [14.3] - [14.5] chemistry. However, previous studies have not analysed diffusion flames with alkene or alkyne fuels. This is in part a reflection of the uncertainties surrounding the chemistry of such flames. Among the additional problems encountered is the formation of soot and cyclic compounds such as benzene. The former is particularly important at low rates of strain and as a consequence experimental flames are under such conditions strongly non-adiabatic due to radiation from soot particles. Recently soot models have been proposed [14.6] which in principle can be applied to obtain a first approximation of such effects in studies of the kind present here. However, the scope of the present study is limited to an investigation of the primary reaction channels including the formation of C3 species but excluding the formation of aromatics or soot.

  16. Formation and properties of distributed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei; Gamezo, Vadim; Oran, Elaine

    2008-11-01

    Interaction of flames with turbulence is a ubiquitous process encountered in a wide variety of systems, ranging from terrestrial flames to thermonuclear burning fronts in supernovae. Burning can alter the turbulent field by injecting additional energy on multiple scales thereby modifying its spectral energy distribution. On the other hand, turbulence itself can have pronounced effect on the flame changing its morphology, properties, etc. In this work we present results of detailed numerical and theoretical modeling of the interaction of flames in stoichiometric methane-air and hydrogen-air mixtures with turbulence of varying intensity and spectrum. We demonstrate the transition with increasing turbulent intensity from the laminar flame to the corrugated flamelet and finally to the distributed reaction zone. The latter represents a quasi-steady-state propagating burning front in which thermal conduction and species diffusion are mediated by turbulent transport. We discuss properties of such flames and their potential implications for deflagration-to-detonation transition both in confined and unconfined systems.

  17. NO concentration imaging in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Schefer, R.W.

    1993-12-01

    The importance of NO as a pollutant species is well known. An understanding of the formation characteristics of NO in turbulent hydrocarbon flames is important to both the desired reduction of pollutant emissions and the validation of proposed models for turbulent reacting flows. Of particular interest is the relationship between NO formation and the local flame zone, in which the fuel is oxidized and primary heat release occurs. Planar imaging of NO provides the multipoint statistics needed to relate NO formation to the both the flame zone and the local turbulence characteristics. Planar imaging of NO has been demonstrated in turbulent flames where NO was seeded into the flow at high concentrations (2000 ppm) to determine the gas temperature distribution. The NO concentrations in these experiments were significantly higher than those expected in typical hydrocarbon-air flames, which require a much lower detectability limit for NO measurements. An imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence with sufficient sensitivity to study the NO formation mechanism in the stabilization region of turbulent lifted-jet methane flames.

  18. An elementary discussion of propellant flame geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Buckmaster, J.; Jackson, T.L.; Yao, J.

    1999-05-01

    The authors examine the geometry of diffusion flames generated by the burning of a heterogeneous solid propellant, using a simple model designed to provide qualitative insights. In the fast chemistry limit a strategy is used which has its roots in Burke and Schumann`s 1928 study of diffusion flames, albeit with different boundary conditions. This shows that the stoichiometric level surface (SLS) intersects the propellant surface at a point displaced from the fuel/oxidizer interface, and the variations of this displacement with Peclet number are discussed. The authors show that for model sandwich propellants, or their axisymmetric counterpart, the geometry of the SLS when the core is oxidizer is quite different from the geometry of the SLS when the core is fuel. Also, it is much easier to quench the flame on an oxidizer core, by reducing the Peclet number, than it is to quench the flame on a fuel core. When finite chemistry effects are accounted for, the flame only occupies a portion of the SLS, and there is a leading edge structure in which premixing plays a role. Enhancement of the burning rate due to premixing is identified, but a well-defined tribrachial structure is not observed. The authors show how a sharp reduction in pressure can lead to a detachment of the flame from the SLS, with subsequent quenching as it is swept downstream.

  19. Premixed Turbulent Flame Propagation in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1999-01-01

    A combined numerical-experimental study has been carried out to investigate the structure and propagation characteristics of turbulent premixed flames with and without the influence of buoyancy. Experimentally, the premixed flame characteristics are studied in the wrinkled regime using a Couette flow facility and an isotropic flow facility in order to resolve the scale of flame wrinkling. Both facilities were chosen for their ability to achieve sustained turbulence at low Reynolds number. This implies that conventional diagnostics can be employed to resolve the smallest scales of wrinkling. The Couette facility was also built keeping in mind the constraints imposed by the drop tower requirements. Results showed that the flow in this Couette flow facility achieves full-developed turbulence at low Re and all turbulence statistics are in good agreement with past measurements on large-scale facilities. Premixed flame propagation studies were then carried out both using the isotropic box and the Couette facility. Flame imaging showed that fine scales of wrinkling occurs during flame propagation. Both cases in Ig showed significant buoyancy effect. To demonstrate that micro-g can remove this buoyancy effect, a small drop tower was built and drop experiments were conducted using the isotropic box. Results using the Couette facility confirmed the ability to carry out these unique reacting flow experiments at least in 1g. Drop experiments at NASA GRC were planned but were not completed due to termination of this project.

  20. Quantitative Species Measurements In Microgravity Combustion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Silver, Joel A.; Piltch, Nancy D.

    2003-01-01

    The capability of models and theories to accurately predict and describe the behavior of low gravity flames can only be verified by quantitative measurements. Although video imaging, simple temperature measurements, and velocimetry methods have provided useful information in many cases, there is still a need for quantitative species measurements. Over the past decade, we have been developing high sensitivity optical absorption techniques to permit in situ, non-intrusive, absolute concentration measurements for both major and minor flames species using diode lasers. This work has helped to establish wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) as an important method for species detection within the restrictions of microgravity-based measurements. More recently, in collaboration with Prof. Dahm at the University of Michigan, a new methodology combining computed flame libraries with a single experimental measurement has allowed us to determine the concentration profiles for all species in a flame. This method, termed ITAC (Iterative Temperature with Assumed Chemistry) was demonstrated for a simple laminar nonpremixed methane-air flame at both 1-g and at 0-g in a vortex ring flame. In this paper, we report additional normal and microgravity experiments which further confirm the usefulness of this approach. We also present the development of a new type of laser. This is an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) which has the unique capability of high frequency modulation as well as a very wide tuning range. This will permit the detection of multiple species with one laser while using WMS detection.

  1. Characterisation of an oxy-coal flame through digital imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, John; Riley, Gerry; Lu, Gang; Yan, Yong

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents investigations into the impact of oxy-fuel combustion on flame characteristics through the application of digital imaging and image processing techniques. The characteristic parameters of the flame are derived from flame images that are captured using a vision-based flame monitoring system. Experiments were carried out on a 0.5 MW{sub th} coal combustion test facility. Different flue gas recycle ratios and furnace oxygen levels were created for two different coals. The characteristics of the flame and the correlation between the measured flame parameters and corresponding combustion conditions are described and discussed. The results show that the flame temperature decreases with the recycle ratio for both test coals, suggesting that the flame temperature is effectively controlled by the flue gas recycle ratio. The presence of high levels of CO{sub 2} at high flue gas recycle ratios may result in delayed combustion and thus has a detrimental effect on the flame stability. (author)

  2. A Computational Investigation of Sooting Limits of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecoustre, V. R.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    Limiting conditions for soot particle inception in spherical diffusion flames were investigated numerically. The flames were modeled using a one-dimensional, time accurate diffusion flame code with detailed chemistry and transport and an optically thick radiation model. Seventeen normal and inverse flames were considered, covering a wide range of stoichiometric mixture fraction, adiabatic flame temperature, and residence time. These flames were previously observed to reach their sooting limits after 2 s of microgravity. Sooting-limit diffusion flames with residence times longer than 200 ms were found to have temperatures near 1190 K where C/O = 0.6, whereas flames with shorter residence times required increased temperatures. Acetylene was found to be a reasonable surrogate for soot precursor species in these flames, having peak mole fractions of about 0.01.

  3. Laminar and Turbulent Gaseous Diffusion Flames. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent measurements and predictions of the properties of homogeneous (gaseous) laminar and turbulent non-premixed (diffusion) flames are discussed, emphasizing results from both ground- and space-based studies at microgravity conditions. Initial considerations show that effects of buoyancy not only complicate the interpretation of observations of diffusion flames but at times mislead when such results are applied to the non-buoyant diffusion flame conditions of greatest practical interest. This behavior motivates consideration of experiments where effects of buoyancy are minimized; therefore, methods of controlling the intrusion of buoyancy during observations of non-premixed flames are described, considering approaches suitable for both normal laboratory conditions as well as classical microgravity techniques. Studies of laminar flames at low-gravity and microgravity conditions are emphasized in view of the computational tractability of such flames for developing methods of predicting flame structure as well as the relevance of such flames to more practical turbulent flames by exploiting laminar flamelet concepts.

  4. The Effects of Gravity on Wrinkled Laminar Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Larry W.; Zhou, Liming; Cheng, Robert K.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of gravity are significant to the dynamics of idealized unconfined open premixed flames. Moderate to low turbulence Reynolds number flames, i.e., wrinkled laminar flames, of various unconfined geometries have been used extensively for investigating fundamental processes of turbulent flame propagation and to validate theoretical models. Without the wall constraints, the flames are free to expand and interact with surrounding ambient air. The flow field in which the flame exists is determined by a coupling of burner geometry, flame orientation and the gravity field. These complex interactions raise serious questions regarding the validity of comparing the experimental data of open flames with current theoretical and numerical models that do not include the effects of gravity nor effects of the larger aerodynamic flowfield. Therefore, studies of wrinkled laminar flame in microgravity are needed for a better understanding of the role of gravity on flame characteristics such as the orientation, mean aerodynamics stretch, flame wrinkle size and burning rate. Our approach to characterize and quantify turbulent flame structures under microgravity is to exploit qualitative and quantitative flow visualization techniques coupled with video recording and computer controlled image analysis technologies. The experiments will be carried out in the 2.2 second drop tower at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The longest time scales of typical wrinkled laminar flames in the geometries considered here are in the order of 10 msec. Hence, the duration of the drop is sufficient to obtain the amount of statistical data necessary for characterize turbulent flame structures.

  5. Blowoff dynamics of bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Kostka, Stanislav; Renfro, Michael W.; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2010-04-15

    This article concerns the flame dynamics of a bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flame as it approaches lean blowoff. Time resolved chemiluminescence imaging along with simultaneous particle image velocimetry and OH planar laser-induced fluorescence were utilized in an axisymmetric bluff body stabilized, propane-air flame to determine the sequence of events leading to blowoff and provide a quantitative analysis of the experimental results. It was found that as lean blowoff is approached by reduction of equivalence ratio, flame speed decreases and the flame shape progressively changes from a conical to a columnar shape. For a stably burning conical flame away from blowoff, the flame front envelopes the shear layer vortices. Near blowoff, the columnar flame front and shear layer vortices overlap to induce high local stretch rates that exceed the extinction stretch rates instantaneously and in the mean, resulting in local flame extinction along the shear layers. Following shear layer extinction, fresh reactants can pass through the shear layers to react within the recirculation zone with all other parts of the flame extinguished. This flame kernel within the recirculation zone may survive for a few milliseconds and can reignite the shear layers such that the entire flame is reestablished for a short period. This extinction and reignition event can happen several times before final blowoff which occurs when the flame kernel fails to reignite the shear layers and ultimately leads to total flame extinguishment. (author)

  6. Surface photometry of WINGS galaxies with GASPHOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, M.; Bindoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moretti, A.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Varela, J.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We present the B, V, and K band surface photometry catalogs obtained by running the automatic software GASPHOT on galaxies from the WINGS cluster survey with isophotal areas larger than 200 pixels. The catalogs can be downloaded at the Centre de Données Astronomiques de Strasbourg. Methods: The luminosity growth curves of stars and galaxies in a given catalog relative to a given cluster image were obtained simultaneously by slicing the image with a fixed surface brightness step in several SExtractor runs. Then, using a single Sersic law convolved with a space-varying point spread function (PSF), GASPHOT performed a simultaneous ?2 best-fit of the major- and minor-axis luminosity growth curves of galaxies. We outline the GASPHOT performances and compare our surface photometry with that obtained by SExtractor, GALFIT, and GIM2D. This analysis is aimed at providing statistical information about the accuracy that is generally achieved by the softwares for automatic surface photometry of galaxies. Results: The GASPHOT catalogs provide the parameters of the Sersic law that fit the luminosity profiles for each galaxy and for each photometric band. They are the sky coordinates of the galaxy center (RA, Dec), the total magnitude (m), the semi-major axis of the effective isophote (Re), the Sersic index (n), the axis ratio (b/a), and a flag parameter (QFLAG) that generally indicates the fit quality. The WINGS-GASPHOT database includes 41 463 galaxies in the B band, 42 275 in the V band, and 71 687 in the K band. The bright early-type galaxies have higher Sersic indices and larger effective radii, as well as redder colors in their center. In general, the effective radii increase systematically from the K to the V and B band. Conclusions: The GASPHOT photometry agrees well with the surface photometry obtained by GALFIT and GIM2D, and with the aperture photometry provided by SExtractor. In particular, the direct comparison of structural parameters derived by different softwares for common galaxies indicates that the systematic differences are small in general. The only significant deviations are most likely due to the peculiar (and very accurate) image processing adopted by WINGS for large galaxies. The main advantages of GASPHOT with respect to other tools are (i) the automatic finding of the local PSF; (ii) the short CPU execution time; and (iii) the remarkable stability against the choice of the initial-guess parameters. All these characteristics make GASPHOT an ideal tool for blind surface photometry of large galaxy samples in wide-field CCD mosaics. Catalogs are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/572/A87

  7. Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the Oxygen Burning Flame

    E-print Network

    Bell, John B.

    Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the Oxygen Burning Flame S. E of these regions can be supersonic and could initiate a detonation. Subject headings: supernovae: general a late time transition of the thermonuclear burning to a detonation wave (e.g., Hoflich et al. 1995

  8. On the dynamics of flame edges in diffusion-flame/vortex interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanns, Miguel; Linan, Amable; Vera, Marcos

    2007-04-15

    We analyze the local flame extinction and reignition of a counterflow diffusion flame perturbed by a laminar vortex ring. Local flame extinction leads to the appearance of flame edges separating the burning and extinguished regions of the distorted mixing layer. The dynamics of these edges is modeled based on previous numerical results, with heat release effects fully taken into account, which provide the propagation velocity of triple and edge flames in terms of the upstream unperturbed value of the scalar dissipation. The temporal evolution of the mixing layer is determined using the classical mixture fraction approach, with both unsteady and curvature effects taken into account. Although variable density effects play an important role in exothermic reacting mixing layers, in this paper the description of the mixing layer is carried out using the constant density approximation, leading to a simplified analytical description of the flow field. The mathematical model reveals the relevant nondimensional parameters governing diffusion-flame/vortex interactions and provides the parameter range for the more relevant regime of local flame extinction followed by reignition via flame edges. Despite the simplicity of the model, the results show very good agreement with previously published experimental results. (author)

  9. Flame jet impingement heat transfer from an array of radial jet reattachment flames

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, J.W.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.; Page, R.H.

    1997-07-01

    The use of gas-fired rapid heating techniques for metal and glass products has many advantages over typical furnace heating techniques, namely: high thermal efficiency, improved product quality, faster heating response time, and increased productivity. Recent reviews have focused on understanding the heat transfer aspects of impinging flame jets. In their two reviews, Baukal and Gebhart discuss the experimental conditions as well as the measurements made with impinging flame jet systems. Their findings add more detailed information to the earlier work of Viskanta (1993) but these reviews clearly demonstrate the scarcity of data regarding impinging flame jets. Here, flame jet impingement heat transfer for an array of Radial Jet Reattachment Combustion (RJRC) nozzles has been studied for flames which were highly, moderately, and weakly interactive. The low, however, the most uniform between-nozzle heat flux distribution on the impingement surface occurred at the closest between-nozzle spacing, when the flames were highly interacting. The highest between-nozzle heat flux was measured when the flame jets were moderately interacting at intermediate between-nozzle spacing. At large spacings, the RJRC nozzles became weakly interacting and behaved much like independent RJRC nozzles with relatively low heat flux to the impingement surface. Based on the heat flux profiles, the optimal between-nozzle spacing was identified and flame temperatures as well as additional heat flux profiles in the direction perpendicular to the line connecting the RJRC nozzles were measured.

  10. Investigation of flame-generated turbulence in premixed flames at low and high burning velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanson; Lenze, Bernhard

    1992-05-01

    Knowledge of the dependence of turbulent flame velocity on such parameters as fuel properties, turbulent fluctuations, and length scales is of central importance for industrial applications such as combustion in motors, gas turbine combustors, and domestic burners. Two unanswered questions concern how aerodynamic turbulence influences the reaction and/or flame speed and how the reaction intensity influences the aerodynamic turbulence values. The reaction velocity has been measured in a stagnation point flame, the turbulence intensities and length scales before and after the flame front being recorded by an LDV system. Laminar burning velocity was varied by using different concentrations of methane-hydrogen-air mixtures. The results show under certain conditions an immense increase in turbulent fluctuations in and after the flame front, measured using conditioned and unconditioned LDV techniques.

  11. DISTRIBUTED FLAMES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Aspden, A. J.; Bell, J. B.; Woosley, S. E.

    2010-02-20

    At a density near a few x10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}, the subsonic burning in a Type Ia supernova (SN) enters the distributed regime (high Karlovitz number). In this regime, turbulence disrupts the internal structure of the flame, and so the idea of laminar burning propagated by conduction is no longer valid. The nature of the burning in this distributed regime depends on the turbulent Damkoehler number (Da{sub T}), which steadily declines from much greater than one to less than one as the density decreases to a few x10{sup 6} g cm{sup -3}. Classical scaling arguments predict that the turbulent flame speed s{sub T} , normalized by the turbulent intensity u-check, follows s{sub T}/u-check = Da{sub T}{sup 1/2} for Da{sub T} {approx}< 1. The flame in this regime is a single turbulently broadened structure that moves at a steady speed, and has a width larger than the {integral} scale of the turbulence. The scaling is predicted to break down at Da{sub T} {approx} 1, and the flame burns as a turbulently broadened effective unity Lewis number flame. This flame burns locally with speed s{sub l}ambda and width l{sub l}ambda, and we refer to this kind of flame as a lambda-flame. The burning becomes a collection of lambda-flames spread over a region approximately the size of the {integral} scale. While the total burning rate continues to have a well-defined average, s{sub T}{approx}u-check, the burning is unsteady. We present a theoretical framework, supported by both one-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical simulations, for the burning in these two regimes. Our results indicate that the average value of s{sub T} can actually be roughly twice u-check for Da{sub T} {approx}> 1, and that localized excursions to as much as 5 times u-check can occur. We also explore the properties of the individual flames, which could be sites for a transition to detonation when Da{sub T} {approx} 1. The lambda-flame speed and width can be predicted based on the turbulence in the star (specifically the energy dissipation rate epsilon*) and the turbulent nuclear burning timescale of the fuel tau {sup T}{sub nuc}. We propose a practical method for measuring s{sub l}ambda and l{sub l}ambda based on the scaling relations and small-scale computationally inexpensive simulations. This suggests that a simple turbulent flame model can be easily constructed suitable for large-scale distributed SNe flames. These results will be useful both for characterizing the deflagration speed in larger full-star simulations, where the flame cannot be resolved, and for predicting when detonation occurs.

  12. Turbulent Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1996-01-01

    The experimental cold-flow facility is now full operational and is currently being used to obtain baseline turbulence data in a Couette flow. The baseline turbulence data is necessary to confirm the capability of the chosen device to generate and maintain the required turbulence intensity. Subsequent reacting flow studies will assume that a similar turbulent flow field exists ahead of the premixed flame. Some modifications and refinements had to be made to enable accurate measurements. It consists of two rollers, one (driven by a motor) which drives a continuous belt and four smaller rollers used to set the belt spacing and tension to minimize belt flutter. The entire assemble is enclosed in a structure that has the dimensions to enable future drop tower experiments of the hot facility. All critical dimensions are the same as the original plans except for the pulley ratio which has been changed to enable a wider operating regime in terms of the Reynolds number. With the current setup, Reynolds numbers as low as 100 and as high as 14,000 can be achieved. This is because the in-between belt spacing can be varied from 1 cm to 7.6 cm, and the belt speed can be accurately varied from .15 m/sec to 3.1 m/sec.

  13. Can we characterize turbulence in premixed flames?

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatnikov, A.N.

    2009-06-15

    Modeling of premixed turbulent combustion involves averaging reaction rates in turbulent flows. The focus of most approaches to resolving this problem has been placed on determining the dependence of the mean rate w of product creation on the laminar flame speed S{sub L}, the rms turbulence velocity u', etc. The goal of the present work is to draw attention to another issue: May the input quantity u{sup '} for a model of w= w(u'/S{sub L},..) be considered to be known? The point is that heat release substantially affects turbulence and, hence, turbulence characteristics in premixed flames should be modeled. However, standard moment methods for numerically simulating turbulent flows do not allow us to evaluate the true turbulence characteristics in a flame. For instance, the Reynolds stresses in premixed flames are affected not only by turbulence itself, but also by velocity jump across flamelets. A common way to resolving this problem consists of considering the Reynolds stresses conditioned on unburned (or burned) mixture to be the true turbulence characteristics. In the present paper, this widely accepted but never proved hypothesis is put into question, first, by considering simple model constant-density problems (flame motion in an oscillating one-dimensional laminar flow; flame stabilized in a periodic shear, one-dimensional, laminar flow; turbulent mixing). In all the cases, the magnitude of velocity fluctuations, calculated using the conditioned Reynolds stresses, is affected by the intermittency of reactants and products and, hence, is not the true rms velocity. Second, the above claim is further supported by comparing balance equations for the mean and conditioned Reynolds stresses. The conditioned Reynolds stresses do not characterize the true turbulence in flames, because conditional averaging cuts off flow regions characterized by either high or low velocities. (author)

  14. Laminar flame speeds of moist syngas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Apurba K.; Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2011-02-15

    This work experimentally investigates the effect of the presence of water vapor on the laminar flame speeds of moist syngas/air mixtures using the counterflow twin-flame configuration. The experimental results presented here are for fuel lean syngas mixtures with molar percentage of hydrogen in the hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture varying from 5% to 100%, for an unburned mixture temperature of 323 K, and under atmospheric pressure. At a given equivalence ratio, the effect of varying amount of water vapor addition on the measured laminar flame speed is demonstrated. The experimental laminar flame speeds are also compared with computed values using chemical kinetic mechanisms reported in the literature. It is found that laminar flame speed varies non-monotonically with addition of water for the carbon monoxide rich mixtures. It first increases with increasing amount of water addition, reaches a maximum value, and then decreases. An integrated reaction path analysis is further conducted to understand the controlling mechanism responsible for the non-monotonic variation in laminar flame speed due to water addition. On the other hand, for higher values of H{sub 2}/CO ratio the laminar flame speed monotonically decreases with increasing water addition. It is shown that the competition between the chemical and thermal effects of water addition leads to the observed response. Furthermore, reaction rate sensitivity analysis as well as binary diffusion coefficient sensitivity analysis are conducted to identify the possible sources of discrepancy between the experimental and predicted values. The sensitivity results indicate that the reaction rate constant of H{sub 2}+OH = H{sub 2}O+H is worth revisiting and refinement of binary diffusion coefficient data of N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O pairs can be considered. (author)

  15. A high-pressure premixed flat-flame burner for chemical process studies. [of pollutant formation in hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.

    1978-01-01

    A premixed flat-flame burner was designed and tested with methane-air mixtures at pressures from 1.1 to 20 atm and equivalence ratios from 0.7 to 1.1. Reactant velocity in the burner mixing chamber was used to characterize the range of stable flames at each pressure-equivalence-ratio condition. Color photographs of the flames were used to determine flame zone thickness and flame height. The results show that this burner can be used for chemical process studies in premixed high pressure methane-air flames up to 20 atm.

  16. Experimental study of premixed flames in intense isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bedat, B.; Cheng, R.K.

    1994-04-01

    A methodology for investigating premixed turbulent flames propagating in intense isotropic turbulence has been developed. The burner uses a turbulence generator developed by Videto and Santavicca and the flame is stabilized by weak-swirl generated by air injectors. This set-up produces stable premixed turbulent flames under a wide range of mixture conditions and turbulence intensities. The experiments are designed to investigate systematically the changes in flame structures for conditions which can be classified as wrinkled laminar flames, corrugated flames and flames with distributed reaction zones. Laser Doppler anemometry and Rayleigh scattering techniques are used to determine the turbulence and scalar statistics. In the intense turbulence, the flames are found to produce very little changes in the mean and rams velocities. Their flame speed increase linearly with turbulence intensity as for wrinkled laminar flames. The Rayleigh scattering pdfs for flames within the distributed reaction zone regime are distinctly bimodal. The probabilities of the reacting states (i.e. contributions from within the reaction zone) is not higher than those of wrinkled laminar flame. These results show that there is no drastic changes in flame structures at Karlovitz number close to unity. This suggest that the Klimov-Williams criterion under-predicts the resilience of wrinkled flamelets to intense turbulence.

  17. Photometry and Polarization in Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.

    Photometry and Polarization in Remote Sensing is a textbook that purports to offer quantitative approaches to theory and applications of remote sensing in the 0.185-12-?m wavelength range. Many researchers utilize remote sensing to conduct at least part of their research, including workers in such diverse areas as astronomy, oceanography, meteorology, ecology, hydrology, and geology. As a consequence, an extensive but dispersed literature exists, mostly written over the past decade. A text that begins with theoretical approaches and covers modern examples of research using remote sensing data would be most welcome.

  18. Photometry and polarimetry of V 1057 Cygni.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G.; Lee, T.; Coyne, G.

    1972-01-01

    Evaluation of extensive photometric and polarimetric data over a six-month interval for V 1057 Cyg. The polarization appears to be constant and of interstellar origin; the photometry, which extends nearly six octaves from the ultraviolet to 22 microns in the infrared, indicates that the total observed luminosity is decreasing - having now declined about 10% from its earlier level. A model characterized by two circumstellar shells which absorb and reradiate short-wavelength stellar flux from an underlying A1-type star provides the best fit to the observational data. The present variability, however, cannot be due to circumstellar activity, but appears to originate in the star itself.

  19. Time Series Photometry of KZ Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    We present BVRI time series photometry of the high amplitude delta Scuti star KZ Lacertae secured using the 0.9-meter telescope located at the Brigham Young University West Mountain Observatory. In addition to the multicolor light curves that are presented, the V data from the last six years of observations are used to plot an O-C diagram in order to determine the ephemeris and evaluate evidence for period change. We wish to thank the Brigham Young University College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences as well as the Department of Physics and Astronomy for their continued support of the research activities at the West Mountain Observatory.

  20. The RINGS Survey: Optical Broadband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Mitchell, Carl; Spekkens, Kristine; Sellwood, Jerry; Williams, Ted

    2016-01-01

    We have targeted a sample of 19 nearby spiral galaxies, the RSS Imaging and Spectroscopy Nearby Galaxy Survey (RINGS), for detailed study of their mass distributions. We have obtained Fabry-Perot Halpha velocity fields using the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), 21-cm HI observations using the Very Large Array (VLA), and optical broadband BVRI photometry using the CTIO 0.9m and KPNO 2.1m telescopes. We present the results of the photometric component of the survey including multicolor images, surface brightness profiles, and DiskFit structural models.

  1. Quick and Dirty WFPC2 Stellar Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.

    2001-01-01

    The latest release of the IRAF (Image Reduction and Analysis Facility) MXTOOLS package includes the new tasks QDWFPC2 (Quick and Dirty Wide Field and Planetary Camera, which does quick CCD (charge-coupled device) stellar photometry on two Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 (Wide Field and Planetary Camera) observations: WFPC2COLOR, which converts HST WFPC2 instrumental magnitudes to standard colors using the Holtzman et al. color equations, and QDCMD (Quick and Dirty Color Magnitude Diagram), which reads the output of WFPC2COLOR and displays a color-magnitude diagram on a user-chosen graphics device.

  2. V photometry of Titania, Oberon, and Triton

    SciTech Connect

    Goguen, J.D.; Hammel, H.B.; Brown, R.H.

    1989-02-01

    The phase angle and orbital brightness variations of Titania, Oberon, and Triton are presently obtained through analysis of V filter photometry obtained at Mauna Kea in 1982-1983. While Titania and Oberon exhibit magnitude variations with phase angle comparable to those of low-to-moderate albedo asteroids observed within several deg of opposition, Triton's phase variation is distinctly different from these and has a phase coefficient consistent with either a high-albedo regolith or an optically thick nonparticulate scattering layer (perhaps an atmosphere, or an ocean). A low-albedo regolith cannot on the strength of these data be ruled out, however. 39 references.

  3. A Theory of Oscillating Edge Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Zhang, Yi

    1999-01-01

    It has been known for some years that when a near-limit flame spreads over a liquid pool of fuel, the edge of the flame can oscillate relative to a frame moving with the mean speed. Each period of oscillation is characterized by long intervals of modest motion during which the edge gases radiate like those of a diffusion flame, punctuated by bursts of rapid advance during which the edge gases radiate like those in a deflagration. Substantial resources have been brought to bear on this issue within the microgravity program, both experimental and numerical. It is also known that when a near-asphyxiated candle-flame burns at zero gravity, the edge of the (hemispherical) flame can oscillate violently prior to extinction. Thus a web-surfer, turning to the NASA web-site at http://microgravity.msfc.nasa.gov, and following the trail combustion science/experiments/experimental results/candle flame, will find photographs and a description of candle burning experiments carried out on board both the Space-shuttle and the Russian space station Mir. A brief report can also be found in the proceedings of the Fourth Workshop. And recently, in a third microgravity program, the leading edge of the flame supported by injection of ethane through the porous surface of a plate over which air is blown has been found to oscillate when conditions are close to blow-off. A number of important points can be made with respect to these observations: It is the edge itself which oscillates, advancing and retreating, not the diffusion flame that trails behind the edge; oscillations only occur under near limit conditions; in each case the Lewis number of the fuel is significantly larger than 1; and because of the edge curvature, the heat losses from the reacting edge structure are larger than those from the trailing diffusion flame. We propose a general theory for these oscillations, invoking Occam's 'Law of Parsimony' in an expanded form, to wit: The same mechanism is responsible for the oscillations in all three experiments; and no new mechanism is invoked (Occam's original 'Razor'). Such a strategy eliminates Marangoni effects as the source, for these are absent in the second and third experiments. And it eliminates arguments that point to numerically predicted gas eddies as the source, a new mechanism, unelucidated. Indeed, we hypothesize that the essential driving mechanism for the instability is a combination of large Lewis number and heat losses from the reacting structure near the flame edge. Instabilities driven by these mechanisms are commonplace in 1D configurations. Chemical reactor theory, for example, leads to system responses which mimic the response of the candle flame - steady flame, oscillations, extinction. In a combustion context, oscillating instabilities were first reported for diffusion flames in a theoretical study by Kirkby and Schmitz, and here also the instabilities are associated with near-extinction conditions, large Lewis numbers, and heat losses. And deflagrations will oscillate if the Lewis number is large enough, oscillations that are exacerbated when heat losses are present, whether global or to a surface.

