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Sample records for flameless atomic absorption

  1. Flameless atomic-absorption determination of gold in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Gold in geologic material is dissolved using a solution of hydrobromic acid and bromine, extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone, and determined using an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a graphite furnace atomizer. A comparison of results obtained by this flameless atomic-absorption method on U.S. Geological Survey reference rocks and geochemical samples with reported values and with results obtained by flame atomic-absorption shows that reasonable accuracy is achieved with improved precision. The sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the method allows acquisition of data on the distribution of gold at or below its crustal abundance. ?? 1980.

  2. DIRECT DETERMINATION OF PHOSPHORUS IN GASOLINE BY FLAMELESS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new method is presented for the determination of phosphorus in gasoline using flameless atomic absorption. Lanthanum nitrate solution is inserted in a graphite furnace prior to direct addition of gasoline. The organic matrix is charred prior to atomization of the phosphorus. Th...

  3. Determination of butyltin metabolites in the mouse liver by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Uneo, S; Susa, N; Furukawa, Y

    1995-08-01

    A new analytical method for observation of the metabolic status of butyltin compounds in the mouse liver was devised by a combination of extraction, purification and separation followed by quantitative analysis of each butyltin compound. After the extraction of all tin compounds from liver homogenate with ethyl acetate, these compounds were purified by combination of the fractional extract with organic solvents and column chromatography. The purified fraction was also analyzed by thin-layer chromatography, identifying each tin compound from differences in mobility on a silica gel plate. The tin content in the each separated spot on the plates was measured by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry after extraction by acid treatment. About 90% of tin was recovered by this method from the liver of mice which had been administered tri- or dibutyltin compound orally. This method will be useful for quantification of each metabolic product formed from butyltin compounds in vivo. PMID:8519922

  4. Comparison of four methods for digesting food samples for determination of trace levels of cadmium by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cabanis, M.T.; Cassanas, G.; Cabanis, J.C.; Brun, S.

    1988-01-01

    The authors compared 4 digestion procedures, namely, sulfuric-nitric acid in an open flask, nitric acid under pressure, sulfuric-nitric acid with refluxing, and nitric-hydrochloric-peroxide with refluxing, for the determination of cadmium by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 3 foodstuffs: rice, beef, and cream cheese. The foodstuffs were homogenized and divided into several batches for analysis. The results were evaluated using a 2-way cross analysis of variance. The study revealed that the digestion procedure was a highly significant factor (P < 10/sup -4/) in the analysis of the 3 foods; whereas the nature of the foodstuffs was not significant for rice and meat and only slightly significant (P < 10/sup -2/) for cream cheese. When the foodstuffs were spiked with a known amount of cadmium, they observed a loss of the metal when the sulfuric-nitric acid procedure in an open flask and the nitric-hydrochloric-peroxide digestion procedure were used. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that the choice of the reagents used for digestion of foodstuffs is a crucial factor for cadmium determination by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  5. Flame and flameless atomic-absorption determination of tellurium in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.; Hubert, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    The sample is digested with a solution of hydrobromic acid and bromine and the excess of bromine is expelled. After dilution of the solution to approximately 3 M in hydrobromic acid, ascorbic acid is added to reduce iron(III) before extraction of tellurium into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). An oxidizing air-acetylene flame is used to determine tellurium in the 0.1-20 ppm range. For samples containing 4-200 ppb of tellurium, a carbon-rod atomizer is used after the MIBK extract has been washed with 0.5 M hydrobromic acid to remove the residual iron. The flame procedure is useful for rapid preliminary monitoring, and the flameless procedure can determine tellurium at very low concentrations. ?? 1978.

  6. Back-extraction of trace elements from organometallic-halide extracts for determination by flameless atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.; Viets, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    The Methyl isobutyl ketone-Amine synerGistic Iodkte Complex (MAGIC) extraction system offers the advantage that a large number of trace elements can be rapidly determined with a single sample preparation procedure. However, many of the elements extracted by the MAGIC system form volatile organometallic halide salts when the organic extract is heated in the graphite furnace. High concentrations of some elements such as Cu and Zn extracted by the system from anomalous geological samples produce serious interferences when certain other elements are determined by flameless atomic absorption. Stripping systems have been developed using solutions of HNO3, H2SO4, and CH3COOH individually or combined with H2O2 in order to circumvent these problems. With these systems most of the elements in the organic extract can be sequentially stripped into an aqueous phase. Organometallic volatilization and the most serious interelement interferences, therefore, can be eliminated by stripping with various combinations of reagents in a series of steps.

  7. Black-extraction of trace elements from organometallic-halide extracts for determination by flameless atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.R.; Viets, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    The Methyl isobutyl ketone-Amine synerGistic Iodide Complex (MAGIC) extraction system offers the advantage that a large number of trace elements can be rapidly determined with a single sample preparation procedure. However, many of the elements extracted by the MAGIC system form volatile organometallic halide salts when the organic extract is heated in the graphite furnace. High concentrations of some elements such as Cu and Zn extracted by the system from anomalous geological samples produce serious interferences when certain other elements are determined by flameless atomic absorption. Stripping systems have been developed using solutions of HNO/sub 3/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and CH/sub 3/COOH individually or combined with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in order to circumvent these problems. With these systems most of the elements in the organic extract can be sequentially stripped into an aqueous phase. Organometallic volatilization and the most serious interelement interferences, therefore, can be eliminated by stripping with various combinations of reagents in a series of steps.

  8. Improved determination of manganese in hair by use of a mini-autoclave and flameless atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction: an evaluation in unexposed subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Guillard, O.; Brugier, J.C.; Piriou, A.; Menard, M.; Gombert, J.; Reiss, D.

    1984-10-01

    Motivated by the relatively wide range of values published hitherto, we offer a new, reliable method for determination of manganese in hair from unexposed human subjects. By using a mini-autoclave, we have developed a method that obviates loss of manganese during digestion and, thanks to use of a Teflon receptacle and rigorous methodology, contamination has been minimized. We used Zeeman flameless atomic absorption spectrometry, with the method of standard additions, for quantification. Within-run CVs for concentrations of Mn of 0.26 and 0.28 microgram/g of dry hair were 3.63 and 3.93%; the day-to-day CV for a Mn concentration of 0.29 microgram/g of dry hair was 5.84%. Mean (+/- SD) analytical recovery of Mn added to samples of hair was 104% (+/- 9.2%). The mean concentration of Mn found in the hair of 15 healthy unexposed subjects was 0.26 (+/- 0.05) microgram/g dry weight. This sensitive, reproducible procedure is suitable for use in analysis for traces of Mn in hair.

  9. THE STANDARD CALIBRATION INSTRUMENT AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER. PART I: FUNCTIONAL SPECIFICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document contains a project definition, a set of functional requirements, and a functional design for the automation of flameless atomic absorption (AA) spectrophotometers. The system is a real-time data acquisition system with 'on line' data reduction, quality control and r...

  10. Hot tube atomic absorption spectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Woodriff, R; Stone, R W

    1968-07-01

    A small, commercially available atomic absorption instrument is used with a heated graphite tube for the atomic absorption analysis of liquid and solid silver samples. Operating conditions of the furnace are described and a sensitivity of about 5 ng of silver is reported. PMID:20068797

  11. Absorption properties of identical atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-09-15

    Emission rates and other optical properties of multi-particle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the absorption probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas. -- Highlights: •The absorption rates of a pair of identical atoms in product and (anti)symmetrized states are different. •The modifications of the optical properties are essentially determined by the overlapping between the atoms. •The absorption properties differ, in some cases, for bosons and fermions.

  12. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  13. Absorption properties of identical atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-09-01

    Emission rates and other optical properties of multi-particle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the absorption probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas.

  14. [Use of solubilization for the preparation of samples for determination of heavy metals in biological materials using atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Pfüller, U; Fuchs, V; Golbs, S; Ebert, E; Pfeifer, D

    1980-01-01

    Solubilisation was tested for its suitability to prepare organic samples for metal determination. Flameless atomic-absorption spectrophotometry was used as test method. Copper, manganese, zinc, and chromium levels were determined from various organ systems of Wistar rat, in response to "normal" feeding of pelletised standard feed. A comparison between experimentally established concentrations, on the one hand, and literature data, on the other, suggested that solubilisation was applicable with good success to the preparation of samples from which to determine reliable values, in ppm and ppb, of the above elements. PMID:7436671

  15. Flameless nitrogen skid unit

    SciTech Connect

    Loesch, S.B.; John, J.C.; Mints, D.K.

    1984-03-27

    A flameless nitrogen vaporizing unit includes a first internal combustion engine driving a nitrogen pump through a transmission. A second internal combustion engine drives three hydraulic oil pumps against a variable back pressure so that a variable load may be imposed upon the second engine. Liquid nitrogen is pumped from the nitrogen pump driven by the first engine into a first heat exchanger where heat is transferred from exhaust gases from the first and second internal combustion engines to the liquid nitrogen to cause the nitrogen to be transformed into a gaseous state. The gaseous nitrogen then flows into a second heat exchanger where it is superheated by an engine coolant fluid to heat the gaseous nitrogen to essentially an ambient temperature. The superheated nitrogen is then injected into the well. The engine coolant fluid flows in a coolant circulation system. Heat is transferred to the coolant fluid directly from the internal combustion engine. Heat is also provided to the coolant fluid from lubrication oil pumped by the three pumps attached to the second internal combustion engine. The coolant fluid circulating system includes a comingling chamber for comingling warmer coolant fluid flowing from the internal combustion engines to the second heat exchanger with cooler coolant fluids flowing from the second heat exchanger to the internal combustion engines. Methods of vaporizing nitrogen are also disclosed.

  16. Determination of total tin in environmental biological and water samples by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace.

    PubMed

    Dogan, S; Haerdi, W

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of traces of tin using several analytical techniques (X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, polarographic techniques and atomic absorption) have been tested. Parameters such as simplicity, rapidity, sensitivity and interferences are compared in order to choose the most useful method for practical purpose. Finally, flameless atomic absorption was chosen for the determination of total tin concentration in different natural samples. Digestion of biological samples (plant, plankton, fish, etc.) was achieved by using Lumatom (a trade organic chemical). Thus, the digested sample is directly injected into the graphite furnace. This digestion technique is suitable and rapid with a minimum of error (contamination and losses). For tin analysis in water samples, a preconcentration of tin is carried out by coprecipitation with 1, 10-phenanthroline and tetraphenyl boron. The precipitate is separated and dissolved in alcohol or in Lumatom. The sensitivity of this method is 0.1 ng absolute tin. PMID:7451013

  17. Flameless thermal destruction of VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Hohl, H.M.

    1997-04-01

    A new technology controls volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions with high destruction efficiencies. This article describes the technology developed by Thermatrix, Inc. of San Jose, CA. The field proven flameless thermal oxidation (FTO) is capable of destroying over 99.99 percent of a wide range of organic air pollution. Topics covered include FTO technology, high destruction efficiencies, VOCs in wastewater from chemical manufacturing; refinery fugitive emissions.

  18. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  19. Do Atoms Really "Emit" Absorption Lines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecher, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    Presents three absorption line sources that enhance student understanding of the phenomena associated with the interaction of light with matter and help dispel the misconception that atoms "emit" absorption lines. Sources include neodymium, food coloring and other common household liquids, and fluorescent materials. (MDH)

  20. Cadmium accumulation in the crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Mayans, J.; Hernandez, F.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Torreblanca, A.

    1986-11-01

    Lake Albufera and the surrounding rice-field waters are being subject to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals and pesticides) from the many urban and wastewaters in this area. The American red crayfish Procambarus clarkii is native to the Louisiana marshes (USA). In 1978, the crayfish appeared in Lake Albufera near Valencia (Spain), and presently, without adequate sanitary controls, the crayfish is being fished commercially for human consumption. In view of this interest, it is important to have accurate information on concentrations of cadmium in natural waters and cadmium levels of tissues of freshwaters animals used as human food, as well as the accumulation rates of this metal in this animal. In the present study, the authors investigated the accumulation of cadmium in several tissues of the red crayfish, P clarkii (Girard) from Lake Albufera following cadmium exposure. Determinations of cadmium were made by flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy and the standard additions method. Digestion of samples was made by wet ashing in open flasks with concentrated HNO/sub 3/ at 80-90/sup 0/C.

  1. Detection of palladium by cold atom solution atomic absorption.

    PubMed

    Molloy, John L; Holcombe, James A

    2006-09-15

    One of the largest obstacles in miniaturizing traditional atomic spectroscopic sources is the need for a thermal/electrical source for free atom production. A single article in the literature has demonstrated atomic absorption detection of Ag, Cu, and Pd in solution at room temperature for atoms in the gas phase, which may ultimately permit miniaturization. Unfortunately, several laboratories have found that reproducing the phenomenon has been difficult. Without a sound fundamental explanation of the processes leading to the signal, one must conclude that it can be done, but some unsuspected and unknown design/methodological nuances are responsible for only a single reported success. Gas phase atoms could exist at room temperature "in solution" if the atoms were trapped in very small bubbles. In the current study, submicrometer-sized bubbles were created in a flow-through cell during the mixing of an alcohol-water solution containing a reducing agent with water containing the analyte. A repeatable atomic absorption signal was produced. Replacement of ethanol with 1-propanol and use of a surfactant increased the signal. Limits of detection of approximately 100 ppb in Pd were achieved, and it is estimated that approximately 0.4% of the Pd initially added is contained within the bubbles as gaseous atoms. The paper discusses the fundamental processes needed to achieve a repeatable signal. PMID:16970344

  2. Simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, James M.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    The extended analytical range capability of a simultaneous multielement atomic absorption continuum source spectrometer (SIMAAC) was tested for furnace atomization with respect to the signal measurement mode (peak height and area), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the temperature program mode (stepped or ramped atomization). These parameters were evaluated with respect to the shapes of the analytical curves, the detection limits, carry-over contamination and accuracy. Peak area measurements gave more linear calibration curves. Methods for slowing the atomization step heating rate, the use of a ramped temperature program or a platform, produced similar calibration curves and longer linear ranges than atomization with a stepped temperature program. Peak height detection limits were best using stepped atomization from the wall. Peak area detection limits for all atomization modes were similar. Carry-over contamination was worse for peak area than peak height, worse for ramped atomization than stepped atomization, and worse for atomization from a platform than from the wall. Accurate determinations (100 ± 12% for Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in National Bureau of Standards' Standard Reference Materials Bovine Liver 1577 and Rice Flour 1568 were obtained using peak area measurements with ramped atomization from the wall and stepped atomization from a platform. Only stepped atomization from a platform gave accurate recoveries for K. Accurate recoveries, 100 ± 10%, with precisions ranging from 1 to 36 % (standard deviation), were obtained for the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni. Pb, V and Zn in Acidified Waters (NBS SRM 1643 and 1643a) using stepped atomization from a platform.

  3. Atomic absorption spectroscopy with high temperature flames.

    PubMed

    Willis, J B

    1968-07-01

    An account is given of the history of the development of high temperature flames for the atomic absorption measurement of metals forming refractory oxides. The principles governing the design of premix burners for such flames, and the relative merits of different types of nebulizer burner systems are described. After a brief account of the structure and emission characteristics of the premixed oxygen-acetylene and nitrous oxide-acetylene flames, the scope and limitations of the latter flame in chemical analysis are discussed. PMID:20068790

  4. Continuum Absorption Coefficient of Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armaly, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of heat transfer to the heat shield of a Jupiter probe has been estimated to be one order of magnitude higher than any previously experienced in an outer space exploration program. More than one-third of this heat load is due to an emission of continuum radiation from atoms and ions. The existing computer code for calculating the continuum contribution to the total load utilizes a modified version of Biberman's approximate method. The continuum radiation absorption cross sections of a C - H - O - N ablation system were examined in detail. The present computer code was evaluated and updated by being compared with available exact and approximate calculations and correlations of experimental data. A detailed calculation procedure, which can be applied to other atomic species, is presented. The approximate correlations can be made to agree with the available exact and experimental data.

  5. On mathematical modelling of flameless combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, Marco; Schwoeppe, Patrick; Weber, Roman; Orsino, Stefano

    2007-07-15

    A further analysis of the IFRF semi-industrial-scale experiments on flameless (mild) combustion of natural gas is carried out. The experimental burner features a strong oxidizer jet and two weak natural gas jets. Numerous publications have shown the inability of various RANS-based mathematical models to predict the structure of the weak jet. We have proven that the failure is in error predictions of the entrainment and therefore is not related to any chemistry submodels, as has been postulated. (author)

  6. 2. VIEW IN ROOM 111, ATOMIC ABSORPTION BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS LABORATORY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW IN ROOM 111, ATOMIC ABSORPTION BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS LABORATORY. AIR FILTERS AND SWIPES ARE DISSOLVED WITH ACIDS AND THE REMAINING RESIDUES ARE SUSPENDED IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTION. THE SOLUTION IS PROCESSED THROUGH THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER TO DETECT THE PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF BERYLLIUM. - Rocky Flats Plant, Health Physics Laboratory, On Central Avenue between Third & Fourth Streets, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  7. Flameless thermal oxidation. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Flameless Thermal Oxidizer (FTO) is a commercial technology offered by Thermatrix, Inc. The FTO has been demonstrated to be an effective destructive technology for process and waste stream off-gas treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and in the treatment of VOC and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) off-gases generated during site remediation using either baseline or innovative in situ environmental technologies. The FTO process efficiently converts VOCs and CVOCs to carbon dioxide, water, and hydrogen chloride. When FTO is coupled with a baseline technology, such as soil vapor extraction (SVE), an efficient in situ soil remediation system is produced. The innovation is in using a simple, reliable, scalable, and robust technology for the destruction of VOC and CVOC off-gases based on a design that generates a uniform thermal reaction zone that prevents flame propagation and efficiently oxidizes off-gases without forming products of incomplete combustion (PICs).