  4. Launch Pad Flame Trench Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Bucherl, Cori; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark; Perusich, Steve; Whitten, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The launch complexes at NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are critical support facilities for the successful launch of space-based vehicles. These facilities include a flame trench that bisects the pad at ground level. This trench includes a flame deflector system that consists of an inverted, V-shaped steel structure covered with a high temperature concrete material five inches thick that extends across the center of the flame trench. One side of the "V11 receives and deflects the flames from the orbiter main engines; the opposite side deflects the flames from the solid rocket boosters. There are also two movable deflectors at the top of the trench to provide additional protection to shuttle hardware from the solid rocket booster flames. These facilities are over 40 years old and are experiencing constant deterioration from launch heat/blast effects and environmental exposure. The refractory material currently used in launch pad flame deflectors has become susceptible to failure, resulting in large sections of the material breaking away from the steel base structure and creating high-speed projectiles during launch. These projectiles jeopardize the safety of the launch complex, crew, and vehicle. Post launch inspections have revealed that the number and frequency of repairs, as well as the area and size of the damage, is increasing with the number of launches. The Space Shuttle Program has accepted the extensive ground processing costs for post launch repair of damaged areas and investigations of future launch related failures for the remainder of the program. There currently are no long term solutions available for Constellation Program ground operations to address the poor performance and subsequent failures of the refractory materials. Over the last three years, significant liberation of refractory material in the flame trench and fire bricks along the adjacent trench walls following Space Shuttle launches have resulted in extensive investigations of failure mechanisms, load response, ejected material impact evaluation, and repair design analysis (environmental and structural assessment, induced environment from solid rocket booster plume, loads summary, and repair integrity), assessment of risk posture for flame trench debris, and justification of flight readiness rationale. Although the configuration of the launch pad, water and exhaust direction, and location of the Mobile Launcher Platform between the flame trench and the flight hardware should protect the Space Vehicle from debris exposure, loss of material could cause damage to a major element of the ground facility (resulting in temporary usage loss); and damage to other facility elements is possible. These are all significant risks that will impact ground operations for Constellation and development of new refractory material systems is necessary to reduce the likelihood of the foreign object debris hazard during launch. KSC is developing an alternate refractory material for the launch pad flame trench protection system, including flame deflector and flame trench walls, that will withstand launch conditions without the need for repair after every launch, as is currently the case. This paper will present a summary of the results from industry surveys, trade studies, life cycle cost analysis, and preliminary testing that have been performed to support and validate the development, testing, and qualification of new refractory materials.

  5. Flame-vortex interaction and mixing behaviors of turbulent non-premixed jet flames under acoustic forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Munki; Choi, Youngil; Oh, Jeongseog; Yoon, Youngbin

    2009-12-15

    This study examines the effect of acoustic excitation using forced coaxial air on the flame characteristics of turbulent hydrogen non-premixed flames. A resonance frequency was selected to acoustically excite the coaxial air jet due to its ability to effectively amplify the acoustic amplitude and reduce flame length and NO{sub x} emissions. Acoustic excitation causes the flame length to decrease by 15% and consequently, a 25% reduction in EINO{sub x} is achieved, compared to coaxial air flames without acoustic excitation at the same coaxial air to fuel velocity ratio. Moreover, acoustic excitation induces periodical fluctuation of the coaxial air velocity, thus resulting in slight fluctuation of the fuel velocity. From phase-lock PIV and OH PLIF measurement, the local flow properties at the flame surface were investigated under acoustic forcing. During flame-vortex interaction in the near field region, the entrainment velocity and the flame surface area increased locally near the vortex. This increase in flame surface area and entrainment velocity is believed to be a crucial factor in reducing flame length and NO{sub x} emission in coaxial jet flames with acoustic excitation. Local flame extinction occurred frequently when subjected to an excessive strain rate, indicating that intense mass transfer of fuel and air occurs radially inward at the flame surface. (author)

  6. Flashback flame arrester devices for fuel cargo tank vapor vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, R. A.; Kushida, R. O.

    1981-01-01

    The flame quenching capability of four types of flame arresting devices suitable for installation on fuel cargo tank vents of marine transport vessels is evaluated. A single 30 mesh screen, a dual 20 mesh screen, a spiral wound crimped metal ribbon, and a packed bed of ballast rings were tested. Flame speed and flame penetration of the test arresters were determined. Eight fuels representative of bulk cargoes were tested. The test arresters quenched a minimum of three flashback flames from all eight fuels, with one exception: high speed ethylene flames penetrated the dual 20 mesh screen on three tests. The arresters withstood the sustained flame from a propane/air mixture for 30 minutes. None of the arresters withstood the sustained flame from an ethylene/air mixture for more than 7 minutes.

  7. Flame acceleration in the early stages of burning in tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bychkov, Vitaly; Fru, Gordon; Petchenko, Arkady; Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Eriksson, Lars-Erik

    2007-09-15

    Acceleration of premixed laminar flames in the early stages of burning in long tubes is considered. The acceleration mechanism was suggested earlier by Clanet and Searby [Combust. Flame 105 (1996) 225]. Acceleration happens due to the initial ignition geometry at the tube axis when a flame develops to a finger-shaped front, with surface area growing exponentially in time. Flame surface area grows quite fast but only for a short time. The analytical theory of flame acceleration is developed, which determines the growth rate, the total acceleration time, and the maximal increase of the flame surface area. Direct numerical simulations of the process are performed for the complete set of combustion equations. The simulations results and the theory are in good agreement with the previous experiments. The numerical simulations also demonstrate flame deceleration, which follows acceleration, and the so-called ''tulip flames''. (author)

  8. Development of video processing based on coal flame detector system

    SciTech Connect

    He Wanqing; Yu Yuefeng; Xu Weiyong; Ma Liqun

    1999-07-01

    The principle and development of a set of pulverized coal combustion flame detection system, which is called intelligent image flame detector device based on digital video processing, is addressed in this paper. The system realizes multi-burner flame detection and processing using a distributive structure of engineering workstation and flame detectors via multi-serial-port communication. The software can deal with multi-tasks in a parallel way based on multi-thread mechanism. Streaming video capture and storage is provided to safe and playback the accidental Audio and Visual Interfaces (AVI) clips. The layer flame detectors can give the flame on/off signal through image processing. Pseudo-color visualization of flame temperature calculated from chromatic CCD signal is integrated into the system. The image flame detector system has been successfully used in thermal power generation units in China.

  9. EFFECT OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS FLAME RETARDANTS ON NEURONAL DEVELOPMENT IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increased use of organophosphorus compounds as alternatives to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) has led to widespread human exposure, There is, however, limited information on their potential health effects. This study compared the effects of nii ne organophosphorus flame...

  10. 41. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM THE FLAME TRENCH AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM THE FLAME TRENCH AT THE TEST STAND AND LOOKING INTO THE FLAME DEFLECTOR. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  11. Flame-Vortex Studies to Quantify Markstein Numbers Needed to Model Flame Extinction Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, James F.; Feikema, Douglas A.

    2003-01-01

    This has quantified a database of Markstein numbers for unsteady flames; future work will quantify a database of flame extinction limits for unsteady conditions. Unsteady extinction limits have not been documented previously; both a stretch rate and a residence time must be measured, since extinction requires that the stretch rate be sufficiently large for a sufficiently long residence time. Ma was measured for an inwardly-propagating flame (IPF) that is negatively-stretched under microgravity conditions. Computations also were performed using RUN-1DL to explain the measurements. The Markstein number of an inwardly-propagating flame, for both the microgravity experiment and the computations, is significantly larger than that of an outwardy-propagating flame. The computed profiles of the various species within the flame suggest reasons. Computed hydrogen concentrations build up ahead of the IPF but not the OPF. Understanding was gained by running the computations for both simplified and full-chemistry conditions. Numerical Simulations. To explain the experimental findings, numerical simulations of both inwardly and outwardly propagating spherical flames (with complex chemistry) were generated using the RUN-1DL code, which includes 16 species and 46 reactions.

  12. Studies of Premixed Laminar and Turbulent Flames at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    The work of the Principal Investigator (PI) has encompassed four topics related to the experimental and theoretical study of combustion limits in premixed flames at microgravity, as discussed in the following sections. These topics include: (1) radiation effects on premixed gas flames; (2) flame structure and stability at low Lewis number; (3) flame propagation and extinction is cylindrical tubes; and (4) experimental simulation of combustion processes using autocatalytic chemical reactions.

  13. Laminar flame speed of methane- air mixtures at atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altag Yousif, Alaeldeen; Sulaiman, Shaharin A.

    2013-06-01

    An experimental study on spherically expanding flames propagation of methane- air mixtures was conducted at constant pressure to measure unstretched laminar flame speeds, laminar burning velocity and flame stretch. The mixtures were ignited at equivalence ratios of 0.7, 0.9 and 1.0, under ambient pressure and temperature. It was found that the unstretched laminar burning velocity increased with the equivalence ratio. The flame propagation speed showed different trends at different equivalence ratio for tested mixtures.

  14. Photometry Transforms Generation with PTGP (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, G.; Menzies, K.; Silvis, G.; Harris, B.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) Historically the development of photometry transformation coefficients required extensive manual effort and the use of large spreadsheets. A new release—version 5.0—of the Photometry Transformations Generation Program (PTGP) achieves the goal of generating transformation coefficients without the use of spreadsheets—saving considerable time and ensuring data accuracy. PTGP version 5.0 works directly with VSP to retrieve the most recent standard star reference magnitudes (currently for M67 and NGC7790). It then processes instrument magnitude file(s) downloaded from vphot or exported from AIP4WIN or MAXIM. Either AUID or “Boulder” star identifications can be used for AIP4WIN and MAXIM. When using VPHOT data or “Boulder” star identifications, PTGP determines the AUID names for each of the reference standard stars. All standard transforms are calculated. Plots of each transform's data can be reviewed, and individual star observations added/deleted. Transform sets can be saved for further use. Transform sets can be compared and selected sets averaged. The averaged sets can be exported in a file format compatible with the AAVSO TA tool. The presentation will provide a brief overview and demonstration of the tool. It will also discuss the implications of using PYTHON for the development—both benefits and potential problems. The program runs on both PCs and Macs. A subsequent presentation will discuss the use of VPHOT and PTGP to generate transforms and the testing of the impacts of varying key VPHOT and PTGP parameters.

  15. The detailed flame structure of highly stretched turbulent premixed methane-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.C.; Peters, N.; Schneemann, G.A.; Wruck, N.; Renz, U.; Mansour, M.S.

    1996-11-01

    The premixed stoichiometric turbulent methane flames are investigated on a piloted Bunsen burner with mean nozzle exit velocities of 65, 50, and 30 m/s. Advanced laser diagnostics of the flow field using two-component and two-point laser Doppler anemometer, as well as of the scalar fields with 2-D Rayleigh thermometry and line Raman/Rayleigh laser-induced predissociation fluorescence techniques, are applied to obtain both the instantaneous and mean flame structure in terms of velocity, temperature, and major species concentrations, as well as turbulent kinetic energy and length scales. The three flames cover the entire range of the distributed-reaction-zones regime from the borderline to the well-stirred reactor regime to the flamelet regime. Measurements were from X/D = 2.5 above the nozzle exit plane to X/D = 12.5 downstream. Thus, a complete database is established for comparison with the numerical predictions. Within the mixing layer between the unburnt gas and the pilot flame, the instantaneous temperatures are much lower than the adiabatic flame temperature due to the short residence time and heat loss to the burner. With increasing residence time the mean flame temperature increases in the axial direction. The radial mixing of the turbulence generated with the shear layers between the nozzle jet stream and surrounding pilot stream is suppressed, such that the turbulence kinetic energy remains nearly constant on the centerline. From the two-dimensional temperature fields instantaneous iso-temperature contours are plotted showing broad regions where burnt and unburnt gas are partially mixed. These regions are interpreted in terms of the quench scale {ell}{sub q} = ({epsilon}{tau}{sub c}{sup 3}){sup 1/2}. The measured values of the flame brush thickness are proportional to the quench scale for the two high-velocity flames, whereas the low-velocity flame exhibits essential flamelet behavior.

  16. Relative Photometry with data from the Peter van de Kamp Observatory D. Cohen and E. Jensen

    E-print Network

    Cohen, David

    Relative Photometry with data from the Peter van de Kamp Observatory D with those reduced images. While in principle, we could "do photometry on" some can download the data: http://astro.swarthmore.edu/~cohen/telescope/sample_photometry

  17. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey I: Introduction and observational overview

    E-print Network

    Evans, C J; Henault-Brunet, V; Sana, H; de Koter, A; Simon-Diaz, S; Carraro, G; Bagnoli, T; Bastian, N; Bestenlehner, J M; Bonanos, A Z; Bressert, E; Brott, I; Campbell, M A; Cantiello, M; Clark, J S; Costa, E; Crowther, P A; de Mink, S E; Doran, E; Dufton, P L; Dunstall, P R; Friedrich, K; Garcia, M; Gieles, M; Graefener, G; Herrero, A; Howarth, I D; Izzard, R G; Langer, N; Lennon, D J; Apellaniz, J Maiz; Markova, N; Najarro, F; Puls, J; Ramirez, O H; Sabin, C; Smartt, S J; Stroud, V E; van Loon, J Th; Vink, J S; Walborn, N R

    2011-01-01

    The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey (VFTS) is an ESO Large Programme that has obtained multi-epoch optical spectroscopy of over 800 massive stars in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Here we introduce our scientific motivations and give an overview of the survey targets, including optical and near-infrared photometry and comprehensive details of the data reduction. One of the principal objectives was to detect massive binary systems via variations in their radial velocities, thus shaping the multi-epoch observing strategy. Spectral classifications are given for the massive emission-line stars observed by the survey, including the discovery of a new Wolf-Rayet star (VFTS 682, classified as WN5h), 2' to the northeast of R136. To illustrate the diversity of objects encompassed by the survey, we investigate the spectral properties of sixteen targets identified by Gruendl & Chu from Spitzer photometry as candidate young stellar objects or stars with notable mid-infrared excesses. Detailed ...

  18. Aerothermodynamic properties of stretched flames in enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, D. A.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    Flames are stretched by being pulled along their frontal surface by the flow field in which they reside. Their trajectories tend to approach particle paths, acquiring eventually the role of contact boundaries, -interfaces between the burnt and unburnt medium that may broaden solely as a consequence of diffusion. Fundamental properties of flow fields governing such flames are determined here on the basis of the zero Mach number model, providng a rational method of approach to the computational analysis of combustion fields in enclosures where, besides the aerodynamic properties flow, the thermodynamic process of compression must be taken into account. To illustrate its application, the method is used to reveal the mechanism of formation of a tulip-shape flame in a rectangular enclosure under nonturbulent flow conditions.

  19. Liquid flame spraying for glass coloring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, K. A.; Tikkanen, J.; Keskinen, J.; Pitkänen, V.; Eerola, M.; Siikamaki, R.; Rajala, M.

    1999-12-01

    The liquid flame spraying process has been developed to uniformly color hot glass objects. A solution consisting of a metal nitrate dissolved in alcohol or water is fed to an oxyfuel torch and atomized in the flame. The liquid evaporates from the droplet, and subsequent reactions produce metals or metallic oxides that impact the hot glass surface. Flame spraying of Co, Cu, and Ag solutions onto soda-lime silica glass at 900 to 1000 °C have produced blue, blue-green, and yellow colors. Typical spraying times are 5 to 20 s. Other colors have been produced by using a combination of transition metal ions. This method has found application in studio production and in volume manufacturing of glassware.

  20. White Flame Energy switches to backhoes

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2005-06-01

    The mountaintop coal operator, White Flame Energy has switched to different truck-shovel arrangement. Along with many surface mining operations throughout central Appalachia, the company is using hoe-configured hydraulic excavators as opposed to the traditional front-shovel arrangements. Located in Varney, WV, White Flame Energy uses two Terex O & K mining shovels, an RH170 and an RH 200, which have the capacity to move 2 million cu yards per month from five seams, primarily the Coalburg, Stockton, and No 5 Block and associated rider seams. The article records conversations on the operations with Mike Vines, the general manager, and Don Nicewonder, the owner of White Flame Energy. 2 photos.

  1. The Flame Challenge and Communicating Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, Ben

    2013-04-01

    When famed actor and science enthusiast Alan Alda was 11 years-old he was itching to know the science behind a flame. He asked his science teacher but her blunt response didn't exactly satisfy his curiosity. ``It's oxidation,'' she said. 65 years later, Alan Alda launched ``The Flame Challenge,'' an annual contest encouraging scientists to improve their communication to the general public. In this talk, last year's winner discusses his approach to successfully explaining the science behind a flame to a wide audience. Because communicating science is a pillar of the scientific method, he shares key elements of successful communication important for engaging funders, policy-makers, students, the general public, and even other scientists.

  2. Properties of flame synthesized germanium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Simanzhenkov, Vasily; Wiggers, Hartmut; Roth, Paul

    2005-03-01

    Germanium oxide (GeOx) nanoparticles in the size range from 1.5 to 10 nm were synthesized in a low-pressure premixed H2/O2/Ar flame in the pressure range 25-55 mbar. The flame was doped with different amounts of tetramethylgermanium (Ge(CH3)4) ranging from 500 to 2000 ppm. The influence of process parameters such as pressure, flame coordinate, and cold gas flow velocity with respect to growth of germanium oxide particles were investigated. The formed particles were analyzed in-situ according to their mass and charge by means of a particle mass spectrometer (PMS). The specific surface area was determined ex-situ by the BET method. The crystal structure and chemical composition of the produced nanopowder was characterized by EDX and XRD measurements. Additionally, the particles were analyzed by means of FT-IR spectroscopy. PMID:15913252

  3. Flame trench analysis of NLS vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeytinoglu, Nuri

    1993-01-01

    The present study takes the initial steps of establishing a better flame trench design criteria for future National Launch System vehicles. A three-dimensional finite element computer model for predicting the transient thermal and structural behavior of the flame trench walls was developed using both I-DEAS and MSC/NASTRAN software packages. The results of JANNAF Standardized Plume flowfield calculations of sea-level exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), Space Transportation Main Engine (STME), and Advanced Solid Rocket Motors (ASRM) were analyzed for different axial distances. The results of sample calculations, using the developed finite element model, are included. The further suggestions are also reported for enhancing the overall analysis of the flame trench model.

  4. Pentan isomers compound flame front structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mansurov, Z.A.; Mironenko, A.W.; Bodikov, D.U.; Rachmetkaliev, K.N.

    1995-08-13

    The fuels (hexane, pentane, diethyl ether) and conditions investigated in this study are relevant to engine knock in spark- ignition engines. A review is provided of the field of low temperature hydrocarbon oxidation. Studies were made of radical and stable intermediate distribution in the front of cool flames: Maximum concentrations of H atoms and peroxy radicals were observed in the luminous zone of the cool flame front. Peroxy radicals appear before the luminous zone at 430 K due to diffusion. H atoms were found in cool flames of butane and hexane. H atoms diffuses from the luminous zone to the side of the fresh mixture, and they penetrate into the fresh mixture to a small depth. Extension of action sphear of peroxy radicals in the fresh mixture is much greater than that of H atoms due to their small activity and high concentrations.

  5. Reduced Kinetic Mechanisms for Premixed Hydrogen Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauss, F.; Peters, N.; Rogg, B.; Williams, F. A.

    There have been a number of studies of structures and propagation velocities of premixed hydrogen-oxygen flames through numerical integrations of one-dimensional, adiabatic conservation equations. Especially notable among these are the very extensive and pioneering works of Dixon-Lewis [3.1], [3.2] and the more recent thorough studies of Warnatz [3.3]-[3.5]. These references should be consulted for additional literature on the subject. These cited works accomplished more than merely the computation of flame structures. They helped to improve knowledge of rates of important elementary steps and also identified accuracies of various steady-state and partial-equilibrium approximations throughout the flames. Moreover, they reviewed and evaluated available experimental results sufficiently thoroughly, so that in the present study it will be adequate to focus attention on theoretical and numerical comparisons with the more recent experimental data presented in Chap. 2 [3.6].

  6. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; D?dina, Ji?í

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l- 1 and 1.0 ng l- 1, respectively.

  7. Investigations of swirl flames in a gas turbine model combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.; Duan, X.R.; Weigand, P.

    2006-01-01

    The thermochemical states of three swirling CH{sub 4}/air diffusion flames, stabilized in a gas turbine model combustor, were investigated using laser Raman scattering. The flames were operated at different thermal powers and air/fuel ratios and exhibited different flame behavior with respect to flame instabilities. They had previously been characterized with respect to their flame structures, velocity fields, and mean values of temperature, major species concentrations, and mixture fraction. The single-pulse multispecies measurements presented in this article revealed very rapid mixing of fuel and air, accompanied by strong effects of turbulence-chemistry interactions in the form of local flame extinction and ignition delay. Flame stabilization is accomplished mainly by hot and relatively fuel-rich combustion products, which are transported back to the flame root within an inner recirculation zone. The flames are not attached to the fuel nozzle, and are stabilized approximately 10 mm above the fuel nozzle, where fuel and air are partially premixed before ignition. The mixing and reaction progress in this area are discussed in detail. The flames are short (<50 mm), especially that exhibiting thermoacoustic oscillations, and reach a thermochemical state close to adiabatic equilibrium at the flame tip. The main goals of this article are to outline results that yield deeper insight into the combustion of gas turbine flames and to establish an experimental database for the validation of numerical models.

  8. 63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE RECOVERY TANK LEFT OF FLAME BUCKET; LIQUID OXYGEN CATCH TANK RIGHT OF FLAME BUCKET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. Opposed Flow Impact on Flame Spread Above Liquid Fuel Pools

    E-print Network

    Liu, Feng

    behavior occurs if the initial liquid temperature and/or the oxygen mass fraction in the incoming airflowOpposed Flow Impact on Flame Spread Above Liquid Fuel Pools Jinsheng Cai, Feng Liu, and William A and flame propagation above a liquid fuel (propanol) pool in an airflow duct. Pulsating flame spread

  10. Distributed Flames in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1

    E-print Network

    Bell, John B.

    the properties of the individual flames, which could be sites for a transition to detonation when DaT 1-scale distributed super- novae flames. These results will be useful both for characterizing the deflagration 1 in larger full-star simulations, where the flame cannot be resolved, and for predicting when detonation

  11. Analytic description of the evolution of an axisymmetric flame surface

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    that the heat release rate is proportional to the area of the flame. The velocity field, which is assumed axial model. However the axial com­ ponent of the velocity is dominant except near the base of the flame [Analytic description of the evolution of an axisymmetric flame surface M.L. Bondar 1 and J.H.M. ten

  12. FLAME SURFACE DENSITIES IN PREMIXED COMBUSTION AT MEDIUM TO HIGH

    E-print Network

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    surface density with turbulence may not be the dominant mechanism for flame velocity enhancement is considered the same as those of laminar flames, the turbulent burning velocity can be approximatedFLAME SURFACE DENSITIES IN PREMIXED COMBUSTION AT MEDIUM TO HIGH TURBULENCE INTENSITIES O¨ MER L

  13. 30 CFR 18.65 - Flame test of hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Flame test of hose. 18.65 Section 18.65 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Inspections and Tests § 18.65 Flame... wide by thickness of the hose. (b) Flame-test apparatus. The principal parts of the apparatus...

  14. Investigation of Bunsen flame dynamics by the method of characteristics

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    burning velocity is normal to the flame front and directed towards the unburnt gas (Figure 1), and its:mbondar@win.tue.nl 1 #12; cannot equate the laminar burning velocity. Consequently, the flame does not reachInvestigation of Bunsen flame dynamics by the method of characteristics M.L. BONDAR # , R

  15. Preconditioned Multigrid Simulation of an Axisymmetric Laminar Diffusion Flame \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jun

    the growth of the Krylov iterations. Key words ­ laminar diffusion flame, vorticity­velocity formulationPreconditioned Multigrid Simulation of an Axisymmetric Laminar Diffusion Flame \\Lambda Samir Karaa of an elliptic flame sheet problem. By selecting the generalized minimum residual method as the linear smoother

  16. 30 CFR 7.26 - Flame test apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Flame test apparatus. 7.26 Section 7.26 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Brattice Cloth and Ventilation Tubing § 7.26 Flame test apparatus. The principal parts of the apparatus used to test for flame-resistance of...

  17. Aalborg Universitet Numerical study of one swirling flame

    E-print Network

    Berning, Torsten

    . The following sections provide validations of the LES and RANS in terms of velocity fields and flame parametersAalborg Universitet Numerical study of one swirling flame Yang, Yang; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Yin. (2011). Numerical study of one swirling flame. Paper presented at 2011 European Combustion Meeting (ECM

  18. Response of turbulent premixed flames to harmonic acoustic forcing

    E-print Network

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    velocity field of varying intensity, u0 T=SL. The results are compared with those obtained for flames turbulence on the dynamics of pre- mixed flames responding to harmonic velocity disturbances. The key is a description of the interaction of harmonic velocity disturbances with a turbulent, premixed flame. Several

  19. Dynamics of Laminar Premixed Flames Forced by Harmonic Velocity Disturbances

    E-print Network

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    Dynamics of Laminar Premixed Flames Forced by Harmonic Velocity Disturbances Preetham GE Global premixed flames responding to harmonic velocity disturbances. Results are derived from analytical/wedge flame-area velocity transfer function K = convection parameter ( uo=uc) k = convective wave number ( !o

  20. Simulation of premixed turbulent flames M. Day and J. Bell

    E-print Network

    Bell, John B.

    ] for the V-flame and slot flame cases, respectively. 2. Simlations results and experimental comparisons A 3D challenge in the combustion community. These flames have the potential to operate cleanly and efficiently of the inertial scales of the turbulence, and the interactions of the turbulence with the combustion chemistry

  1. 30 CFR 56.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.6904 Section 56.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Requirements § 56.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of open flames shall not be permitted within...

  2. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  3. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  4. 27 CFR 555.212 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Smoking and open flames..., AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Storage § 555.212 Smoking and open flames. Smoking, matches, open flames, and spark producing devices are not permitted: (a) In...

  5. 30 CFR 56.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.6904 Section 56.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Requirements § 56.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of open flames shall not be permitted within...

  6. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  7. 27 CFR 555.212 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Smoking and open flames..., AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Storage § 555.212 Smoking and open flames. Smoking, matches, open flames, and spark producing devices are not permitted: (a) In...

  8. 27 CFR 555.212 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Smoking and open flames..., AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Storage § 555.212 Smoking and open flames. Smoking, matches, open flames, and spark producing devices are not permitted: (a) In...

  9. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  10. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  11. 27 CFR 555.212 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smoking and open flames..., AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Storage § 555.212 Smoking and open flames. Smoking, matches, open flames, and spark producing devices are not permitted: (a) In...

  12. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  13. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  14. 30 CFR 56.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.6904 Section 56.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Requirements § 56.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of open flames shall not be permitted within...

  15. 27 CFR 555.212 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Smoking and open flames..., AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Storage § 555.212 Smoking and open flames. Smoking, matches, open flames, and spark producing devices are not permitted: (a) In...

  16. 30 CFR 56.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.7805 Section 56... Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not smoke and open... smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  17. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  18. 30 CFR 57.7805 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.7805 Section 57... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7805 Smoking and open flames. Persons shall not... warning against smoking and open flames shall be posted in these areas....

  19. 30 CFR 56.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.6904 Section 56.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Requirements § 56.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of open flames shall not be permitted within...

  20. 30 CFR 56.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 56.6904 Section 56.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... Requirements § 56.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of open flames shall not be permitted within...

  1. Numerical Simulation of a Laboratory-Scale Turbulent Slot Flame

    E-print Network

    Bell, John B.

    interaction. See Vervisch et al. [6] and Bell et al. [7] for simulations of turbulent V-flames. In this paperNumerical Simulation of a Laboratory-Scale Turbulent Slot Flame John B. Bella , Marcus S. Daya dynamically resolves the flame and turbulent structures. Detailed comparisons with experimental measurements

  2. The dynamics of turbulent premixed flames: Mechanisms and models for turbulence-flame interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Adam M.

    The use of turbulent premixed combustion in engines has been garnering renewed interest due to its potential to reduce NOx emissions. However there are many aspects of turbulence-flame interaction that must be better understood before such flames can be accurately modeled. The focus of this dissertation is to develop an improved understanding for the manner in which turbulence interacts with a premixed flame in the 'thin flamelet regime'. To do so, two new diagnostics were developed and employed in a turbulent slot Bunsen flame. These diagnostics, Cinema-Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry and Orthogonal-Plane Cinema-Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry, provided temporally resolved velocity and flame surface measurements in two- and three-dimensions with rates of up to 3 kHz and spatial resolutions as low as 280 mum. Using these measurements, the mechanisms with which turbulence generates flame surface area were studied. It was found that the previous concept that flame stretch is characterized by counter-rotating vortex pairs does not accurately describe real turbulence-flame interactions. Analysis of the experimental data showed that the straining of the flame surface is determined by coherent structures of fluid dynamic strain rate, while the wrinkling is caused by vortical structures. Furthermore, it was shown that the canonical vortex pair configuration is not an accurate reflection of the real interaction geometry. Hence, models developed based on this geometry are unlikely to be accurate. Previous models for the strain rate, curvature stretch rate, and turbulent burning velocity were evaluated. It was found that the previous models did not accurately predict the measured data for a variety of reasons: the assumed interaction geometries did not encompass enough possibilities to describe the possible effects of real turbulence, the turbulence was not properly characterized, and the transport of flame surface area was not always considered. New models therefore were developed that accurately reflect real turbulence-flame interactions and agree with the measured data. These can be implemented in Large Eddy Simulations to provide improved modeling of turbulence-flame interaction.