  8. Flameless Thermal Oxidation. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Flameless Thermal Oxidizer (FTO) is a commercial technology offered by Thermatrix, Inc. The FTO has been demonstrated to be an effective destructive technology for process and waste stream off-gas treatment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and in the treatment of VOC and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) off-gases generated during site remediation using either baseline or innovative in situ environmental technologies. The FTO process efficiently converts VOCs and CVOCs to carbon dioxide, water, and hydrogen chloride. When FTO is coupled with a baseline technology, such as soil vapor extraction (SVE), an efficient in situ soil remediation system is produced. The innovation is in using a simple, reliable, scalable, and robust technology for the destruction of VOC and CVOC off-gases based on a design that generates a uniform thermal reaction zone that prevents flame propagation and efficiently oxidizes off-gases without forming products of incomplete combustion (Plcs ).

  9. Determination of iridium in mafic rocks by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Schnepfe, M.M.

    1970-01-01

    Iridium is determined in mineralized mafic rocks by atomic absorption after fire-assay concentration into a gold bead. Interelement interferences in the atomic-absorption determination are removed and Ir sensitivity is increased by buffering the solutions with a mixture of copper and sodium sulphates. Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Ho, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn and platinum metals can be tolerated in the atomic-absorption determination. The sensitivity and detection limits are 3.2 and 0.25 ppm of Ir, respectively. ?? 1970.

  10. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  11. Perfect electromagnetic absorption at one-atom-thick scale

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sucheng; Duan, Qian; Li, Shuo; Yin, Qiang; Lu, Weixin; Li, Liang; Hou, Bo; Gu, Bangming; Wen, Weijia

    2015-11-02

    We experimentally demonstrate that perfect electromagnetic absorption can be realized in the one-atom thick graphene. Employing coherent illumination in the waveguide system, the absorbance of the unpatterned graphene monolayer is observed to be greater than 94% over the microwave X-band, 7–13 GHz, and to achieve a full absorption, >99% in experiment, at ∼8.3 GHz. In addition, the absorption characteristic manifests equivalently a wide range of incident angle. The experimental results agree very well with the theoretical calculations. Our work accomplishes the broadband, wide-angle, high-performance absorption in the thinnest material with simple configuration.

  12. Ammonia chemistry in a flameless jet

    SciTech Connect

    Zieba, Mariusz; Schuster, Anja; Scheffknecht, Guenter; Brink, Anders; Hupa, Mikko

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, the nitrogen chemistry in an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) doped flameless jet is investigated using a kinetic reactor network model. The reactor network model is used to explain the main differences in ammonia chemistry for methane (CH{sub 4})-containing fuels and methane-free fuels. The chemical pathways of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) formation and destruction are identified using rate-of-production analysis. The results show that in the case of natural gas, ammonia reacts relatively late at fuel lean condition leading to high NO{sub x} emissions. In the pre-ignition zone, the ammonia chemistry is blocked due to the absence of free radicals which are consumed by methane-methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) conversion. In the case of methane-free gas, the ammonia reacted very rapidly and complete decomposition was reached in the fuel rich region of the jet. In this case the necessary radicals for the ammonia conversion are generated from hydrogen (H{sub 2}) oxidation. (author)

  13. Atomic-absorption determination of rhodium in chromite concentrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnepfe, M.M.; Grimaldi, F.S.

    1969-01-01

    Rhodium is determined in chromite concentrates by atomic absorption after concentration either by co-precipitation with tellurium formed by the reduction of tellurite with tin(II) chloride or by fire assay into a gold bead. Interelement interferences in the atomic-absorption determination are removed by buffering the solutions with lanthanum sulphate (lanthanum concentration 1%). Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ho, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn and platinum metals can be tolerated. A lower limit of approximately 0.07 ppm Rh can be determined in a 3-g sample. ?? 1969.

  14. Determination of palladium and platinum by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnepfe, M.M.; Grimaldi, F.S.

    1969-01-01

    Palladium and platinum are determined by atomic absorption after fire-assay concentration into a gold bead. The limit of determination is ~0??06 ppm in a 20-g sample. Serious depressive interelement interferences are removed by buffering the solutions with a mixture of cadmium and copper sulphates with cadmium and copper concentrations each at 0??5%. Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Co, Cr, Fe, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn, and the platinum metals do not interfere in the atomic-absorption determination. ?? 1969.

  15. Speciation of mercury compounds by differential atomization - atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.W.; Skelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the dual stage atomization technique which allows speciation of several mercury-containing compounds in aqueous solution and in biological fluids. The technique holds great promise for further speciation studies. Accurate temperature control, expecially at temperatures less than 200/sup 0/C, is needed to separate the extremely volatile mercury halides and simple organomercurials from each other. Studies with mercury salts and EDTA, L-cysteine and dithioxamide demonstrate that this technique may be used to study the extent of complex formation. Investigations of biological fluids indicate that there is a single predominant form of mercury in sweat and a single predominant form of mercury in urine. The mercury compound in urine is more volatile than that in sweat. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses are possible with this technique.

  16. COMPUTER-ASSISTED FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of furnace atomic absorption instrumentation with a turnkey chromatography data system is described. A simple addition of relays to the furnace power supply allows for automatic start-up of A/D conversion and spectrophotometer zeroing at the proper time. Manipulations inv...

  17. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  18. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  19. A COMPUTER CONTROL AND ACQUISITION SYSTEM FOR ATOMIC ABSORPTION DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A system is presented that controls and acquires data from a Perkin-Elmer 603 or similar atomic absorption spectrophotometer operating in the flame mode and equipped with a 200 place auto-sampler. The hardware consists of a PDP11 computer with minimum peripheral equipment and a s...

  20. Induced absorption and annihilation in hadronic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, Vladimir N.; Popov, Vladimir P.

    The induced absorption or annihilation in the collisions of the hydrogen hadronic atoms in the excited states with ordinary hydrogen have been described in a unified manner with the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation in the framework of a close-coupling approach including both the open and closed channels corresponding to both the stationary and non-stationary states of hadronic atom. The general features of the induced absorption cross sections have been studied in a wide range of the complex energy-shift values. The total and differential cross sections of all processes have been calculated for π - p, K - p, and bar p p atoms with the principal quantum numbers n = 2 - 8 and kinetic energy from 0.001 eV up to 100 eV.

  1. Induced absorption and annihilation in hadronic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, Vladimir N.; Popov, Vladimir P.

    2012-05-01

    The induced absorption or annihilation in the collisions of the hydrogen hadronic atoms in the excited states with ordinary hydrogen have been described in a unified manner with the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation in the framework of a close-coupling approach including both the open and closed channels corresponding to both the stationary and non-stationary states of hadronic atom. The general features of the induced absorption cross sections have been studied in a wide range of the complex energy-shift values. The total and differential cross sections of all processes have been calculated for π - p, K - p, and bar p p atoms with the principal quantum numbers n = 2 - 8 and kinetic energy from 0.001 eV up to 100 eV.

  2. Coherent Enhanced Absorption in an Intracavity Atomic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David D.; Myneni, Krishna; Chang, Hongrok; Odutola, Jamiu A.

    2011-05-01

    The conditions for coherent enhanced absorption of an intracavity atomic medium are discussed. For a symmetric cavity, a specific amplitude and phase relationship between two oppositely oriented input beams results in coherent perfect absorption by the medium. In contrast, for a single input beam, perfect absorption requires a perfectly asymmetric, i.e., single port, cavity. Even when the cavity is not perfectly asymmetric or lossless, we find that enhanced absorption can occur. For a single input to an asymmetric cavity, as the input intensity is increased and the medium saturates, the cavity passes from the over-coupled to the under-coupled regime. We find the counterintuitive result that the cavity absorptance can increase with increasing input intensity in the over-coupled regime, i.e., the atom-cavity system behaves as a reverse saturable absorber. These results were compared with measurements performed using a tunable laser incident on a Fabry-Perot cavity containing an Rb87 cell, taking into account the effects of saturation and beam divergence.

  3. [Application of atomic absorption spectrometry in the engine knock detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Dan

    2013-02-01

    Because existing human experience diagnosis method and apparatus for auxiliary diagnosis method are difficult to diagnose quickly engine knock. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to detect the automobile engine knock in in innovative way. After having determined Fe, Al, Cu, Cr and Pb content in the 35 groups of Audi A6 engine oil whose travel course is 2 000 -70 000 kilometers and whose sampling interval is 2 000 kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the database of primary metal content in the same automobile engine at different mileage was established. The research shows that the main metal content fluctuates within a certain range. In practical engineering applications, after the determination of engine oil main metal content and comparison with its database value, it can not only help to diagnose the type and location of engine knock without the disintegration and reduce vehicle maintenance costs and improve the accuracy of engine knock fault diagnosis. PMID:23697150

  4. Determination of nanogram amounts of bismuth in rocks by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Bismuth concentrations as low as 10 ng g-1 in 100-mg samples of geological materials can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. After HF-HClO4 decomposition of the sample, bismuth is extracted as the iodide into methyl isobutyl ketone and is then stripped with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid into the aqueous phase. Aliquots of this solution are pipetted into the graphite furnace and dried, charred, and atomized in an automated sequence. Atomic absorbance at the Bi 223.1-nm line provides a measure of the amount of bismuth present. Results are presented for 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. ?? 1979.

  5. Optimization of electrothermal atomization parameters for simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harnly, J.M.; Kane, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the acid matrix, the measurement mode (height or area), the atomizer surface (unpyrolyzed and pyrolyzed graphite), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the atomization temperature on the simultaneous electrothermal atomization of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn was examined. The 5% HNO3 matrix gave rise to severe irreproducibility using a pyrolyzed tube unless the tube was properly "prepared". The 5% HCl matrix did not exhibit this problem, and no problems were observed with either matrix using an unpyrolized tube or a pyrolyzed platform. The 5% HCl matrix gave better sensitivities with a pyrolyzed tube but the two matrices were comparable for atomization from a platform. If Mo and V are to be analyzed with the other seven elements, a high atomization temperature (2700??C or greater) is necessary regardless of the matrix, the measurement mode, the atomization mode, or the atomizer surface. Simultaneous detection limits (peak height with pyrolyzed tube atomization) were comparable to those of conventional atomic absorption spectrometry using electrothermal atomization above 280 nm. Accuracies and precisions of ??10-15% were found in the 10 to 120 ng mL-1 range for the analysis of NBS acidified water standards.

  6. A thin-walled metallic hollow cathode as an atomizer for Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeyev, A. A.; Sholupov, S. E.

    1998-03-01

    A new kind of glow discharge atomizer, a thin-walled metallic hollow cathode (TMHC) combined with Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry using high frequency modulated light polarization (ZAAS-HFM), is studied. A theoretically suggested, and experimentally confirmed, model of the atom confinement in the TMHC yields the appearance of the diffusion traps for atoms at both ends of the cathode, which increases the residence time of the analyte atoms in the analysis volume. The high atomization efficiency in the glow discharge atomizer (caused by the ionic-thermal mechanism of sputtering) and the high selectivity of ZAAS-HFM are demonstrated in the analysis of complex matrix samples such as whole blood and urine. The analytical system TMHC + ZAAS-HFM is characterized by low detection limits, which are comparable to those of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Owing to its rather low average power consumption (30-50 W) the TMHC can be used in a portable and mobile spectrometer, and is therefore suitable for the in situ analysis of various sample materials.

  7. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify and...

  8. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify and...

  9. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify and...

  10. 21 CFR 862.2850 - Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical... Laboratory Instruments § 862.2850 Atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer for clinical use is a device intended to identify and...

  11. Cinchocaine hydrochloride determination by atomic absorption spectrometry and spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour T; Youssef, Ahmed F A; Awady, Mohamed A

    2005-05-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures have been developed for determination of cinchocaine hydrochloride (Cin.Cl) in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The spectrophotometric method was based on formation of an insoluble colored ion-associate between the cited drug and tetrathiocyanatocobaltate (CoTC) or hexathiocyanatochromate (CrTC) which dissolved and extracted in an organic solvent. The optimal experimental conditions for quantitative extraction such as pH, concentration of the reagents and solvent were studied. Toluene and iso-butyl alcohol proved to be the most suitable solvents for quantitative extraction of Cin-CoTC and Cin-CrTC ion-associates with maximum absorbance at 620 and 555 nm, respectively. The optimum concentration ranges, molar absorptivities, Ringbom ranges and Sandell sensitivities were also evaluated. The atomic absorption spectrometric method is based on measuring of the excess cobalt or chromium in the aqueous solution, after precipitation of the drug, at 240.7 and 357.9 nm, respectively. Linear application ranges, characteristic masses and detection limits were 57.99-361.9, 50.40 and 4.22 microg ml(-1) of Cin.Cl, in case of CoTC, while 37.99-379.9, 18.94 and 0.81 microg ml(-1) in case of CrTC. PMID:15910814

  12. A Comprehensive X-Ray Absorption Model for Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorczyca, T. W.; Bautista, M. A.; Hasoglu, M. F.; Garcia, J.; Gatuzz, E.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kallman, T. R.; Manson, S. T.; Mendoza, C.; Raassen, A. J. J.; de Vries, C. P.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2013-01-01

    An analytical formula is developed to accurately represent the photoabsorption cross section of atomic Oxygen for all energies of interest in X-ray spectral modeling. In the vicinity of the K edge, a Rydberg series expression is used to fit R-matrix results, including important orbital relaxation effects, that accurately predict the absorption oscillator strengths below threshold and merge consistently and continuously to the above-threshold cross section. Further, minor adjustments are made to the threshold energies in order to reliably align the atomic Rydberg resonances after consideration of both experimental and observed line positions. At energies far below or above the K-edge region, the formulation is based on both outer- and inner-shell direct photoionization, including significant shake-up and shake-off processes that result in photoionization-excitation and double-photoionization contributions to the total cross section. The ultimate purpose for developing a definitive model for oxygen absorption is to resolve standing discrepancies between the astronomically observed and laboratory-measured line positions, and between the inferred atomic and molecular oxygen abundances in the interstellar medium from XSTAR and SPEX spectral models.

  13. The determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crump-Wiesner, Hans J.; Feltz, H.R.; Purdy, W.C.

    1971-01-01

    A standard addition method is described for the determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Sample pH is adjusted to 1.0 with concentrated hydrochloric acid and the vanadium is directly extracted with 5% cupferron in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The ketone layer is then aspirated into the flame and the recorded absorption values are plotted as a function of the concentration of the added metal. As little as 2.5 ??g l-1 of vanadium can be detected under the conditions of the procedure. Tungsten and tin interfere when present in excess of 5 and 10 ??g ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of the two interfering ions normally found in brines are well below interference levels. ?? 1971.

  14. Performance characteristics of an S-600 portable atomic absorption spectrophotometer

    SciTech Connect

    Pelieva, L.A.; Dyndar, Zh.I.

    1995-12-01

    Performance characteristics of an S-600 portable atomic absorption spectrophotometer are discussed. The optimum analysis conditions, characteristic mass, and detection limit for determining Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in solutions and in powders are specified. Direct analysis of solid-state samples (standard soil samples) is described. The relative error of measurement by the calibration graph method lies, with few exceptions, within 7-30%, and by the addition method, within 4-20%. The time needed for a single element determination is 10-20 min.

  15. A heated chamber burner for atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venghiattis, A A

    1968-07-01

    A new heated chamber burner is described. The burner is of the premixed type, and burner heads of the types conventionally used in atomic absorption may be readily adapted to it. This new sampling system has been tested for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Si, Ti, and Zn in aqueous solutions. An improvement of the order of ten times has been obtained in sensitivity, and in detection limits as well, for the elements determined. Interferences controllable are somewhat more severe than in conventional burners but are controllable. PMID:20068792

  16. Measuring Microwaves via Absorption and Dispersion in Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, Daniel; Kunz, Paul; Meyer, David; Solmeyer, Neal

    2016-05-01

    Weak microwave frequency electromagnetic fields can be difficult to detect and fully characterize with traditional methods. However it is possible to transduce the measurement of these fields from the microwave domain to the optical domain via resonant transitions between Rydberg levels in atomic vapors using electromagnetically-induced transparency and the Autler-Townes effect. This technique allows for sensitive measurements of the microwave field amplitude, polarization, and spatial waveform (via the position of the probe and coupling laser beams) as compared to measurements performed with dipole antennas. We are able to obtain these quantities by monitoring the properties of a probe laser beam as it passes through a rubidium vapor cell. Previous experiments using Rydberg spectroscopy have typically relied on measuring the absorption of the probe laser as it passed through the atomic system. We report on progress to use the polarization rotation of the probe as it passes through the atoms in a static magnetic field, which corresponds to the real part of the susceptibility of the atomic medium, for measuring the characteristics of a microwave frequency signal. This effect is known as Nonlinear Magneto Optical Rotation (NMOR) and has been used for sensitive magnetometry.

  17. Oscillator strength measurements of atomic absorption lines from stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, Alex

    2011-05-01

    Herein we develop a new method to determine oscillator strength values of atomic absorption lines with state-of-the-art detailed spectral synthesis calculations of the optical spectrum of the Sun and of standard spectral reference stars. We update the log(gf) values of 911 neutral lines observed in the KPNO-FTS flux spectrum of the Sun and high-resolution echelle spectra (R = 80 000) of Procyon (F5 IV-V) and Eps Eri (K2 V) observed with large signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of 2000 using the new Mercator-Hermes spectrograph at La Palma Observatory (Spain). We find for 483 Fe I, 85 Ni I, and 51 Si I absorption lines in the sample a systematic overestimation of the literature log(gf) values with central line depths below 15%. We employ a curve-of-growth analysis technique to test the accuracy of the new oscillator strength values and compare calculated equivalent line widths to the Moore, Minnaert, and Houtgast atlas of the Sun. The online SpectroWeb database at http://spectra.freeshell.org interactively displays the observed and synthetic spectra and provides the new log(gf) values together with important atomic line data. The graphical database is under development for stellar reference spectra of every spectral sub-class observed with large spectral resolution and S/N ratios.

  18. A comprehensive X-ray absorption model for atomic oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczyca, T. W.; Bautista, M. A.; Mendoza, C.; Hasoglu, M. F.; García, J.; Gatuzz, E.; Kaastra, J. S.; Raassen, A. J. J.; De Vries, C. P.; Kallman, T. R.; Manson, S. T.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2013-12-10

    An analytical formula is developed to accurately represent the photoabsorption cross section of O I for all energies of interest in X-ray spectral modeling. In the vicinity of the K edge, a Rydberg series expression is used to fit R-matrix results, including important orbital relaxation effects, that accurately predict the absorption oscillator strengths below threshold and merge consistently and continuously to the above-threshold cross section. Further, minor adjustments are made to the threshold energies in order to reliably align the atomic Rydberg resonances after consideration of both experimental and observed line positions. At energies far below or above the K-edge region, the formulation is based on both outer- and inner-shell direct photoionization, including significant shake-up and shake-off processes that result in photoionization-excitation and double-photoionization contributions to the total cross section. The ultimate purpose for developing a definitive model for oxygen absorption is to resolve standing discrepancies between the astronomically observed and laboratory-measured line positions, and between the inferred atomic and molecular oxygen abundances in the interstellar medium from XSTAR and SPEX spectral models.

  19. Organic solvents as interferents in arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with flame atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Dědina, Jiri; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Onor, Massimo; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2006-05-01

    Interference effects of various organic solvents miscible with water on arsenic determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry have been studied. Arsine was chemically generated in continuous flow hydride generation system and atomized by using a flame atomizer able to operate in two modes: miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-flame. The effects of experimental variables and atomization mode were investigated: tetrahydroborate and hydrochloric acid concentrations, argon, hydrogen and oxygen supply rates for the microflame, and the distance from the atomization region to the observation zone. The nature of the species formed in the flame due to the pyrolysis of organic solvent vapors entering the flame volume together with arsine is discussed. The observed signal depression in the presence of organic solvents has been mainly attributed to the atomization interference due to heterogeneous gas-solid reaction between the free arsenic atoms and finely dispersed carbon particles formed by carbon radicals recombination. The best tolerance to interferences was obtained by using flame-in-flame atomization (5-10 ml min - 1 of oxygen flow rate), together with higher argon and hydrogen supply rates and elevated observation heights.

  20. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  1. Direct analysis of solids by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a second surface atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rettberg, T.M.; Holcombe, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    The direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of solids using the second surface atomizer has been investigated. The atomizer features a gas-cooled Ta insert within the graphite furnace onto which the analyte can be condensed, after which atomization is performed by raising the furnace to a higher temperature and shutting off the coolant gas. The analyses were conducted on standard reference material fly ash, river sediment, and citrus leaves, in addition to filter paper samples. All analyses were conducted without sample pretreatment or use of matrix modifiers. Quantitation was done by using simple aqueous standards. By use of peak heights, the recoveries varied from 81% to 127%, although several determinations were within the certified concentration range. The procedures typically gave low background absorbances and peak shapes that were relatively independent of the original sample matrix.

  2. The role of atomic absorption spectrometry in geochemical exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.; O'Leary, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the principles of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and the basic hardware components necessary to make measurements of analyte concentrations. Then we discuss a variety of methods that have been developed for the introduction of analyte atoms into the light path of the spectrophotometer. This section deals with sample digestion, elimination of interferences, and optimum production of ground-state atoms, all critical considerations when choosing an AAS method. Other critical considerations are cost, speed, simplicity, precision, and applicability of the method to the wide range of materials sampled in geochemical exploration. We cannot attempt to review all of the AAS methods developed for geological materials but instead will restrict our discussion to some of those appropriate for geochemical exploration. Our background and familiarity are reflected in the methods we discuss, and we have no doubt overlooked many good methods. Our discussion should therefore be considered a starting point in finding the right method for the problem, rather than the end of the search. Finally, we discuss the future of AAS relative to other instrumental techniques and the promising new directions for AAS in geochemical exploration. ?? 1992.

  3. Preconcentration and Atomization of Arsane in a Dielectric Barrier Discharge with Detection by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Novák, Petr; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Atomization of arsane in a 17 W planar quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized, and its performance was compared to that of a multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (MMQTA) for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Argon, at a flow rate of 60 mL min(-1), was the best DBD discharge gas. Free As atoms were also observed in the DBD with nitrogen, hydrogen, and helium discharge gases but not in air. A dryer tube filled with NaOH beads placed downstream from the gas-liquid separator to prevent residual aerosol and moisture transport to the atomizer was found to improve the response by 25%. Analytical figures of merit were comparable, reaching an identical sensitivity of 0.48 s ng (-1) As in both atomizers and limits of detection (LOD) of 0.15 ng mL(-1) As in MMQTA and 0.16 ng mL(-1) As in DBD, respectively. Compared to MMQTA, DBD provided 1 order of magnitude better resistance to interference from other hydride-forming elements (Sb, Se, and Bi). Atomization efficiency in DBD was estimated to be 100% of that reached in the MMQTA. A simple procedure of lossless in situ preconcentration of arsane was developed. Addition of 7 mL min(-1) O2 to the Ar plasma discharge resulted in a quantitative retention of arsane in the optical arm of the DBD atomizer. Complete analyte release and atomization was reached as soon as oxygen was switched off. Preconcentration efficiency of 100% was observed, allowing a decrease of the LOD to 0.01 ng mL(-1) As employing a 300 s preconcentration period. PMID:27159266

  4. Simultaneous Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for Cadmium and Lead Determination in Wastewater: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, Paulo R. M.; Oliveira, Pedro V.

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead by multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with electrochemical atomization is proposed by employing a problem-based approach. The reports indicate that the students assimilated the principles of the simultaneous atomic absorption spectrometry (SIMAAS), the role of the chemical modifier, the…

  5. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry determination of molybdenum in whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguera, J. L.; Rondón, C.; Burguera, M.; Roa, M. E.; Petit de Peña, Y.

    2002-03-01

    A method for the determination of molybdenum in whole blood by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was developed and evaluated. Erbium (25 μg) was chosen from several potential chemical modifiers (Sm, Lu, Ho, Eu and Pd+Mg) as the most appropriate for the sensitive and reliable determination of molybdenum in such sample. The process used was direct dilution of the sample in a ratio 1:2 with a 0.1% (v/v) Triton X-100 solution. The injection of 20 μl of a solution of 15% (w/v) hydrogen peroxide and running the temperature program after 5 firings greatly reduced the effect of build-up of carbonaceous residues within the atomizer. The limit of detection and working ranges, respectively, were 0.6 and 2.0-100.0 μg l -1, and the characteristic mass was 7.2 pg. The relative standard deviation varied from 0.8 to 1.5% for within and between batch determinations, respectively. The determination of molybdenum in Seronorm™ Trace Elements in Whole Blood with known added amounts of the analyte was performed to asses the accuracy. The optimized procedure has been applied to the determination of molybdenum in whole blood specimens of 20 subjects taken before and 10-12 h after receiving an over-supply of 1 mg of molybdenum. The molybdenum concentrations (±S.D.) were 10.9±0.4 μg Mo l -1 (range 9.9-11.6 μg Mo l -1) and 15.4±0.4 μg Mo l -1 (range 13.1-16.9 μg Mo l -1) for the individuals before and after the administration of molybdenum.

  6. Modular L-design of hydride atomizers for atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řezáčová, Olga; Dědina, Jiří

    2009-07-01

    A novel modular L-shaped design of hydride atomizer for atomic absorption spectrometry is described. It makes it possible to replace the optical tube of the atomizer and, mainly, to employ optical tubes made also from other materials than fused quartz. The design is useful mainly for further improvement of hydride atomizers based on the multiatomizer concept. Employing selenium hydride as the analyte and arsine as the interferent, a preliminary evaluation of performance of three types of L-shaped multiatomizers based on various optical tubes in terms of sensitivity, linearity of calibration graph and resistance to atomization interferences is made. The "classical" T-shaped multiatomizer was employed as a reference. The L-shaped multiatomizer with the optical tube analogous to that employed in the "classical" T-shaped multiatomizer offers virtually the same performance as the reference multiatomizer. Optical tube made of fused quartz with holes with smaller diameters does not offer significantly better performance compared to the reference T-shaped multiatomizer. However, the L-shaped multiatomizer with optical tube fabricated from porous quartz glass overpowers all the other multiatomizers substantially in terms of the resistance against interferences: even the maximum As interferent concentration of 5 µg ml - 1 does not significantly influence the observed signal. This should be compared with multiatomizers based on plain fused quartz tubes with holes: tolerance limit around 0.5 µg ml - 1 ; interferent concentration of 1 µg ml - 1 causing 20% signal depression.

  7. Etalon-induced baseline drift and correction in atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of these sensors are strongly affected by baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability, which has not been previously considered, and cannot be corrected using existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5% which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  8. Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific, real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of the sensors are strongly affected by the long-term and short term baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability which has not been previously considered or corrected by existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5%, which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  9. Light absorption during alkali atom-noble gas atom interactions at thermal energies: a quantum dynamics treatment.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2006-10-21

    The absorption of light during atomic collisions is treated by coupling electronic excitations, treated quantum mechanically, to the motion of the nuclei described within a short de Broglie wavelength approximation, using a density matrix approach. The time-dependent electric dipole of the system provides the intensity of light absorption in a treatment valid for transient phenomena, and the Fourier transform of time-dependent intensities gives absorption spectra that are very sensitive to details of the interaction potentials of excited diatomic states. We consider several sets of atomic expansion functions and atomic pseudopotentials, and introduce new parametrizations to provide light absorption spectra in good agreement with experimentally measured and ab initio calculated spectra. To this end, we describe the electronic excitation of the valence electron of excited alkali atoms in collisions with noble gas atoms with a procedure that combines l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials, including two- and three-body polarization terms, and a treatment of the dynamics based on the eikonal approximation of atomic motions and time-dependent molecular orbitals. We present results for the collision induced absorption spectra in the Li-He system at 720 K, which display both atomic and molecular transition intensities. PMID:17059261

  10. Disposal of Liquid Combustible Wastes using Flameless Burners with Porous Carbon Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, Sergei; Savchenko, Evgenii; Khaustov, Sergei; Tabakaev, Roman; Zavorin, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Two modifications of flameless burners with a carbon porous media in the combustion area were investigated. Kerosene TS-1 and mixtures of highly flammable liquids wastes (HIL) were used as fuel. Experimental data are presented in a graphical form as plot of the burner thermal capacity. Results show capacity for of the developed devices and prove the prospects of disposal of liquid combustible wastes using flameless burners with porous carbon matrix.

  11. Determination of gold in geologic materials by solvent extraction and atomic-absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Claude; Mensik, J.D.; Riley, L.B.

    1967-01-01

    The two methods presented for the determination of traces of gold in geologic materials are the cyanide atomic-absorption method and the fire-assay atomic-absorption method. In the cyanide method gold is leached with a sodium-cyanide solution. The monovalent gold is then oxidized to the trivalent state and concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to estimation by atomic absorption. In the fire-assay atomic-absorption method, the gold-silver bead obtained from fire assay is dissolved in nitric and hydrochloric acids. Gold is then concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to determination by atomic absorption. By either method concentrations as low as 50 parts per billion of gold can be determined in a 15-gram sample.

  12. Performance of a flameless combustion furnace using biogas and natural gas.

    PubMed

    Colorado, A F; Herrera, B A; Amell, A A

    2010-04-01

    Flameless combustion technology has proved to be flexible regarding the utilization of conventional fuels. This flexibility is associated with the main characteristic of the combustion regime, which is the mixing of the reactants above the autoignition temperature of the fuel. Flameless combustion advantages when using conventional fuels are a proven fact. However, it is necessary to assess thermal equipments performance when utilizing bio-fuels, which usually are obtained from biomass gasification and the excreta of animals in bio-digesters. The effect of using biogas on the performance of an experimental furnace equipped with a self-regenerative Flameless burner is reported in this paper. All the results were compared to the performance of the system fueled with natural gas. Results showed that temperature field and uniformity are similar for both fuels; although biogas temperatures were slightly lower due to the larger amount of inert gases (CO(2)) in its composition that cool down the reactions. Species patterns and pollutant emissions showed similar trends and values for both fuels, and the energy balance for biogas showed a minor reduction of the efficiency of the furnace; this confirms that Flameless combustion is highly flexible to burn conventional and diluted fuels. Important modifications on the burner were not necessary to run the system using biogas. Additionally, in order to highlight the advantages of the Flameless combustion regime, some comparisons of the burner performance working in Flameless mode and working in conventional mode are presented. PMID:19944602

  13. Absorption-free Bragg reflector using Zeeman sublevels in atomic vapor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongjie; Luo, Bin; Guo, Hong

    2014-06-30

    Absorption-free Bragg reflector has been studied in ions doped in crystals. We propose a new scheme using Zeeman sublevels of atoms to construct an absorption-free Bragg reflector with practical laser power. Its spatial period of refractive index equals half of the wavelength of the incident standing-wave coupling light. The proposal is simulated in a helium atom scheme, and can be extended to alkali earth atoms. PMID:24977814

  14. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry of nickel in tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Sunderman, F W; Marzouk, A; Crisostomo, M C; Weatherby, D R

    1985-01-01

    A method for analysis of Ni concentrations in tissues is described, which involves (a) tissue dissection with metal-free obsidian knives, (b) tissue homogenization in polyethylene bags by use of a "Stomacher" blender, (c) oxidative digestion with mixed nitric, sulfuric, and perchloric acids, and (d) quantitation of Ni by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction. The detection limit for Ni in tissues is 10 ng per g, dry weight; the coefficient of variation ranges from 7 to 15 percent, depending on the tissue Ni concentration; the recovery of Ni added in concentration of 20 ng per g, dry weight, to kidney homogenates averages 101 +/- 8 percent (mean +/- SD). In control rats, Ni concentrations are highest in lung (102 +/- 39 ng per g, dry weight) and lowest in spleen (35 +/- 16 ng per g, dry wt.). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of control rats rank as follows: lung greater than heart greater than bone greater than kidney greater than brain greater than testis greater than fat greater than liver greater than spleen. In rats killed 24 h after sc injection of NiCl2 (0.125 mmol per kg, body weight) Ni concentrations are highest in kidney (17.7 +/- 2.5 micrograms per g, dry weight) and lowest in brain (0.38 +/- 0.14 micrograms per g, dry weight). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of NiCl2-treated rats rank as follows: kidney much greater than lung greater than spleen greater than testis greater than heart greater than fat greater than liver greater than bone greater than brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4037701

  15. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry of nickel in tissue homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Marzouk, A.; Crisostomo, M.C.; Weatherby, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for analysis of Ni concentrations in tissues is described, which involves (a) tissue dissection with metal-free obsidian knives, (b) tissue homogenization in polyethylene bags by use by a Stomacher blender, (c) oxidative digestion with mixed nitric, sulfuric, and perchloric acids, and (d) quantitation of Ni by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry with Zeeman background correction. The detection limit for Ni in tissues is 10 ng per g, dry weight; the coefficient of variation ranges from 7 to 15%, depending on the tissue Ni concentration; the recovery of Ni added in concentration of 20 ng per g, dry weight, to kidney homogenates averages 101 +/- 8% (mean +/-SD). In control rats, Ni concentrations are highest in lung (102 +/- 39 ng per g, dry weight) and lowest in spleen (35 +/- 16 ng per g, dry wt.). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of control rats rank as follows: lung > heart > bone > kidney > brain > testis > fat > liver > spleen. In rats killed 24 h after sc injection of NiCl/sub 2/ (0.125 mmol per kg, body weight) Ni concentrations are highest in kidney (17.7 +/- 2.5 ..mu..g per g, dry weight) and lowest in brain (0.38 +/- 0.14 ..mu..g per g, dry weight). In descending order of Ni concentrations, the tissues of NiCl/sub 2/-treated rats rank as follows: kidney >> lung > spleen > testis > heart > fat > liver > bone > brain. The present method fills the need for an accurate, sensitive, and practical technique to determine tissue Ni concentrations, with stringent precautions to minimize Ni contamination during tissue sampling and processing. 35 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  16. Element selective detection of molecular species applying chromatographic techniques and diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kunze, K; Zybin, A; Koch, J; Franzke, J; Miclea, M; Niemax, K

    2004-12-01

    Tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (DLAAS) combined with separation techniques and atomization in plasmas and flames is presented as a powerful method for analysis of molecular species. The analytical figures of merit of the technique are demonstrated by the measurement of Cr(VI) and Mn compounds, as well as molecular species including halogen atoms, hydrogen, carbon and sulfur. PMID:15561625

  17. Uranium isotopes quantitatively determined by modified method of atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. H.

    1967-01-01

    Hollow-cathode discharge tubes determine the quantities of uranium isotopes in a sample by using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Dissociation of the uranium atoms allows a large number of ground state atoms to be produced, absorbing the incident radiation that is different for the two major isotopes.