  3. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation strategy to incorporate into the microgravity experiment.

  4. JHK photometry of selected Trojan and Hilda asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dale W.; Johnson, Paul E.; Buckingham, William L.; Shorthill, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    No entirely satisfactory match has been established between the present JHK photometry of selected Hilda and Trojan asteroids and photometry for both main belt asteroids and laboratory samples. It is noted that while the leading Trojans and Hildas exhibit similar and homogeneous JHK colors, the trailing Trojans appear to be more heterogeneous. Charcoal and magnetite provide the best match in terms of JHK colors.

  5. Wide-field stellar photometry in Piwnice Observatory

    E-print Network

    Gracjan Maciejewski

    2007-12-17

    In this paper research projects based on the wide-field CCD photometry performed in Piwnice Observatory are discussed. The used telescopes, as well as dedicated software pipeline for data reduction are presented. The prospects for collaboration between Polish and Bulgarian institutes in the field of wide-field photometry are also discussed.

  6. Flame-Vortex Interactions Imaged in Microgravity - To Assess the Theory Flame Stretch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, James F.

    2001-01-01

    The goals of this research are to: 1) Assess the Theory of Flame Stretch by operating a unique flame-vortex experiment under microgravity conditions in the NASA Glenn 2.2 Second Drop Tower (drops to identify operating conditions have been completed); 2) Obtain high speed shadowgraph images (500-1000 frames/s) using the drop rig (images were obtained at one-g, and the NASA Kodak RO camera is being mounted on the drop rig); 3) Obtain shadowgraph and PIV images at 1-g while varying the effects of buoyancy by controlling the Froude number (completed); 4) Numerically model the inwardly-propagating spherical flame that is observed in the experiment using full chemistry and the RUN 1DL code (completed); 5) Send images of the flame shape to Dr. G. Patniak at NRL who is numerically simulating the entire flame-vortex interaction of the present experiment (data transfer completed); and 6) Assess the feasibility of obtaining PIV velocity field images in the drop rig, which would be useful (but not required) for our assessment of the Theory of Flame Stretch (PIV images were obtained at one-g using same low laser power that is available from fiber optic cable in drop tower). The motivation for the work is to obtain novel measurement needed to develop a physically accurate model of turbulent combustion that can help in the control of engine pollutants. The unique experiment allows, for the first time, the detailed study of a negatively-curved (negatively stretched) flame, which is one of the five fundamental types of premixed flames. While there have been studies of flat flames, positively-curved (outwardly-propagating) cases and positively-strained (counterflow) cases, this is the first detailed study of a negatively-curved (inwardly-propagating) flame. The first set of drops in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower showed that microgravity provides more favorable conditions for achieving inwardly-propagating flames (IPFs) than 1-g. A vortex interacts with a flame and creates a spherical pocket, which burns inwardly. Shadowgraphs at 1000 frames/sec quantify the Markstein number and flame speed. A Low-Laser Power PIV System was developed and is being added to the drop package. Numerical computations were required to explain why the Markstein numbers measured for the inwardly-propagating flames differ from those of outward propagating flames; this is an important research issue in the assessment of the Theory of Flame Stretch. The RUN-1DL code (developed by Prof. B. Rogg) was run for IPF and OPFs with complex methane and propane chemistry. Results confirmed that Ma for the IPFs are larger than for OPFs as was observed experimentally. Physical reasons for these new findings about the Theory of Flame Stretch are being determined from the experiments and the computations. Several journal papers have been published; the drop package is described in the AIAA Journal, while the one-g results appear in three other journal papers.

  7. Interactions between flames on parallel solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    1995-01-01

    The interactions between flames spreading over parallel solid sheets of paper are being studied in normal gravity and in microgravity. This geometry is of practical importance since in most heterogeneous combustion systems, the condensed phase is non-continuous and spatially distributed. This spatial distribution can strongly affect burning and/or spread rate. This is due to radiant and diffusive interactions between the surface and the flames above the surfaces. Tests were conducted over a variety of pressures and separation distances to expose the influence of the parallel sheets on oxidizer transport and on radiative feedback.

  8. Computatonal and experimental study of laminar flames

    SciTech Connect

    Smooke, M.D.; Long, M.B.

    1993-12-01

    This research has centered on an investigation of the effects of complex chemistry and detailed transport on the structure and extinction of hydrocarbon flames in counterflow, cylindrical and coflowing axisymmetric configurations. The authors have pursued both computational and experimental aspects of the research in parallel. The computational work has focused on the application of accurate and efficient numerical methods for the solution of the one and two-dimensional nonlinear boundary value problems describing the various reacting systems. Detailed experimental measurements were performed on axisymmetric coflow flames using two-dimensional imaging techniques. In particular, spontaneous Raman scattering and laser induced fluorescence were used to measure the temperature, major and minor species profiles.

  9. Velocity profiles in laminar diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Margle, Janice M.

    1986-01-01

    Velocity profiles in vertical laminar diffusion flames were measured by using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Four fuels were used: n-heptane, iso-octane, cyclohexane, and ethyl alcohol. The velocity profiles were similar for all the fuels, although there were some differences in the peak velocities. The data compared favorably with the theoretical velocity predictions. The differences could be attributed to errors in experimental positioning and in the prediction of temperature profiles. Error in the predicted temperature profiles are probably due to the difficulty in predicting the radiative heat losses from the flame.

  10. Visible and infrared photometry of Kuiper Belt objects: searching for evidence of trends

    E-print Network

    Sheppard, Scott S.

    Visible and infrared photometry of Kuiper Belt objects: searching for evidence of trends Neil Mc. © 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved. Keywords: Kuiper Belt objects; Photometry; Infrared

  11. The effect of flame structure on soot formation and transport in turbulent nonpremixed flames using direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lignell, David O.; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Smith, Philip J.; Lu, Tianfeng; Law, Chung K.

    2007-10-15

    Direct numerical simulations of a two-dimensional, nonpremixed, sooting ethylene flame are performed to examine the effects of soot-flame interactions and transport in an unsteady configuration. A 15-step, 19-species (with 10 quasi-steady species) chemical mechanism was used for gas chemistry, with a two-moment, four-step, semiempirical soot model. Flame curvature is shown to result in flames that move, relative to the fluid, either toward or away from rich soot formation regions, resulting in soot being essentially convected into or away from the flame. This relative motion of flame and soot results in a wide spread of soot in the mixture fraction coordinate. In regions where the center of curvature of the flame is in the fuel stream, the flame motion is toward the fuel and soot is located near the flame at high temperature and hence has higher reaction rates and radiative heat fluxes. Soot-flame breakthrough is also observed in these regions. Fluid convection and flame displacement velocity relative to fluid convection are of similar magnitudes while thermophoretic diffusion is 5-10 times lower. These results emphasize the importance of both unsteady and multidimensional effects on soot formation and transport in turbulent flames. (author)

  12. Ten Recent Enhancements To Aperture Photometry Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laher, Russ; Rebull, L. M.; Gorjian, V.

    2013-01-01

    Aperture Photometry Tool is free, multi-platform, easy-to-install software for astronomical research, as well as for learning, visualizing, and refining aperture-photometry analyses. This mature software has been under development for five years, and is a silent workhorse of the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program. Software version 2.1.5 is described by Laher et al., Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Vol. 124, No. 917, pp. 737-763, (July 2012). Four software upgrades have been released since the publication, which include new capabilities, increased speed, more user-friendliness, and some minor bug fixes. Visit www.aperturephotometry.org to download the latest version. The enhancements are as follows: 1) Added new Tools menu option to write selected primary-image data to a comma-separated-value file (for importing into Excel); 2) Added a new display of the color-table levels on a separate panel; 3) Added a new tool to measure the angular separation between positions on the thumbnail image, via mouse-cursor drag and release; 4) Added a new tool to overlay an aperture at user-specified coordinates (in addition to aperture overlay via mouse click); 5) Speeded up the source-list tool with optional multithreading in its automatic mode (allowed thread number is user-specifiable); 6) Added a new “Number” column to the output aperture-photometry-table file in order to track the input source order (multithreading reorders the output); 7) Upgraded the source-list tool to accept input source lists containing positions in sexagesimal equatorial coordinates (in addition to decimal degrees, or, alternatively, pixel coordinates); 8) Added a new decimal/sexagesimal converter; 9) Upgraded the source-list creation tool to compute the detection threshold using robust estimates of the local background and local data dispersion, where the user can select the grid and window sizes for these local calculations; and 10) Modified the batch mode to optionally generate a source list. These upgrades increase the software's utility, and more improvements are planned for future releases.

  13. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Commandant (G-MSO). (c) Each flame screen required by this part must be either a single screen of corrosion resistant wire of at least 30 by 30 mesh, or two screens, both of corrosion resistant wire, of at least...

  14. Flame temperature, fuel structure, and fuel concentration effects on soot formation in inverse diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sidebotham, G.W.; Glassman, I. )

    1992-09-01

    Insights into soot formation processes are gained from chemical sampling and thermocouple probing of co-flowing inverse diffusion flames (IDFs), with the oxidizer in the center. In this paper the transition from near-to slightly sooting flames and the effects of flame temperature, fuel concentration, and fuel structure (using methane, ethene, propene and 1-butene) are investigated. The aromatic content of IDFS scales with the fuel's sooting tendency, and suggests that the formation of the aromatic ring is a controlling step in soot formation. In addition to the relatively well-established reactions involving C4 and C2 species, benzene may form directly from two C3 species for fuels that readily produce C3 species during pyrolysis and/or oxidative pyrolysis. The total concentration of growth species increases almost linearly with fuel concentration, but depends more weakly on flame temperature than would be expected if pure pyrolysis governed the intermediate hydrocarbon behavior.

  15. On open and closed tips of bunsen burner flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, G.; Sivashinsky, G. I.

    1994-04-01

    An adiabatic, constant-density reaction-diffusion-advection model for the Bunsen burner flame tip is studied numerically. It is shown that for Lewis numbers exceeding unity the reaction rate and flame speed gradually increase toward the flame tip. For small Lewis numbers the picture is quite different. The reaction rate drops near the tip. In spite of this the flame survives and, moreover, manages to consume all the fuel supplied to the reaction zone. There is no leakage of the fuel through the front. The flame speed varies nonmonotonously along the front from gradual reduction to steep increase near the tip.

  16. Flame Structure and Scalar Properties in Microgravity Laminar Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feikema, D. A.; Lim, J.; Sivathanu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Recent results from microgravity combustion experiments conducted in the Zero Gravity Facility (ZGF) 5.18 second drop tower are reported. Emission mid-infrared spectroscopy measurements have been completed to quantitatively determine the flame temperature, water and carbon dioxide vapor concentrations, radiative emissive power, and soot concentrations in a microgravity laminar ethylene/air flame. The ethylene/air laminar flame conditions are similar to previously reported experiments including the Flight Project, Laminar Soot Processes (LSP). Soot concentrations and gas temperatures are in reasonable agreement with similar results available in the literature. However, soot concentrations and flame structure dramatically change in long duration microgravity laminar diffusion flames as demonstrated in this paper.

  17. Pseudoresonant interaction between flame and upstream velocity fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Karlin, V

    2006-01-01

    This work is dedicated to the analysis of the delicate details of the effect of upstream velocity fluctuations on the flame propagation speed. The investigation was carried out using the Sivashinsky model of cellularization of hydrodynamically unstable flame fronts. We identified the perturbations of the steadily propagating flames which can be significantly amplified over finite periods of time. These perturbations were used to model the effect of upstream velocity fluctuations on the flame front dynamics and to study a possibility to control the flame propagation speed. PMID:16486275

  18. Analytical Study of Gravity Effects on Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelman, R. B.; Fortune, O.; Weilerstein, G.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented for the description of axisymmetric laminar-jet diffusion flames. The analysis includes the effects of inertia, viscosity, diffusion, gravity and combustion. These mechanisms are coupled in a boundary layer type formulation and solutions are obtained by an explicit finite difference technique. A dimensional analysis shows that the maximum flame width radius, velocity and thermodynamic state characterize the flame structure. Comparisons with experimental data showed excellent agreement for normal gravity flames and fair agreement for steady state low Reynolds number zero gravity flames. Kinetics effects and radiation are shown to be the primary mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy. Additional factors are discussed including elipticity and transient effects.

  19. Effect of azimuthal flow fluctuations on flow and flame dynamics of axisymmetric swirling flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Vishal; Lieuwen, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have clearly shown the important role of swirl fluctuations (or, more precisely, fluctuations in axial vorticity) in the response of premixed flames to flow oscillations. An important implication of this mechanism is that the axial location of the swirler plays a key role in the phase between the acoustic flow excitation source and the resulting axial vorticity fluctuation at the flame. Similar to the previously well recognized role of azimuthal vorticity fluctuations, these swirl fluctuations are vortical and convect at the mean flow velocity, unlike the acoustic flow fluctuations. However, there is a fundamental difference between axial and azimuthal vorticity disturbances in terms of the flow oscillations they induce on the flame. Specifically, azimuthal vorticity disturbances excite radial and axial flow disturbances, while axial vorticity oscillations, in general induce both radial and azimuthal flow fluctuations, but in the axisymmetric case, they only directly excite azimuthal flow fluctuations. The axial vorticity fluctuations do, however, indirectly excite axial and radial velocity fluctuations when the axial vortex tube is tilted off-axis, such as at locations of area expansion. This difference is significant because axisymmetric flames are disturbed only by the velocity component normal to it, which stem from axial and radial velocity components only. This implies that axisymmetric mean flames are not directly affected by azimuthal flow fluctuations, since they are tangential to it. Thus, it is the extent to which the axial vorticity is tilted and rotated that controls the strength of the flow oscillations normal to the flame and, in turn, lead to heat release oscillations. This coupling process is not easily amenable to analytical calculations and, as such, we report here a computational study of the role of these different flow fluctuations on the flame response in an axisymmetric framework. The results indicate that the swirl fluctuations can act as significant source of flame heat release disturbances, due to azimuthal and radial vortex tubes tilting in mixing passage boundary layers and at the expansion into the combustor.

  20. Supernova Photometry with the LCOGT Faulkes Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilday, Benjamin E.; Howell, D.; Brunner, N.; Bianco, F.; Graham, M.; LCOGT

    2011-05-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) is currently designing, constructing, and deploying a network of robotic telescopes which will consist of multiple 1m and 0.4m telescopes, positioned at sites distributed roughly equi-longitudinally around the globe. When completed, the network will enable unique opportunities for time-domain astronomy. The LCOGT network also includes the 2m Faulkes Telescopes (FTs); Faulkes North (Haleakala, Maui) and Faulkes South (Siding Springs, Australia). As a precursor to the full telescope network, LCOGT is operating the Faulkes Telescopes in a robotic observing mode, and one primary use of the FTs over the last two years has been to provide multi-color photometric follow-up of supernovae (SNe) discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We discuss the current status of FT photometry for SNe from PTF, including the photometric reduction pipeline, data-quality statistics, and photometric calibrations.

  1. Inferring Planetary Obliquity Using Rotational & Orbital Photometry

    E-print Network

    Schwartz, Joel C; Haggard, Hal M; Pallé, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B

    2015-01-01

    The obliquity of a terrestrial planet is an important clue about its formation and critical to its climate. Previous studies using simulated photometry of Earth show that continuous observations over most of a planet's orbit can be inverted to infer obliquity. We extend this approach to single-epoch observations for planets with arbitrary albedo maps. For diffuse reflection, the flux seen by a distant observer is the product of the planet's albedo map, the host star's illumination, and the observer's visibility of different planet regions. It is useful to treat the product of illumination and visibility as the kernel of a convolution; this kernel is unimodal and symmetric. For planets with unknown obliquity, the kernel is not known a priori, but could be inferred by fitting a rotational light curve. We analyze this kernel under different viewing geometries, finding it well described by its longitudinal width and latitudinal position. We use Monte Carlo simulation to estimate uncertainties on these kernel char...

  2. Techniques for Automated Single-Star Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Gregory W.

    2001-01-01

    Tennessee State University operates several automatic photoelectric telescopes (APTs) located at Fairborn Observatory in the Patagonia Mountains of southern Arizona. The APTs are dedicated to photometric monitoring programs that would be expensive and difficult to accomplish without the advantages of automation. I review the operation of two of the telescopes (a 0.75- and 0.80-meter (m) APT) and the quality-control techniques that result in the routine acquisition of single-star differential photometry with a precision of 0.001 mag for single observations and 0.0001 - 0.0002 mag for seasonal means. I also illustrate the capabilities of the APTS with sample results from a program to measure luminosity cycles in sun-like stars and a related program to search for the signatures of extrasolar planets around these stars.

  3. TERMS PHOTOMETRY OF KNOWN TRANSITING EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Diana; Kane, Stephen R.; Ciardi, David R.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Payne, Alan; Ramirez, Solange V.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Wyatt, Pamela; Pilyavsky, Genady; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wright, Jason T.; Zachary Gazak, J.; Rabus, Markus

    2011-10-15

    The Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey conducts radial velocity and photometric monitoring of known exoplanets in order to refine planetary orbits and predictions of possible transit times. This effort is primarily directed toward planets not known to transit, but a small sample of our targets consists of known transiting systems. Here we present precision photometry for six WASP (Wide Angle Search for Planets) planets acquired during their transit windows. We perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis for each planet and combine these data with previous measurements to redetermine the period and ephemerides for these planets. These observations provide recent mid-transit times which are useful for scheduling future observations. Our results improve the ephemerides of WASP-4b, WASP-5b, and WASP-6b and reduce the uncertainties on the mid-transit time for WASP-29b. We also confirm the orbital, stellar, and planetary parameters of all six systems.

  4. Difference image photometry with bright variable backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerins, E.; Darnley, M. J.; Duke, J. P.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Newsam, A.; Park, B. G.; Street, R.

    2010-11-01

    Over the last two decades the Andromeda galaxy (M31) has been something of a test-bed for methods aimed at obtaining accurate time-domain relative photometry within highly crowded fields. Difference imaging methods, originally pioneered towards M31, have evolved into sophisticated methods, such as the optimal image subtraction (OIS) method of Alard & Lupton, that today are most widely used to survey variable stars, transients and microlensing events in our own Galaxy. We show that modern difference image analysis (DIA) algorithms such as OIS, whilst spectacularly successful towards the Milky Way bulge, may perform badly towards high surface brightness targets such as the M31 bulge. Poor results can occur in the presence of common systematics which add spurious flux contributions to images, such as internal reflections, scattered light or fringing. Using data from the Angstrom Project microlensing survey of the M31 bulge, we show that very good results are usually obtainable by first performing careful photometric alignment prior to using OIS to perform point spread function (PSF) matching. This separation of background matching and PSF matching, a common feature of earlier M31 photometry techniques, allows us to take full advantage of the powerful PSF matching flexibility offered by OIS towards high surface brightness targets. We find that difference images produced this way have noise distributions close to Gaussian, showing significant improvement upon results achieved using OIS alone. We show that with this correction light curves of variable stars and transients can be recovered to within ~10arcsec of the M31 nucleus. Our method is simple to implement and is quick enough to be incorporated within real-time DIA pipelines. We also demonstrate that OIS is remarkably robust even when, as in the case of the central regions of the M31 bulge, the sky density of variable sources approaches the confusion limit.

  5. Multicolour Optical Photometry of Active Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, A.; Wade, G.; Bedard, D.

    Although broadband photometry has been used to infer information about artificial satellites since soon after the launch of Sputnik 1, the development of photometric techniques for non-resolved space object identification or characterisation has been hampered by the large number of variables involved. Many individual studies, and some long ongoing experiments, have used costly metre-class telescopes to obtain data despite other experiments demonstrating that much more flexible and affordable small aperture telescopes may be suitable for the task. In addition, due to the highly time consuming and weather dependent nature of obtaining photometric observations, many studies have suffered from data sets of limited size, or relied upon simulations to support their claims. With this in mind, an experiment was conducted with the aim of determining the utility of small aperture telescopes for conducting broadband photometry of satellites for the purpose of non-resolved space object identification and characterisation. A 14 inch Celestron CG-14 telescope was used to gain multiple night-long, high temporal resolution data sets of six active geostationary satellites. The results of the experiment cast doubt on the efficacy of some of the previous approaches to obtaining and analysing photometric data. It was discovered that geostationary satellite lightcurves can vary to a greater degree than has generally been recognised, and colour ratios vary considerably with changes in the illumination/observation geometry, making it difficult to use colour for satellite discrimination. Evidence was also detected of variations in the spectral energy distribution of sunlight reflected off satellite surface materials, which could have implications for surface material characterisation and techniques that aim to separate satellite body and solar panel contributions to the total observed spectra.

  6. The effects of gravity on wrinkled laminar flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kostiuk, L.W.; Zhou, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1992-09-01

    Laminar and turbulent conical Bunsen type flames were used. The study compares results from normal gravity with the burner in an up-right orientation (+g), the burner inverted (-g), and in microgravity ([mu]g) by using the NASA Lewis drop tower facility. The primary diagnostic is a laser schlieren system and some LDA measurements were taken for the +g condition to measure the flow field. The +g laminar flame experiences a large amount of instabilities and results in an unsteady flame tip; cause is torroidal vortex rolling up between products and stagnate surrounding air. Comparison between LDA measurements in reactants and schlieren images shows that velocity fluctuation are induced at the same frequency as the roll up vortices are formed. This pumping of the reactant stream by the product/air interface instability in the +g case is also observed in the turbulent flames. In the -g arrangement the product/air interface is stable so there is no large pumping of the flame tip. At low flow rates the -g flames have flattened tips, but at higher flow rates they become conical in shape. When both flames. appear conical, the -g flames are longer for the same flow rate. In [mu]g the larger instabilities in the flame no longer exist as the product/air interface is believed to become stable. The laminar flames in [mu]g still show small instabilities over the entire flame.

  7. The effects of gravity on wrinkled laminar flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kostiuk, L.W.; Zhou, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1992-09-01

    Laminar and turbulent conical Bunsen type flames were used. The study compares results from normal gravity with the burner in an up-right orientation (+g), the burner inverted (-g), and in microgravity ({mu}g) by using the NASA Lewis drop tower facility. The primary diagnostic is a laser schlieren system and some LDA measurements were taken for the +g condition to measure the flow field. The +g laminar flame experiences a large amount of instabilities and results in an unsteady flame tip; cause is torroidal vortex rolling up between products and stagnate surrounding air. Comparison between LDA measurements in reactants and schlieren images shows that velocity fluctuation are induced at the same frequency as the roll up vortices are formed. This pumping of the reactant stream by the product/air interface instability in the +g case is also observed in the turbulent flames. In the -g arrangement the product/air interface is stable so there is no large pumping of the flame tip. At low flow rates the -g flames have flattened tips, but at higher flow rates they become conical in shape. When both flames. appear conical, the -g flames are longer for the same flow rate. In {mu}g the larger instabilities in the flame no longer exist as the product/air interface is believed to become stable. The laminar flames in {mu}g still show small instabilities over the entire flame.

  8. Freely propagating open premixed turbulent flames stabilized by swirl

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.K.; Lau, K.S.; Chin, W.K.; Cheng, R.K.

    1991-12-01

    A novel means has been developed for using weak swirl to stabilize freely propagating open premixed turbulent flames (swirl numbers between 0.05 to 0.3). By injecting a small amount of air tangentially into the co-flow of a concentric burner, stationary flames can be maintained above the burner exit for a large range of mixture, turbulence and flow conditions. The absence of physical surfaces in the vicinity of the flame provides free access to laser diagnostics. Laser Doppler anemometry and laser Mie scattering measurements of four flames with and without incident turbulence show that their features are typical of wrinkled laminar flames. The most distinct characteristics is that flame stabilization does not rely on flow recirculation. Centrifugal force induced by swirl causes flow divergence, and the flame is maintained at where the local mass flux balances the burning rate. The flame speeds can be estimated based on the centerline velocity vector, which is locally normal to the flame brush. This flame geometry is the closest approximation to the 1-D planar flame for determining fundamental properties to advance turbulent combustion theories. 18 refs.

  9. Brominated flame retardants as food contaminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews analytical methods for the three major brominated flame retardant (BFR) classes in use today, tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a "legacy" BFR no longer in use, polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), and a...

  10. Measurement system for flame-front overpressure

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.W.

    1982-02-01

    A low-power remote data acquisition system for acoustic monitoring in the presence of high-temperature flashes has been successfully fielded. Preliminary data reduction from actual tests (Coyote LNG spills) indicates flame front overpressures in the range of a few millibars with frequency spectra extending to approximately 1 kHz.

  11. HEALTH ASPECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to reduce the societal costs of fires, flammability standards have been set for consumer products and equipment. Flame retardants containing bromine have constituted the largest share of this market due both to their efficiency and cost. While there are at least 75 dif...

  12. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: CAUSE FOR CONCERN?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have routinely been added to consumer products for several decades in a successful effort to reduce fire-related injury and property damage. Recently, concern for this emerging class of chemicals has risen due to the occurrence of several class...

  13. The Flame Challenge What is Time?

    E-print Network

    The Flame Challenge What is Time? Alan Alda, the Center for Communicating Science -- and 11- year-olds around the country ­ are seeking answers from scientists to a timeless question: What is time're asking a very deep question this year ("What is Time?!). It's going to be fun to see how scientists

  14. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: WHY DO WE CARE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) save lives and property by preventing the spread of fires or delaying the time of flashover, enhancing the time people have to escape. The worldwide production of BFRs exceeded 200,000 metric tons in 2003 placing them in the high production vol...

  15. HEALTH EFFECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Brominated flame retardant use has increased dramatically in order to provide fire safety to consumers. However, there is growing concern about widespread environmental contamination and potential health risks from some of these products. The most used products...

  16. Premixed-gas flames Paul D. Ronney

    E-print Network

    are not constrained to follow a contour of stoichiometric composition, whereas with non- premixed flames, the fuel in recent reviews of µg combustion (Sacksteder, 1990; Law and Faeth, 1994; Anon., 1995; Kono et al., 1996 to conductive heat loss, i.e., Tf/(dT/dt) Tf/(rCph(Tf-T)), where Cp is the constant-pressure heat capacity, h

  17. Flame in methane jet after spark ignition

    E-print Network

    Ahmed, Samer F.; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2009-05-21

    The video shows the flame motion following spark ignition in a turbulent methane jet. The flow conditions were: 30% air, 70% CH4, jet velocity 12.5m/s & 25m/s, framing rate 4200 fps, spark at r=0, z=40d (40 jet diameters; d=5mm). For details, see: S...

  18. Radiation Heat Transfer in Particle-Laden Gaseous Flame: Flame Acceleration and Triggering Detonation

    E-print Network

    Liberman, M A; Kiverin, A D

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine influence of the radiation heat transfer on the combustion regimes in the mixture, formed by suspension of fine inert particles in hydrogen gas. The gaseous phase is assumed to be transparent for the thermal radiation, while the radiant heat absorbed by the particles is then lost by conduction to the surrounding gas. The particles and gas ahead of the flame is assumed to be heated by radiation from the original flame. It is shown that the maximum temperature increase due to the radiation preheating becomes larger for a flame with lower velocity. For a flame with small enough velocity temperature of the radiation preheating may exceed the crossover temperature, so that the radiation heat transfer may become a dominant mechanism of the flame propagation. In the case of non-uniform distribution of particles, the temperature gradient formed due to the radiation preheating can initiate either deflagration or detonation ahead of the original flame via the Zel'dovich's gradient mechanism. Th...

  19. Power-law wrinkling turbulence-flame interaction model for astrophysical flames

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Townsley, Dean M.; Calder, Alan C.

    2014-04-01

    We extend a model for turbulence-flame interactions (TFI) to consider astrophysical flames with a particular focus on combustion in Type Ia supernovae. The inertial range of the turbulent cascade is nearly always under-resolved in simulations of astrophysical flows, requiring the use of a model in order to quantify the effects of subgrid-scale wrinkling of the flame surface. We provide implementation details to extend a well-tested TFI model to low-Prandtl number flames for use in the compressible hydrodynamics code FLASH. A local, instantaneous measure of the turbulent velocity is calibrated for FLASH and verification tests are performed. Particular care is taken to consider the relation between the subgrid rms turbulent velocity and the turbulent flame speed, especially for high-intensity turbulence where the turbulent flame speed is not expected to scale with the turbulent velocity. Finally, we explore the impact of different TFI models in full-star, three-dimensional simulations of Type Ia supernovae.

  20. Photometry’s Bright Future: Detecting Solar System Analogs with Future Space Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippke, Michael; Angerhausen, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Time-series transit photometry from the Kepler space telescope has allowed for the discovery of thousands of exoplanets. We explore the potential of yet improved future missions such as PLATO 2.0 in detecting solar system analogs. We use real-world solar data and end-to-end simulations to explore the stellar and instrumental noise properties. By injecting and retrieving planets, rings, and moons of our own solar system, we show that the discovery of Venus and Earth analogs transiting G dwarfs like our Sun is feasible at high signal-to-noise ratio after collecting 6 yr of data, but Mars and Mercury analogs will be difficult to detect owing to stellar noise. In the best cases, Saturn’s rings and Jupiter’s moons will be detectable even in single-transit observations. Through the high number (>1 billion) of observed stars by PLATO 2.0, it will become possible to detect thousands of single-transit events by cold gas giants, analogs to our Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Our own solar system aside, we also show, through signal injection and retrieval, that PLATO 2.0 class photometry will allow for the secure detection of exomoons transiting quiet M dwarfs. This is the first study analyzing in depth the potential of future missions and the ultimate limits of photometry, using realistic case examples.

  1. Local burning velocity in a Bunsen jet flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Soriano, Gabriel; Castillo, José Luis; Higuera, Francisco J.; García-Ybarra, Pedro L.

    2012-11-01

    A PIV-based system has been set-up for the simultaneous measurement of the local burning velocity of premixed flames and the flame stretch due to the flame front curvature and the incoming flow strain rate. For moderately short jet flames, these measurements allow an indirect determination of the Markstein length, according to Clavin and Joulin (C-J) theory. For tall flames, the flame curvature becomes relatively large in a region around the tip where the C-J theory breaks down. However, our experiments confirm the appearance of a new linear relation between burning velocity and curvature at the flame tip. This relation defines a new proportionality factor which is probably associated to the evolution from rounded tips to slender tips when the jet velocity is increased.

  2. Chemistry and toxicity of flame retardants for plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Liepins, R; Pearce, E M

    1976-01-01

    An overview of commercially used flame retardants is give. The most used flame retardants are illustrated and the seven major markets, which use 96% of all flame-retarded polymers, are described. Annual flame retardant growth rate for each major market is also projected. Toxicity data are reviewed on only those compositions that are considered commercially significant today. This includes 18 compounds or families of compounds and four inherently flame-retarded polymers. Toxicological studies of flame retardants for most synthetic materials are of recent origin and only a few of the compounds have been evaluated in any great detail. Considerable toxicological problems may exist in the manufacturing of some flame retardants, their by-products, and possible decomposition products. PMID:1026419

  3. Computational predictions of flame spread over alcohol pools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, D. N.; Ross, H. D.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of buoyancy and thermocapillarity on pulsating and uniform flame spread above n-propanol fuel pools have been studied using a numerical model. Data obtained indicate that the existence of pulsating flame spread is dependent upon the formation of a gas-phase recirculation cell which entrains evaporating fuel vapor in front of the leading edge of the flame. The size of the recirculation cell which is affected by the extent of liquid motion ahead of the flame, is shown to dictate whether flame spread is uniform or pulsating. The amplitude and period of the flame pulsations are found to be proportional to the maximum extent of the flow head. Under conditions considered, liquid motion was not affected appreciably by buoyancy. Horizontal convection in the liquid is the dominant mechanism for transporting heat ahead of the flame for both the pulsating and uniform regimes.

  4. Theory and modeling of accelerating flames in tubes.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, Vitaly; Petchenko, Arkady; Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Eriksson, Lars-Erik

    2005-10-01

    The analytical theory of premixed laminar flames accelerating in tubes is developed, which is an important part of the fundamental problem of flame transition to detonation. According to the theory, flames with realistically large density drop at the front accelerate exponentially from a closed end of a tube with nonslip at the walls. The acceleration is unlimited in time; it may go on until flame triggers detonation. The analytical formulas for the acceleration rate, for the flame shape and the velocity profile in the flow pushed by the flame are obtained. The theory is validated by extensive numerical simulations. The numerical simulations are performed for the complete set of hydrodynamic combustion equations including thermal conduction, viscosity, diffusion, and chemical kinetics. The theoretical predictions are in a good agreement with the numerical results. It is also shown how the developed theory can be used to understand acceleration of turbulent flames. PMID:16383533

  5. Excitation of thermoacoustic oscillations by small premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, C.M.; Chang, Z.; Williams, P.D.

    2010-06-15

    Experiments have been carried out in which very small lean premixed flames closely representative of those formed by modern multiport domestic gas burners have been subjected to controlled acoustic perturbation. PLIF from CH has been used to visualise the flame response and the heat-release-rate fluctuations have been evaluated directly from the flame images. It is shown that small laminar flames can amplify the effects of acoustic velocity fluctuations by mechanisms that do not involve resonant heat loss to the burner and that the fluctuations in flame-front area are not adequately characterised by a Strouhal number alone. The measured transfer function is compared with the predictions of various analytical formulations and a new model of the flame oscillation is proposed which applies specifically to situations in which the design of the burner renders the flame base immobile. (author)

  6. A new flame monitor with triple photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L.J.; Yan, Y.

    2006-08-15

    In this paper, we present a new flame monitor that uses three photovoltaic cells covering the ultraviolet (UV), visible, and infrared (IR) spectral bands. A gain-adjustable amplifier is incorporated into the monitor so that it is applicable to the coal-, oil-, or gas-fired flames. Self-checking of the monitor is implemented through cross correlation of the signals from the three cells, and hence, no additional self-checking hardware is required. Both the oscillation frequency and the brightness of the flame are used to monitor flame stability and to detect flame presence as well as sighting-tube blockage. Unlike conventional single-cell flame detectors, the new multicell devices can still be in operation before being repaired, after a cell-failure alarm has gone off. Experiments were carried out on an industrial-scale combustion test facility in order to demonstrate the operability and efficacy of the new flame monitor.

  7. Experimental studies of inhibited counterflow flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truett, Leonard Franklin, III

    An experimental and numerical study was performed to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of chemical inhibition. The first part of this work examined the structure of non-premixed counterflow methane-air flames. Gas samples were taken with a quartz microprobe and analyzed using a gas chromatograph with a thermal conductivity detector. Experimental and detailed numerical results were obtained for an uninhibited flame and flames inhibited by 1.5% CF3Br and 1.5% CF3I added to the oxidizer, all with a strain rate of 150s-1. The experimental data showed a slight shift toward the oxidizer duct above the flame, but showed excellent agreement with the numerical results below the flame in all cases. The inhibiting effect of CF3Br on a non-premixed diluted hydrogen-air flame was also investigated in the counterflowing configuration. Extinction results were obtained for 15%H2/85%N2 and 16%H 2/84%N2 in the fuel stream. The experimental results supported the theory that carbon chemistry does not play a significant role in inhibition by CF3Br. These results were compared with two different numerical models with different inhibition mechanisms. The effect of partially premixing a methane-air counterflow flame on the extinction strain rate was also examined. Premixing the oxidizer flow had a stabilizing effect, premixing the fuel flow had a weak inhibiting effect, and premixing in both flows had a very weak stabilizing effect that was basically the average of the two individual cases. These results were compared with detailed calculations, asymptotic and one-step analysis. The detailed numerical calculations had excellent agreement with the experiments but the asymptotic and one-step analysis predicted incorrect trends for all cases. Tests were also performed to examine the inhibiting effectiveness of alkali metal salts. Experiments were performed with NaHCO3 and KHCO3 with particle sizes of <30 microns and <20 microns, NaBr and KBr with a particle size of 5--25 microns, and silica (SiO 2) with a particle size of 1--3 microns. Inhibiting effectiveness increased as the particle sized decreased for all powders. The KHCO3 was approximately twice as effective as the NaHCO3, NaBr and KBr for similar particle sizes. These powders were approximately 10 times more efficient than silica and CF3Br on a mass basis.

  8. Flame Propagation of Butanol Isomers/Air Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Veloo, Peter S.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental and computational study was conducted on the propagation of flames of saturated butanol isomers. The experiments were performed in the counterflow configuration under atmospheric pressure, unburned mixture temperature of 343 K, and for a wide range of equivalence ratios. The experiments were simulated using a recent kinetic model for the four isomers of butanol. Results indicate that n-butanol/air flames propagate somewhat faster than both sec-butanol/air and iso-butanol/air flames, and that tert-butanol/air flames propagate notably slower compared to the other three isomers. Reaction path analysis of tert-butanol/air flames revealed that iso-butene is a major intermediate, which subsequently reacts to form the resonantly stable iso-butenyl radical retarding thus the overall reactivity of tert-butanol/air flames relatively to the other three isomers. Through sensitivity analysis, it was determined that the mass burning rates of sec-butanol/air and iso-butanol/air flames are sensitive largely to hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and C{sub 1}–C{sub 2} hydrocarbon kinetics and not to fuel-specific reactions similarly to n-butanol/air flames. However, for tert-butanol/air flames notable sensitivity to fuel-specific reactions exists. While the numerical results predicted closely the experimental data for n-butanol/air and sec-butanol/air flames, they overpredicted and underpredicted the laminar flame speeds for iso-butanol/air and tert-butanol/air flames respectively. It was demonstrated further that the underprediction of the laminar flame speeds of tert-butanol/air flames by the model was most likely due to deficiencies of the C{sub 4}-alkene kinetics.

  9. Highly turbulent combustion: A study of lifted and shredded flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, Albert

    The impact of turbulence on flame chemistry in highly turbulent flames has been studied in order to test existing theories and produce data that are useful to the computer modeling community. In these flames, the fuel is injected separately from the air, but a significant amount of premixing occurs prior to combustion. By employing Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) of chemical species, and exhaust gas sampling, the effect of turbulence on flame chemistry has been quantified for a highly lifted, supersonic flame and for a highly swirled, shredded flame. In the supersonic flame, OH PLIF measurements were combined with combustion efficiency measurements and PIV to help to understand the mixing and flame structure. Negative velocities of more than 200 m/s were identified in the recirculating zones. Mechanisms of fuel-air mixing that result in decreased combustion efficiencies were identified. In the shredded flame, an ultra-high turbulence region was generated to examine what occurs when reaction layers encounter high turbulence levels. The flame was probed with simultaneous CH and OH PLIF and then simultaneous PIV and OH PLIF. It was found that the normalized turbulence level, even though it was ten-times greater than any previous imaging study, still produced no measurable impact on flame reaction layer thickness. This flame was also quantified by measurements of Flame Surface Density (Sigma). The thin flamelet assumption of flamelet theory is found to be valid in these highly turbulent flames. Data are presented that can be used to assess computational models as well as to provide insight into the physical processes of turbulent combustion.

  10. Field Effects of Buoyancy on Lean Premixed Turbulent Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. K.; Johnson, M. R.; Greenberg, P. S.; Wernet, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    The study of field effects of buoyancy on premixed turbulent flames is directed towards the advancement of turbulent combustion theory and the development of cleaner combustion technologies. Turbulent combustion is considered the most important unsolved problem in combustion science and laboratory studies of turbulence flame processes are vital to theoretical development. Although buoyancy is dominant in laboratory flames, most combustion models are not yet capable to consider buoyancy effects. This inconsistency has impeded the validation of theories and numerical simulations with experiments. Conversely, the understanding of buoyancy effects is far too limited to help develop buoyant flame models. Our research is also relevant to combustion technology because lean premixed combustion is a proven method to reduce the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). In industrial lean premixed combustion systems, their operating conditions make them susceptible to buoyancy thus affecting heat distribution, emissions, stability, flashback and blowoff. But little knowledge is available to guide combustion engineers as to how to avoid or overcome these problems. Our hypothesis is that through its influence on the mean pressure field, buoyancy has direct and indirect effects on local flame/turbulence interactions. Although buoyancy acts on the hot products in the farfield the effect is also felt in the nearfield region upstream of the flame. These changes also influence the generation and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy inside the flame brush and throughout the flowfield. Moreover, the plume of an open flame is unstable and the periodic fluctuations make additional contributions to flame front dynamics in the farfield. Therefore, processes such as flame wrinkling, flow acceleration due to heat release and flame- generated vorticity are all affected. Other global flame properties (e.g. flame stabilization limits and flame speed) may all be coupled to buoyancy. This problem poses major challenges to combustion modeling due to its need for a computation domain extending into the farfield and full specifications of upstream, wall and downstream boundary conditions.

  11. Flame behaviors of propane/air premixed flame propagation in a closed rectangular duct with a 90-deg bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xuechao; Sun, Jinhua; Yuen, K. K.; Ding, Yibin; Chen, Sining

    2008-11-01

    Experiments of flame propagation in a small, closed rectangular duct with a 90° bend were performed for a propane-air mixture. The high speed camera and Schlieren techniques were used to record images of flame propagation process in the combustion pipe. Meanwhile, the fine thermocouples and ion current probes were applied to measure the temperature distribution and reaction intensity of combustion. The characteristics of propane-air flame and its microstructure were analyzed in detail by the experimental results. In the test, the special tulip flame formation was observed. Around the bend, the flame tip proceeded more quickly at the lower side with the flame front elongated toward the axial direction. And transition to turbulent flame occurred. It was suggested that fluctuations of velocity, ion current and temperature were mainly due to the comprehensive effects of multi-wave and the intense of turbulent combustion.

  12. Automated surface photometry for the Coma Cluster galaxies: The catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Okamura, S.; Tarusawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    A homogeneous photometry catalog is presented for 450 galaxies with B(sub 25.5) less than or equal to 16 mag located in the 9.8 deg x 9.8 deg region centered on the Coma Cluster. The catalog is based on photographic photometry using an automated surface photometry software for data reduction applied to B-band Schmidt plates. The catalog provides accurate positions, isophotal and total magnitudes, major and minor axes, and a few other photometric parameters including rudimentary morphology (early of late type).

  13. Flamelet Characteristics of Gaseous and Spray Lifted Flames on Two-Dimensional Direct Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Yuya; Kurose, Ryoichi

    The detailed behaviors of gaseous and spray lifted flames are studied by two- dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS), and the characteristics of the flamelets are investigated in terms of two key variables for flamelet modeling, namely mixture fraction and scalar G. The results show that both the gaseous and spray lifted flames are partially premixed flames, in which premixed and diffusion flames co-exist and the premixed flame stabilizing the flames precedes to the diffusion flame. The non-combusting and combusting regions can be generally discriminated by the scalar G, and the premixed and diffusion flames in the combusting region can be predicted by flame index, respectively. Although the flamelets in the diffusion flame of the gaseous lifted flame are characterized by the mixture fraction and scalar dissipation rate, those on the spray lifted flame are not. To account for the flamelet characteristics of the spray lifted flame, flamelet/progress-variable approach needs to be introduced.

  14. The effect of unburned gas axial velocity on the characteristics of rotational flame during flashback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufares, Ahmed M.; Wahid, M. A.

    2012-06-01

    The qualitative study has been carried out to investigate the effect of axial velocity of unburned gases on the flame characteristics during flame flashback in rotating burner. Our focus of study mainly on the flame shape and its behavior during flashback. It is found that the flame shape has been affected by the unburned gases axial velocity. Two flame shapes have been noticed the plate shape with cusp flame "fish flame" and upset dome flame. The cases that have been studied are flames at rotating speed 1200 rpm and 1620 rpm and several unburned gases axial velocity. Double concentric Bunsen rotating burner has been used in the study.

  15. Numerical Study of Buoyancy and Differential Diffusion Effects on the Structure and Dynamics of Triple Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. -Y.; Echekki, T.

    1999-01-01

    Triple flames arise in a number of practical configurations where fuel and oxidizer are partially premixed, such as in the base of a lifted jet flame. Past experimental studies, theoretical analyses, and numerical modeling of triple flames suggested the potential role of triple flames in stabilizing turbulent flames and in promoting flame propagation. From recent numerical simulations of laminar triple flames, a strong influence of differential diffusion among species and heat on the triple flame structure has been gradually appreciated. This paper reports preliminary numerical results on the influence of gravity and differential diffusion effects on the structure and dynamics of triple flames with a one-step global irreversible chemistry model.

  16. Flame quality monitor system for fixed firing rate oil burners

    DOEpatents

    Butcher, Thomas A. (Pt. Jefferson, NY); Cerniglia, Philip (Moriches, NY)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining and indicating the flame quality, or efficiency of the air-fuel ratio, in a fixed firing rate heating unit, such as an oil burning furnace, is provided. When the flame brightness falls outside a preset range, the flame quality, or excess air, has changed to the point that the unit should be serviced. The flame quality indicator output is in the form of lights mounted on the front of the unit. A green light indicates that the flame is about in the same condition as when the burner was last serviced. A red light indicates a flame which is either too rich or too lean, and that servicing of the burner is required. At the end of each firing cycle, the flame quality indicator goes into a hold mode which is in effect during the period that the burner remains off. A yellow or amber light indicates that the burner is in the hold mode. In this mode, the flame quality lights indicate the flame condition immediately before the burner turned off. Thus the unit can be viewed when it is off, and the flame condition at the end of the previous firing cycle can be observed.

  17. Analysis of flame surface density measurements in turbulent premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Halter, Fabien; Chauveau, Christian; Goekalp, Iskender; Veynante, Denis

    2009-03-15

    In premixed turbulent combustion, reaction rates can be estimated from the flame surface density. This parameter, which measures the mean flame surface area available per unit volume, may be obtained from algebraic expressions or by solving a transport equation. In this study, detailed measurements were performed on a Bunsen-type burner fed with methane/air mixtures in order to determine the local flame surface density experimentally. This burner, located in a high-pressure combustion chamber, allows investigation of turbulent premixed flames under various flow, mixture, and pressure conditions. In the present work, equivalence ratio was varied from 0.6 to 0.8 and pressure from 0.1 to 0.9 MPa. Flame front visualizations by Mie scattering laser tomography are used to obtain experimental data on the instantaneous flame front dynamics. The exact equation given by Pope is used to obtain flame surface density maps for different flame conditions. Some assumptions are made in order to access three-dimensional information from our two-dimensional experiments. Two different methodologies are proposed and tested in term of global mass balance (what enters compared to what is burned). The detailed experimental flame surface data provided for the first time in this work should progressively allow improvement of turbulent premixed flame modeling approaches. (author)

  18. Radiative Extinction of Gaseous Spherical Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa, K. J.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.; Axelbaum, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    Radiative extinction of spherical diffusion flames was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments involved microgravity spherical diffusion flames burning ethylene and propane at 0.98 bar. Both normal (fuel flowing into oxidizer) and inverse (oxidizer flowing into fuel) flames were studied, with nitrogen supplied to either the fuel or the oxygen. Flame conditions were chosen to ensure that the flames extinguished within the 2.2 s of available test time; thus extinction occurred during unsteady flame conditions. Diagnostics included color video and thin-filament pyrometry. The computations, which simulated flow from a porous sphere into a quiescent environment, included detailed chemistry, transport and radiation, and yielded transient results. Radiative extinction was observed experimentally and simulated numerically. Extinction time, peak temperature, and radiative loss fraction were found to be independent of flow rate except at very low flow rates. Radiative heat loss was dominated by the combustion products downstream of the flame and was found to scale with flame surface area, not volume. For large transient flames the heat release rate also scaled with surface area and thus the radiative loss fraction was largely independent of flow rate. Peak temperatures at extinction onset were about 1100 K, which is significantly lower than for kinetic extinction. One observation of this work is that while radiative heat losses can drive transient extinction, this is not because radiative losses are increasing with time (flame size) but rather because the heat release rate is falling off as the temperature drops.

  19. Upward Flame Spread Over Thin Solids in Partial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feier, I. I.; Shih, H. Y.; Sacksteder, K. R.; Tien, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of partial-gravity, reduced pressure, and sample width on upward flame spread over a thin cellulose fuel were studied experimentally and the results were compared to a numerical flame spread simulation. Fuel samples 1-cm, 2-cm, and 4-cm wide were burned in air at reduced pressures of 0.2 to 0.4 atmospheres in simulated gravity environments of 0.1-G, 0.16-G (Lunar), and 0.38-G (Martian) onboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft and in normal-gravity tests. Observed steady flame propagation speeds and pyrolysis lengths were approximately proportional to the gravity level. Flames spread more quickly and were longer with the wider samples and the variations with gravity and pressure increased with sample width. A numerical simulation of upward flame spread was developed including three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, one-step Arrhenius kinetics for the gas phase flame and for the solid surface decomposition, and a fuel-surface radiative loss. The model provides detailed structure of flame temperatures, the flow field interactions with the flame, and the solid fuel mass disappearance. The simulation agrees with experimental flame spread rates and their dependence on gravity level but predicts a wider flammable region than found by experiment. Some unique three-dimensional flame features are demonstrated in the model results.

  20. Combustion and Flame 153 (2008) 367383 www.elsevier.com/locate/combustflame

    E-print Network

    Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    2008-01-01

    displacement velocity. As the flame approaches the burner, it transitions to a double flame, and subsequently flame velocity. As the H2 concentration in the fuel blend is increased, the displacement flame velocityCombustion and Flame 153 (2008) 367­383 www.elsevier.com/locate/combustflame Effects of H2

  1. Dynamics of a Longitudinally Forced, Bluff Body Stabilized Flame Dong-Hyuk Shin,

    E-print Network

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    velocities from 38 to 170 m=s. These data show that the flame-front response at the acoustic forcing of flame-front wrinkles by the oscillating velocity, 3) interference of wrinkles on the flame front, and 4 SL = laminar flame speed ST = turbulent flame speed t = time u = flow velocity in the x-direction u0

  2. Influence of edge velocity on flame front position and displacement speed in turbulent premixed combustion

    E-print Network

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Influence of edge velocity on flame front position and displacement speed in turbulent premixed velocity Flame front position Flame displacement speed a b s t r a c t Using a novel concept, the present position and the flame front velocity in turbulent premixed V-shaped flames. The concept is associated

  3. Premixed turbulent flame front structure investigation by Rayleigh scattering in the thin

    E-print Network

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    flames, and from 0.7 to stoichiometric for propane flames. The non-dimensional turbulence rms velocity, u rms velocity in both methane and propane flames, although the flame thickening was more prominent interface that locally propagates with a laminar burning velocity and a scalar structure of a laminar flame

  4. The propagation of premixed flames in closed tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matalon, Moshe; Metzener, Philippe

    1997-04-01

    A nonlinear evolution equation that describes the propagation of a premixed flame in a closed tube has been derived from the general conservation equations. What distinguishes it from other similar equations is a memory term whose origin is in the vorticity production at the flame front. The two important parameters in this equation are the tube's aspect ratio and the Markstein parameter. A linear stability analysis indicates that when the Markstein parameter [alpha] is above a critical value [alpha]c the planar flame is the stable equilibrium solution. For [alpha] below [alpha]c the planar flame is no longer stable and there is a band of growing modes. Numerical solutions of the full nonlinear equation confirm this conclusion. Starting with random initial conditions the results indicate that, after a short transient, a at flame develops when [alpha]>[alpha]c and it remains flat until it reaches the end of the tube. When [alpha]<[alpha]c, on the other hand, stable curved flames may develop down the tube. Depending on the initial conditions the flame assumes either a cellular structure, characterized by a finite number of cells convex towards the unburned gas, or a tulip shape characterized by a sharp indentation at the centre of the tube pointing toward the burned gases. In particular, if the initial conditions are chosen so as to simulate the elongated finger-like flame that evolves from an ignition source, a tulip flame evolves downstream. In accord with experimental observations the tulip shape forms only after the flame has travelled a certain distance down the tube, it does not form in short tubes and its formation depends on the mixture composition. While the initial deformation of the flame front is a direct result of the hydrodynamic instability, the actual formation of the tulip flame results from the vortical motion created in the burned gas which is a consequence of the vorticity produced at the flame front.

  5. Effect of Wind Velocity on Flame Spread in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Kuldeep; Olson, Sandra L.; Nakamura, Yuji; Fujita, Osamu; Nishizawa, Katsuhiro; Ito, Kenichi; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Simons, Stephen N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time-dependent model is developed describing ignition and subsequent transition to flame spread over a thermally thin cellulosic sheet heated by external radiation in a microgravity environment. A low Mach number approximation to the Navier Stokes equations with global reaction rate equations describing combustion in the gas phase and the condensed phase is numerically solved. The effects of a slow external wind (1-20 cm/s) on flame transition are studied in an atmosphere of 35% oxygen concentration. The ignition is initiated at the center part of the sample by generating a line-shape flame along the width of the sample. The calculated results are compared with data obtained in the 10s drop tower. Numerical results exhibit flame quenching at a wind speed of 1.0 cm/s, two localized flames propagating upstream along the sample edges at 1.5 cm/s, a single line-shape flame front at 5.0 cm/s, three flames structure observed at 10.0 cm/s (consisting of a single line-shape flame propagating upstream and two localized flames propagating downstream along sample edges) and followed by two line-shape flames (one propagating upstream and another propagating downstream) at 20.0 cm/s. These observations qualitatively compare with experimental data. Three-dimensional visualization of the observed flame complex, fuel concentration contours, oxygen and reaction rate isosurfaces, convective and diffusive mass flux are used to obtain a detailed understanding of the controlling mechanism, Physical arguments based on lateral diffusive flux of oxygen, fuel depletion, oxygen shadow of the flame and heat release rate are constructed to explain the various observed flame shapes.

  6. Comparison of Metallicities Adopted for the Synthetic UBV Photometry with Those Evaluated by Means of RGU Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaali, S.; Güngör, S.; Karatas, Y.

    1998-04-01

    Comparison of metallicities adopted for the synthetic UBV photometry with those evaluated by means of RGU photometry for 92 stars is presented. The agreement only for zero metallicity. The discrepancy increases to low metallicities which cover Intermediate population and Population II main-sequence star. U-G and G-R colour indices are transformed from UBV synthetic data and do not include any observational error. Therefore, the disagreement may orginate from a systematic error in the metallicity calibration of relatively metal-poor stars in RGU photometry.

  7. Detection of Extrasolar Planets by Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William; Koch, David; Webster, Larry; Dunham, Edward; Witteborn, Fred; Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Douglas; Showen, Robert; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A knowledge of other planetary systems that includes information on the number, size, mass, and spacing of the planets around a variety of star types is needed to deepen our understanding of planetary system formation and processes that give rise to their final configurations. Recent discoveries show that many planetary systems are quite different from the solar system in that they often possess giant planets in short period orbits. The inferred evolution of these planets and their orbital characteristics imply the absence of Earth-like planets near the habitable zone. Information on the properties of the giant-inner planets is now being obtained by both the Doppler velocity and the transit photometry techniques. The combination of the two techniques provides the mass, size, and density of the planets. For the planet orbiting star HD209458, transit photometry provided the first independent confirmation and measurement of the diameter of an extrasolar planet. The observations indicate a planet 1.27 the diameter of Jupiter with 0.63 of its mass (Charbonneau et al. 1999). The results are in excellent agreement with the theory of planetary atmospheres for a planet of the indicated mass and distance from a solar-like star. The observation of the November 23, 1999 transit of that planet made by the Ames Vulcan photometer at Lick Observatory is presented. In the future, the combination of the two techniques will greatly increase the number of discoveries and the richness of the science yield. Small rocky planets at orbital distances from 0.9 to 1.2 AU are more likely to harbor life than the gas giant planets that are now being discovered. However, new technology is needed to find smaller, Earth-like planets, which are about three hundred times less massive than Jupiter-like planets. The Kepler project is a space craft mission designed to discover hundreds of Earth-size planets in and near the habitable zone around a wide variety of stars. To demonstrate that the technology exists to find such small planets, our group has conducted an end-to-end system test. The results of the laboratory tests are presented and show that we are ready to start the search for Earth-size planets.

  8. L' AND M' Photometry Of Ultracool Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, M. S.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; Vrba, F. J.; Henden, A. A.; Luginbuhl, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    We have compiled L' (3.4-4.1 microns) and M' (4.6- 4.8 microns) photometry of 63 single and binary M, L, and T dwarfs obtained at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope using the Mauna Kea Observatory filter set. This compilation includes new L' measurements of eight L dwarfs and 13 T dwarfs and new M' measurements of seven L dwarfs, five T dwarfs, and the M1 dwarf Gl 229A. These new data increase by factors of 0. 6 and 1.6, respectively, the numbers of ultracool dwarfs T (sub eff) photometry, and trigonometric parallaxes are available, and we estimate these quantities for nine other dwarfs whose parallaxes and flux-calibrated spectra have been obtained. BC(SUB K) is a well-behaved function of near-infrared spectral type with a dispersion of approx. 0.1 mag for types M6-T5 it is significantly more scattered for types T5-T9. T (sub eff) declines steeply and monotonically for types M6-L7 and T4-T9, but it is nearly constant at approx. 1450 K for types L7-T4 with assumed ages of approx. 3 Gyr. This constant T(sub eff) is evidenced by nearly unchanging values of L'-M' between types L6 and T3. It also supports recent models that attribute the changing near-infrared luminosities and spectral features across the L-T transition to the rapid migration, disruption, and/or thinning of condensate clouds over a narrow range of T(sub eff). The L' and M' luminosities of early-T dwarfs do not exhibit the pronounced humps or inflections previously noted in l through K bands, but insufficient data exist for types L6-T5 to assert that M(Sub L') and M(sub M') are strictly monotonic within this range of typew. We compare the observed K, L', and M' luminosities of L and T dwarfs in our sample with those predicted by precipitation-cloud-free models for varying surface gravities and sedimentation efficiencies.

  9. WIYN Open Cluster Study: UBVRI Photometry of NGC 2158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taverne, Luke T.; Steinhauer, Aaron J.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.

    2015-01-01

    We present WIYN 0.9m HDI UBVRI photometry of NGC 2158, a very rich, intermediate-aged, open cluster located near the galactic anti-center. We report derived values for the cluster age, distance, reddening.

  10. Revised Filter Profiles and Zero Points for Broadband Photometry

    E-print Network

    Mann, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Estimating accurate bolometric fluxes for stars requires reliable photometry to absolutely flux calibrate the spectra. This is a significant problem for studies of very bright stars, which are generally saturated in modern photometric surveys. Instead we must rely on photometry with less precise calibration. We utilize precisely flux-calibrated spectra to derive improved filter bandpasses and zero points for the most common sources of photometry for bright stars. In total we test 40 different filters in the General Catalog of Photometric Data as well as those from Tycho-2 and $Hipparcos$. We show that utilizing inaccurate filter profiles from the literature can create significant color terms resulting in fluxes that deviate by $>$10% from actual values. To remedy this we employ an empirical approach; we iteratively adjust the literature filter profile and zero point, convolve it with catalog spectra, and compare to the corresponding flux from the photometry. We adopt the passband values that produces the best...