  18. Evaluation of electrochemical generation of volatile zinc hydride by heated quartz tube atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arbab-Zavar, Mohammad-Hossein; Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Youssefi, Abbas; Aliakbari, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical hydride generation (EcHG) as a sample introduction system for determination of zinc was developed. It was directly coupled to an electrically heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA) atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) system. The hydride generator is a laboratory-made semi-batch electrolytic cell that consists of a lead-tin alloy cathode and a platinum anode. The effects of typical parameters on the generation efficiency of the technique, such as types of cathode material and catholyte and anolyte solutions, were studied. The influences of numerical experimental operating parameters on the analytical signal were evaluated in detail and optimum conditions were obtained. The analytical figures of merit for the developed method were determined. The calibration curve was linear up to 300 ng mL(-1) of Zn. A concentration detection limit (3σ, n = 9) of 11 ng mL(-1) Zn and a relative standard deviation of 5.0% (RSD, n = 9) for 200 ng mL(-1) Zn were accessed. In addition, the susceptibility of interference from various ions was evaluated. The accuracy of the method was verified by determination of Zn in a certified reference material and in tap water. The achieved concentrations were found to be in good agreement with both the certified value and the data obtained using flame AAS. PMID:22790376

  19. Atomic-absorption determination of beryllium in geological materials by use of electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, E.Y.; Simon, F.O.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for the atomic-absorption determination of beryllium in geological materials, that utilizes electrothermal atomization after a separation by solvent extraction. Samples are decomposed with hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid in Teflon-lined pressure decomposition vessels. Beryllium is isolated by its extraction as beryllium acetylacetonate at pH 8 into xylene and back-extraction in 3M hydrochloric acid. The method has been successfully applied to the determination of beryllium in 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. Four subsamples from four bottles of each standard sample were analysed in random order. The mean beryllium contents (ppm) are: AGV-1, 1.98; PCC-1, 0.024; MAG-1, 2.84; BHVO-1, 0.90; DTS-1, 0.026; SCo-1, 1.74; SDC-1, 2.52; BCR-1, 1.44; GSP-1, 1.22; SGR-1, 0.86; QLO-1, 1.83; RGM-1, 2.21; STM-1, 8.75; G-2, 2.29. An analysis of variance shows that all the samples may be considered homogeneous at F0.95 except AGV-1 and DTS-1 which may be considered homogeneous at F0.99. ?? 1978.

  20. DETERMINATION OF TOTAL MERCURY IN FISH TISSUES USING PYROLYSIS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY WITH GOLD AMALGAMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid procedure for measuring total mercury in fish tissues is evaluated and
    compared with conventional techniques. Using an automated instrument incorporating combustion, preconcentration by amalgamation with gold, and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), mill...

  1. THE STANDARD CALIBRATION INSTRUMENT AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR THE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER. PART III: PROGRAM DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report contains complete documentation for the 15 programs and 11 data files of the EPA Atomic Absorption Instrument Automation System. The system incorporates the following major features: (1) multipoint calibration using first, second, or third degree regression or linear ...

  2. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 times 10 ^{17} and 9 times 10^{17} cm ^{-3}. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  3. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17)/cu cm. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  4. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3x10(exp 17) and 9x10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  5. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  6. Some interferences in atomic-absorption spectrometry and extraction of iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, M; Kihara, H; Suzuki, M; Takeuchi, T

    1970-09-01

    The effect of complexing agents on the atomic-absorption spectrometry of iron and copper extracts was investigated Thiocyanate complexes gave a marked depression of absorption by iron and copper, especially in fuel-rich flames. Chloride, diethyldithiocarbamate and hydroxyquinoline complexes of iron behaved alike, but differently from the thiocyanate complex. PMID:18960816

  7. Optimization of Pressurized Oxy4Combustion with Flameless Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Malavasi, Massimo; Landegger, Gregory

    2014-06-30

    Pressurized OxyECombustion is one of the most promising technologies for utilityEscale power generation plants. Benefits include the ability to burn low rank coal and capture C02. By increasing the flue gas pressure during this process, greater efficiencies are derived from increased quantity and quality of thermal energy recovery. UPA with modeling support from MIT and testing and data verification by Georgia Tech’s Research Center designed and built a 100kW system capable of demonstrating pressurized oxyEcombustion using a flameless combustor. Wyoming PRB coal was run at 15 and 32 bar. Additional tests were not completed but sampled data demonstrated the viability of the technology over a broader range of operating pressures, Modeling results illustrated a flat efficiency curve over 20 bar, with optimum efficiency achieved at 29 bar. This resulted in a 33% (HHV) efficiency, a 5 points increase in efficiency versus atmospheric oxyEcombustion, and a competitive cost of electricity plus greater C02 avoidance costs then prior study’s presented. UPA’s operation of the benchEscale system provided evidence that key performance targets were achieved: flue gas sampled at the combustor outlet had nonE detectable residual fly ashes, and low levels of SO3 and heavyEmetal. These results correspond to prior pressurized oxyEcombustion testing completed by IteaEEnel.

  8. Measurement of aluminum in neuronal tissues using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, K.B.; Evenson, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    Studies characterizing aluminum complexes isolated from neuronal tissues require accurate and precise techniques for aluminum measurement. A solution of 0.01 M nitric acid containing 0.2% Triton X-100 was the optimal diluent for aluminum measurement under the experimental conditions used. Three National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials (SRM) were digested, and the aluminum concentration of each was measured with a Perkin-Elmer 503 atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a Perkin-Elmer HGA 2100 controller. The calculated detection limit of aluminum was 120 pg using 15-..mu..L sample injections (8 ..mu..g/L). Aluminum concentrations present in citrus leaves (SRM 1572), pine needles (SRM 1575), and tomato leaves (SRM 1573) were 100 +- 12 (certified value, 92 +- 15), 522 +- 45 (certified value, 454 +- 30), and 1273 +- 112 (provisional value, 1200) ..mu..g/g, respectively. The within- and between-day precision had coefficients of variation for citrus leaves, pine needles, and tomato leaves of 18 and 12%, 6.3 and 8.6%, and 3.7 and 8.7%, respectively. Aluminum absorbance was enhanced at high pH values and by zinc.

  9. Absorption of twisted light by a mesoscopic atomic target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshkov, A. A.; Serbo, V. G.; Fritzsche, S.; Surzhykov, A.

    2016-06-01

    The excitation of a hydrogen-atom target by a twisted Bessel light beam is investigated. The atoms are assumed to have a Gaussian spatial distribution in the target. Theoretical analysis is performed within a nonrelativistic framework using a first-order perturbation approach and density matrix formalism. By using this theory, we derive the expressions for excitation cross sections and for alignment parameters of the excited atomic state. In particular, we make calculations for the 1s\\to 2p transition caused by the interaction of Bessel beams with the atomic target. For this transition, we analyze the population of magnetic sublevels for the excited 2p state and study how it is affected by the projection of the total angular momentum of incident light. The calculations indicate that the projection of the total angular momentum of the incident Bessel beam affects the alignment of atoms for sufficiently small targets with size less than 200 nm. This can be observed experimentally by measuring the linear polarization of the subsequent fluorescent light.

  10. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  11. Targeting Inaccurate Atomic Data in the Eta Car Ejecta Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. E.; Kober, G. Vieira; Gull, T. R.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.

    2006-01-01

    The input from the laboratory spectroscopist community has on many occasions helped the analysis of the eta Car spectrum. Our analysis has targeted spectra where improved wavelengths and oscillator strengths are needed. We will demonstrate how experimentally derived atomic data have improved our spectral analysis, and illuminate where more work still is needed.

  12. Determination of cadmium in biodiesel using microemulsion and electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, Adriana S; Silva, Deise G; Teixeira, Leonardo S G

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to prepare biodiesel microemulsions for the subsequent quantification of cadmium via graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The biodiesel samples were prepared using n-propanol as an emulsifier, 10% (v/v) nitric acid as the aqueous phase, and biodiesel. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to determine the microemulsion region with the specified components. The optimized conditions for microemulsion formation were 57.6% (v/v) n-propanol, 21.2% (v/v) biodiesel, and 21.2% (v/v) nitric acid solution. The stability of the microemulsified system was investigated using aqueous and organic standards, and the system was found to be stable for at least 240 min. The applied pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 800 and 2000 °C, respectively, and 5 μg of aluminum was used as the chemical modifier. The obtained limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.5 μg kg(-1), respectively, and the characteristic mass was 1.6 pg. The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (% R.S.D., n = 10), was 2.5% for a sample with a cadmium concentration of 6.5 μg kg(-1). The accuracy was determined from addition and recovery experiments, with results varying from 93 to 108% recovery. This study demonstrates that the proposed method based on the use of a microemulsion formation in sample preparation can be applied as an efficient alternative for the determination of cadmium in biodiesel by GFAAS. Cadmium determination in biodiesel samples of different origins (soybean, corn, cotton, and sunflower) was evaluated after acid digestion using the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique, and the obtained results were compared to the results obtained using the proposed method. The paired t test (95% confidence level) did not show significant differences. The concentrations of cadmium found ranged from 5.3 to 8.0 μg kg(-1). PMID:25381584

  13. Absorption of infrared radiation by electrons in the field of a neutral hydrogen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical expression for the absorption coefficient is developed from a relationship between the cross-section for inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and the cross-section for electron-atom momentum transfer; it is accurate for those photon frequencies v and temperatures such that hv/kT is small. The determination of the absorption of infrared radiation by free-free transitions of the negative hydrogen ion has been extended to higher temperatures. A simple analytical expression for the absorption coefficient has been derived.

  14. Gold volatile species atomization and preconcentration in quartz devices for atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Yasin; Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Kratzer, Jan; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The on-line atomization of gold volatile species was studied and the results were compared with thermodynamic calculations in several quartz atomizers, namely: diffusion flame, flame-in-gas-shield, flame-in-plain-tube, externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. Atomization mechanism in the explored devices is proposed, where volatile species are converted to thermodynamically stable AuH at elevated temperature over 500 °C and then atomized by an interaction with a cloud of hydrogen radicals. Because of its inherent simplicity and robustness, diffusion flame was employed as a reference atomizer. It yielded atomization efficiency of 70 to 100% and a very good long time reproducibility of peak area sensitivity: 1.6 to 1.8 s μg- 1. Six and eleven times higher sensitivity, respectively, was provided by atomizers with longer light paths in the observation volume, i.e. externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. The latter one, offering limit of detection below 0.01 μg ml- 1, appeared as the most prospective for on-line atomization. Insight into the mechanism of atomization of gold volatile species, into the fate of free atoms and into subsequent analyte transfer allowed to assess possibilities of in-atomizer preconcentration of gold volatile species: it is unfeasible with quartz atomizers but a sapphire tube atomizer could be useful in this respect.

  15. Real-time atomic absorption mercury continuous emission monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamzow, Daniel S.; Bajic, Stanley J.; Eckels, David E.; Baldwin, David P.; Winterrowd, Chris; Keeney, Robert

    2003-08-01

    A continuous emission monitor (CEM) for mercury (Hg) in combustor flue gas streams has been designed and tested for the detection of Hg by optical absorption. A sampling system that allows continuous introduction of stack gas is incorporated into the CEM, for the sequential analysis of elemental and total Hg. A heated pyrolysis tube is used in the system to convert oxidized Hg compounds to elemental Hg for analysis of total Hg; the pyrolysis tube is bypassed to determine the elemental Hg concentration in the gas stream. A key component of the CEM is a laboratory-designed and -assembled echelle spectrometer that provides simultaneous detection of all of the emission lines from a Hg pen lamp, which is used as the light source for the optical absorption measurement. This feature allows for on-line spectroscopic correction for interferent gases such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, typically present in combustion stack gas streams, that also absorb at the Hg detection wavelength (253.65 nm). This article provides a detailed description of the CEM system, the characteristics and performance of the CEM, and the results of field tests performed at the Environmental Protection Agency-Rotary Kiln at Research Triangle Park, NC.

  16. Chlorine analysis by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Koch, J; Zybin, A; Niemax, K

    2000-04-01

    The general characteristics of Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry (DLAAS) in low pressure plasmas particularly with respect to the detection of non-metals are comprehensively recapitulated and discussed. Furthermore, a detector, which is based on DLAAS in a microwave-induced low pressure plasma as an alternative technique for halogene-specific analysis of volatile compounds and polymeric matrices is described. The analytical capability of the technique is demonstrated on the chlorine-specific analysis of ablated polymer fragments as well as gas chromatographically separated hydrocarbons. Since the measurements were carried out by means of a balanced-heterodyne detection scheme, different technical noise contributions, such as laser excess and RAM noise could efficiently be suppressed and the registered absorption was limited only by the principal shot noise. Thus, in the case of the polymer analysis a chlorine-specific absolute detection limit of 10 pg could be achieved. Furthermore, fundamental investigations concerning the influence of hydrocarbons on the dissociation capability of the microwave induced plasma were performed. For this purpose, the carbon-, chlorine- and hydrogen-specific stoichiometry of the compounds were empirically determined. Deviations from the expected proportions were found to be insignificant, implying the possibility of internal standardization relative to the response of a reference sample. PMID:12953476

  17. Double tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometer based on an acousto-optic tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jora, M. Z.; Nóbrega, J. A.; Rohwedder, J. J. R.; Pasquini, C.

    2015-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometer based on a quartz acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) monochromator operating in the 271-453 nm range, is described. The instrument was tailored to study the formation and evolution of electrothermal atomic cloud induced either by one or two tungsten coils. The spectrometer also includes a fast response programmable photomultiplier module for data acquisition, and a power supply capable of driving two parallel tungsten coils independently. The atomization cell herein described was manufactured in PTFE and presents a new design with reduced size. Synchronization between the instant of power delivering to start the atomization process and the detection was achieved, allowing for monitoring the atomization and thermal events synchronously and in real time. Absorption signals can be sampled at a rate of a few milliseconds, compatible with the fast phenomena that occur with electrothermal metallic atomizers. The instrument performance was preliminarily evaluated by monitoring the absorption of radiation of atomic clouds produced by standard solutions containing chromium or lead. Its quantitative performance was evaluated by using Cr aqueous solutions, resulting in detection limits as low as 0.24 μg L- 1, and a relative standard deviation of 3%.

  18. Susceptibility of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) life stages to flameless catalytic infrared radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The susceptibility of various life stages of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), a pest of stored wheat, to flameless catalytic infrared radiation in the 3 to 7 µm range was evaluated in the laboratory. Immature stages were collected from flour infested with T. castaneum adults only ...

  19. Effects of flameless catalytic infrared radiation on Sitophilus oryzae (L.) life stages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory bench top flameless catalytic infrared emitter was evaluated against all life stages of the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.), an insect species associated with stored wheat. The infrared radiation emitted was in the 3 to 7 µm range. A non-contact infrared thermometer measured grain t...

  20. Transient dispersion and absorption in a V-shaped atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahrai, M.; Maleki, A.; Hemmati, R.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical behavior of the dispersion and the absorption in a V-type three level atomic system. It is shown that in the presence of decay-induced interference the probe dispersion and absorption are phase dependent. We find that an incoherent pumping field provides an additional control parameter for switching the group velocity of a light pulse. The required switching times for switching the group velocity of a probe field from subluminal to superluminal pulse propagation is then discussed.

  1. Laboratory atomic transition data for precise optical quasar absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Berengut, Julian C.

    2014-02-01

    Quasar spectra reveal a rich array of important astrophysical information about galaxies which intersect the quasar line of sight. They also enable tests of the variability of fundamental constants over cosmological time- and distance-scales. Key to these endeavours are the laboratory frequencies, isotopic and hyperfine structures of various metal-ion transitions. Here, we review and synthesize the existing information about these quantities for 43 transitions which are important for measuring possible changes in the fine-structure constant, α, using optical quasar spectra, i.e. those of Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Zn. We also summarize the information currently missing that precludes more transitions being used. We present an up-to-date set of coefficients, q, which define the sensitivity of these transitions to variations in α. New calculations of isotopic structures and q-coefficients are performed for Si II and Ti II, including Si II λ1808 and Ti IIλλ1910.6/1910.9 for the first time. Finally, simulated absorption-line spectra are used to illustrate the systematic errors expected if the isotopic/hyperfine structures are omitted from profile fitting analyses. To ensure transparency, repeatability and currency of the data and calculations, we supply a comprehensive data base as Supporting Information. This will be updated as new measurements and calculations are performed.

  2. Comparison of liposome entrapment parameters by optical and atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Yoss, N L; Popescu, O; Pop, V I; Porutiu, D; Kummerow, F A; Benga, G

    1985-01-01

    Methods for the complete characterization of liposomes prepared by ether-injection are described in detail. The validity of atomic absorption spectrophotometry for measuring markers of trapped volume was checked by comparative determinations of markers with established optical spectrophotometrical methods. The favorable results using atomic absorption spectrophotometry to quantitate the marker Mn2+ are of particular relevance as manganese ion is also the paramagnetic probe in n.m.r. measurements of water permeability of liposomes; our results indicate that in such measurements no other marker need be incorporated. PMID:3986305

  3. Effective Atomic Numbers of Lanthanides with Gamma Radiation for Photon Energy Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, ZPEA,eff have been calculated for photon from 1 keV to 20 MeV for selected oxides of lanthanides, such as Lanthanum oxide, Cerium oxide, Samarium oxide, Europium oxide, Dysprosium oxide, Thulium oxide, Ytterbium oxide. The ZPEA,eff values then compared with ZPI,eff for photon interaction. The ZPEA,eff values have been found to change with energy and composition of selected lanthanides. Oxides of lanthanides are considered as better shielding materials to the exposure of gamma radiation. The values of effective atomic number for photon energy absorption help in the calculation of absorbed dose.

  4. Determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins by carbon furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, J M; Campbell, W C

    1976-01-01

    A carbon furnace atomic absorption procedure is described for the determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins, fratercula arctica. Samples are dried and weighed and 2 to 100 mg are dissolved in sulphuric and nitric acids. These solutions are analysed directly in the carbon furnace against aqueous standards and provide accurate results in the range 0-1 to 100 micrograms/g dry weight. The method is simple and rapid and requires much less of the small total sample than would be required for flame atomic absorption. PMID:1030692

  5. Methods for analysis of selected metals in water by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Marvin J.; Downs, Sanford C.

    1966-01-01

    This manual describes atomic-absorption-spectroscopy methods for determining calcium, copper, lithium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium, strontium and zinc in atmospheric precipitation, fresh waters, and brines. The procedures are intended to be used by water quality laboratories of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. Detailed procedures, calculations, and methods for the preparation of reagents are given for each element along with data on accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. Other topics discussed briefly are the principle of atomic absorption, instrumentation used, and special analytical techniques.

  6. Observing random walks of atoms in buffer gas through resonant light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kenichiro; Mitsui, Takahisa

    2016-07-01

    Using resonant light absorption, random-walk motions of rubidium atoms in nitrogen buffer gas are observed directly. The transmitted light intensity through atomic vapor is measured, and its spectrum is obtained, down to orders of magnitude below the shot-noise level to detect fluctuations caused by atomic motions. To understand the measured spectra, the spectrum for atoms performing random walks in a Gaussian light beam is computed, and its analytical form is obtained. The spectrum has 1 /f2 (f is frequency) behavior at higher frequencies, crossing over to a different, but well-defined, behavior at lower frequencies. The properties of this theoretical spectrum agree excellently with the measured spectrum. This understanding also enables us to obtain the diffusion constant, the photon cross section of atoms in buffer gas, and the atomic number density from a single spectral measurement. We further discuss other possible applications of our experimental method and analysis.

  7. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications. PMID:23171130

  8. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of microgram quantities of copper in tea after solvent extraction.

    PubMed

    Aziz-Alrahman, A M

    1985-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrophotometric method is described for determining trace amounts of copper in tea. The method is based on the solvent extraction of the metal as tetraiodocuprate (I), from 2 M HCl solutions of tea samples which contain 12% (w/v) KI, into methylisobutyl ketone. The organic extracts, containing the ion-association complex of copper are atomized into an air-acetylene flame. The limit of detection is 1.14 micrograms g-1 Cu. PMID:4077371

  9. Investigations on Freon-assisted atomization of refractory analytes (Cr, Mo, Ti, V) in multielement electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Hans-Joachim; Matschat, Ralf

    2007-08-01

    Premixed 1% Freon in argon inner gas of various composition (CCl 2F 2, CHClF 2, CHF 3) was applied to graphite furnace atomizer to minimize unfavorable effects of carbide formation, such as signal tailing and memory effects in the simultaneous determination of Cr, Mo, Ti and V refractory analytes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using a multielement atomic absorption spectrometer. The effect of these gaseous additives was investigated when applied separately in atomization, pyrolysis and clean-out steps. The halogenation effects were analytically useful only under the precondition of using Ar-H 2 outer gas to the furnace to all heating steps, and also using this gas in the pre-atomization (drying, pyrolysis) steps. Optimum analytical performance was obtained when mixtures of 1% Freon in argon were applied just before and during the atomization step at a flow rate of 50 mL min - 1 and 2% hydrogen was used as purge gas. Using optimum conditions, signal tailings and carry-over contamination were reduced effectively and good precision (relative standard deviation below 1%) could be attained. Applying 1% CHClF 2 and an atomization temperature of 2550 °C, the characteristic masses obtained for simple aqueous solutions were 8.8 pg for Cr, 17 pg for Mo, 160 pg for Ti, and 74 pg for V. The limits of detection were 0.05, 0.2, 2.3 and 0.5 μg L - 1 for Cr, Mo, Ti and V, respectively. The developed method was applied to the analysis of digests of advanced ceramics. The accuracy of the procedure was confirmed by analyzing the certified reference material ERM-ED 102 (Boron Carbide Powder) and a silicon nitride powder distributed in the inter-laboratory comparison CCQM-P74.

  10. Determination of arsenic and selenium in environmental and agricultural samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hershey, J.W.; Oostdyk, T.S.; Keliher, P.N.

    1988-11-01

    Agricultural and environmental samples are digested with acid, and arsenic and selenium are determined using hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Interelement interferences are eliminated by high acid concentrations or cation-exchange resins. Agreement with standard reference material is excellent. The technique is also applied to actual samples.

  11. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT ARSENICALS BY PH-SELECTIVE HYDRIDE GENERATION-ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory


    A method based on pH-selective generation and separation of arsines is commonly used for analysis of inorganic, methylated, and dimethylated trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). We have optimized this method to pe...

  12. A COMPUTER INTERFACE FOR A PERKIN-ELMER 5000 ATOMIC ABSORPTION INSTRUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document contains a detailed description of an ASCII Character Buffer Interface designed to store and forward serial ASCII data received from an EIA RS-232C Interface. The particular application described herein concerns a Perkin-Elmer Model 5000 Atomic Absorption instrument...

  13. [Determination of lead in beard hair by atomic absorption spectrometry (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Graef, V

    1976-04-01

    The lead content of hair from the electric razor can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, using the micro-sampling technique of Delves. 1--5 mg of the washed and dried hair are partially oxidized with hydrogen peroxide prior to analysis. The method is simple and quick and therefore suited for the serial investigation of persons exposed to lead. PMID:1271019

  14. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  15. The Use of an Air-Natural Gas Flame in Atomic Absorption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melucci, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    Points out that excellent results are obtained using an air-natural gas flame in atomic absorption experiments rather than using an air-acetylene flame. Good results are obtained for alkali metals, copper, cadmium, and zinc but not for the alkaline earths since they form refractory oxides. (Author/JN)

  16. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  17. [Determination of sulfur in plant using a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Jia-xi

    2009-05-01

    A method for the analysis of sulfur (S) in plant by molecular absorption of carbon monosulfide (CS) using a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer (CS AAS) with a fuel-rich air/acetylene flame has been devised. The strong CS absorption band was found around 258 nm. The half-widths of some absorption bands were of the order of picometers, the same as the common atomic absorption lines. The experimental procedure in this study provided optimized instrumental conditions (the ratio of acetylene to air, the burner height) and parameters, and researched the spectral interferences and chemical interferences. The influence of the organic solvents on the CS absorption signals and the different digestion procedures for the determination of sulfur were also investigated. The limit of detection achieved for sulfur was 14 mg x L(-1), using the CS wavelength of 257. 961 nm and a measurement time of 3 s. The accuracy and precision were verified by analysis of two plant standard reference materials. The major applications of this method have been used for the determination of sulfur in plant materials, such as leaves. Compared to the others, this method for the analysis of sulfur is rapid, easy and simple for sulfur determination in plant. PMID:19650504

  18. Multielement continuum-source atomic-absorption spectrometry with an echelle-spectrometer/image-dissector system.

    PubMed

    Masters, R; Hsiech, C; Pardue, H L

    1989-01-01

    The continued development of the echelle-spectrometer/image-dissector system for multielement determination by continuum-source atomic-absorption spectrometry is presented. Modifications of the instruments include the use of a 20-groove/mm echelle grating blazed at 76 degrees , and the removal of the magnetic shield from the image dissector. The spectral range is from 300 to 430 nm and the observed resolution is better than 0.005 nm at 400 nm. Calibration curves are linear up to an absorbance of 0.2, and absorption sensitivities are up to 4-fold better than with the previous design. Fundamental characteristics of the detector limit the application of the instrument to sequential single-element quantifications with the electrothermal atomizer, and to sequential multielement quantification with the flame atomizer. The further development of the instrument for simultaneous multielement qualification is discussed. PMID:18964682

  19. Enhanced Reverse Saturable Absorption and Optical Limiting in Heavy-Atom Substituted Phthalocyanines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. W.; Mansour, K.; Marder, S. R.; Alvarez, D., Jr.; Perry, K. J.; Choong, I.

    1994-01-01

    The reverse saturable absorption and optical limiting response of metal phthalocyaninies can be enhanced by using the heavy-atom effect. Phthalocyanines containing heavy metal atoms, such as In, Sn, and Pb show nearly a factor of two enhancement in the ratio of effective excited-state to ground-state absorption cross sections compared to those containing lighter atoms, such as Al and Si. In an f/8 optical geometry, homogeneous solutions of heavy metal phthalocyanines, at 30% linear transmission, limit 8-ns, 532-nm laser pulses to less than or equal to 3 (micro)J (the energy for 50% probability of eye damage) for incident pulses up to 800 (micro)J.

  20. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma atomizer for hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry-Performance evaluation for selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duben, Ondřej; Boušek, Jaroslav; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Atomization of selenium hydride in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized and its performance was compared to that of the externally heated quartz multiatomizer. Argon was found as the best DBD discharge gas employing a flow rate of 75 ml min- 1 Ar while the DBD power was optimized at 14 W. The detection limits reached 0.24 ng ml- 1 Se in the DBD and 0.15 ng ml- 1 Se in the multiatomizer. The tolerance of DBD to interferences is even better than with the multiatomizer.

  1. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  2. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-01

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor. PMID:26938713

  3. Analytical control of wollastonite for biomedical applications by use of atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Aza, P N; Guitián, F; De Aza, S; Valle, F J

    1998-04-01

    Preliminary in vitro experiments revealed that wollastonite (CaSiO3) is a potentially highly bioactive material that forms a hyroxyapatite (HA) surface layer on exposure to simulated body fluid with an ion concentration, pH and temperature virtually identical with those of human blood plasma. The formation of the HA layer is an essential requirement for an artificial material to be used as bioactive bone substitute. This finding opens up a wide field for biomedical applications of wollastonite. Biomaterials used as implants in the human body require strict control of trace elements and of the toxic species specified in American Society for Testing and Materials F-1185-88 (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) in ceramic hydroxyapatite for surgical implantation. In this work, two types of pseudowollastonite, the high temperature form of wollastonite, were analysed by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, in order to determine the elements stated in the above-mentioned norm, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry to establish the SiO2/CaO ratio of the two materials and analyse for all other impurities introduced by the raw materials and by the processes of synthesis, sintering and grinding. Barium and Mg were especially prominent in raw materials, and Zr, Y, Mg, W, Co and Ni come mainly from the processing. PMID:9684401

  4. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-04-24

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Li, G.

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  6. Atomic calculations and search for variation of the fine-structure constant in quasar absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    A brief review of the search for variation of the fine structure constant in quasar absorption spectra is presented. Special consideration is given to the role of atomic calculations in the analysis of the observed data. A range of methods which allow to perform calculations for atoms or ions with different electron structure and which cover practically all periodic table of elements is discussed. Critical compilation of the results of the calculations as well as a review of the most recent results of the analysis are presented.

  7. Three-photon-absorption resonance for all-optical atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Taichenachev, Aleksei V.; Yudin, Valeriy I.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.

    2005-07-15

    We report an experimental study of an all-optical three-photon-absorption resonance (known as an 'N resonance') and discuss its potential application as an alternative to atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping. We present measurements of the N-resonance contrast, width and light shift for the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with varying buffer gases, and find good agreement with an analytical model of this resonance. The results suggest that N resonances are promising for atomic clock applications.

  8. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of Metastable Atoms in Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Tung Do; Hippler, Rainer

    2008-09-07

    Spatial density profile of neon metastable produced in dusty plasma was investigated by means of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The line averaged measured density drops about 30% with the presence of dust particles. The observations provide evidence for a significant interaction between atoms and powder particles which are important for energy transfer from plasma to particles. The power per unit area absorbed by dust particles due to the collision of metastable atoms with dust particle surface is about some tens of mW/m{sup 2}.

  9. Evaluation of quartz tubes as atomization cells for gold determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzan, Ezequiel; Piano, Ornela; Stripeikis, Jorge; Tudino, Mabel

    2012-11-01

    This work describes the development of a new analytical procedure able to determine gold by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) using nickel tubes (NiT) and quartz tubes (QT) as atomization cells. Experiments involving changes in the flow injection operational parameters, reagent concentrations and sizes of the QT were performed in order to optimize sensitivity. Under the same operational conditions, it was observed that the employment of QT increases the sensitivity of gold determination when compared to the nickel tube. Since solutions of highly concentrated hydrochloric acid showed the best performance as carriers, quartz tubes were also preferred due to its greater tolerance to corrosion by mineral acids in comparison to NiT. In addition, changes in the internal diameter of the QT revealed an important improvement in sensitivity for smaller tubes. Under optimized conditions the main figures of merit showed values close to that of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with the addition of an excellent improvement of the sample throughput. They are: LOD (3 s): 0.004 μg mL- 1, sensitivity: 0.306 (μg mL- 1)- 1, RSD% (n = 10, 1 μg mL- 1): 2.5, linear range: 0.01-4 μg mL- 1 and sample throughput: 72 h- 1. This new method was employed for the determination of gold in homeopathic medicines with no need of sample digestion. Validation of the analytical results will be shown. A full discussion of the most relevant findings regarding the role of the atomization cell as a strategic key for improving sensitivity will be also provided.

  10. Electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of lead in urine: results of an interlaboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Slavin, Walter

    1999-05-01

    Results of an interlaboratory study are reported for the determination of lead in urine. Two levels of a lyophilized material containing biologically-bound lead were prepared using pooled urine obtained from lead-poisoned children undergoing the CaNa 2EDTA mobilization test. The materials were circulated to a group of reference laboratories that participate in the `New York State Proficiency Testing Program for Blood Lead'. Results of the initial round-robin gave all-method consensus target values of 145±22 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 17 and 449±43 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 20. The interlaboratory exercise was repeated some 5 years later and consensus target values were re-calculated using the grand mean (excluding outliers) of results reported by laboratories using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The re-calculated target values were 139±10 μg/l (S.D.) and 433±12 μg/l (S.D.). The urine reference materials were also analyzed for lead by several laboratories using other instrumental techniques including isotope dilution (ID), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), flame atomic absorption with extraction, ICP-atomic emission spectrometry, ID-gas chromatography MS and flow injection-hydride generation AAS, thus providing a rich source of analytical data with which to characterize them. The materials were also used in a long-term validation study of an ETAAS method developed originally for blood lead determinations that has since been used unmodified for the determination of lead in urine also. Recently, urine lead method performance has been tracked in a proficiency testing program specifically for this analysis. In addition, a number of commercial control materials have been analyzed and evaluated.

  11. Determination of iodine in seaweed and table salt by an indirect atomic-absorption method.

    PubMed

    Wifladt, A M; Lund, W; Bye, R

    1989-03-01

    Decomposition methods based on fusion with alkali are discussed, with respect to the determination of iodine in biological material. It is shown that sodium hydroxide can be used for the decomposition of seaweed without loss of iodine. In spite of the oxidizing conditions, the iodine will be present as iodide in the final ash. The iodide can be determined by an indirect atomic-absorption method, based on the reaction between iodide and mercury(II), with determination of mercury by cold vapour atomic-absorption spectrometry. The basis of the method is discussed, and it is shown that the use of tin(II) as reductant is essential. The effect of the oxidation state of the iodine on the sensitivity of the method is pointed out. High concentrations of chloride interfere, but it is still possible to determine iodide in iodinated table salt. PMID:18964724

  12. Determination of tetraalkyllead compounds in gasoline by liquid chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messman, J.D.; Rains, T.C.

    1981-01-01

    A liquid chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry (LC-AAS) hybrid analytical technique is presented for metal speciation measurements on complex liquid samples. The versatility and inherent metal selectivity of the technique are Illustrated by the rapid determination of five tetraalkyllead compounds in commercial gasoline. Separation of the individual tetraalkyllead species is achieved by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using an acetonitrile/water mobile phase. The effluent from the liquid Chromatograph Is introduced directly into the aspiration uptake capillary of the nebulizer of an air/acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Spectral interferences due to coeluting hydrocarbon matrix constituents were not observed at the 283.3-nm resonance line of lead used for analysis. Detection limits of this LC-AAS hydrid analytical technique, based on a 20-??L injection, are approximately 10 ng Pb for each tetraalkyllead compound.

  13. Studies on mass energy-absorption coefficients and effective atomic energy-absorption cross sections for carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladhaf, Bibifatima M.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2015-04-01

    We measured here the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of carbohydrates, Esculine (C15H16O9), Sucrose (C12H22O11), Sorbitol (C6H14O6), D-Galactose (C6H12O6), Inositol (C6H12O6), D-Xylose (C5H10O5) covering the energy range from 122 keV up to 1330 keV photon energies by using gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI(Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 8.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the total attenuation cross-section (σtot), molar extinction coefficients (ε), mass-energy absorption coefficients (μen/ρ) and effective (average) atomic energy-absorption cross section (σa,en) of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  14. Observation of an electromagnetically induced change of absorption in multilevel rubidium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Qing; Jin, Shao-Zheng; Xiao, Min

    1995-03-01

    A 64.4% reduction in absorption at the rubidium D2 line is observed when a pumping field at 775.8 nm is tuned on resonance to the transition between the excited states 5P3/2 and 5D5/2. As the pumping field is tuned off resonance, an absorption peak appears at the side of the Doppler-broadened D2 line. This modification in absorption is related to pumping-induced atomic coherence in this three-level ladder-type system. This experiment is done in a Rb vapor cell at room temperature and with cw diode lasers for both pumping and probe beams in a Doppler-free configuration.