  11. A catalogue of IJK photometry of Planetary Nebulae with DENIS

    E-print Network

    S. Schmeja; S. Kimeswenger

    2001-05-15

    Near-infrared photometry of planetary nebulae (PNe) allows the classification of those objects. We present the largest homogeneous sample so far, obtained with the Deep Near Infrared Southern Sky Survey (DENIS).

  12. Photometry and transit-timing analysis for eleven transiting exoplanets

    E-print Network

    De Kleer, Katherine Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents time-series photometry of transits of 11 different extrasolar planets. Observations were conducted with the Fred L. Whipple Observatory 1.2m telescope and the Wise Observatory im telescope, in standard ...

  13. The Interaction of High-Speed Turbulence with Flames: Turbulent Flame Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei; Oran, Elaine

    2010-11-01

    The interaction of flames with background turbulence occurs in systems ranging from chemical flames on Earth to thermonuclear burning fronts in supernovae. We present an analysis of a set of numerical simulations aimed at studying the dynamics and properties of turbulent flames formed under the action of high-speed turbulence in stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture. The simulations were performed using the massively parallel reactive-flow code Athena-RFX. Previous analysis of these simulations showed that this system represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime even in the presence of intense turbulence (Da = 0.05, Urms˜ 35 times the laminar flame speed). Here we discuss the processes that determine the turbulent burning velocity and show that it exceeds values that can be attributed only to the increase of the flame surface area. We suggest a possible mechanism for this excess burning rate. Finally, we discuss the implications of these results for the process of deflagration-to-detonation transition in unconfined systems. This work was supported in part by AFOSR, NRL, ONR, and by NSF through the TeraGrid resources.

  14. Power generation performance of direct flame fuel cell (DFFC) impinged by small jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuji; Endo, Shota

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigated the effect of cell temperature and product species concentration induced by a small jet flame on the power generation performance of a direct flame fuel cell (DFFC). The cell is placed above the small-scale jet flame and the heated product’s gases are impinged toward it. This system is considered to be the simplest and smallest unit of such power generation devices to have been developed. Methane is used as fuel and an equivalence ratio (? ) of the mixture (with oxygen) and the distance between the cell and the burner surface (d) are considered as the experimental parameters. It turns out that open circuit voltage increases linearly with the increase of temperature in a wide range of equivalence ratios. However, it increases drastically to the point at which the equivalence ratio becomes small enough (? ?????2.0 in the present study) within the specific distance range to bring about the appearance of an inner flame. This could provide sufficient heat and oxygen for the anode, contributing to the generation of the cell’s high electric potential. It is also noted that the appearance of the inner flame does not promise to better the performance unless the preferred conditions (high temperature, low oxygen, rich fuel) near the cell are achieved. The Nernst equation works well for predicting the open circuit voltage under the conditions studied. Systematic design of the entire power generation system is preferable when a miniaturized power generation system is considered by applying DFFC.

  15. Strained flamelets for turbulent premixed flames, I: Formulation and planar flame results

    SciTech Connect

    Kolla, H.; Swaminathan, N.

    2010-05-15

    A strained flamelet model is proposed for turbulent premixed flames using scalar dissipation rate as a parameter. The scalar dissipation rate of reaction progress variable is a suitable quantity to describe the flamelet structure since it is governed by convection-diffusion-reaction balance and it is defined at every location in the flamelets, which are represented by laminar flames in reactant-to-product opposed flow configuration. The mean reaction rate is obtained by using the flamelets reaction rate and the joint pdf of the progress variable and its dissipation rate. The marginal pdf of the progress variable is presumed to be {beta}-pdf and the pdf of the conditional dissipation rate is taken to be log-normal. The conditional mean dissipation rate is obtained from modelled mean dissipation rate. This reaction rate closure is assessed using RANS calculations of statistically planar flames in the corrugated flamelets and thin reaction zones regimes. The flame speeds calculated using this closure are close to the experimental data of Abdel-Gayed et al. (1987) for flames in both the regimes. Comparisons with other reaction rate closures showed the benefits of the strained flamelets approach. (author)

  16. Exoplanet Photometry of Tres-5b Using a DSLR Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mike

    2015-05-01

    DSLR cameras are commonly used by amateur astronomers in the field of variable star photometry. After submitting photometry results to AAVSO using a DSLR camera for the past 4 years, I decided to see if it was possible to actually record magnitude drops of as little as 15 to 20 mmg as are seen in some exoplanet transits. Surprisingly, my results were much better than I expected. Clearly it is possible to get publishable results of exoplanet transits with a DSLR camera.

  17. BINARY STAR SYNTHETIC PHOTOMETRY AND DISTANCE DETERMINATION USING BINSYN

    SciTech Connect

    Linnell, Albert P.; DeStefano, Paul; Hubeny, Ivan E-mail: pdestefa@uw.edu

    2013-09-15

    This paper extends synthetic photometry to components of binary star systems. The paper demonstrates accurate recovery of single star photometric properties for four photometric standards, Vega, Sirius, GD153, and HD209458, ranging over the HR diagram, when their model synthetic spectra are placed in fictitious binary systems and subjected to synthetic photometry processing. Techniques for photometric distance determination have been validated for all four photometric standards.

  18. Resolution-doubled one-dimensional wavelength modulation spectroscopy tomography for flame flatness validation of a flat-flame burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Lijun; Li, Fangyan; Cao, Zhang; Tsekenis, Stylianos A.; McCann, Hugh

    2015-09-01

    Flame flatness is one of the most critical factors in evaluating the performance of a flat-flame burner. In this paper, the flame flatness of a flat-flame burner is validated using a resolution-doubled one-dimensional wavelength modulation spectroscopy tomography (1D-WMST) technique that only uses one view of multiple parallel laser beams. When the interval of two neighboring parallel laser beams is ? r, a designed novel geometry of the parallel laser beams realizes a doubled tomographic resolution of ? r/2. Using the proposed technique, the distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction in an axisymmetric premixed flame are simultaneously reconstructed and hence the flame flatness of a flat-flame burner can be validated. The flatness factor is quantitatively described by the similarity between the reconstructed and expected distributions of H2O mole fraction. For flat and non-flat flames, the experimental results agree well with the CFD simulation results, denoting that the resolution-doubled 1D-WMST technique provides a noninvasive, reliable and low cost way to validate the flame flatness of the flat-flame burner.

  19. Analytical study in the mechanism of flame movement in horizontal tubes. II. Flame acceleration in smooth open tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2013-08-01

    The problem of spontaneous acceleration of premixed flames propagating in open horizontal tubes with smooth walls is revisited. It is proved that in long tubes, this process can be considered quasi-steady, and an equation for the flame front position is derived using the on-shell description. Numerical solutions of this equation are found which show that as in the case of uniform flame movement, there are two essentially different regimes of flame propagation. In the type I regime, the flame speed and its acceleration are comparatively low, whereas the type II regime is characterized by significant flame acceleration that rapidly increases as the flame travels along the tube. A detailed comparison of the obtained results with the experimental data on flame acceleration in methane-air mixtures is given. In particular, it is confirmed that flames propagating in near-stoichiometric mixtures and mixtures near the limits of inflammability belong to the types II and I, respectively, whereas flames in transient mixtures undergo transitions between the two regimes during their travel.

  20. Non-premixed acoustically perturbed swirling flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Idahosa, Uyi; Saha, Abhishek; Xu, Chengying; Basu, Saptarshi

    2010-09-15

    An investigation into the response of non-premixed swirling flames to acoustic perturbations at various frequencies (f{sub p}=0-315 Hz) and swirl intensities (S=0.09 and 0.34) is carried out. Perturbations are generated using a loudspeaker at the base of an atmospheric co-flow burner with resulting velocity oscillation amplitudes vertical stroke u'/U{sub avg} vertical stroke in the 0.03-0.30 range. The dependence of flame dynamics on the relative richness of the flame is investigated by studying various constant fuel flow rate flame configurations. Flame heat release rate is quantitatively measured using a photomultiplier with a 430 nm bandpass filter for observing CH* chemiluminescence which is simultaneously imaged with a phase-locked CCD camera. The flame response is observed to exhibit a low-pass filter characteristic with minimal flame response beyond pulsing frequencies of 200 Hz. Flames at lower fuel flow rates are observed to remain attached to the central fuel pipe at all acoustic pulsing frequencies. PIV imaging of the associated isothermal fields show the amplification in flame aspect ratio is caused by the narrowing of the inner recirculation zone (IRZ). Good correlation is observed between the estimated flame surface area and the heat release rate signature at higher swirl intensity flame configurations. A flame response index analogous to the Rayleigh criterion in non-forced flames is used to assess the potential for a strong flame response at specific perturbation configurations and is found to be a good predictor of highly responsive modes. Phase conditioned analysis of the flame dynamics yield additional criteria in highly responsive modes to include the effective amplitude of velocity oscillations induced by the acoustic pulsing. In addition, highly responsive modes were characterized by velocity to heat release rate phase differences in the {+-}{pi}/2 range. A final observed characteristic in highly responsive flames is a Strouhal number between 1 and 3.5 based on the burner co-flow annulus diameter (St = f{sub p}U{sub avg}/d{sub m}). Finally, wavelet analyses of heat release rate perturbations indicate highly responsive modes are characterized by sustained low frequency oscillations which accompany the high amplitude velocity perturbations at these modes. Higher intensity low frequency heat release rate oscillations are observed for lean flame/low pulsing frequency conditions. (author)

  1. Multicolor Photometry of Trans-neptunian Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doressoundiram, A.; Barucci, M. A.; Romon, J.; Veillet, C.

    2001-12-01

    We are continuing our photometric survey of the trans-neptunian and Centaur populations started in 1997. We report multicolor photometry for 17 objects. With these results combined with previous data (M. A. Barucci, A. Doressoundiram, M. Fulchignoni, D. Tholen, and M. Lazzarin 1999. Icarus142, 476-481; M. A. Barucci, J. Romon, A. Doressoundiram, and D. Tholen 2000. Astron. J.120, 496-500), we have at our disposal a homogeneous and high-quality set of color indices for 29 objects, numerous enough to make significant studies. The color-color diagrams confirm the wide and continuous spread of colors in the trans-neptunian object population. This diversity may be explained by the combined action of space weathering and collisional resurfacing. We do not find any correlation of colors with size or heliocentric distance, but we note an excess of red objects for perihelion distance greater than 40 AU. Furthermore, our results suggest also that highly inclined (e.g., i>17°) and eccentric objects are preferentially neutral. These objects may have suffered more collisional resurfacing than others.

  2. Recent Advances in Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Meachem, Terry; Cooke, William J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the most common (and obvious) problems with video meteor data involves the saturation of the output signal produced by bright meteors, resulting in the elimination of such meteors from photometric determinations. It is important to realize that a "bright" meteor recorded by intensified meteor camera is not what would be considered "bright" by a visual observer - indeed, many Generation II or III camera systems are saturated by meteors with a visual magnitude of 3, barely even noticeable to the untrained eye. As the relatively small fields of view (approx.30 ) of the camera systems captures at best modest numbers of meteors, even during storm peaks, the loss of meteors brighter than +3 renders the determination of shower population indices from video observations even more difficult. Considerable effort has been devoted by the authors to the study of the meteor camera systems employed during the Marshall Space Flight Center s Leonid ground-based campaigns, and a calibration scheme has been devised which can extend the useful dynamic range of such systems by approximately 4 magnitudes. The calibration setup involves only simple equipment, available to amateur and professional, and it is hoped that use of this technique will make for better meteor photometry, and move video meteor analysis beyond the realm of simple counts.

  3. BVRI photometry of DQ Herculis in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrienko, E. S.; Ibragimov, M. A.; Savanov, I. S.; Satovskii, B. L.; Egamberdiev, Sh. A.; Burkhanov, O. A.

    2015-09-01

    The results of BV RI photometry of the nova DQ Her 1934 performed at the Maidanak Observatory of the Astronomical Institute of the Uzbek Academy of Sciences in October 2014 are presented. The system's brightness, the out-of-eclipse color indices, and the shape of the minima in the BV RI light curves, which are due to eclipses of the white dwarf with its accreting disk-like envelope by the red dwarf, correspond to one of the lowest activity levels observed during the system's deepest relaxation after a nova outburst. The orbital-phase variations of the color indices indicate the presence of a considerably non-uniform brightness distribution for light coming from the disk-like envelope and other gaseous structures of DQ Her, which are observed at orbital phases of 0.85-1.15. The results can be qualitatively interpreted in a picture in which the gas flow structure is formed during mass exchange in an intermediate polar. The behavior found for the color indices could be due, for example, to the visibility in this phase interval of the passage of regions of shocks (tidal shocks, a hot line, and/or a detached shock) through the line of sight.

  4. BVRI PHOTOMETRY OF 53 UNUSUAL ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Q.-Z.

    2011-02-15

    We present the results of BVRI photometry and classification of 53 unusual asteroids, including 35 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), 6 high eccentricity/inclination asteroids, and 12 recently identified asteroid-pair candidates. Most of these asteroids were not classified prior to this work. For the few asteroids that have been previously studied, the results are generally in agreement. In addition to observing and classifying these objects, we merge the results from severalphotometric/spectroscopic surveys to create the largest-ever sample with 449 spectrally classified NEAs for statistical analysis. We identify a 'transition point' of the relative number of C/X-like and S-like NEAs at H {approx} 18 {r_reversible} D {approx} 1 km with confidence level at {approx}95% or higher. We find that the C/X-like:S-like ratio for 18 {<=} H < 22 is about twice as high as that of H < 18 (0.33 {+-} 0.04 versus 0.17 {+-} 0.02), virtually supporting the hypothesis that smaller NEAs generally have less weathered surfaces (therefore less reddish appearance) due to younger collision ages.

  5. BVI CCD photometry of 47 Tucanae

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.

    1987-08-01

    CCD BVI main-sequence photometry of 47 Tuc is presented, matched to the recent BVI isochrones of VandenBerg and Bell (1985). The main-sequence turnoffs are found to be at V = 17.60 + or - 0.1, B-V = 0.56 + or - 0.02; V-I = 0.68 + or - 0.02, and B-I = 1.24 + or - 0.02. The magnitude difference between the main-sequence turnoff and the horizontal branch is 3.55 + or - 0.15 for all three color indices. A consistent age for 47 Tuc of 17 Gyr and a consistent distance modulus of (m-M)v = 13.2 are obtained for all three indices, and an absolute magnitude of Mv = 0.85 is determined for the horizontal branch stars. The results also favor the adoption of (Fe/H) near -0.5 as the best abundance value for 47 Tuc. 38 references.

  6. More results on oscillating edge-flames

    SciTech Connect

    Buckmaster, J.; Hegab, A.; Jackson, T. L.

    2000-06-01

    We examine a simple model of a side-anchored non-premixed edge-flame in order to gain insights into the oscillations that are sometimes observed in microgravity candle burning, flame-spread over liquids, etc. Previous results describe the role played by the Lewis number of the fuel, and the Damkoehler number, and here we examine both the effects of an on-edge and off-edge convective flow, and the effects of a heat sink. The on-edge flow and the heat sink tend to destabilize and the off-edge flow tends to stabilize, results consistent with our hypothesis regarding the genesis of the oscillations. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Brominated flame retardants: cause for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Linda S; Staskal, Daniele F

    2004-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have routinely been added to consumer products for several decades in a successful effort to reduce fire-related injury and property damage. Recently, concern for this emerging class of chemicals has risen because of the occurrence of several classes of BFRs in the environment and in human biota. The widespread production and use of BFRs; strong evidence of increasing contamination of the environment, wildlife, and people; and limited knowledge of potential effects heighten the importance of identifying emerging issues associated with the use of BFRs. In this article, we briefly review scientific issues associated with the use of tetrabromobisphenol A, hexabromocyclododecane, and three commercial mixtures of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and discuss data gaps. Overall, the toxicology database is very limited; the current literature is incomplete and often conflicting. Available data, however, raise concern over the use of certain classes of brominated flame retardants. PMID:14698924

  8. Temperature effect in sooting diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Glassman, I.; Yaccarino, P.

    1981-01-01

    By controlling the temperature of sooting diffusion flames with the addition of inert additives, it was possible to show that the C/sub 4/ and C/sub 5/ olefins have the greatest tendency to soot of all the aliphatics tested - even acetylene. The results, plotted as the log of the reciprocal of the flow rate at the sooting height versus (1/T), indicate that the sooting height is a good qualitative measure of the fuel pyrolysis rate and sooting tendency. By using monoatomic and diatomic inerts, it was possible to show that fuel partial pressure was of secondary importance. Flame temperature and fuel structure appear to be the most significant factors which determine the propensity to soot in diffusion controlled combustion systems. 24 refs.

  9. NEW UBVRI PHOTOMETRY OF 234 M33 STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jun

    2013-04-15

    This is the second paper of our series. In this paper, we present UBVRI photometry for 234 star clusters in the field of M33. For most of these star clusters, there is photometry in only two bands in previous studies. The photometry of these star clusters is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements, and in particular that our photometry is in good agreement with that of Zloczewski and Kaluzny. Combined with star cluster photometry in previous studies, we present some results: none of the M33 youngest clusters ({approx}10{sup 7} yr) have masses approaching 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }, and comparisons with models of simple stellar populations suggest a large range of ages for M33 star clusters and some as old as the Galactic globular clusters.

  10. FIXING THE U-BAND PHOTOMETRY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Krisciunas, Kevin; Bastola, Deepak; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Espinoza, Juan; Gonzalez, David; Gonzalez, Luis; Gonzalez, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Morrell, Nidia; Phillips, Mark M.; Hamuy, Mario E-mail: suntzeff@physics.tamu.edu E-mail: hsiao@lco.cl E-mail: mmp@lco.cl

    2013-01-01

    We present previously unpublished photometry of supernovae 2003gs and 2003hv. Using spectroscopically derived corrections to the U-band photometry, we reconcile U-band light curves made from imagery with the Cerro Tololo 0.9 m, 1.3 m, and Las Campanas 1 m telescopes. Previously, such light curves showed a 0.4 mag spread at one month after maximum light. This gives us hope that a set of corrected ultraviolet light curves of nearby objects can contribute to the full utilization of rest-frame U-band data of supernovae at redshift {approx}0.3-0.8. As pointed out recently by Kessler et al. in the context of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey supernova search, if we take the published U-band photometry of nearby Type Ia supernovae at face value, there is a 0.12 mag U-band anomaly in the distance moduli of higher redshift objects. This anomaly led the Sloan survey to eliminate from their analyses all photometry obtained in the rest-frame U-band. The Supernova Legacy Survey eliminated observer frame U-band photometry, which is to say nearby objects observed in the U-band, but they used photometry of high-redshift objects no matter in which band the photons were emitted.

  11. Simple Flame Test Techniques Using Cotton Swabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanger, Michael J.; Phelps, Amy J.

    2004-07-01

    This article describes three new methods for performing simple flame tests using cotton swabs. The first method uses a Bunsen burner and solid metal salts; the second method uses a Bunsen burner and 1 M aqueous solutions of metal salts; and the third method uses candles, rubbing alcohol, and solid metal salts. These methods have the advantage of being easy to perform, require inexpensive and easily-obtained materials, and have easy cleanup and disposal methods. See the Discussion on this Tested Demonstation .

  12. Fluid mechanical properties of flames in enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.A.; Pindera, M.Z.; Oppenheim, A.K.

    1988-07-01

    In an enclosure where the reacting medium is initially at rest, the flame first generates a flowfield that then gets stretched, i.e., its front is pulled along the surface by the flowfield in which it then finds itself residing. A methodology developed for numerical modeling of such fields is described. Of key significance in this respect is the zero Mach number model/endash/a reasonable idealization in view of the relatively high temperature, and hence sound speed, that exists, concomitantly with a comparatively low particle velocity, in the confinement of a combustion chamber. According to this model, the density gradient in the field is nullified, while across the flame front it approaches infinity. One has thus two regimes: one of the unburned medium and the other of the burned gas, each of spatially uniform density, separated by a flame front interface. The latter is endowed with four properties, of which the first two are purely kinematic and the others dynamic in nature, namely: 1) it is advected at the local velocity of flow; 2) it self-advances at the normal burning speed, the eigenvalue of the system; 3) it acts as the velocity source due to the exothermicity of the combustion process; and 4) it acts as the vorticity source due to the baroclinic effect generated by the pressure gradient along its surface and the density gradient across it. A solution obtained for a flame propagating in an oblong rectangular enclosure demonstrates that the latter has a significant influence upon the formation of the well known tulip shape. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Thermal Insulation System for Large Flame Buckets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callens, E. Eugene, Jr.; Gamblin, Tonya Pleshette

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the use of thermal protection coatings, single tiles, and layered insulation systems to protect the walls of the flame buckets used in the testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine, while reducing the cost and maintenance of the system. The physical behavior is modeled by a plane wall boundary value problem with a convective frontface condition and a backface condition designed to provide higher heat rates through the material.

  14. Computational and experimental study of laminar flames

    SciTech Connect

    Smooke, Mitchell

    2015-05-29

    During the past three years, our research has centered on an investigation of the effects of complex chemistry and detailed transport on the structure and extinction of hydrocarbon flames in coflowing axisymmetric configurations. We have pursued both computational and experimental aspects of the research in parallel on both steady-state and time-dependent systems. The computational work has focused on the application of accurate and efficient numerical methods for the solution of the steady-state and time-dependent boundary value problems describing the various reacting systems. Detailed experimental measurements were performed on axisymmetric coflow flames using two-dimensional imaging techniques. Previously, spontaneous Raman scattering, chemiluminescence, and laser-induced fluorescence were used to measure the temperature, major and minor species profiles. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been used to investigate velocity distributions and for calibration of time-varying flames. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) with an extinction calibration was used to determine soot volume fractions, while soot surface temperatures were measured with three-color optical pyrometry using a color digital camera. A blackbody calibration of the camera allows for determination of soot volume fraction as well, which can be compared with the LII measurements. More recently, we have concentrated on a detailed characterization of soot using a variety of techniques including time-resolved LII (TiRe-LII) for soot primary particles sizes, multi-angle light scattering (MALS) for soot radius of gyration, and spectrally-resolved line of sight attenuation (spec-LOSA). Combining the information from all of these soot measurements can be used to determine the soot optical properties, which are observed to vary significantly depending on spatial location and fuel dilution. Our goal has been to obtain a more fundamental understanding of the important fluid dynamic and chemical interactions in these flames so that this information can be used effectively in combustion modeling.

  15. Soot Deposit Properties in Practical Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Preciado, Ignacio; Eddings, Eric G.; Sarofim, Adel F.; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Porter, Wallace D; Lance, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Soot deposition from hydrocarbon flames was investigated in order to evaluate the evolution of the deposits during the transient process of heating an object that starts with a cold metal surface that is exposed to a flame. The study focused on the fire/metal surface interface and the critical issues associated with the specification of the thermal boundaries at this interface, which include the deposition of soot on the metal surface, the chemical and physical properties of the soot deposits and their subsequent effect on heat transfer to the metal surface. A laboratory-scale device (metallic plates attached to a water-cooled sampling probe) was designed for studying soot deposition in a laminar ethylene-air premixed flame. The metallic plates facilitate the evaluation of the deposition rates and deposit characteristics such as deposit thickness, bulk density, PAH content, deposit morphology, and thermal properties, under both water-cooled and uncooled conditions. Additionally, a non-intrusive Laser Flash Technique (in which the morphology of the deposit is not modified) was used to estimate experimental thermal conductivity values for soot deposits as a function of deposition temperature (water-cooled and uncooled experiments), location within the flame and chemical characteristics of the deposits. Important differences between water-cooled and uncooled surfaces were observed. Thermophoresis dominated the soot deposition process and enhanced higher deposition rates for the water-cooled experiments. Cooler surface temperatures resulted in the inclusion of increased amounts of condensable hydrocarbons in the soot deposit. The greater presence of condensable material promoted decreased deposit thicknesses, larger deposit densities, different deposit morphologies, and higher thermal conductivities.

  16. Flame and acid resistant polymide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringham, R. S.; Toy, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    Economical process improves flame resistance and resistance to acids of polyamide fibers, without modifying colors of mechanical properties. Process improves general safety of garments and other items made from polyamide fibers and makes them suitable for applications requiring exposure to oxygen-rich atmosphere or corrosive acids. Halo-olefins are added to surface of fibers by photoadditon in sealed chamber. Process could be used with films and other forms of polyamide.

  17. Tomographic PIV measurements in a turbulent lifted jet flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinkauff, J.; Michaelis, D.; Dreizler, A.; Böhm, B.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of instantaneous volumetric flow fields are required for an improved understanding of turbulent flames. In non-reacting flows, tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV) is an established method for three-dimensional (3D) flow measurements. In flames, the reconstruction of the particles location becomes challenging due to a locally varying index of refraction causing beam-steering. This work presents TPIV measurements within a turbulent lifted non-premixed methane jet flame. Solid seeding particles were used to provide the 3D flow field in the vicinity of the flame base, including unburned and burned regions. Four cameras were arranged in a horizontal plane around the jet flame. Following an iterative volumetric self-calibration procedure, the remaining disparity caused by the flame was less than 0.2 pixels. Comparisons with conventional two-component PIV in terms of mean and rms values provided additional confidence in the TPIV measurements.

  18. Analysis of Aluminum Dust Cloud Combustion Using Flame Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghyup; Noh, Kwanyoung; Yoon, Woongsup

    2015-09-01

    In this study, aluminum flame analysis was researched in order to develop a measurement method for high-energy-density metal aluminum dust cloud combustion, and the flame temperature and UV-VIS-IR emission spectra were precisely measured using a spectrometer. Because the micron-sized aluminum flame temperature was higher than 2400 K, Flame temperature was measured by a non-contact optical technique, namely, a modified two-color method using 520 and 640 nm light, as well as by a polychromatic fitting method. These methods were applied experimentally after accurate calibration. The flame temperature was identified to be higher than 2400 K using both methods. By analyzing the emission spectra, we could identify AlO radicals, which occur dominantly in aluminum combustion. This study paves the way for realization of a measurement technique for aluminum dust cloud combustion flames, and it will be applied in the aluminum combustors that are in development for military purposes. PMID:26669143

  19. Temperature and velocity measurements in premixed turbulent flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dandekar, K. V.; Gouldin, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    Turbulent flame speed data for premixed flames of methane-air, propane-air and ethylene-air mixtures stabilized in grid turbulence are reported and discussed. It is shown that turbulence effects on flame speed cannot be fully correlated by the turbulence length scale and r.m.s. velocity in the cold flow. Rather there appear to be significant flame-flow-turbulence interactions affecting both turbulence level in the reaction zone and measured flame speeds. Results of detailed velocity measurements, including autocorrelations, by laser velocimetry are used to elucidate the nature of these interactions. It is concluded that flame speed experiments must be designed and conducted to provide sufficient information (e.g., boundary conditions) to allow for reconstruction of the flow field and these interactions by modelers if the data are to be of value in turbulent combustion model development and evaluation.

  20. Fundamental flame velocities of pure hydrocarbons II : alkadienes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Oscar; Wong, Edgar L; Gerstein, Melvin

    1950-01-01

    Data are presented for the fundamental flame velocities of 10 pure alkadienes that have isolated, conjugated, or cumulative double-bond systems. On the basis of this limited amount of data and the flame velocities previously reported, it is concluded that unsaturation changes the flame velocity in the order alkanes ? alkenes ? alkadienes with isolated double bonds ?= alkadienes with conjugated double bonds ? alkadienes with cumulative double bonds ?= alkynes. There were no significant differences in the flame velocities of cis and trans 1,3-pentadiene. The alkadienes 1,2-pentadiene and 2,3-pentadiene, with different positions of the cumulative double bond in the straight chain, have similar flame velocities. Methyl substitution in a hydrocarbon reduces the flame velocity; the extent of the reduction increases with the degree of unsaturation of the hydrocarbon.

  1. Flame inhibition by hydrogen halides - Some spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Cagliostro, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The far-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of an air-propane diffusion flame inhibited with hydrogen halides has been studied. Plots of the absorption of light by hydrogen halides as a function of position in the flame and also as a function of the amount of hydrogen halide added to the flame have been obtained. The hydrogen halides are shown to be more stable on the fuel side of the reaction zone than they are on the air side. Thermal diffusion is seen to be important in determining the concentration distribution of the heavier hydrogen halides in diffusion flames. The relationship between the concentration distribution of the hydrogen halides in the flame and the flame inhibition mechanism is discussed.

  2. Turbulent Nonpremixed Flames (TNF): Experimental Data Archives and Computational Submodels

    DOE Data Explorer

    In the 1990s an international collaboration formed around a series of workshops that became known collectively as the International Workshop on Measurement and Computation of Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames (TNF). An online library, hosted by Sandia National Laboratory (California) was established that provides data sets and submodels or "mechanisms" for the study of turbulence-chemistry interactions in turbulent nonpremixed and partially premixed combustion. Data are organized by flame types: simple jet flames, piloted jet flames, bluff body flames, and swirl flames. These data sets provide a means for collaborative comparisons of both measured and simulated/modeled research results and also assist scientists in determining priorities for further research. More than 20 data sets or databases are available from this website, along with various downloadable files of chemical mechanisms. The website also provides an extensive bibliography and the proceedings of the workshops themselves from 1996 through 2012. Information continues to be added to this collection.

  3. A Series of Laminar Jet Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Study of the downlink data from the Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment quickly resulted in discovery of a new mechanism of flame extinction caused by radiation of soot. Scientists found that the flames emit soot sooner than expected. These findings have direct impact on spacecraft fire safety, as well as the theories predicting the formation of soot -- which is a major factor as a pollutant and in the spread of unwanted fires. This sequence, using propane fuel, was taken STS-94, July 4 1997, MET:2/05:30 (approximate). LSP investigated fundamental questions regarding soot, a solid byproduct of the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The experiment was performed using a laminar jet diffusion flame, which is created by simply flowing fuel-like ethylene or propane -- through a nozzle and igniting it, much like a butane cigarette lighter. The LSP principal investigator was Gerard Faeth, University of Michigan, Arn Arbor. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). LSP results led to a reflight for extended investigations on the STS-107 research mission in January 2003. Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (249KB JPEG, 1350 x 1524 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300185.html.