  15. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  16. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Proposal for efficient two-dimensional atom localization using probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Xiong Hao; Zhang Duo

    2011-10-15

    The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is explored by monitoring the probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic medium under the action of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Because of the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the information about the position of the atom can be obtained via the absorption measurement of the weak probe field. It is found that the localization behavior is significantly improved due to the joint quantum interference induced by the standing-wave and microwave-driven fields. Most importantly, the atom can be localized at a particular position and the maximal probability of finding the atom in one period of the standing-wave fields reaches unity by properly adjusting the system parameters. The proposed scheme may provide a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization.

  18. Determination of ytterbium in animal faeces by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lima, E C; Krug, F J; Nóbrega, J A; Nogueira, A R

    1998-11-01

    A method for ytterbium determination in animal faeces by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (TCAAS) was developed. Faeces were dry-ashed in a muffle furnace, the ashes were treated with hydrochloric acid, and 10 mul of sample solution were delivered into 150-W tungsten coil atomizer. A matrix-matching procedure employing a 66-s heating program proved to be efficient for obtaining accurate results. Characteristic mass and detection limit were 7.1 pg and 0.35 mug g(-1) Yb, respectively. The tungsten coil atomizer lifetime exceeded 300 firings with digested solutions and R.S.D. of measurements was 1.9% after ten consecutive injections of 10.0 mug l(-1) Yb. Accuracy of the proposed method was assessed by employing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric procedure. Application of the paired t-test did not reveal any significant difference for ytterbium contents determined by both methods at 95% confidence level. It was demonstrated that the proposed procedure can successfully be used for evaluation of kinetic passage rate of feed through digestive tract of animals. PMID:18967363

  19. Determination of selenium using atomically imprinted polymer (AIP) and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Grazielle Cabral; do Lago, Ayla Campos; Chaves, Arley Alves; Fadini, Pedro Sergio; Luccas, Pedro Orival

    2013-03-20

    This paper describes selenium determination based on Se(0) preconcentration in the imprinted polymer (synthesized with 2.25mmol SeO2, 4-vinylpyridine and 1-vinylimidazole) with subsequent detection on-line in HG-FAAS. During the synthesis, SeO2 is reduced to Se (0). Therefore, there are no MIP neither IIP in the present work, thus we denominated: AIP, i.e., atomically imprinted polymers. For the optimization of analytical parameters Doehlert design was used. The method presented limit of detection and limit of quantification of 53 and 177ngL(-1), respectively, and linear range from 0.17 up to 6μgL(-1) (r=0.9936). The preconcentration factor (PF), consumptive index (CI) and concentration efficiency (CE) were 232; 0.06mL and 58min(-1) respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine Se in Brazil nuts (0.33±0.03mgkg(-1)), apricot (0.46±0.02mgkg(-1)), white bean (0.47±0.03mgkg(-1)), rice flour (0.47±0.02mgkg(-1)) and milk powder (0.22±0.01mgkg(-1)) samples. It was possible to do 12 analyzes per hour. Accuracy was checked and confirmed by analyzing certified reference material (DORM-2, dogfish muscle), and samples precision was satisfactory with RSD lower than 10%. PMID:23473247

  20. A metallic furnace atomizer in hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry: Determination of bismuth and selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Aline; Kim, Manuela Leticia; Tudino, Mabel Beatriz; Baccan, Nivaldo; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2008-08-01

    A flow injection hydride generation system with a metal furnace atomizer (Inconel 600® alloy) was employed for Bi and Se determination. The presented methods have linear ranges up to 200 and 500 μg L - 1 for Bi and Se, respectively, with good linearities ( r2 = 0.9997 and 0.9974, respectively). The limits of quantification obtained according to IUPAC recommendations were 2.3 μg L - 1 for Bi and 6 μg L - 1 for Se, and the relative standard deviations ( N = 6) based on Bi and Se analytical responses from real samples were 2.7% and 10%, respectively. Accuracy evaluations were based on certified materials such as SRM 361, SRM 363, and SRM 364 (steel alloys) for Bi, Mess-3 (marine sediment), SRM 397 (human hair), and Bio-Rad2 — 69042 (urine) for Se. Good agreements between the results were obtained at the 95% confidence level, according to the t-test.

  1. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusiewicz, Henryk; Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2007-03-01

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation — integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H 2Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangements (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an "integrated trap") was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3 σ), was 0.9 ng mL - 1 for Te. For a 2 min in situ pre-concentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation — atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% ( n = 6) for Te. The designs studied include slotted tube, single silica tube and integrated atom trap-cooled atom traps. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  2. Determination of trace and minor elements in alloys by atomic-absorption spectroscopy using an induction-heated graphite-well furnace as atom source-II.

    PubMed

    Ashy, M A; Headridge, J B; Sowerbutts, A

    1974-06-01

    Results are presented for the atomic-absorption spectrophotometric determination of zinc in aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloys, and aluminium, antimony and tin in steels, by means of solid samples dropped into an induction-heated graphite-well furnace to produce the atomic vapour. PMID:18961510

  3. Microplasmas as vacuum ultraviolet source for Cl-atom density measurements by resonance absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Virginie; Bauville, Gérard; Sadeghi, Nader; Puech, Vincent

    2011-11-01

    A micro-hollow cathode discharge was used to generate radiation on the chlorine atom resonance lines. Such radiation could be used to measure, by resonance absorption spectroscopy, the density of chlorine atoms in either ground state (3p5 2P3/2) or in the fine structure metastable state (3p5 2P1/2), which is located at 882.35 cm-1. Among the nine analysed lines in the 132-142 nm spectral region, only those at 137.953 and 139.653 nm, which are strong enough and are not affected by the self-absorption, can be used for the resonance absorption diagnostic of the ground state and the metastable state, respectively. The best operating conditions of the lamp source are 0.5% of Cl2 in argon at 150 mbar and 4 mA discharge current. The measured 800 ± 30 K gas temperature of the microplasma, indicates that under these specific conditions, these two lines are dominantly Doppler broadened. So their profile is Gaussian shaped with full widths at half maximum of (4.7 ± 0.1) × 10-4 nm.

  4. Method 200.12 - Determination of Trace Elements in Marine Waters by StabilizedTemperature Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides procedures for the determination of total recoverable elements by graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) in marine waters, including estuarine, ocean and brines with salinities of up to 35 ppt.

  5. Spectro web: oscillator strength measurements of atomic absorption lines in the sun and procyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, A.

    2008-10-01

    We update the online SpectroWeb database of spectral standard reference stars with 1178 oscillator strength values of atomic absorption lines observed in the optical spectrum of the Sun and Procyon (α CMi A). The updated line oscillator strengths are measured with best fits to the disk-integrated KPNO-FTS spectrum of the Sun observed between 4000 Å and 6800 Å using state-of-the-art detailed spectral synthesis calculations. A subset of 660 line oscillator strengths is validated with synthetic spectrum calculations of Procyon observed with ESO-UVES between 4700 Å and 6800 Å. The new log(gf)-values in SpectroWeb are improvements upon the values offered in the online Vienna Atomic Line Database (VALD). We find for neutral iron-group elements, such as Fe I, Ni I, Cr I, and Ti I, a statistically significant over-estimation of the VALD log((gf)-values for weak absorption lines with normalized central line depths below 15 %. For abundant lighter elements (e.g. Mg I and Ca I) this trend is statistically not significantly detectable, with the exception of Si I for which the log(gf)-values of 60 weak and medium-strong lines are substantially decreased to best fit the observed spectra. The newly measured log(gf)-values are available in the SpectroWeb database at http://spectra.freeshell.org, which interactively displays the observed and computed stellar spectra, together with corresponding atomic line data.

  6. Possible atomic structures responsible for the sub-bandgap absorption of chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ke-Fan; Shao, Hezhu; Liu, Kong; Qu, Shengchun E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn; Wang, Zhanguo; Wang, Yuanxu E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn

    2015-09-14

    Single-crystal silicon was hyperdoped with sulfur, selenium, and tellurium using ion implantation and nanosecond laser melting. The hyperdoping of such chalcogen elements led to strong and wide sub-bandgap light absorption. Annealing the hyperdoped silicon, even at low temperatures (such as 200–400 °C), led to attenuation of the sub-bandgap absorption. To explain the attenuation process, we modeled it as chemical decomposition reaction from an optically absorbing structure to a non-absorbing structure. Attenuation of the experimental absorption coefficient was fit using the Arrhenius equation. From the fitted data, we extracted the reaction activation energies of S-, Se-, and T-hyperdoped silicon as 0.338 ± 0.029 eV, 0.471 ± 0.040 eV, and 0.357 ± 0.028 eV, respectively. We discuss these activation energies in terms of the bond energies of chalcogen–Si metastable bonds, and suggest that several high-energy interstitial sites, rather than substitutional sites, are candidates for the atomic structures that are responsible for the strong sub-bandgap absorption of chalcogen hyperdoped silicon.

  7. Alternative approaches to correct interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasias, I. N.; Pappa, Ch.; Katsarou, V.; Τhomaidis, N. S.; Piperaki, E. A.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to propose alternative techniques and methods in combination with the classical chemical modification to correct the major matrix interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps. The performance of an internal standard (Ge) for the determination of boron by the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry was tested. The use of internal standardization increased the recovery from 85.9% to 101% and allowed a simple correction of errors during sampling preparation and heating process. Furthermore, a new preparation procedure based on the use of citric acid during digestion and dilution steps improved the sensitivity of the method and decreased the limit of detection. Finally, a comparative study between the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with a longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction system, equipped with a transversely-heated graphite atomizer and the single element atomic absorption spectrometry with a D2 background correction system, equipped with an end-heated graphite atomizer was undertaken to investigate the different behavior of boron in both techniques. Different chemical modifiers for the determination of boron were tested with both techniques. Ni-citric acid and Ca were the optimal chemical modifiers when simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry and single-element atomic absorption spectrometry were used, respectively. By using the single-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the calculated characteristic mass was 220 pg and the calculated limit of detection was 370 μg/kg. On the contrary, with simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the characteristic mass was 2200 pg and the limit of detection was 5.5 mg/kg.

  8. Ablation-initiated Isotope-selective Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy of Lanthanide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Wakaida, I.; Watanabe, K.

    2009-03-17

    For remote isotope analysis of low-decontaminated trans-uranium (TRU) fuel, absorption spectroscopy has been applied to a laser-ablated plume of lanthanide elements. To improve isotopic selectivity and detection sensitivity of the ablated species, various experimental conditions were optimized. Isotope-selective absorption spectra were measured by observing the slow component of the plume produced under low-pressure rare-gas ambient. The measured minimum line width of about 0.9 GHz was close to the Doppler width of the Gd atomic transition at room temperature. The relaxation rate of high-lying metastable state was found to be higher than that of the ground state, which suggests that higher analytical sensitivity can be obtained using low-lying state transition. Under helium gas environment, Doppler splitting was caused from particle motion. This effect was considered for optimization for isotope selection and analysis. Some analytical performances of this method were determined under optimum conditions and were discussed.

  9. Coherent population trapping on 87Rb atoms in small-size absorption cells with buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermak, S. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) on 87Rb atoms in neon atmosphere has been studied in small-size glass absorption cells under conditions of pumping with narrow-band laser radiation at the D2 line of the main doublet. Parameters of the absorption signal have been measured in 3-mm-diameter cells at buffer gas (Ne) pressures varied within 200-400 Torr, cell temperatures within 65-120°C, and pumping radiation power densities within 30-400 μW/cm2. Optimum values of the buffer gas pressures, cell temperature, and pumping power are determined at which the short-term instability of the resonance line is at minimum. Orientational shifts of the CPT resonance signal in gas-filled cells and small-size cells with antirelaxation coating have been compared.

  10. The physical basis for absorption of light. [effects on wave functions of gas molecules and atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, H. M.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of light absorption on the wave functions of gas-phase molecules and atoms are investigated by high resolution spectral measurements of radiation emerging from a sample. A Stark-modulated sample of methyl fluoride was irradiated at the 102 GHz rotational transition and the emergent radiation was resolved by means of a spectrum analyzer. For signal oscillator frequencies below or above the molecular resonance by one modulation frequency, the amplitudes of the upper and lower modulation sidebands are found to be of nonuniform intensity, which is inconsistent with amplitude modulation. Emission due to polarization is, however, calculated to be consistent with the results observed, indicating that light absorption should be considered as a subtractive stimulated emission.

  11. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  12. Determination of mercury in soils and sediments by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with slurry sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, Ignacio; Sánchez-Merlos, Mateo; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    1997-12-01

    A graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric procedure for the determination of mercury is presented, in which the samples are suspended in a solution containing hydrofluoric and nitric acids. Silver nitrate (4% m/v) and potassium permanganate (3%) are incorporated, in the order specified, and aliquots are directly introduced into the graphite furnace. A fast heating programme with no conventional pyrolysis step is used. The detection limit for mercury in a 125 mg ml -1 suspension is 0.1 μg g -1. Calibration is performed by using aqueous standards. The reliability of the procedure is proved by analysing certified reference materials.

  13. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  14. Telecom-heralded single-photon absorption by a single atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhard, Andreas; Bock, Matthias; Becher, Christoph; Kucera, Stephan; Brito, José; Eich, Pascal; Müller, Philipp; Eschner, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We present, characterize, and apply the architecture of a photonic quantum interface between the near infrared and telecom spectral regions. A singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) operated below threshold, in combination with external filters, generates high-rate (>2.5 ×106s-1 ) narrowband photon pairs (˜7 MHz bandwidth); the signal photons are tuned to resonance with an atomic transition in Ca+, while the idler photons are at telecom wavelength. Interface operation is demonstrated through high-rate absorption of single photons by a single trapped ion (˜670 s-1 ), heralded by coincident telecom photons.

  15. Neutral atomic absorption lines and far-UV extinction: Possible implications for depletions and grain parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Daniel E.

    1990-07-01

    Researchers examine nine lines of sight within the Galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) for which data on both neutral atomic absorption lines (Snow 1984; White 1986; Welty, Hobbs, and York 1989) and far UV extinction (Bless and Savage 1972; Jenkins, Savage, and Spitzer 1986) are available, in order to test the assumption that variations in gamma/alpha will cancel in taking ratios of the ionization balance equation, and to try to determine to what extent that assumption has affected the aforementioned studies of depletions and grain properties.

  16. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fara, M.; Novak, F.

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  17. Refraction and absorption of x rays by laser-dressed atoms.

    SciTech Connect

    Buth, C.; Santra, R.; Young, L.

    2010-06-01

    X-ray refraction and absorption by neon atoms under the influence of an 800 nm laser with an intensity of 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} is investigated. For this purpose, we use an ab initio theory suitable for optical strong-field problems. Its results are interpreted in terms of a three-level model. On the Ne 1s {yields} 3p resonance, we find electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for x rays. Our work opens novel perspectives for ultrafast x-ray pulse shaping.

  18. [Electrothermal atomic absorption determination of arsenic in plants and plant products].

    PubMed

    Karpova, E A; Malysheva, A G; Ermakov, A A; Sidorenkova, N K

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed the optimal temperature-time parameters of electrothermal atomic absorption determination of arsenic in plants after their acid predigestion. The matrix modifier is 1% nickel nitrate or palladium nitrate solution. Cuvettes (ovens) are simple, made of porous or pyrolytic graphite. The analytical program is suitable for both spectrometers with Zeeman and deuterium background correction. The correctness of the procedure has been estimated from the results of analysis of state reference samples certified for their arsenic content. The coefficient of variation was 20-35% for the concentration range of 0.02-0.2 mg/kg. PMID:22712335

  19. Neutral atomic absorption lines and far-UV extinction: Possible implications for depletions and grain parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welty, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers examine nine lines of sight within the Galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) for which data on both neutral atomic absorption lines (Snow 1984; White 1986; Welty, Hobbs, and York 1989) and far UV extinction (Bless and Savage 1972; Jenkins, Savage, and Spitzer 1986) are available, in order to test the assumption that variations in gamma/alpha will cancel in taking ratios of the ionization balance equation, and to try to determine to what extent that assumption has affected the aforementioned studies of depletions and grain properties.

  20. Automated atomic absorption spectrometric determination of total arsenic in water and streambed materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, M.

    1977-01-01

    An automated method to determine both inorganic and organic forms of arsenic In water, water-suspended mixtures, and streambed materials Is described. Organic arsenic-containing compounds are decomposed by either ultraviolet radiation or by suHurlc acid-potassium persulfate digestion. The arsenic liberated, with Inorganic arsenic originally present, is reduced to arsine with sodium borohydrlde. The arable Is stripped from the solution with the aid of nitrogen and Is then decomposed In a tube furnace heated to 800 ??C which Is placed in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. Thirty samples per hour can be analyzed to levels of 1 ??g arsenic per liter.

  1. Determination of traces of silver in waters by anion exchange and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Fishman, M. J.; Ball, J.W.

    1969-01-01

    A method has been developed for the accurate determination of 0.1-1 ??g of silver per liter of water. The method permits stabilization of silver in water without loss to container walls. Optimum conditions have been established for the complete recovery of silver from water with an anion-exchange column, for quantitative elution of silver from the resin, and for measurement of silver by atomic absorption spectrophotometry after chelation with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and extraction of the chelate with MIBK. Silver in the 1-10 ??g 1 range can be determined by extraction without pre-concentration on an ion-exchange resin. ?? 1969.