  4. On burner-stabilized cylindrical premixed flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, James A.; Zhu, Delin; Law, Chung K.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical program on cylindrical and spherical premixed flames in microgravity has been initiated. We are especially interested in: (1) assessing heat loss versus flow divergence as the dominant stabilization mechanism; (2) understanding the effects of flame curvature on the burning intensity; and (3) determining the laminar burning velocity by using this configuration. In the present study we have performed analytical, computational, and mu g-experimental investigations of the cylindrical flame. The results are presented.

  5. Simulation of turbulent flames relevant to spark-ignition engines

    E-print Network

    Ahmed, Irufan

    2014-04-29

    to acknowledge the conference grants I received from the Cambridge University Engineering Department, the Combustion Institute and Hughes Hall. The financial support I received from Tokyo Institute of Technology to participate in the ACEEES forum is gratefully ac... used to simulate these flames (Schneider et al., 2005; Ewald and Peters, 2007). The transported probability density function (pdf) approach has been used to simulate spherical flames (Pope and Cheng, 1986) and Bunsen burner flames (Hack and Jenny, 2013...

  6. Experimental annular stratified flames characterisation stabilised by weak swirl

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaldo, A.; Kelman, J.B.

    2009-04-15

    A burner for the investigation of lean stratified premixed flames propagating in intense isotropic turbulence has been developed. Lean pre-mixtures of methane at different equivalence ratios were divided between two concentric co-flows to obtain annular stratification. Turbulence generators were used to control the level of turbulence intensity in the oncoming flow. A third annular weakly swirling airflow provided the flame stabilisation mechanism. A fundamental characteristic was that flame stabilisation did not rely on flow recirculation. The flames were maintained at a position where the local mass flux balanced the burning rate, resulting in a freely propagating turbulent flame front. The absence of physical surfaces in the vicinity of the flame provided free access for laser diagnostics. Stereoscopic Planar Image Velocimetry (SPIV) was applied to obtain the three components of the instantaneous velocity vectors on a vertical plane above the burner at the point of flame stabilisation. The instantaneous temperature fields were determined through Laser Induced Rayleigh (LIRay) scattering. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) of acetone was used to calculate the average equivalence ratio distributions. Instantaneous turbulent burning velocities were extracted from SPIV results, while flame curvature and flame thermal thickness were calculated using the instantaneous temperature fields. The PDFs of these quantities were analysed to consider the separate influence of equivalence ratio stratification and turbulence. Increased levels of turbulence resulted in the expected higher turbulent burning velocities and flame front wrinkling. Flames characterised by higher fuel gradients showed higher turbulent burning velocities. Increased fuel concentration gradients gave rise to increased flame wrinkling, particularly when associated with positive small radius of curvature. (author)

  7. Isomer-specific combustion chemistry in allene and propyne flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Nils; Miller, James A.; Westmoreland, Phillip R.; Kasper, Tina; Kohse-Hoeinghaus, Katharina; Wang, Juan; Cool, Terrill A.

    2009-11-15

    A combined experimental and modeling study is performed to clarify the isomer-specific combustion chemistry in flames fueled by the C{sub 3}H{sub 4} isomers allene and propyne. To this end, mole fraction profiles of several flame species in stoichiometric allene (propyne)/O{sub 2}/Ar flames are analyzed by means of a chemical kinetic model. The premixed flames are stabilized on a flat-flame burner under a reduced pressure of 25 Torr (=33.3 mbar). Quantitative species profiles are determined by flame-sampling molecular-beam mass spectrometry, and the isomer-specific flame compositions are unraveled by employing photoionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. The temperature profiles are measured by OH laser-induced fluorescence. Experimental and modeled mole fraction profiles of selected flame species are discussed with respect to the isomer-specific combustion chemistry in both flames. The emphasis is put on main reaction pathways of fuel consumption, of allene and propyne isomerization, and of isomer-specific formation of C{sub 6} aromatic species. The present model includes the latest theoretical rate coefficients for reactions on a C{sub 3}H{sub 5} potential [J.A. Miller, J.P. Senosiain, S.J. Klippenstein, Y. Georgievskii, J. Phys. Chem. A 112 (2008) 9429-9438] and for the propargyl recombination reactions [Y. Georgievskii, S.J. Klippenstein, J.A. Miller, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 9 (2007) 4259-4268]. Larger peak mole fractions of propargyl, allyl, and benzene are observed in the allene flame than in the propyne flame. In these flames virtually all of the benzene is formed by the propargyl recombination reaction. (author)

  8. Effect of Intense Sound Waves on a Stationary Gas Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahnemann, H; Ehret, L

    1950-01-01

    Intense sound waves with a resonant frequency of 5000 cycles per second were imposed on a stationary propane-air flame issuing from a nozzle. In addition to a slight increase of the flame velocity, a fundamental change both in the shape of the burning zone and in the flow pattern could be observed. An attempt is made to explain the origin of the variations in the flame configuration on the basis of transition at the nozzle from jet flow to potential flow.

  9. Structure Of Flame Balls At Low Lewis-number (SOFBALL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, Paul D.

    1995-01-01

    The work has encompassed several topics related to the experimental and theoretical study of combustion limits in premixed flames at microgravity. These topics include (1) flame structure and stability at low Lewis number (which is the basis for the SOFBALL space flight experiment), (2) flame propagation and extinction in cylindrical tubes, and (3) experimental simulation of combustion processes using autocatalytic chemical reactions. Progress on each of these topics is outlined.

  10. Turbulence Measurements in a Fan-Stirred Flame Bomb Using Laser Doppler Velocimetry 

    E-print Network

    Morones Ruelas, Anibal

    2015-08-07

    An ongoing project for the construction of a high-pressure, high-temperature turbulent flame speed vessel is furthered in this study. Prior to this work, a laminar flame bomb apparatus was repurposed as a turbulent flame speed vessel...

  11. The flame retardant properties of cyanuric chloride derivatives in cotton textile applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyanuric chloride derivatives are promising flame retardants in cotton textile applications due to their ease of synthesis, high yield, and excellent flame retardant properties as measured by thermogravimetric analyses, limiting oxygen index, and vertical flame testing. Scanning electron microscopic...

  12. MODELLING OF BURNING AND EXTINCTION CHARACTERISTICS OF A POLYMER DIFFUSION FLAME AND COMPARISON WITH EXPERIMENT

    E-print Network

    Pitz, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    radial velocity occurs between the flame and the surface.flame temperature at extinction increases slightly with nozzle velocity,flame temperature was sufficient to accomodate the higher nozzle velocities.

  13. On the flame-generated vorticity dynamics of bluff-body stabilized premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramella, Lucia

    This investigation considers the dynamics of the flame-generated vorticity for a premixed, submerged bluff-body stabilized flame. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) is used to obtain mean and instantaneous velocity and vorticity fields in four streamwise locations, capturing nearly the entire combustion chamber. The Mie scattering images which are collected for DPIV prove useful in determining the approximate location of the flame as indicated by a stark difference in seeding particle density caused by volumetric expansion. Examining the location of the flame fronts in relation to the mean velocity, mean vorticity, and corresponding instantaneous fields provides useful information about the interaction of the flame and the flow. Experiments characterize the far-field region in particular with a level of detail not previously afforded to this type of flow. The unique nature of the velocity and vorticity fields, as well as a change in rotation of the flame structures observed in the Mie scattering images, are explained by appealing to the baroclinic generation of vorticity. The baroclinic mechanism is activated when non-parallel pressure and density gradients are present. Mean static pressure measurements at the combustion chamber wall allow inferences about the pressure field to be made. The coupling that exists among pressure, heat release, and baroclinic generation is also acknowledged and will influence strategies for control of the baroclinic mechanism. Particular details of the coupling remain unclear, nevertheless improved understanding can lead to advancements in combustion efficiency. Simple scaling of the problem allows a prediction of baroclinic vorticity generation to be obtained. Further insight into the dynamics in the region of interest are provided using CH* filtered and unfiltered chemiluminescence images.

  14. Flame Chemiluminescence Rate Constants for Quantitative Microgravity Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luque, Jorge; Smith, Gregory P.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Crosley, David R.; Weiland, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Absolute excited state concentrations of OH(A), CH(A), and C2(d) were determined in three low pressure premixed methane-air flames. Two dimensional images of chemiluminescence from these states were recorded by a filtered CCD camera, processed by Abel inversion, and calibrated against Rayleigh scattering, Using a previously validated 1-D flame model with known chemistry and excited state quenching rate constants, rate constants are extracted for the reactions CH + O2 (goes to) OH(A) + CO and C2H + O (goes to) CH(A) + CO at flame temperatures. Variations of flame emission intensities with stoichiometry agree well with model predictions.

  15. NO emission characteristics of methane-air double flame

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, M.; Nakagawa, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Takeno, T. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    NO emission characteristics of methane-air Bunsen-type burner flames were studied numerically in terms of counterflow flame. The flames have the well-known double flame structure: the rich premixed flame to produce CO and H[sub 2] as the main intermediate products and the diffusion flame where the intermediate products burn with surrounding air, and the structure can be simulated by using rich counterflow flame with air. The similarity solution was adopted to describe the flow, temperature, and concentration fields and the detailed kinetics calculation was made by using C[sub 2] chemistry with the all mechanisms leading to NO formation, including thermal and prompt NO mechanisms. The calculation was made as well for thermal mechanism alone, so as to distinguish contribution of the respective NO formation mechanisms in total NO production. The emission characteristics were evaluated quantitatively in terms of the emission index, as compared to the normal premixed and pure diffusion flames. The effects of equivalence ratio and the velocity gradient on the emission index of these flames were studied.

  16. Intermittency and conditional velocities in premixed conical turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.K.; Shepherd, I.G.

    1986-04-01

    A turbulent premixed ethylene/air conical flame in a large Bunsen type burner has been studied using a two-component laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) system. Conditioned reactant velocity statistics were measured using a silicon oil aerosol, which evaporated and burned through the flame fronts, as the LDA seed. The intermittency was also determined by monitoring the Mie scattering intensity from the aerosol. The unconditioned velocity statistics were measured using aluminum oxide particles. A conditional analysis method was developed to deduce the conditioned product velocities. The method is based on deconvolution of the velocity probability density function (pdf). The difference between the conditioned mean product velocity and the conditioned mean reactant velocity, ..delta..U, within the oblique region of the Bunsen flame is less than that observed previously in v-shaped premixed turbulent flames. The main reason is that combustion induced flow acceleration is lower for the lean test mixture. The conditioned product rms velocities are almost equal to the conditioned reactant rms velocities meaning that flame generated turbulence is not significant. The unconditioned and conditioned covariance (Reynolds stress) are negligibly small through the flame. Since the flame brush is almost parallel to the burner axis, this result is consistent with the covariances for the v-flames after the data was transformed with respect to the flame co-ordinate. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  17. An experimental investigation of flame behavior during cylindrical vessel explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, R.; Roth, P.

    1986-12-01

    The propagation of premixed flames centrally ignited at one of the end flanges of a closed cylindrical vessel and the flame-induced fluid flow have been investigated in the present study. Photographic records show that under specific geometrical conditions the flame exhibits a cone form with a backward directed top, called ''tulip'' -shaped. This appears after the flame has lost a main part of its area by side wall quenching. With a laser-Doppler anemometer the instantaneous flow velocity during the short explosion process was measured together with pressure records.

  18. An experimental investigation of flame behavior during cylindrical vessel explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, R.; Roth, P.

    1986-12-01

    The propagation of premixed flames centrally ignited at one of the end flanges of a closed cylindrical vessel and the flame-induced flow have been investigated. Photographic records show that under specific geometrical conditions the flame exhibits a cone form with a backward directed top, called tulip-shaped. This appears after the flame has lost a main part of its area by side wall quenching. The instantaneous flow velocity during the short explosion process was measured, together with pressure records, with an LDV. An analogy to the experiments of Markstein (1964), is shown, and the explanations of several authors for the 'tulip' formation are given.

  19. Soot precursor measurements in benzene and hexane diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Furuhata, T.; Amagai, K.; Arai, M.

    2008-08-15

    To clarify the mechanism of soot formation in diffusion flames of liquid fuels, measurements of soot and its precursors were carried out. Sooting diffusion flames formed by a small pool combustion equipment system were used for this purpose. Benzene and hexane were used as typical aromatic and paraffin fuels. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method was used to obtain spatial distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are considered as soot particles. Spatial distributions of soot in test flames were measured by a laser-induced incandescence (LII) method. Soot diameter was estimated from the temporal change of LII intensity. A region of transition from PAHs to soot was defined from the results of LIF and LII. Flame temperatures, PAH species, and soot diameters in this transition region were investigated for both benzene and hexane flames. The results show that though the flame structures of benzene and hexane were different, the temperature in the PAHs-soot transition region of the benzene flame was similar to that of the hexane flame. Furthermore, the relationship between the PAH concentrations measured by gas chromatography in both flames and the PAH distributions obtained from LIF are discussed. It was found that PAHs with smaller molecular mass, such as benzene and toluene, remained in both the PAHs-soot transition and sooting regions, and it is thought that molecules heavier than pyrene are the leading candidates for soot precursor formation. (author)

  20. Effects of buoyancy on gas jet diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Edelman, Raymond B.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to gain a better understanding of the fundamental phenomena involved in laminar gas jet diffusion flames in the absence of buoyancy by studying the transient phenomena of ignition and flame development, (quasi-) steady-state flame characteristics, soot effects, radiation, and, if any, extinction phenomena. This involved measurements of flame size and development, as well as temperature and radiation. Additionally, flame behavior, color, and luminosity were observed and recorded. The tests quantified the effects of Reynolds number, nozzle size, fuel reactivity and type, oxygen concentration, and pressure on flame characteristics. Analytical and numerical modeling efforts were also performed. Methane and propane flames were studied in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower and the 5.18-Second Zero-Gravity Facility of NASA LeRC. In addition, a preliminary series of tests were conducted in the KC-135 research aircraft. Both micro-gravity and normal-gravity flames were studied in this program. The results have provided unique and new information on the behavior and characteristics of gas jet diffusion flames in micro-gravity environments.

  1. Effects of Lewis Number on Temperatures of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa, K. J.; Sun, Z.; Chao, B. H.; Sunderland, P. B.; Axelbaum, R. I.; Urban, D. L.; Stocker, D. P.

    2007-01-01

    Spherical diffusion flames supported on a porous sphere were studied numerically and experimentally. Experiments were performed in 2.2 s and 5.2 s microgravity facilities. Numerical results were obtained from a Chemkin-based program. The program simulates flow from a porous sphere into a quiescent environment, yields both steady-state and transient results, and accounts for optically thick gas-phase radiation. The low flow velocities and long residence times in these diffusion flames lead to enhanced radiative and diffusive effects. Despite similar adiabatic flame temperatures, the measured and predicted temperatures varied by as much as 700 K. The temperature reduction correlates with flame size but characteristic flow times and, importantly, Lewis number also influence temperature. The numerical results show that the ambient gas Lewis number would have a strong effect on flame temperature if the flames were steady and nonradiating. For example, a 10% decrease in Lewis number would increase the steady-state flame temperature by 200 K. However, for these transient, radiating flames the effect of Lewis number is small. Transient predictions of flame sizes are larger than those observed in microgravity experiments. Close agreement could not be obtained without either increasing the model s thermal and mass diffusion properties by 30% or reducing mass flow rate by 25%.

  2. Particle-Image Velocimetry in Microgravity Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Greenberg, P. S.; Urban, D. L.; Wernet, M. P.; Yanis, W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses planned velocity measurements in microgravity laminar jet diffusion flames. These measurements will be conducted using Particle-Image Velocimetry (PIV) in the NASA Glenn 2.2-second drop tower. The observations are of fundamental interest and may ultimately lead to improved efficiency and decreased emissions from practical combustors. The velocity measurements will support the evaluation of analytical and numerical combustion models. There is strong motivation for the proposed microgravity flame configuration. Laminar jet flames are fundamental to combustion and their study has contributed to myriad advances in combustion science, including the development of theoretical, computational and diagnostic combustion tools. Nonbuoyant laminar jet flames are pertinent to the turbulent flames of more practical interest via the laminar flamelet concept. The influence of gravity on these flames is deleterious: it complicates theoretical and numerical modeling, introduces hydrodynamic instabilities, decreases length scales and spatial resolution, and limits the variability of residence time. Whereas many normal-gravity laminar jet diffusion flames have been thoroughly examined (including measurements of velocities, temperatures, compositions, sooting behavior and emissive and absorptive properties), measurements in microgravity gas-jet flames have been less complete and, notably, have included only cursory velocity measurements. It is envisioned that our velocity measurements will fill an important gap in the understanding of nonbuoyant laminar jet flames.

  3. Measurements of combustion properties in a microwave enhanced flame

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, Emanuel S.; Zaidi, Sohail H.; Miles, Richard B.; Carter, Campbell D.; Ryan, Michael D.

    2009-07-15

    Microwave induced flame speed enhancement is quantified in a laminar, premixed CH{sub 4}/air wall stagnation flat flame. Experiments were performed in a high Q microwave cavity with the cavity tuned so that the maximum microwave field is located in the vicinity of a flat flame front. Equivalence ratios were varied between 0.6 and 0.8. When the flame is radiated by a continuous wave microwave field of approximately 5 kV/cm, the flame front is observed to move towards the burner exit and stabilize at a standoff distance corresponding to a flame speed increase of up to 20%. No microwave discharge is observed, indicating that the enhanced flame speed arises from microwave energy deposited directly into the reaction zone through coupling to the weakly ionized gas in that region. Laser diagnostics were performed to quantify temperature increase, the laminar flame speed enhancement, and changes in the OH radical concentration through filtered Rayleigh scattering, particle image velocimetry, and planar laser induced fluorescence, respectively. These measurements indicate that microwave radiation may prove to be an effective means to non-invasively control and enhance flame stability in combustors. (author)

  4. Flame propagation in heterogeneous mixtures of fuel drops and air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, G. D.; Lefebvre, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    Photographic methods are used to measure flame speeds in flowing mixtures of fuel props and air at atmospheric pressure. The fuels employed include a conventional fuel oil plus various blends JP 7 with stocks containing single-ring and mullti-ring aromatics. The results for stoichiometric mixtures show that flame propagation cannot occur in mixtures containing mean drop sizes larger than 300 to 400 microns, depending on the fuel type. For smaller drop sizes, down to around 60 microns, flame speed is inversely proportional to drop size, indicating that evaporation rates are limiting to flame speed. Below around 60 microns, the curves of flame speed versus mean drop size flatten out, thereby demonstrating that for finely atomized sprays flame speeds are much less dependent on evaporation rates, and are governed primarily by mixing and/or chemical reaction rates. The fuels exhibiting the highest flame speeds are those containing multi-ring aromatics. This is attributed to the higher radiative heat flux emanating from their soot-bearing flames which enhances the rate of evaporation of the fuel drops approaching the flame front.

  5. Flame dynamics in a micro-channeled combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Taaha; Markides, Christos N.; Balachandran, Ramanarayanan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) has generated a significant interest in combustion-based power generation technologies, as a replacement of traditional electrochemical batteries which are plagued by low energy densities, short operational lives and low power-to-size and power-to-weight ratios. Moreover, the versatility of integrated combustion-based systems provides added scope for combined heat and power generation. This paper describes a study into the dynamics of premixed flames in a micro-channeled combustor. The details of the design and the geometry of the combustor are presented in the work by Kariuki and Balachandran [1]. This work showed that there were different modes of operation (periodic, a-periodic and stable), and that in the periodic mode the flame accelerated towards the injection manifold after entering the channels. The current study investigates these flames further. We will show that the flame enters the channel and propagates towards the injection manifold as a planar flame for a short distance, after which the flame shape and propagation is found to be chaotic in the middle section of the channel. Finally, the flame quenches when it reaches the injector slots. The glow plug position in the exhaust side ignites another flame, and the process repeats. It is found that an increase in air flow rate results in a considerable increase in the length (and associated time) over which the planar flame travels once it has entered a micro-channel, and a significant decrease in the time between its conversion into a chaotic flame and its extinction. It is well known from the literature that inside small channels the flame propagation is strongly influenced by the flow conditions and thermal management. An increase of the combustor block temperature at high flow rates has little effect on the flame lengths and times, whereas at low flow rates the time over which the planar flame front can be observed decreases and the time of existence of the chaotic flame increases. The frequency of re-ignition of successive flames decreases at higher flow rates and increases at higher temperatures. The data and results from this study will not only help the development of new micro-power generation devices, but they will also serve as a validation case for combustion models capable of predicting flame behavior in the presence of strong thermal and flow boundary layers, a situation common to many industrial applications.

  6. Cellular Instabilities and Self-Acceleration of Expanding Spherical Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Kwon, O. C.

    2003-01-01

    In the present investigation we aim to provide experimental information on and thereby understanding of the generation and propagation of spark-ignited, outwardly propagating cellular flames, with three major focuses. The first is to unambiguously demonstrate the influence of the four most important parameters in inducing hydrodynamic and diffusional-thermal cellularities, namely thermal expansion, flame thickness, non-unity Lewis number, and global activation energy. The second is to investigate the critical state for the onset of cellularity for the stretch-affected, expanding flame. The third is to identify and consequently quantify the phenomena of self-acceleration and possibly auto-turbulization of cellular flames. Due to space limitation the effects of activation energy and the critical state for the onset of cellularity will not be discussed herein. Experiments were conducted using C3H8-air and H2-O2-N2 mixtures for their opposite influences of non-equidiffusivity. The additional system parameters varied were the chamber pressure (p) and the mixture composition including the equivalence ratio (phi). From a sequence of the flame images we can assess the propensity of cell formation, and determine the instantaneous flame radius (R), the flame propagation rate, the global stretch rate experienced by the flame, the critical flame radius at which cells start to grow, and the average cell size.

  7. Reaction zone visualisation in swirling spray n-heptane flames

    E-print Network

    Yuan, R.; Kariuki, J.; Dowlut, A.; Balachandran, R.; Mastorakos, E.

    2014-06-26

    advanced turbulent combustion models. In gas turbines and industrial furnaces, the flame is virtually always stabilised by swirl. It can be argued that we know little about the fundamental processes of extinction of spray flames in recirculation zones... flames could be made. In this paper, we use simultaneous CH2O and OH imaging in the stabilisation region of an n-heptane spray flame in a swirl-induced recirculation zone, a configuration of great relevance to gas turbine combustion, and in particular...

  8. Soot Formation in Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames are important because they affect the durability and performance of propulsion systems, the hazards of unwanted fires, the pollutant and particulate emissions from combustion processes, and the potential for developing computational combustion. Motivated by these observations, this investigation involved an experimental study of the structure and soot properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames, seeking an improved understanding of soot formation (growth and nucleation) within diffusion flames. The present study extends earlier work in this laboratory concerning laminar smoke points (l) and soot formation in acetylene/air laminar jet diffusion flames (2), emphasizing soot formation in hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames for fuels other than acetylene. In the flame system, acetylene is the dominant gas species in the soot formation region and both nucleation and growth were successfully attributed to first-order reactions of acetylene, with nucleation exhibiting an activation energy of 32 kcal/gmol while growth involved negligible activation energy and a collision efficiency of O.53%. In addition, soot growth in the acetylene diffusion flames was comparable to new soot in premixed flame (which also has been attributed to first-order acetylene reactions). In view of this status, a major issue is the nature of soot formation processes in diffusion flame involving hydrocarbon fuels other than acetylene. In particular, information is needed about th dominant gas species in the soot formation region and the impact of gas species other than acetylene on soot nucleation and growth.

  9. Active Control for Statistically Stationary Turbulent PremixedFlame Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Grcar, J.F.; Lijewski, M.J.

    2005-08-30

    The speed of propagation of a premixed turbulent flame correlates with the intensity of the turbulence encountered by the flame. One consequence of this property is that premixed flames in both laboratory experiments and practical combustors require some type of stabilization mechanism to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. Furthermore, the stabilization introduces additional fluid mechanical complexity into the overall combustion process that can complicate the analysis of fundamental flame properties. To circumvent these difficulties we introduce a feedback control algorithm that allows us to computationally stabilize a turbulent premixed flame in a simple geometric configuration. For the simulations, we specify turbulent inflow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm on methane flames at various equivalence ratios in two dimensions. The simulation data are used to study the local variation in the speed of propagation due to flame surface curvature.

  10. Characteristics Of Turbulent Nonpremixed Jet-Flames And Jet-Flames In Crossflow In Normal- And Low-Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, N. T.; Boxx, I. G.; Idicheria, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that buoyancy has a major influence on the flow structure of turbulent nonpremixed jet flames. For example, previous studies have shown that transitional and turbulent jet flames exhibit flame lengths that are as much as a factor of two longer in microgravity than in normal gravity. The objective of this study is to extend these previous studies by investigating both mean and fluctuating characteristics of turbulent nonpremixed jet flames under three different gravity levels (1 g, 20 mg and 100 micrograms). This work is described in more detail elsewhere. In addition, we have recently initiated a new study into the effects of buoyancy on turbulent nonpremixed jet flames in cross-flow (JFICF). Buoyancy has been observed to play a key role in determining the centerline trajectories of such flames.6 The objective of this study is to use the low gravity environment to study the effects of buoyancy on the turbulent characteristics of JFICF.

  11. FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew M. Rudin; Thomas Butcher; Henry Troost

    2003-02-04

    The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel pump cut-off. Service organizations can use these early indications to reduce problems and service costs. There were also some ''call-for-service'' indications for which problems were not identified. The test program also showed that monitoring of the flame can provide information on burner run times and this can be used to estimate current oversize factors and to determine actual fuel usage, enabling more efficient fuel delivery procedures.

  12. Dithering Strategies and Point-Source Photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan; Kim, Alex G

    2011-02-22

    The accuracy in the photometry of a point source depends on the point-spread function (PSF), detector pixelization, and observing strategy. The PSF and pixel response describe the spatial blurring of the source, the pixel scale describes the spatial sampling of a single exposure, and the observing strategy determines the set of dithered exposures with pointing offsets from which the source flux is inferred. In a wide-field imaging survey, sources of interest are randomly distributed within the field of view and hence are centered randomly within a pixel. A given hardware configuration and observing strategy therefore have a distribution of photometric uncertainty for sources of fixed flux that fall in the field. In this article we explore the ensemble behavior of photometric and position accuracies for different PSFs, pixel scales, and dithering patterns. We find that the average uncertainty in the flux determination depends slightly on dither strategy, whereas the position determination can be strongly dependent on the dithering. For cases with pixels much larger than the PSF, the uncertainty distributions can be non-Gaussian, with rms values that are particularly sensitive to the dither strategy. We also find that for these configurations with large pixels, pointings dithered by a fractional pixel amount do not always give minimal average uncertainties; this is in contrast to image reconstruction for which fractional dithers are optimal. When fractional pixel dithering is favored, a pointing accuracy of better than {approx}0.15 {approx}0.15 pixel width is required to maintain half the advantage over random dithers.

  13. Extinction conditions of a premixed flame in a channel

    SciTech Connect

    Alliche, Mounir; Haldenwang, Pierre; Chikh, Salah

    2010-06-15

    A local refinement method is used to numerically predict the propagation and extinction conditions of a premixed flame in a channel considering a thermodiffusive model. A local refinement method is employed because of the numerous length scales that characterize this phenomenon. The time integration is self adaptive and the solution is based on a multigrid method using a zonal mesh refinement in the flame reaction zone. The objective is to determine the conditions of extinction which are characterized by the flame structure and its properties. We are interested in the following properties: the curvature of the flame, its maximum temperature, its speed of propagation and the distance separating the flame from the wall. We analyze the influence of heat losses at the wall through the thermal conductivity of the wall and the nature of the fuel characterized by the Lewis number of the mixture. This investigation allows us to identify three propagation regimes according to heat losses at the wall and to the channel radius. The results show that there is an intermediate value of the radius for which the flame can bend and propagate provided that its curvature does not exceed a certain limit value. Indeed, small values of the radius will choke the flame and extinguish it. The extinction occurs if the flame curvature becomes too small. Furthermore, this study allows us to predict the limiting values of the heat loss coefficient at extinction as well as the critical value of the channel radius above which the premixed flame may propagate without extinction. A dead zone of length 2-4 times the flame thickness appears between the flame and the wall for a Lewis number (Le) between 0.8 and 2. For small values of Le, local extinctions are observed. (author)

  14. Flame sheet dynamics of bluff-body stabilized flames during longitudinal acoustic forcing

    E-print Network

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    . The motivation for this work is 2-fold. First, the dynamics of such flames, even in the absence of imposed are dominated by that of the free shear layer and wake, each exhibiting distinct instabilities­Helmholtz, KH) instability is a convective instability leading to vortex roll-up and pairing. Under

  15. A Study on the Local Flame Displacement Velocity of Premixed Turbulent Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Masaya; Kido, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Kenshiro

    The local flame properties of turbulent propagating flames with respect to the ratio of the turbulence intensity to the laminar burning velocity u’/SL0 in the flamelet regime have been investigated experimentally for methane, propane and hydrogen mixtures having nearly the same laminar burning velocity with different equivalence ratios. u’/SL0 is varied as 1.4 and 2.3. A 2D laser tomography technique is used to obtain the flame configuration and movement in a constant-volume vessel and then the local flame displacement velocity SF is quantitatively measured as a key parameter of turbulent combustion. As a result, the mean value of SF shows to be affected by u’/SL0, which indicates a relation between the characteristic chemical reaction time and the characteristic flow time, to some extent, especially for leaner and richer mixtures. SF is also discussed by the concept of preferential diffusion and Markstein number which can affect the local burning velocity characteristics.

  16. Transient flame propagation process and flame-speed oscillation phenomenon in a carbon dust cloud

    E-print Network

    Qiao, Li

    metals such as aluminum and boron have high-energy density and are commonly used in solid in revised form 28 June 2011 Accepted 24 July 2011 Available online 19 August 2011 Keywords: Flame particle number density in the reac- tion zone, which in turn changes the local fuel equivalence ratio

  17. Correlating Total Visual Magnitude Estimates and CCD Photometry for Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidger, Mark Richard

    2015-08-01

    A key facet of understanding the activity of comets is coverage of their light curve. For some comets such as 2P/Encke there is good light curve coverage from visual observers extending back over many returns over more than 2 centuries. However, in recent years, CCD photometry by amateur astronomers has become the dominant data source and the number of total visual magnitude estimates has reduced sharply, making comparison of recent and historical photometric data for comets increasingly difficult. The relationship between total visual magnitude estimates - dominated by the emission from the Swan bands of C2 - and CCD aperture photometry - dominated by the dust continuum - has been far from clear.This paper compares CCD aperture photometry and total visual magnitude for several recent well-observed bright comets, including C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) using a consistent and homogeneous database of observations from (mainly) Spanish observers. For comets with a 1/r radial coma profile, good agreement is found between CCD aperture photometry and total visual magnitude estimates for a CCD aperture corresponding to a physical coma diameter of ?105km.The relationship between the coma radial brightness slope and the equivalent physical aperture for CCD photometry to obtain agreement with total visual magnitude estimates is investigated.

  18. CP2 stars in clusters: deep Delta a-photometry

    E-print Network

    H. M. Maitzen; M. Rode; E. Paunzen

    1998-05-05

    The search for chemically peculiar (CP) stars in open clusters using photoelectric photometry sampling the presence of the characteristic flux depression feature at 5200A via the Delta a-system (Maitzen 1976) has so far delivered data for objects usually no more distant than 1000 pc from the Sun. If one intends to study the presence of CP stars at larger distances from the Sun, classical photometry has to be replaced by CCD photometry. For the first time, our investigation presents the results of CCD-photometry in the Delta a-system for a rich open cluster which is at a distance clearly beyond hitherto studied objects, Melotte 105 (2 kpc, log age = 8.5). Comparison with published uvby-photometry yields the calibration of the colour index g_1-y of our system, which is necessary for deriving the peculiarity index Delta a. For this we achieve an average accuracy of 0.007 mag. Six objects with only marginally peculiar Delta a-values were found, but spectroscopic and additional photometric evidence is needed to substantiate their peculiarity.

  19. Nanotechnology finding its way into flame retardancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology is one of the key technologies of the 21st century. The exploitation of "new" effects that arise from materials structured on the nano-scale has also been proposed successfully for flame retardancy of polymers since the end of the 90s. Of all of the approaches these include, at this time the use of nanocomposites offers the best potential for industrial application, also some other ideas are sketched, such as using electrospun nanofibers mats or layer-by-layer deposits as protection coatings, as well as sub-micrometer multilayer coatings as effective IR-mirrors. The general phenomena, inducing a flow limit in the pyrolysing melt and changing the fire residue, are identified in nanocomposites. Key experiments are performed such as quasi online investigation of the protection layer formation to understand what is going on in detail. The flame retardancy mechanisms are discussed and their impact on fire behaviour quantified. With the latter, the presentation pushes forward the state of the art. For instance, the heat shielding is experimentally quantified for a layered silicate epoxy resin nanocomposite proving that it is the only import mechanism controlling the reduction in peak heat release rate in the investigated system for different irradiations. The flame retardancy performance is assessed comprehensively illuminating not only the strengths but also the weak points of the concepts. Guidelines for materials development are deduced and discussed. Apart from inorganic fillers (layered silicate, boehmite, etc.) not only carbon nanoobjects such as multiwall carbon nanotubes, multilayer graphene and graphene are investigated, but also nanoparticles that are more reactive and harbor the potential for more beneficial interactions with the polymer matrix.

  20. Nanotechnology finding its way into flame retardancy

    SciTech Connect

    Schartel, Bernhard

    2014-05-15

    Nanotechnology is one of the key technologies of the 21{sup st} century. The exploitation of 'new' effects that arise from materials structured on the nano-scale has also been proposed successfully for flame retardancy of polymers since the end of the 90s. Of all of the approaches these include, at this time the use of nanocomposites offers the best potential for industrial application, also some other ideas are sketched, such as using electrospun nanofibers mats or layer-by-layer deposits as protection coatings, as well as sub-micrometer multilayer coatings as effective IR-mirrors. The general phenomena, inducing a flow limit in the pyrolysing melt and changing the fire residue, are identified in nanocomposites. Key experiments are performed such as quasi online investigation of the protection layer formation to understand what is going on in detail. The flame retardancy mechanisms are discussed and their impact on fire behaviour quantified. With the latter, the presentation pushes forward the state of the art. For instance, the heat shielding is experimentally quantified for a layered silicate epoxy resin nanocomposite proving that it is the only import mechanism controlling the reduction in peak heat release rate in the investigated system for different irradiations. The flame retardancy performance is assessed comprehensively illuminating not only the strengths but also the weak points of the concepts. Guidelines for materials development are deduced and discussed. Apart from inorganic fillers (layered silicate, boehmite, etc.) not only carbon nanoobjects such as multiwall carbon nanotubes, multilayer graphene and graphene are investigated, but also nanoparticles that are more reactive and harbor the potential for more beneficial interactions with the polymer matrix.

  1. Experimental study on the flame behaviors of premixed methane/air mixture in horizontal rectangular ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongliang; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Sining; Liu, Yi; Chu, Guanquan

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the flame propagation characteristics and tulip flame formation mechanism of premixed methane/air mixture in horizontal rectangular ducts, the techniques of Schlieren and high-speed video camera are used to study the flame behaviors of the premixed gases in a closed duct and opened one respectively, and the propagation characteristics in both cases and the formation mechanism of the tulip flame are analyzed. The results show that, the propagation flame in a closed duct is prior to form a tulip flame structure than that in an opened duct, and the tulip flame structure formation in a closed duct is related to the flame propagation velocity decrease. The sharp decrease of the flame propagation velocity is one of the reasons to the tulip flame formation, and the decrease of the flame propagation velocity is due to the decrease of the burned product flow velocity mainly.

  2. Stationary premixed flames in spherical and cylindrical geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, P. D.; Whaling, K. N.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Gatto, J. L.; Pisowiscz, V. L.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary source-free spherical flames ('flame balls') in premixed combustible gases were studied by employing low-gravity (micro-g) environments in a drop tower and an aircraft flying parabolic trajectories to diminish the impact of buoyancy-induced convective flow. Flame balls were found in all mixture families tested when: (1) the Lewis number Le of the deficient reactant was sufficiently low; and (2) the compositions were sufficiently close to the flammability limits. Probably as a consequence of the reduction in buoyant convection, the flammability limits at micro-g were significantly more dilute than those at Earth gravity; for example, 3.35% H2 vs 4.0% H2 in lean H2-air mixtures. By comparison with analytical and computational models, it is inferred that the phenomenon is probably related to diffusive-thermal effects in low-Le mixtures in conjunction with flame-front curvature and radiative heat losses from the combustion products. The chemical reaction mechanism appears to play no qualitative role. In the aircraft experiments, the gravity levels (approximately equal 10(exp -2)g(sub 0)) were found to cause noticeable motion of flame balls due to buoyancy, which in turn influenced the behavior of flame balls. At these g levels, a new type of transient, nearly cylindrical flame structure, termed 'flame strings,' was observed.

  3. MODELING OF PARTICLE FORMATION AND DYNAMICS IN A FLAME INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model has been developed to predict the formation and growth of metallic particles in a flame incinerator system. Flow fields and temperature profiles in a cylindrical laminar jet flame have been used to determine the position and physical conditions of the species along the fl...

  4. Flame retardant antibacterial cotton high-loft nonwoven fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flame retardant treated gray cotton fibers were blended with antibacterial treated gray cotton fibers and polyester/polyester sheath/core bicomponent fibers to form high-loft fabrics. The high flame retardancy (FR) and antibacterial property of these high lofts were evaluated by limiting oxygen inde...

  5. THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURES OF FLAMES OVER LIQUID FUEL POOLS

    E-print Network

    Liu, Feng

    behavior occurs if the initial liquid temperature and=or the oxygen mass fraction in the incoming airflowTHREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURES OF FLAMES OVER LIQUID FUEL POOLS JINSHENG CAI, FENG LIU* , AND WILLIAM and flame propagation above a liquid fuel (propanol) pool in an airflow duct. The article extends

  6. Some effects of heat release in premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, I.G.

    1994-03-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented to illustrate some hydrodynamic effects of heat release in premixed flames. The heat release is represented by a simple model which treats the flame front as a two dimensional line source of volume. The velocity and strain rate induced in the flow field are determined and the numerical solution for the case of a laminar double kernel ignition is obtained. Of primary interest is the strain induced in the reactants between the expanding flame kernels and, for heat release rates typical of hydrocarbon flames, the strain rate at the plane of symmetry midway between the kernels up to 150 s{sup {minus}1}. The effects of kernel size, density ratio across the flame front and laminar burning velocity are studied. For the case of turbulent combustion the velocity induced in the reactant stream is measured in a plane parallel to the flame holder of an open premixed turbulent V-shaped flame. A divergent flow field, with a strain rate of 50 s{sup {minus}1}, is induced by the heat release in the flame zone and the consequences of this for determining the turbulent burning velocity in this and similar systems is reviewed.

  7. Calculations of the flow properties of a confined diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yongmo; Chung, T. J.; Sohn, Jeong L.

    1989-01-01

    A finite element algorithm for the computation of confined, axisymmetric, turbulent diffusion flames is developed. The mean mixture properties were obtained by three methods based on diffusion flame concept: without using a probability density function (PDF), with a double-delta PDF, and with a beta PDF. A comparison is made for the combustion models, and the effect of turbulence on combustion are discussed.

  8. Camping Burner-Based Flame Emission Spectrometer for Classroom Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ne´el, Bastien; Crespo, Gasto´n A.; Perret, Didier; Cherubini, Thomas; Bakker, Eric

    2014-01-01

    A flame emission spectrometer was built in-house for the purpose of introducing this analytical technique to students at the high school level. The aqueous sample is sprayed through a homemade nebulizer into the air inlet of a consumer-grade propane camping burner. The resulting flame is analyzed by a commercial array spectrometer for the visible…

  9. Premixed-flame propagation in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Aldredge, R.C.; Vaezi, V.; Ronney, P.D.

    1998-11-01

    Turbulent-flame speeds in methane-air mixtures were measured in a Taylor-Couette apparatus with counter-rotating cylinders, used to generate turbulence that is nearly homogeneous and isotropic over many integral length and time scales. While laminar-flame propagation is found to be influenced by the Darrieus-Landau instability and heat loss to the walls of the apparatus, turbulent-flame propagation in high-intensity turbulence is found to be uninfluenced by these effects. A decreasing sensitivity of the turbulent-flame speed to increases in turbulence intensity is found to occur beyond turbulence intensities of approximately 2.5 times the laminar-flame speed. This is possibly due to a transition to a nonflamelet combustion regime where flame propagation is influenced by both small-scale flame-structure modification and large-scale flame-front wrinkling. Results are compared with those obtained by earlier investigators using other experimental apparatuses and with theoretical predictions.

  10. Simulation of a turbulent flame in a channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruneaux, G.; Akselvoll, K.; Poinsot, T.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent premixed flames and channel walls is studied. Combustion is represented by a simple irreversible reaction with a large activation temperature. Feedback to the flowfield is suppressed by invoking a constant density assumption. The effect of wall distance on local and global flame structure is investigated. Quenching distances and maximum wall heat fluxes computed in laminar cases are compared to DNS results. It is found that quenching distances decrease and maximum heat fluxes increase relative to laminar flame values. It is shown that these effects are due to large coherent structures which push flame elements towards to wall. The effect of wall strain is studied in flame-wall interaction in a stagnation line flow; this is used to explain the DNS results. It is also shown that 'remarkable' flame events are produced by interaction with a horseshoe vortex: burnt gases are pushed towards the wall at high speed and induce quenching and high wall heat fluxes while fresh gases are expelled from the wall region and form finger-like structures. Effects of the wall on flame surface density are investigated, and a simple model for flame-wall interaction is proposed; its predictions compare well with the DNS results.

  11. 46 CFR 151.03-23 - Flame arrestor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flame arrestor. 151.03-23 Section 151.03-23 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-23 Flame arrestor. Any device or assembly of cellular, tubular, pressure or other...

  12. Flame retardant properties of triazine phosphonates derivative with cotton fabric

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The flame retardant behavior of a cotton fabric treated with phosphorus-nitrogen containing triazine compound was evaluated. It was found that cyanuric chloride (2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine) is an excellent starting material for the preparation of phosphonates flame retardants that interacts wel...

  13. Modeling of NOx formation in circular laminar jet flames 

    E-print Network

    Siwatch, Vivek

    2007-04-25

    Emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from combustion devices is a topic of tremendous current importance. The bulk of the review of NOx emissions has been in the field of turbulent jet flames. However laminar jet flames have provided much insight...

  14. Large-Eddy Simulation of Premixed Turbulent Combustion Using Flame

    E-print Network

    Groth, Clinton P. T.

    significant development. In particular, for many pre- mixed combustion applications, the chemical reactionsLarge-Eddy Simulation of Premixed Turbulent Combustion Using Flame Surface Density Approach by Wen #12;2 #12;3 Abstract Large-Eddy Simulation of Premixed Turbulent Combustion Using Flame Surface

  15. Modeling of pulverized-coal flames in plug flow furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, M.K.

    1990-01-01

    An existing char flame program is modified to predict coal particle behavior in one-dimensional furnaces. The complete p.c. flame program ties the important elements of coal flames, namely volatile matter generation, its combustion and char combustion. Unlike other flame models, where substitution for VM combustion kinetics and approximations for char combustion kinetics are used, this model incorporates experimentally determined kinetics for VM combustion, extensively verified engineering equations for VM release and an extended char combustion model that includes rates for diffusion, adsorption and desorption of oxidizing and product gases. The model thus constructed is used to predict the variations in the density and size of particles in addition to the temperatures and reaction rate profiles. Results showing the relative role of flame radiation in affecting flame stabilization and ignition parameters are calculated. Results are also calculated to show the effect of inlet variables such as mean particle size and fuel-air ratios on flame radiation properties. Predictions are compared with experimental results from different sources. A specific focus of the modeling is the influence of reaction mode on the flame emissivity, and hence on the ignition time. These results account for wide variations in ignition time found experimentally, that were previously attributed to differences in fuel reactivity.

  16. 5. Credit GE. Photographic copy of photograph, completed flame pit ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Credit GE. Photographic copy of photograph, completed flame pit in Test Stand 'A' with steel plate flame deflector over refractory brick. (JPL negative no. 383-1033, 17 January 1946) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. Premixed laminar flame propagation in a rotating vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Teresa; Gorczakowski, Andrzej; Chomiak, Jerzy; Jarosinski, Jozef

    2008-11-01

    Combustion in a swirling flow is devoted to burn lean mixture in spark ignition engines since it provides fuel economy and exhaust emission reduction. Therefore it is important to know the flame behavior under centrifugal forces. The flame in a rotating gas is modified by an aerodynamic mechanism due to action of centrifugal forces instead the laminar burning velocity due to chemical kinetics. The paper deals with important characteristics of eddy combustion mechanism such as: flame shape and propagation as a function of the rotation rate. Therefore pictures captured by a video camera are treated with the image processing toolbox from Matlab in order to establish the main characteristics of the flame kernel of a mixture propane -- air at different rotation rates ranging from 500 to 4000 rpm. It is observed that the flame propagates along the rotation axis and that the extinguishing of the flame is involved with the heat losses as soon the flame reaches the wall of the chamber. In addition, the flame shape is quite similar to the intrusion head of a light fluid penetrating into a stagnated heavy fluid.

  18. Interaction of a free flame front with a turbulence field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Maurice

    1956-01-01

    Small-perturbation spectral-analysis techniques are used to obtain the root-mean-square flame-generated turbulence velocities and the attenuating pressure fluctuations stemming from interaction of a constant-pressure flame front with a field of isotropic turbulence in the absence of turbulence decay processes.

  19. Novel phosphonates triazine derivative as economic flame retardant for cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorous-containing flame retardants are widely used in standard and engineering plastics, polyurethane foams, thermosets, coatings, and textiles. Organophosphorous flame retardants have been known to be more effective when used in conjunction with nitrogen-containing systems. Their mixture produ...

  20. 30 CFR 7.26 - Flame test apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flame test apparatus. 7.26 Section 7.26 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Brattice Cloth and Ventilation Tubing § 7.26 Flame test apparatus. The principal parts...

  1. Flame oscillations in tubes with nonslip at the walls

    SciTech Connect

    Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Bychkov, Vitaly; Petchenko, Arkady; Eriksson, Lars-Erik

    2006-06-15

    A laminar premixed flame front propagating in a two-dimensional tube is considered with nonslip at the walls and with both ends open. The problem of flame propagation is solved using direct numerical simulations of the complete set of hydrodynamic equations including thermal conduction, diffusion, viscosity, and chemical kinetics. As a result, it is shown that flame interaction with the walls leads to the oscillating regime of burning. The oscillations involve variations of the curved flame shape and the velocity of flame propagation. The oscillation parameters depend on the characteristic tube width, which controls the Reynolds number of the flow. In narrow tubes the oscillations are rather weak, while in wider tubes they become stronger with well-pronounced nonlinear effects. The period of oscillations increases for wider tubes, while the average flame length scaled by the tube diameter decreases only slightly with increasing tube width. The average flame length calculated in the present work is in agreement with that obtained in the experiments. Numerical results reduce the gap between the theory of turbulent flames and the experiments on turbulent combustion in tubes. (author)

  2. Structure of confined laminar spray diffusion flames: Numerical investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawid, M. A.; Bulzan, D. L.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of confined laminar spray diffusion flames is investigated numerically by solving the gas-phase conservation equations for mass species, continuity, momentum, and energy and the liquid-phase equations for droplet position, velocity, size, and temperature. A one-step global reaction scheme along with six equilibrium reactions are employed to model the flame chemistry. Monodisperse as well as polydisperse sprays are considered. The numerical results demonstrate that liquid spray flames substantially differ from gaseous flames in their structure, i.e., temperature, concentration, and velocity fields, shape, and dimensions under the same conditions. Spray flames are predicted to be taller and narrower than their counterpart gaseous ones and their shapes are almost cylindrical. This is in agreement with experimental observations. The numerical computations also show that the use of the equilibrium reactions with the one-step reaction scheme decreases the flame temperature compared to the one-step reaction scheme without the equilibrium reactions and more importantly increases the surface area of the flame zone due to a phenomenon termed 'equilibrium broadening.' The spray flames also possess a finite thickness with minimal overlap of the fuel and oxygen species. A case for which a fuel-mixture consisting of 20 to 80 percent gas-liquid by mass is introduced into the combustor is also investigated and compared with predictions using only gaseous or liquid fuel.

  3. 30 CFR 18.65 - Flame test of hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Flame test of hose. 18.65 Section 18.65 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Inspections and Tests § 18.65 Flame test of hose. (a) Size of...

  4. The propagation of tribrachial flames in a confined channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nam Il; Seo, Jeong Il; Guahk, Young Tae; Shin, Hyun Dong

    2006-07-15

    A flame formulated in a mixing layer has a typical structure of a tribrachial (or triple) flame. The propagation velocity of a tribrachial flame is much higher than the laminar burning velocity of a stoichiometric premixed flame, and the propagation velocity usually decreases as the gradient of fuel concentration increases. A separate experimental study that used a jet flow in an open space reported that there is a maximum propagation velocity at a critical fuel concentration gradient coupled with the enhancement of a diffusion flame branch and that the critical concentration gradient can be varied even by the difference in velocity variation near the flame. This study investigates how a confined flow field affects the structure of a tribrachial flame. The mean velocity and the concentration gradient of fuel were controlled by a multislot burner. Laser diagnostic methods were used to measure the velocity variation, the OH radical, and the temperature variation. Even in a confined geometrical space, the existence of the maximum propagation velocity was confirmed. Moreover, the critical concentration gradients in a confined channel were larger than those in an open jet case; that is, the role of the diffusion flame at the maximum propagation velocity becomes more significant in a confined structure due to the enhanced convective diffusion. This result shows the importance of the diffusion branch in a confined (or squeezed) stream tube. (author)

  5. 30 CFR 18.65 - Flame test of hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Flame test of hose. 18.65 Section 18.65 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Inspections and Tests § 18.65 Flame test of hose. (a) Size of...

  6. Suppression Characteristics of Cup-Burner Flames in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Linteris, Gregory T.; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2004-01-01

    The structure and suppression of laminar methane-air co-flow diffusion flames formed on a cup burner have been studied experimentally and numerically using physically acting fire-extinguishing agents (CO2, N2, He, and Ar) in normal earth (lg) and zero gravity (0g). The computation uses a direct numerical simulation with detailed chemistry and radiative heat-loss models. An initial observation of the flame without agent was also made at the NASA Glenn 2.2-Second Drop Tower. An agent was introduced into a low-speed coflowing oxidizing stream by gradually replacing the air until extinguishment occurred under a fixed minimal fuel velocity. The suppression of cup-burner flames, which resemble real fires, occurred via a blowoff process (in which the flame base drifted downstream) rather than the global extinction phenomenon typical of counterflow diffusion flames. The computation revealed that the peak reactivity spot (the reaction kernel) formed in the flame base was responsible for attachment and blowoff phenomena of the trailing diffusion flame. The thermal and transport properties of the agents affected the flame extinguishment limits.

  7. 30 CFR 7.26 - Flame test apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Flame test apparatus. 7.26 Section 7.26 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Brattice Cloth and Ventilation Tubing § 7.26 Flame test apparatus. The principal parts...

  8. Flame Enhancement and Quenching in Fluid Flows Natalia Vladimirova

    E-print Network

    Kiselev, Alex

    -called flamelet regime, where flame thickness is small compared to the fluid velocity scales. The geometric opticsFlame Enhancement and Quenching in Fluid Flows Natalia Vladimirova , Peter Constantin , Alexander is the typical flow velocity and a is a constant depending on the relationship between the oscillation length

  9. 30 CFR 7.26 - Flame test apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Flame test apparatus. 7.26 Section 7.26 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Brattice Cloth and Ventilation Tubing § 7.26 Flame test apparatus. The principal parts...

  10. 30 CFR 7.26 - Flame test apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Flame test apparatus. 7.26 Section 7.26 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Brattice Cloth and Ventilation Tubing § 7.26 Flame test apparatus. The principal parts...

  11. 30 CFR 18.65 - Flame test of hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Flame test of hose. 18.65 Section 18.65 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Inspections and Tests § 18.65 Flame test of hose. (a) Size of...

  12. 30 CFR 18.65 - Flame test of hose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flame test of hose. 18.65 Section 18.65 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Inspections and Tests § 18.65 Flame test of hose. (a) Size of...

  13. Tracked Flame Simulation for Type Ia Yongmin Zhang1

    E-print Network

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    Tracked Flame Simulation for Type Ia Supernova Yongmin Zhang1 , James Glimm1 2 , Srabasti Dutta1 1 the expansion of the uni- verse. The chemical composition, the density and velocity of the ejecta is not far from = 4=3. 2 Tracked Flame Model The liberated energy from combustion is determined from

  14. PROTOTYPE CORRELATION MASK FLAME PHOTOMETRIC DETECTOR FOR MEASURING SULFUR DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype flame photometric detector system (FPD) to measure gaseous sulfur compounds was fabricated using a previously developed correlation mask optical system and a new flame housing. Also, a new burner for the FPD system was optimized to view the excited molecular sulfur em...

  15. IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF FLAME RETARDANT CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    The use of flame retardant chemicals in furniture fabric could pose a potential health risk to consumers from dermal absorption of these compounds. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro dermal absorption of two flame retardant chemicals, [14C]-d...

  16. 30 CFR 57.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.6904 Section 57.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... General Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of...

  17. 49 CFR 195.438 - Smoking or open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Smoking or open flames. 195.438 Section 195.438 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.438 Smoking or open flames. Each operator shall prohibit...

  18. 30 CFR 57.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.6904 Section 57.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... General Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of...

  19. 49 CFR 195.438 - Smoking or open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Smoking or open flames. 195.438 Section 195.438 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.438 Smoking or open flames. Each operator shall prohibit...

  20. 30 CFR 57.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.6904 Section 57.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... General Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of...

  1. 49 CFR 195.438 - Smoking or open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Smoking or open flames. 195.438 Section 195.438 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.438 Smoking or open flames. Each operator shall prohibit...

  2. 30 CFR 57.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.6904 Section 57.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... General Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of...

  3. 49 CFR 195.438 - Smoking or open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Smoking or open flames. 195.438 Section 195.438 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.438 Smoking or open flames. Each operator shall prohibit...

  4. 30 CFR 57.6904 - Smoking and open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoking and open flames. 57.6904 Section 57.6904 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... General Requirements-Surface and Underground § 57.6904 Smoking and open flames. Smoking and use of...

  5. 49 CFR 195.438 - Smoking or open flames.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Smoking or open flames. 195.438 Section 195.438 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.438 Smoking or open flames. Each operator shall prohibit...

  6. Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames

    E-print Network

    Pascucci, Valerio

    Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames Peer-Timo Bremer, Member hundred time steps. Finally, we discuss a user interface that correlates the tracking information demonstrate our approach by analyzing three numerical simulations of lean hydrogen flames subject to different

  7. Flow/Soot-Formation Interactions in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Nonpremixed (diffusion) flames are attractive for practical applications because they avoid the stability, autoignition, flashback, etc. problems of premixed flames. Unfortunately, soot formation in practical hydrocarbon-fueled diffusion flames reduces their attractiveness due to widely-recognized public health and combustor durability problems of soot emissions. For example, more deaths are attributed to the emission of soot (15,000-60,000 deaths annually in the U.S. alone) than any other combustion-generated pollutant. In addition, continuum radiation from soot-containing flames is the principle heat load to combustor components and is mainly responsible for engine durability problems of aircraft and gas turbine engines. As a result, there is considerable interest in controlling both soot concentrations within flames and soot emissions from flames. Thus, the objective of the present investigation is to study ways to control soot formation in diffusion flames by manipulating the mixing process between the fuel and oxidant streams. In order to prevent the intrusion of gravity from masking flow properties that reduce soot formation in practical flames (where effects of gravity are small), methods developed during past work will be exploited to minimize effects of buoyant motion.

  8. Reduced Kinetic Mechanisms for Premixed Acetylene-Air Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauss, Fabian; Lindstedt, R. P.

    It has been shown in a number of publications [7.1], [7.2] that the formation of acetylene is a precondition of the formation of soot in fuel rich hydrocarbon flames. Accordingly, studies of acetylene flames are closely connected with the study of PAH growth and soot formation [7.3].

  9. Experimental and Numerical Study of Ammonium Perchlorate Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smooke, M. D.; Yetter, R. A.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Tanoff, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Many solid rocket propellants are based on a composite mixture of ammonium perchlorate (AP) oxidizer and polymeric binder fuels. In these propellants, complex three-dimensional diffusion flame structures between the AP and binder decomposition products, dependent upon the length scales of the heterogeneous mixture, drive the combustion via heat transfer back to the surface. Changing the AP crystal size changes the burn rate of such propellants. Large AP crystals are governed by the cooler AP self-deflagration flame and burn slowly, while small AP crystals are governed more by the hot diffusion flame with the binder and burn faster. This allows control of composite propellant ballistic properties via particle size variation. Previous measurements on these diffusion flames in the planar two-dimensional sandwich configuration yielded insight into controlling flame structure, but there are several drawbacks that make comparison with modeling difficult. First, the flames are two-dimensional and this makes modeling much more complex computationally than with one-dimensional problems, such as RDX self- and laser-supported deflagration. In addition, little is known about the nature, concentration, and evolution rates of the gaseous chemical species produced by the various binders as they decompose. This makes comparison with models quite difficult. Alternatively, counterflow flames provide an excellent geometric configuration within which AP/binder diffusion flames can be studied both experimentally and computationally.

  10. Determination of lanthanum by flame photometric titration.

    PubMed

    Svehla, G; Slevin, P J

    1968-09-01

    The flame emission of lanthanum at 560 mmu decreases linearly with phosphate concentration until a 1:1 molar ratio is reached, and then remains practically constant. Lanthanum can be titrated with phosphate, the equivalence point being detected from the change in emission intensity. Errors due to consumption of solution by the atomizer can be kept low by using short spraying times and low galvanometer damping. The average error is about -1% for 0.1M solutions and less than -5% for 0.01M. The method gives good results in the presence of titanium(III), zirconium, thorium and aluminium but cerium(III) and yttrium seriously interfere. PMID:18960392

  11. New hybrid halogen-free flame retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijowska, Dorota; Jankowski, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    The main objective of this work were researches concerning the methods of the in-situ modification of silicate layer-tubular mineral (SL-TM) halloysite, using the salts of melamine, i.e. melamine cyanurate. The modified mineral was used as flame retardant to thermoplastic polymers. In the case of the application of halloysite modified by melamine cyanurate to polyamide 6 (PA6) the highest parameters of vertical and horizontal flammability were achieved. The mechanical properties of filled polyamide 6 have been improved.

  12. A polymeric flame retardant additive for rubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.N.; Maiti, S.

    1993-12-31

    Synthesis of a polyphosphonate by the interfacial polymerization of bisphenol-A (BPA) and dichloro-phenyl phosphine oxide (DCPO) using cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (TMAC) as phase transfer catalyst (PTC) was reported. The polyphosphonate was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, DSC and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The flame retardancy of the polymer was done by OI study. The polymer was used as a fire retardant additive to rubbers such as natural rubber (NR), styrene-butadiene rubber(SBR), nitrile rubber (NBR) and chloroprene rubber (CR). The efficiency of the fire retardant property of this additive was determined by LOI measurements of the various rubber samples.

  13. CARS system for turbulent flame measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antcliff, R. R.; Jarrett, O., Jr.; Rogers, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Simultaneous nitrogen number density and rotational-vibrational temperatures were measured in a turbulent diffusion flame with a Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) instrument. The fuel jet was diluted with nitrogen (20 percent by volume) to allow temperature measurements across the entire jet mixing region. These measurements were compared with fluid dynamics computations. The CARS system incorporated a neodymium YAG laser, an intensified silicon photodiode array detector, and unique dynamic range enhancement methods. Theoretical calculations were based on a parabolic Navier-Stokes computer code. The comparison of these techniques will aid their development in the study of complex flowfields.