  2. Determination of vanadium in mussels by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical modifiers.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Y; Fernández, P; González, A

    2004-05-01

    A method was developed for the quantitative determination of total vanadium concentration in mussels via electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). After the microwave digestion of the samples, a program using temperatures of 1600 degrees C and 2600 degrees C for ashing and atomization respectively, without any matrix modifiers, allowed us to obtain results that were satisfactory since they agreed closely with certified reference material values. The detection limit was 0.03 mg kg(-1) (dry weight), indicating that the method is suitable for the analysis of mussel samples. This determination was compared with matrix modifiers that have been reported previously. The method was applied to various cultivated and wild mussels from the Galician coast, yielding levels below 1 mg kg(-1) (wet weight). PMID:14745471

  3. Expressing self-absorption in the analytical function of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, Tibor; Bartha, András

    2015-11-01

    The self-absorption of spectral lines was studied with up to date multi-element inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) instrumentation using radial and axial viewing of the plasma, as well, performing line peak height and line peak area measurements. Two resonance atomic and ionic lines of Cd and Mg were studied, the concentration range was extended up to 2000 mg/L. At the varying analyte concentration, constant matrix concentration of 10,000 mg/L Ca was ensured in the pneumatically nebulized solutions. The physical and the phenomenological formulation of the emission analytical function is overviewed and as the continuity of the earlier results the following equation is offered:

  4. Determination of ruthenium in pharmaceutical compounds by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiujuan; Wang, Tiebang; Bu, Xiaodong; Tu, Qiang; Spencer, Sandra

    2006-04-11

    A graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) spectrometric method for the determination of ruthenium (Rh) in solid and liquid pharmaceutical compounds has been developed. Samples are dissolved or diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) without any other treatment before they were analyzed by GFAA with a carefully designed heating program to avoid pre-atomization signal loss and to achieve suitable sensitivity. Various inorganic and organic solvents were tested and compared and DMSO was found to be the most suitable. In addition, ruthenium was found to be stable in DMSO for at least 5 days. Spike recoveries ranged from 81 to 100% and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined to be 0.5 microg g(-1) for solid samples or 0.005 microg ml(-1) for liquid samples based a 100-fold dilution. The same set of samples was also analyzed by ICP-MS with a different sample preparation method, and excellent agreement was achieved. PMID:16314066

  5. Analysis of lithium in deep basalt groundwaters using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, J.A.; Marcy, A.D.

    1986-05-01

    Lithium is under consideration for use as a reactive (sorptive) tracer in experiments designed to provide information regarding natural attenuation processes in a basalt-groundwater environment. In support of these activities, background lithium concentrations in samples obtained from a variety of test horizons have been determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Significant interference was observed in these determinations and was found to be due to the presence of silicate in the samples. It was found that these problems could be circumvented through the use of alkaline silicate or synthetic groundwater matrix modifiers. This matrix effect was examined in some detail. Results obtained using the graphite furnace were compared to results obtained using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

  6. Atomic absorption determination of traces of cadmium in urine after electrodeposition onto a tungsten wire.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Li, J; Fu, D; Hao, D; Xiang, P

    1993-03-01

    A three-coil tungsten wire is used as electrode for the preconcentration of cadmium, which is then placed in a graphite tube for atomization and atomic absorption measurement. The heating parameters of the graphite furnace are optimized using the Modified and Weighted Centroid Simplex Method (MWCS), and computer program for automatic calculation. Sulphuric acid is selected as the supporting electrolyte for electrodeposition. The linear range of the calibration graph is 0.00-0.55 ng/ml. The detection limit is 0.01 ng/ml. For 0.1 ng/ml cadmium the coefficient of variation is 3.35% for ten parallel determinations. No interference occurs in the presence of more than 20 coexisting ions. Traces of cadmium in urine of normal people and in river water and the recoveries for cadmium are determined. The results are satisfactory. PMID:18965645

  7. Determination of Copper by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry: A Student Exercise in Instrumental Methods of Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a student exercise which requires the optimizing of the charring and atomization temperatures by producing a plot of absorbance versus temperature for each temperature parameter. Notes that although the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy technique has widespread industrial use, there are no published, structured experiments…

  8. Investigation of artifacts caused by deuterium background correction in the determination of phosphorus by electrothermal atomization using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessuy, Morgana B.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Lepri, Fábio G.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; Welz, Bernhard; Silva, Márcia M.; Heitmann, Uwe

    2008-02-01

    The artifacts created in the measurement of phosphorus at the 213.6-nm non-resonance line by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using line source atomic absorption spectrometry (LS AAS) and deuterium lamp background correction (D 2 BC) have been investigated using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS). The absorbance signals and the analytical curves obtained by LS AAS without and with D 2 BC, and with HR-CS AAS without and with automatic correction for continuous background absorption, and also with least-squares background correction for molecular absorption with rotational fine structure were compared. The molecular absorption due to the suboxide PO that exhibits pronounced fine structure could not be corrected by the D 2 BC system, causing significant overcorrection. Among the investigated chemical modifiers, NaF, La, Pd and Pd + Ca, the Pd modifier resulted in the best agreement of the results obtained with LS AAS and HR-CS AAS. However, a 15% to 100% higher sensitivity, expressed as slope of the analytical curve, was obtained for LS AAS compared to HR-CS AAS, depending on the modifier. Although no final proof could be found, the most likely explanation is that this artifact is caused by a yet unidentified phosphorus species that causes a spectrally continuous absorption, which is corrected without problems by HR-CS AAS, but which is not recognized and corrected by the D 2 BC system of LS AAS.

  9. [The application of atomic absorption spectrometry in automatic transmission fault detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-dan; Chen, Kai-kao

    2012-01-01

    The authors studied the innovative applications of atomic absorption spectrometry in the automatic transmission fault detection. After the authors have determined Fe, Cu and Cr contents in the five groups of Audi A6 main metal in automatic transmission fluid whose travel course is respectively 10-15 thousand kilometers, 20-26 thousand kilometers, 32-38 thousand kilometers, 43-49 thousand kilometers, and 52-58 thousand kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the authors founded the database of primary metal content in the Audi A6 different mileage automatic transmission fluid (ATF). The research discovered that the main metal content in the automatic transmission fluid increased with the vehicles mileage and its normal metal content level in the automatic transmission fluid is between the two trend lines. The authors determined the main metal content of automatic transmission fluid which had faulty symptoms and compared it with its database value. Those can not only judge the wear condition of the automatic transmission which had faulty symptoms but also help the automobile detection and maintenance personnel to diagnose automatic transmission failure reasons without disintegration. This reduced automobile maintenance costs, and improved the quality of automobile maintenance. PMID:22497168

  10. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16–42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  11. Multi-element analysis of manganese nodules by atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.; Harnly, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Five manganese nodules, including the USGS reference nodules A-1 and P-1, were analyzed for Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni and Zn without prior chemical separation by using a simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometer with an air-cetylene flame. The nodules were prepared in three digestion matrices. One of these solutions was measured using sixteen different combinations of burner height and air/acetylene ratios. Results for A-1 and P-1 are compared to recommended values and results for all nodules are compared to those obtained with an inductively coupled plasma. The elements Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Zn are simultaneously determined with a composite recovery for all elements of 100 ?? 7%, independent of the digestion matrices, heights in the flame, or flame stoichiometries examined. Individual recoveries for Co, K, and Ni are considerably poorer in two digests than this composite figure, however. The optimum individual recoveries of 100 ?? 5% and imprecisions of 1-4%, except for zinc, are obtained when Co, K, Mn, Na and Ni are determined simultaneously in a concentrated digest, and in another analytical sequence, when Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn are measured simultaneously after dilution. Determination of manganese is equally accurate in the two sequences; its measurement in both assures internal consistency between the two measurement sequences. This approach improves analytical efficiency over that for conventional atomic absorption methods, while minimizing loss of accuracy or precision for individual elements. ?? 1982.

  12. Determination of maduramicin by liquid chromatography with atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N A

    1989-01-01

    A liquid chromatograph was interfaced to an atomic absorption spectrometer for the detection and quantitation of maduramicin in feed matrixes at the 1-8 ppm level. Ionophores in general form strong 1:1 products with various metal cations, yielding complexes that are insoluble in water but very soluble in organic solvents. Maduramicin, a carboxylic, polyalcohol, polyether antibiotic, is labeled with the sodium cation and analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The lower limit of detection is approximately 100-200 ng maduramicin sodium salt. Feeds containing 1-8 ppm maduramicin are extracted with acetone, the extract is passed through an alumina column, the column is eluted with acetonitrile-water (90 + 10), and the eluate is analyzed for maduramicin by liquid chromatography-AAS after concentration and conversion of maduramicin to the sodium salt. Recoveries of maduramicin averaged 89.5%. Liquid chromatography with AAS detection has been shown to be a sensitive and highly specific technique for the determination of ionophores in general and maduramicin in particular. PMID:2708270

  13. Determination of elements by atomic absorption spectrometry in medicinal plants employed to alleviate common cold symptoms.

    PubMed

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Kuyumcu, Ebru

    2014-09-01

    Eleven important medicinal plants generally used by the people of Turkey for the treatment of common cold have been studied for their mineral contents. Eleven minor and major elements (essential, non-essential and toxic) were identified in the Asplenium adiantum-nigrum L. , Althaea officinalis L. , Verbascum phlomoides L., Euphorbia chamaesyce L., Zizyphus jujube Miller, Peganum harmala L., Arum dioscoridis Sm., Sambucus nigra L., Piperlongum L., Tussilago farfara L. and Elettaria cardamomum Maton by employing flame atomic absorption and emission spectrometry and electro-thermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Microwave digestion procedure for total concentration was applied under optimized conditions for dissolution of medicinal plants. Plant based biological certified reference materials (CRMs) served as standards for quantification. These elements are found to be present in varying concentrations in the studied plants. The baseline data presented in this work can be used in understanding the role of essential, non-essential and toxic elements in nutritive, preventive and therapeutic properties of medicinal plants. PMID:25532362

  14. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of some fluoroquinolone antibacterials using ammonium reineckate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghannam, Sheikha M.

    2008-04-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS), conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of gatifloxacin (GTF), moxifloxacin (MXF) and sparfloxacin (SPF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. Optimum concentration ranges for the determination of GTF, MXF and SPF were 5.0-150, 40-440 μg mL -1 and 0.10-1.5 mg mL -1 using atomic absorption (AAS), conductometric and colorimetric methods, respectively. Detection and quantification limits are ranges from 1.5 to 2.3 μg mL -1 using AAS method or 30-45 μg mL -1 using colorimetric method. The proposed procedures have been applied successfully to the analysis of these drugs in pharmaceutical formulations and the results are favourably comparable to the reference methods.

  15. Local atomic structure around Ni, Nb, and Zr atoms in Ni-Nb-Zr-H glassy alloys studied by x-ray absorption fine structure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oji, H.; Handa, K.; Ide, J.; Honma, T.; Yamaura, S.; Inoue, A.; Umesaki, N.; Emura, S.; Fukuhara, M.

    2009-06-01

    To elucidate hydrogen effects on the atomic configuration of Ni-Nb-Zr-H glassy alloys exhibiting proton-tunneling-induced Coulomb oscillation, we investigated the local atomic configuration around the Ni, Nb, and Zr atoms by x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) method. The analysis of the XAFS spectra indicates that there is the significant difference in structural response between the Zr 30 and the Zr 40 at. % alloys when hydrogen atoms are charged; charging the hydrogen atoms basically does not alter the local structures around the three atoms for the Zr 30 at. % alloy but induces the elongation of the Zr-Zr, Zr-Nb, and Nb-Ni distances for the Zr 40 at. % alloy. The distorted icosahedral Zr5Ni5Nb3 clusters assembled in randomly packed manners for the possible models in the Ni-Nb-Zr glassy alloy are proposed. The sites where hydrogen atoms occupy are also inferred.

  16. Measurement of copper in biological samples by flame or electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Evenson, M A

    1988-01-01

    Guidelines presented here allow for copper analysis of biological materials by methods that are very sensitive, that require little sample preparation, that have few chemical or spectral interferences, that are inexpensive, and that require only usual care in contamination control. The commercial instruments for FAAS and ETAAS from Perkin-Elmer, from Varian, and from Instrumentation Laboratories Inc. (Allied Analytical Systems) all work well in either the flame or the flameless mode. Background correction techniques are not essential for copper analysis if care is taken with the sample preparation to minimize the background signals. Different types of burners will work adequately if one makes certain that the viscosity of the sample and the control products are similar to the calibration standards. Further, dilution of samples is preferred over increasing the viscosity of the calibration standards by the addition of a protein containing solution or a substance such as glycerol. A 1:10 dilution of blood plasma or serum with dilute nitric acid or water is all that is necessary for copper analysis by the FFAS methods. Cation and anion effects should be tested by bracketing the concentrations of the ions found in the sample with known amounts of ions in the sample solutions. Increasing the concentrations of the ions thought to interfere while keeping the copper concentration constant is another way to test for ion interferences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3374386

  17. Direct determination of lead in sweet fruit-flavored powder drinks by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Éder C.; Krug, Francisco José; Arruda, Marco A. Z.

    1998-04-01

    A simplified method for direct determination of lead in sweet fruit-flavored powder drinks, syrups and honeys by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without sample digestion is proposed. Samples were dissolved in water, acidified to 0.2% (v/v) HNO 3, and directly injected into an end-capped transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). Building up of carbonaceous residue inside the atomizer was effectively precluded for sugar solutions not exceeding 8.0% (m/v) when a heating program with two pyrolysis steps (600 and 1000°C) was carried out without air-ashing. Under these conditions one atomizer supported about 250 firings. Among various chemical modifiers tested, better recovery and repeatability results were obtained with a 5 μg Pd + 3 μg Mg(NO 3) 2 mixture. Tests carried out with individual concomitants containing up to 1.0 μg Na, K, Ca or Cl, and up to 10.0 μg phosphate or sulphate, and several mixtures of these six concomitants, did not reveal significant interferences on lead atomization. Characteristic mass and detection limit based on integrated absorbance were 15 and 11 pg Pb, respectively. The relative standard deviation based on 10 measurements for typical samples (20-60 ng g -1 Pb) was always lower than 5.5%. The detection limit of 7.0 ng g -1 Pb attained the Codex recommendation for the maximum allowed lead contents in the sugar samples. Application of t-test to the results obtained by the proposed direct analysis, and the official method adopted by Food Chemical Codex, demonstrated that there were no significant differences at the 5% probability level.

  18. Rhodium as permanent modifier for atomization of lead from biological fluids using tungsten filament electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Parsons, Patrick J.; Aldous, Kenneth M.; Brockman, Paul; Slavin, Walter

    2002-04-01

    Rhodium (Rh) was investigated as a permanent modifier for the atomization of Pb from biological fluids in W-filament atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Heating the W-filament with a Rh solution provided a protective coating for subsequent determinations of Pb in blood and urine matrices. The W-filament AAS instrumentation used was based on a prototype design that utilized self-reversal background correction scheme and peak area measurements. We found that Rh not only stabilized Pb during the pyrolysis step, but also facilitated the removal of carbonaceous residues during the cleaning step, requiring much less power than with phosphate modifier. Thus, the filament lifetime was greatly extended to over 300 firings. Periodic reconditioning with Rh was necessary every 30 firings or so. Conditioning the filament with Rh also permitted direct calibration using simple aqueous Pb standards. The method detection limit for blood Pb was approximately 1.5 μg dl -1, similar to that reported previously. Potential interferences from concomitants such as Na, K, Ca and Mg were evaluated. Accuracy was verified using lead reference materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the New York State Department of Health. Blood lead results below 40 μg dl -1 were within ±1 μg dl -1 of certified values, and within ±10% above 40 μg dl -1; within-run precision was ±10% or better. Additional validation was reported using proficiency test materials and human blood specimens. All blood lead results were within the acceptable limits established by regulatory authorities in the US. When measuring Pb in urine, sensitivity was reduced and matrix-matched calibration became necessary. The method of detection limit was 27 μg l -1 for urine Pb. Urine lead results were also validated using an acceptable range comparable to that established for blood lead by US regulatory agencies.

  19. Reduction of matrix interferences in furnace atomic absorption with the L'vov Platform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaiser, M.L.; Koirtyohann, S.R.; Hinderberger, E.J.; Taylor, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    Use of a modified L'vov Platform and ammonium phosphate as a matrix modifier greatly reduced matrix interferences in a commercial Massmann-type atomic absorption furnace. Platforms were readily fabricated from furnace tubes and, once positioned in the furnace, caused no inconvenience in operation. Two volatile elements (Pb, Cd), two of intermediate volatility (Co, Cr) and two which form stable oxides (Al, Sn) were tested in natural water and selected synthetic matrices. In every case for which there was a significant matrix effect during atomization from the tube wall, the platform and platform plus modifier gave improved performance. With lead, for example, an average ratio of 0.48 ?? 0.11 was found when the slope of the standard additions plot for six different natural water samples was compared to the slope of the standard working curve in dilute acid. The average slope ratio between the natural water matrices and the dilute acid matrix was 0.94 ?? 0.03 with the L'vov Platform and 0.96 ?? 0.03 with the platform and matrix modifier. In none of the cases studied did the use of the platform or platform plus modifier cause an interference problem where none existed while atomizing from the tube wall. An additional benefit of the platform was a factor of about two improvement in peak height precision. ?? 1981.

  20. Permanent modification in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry — advances, anticipations and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsalev, Dimiter L.; Slaveykova, Vera I.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Georgieva, Rositsa

    2000-05-01

    Permanent modification is an important recent development in chemical modification techniques which is promising in view of increasing sample throughput with 'fast' programs, reducing reagent blanks, preliminary elimination of unwanted modifier components, compatibility with on-line and in situ enrichment, etc. An overview of this approach based on the authors' recent research and scarce literature data is given, revealing both success and failure in studies with permanently modified surfaces (carbides, non-volatile noble metals, noble metals on carbide coatings, etc.), as demonstrated in examples of direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) applications to biological and environmental matrices and vapor generation (VG)-ETAAS coupling with in-atomizer trapping of hydrides and other analyte vapors. Permanent modifiers exhibit certain drawbacks and limitations such as: poorly reproducible treatment technologies — eventually resulting in poor tube-to-tube repeatability and double or multiple peaks; impaired efficiency compared with modifier addition to each sample aliquot; relatively short lifetimes; limitations imposed on temperature programs, the pyrolysis, atomization and cleaning temperatures being set somewhat lower to avoid excessive loss of modifier; applicability to relatively simple sample solutions rather than to high-salt matrices and acidic digests; side effects of overstabilization, etc. The most important niches of application appear to be the utilization of permanently modified surfaces in coupled VG-ETAAS techniques, analysis of organic solvents and extracts, concentrates and fractions obtained after enrichment and/or speciation separations and direct ETAAS determinations of highly volatile analytes in relatively simple sample matrices.