  14. Field Effects of Buoyancy on a Premixed Turbulent Flame Studied by Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Robert K.

    2003-01-01

    Typical laboratory flames for the scientific investigation of flame/turbulence interactions are prone to buoyancy effects. Buoyancy acts on these open flame systems and provides upstream feedbacks that control the global flame properties as well as local turbulence/flame interactions. Consequently the flame structures, stabilization limits, and turbulent reaction rates are directly or indirectly coupled with buoyancy. The objective of this study is to characterize the differences between premixed turbulent flames pointing upwards (1g), pointing downwards (-1g), and in microgravity (mg). The configuration is an inverted conical flame stabilized by a small cone-shaped bluff body that we call CLEAN Flames (Cone-Stabilized Lean Flames). We use two laser diagnostics to capture the velocity and scalar fields. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measures the mean and root mean square velocities and planar imaging by the flame fronts method outlines the flame wrinkle topology. The results were obtained under typical conditions of small domestic heating systems such as water heaters, ovens, and furnaces. Significant differences between the 1g and -1g flames point to the need for including buoyancy contributions in theoretical and numerical calculations. In Earth gravity, there is a complex coupling of buoyancy with the turbulent flow and heat release in the flame. An investigation of buoyancy-free flames in microgravity will provide the key to discern gravity contributions. Data obtained in microgravity flames will provide the benchmark for interpreting and analyzing 1g and -1g flame results.

  15. Investigations of swirl flames in a gas turbine model combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Weigand, P.; Meier, W.; Duan, X.R.; Stricker, W.; Aigner, M.

    2006-01-01

    A gas turbine model combustor for swirling CH{sub 4}/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure with good optical access for detailed laser measurements is discussed. Three flames with thermal powers between 7.6 and 34.9 kW and overall equivalence ratios between 0.55 and 0.75 were investigated. These behave differently with respect to combustion instabilities: Flame A burned stably, flame B exhibited pronounced thermoacoustic oscillations, and flame C, operated near the lean extinction limit, was subject to sudden liftoff with partial extinction and reanchoring. One aim of the studies was a detailed experimental characterization of flame behavior to better understand the underlying physical and chemical processes leading to instabilities. The second goal of the work was the establishment of a comprehensive database that can be used for validation and improvement of numerical combustion models. The flow field was measured by laser Doppler velocimetry, the flame structures were visualized by planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH and CH radicals, and the major species concentrations, temperature, and mixture fraction were determined by laser Raman scattering. The flow fields of the three flames were quite similar, with high velocities in the region of the injected gases, a pronounced inner recirculation zone, and an outer recirculation zone with low velocities. The flames were not attached to the fuel nozzle and thus were partially premixed before ignition. The near field of the flames was characterized by fast mixing and considerable finite-rate chemistry effects. CH PLIF images revealed that the reaction zones were thin (=<0.5 mm) and strongly corrugated and that the flame zones were short (h=<50 mm). Despite the similar flow fields of the three flames, the oscillating flame B was flatter and opened more widely than the others. In the current article, the flow field, structures, and mean and rms values of the temperature, mixture fraction, and species concentrations are discussed. Turbulence intensities, mixing, heat release, and reaction progress are addressed. In a second article, the turbulence-chemistry interactions in the three flames are treated.

  16. Pulsating Instability of Turbulent Thermonuclear Flames in Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei Y.

    2014-01-01

    Presently, one of the main explosion scenarios of type Ia supernovae (SNIa), aimed at explaining both "normal" and subluminous events, is the thermonuclear incineration of a white-dwarf in a single-degenerate system. The underlying engine of such explosions is the turbulent thermonuclear flame. Modern, large-scale, multidimensional simulations of SNIa cannot resolve the internal flame structure, and instead must include a subgrid-scale prescription for the turbulent-flame properties. As a result, development of robust, parameter-free, large-scale models of SNIa crucially relies on the detailed understanding of the turbulent flame properties during each stage of the flame evolution. Due to the complexity of the flame dynamics, such understanding must be validated by the first-principles direct numerical simulations (DNS). In our previous work, we showed that sufficiently fast turbulent flames are inherently susceptible to the development of detonations, which may provide the mechanism for the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in the delayed-detonation model of SNIa. Here we extend this study by performing detailed analysis of the turbulent flame properties at turbulent intensities below the critical threshold for DDT. We carried out a suite of 3D DNS of turbulent flames for a broad range of turbulent intensities and system sizes using a simplified, single-step, Arrhenius-type reaction kinetics. Our results show that at the later stages of the explosion, as the turbulence intensity increases prior to the possible onset of DDT, the flame front will become violently unstable. We find that the burning rate exhibits periodic pulsations with the energy release rate varying by almost an order of magnitude. Furthermore, such flame pulsations can produce pressure waves and shocks as the flame speed approaches the critical Chapman-Jouguet deflagration speed. Finally, in contrast with the current theoretical understanding, such fast turbulent flames can propagate at speeds, which are much higher than the characteristic speeds of turbulent fluctuations. These effects can qualitatively change the dynamics of the explosion and, therefore, must be properly accounted for in the turbulent-flame subgrid-scale models.

  17. Trapping and aerogelation of nanoparticles in negative gravity hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Novosselov, Igor V.; Beres, Nicholas D.; Moosmüller, Hans; Sorensen, Christopher M.; Stipe, Christopher B.

    2014-06-01

    We report the experimental realization of continuous carbon aerogel production using a flame aerosol reactor by operating it in negative gravity (-g; up-side-down configuration). Buoyancy opposes the fuel and air flow forces in -g, which eliminates convectional outflow of nanoparticles from the flame and traps them in a distinctive non-tipping, flicker-free, cylindrical flame body, where they grow to millimeter-size aerogel particles and gravitationally fall out. Computational fluid dynamics simulations show that a closed-loop recirculation zone is set up in -g flames, which reduces the time to gel for nanoparticles by ?106 s, compared to positive gravity (upward rising) flames. Our results open up new possibilities of one-step gas-phase synthesis of a wide variety of aerogels on an industrial scale.

  18. Premixing quality and flame stability: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, K.; Heywood, J. B.; Tabaczynski, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Models for predicting flame ignition and blowout in a combustor primary zone are presented. A correlation for the blowoff velocity of premixed turbulent flames is developed using the basic quantities of turbulent flow, and the laminar flame speed. A statistical model employing a Monte Carlo calculation procedure is developed to account for nonuniformities in a combustor primary zone. An overall kinetic rate equation is used to describe the fuel oxidation process. The model is used to predict the lean ignition and blow out limits of premixed turbulent flames; the effects of mixture nonuniformity on the lean ignition limit are explored using an assumed distribution of fuel-air ratios. Data on the effects of variations in inlet temperature, reference velocity and mixture uniformity on the lean ignition and blowout limits of gaseous propane-air flames are presented.

  19. Heat transfer from a pair of radial jet reattachment flames

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, J.W.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.; Page, R.H.

    1996-12-01

    Flame jet impingement heat transfer for a pair of Radial Jet Reattachment Combustion (RJRC) nozzles has been studied for flames which were highly, moderately, and weakly interactive. The most uniform heat flux and temperature distributions occurred at the closest between-nozzle spacing, when the flames were highly interacting, while the highest heat flux and surface temperatures were measured when the two flame jets were moderately interacting at intermediate between-nozzle spacings. The optimal spacing for two nozzles was determined based on maximum heat flux and surface temperature. In addition, the percent overall heat transfer to the impingement surface decreased with increasing between-nozzle spacing. The results of this study provide valuable information for applying RJRC nozzles to industrial flame jet impingement heat-treatment processes.

  20. Electrical probe diagnostics for the laminar flame quenching distance

    SciTech Connect

    Karrer, Maxime; Makarov, Maxime; Bellenoue, Marc; Labuda, Sergei; Sotton, Julien

    2010-02-15

    A simplified theory, previously developed for the general case of weakly ionized gas flow, is used to predict electrical probe response when the flame is quenched on the probe surface. This theory is based on the planar model of space charge sheaths around the measuring electrode. For the flame quenching case, by assuming that the sheath thickness is comparable with the thermal boundary layer thickness, probe current can be related to flame quenching distance. The theoretical assumptions made to obtain the analytical formulation of probe current were experimentally proved by using direct visualization and high-frequency PIV. The direct visualization method was also used to validate the results of flame quenching distance values obtained with electrical probe. The electrical probe diagnostics have been verified for both head-on and sidewall flame quenching regimes and for stoichiometric methane/air and propane/air mixtures in a pressure range of 0.05-0.6 MPa. (author)

  1. Trapping and aerogelation of nanoparticles in negative gravity hydrocarbon flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Novosselov, Igor V.; Beres, Nicholas D.; Moosmüller, Hans; Sorensen, Christopher M.; Stipe, Christopher B.

    2014-06-16

    We report the experimental realization of continuous carbon aerogel production using a flame aerosol reactor by operating it in negative gravity (?g; up-side-down configuration). Buoyancy opposes the fuel and air flow forces in ?g, which eliminates convectional outflow of nanoparticles from the flame and traps them in a distinctive non-tipping, flicker-free, cylindrical flame body, where they grow to millimeter-size aerogel particles and gravitationally fall out. Computational fluid dynamics simulations show that a closed-loop recirculation zone is set up in ?g flames, which reduces the time to gel for nanoparticles by ?10{sup 6}?s, compared to positive gravity (upward rising) flames. Our results open up new possibilities of one-step gas-phase synthesis of a wide variety of aerogels on an industrial scale.

  2. Reduced Kinetic Mechanisms for Premixed Methane-Air Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauss, F.; Peters, N.

    Methane-air flames have served as the first example for the development of a strategy to systematically reduce kinetic mechanisms. Premixed methane-air flames were first considered in [5.1] and [5.2], methane-air diffusion flames in [5.3]. At last, an entire book, from which further references may be taken, was devoted to the subject of "Reduced Kinetic Mechanisms and Asymptotic Approximations for Methane-Air Flames" [5.4]. The idea there was to use a relatively short kinetic mechanism containing only 25 reactions of the C1-chain, and to analyse not only different approximations for reduced mechanisms of methane-air flames, but asymptotic formulations as well.

  3. First time-series optical photometry from Antarctica

    E-print Network

    K. G. Strassmeier; R. Briguglio; T. Granzer; G. Tosti; I. DiVarano; I. Savanov; M. Bagaglia; S. Castellini; A. Mancini; G. Nucciarelli; O. Straniero; E. Distefano; S. Messina; G. Cutispoto

    2008-07-18

    Beating the Earth's day-night cycle is mandatory for long and continuous time-series photometry and had been achieved with either large ground-based networks of observatories at different geographic longitudes or when conducted from space. A third possibility is offered by a polar location with astronomically-qualified site characteristics. Aims. In this paper, we present the first scientific stellar time-series optical photometry from Dome C in Antarctica and analyze approximately 13,000 CCD frames taken in July 2007. We conclude that high-precision CCD photometry with exceptional time coverage and cadence can be obtained at Dome C in Antarctica and be successfully used for time-series astrophysics.

  4. CCD Photometry of bright stars using objective wire mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Kami?ski, Krzysztof; Zgórz, Marika; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, Aleksander

    2014-06-01

    Obtaining accurate photometry of bright stars from the ground remains problematic due to the danger of overexposing the target and/or the lack of suitable nearby comparison stars. The century-old method of using objective wire mesh to produce multiple stellar images seems promising for the precise CCD photometry of such stars. Furthermore, our tests on ? Cep and its comparison star, differing by 5 mag, are very encouraging. Using a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope with the objective covered by a plastic wire mesh, in poor weather conditions, we obtained differential photometry with a precision of 4.5 mmag per two minute exposure. Our technique is flexible and may be tuned to cover a range as big as 6-8 mag. We discuss the possibility of installing a wire mesh directly in the filter wheel.

  5. Properties of Young Massive Cluster Derived from Photometry

    E-print Network

    U. Fritze-v. Alvensleben

    2004-08-25

    I will show that photometry -- if extending over a reasonable choice of passbands -- can give fairly precise information about young star clusters and their evolutionary state. Optical colors alone are known to leave severe ambiguities due to degeneracies between age, metallicity and extinction. High quality photometry including $U, B, V$ or $I$, and a NIR band, however, in combination with an extensive grid of evolutionary synthesis models for star clusters and a dedicated tool to analyse spectral energy distributions allows to assess and largely disentangle star cluster ages, metallicities, extinction values and, hence, to derive their masses. Gaseous emission contributions sensibly affect broad band colors during the youngest stages, depending on metallicity. Mass functions of young star cluster systems may considerably differ in shape from luminosity functions. An ESO ASTROVIRTEL project provides multi-color photometry for a large number of young, intermediate age and old star cluster systems. As a first example I show results obtained for NGC 1569.

  6. Stabilization of premixed flames on rotating Bunsen burners

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, J.M.; Sohrab, S.H.

    1996-09-01

    The effect of rotation on stabilization of methane-air premixed Bunsen flame sis experimentally investigated. Both the flame blowoff and flashback contours are determined in the fuel mole fraction versus Reynolds number plane (X{sub F}-Re) with the rotational Reynolds number Re{sub 4} as a parameter. It is found that rotation of the gas increases the flame stabilization area A{sub s} = A{sub B} {minus} A{sub F} defined as the difference between the flame blowoff A{sub B} and flashback A{sub F} areas in the (X{sub F}-Re) plane. The flame stabilization efficiency is defined as {eta}{sub s} = 1 {minus} A{sub F}/A{sub B} that approaches unity in either A{sub B} {yields} {infinity} or A{sub F} {yields} 0 limit. The experimental results suggest that rotation decreases the flame stabilization efficiency. However, rotation is found to substantially increase the flame stabilization coefficient defined as {beta}{sub s} = A{sub s}/A{sub st}, where A{sub st} is the stabilization area of the standard nonrotating burner. The parameters {eta}{sub s} and {beta}{sub s} may be useful in combustion technology for quantitative evaluation of the stabilization performance of different types of flame holders. In addition, the local hydrodynamics near the center of rotating Bunsen burner is simulated by investigating stabilization of planar laminar premixed flames on rotating porous disks with uniform surface velocity. Physical concepts concerning mechanisms of flame stabilization are discussed in terms of three important parameters namely the translational Reynolds number Re, the rotation Reynolds number Re{sub r}, and the fuel mole fraction X{sub F}. The results of the experimental findings are shown to be in accordance with prior theoretical investigation.

  7. Effects of pressure gradients on turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veynante, D.; Poinsot, T.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of a constant acceleration on a turbulent premixed flame is studied by direct numerical simulation. This acceleration induces a mean pressure gradient across the flame brush, leading to a modification of the turbulent flame structure due to differential buoyancy mechanisms between heavy cold fresh and light hot burnt gases. Such a pressure gradient may be encountered in practical applications in ducted flames. A favorable pressure gradient, i.e. the pressure decreases from unburnt to burnt gases, is found to decrease the flame wrinkling, the flame brush thickness, and the turbulent flame speed. A favorable pressure gradient also promotes counter-gradient turbulent transport. On the other hand, adverse pressure gradients tend to increase the flame brush thickness and turbulent flame speed, and promote classical gradient turbulent transport. The balance equation for the turbulent flux of the Favre averaged progress variable is also analyzed. The first results show that the fluctuating pressure term, cannot be neglected as generally assumed in models. Simple models assuming that a high mean pressure gradient may only be balanced by the cross-dissipation term seem too approximate. This analysis has to be continued to compare simulation data and closure schemes proposed for the transport equation. The analysis developed by Veynante et al.(1995) has been extended to imposed acceleration and mean pressure gradients. A simple model for the turbulent flux is proposed and validated from simulation data. Then, a modified criterion is derived to delineate between counter-gradient and gradient turbulent diffusion. In fact, counter-gradient diffusion may occur in most practical applications, especially for ducted flames.

  8. Pulsating instability and self-acceleration of fast turbulent flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei Y.

    2015-01-01

    A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations is used to study the intrinsic stability of high-speed turbulent flames. Calculations model the interaction of a fully resolved premixed flame with a highly subsonic, statistically steady, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. The computational domain is unconfined to prevent the onset of thermoacoustic instabilities. We consider a wide range of turbulent intensities and system sizes, corresponding to the Damköhler numbers Da = 0.1 - 6.0. These calculations show that turbulent flames in the regimes considered are intrinsically unstable. In particular, we find three effects. (1) Turbulent flame speed, ST, develops pulsations with the observed peak-to-peak amplitude ST max / ST min > 10 and a characteristic time scale close to a large-scale eddy turnover time. Such variability is caused by the interplay between turbulence, which continuously creates the flame surface, and highly intermittent flame collisions, which consume the flame surface. (2) Unstable burning results in the periodic pressure build-up and the formation of pressure waves or shocks, when ST approaches or exceeds the speed of a Chapman-Jouguet deflagration. (3) Coupling of pressure gradients formed during pulsations with density gradients across the flame leads to the anisotropic amplification of turbulence inside the flame volume and flame acceleration. Such process, which is driven by the baroclinic term in the vorticity transport equation, is a reacting-flow analog of the mechanism underlying the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. With the increase in turbulent intensity, the limit-cycle instability discussed here transitions to the regime described in our previous work, in which the growth of ST becomes unbounded and produces a detonation.

  9. Experimental Measurements of Two-dimensional Planar Propagating Edge Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villa-Gonzalez, Marcos; Marchese, Anthony J.; Easton, John W.; Miller, Fletcher J.

    2007-01-01

    The study of edge flames has received increased attention in recent years. This work reports the results of a recent study into two-dimensional, planar, propagating edge flames that are remote from solid surfaces (called here, free-layer flames, as opposed to layered flames along floors or ceilings). They represent an ideal case of a flame propagating down a flammable plume, or through a flammable layer in microgravity. The results were generated using a new apparatus in which a thin stream of gaseous fuel is injected into a low-speed laminar wind tunnel thereby forming a flammable layer along the centerline. An airfoil-shaped fuel dispenser downstream of the duct inlet issues ethane from a slot in the trailing edge. The air and ethane mix due to mass diffusion while flowing up towards the duct exit, forming a flammable layer with a steep lateral fuel concentration gradient and smaller axial fuel concentration gradient. We characterized the flow and fuel concentration fields in the duct using hot wire anemometer scans, flow visualization using smoke traces, and non-reacting, numerical modeling using COSMOSFloWorks. In the experiment, a hot wire near the exit ignites the ethane air layer, with the flame propagating downwards towards the fuel source. Reported here are tests with the air inlet velocity of 25 cm/s and ethane flows of 967-1299 sccm, which gave conditions ranging from lean to rich along the centerline. In these conditions the flame spreads at a constant rate faster than the laminar burning rate for a premixed ethane air mixture. The flame spread rate increases with increasing transverse fuel gradient (obtained by increasing the fuel flow rate), but appears to reach a maximum. The flow field shows little effect due to the flame approach near the igniter, but shows significant effect, including flow reversal, well ahead of the flame as it approaches the airfoil fuel source.

  10. Unsteady numerical simulations of the stability and dynamics of flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kailasanath, K.; Patnaik, G.; Oran, E. S.

    1995-01-01

    In this report we describe the research performed at the Naval Research Laboratory in support of the NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Program over the past three years (from Feb. 1992) with emphasis on the work performed since the last microgravity combustion workshop. The primary objective of our research is to develop an understanding of the differences in the structure, stability, dynamics and extinction of flames in earth gravity and in microgravity environments. Numerical simulations, in which the various physical and chemical processes can be independently controlled, can significantly advance our understanding of these differences. Therefore, our approach is to use detailed time-dependent, multi-dimensional, multispecies numerical models to perform carefully designed computational experiments. The basic issues we have addressed, a general description of the numerical approach, and a summary of the results are described in this report. More detailed discussions are available in the papers published which are referenced herein. Some of the basic issues we have addressed recently are (1) the relative importance of wall losses and gravity on the extinguishment of downward-propagating flames; (2) the role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the formation of cellular flames; (3) effects of gravity on burner-stabilized flames, and (4) effects of radiative losses and chemical-kinetics on flames near flammability limits. We have also expanded our efforts to include hydrocarbon flames in addition to hydrogen flames and to perform simulations in support of other on-going efforts in the microgravity combustion sciences program. Modeling hydrocarbon flames typically involves a larger number of species and a much larger number of reactions when compared to hydrogen. In addition, more complex radiation models may also be needed. In order to efficiently compute such complex flames recent developments in parallel computing have been utilized to develop a state-of-the-art parallel flame code. This is discussed below in some detail after a brief discussion of the numerical models.

  11. A Numerical Study of the Superadiabatic Flame Temperature Phenomenon in HN3 Flame O. P. Korobeinichev,a

    E-print Network

    Knyazev, Vadim D.

    and Combustion SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia b The Catholic University of America, Department of Chemistry (the C-H-O system) [1] and described in number of articles [1-6]. In ref [1], where modeling of flame by heat consumption in endothermic reactions in the post-flame zone as the system approaches thermodynamic

  12. Development of fiber reactive, non-halogenated flame retardant on cotton fabrics and the enhanced flame retardancy by covalent bonding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US law requires flame resistant properties on apparel or house hold items to prevent or minimize the fire damage. The objective of this research was to develop a non-halogenated flame retardant for application onto cotton fabrics. These treated fabrics can then be used in clothes or beddings to ...

  13. Flame Velocities over a Wide Composition Range for Pentane-air, Ethylene-air, and Propyne-air Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dorothy M; Wong, Edgar, L

    1951-01-01

    Fundamental flame velocities are reported for pentane air, ethylene-air, and propylene-air mixtures for the concentration range 60 to 130 percent of stoichiometric. A form of the Tanford and Pease equation, which includes a small constant velocity term independent of diffusion, will predict the observed changes in flame velocity.

  14. Characterization of transiting exoplanets by way of differential photometry

    E-print Network

    Cowley, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a simple activity for plotting and characterizing the light curve from an exoplanet transit event by way of differential photometry analysis. Using free digital imaging software, participants analyse a series of telescope images with the goal of calculating various exoplanet parameters, including its size, orbital radius and habitability. The activity has been designed for a high school or undergraduate university level and introduces fundamental concepts in astrophysics and an understanding of the basis for exoplanetary science, the transit method and digital photometry.

  15. A method for determining stellar parameters from multicolor photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskij, S. G.

    2012-09-01

    Amethod for determining the most probable spectral types, color excesses E B- V , and distances of stars from multicolor photometry is described. The main idea of the method is modeling the photometric data using various models for the stellar spectra and the interstellar extinction law, and applying the maximum likelihood method. The reliability of the method is estimated using stars with known spectral types and WBVR photometry, based on the empirical library of stellar spectra of Pickles and the model for the interstellar extinction law developed by Fluks et al.

  16. Tipsy pulsation of classical Cepheids - lessons from space photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabados, L.; Evans, N. R.; Szabó, R.; Derekas, A.; Cameron, A.

    2015-09-01

    Space photometric data of the Kepler Cepheid, V1154 Cygni, and those of SZ Tauri (MOST photometry) indicate that classical Cepheids are not strictly regular pulsators. Cycle-to-cycle period changes and variations in the shape of the light curve are revealed from the continuous photometry covering 6 cycles of SZ Tau pulsation and several hundred pulsation cycles of V1154 Cyg. To make the situation more interesting/complicated, the MOST light curve of RT Aurigae (a Cepheid pulsating in the fundamental mode) shows stellar oscillations in a highly repetitive manner.

  17. Transit and secondary eclipse photometry in the near-infrared

    E-print Network

    Ignas Snellen

    2007-05-02

    Near-infrared photometry of transiting extrasolar planets can be of great scientific value. It is however not straightforward to reach the necessary millimagnitude precision. Here we report on our attempts to observe transits and secondary eclipses of several extrasolar planets at 2.2 micron. Best results have been obtained on OGLE-TR-113b using the SOFI near-infrared camera on ESO's New Technology Telescope. Its K-band transit shows a remarkably flat bottom indicating low stellar limb darkening. Secondary eclipse photometry has resulted in a formal 3 sigma detection, but residual systematic effects make this detection rather uncertain.

  18. Pressure waves generated by steady flames.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, A. L.; Kamel, M. M.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of pressure waves that can be generated by clouds of explosive gas mixtures in a free atmosphere which is initially at a uniform state. The treatment is restricted only to the final stage of constant flame velocity when the flowfield is self-similar. By the introduction of reduced blast-wave parameters as phase-plane coordinates, the problem is resolved into the determination of the appropriate integral curves on this plane. Results, including space profiles of gasdynamic parameters, have been computed for a specific case of a hydrocarbon-air mixture characterized by a specific heat ratio of 1.3, sound speed at NTP of 345 m/sec, and volumetric expansion ratio corresponding to constant pressure deflagration of 7. Maximum overpressure ratios that can be generated by such flames in point-and line-symmetrical waves range from .00053, for the lower bound in the burning speed, up to 6 for the deflagration, while, for the average speeds of 5 to 10 m/sec, they are at a level of 0.05 to 0.10.

  19. Galileo Photometry of Asteroid 951 Gaspra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.C.; Simonelli, D.P.; Lee, P.; Klaasen, K.; Johnson, T.V.; Breneman, H.; Head, J.W.; Murchie, S.; Fanale, F.; Robinson, M.; Clark, B.; Granahan, J.; Garbeil, H.; McEwen, A.S.; Kirk, R.L.; Davies, M.; Neukum, G.; Mottola, S.; Wagner, R.; Belton, M.; Chapman, C.; Pilcher, C.

    1994-01-01

    Galileo images of Gaspra make it possible for the first time to determine a main-belt asteroid's photometric properties accurately by providing surface-resolved coverage over a wide range of incidence and emission angles and by extending the phase angle coverage to phases not observable from Earth. We combine Earth-based telescopic photometry over phase angles 2?? ??? ?? ??? 25?? with Galileo whole-disk and disk-resolved data at 33?? ??? ?? ??? 51?? to derive average global photometric properties in terms of Hapke's photometric model. The microscopic texture and particle phase-function behavior of Gaspra's surface are remarkably like those of other airless rocky bodies such as the Moon. The macroscopic surface roughness parameter, ??? = 29??, is slightly larger than that reported for typical lunar materials. The particle single scattering albedo, ???0 = 0.36 ?? 0.07, is significantly larger than for lunar materials, and the opposition surge amplitude, B0 = 1.63 ?? 0.07, is correspondingly smaller. We determine a visual geometric albedo pv = 0.22 ?? 0.06 for Gaspra, in close agreement with pv = 0.22 ?? 0.03 estimated from Earth-based observations. Gaspra's phase integral is 0.47, and the bolometric Bond albedo is estimated to be 0.12 ?? 0.03. An albedo map derived by correcting Galileo images with our average global photometric function reveals subdued albedo contrasts of ??10% or less over Gaspra's northern hemisphere. Several independent classification algorithms confirm the subtle spectral heterogeneity reported earlier (S. Mottola, M. DiMartino, M. Gonano-Beurer, H. Hoffman, and G. Neukum, 1993, Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, pp. 421-424; M. J. S. Belton et al., 1992, Science 257, 1647-1652). Whole-disk colors (0.41 ??? ?? ??? 0.99 ??m) vary systematically with longitude by about ??5%, but color differences as large as 30% occur locally. Colors vary continuously between end-member materials whose areal distribution correlates with regional topography. Infrared: violet (0.99:0.41-??m) color ratios on Gaspra are strongly correlated with local elevation, being largest at lower elevations and smaller at higher elevations. No correlation was detected between elevation and the green:violet (0.56:0.41-??m) color ratio. Bright materials with a strong 1-??m absorption occur primarily in association with craters along ridges, while darker materials with 30% weaker 1-??m signatures occur downslope. The variations of color and albedo cannot be easily explained by grain-size effects alone or by differences in photometric geometry. The trends observed are consistent with those revealed by laboratory studies of the effects of comminution, glass formation, and segregation of metal from silicate components in chondritic meteorites and also in some silicate mixtures. The relative importance of these various processes on Gaspra remains to be determined. ?? 1994 Academic Press. All rights reserved.

  20. Periodic motion of a bunsen flame tip with burner rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Maeda, Kazuyuki; Ueda, Toshihisa; Cheng, Robert K.

    2003-09-01

    Effects of burner rotation on the shapes and dynamics of premixed Bunsen flames have been investigated experimentally in normal gravity and in microgravity. Mixtures of CH{sub 4}-air and C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air are issued from the burner tube with mean flow velocity U = 0.6 m/s. The burner tube is rotated up to 1400 rpm (swirl number S = 1.58). An oscillating flame with large amplitude is formed between a conical-shape flame and a plateau flame under the condition of Lewis number Le > 1 mixtures (rich CH{sub 4}-air and lean C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air mixtures). In contrast, for Le = 1 mixtures (lean CH{sub 4}-air and rich C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air), asymmetric, eccentric flame or tilted flame is formed under the same swirl number range. Under microgravity condition, the oscillating flames are not formed, indicating that the oscillation is driven by buoyancy-induced instability associated with the unstable interface between the hot products and the ambient air. The flame tip flickering frequency {nu} is insensitive to burner rotation for S < 0.11. For S > 0.11, {nu} decreases linearly with increasing S. As S exceeds 0.11, a minimum value of axial mean velocity along the center line uj,m due to flow divergence is found and it has a linear relationship with {nu}. This result shows that uj,m has direct control of the oscillation frequency. When S approaches unity, the flame oscillation amplitude increases by a factor of 5, compared to the flickering amplitude of a conical-shape flame. This is accompanied by a hysteresis variation in the flame curvature from positive to negative and the thermo-diffusive zone thickness varying from small to large. With S > 1.3, the plateau flame has the same small flickering amplitudes as with S = 0. These results show that the competing centrifugal and buoyancy forces, and the non-unity Lewis number effect, play important roles in amplifying the flame-tip oscillation.