  1. Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: determination of trace metals in mineral coal.

    PubMed

    Silva, M M; Goreti, M; Vale, R; Caramão, E B

    1999-12-01

    A procedure for lead, cadmium and copper determination in coal samples based on slurry sampling using an atomic absorption spectrometer equipped with a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer is proposed. The slurries were prepared by weighing the samples directly into autosampler cups (5-30 mg) and adding a 1.5 ml aliquot of a diluent mixture of 5% v/v HNO(3), 0.05% Triton X-100 and 10% ethanol. The slurry was homogenized by manual stirring before measurement. Slurry homogenization using ultrasonic agitation was also investigated for comparison. The effect of particle size and the use of different diluent compositions on the slurry preparation were investigated. The temperature programmes were optimized on the basis of pyrolysis and atomization curves. Absorbance characteristics with and without the addition of a palladium-magnesium modifier were compared. The use of 0.05% m/v Pd and 0.03% m/v Mg was found satisfactory for stabilizing Cd and Pb. The calibration was performed with aqueous standards. In addition, a conventional acid digestion procedure was applied to verify the efficiency of the slurry sampling. Better recoveries of the analytes were obtained when the particle size was reduced to <37 mum. Several certified coal reference materials (BCR Nos. 40, 180, and 181) were analyzed, and good agreement was obtained between the results from the proposed slurry sampling method and the certificate values. PMID:18967798

  2. Direct determination of lead in wine materials by atomic absorption spectrometry using an electrothermal atomizer with a graphite filter-insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharia, A. N.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Chebotarev, A. N.; Arabadgi, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The operational parameters of an atomizer with a graphite filter-insert and a Pd-Mg matrix modifier are optimized for direct electrothermal atomic absorption determination of lead in some wines and associated materials. A method is proposed for eliminating interferences from mineral and organic components, as well as from nonatomic absorption, and for increasing the detection sensitivity for the element by up to a factor of two. The lower limit for determining the amount of lead in wines is 0.0025 mg/dm3. The relative standard deviation ( S r) does not exceed 10%.

  3. Development and Validation of Spectrophotometric, Atomic Absorption and Kinetic Methods for Determination of Moxifloxacin Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Abdellaziz, Lobna M.; Hosny, Mervat M.

    2011-01-01

    Three simple spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods are developed and validated for the determination of moxifloxacin HCl in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulations. Method (A) is a kinetic method based on the oxidation of moxifloxacin HCl by Fe3+ ion in the presence of 1,10 o-phenanthroline (o-phen). Method (B) describes spectrophotometric procedures for determination of moxifloxacin HCl based on its ability to reduce Fe (III) to Fe (II), which was rapidly converted to the corresponding stable coloured complex after reacting with 2,2′ bipyridyl (bipy). The formation of the tris-complex formed in both methods (A) and (B) were carefully studied and their absorbance were measured at 510 and 520 nm respectively. Method (C) is based on the formation of ion- pair associated between the drug and bismuth (III) tetraiodide in acidic medium to form orange—red ion-pair associates. This associate can be quantitatively determined by three different procedures. The formed precipitate is either filtered off, dissolved in acetone and quantified spectrophotometrically at 462 nm (Procedure 1), or decomposed by hydrochloric acid, and the bismuth content is determined by direct atomic absorption spectrometric (Procedure 2). Also the residual unreacted metal complex in the filtrate is determined through its metal content using indirect atomic absorption spectrometric technique (procedure 3). All the proposed methods were validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines, the three proposed methods permit the determination of moxifloxacin HCl in the range of (0.8–6, 0.8–4) for methods A and B, (16–96, 16–96 and 16–72) for procedures 1–3 in method C. The limits of detection and quantitation were calculated, the precision of the methods were satisfactory; the values of relative standard deviations did not exceed 2%. The proposed methods were successfully applied to determine the drug in its pharmaceutical

  4. Susceptibility of various life stages of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.)(Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) to flameless catalytic infrared radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In laboratory experiments, a flameless catalytic infrared emitter, fueled by propane, was used to disinfest hard red winter wheat containing different life stages of the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), an economically important insect species associated with stored wheat in Kansas. Th...

  5. Atomic Oxygen Abundance in Molecular Clouds: Absorption Toward Sagittarius B2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lis, D. C.; Keene, Jocelyn; Phillips, T. G.; Schilke, P.; Werner, M. W.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (approximately 35 km/s) spectra toward the molecular cloud Sgr B2 at 63 micrometers, the wavelength of the ground-state fine-structure line of atomic oxygen (O(I)), using the ISO-LWS instrument. Four separate velocity components are seen in the deconvolved spectrum, in absorption against the dust continuum emission of Sgr B2. Three of these components, corresponding to foreground clouds, are used to study the O(I) content of the cool molecular gas along the line of sight. In principle, the atomic oxygen that produces a particular velocity component could exist in any, or all, of three physically distinct regions: inside a dense molecular cloud, in the UV illuminated surface layer (PDR) of a cloud, and in an atomic (H(I)) gas halo. For each of the three foreground clouds, we estimate, and subtract from the observed O(I) column density, the oxygen content of the H(I) halo gas, by scaling from a published high-resolution 21 cm spectrum. We find that the remaining O(I) column density is correlated with the observed (13)CO column density. From the slope of this correlation, an average [O(I)]/[(13)CO] ratio of 270 +/- 120 (3-sigma) is derived, which corresponds to [O(I)]/[(13)CO] = 9 for a CO to (13)CO abundance ratio of 30. Assuming a (13)CO abundance of 1x10(exp -6) with respect to H nuclei, we derive an atomic oxygen abundance of 2.7x10(exp -4) in the dense gas phase, corresponding to a 15% oxygen depletion compared to the diffuse ISM in our Galactic neighborhood. The presence of multiple, spectrally resolved velocity components in the Sgr B2 absorption spectrum allows, for the first time, a direct determination of the PDR contribution to the O(I) column density. The PDR regions should contain O(I) but not (13)CO, and would thus be expected to produce an offset in the O(I)-(13)CO correlation. Our data do not show such an offset, suggesting that within our beam O(I) is spatially coexistent with the molecular gas, as traced by (13)CO

  6. [Preliminary study on using acousto-optic tunable filter as wavelength selector for atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-wei; Zhang, Yi-hua; Wang, Mei-jia; Song, Da-qian; Zhang, Han-qi; Jin, Qin-han

    2002-06-01

    An acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is an all-solid-state, electronic monochromator that is based on the diffraction of light by an acoustic wave in an anisotropic crystal. It is a new kind of tunable small filter with narrow band compared with traditional unicolor filter. The filter can diffract incident white light at a specific wavelength when a specific radio frequency is applied into it. An AAS experimental setup using a microwave plasma torch (MPT) as the atomizer, and a visible AOTF as the wavelength selector was developed and the analytical performance was evaluated by determination of Na. The effect on the absorption signal of some operating conditions, including the observation height, the microwave forward power and the carrier and support gas flow rates for MPT, were investigated. The detection limit for Na was shown to be 0.23 microgram.mL-1 and the relative standard deviation was 2.6% (n = 6). PMID:12938338

  7. Indirect determination of trace phenol in water by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Bo-Xing, X; Tong-Ming, X; Ming-Neng, S; Yu-Zhi, F

    1985-03-01

    An indirect method for determination of trace phenol in water by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) is described. The phenol is brominated in acidic solution with KBrO(3)-KBr solution at room temperature. The excess of bromine is reacted with KI and the I(2) produced is extracted into cyclohexane and then reduced back to I(-) with ascorbic acid. The I(-) is then complexed with Cd(2+) in sulphuric acid medium and the complex extracted into MIBK. The extract is analysed by flame AAS for Cd (and hence indirectly for phenol). The linear concentration range for determination of phenol is 6 x 10(-7)-0.9 x 10(-5)M in aqueous solution. Several foreign ions and organic substances do not interfere. PMID:18963829

  8. The direct determination of HgS by thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coufalík, Pavel; Zvěřina, Ondřej; Komárek, Josef

    2016-04-01

    This research was aimed at the direct determination of HgS in environmental samples by means of thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry. Operating parameters of the apparatus used for thermal desorption (including a prototype desorption unit) are described in this work, as well as the procedure for measuring mercury release curves together with an evaluation of the analytical signal including two methods of peak integration. The results of thermal desorption were compared with HgS contents obtained by sequential extraction. The limits of quantification of the proposed method for the selective determination of the black and red forms of HgS were 4 μg kg- 1 and 5 μg kg- 1, respectively. The limit of quantification of red HgS in soils was 35 μg kg- 1. The developed analytical procedure was applied to soil and sediment samples from historical mining areas.

  9. Arsenic Speciation of Waters from the Aegean Region, Turkey by Hydride Generation: Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Çiftçi, Tülin Deniz; Henden, Emur

    2016-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is a serious problem for human health. Since the toxicity of arsenic species As(III) and As(V) is different, it is important to determine the concentrations separately. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an accurate and sensitive method for the speciation of arsenic. It was intended with this work to determine the concentrations of arsenic species in water samples collected from Izmir, Manisa and nearby areas. A batch type hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer was used. As(V) gave no signal under the optimal measurement conditions of As(III). A certified reference drinking water was analyzed by the method and the results showed excellent agreement with the reported values. The procedure was applied to 34 water samples. Eleven tap water, two spring water, 19 artesian well water and two thermal water samples were analyzed under the optimal conditions. PMID:27236436

  10. An atomic-absorption method for the determination of gold in large samples of geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanSickle, Gordon H.; Lakin, Hubert William

    1968-01-01

    A laboratory method for the determination of gold in large (100-gram) samples has been developed for use in the study of the gold content of placer deposits and of trace amounts of gold in other geologic materials. In this method the sample is digested with bromine and ethyl ether, the gold is extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone, and the determination is made by atomicabsorption spectrophotometry. The lower limit of detection is 0.005 part per million in the sample. The few data obtained so far by this method agree favorably with those obtained by assay and by other atomic-absorption methods. About 25 determinations can be made per man-day.

  11. Automation of preparation of nonmetallic samples for analysis by atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmann, A.; Willay, G.

    1986-01-01

    For a rapid preparation of solutions intended for analysis by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry or atomic absorption spectrometry, an automatic device called Plasmasol was developed. This apparatus used the property of nonwettability of glassy C to fuse the sample in an appropriate flux. The sample-flux mixture is placed in a composite crucible, then heated at high temperature, swirled until full dissolution is achieved, and then poured into a water-filled beaker. After acid addition, dissolution of the melt, and filling to the mark, the solution is ready for analysis. The analytical results obtained, either for oxide samples or for prereduced iron ores show that the solutions prepared with this device are undistinguished from those obtained by manual dissolutions done by acid digestion or by high temperature fusion. Preparation reproducibility and analytical tests illustrate the performance of Plasmasol.

  12. Determination of total mercury in human hair and animal fur by combustion atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cizdziel, J V; Gerstenberger, Shawn

    2004-11-15

    A commercially available mercury (Hg) analyzer based on sample combustion, gold amalgamation, and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) was evaluated for the direct determination of Hg in composites of human hair and individual samples of horse fur. Results for human hair reference material (NIES No. 13) were within the certified range. Analyses of "blind" samples from an international interlaboratory (n>16) comparison study produced results within 1S.D. of the consensus means. Precision (%R.S.D.) was found to be <5% and total analyses time per sample was <10min. This study demonstrated that analyzers based on combustion-AAS are suitable for wide-scale monitoring of Hg in human hair and animal fur. PMID:18969690

  13. Liquid-phase microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: A review.

    PubMed

    de la Calle, Inmaculada; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2016-09-14

    An overview of the combination of liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) techniques with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) is reported herein. The high sensitivity of GFAAS is significantly enhanced by its association with a variety of miniaturized solvent extraction approaches. LPME-GFAAS thus represents a powerful combination for determination of metals, metalloids and organometallic compounds at (ultra)trace level. Different LPME modes used with GFAAS are briefly described, and the experimental parameters that show an impact in those microextraction processes are discussed. Special attention is paid to those parameters affecting GFAAS analysis. Main issues found when coupling LPME and GFAAS, as well as those strategies reported in the literature to solve them, are summarized. Relevant applications published on the topic so far are included. PMID:27566338

  14. Removal of iron interferences by solvent extraction for geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Iron is a common interferent in the determination of many elements in geochemical samples. Two approaches for its removal have been taken. The first involves removal of iron by extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) from hydrochloric acid medium, leaving the analytes in the aqueous phase. The second consists of reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) by ascorbic acid to minimize its extraction into MIBK, so that the analytes may be isolated by extraction. Elements of interest can then be determined using the aqueous solution or the organic extract, as appropriate. Operating factors such as the concentration of hydrochloric acid, amounts of iron present, number of extractions, the presence or absence of a salting-out agent, and the optimum ratio of ascorbic acid to iron have been determined. These factors have general applications in geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1985.

  15. Development of mixed-waste analysis capability for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, D.A.; TenKate, L.B.; Wroblewski, A.

    1995-03-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer (GFAAS) are typically configured with ventilation to capture potentially toxic and corrosive gases emitted from the vaporization of sample aliquots. When radioactive elements are present, additional concerns (such as meeting safety guidelines and ALARA principles) must be addressed. This report describes a modification to a GFAAS that provides additional containment of vaporized sample aliquots. The modification was found to increase containment by a factor of 80, given expected operating conditions. The use of the modification allows more mixed-waste samples to be analyzed, permits higher levels of radioactive samples to be analyzed, or exposes the analyst to less airborne radioactivity. The containment apparatus was attached to a Perkin-Elmer Zeeman 5000 spectrophotometer for analysis of mixed-waste samples; however, it could also be used on other systems and in other applications where greater containment of vaporized material is desired.

  16. Laser absorption spectroscopy diagnostics of helium metastable atoms generated in dielectric barrier discharge cryoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Stauss, Sven; Sakai, Osamu; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Cryoplasmas, which are plasmas whose gas temperatures are below room temperature (RT), have shown dynamic changes in their physical and chemical characteristics when the gas temperature in the plasmas (Tgp) was decreased from RT. In this study, we measured the temporal behavior of helium metastable (Hem) atoms generated in a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge at ambient gas temperatures (Tga) of 300, 100, and 14 K and with a gas density similar to atmospheric conditions by laser absorption spectroscopy. The increments of Tgp to Tga were less than 20 K. We found from the results that the Hem lifetime and maximum density become longer and larger over one order of magnitude for lower Tga. The reasons for the long Hem lifetime at low Tga are decreases in the rate coefficients of three-body Hem quenching reactions and in the amounts of molecular impurities with boiling points higher than that of He.

  17. A summary of transition probabilities for atomic absorption lines formed in low-density clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, D. C.; Smith, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A table of wavelengths, statistical weights, and excitation energies is given for 944 atomic spectral lines in 221 multiplets whose lower energy levels lie below 0.275 eV. Oscillator strengths were adopted for 635 lines in 155 multiplets from the available experimental and theoretical determinations. Radiation damping constants also were derived for most of these lines. This table contains the lines most likely to be observed in absorption in interstellar clouds, circumstellar shells, and the clouds in the direction of quasars where neither the particle density nor the radiation density is high enough to populate the higher levels. All ions of all elements from hydrogen to zinc are included which have resonance lines longward of 912 A, although a number of weaker lines of neutrals and first ions have been omitted.

  18. Determination of trace amounts of tin in geological materials by atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsch, E.P.; Chao, T.T.

    1976-01-01

    An atomic absorption method is described for the determination of traces of tin in rocks, soils, and stream sediments. A dried mixture of the sample and ammonium iodide is heated to volatilize tin tetraiodide -which is then dissolved in 5 % hydrochloric acid, extracted into TOPO-MIBK, and aspirated into a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The limit of determination is 2 p.p.m. tin and the relative standard deviation ranges from 2 to 14 %. Up to 20 % iron and 1000 p.p.m. Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Hg, Mo, V, or W in the sample do not interfere. As many as 50 samples can be easily analyzed per man-day. ?? 1976.

  19. Near resonant absorption by atoms in intense fluctuating laser fields. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this program was to make quantitative measurements of the effects of higher-order phase/frequency correlations in a laser beam on nonlinear optical absorption processes in atoms. The success of this program was due in large part to a unique experimental capability for modulating the extracavity beam of a stabilized ({approx_lt}200 kHz) continuous-wave laser with statistically-well-characterized stochastic phase (or frequency) fluctuations, in order to synthesize laser bandwidths to {approximately}20 MHz (depending on noise amplitude), with profiles variable between Gaussian and Lorentzian (depending on noise bandwidth). Laser driven processes investigated included the following: (1) the optical Autler-Towns effect in the 3S{sub 1/2} (F = 2, M{sub F} = 2) {yields} 3P{sub 3/2} (F = 3, M{sub F} = 3) two- level Na resonance, using a weak probe to the 4D{sub 5/2} level; (2) the variance and spectra of fluorescence intensity fluctuations in the two-level Na resonance; (3) the Hanle effect in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {minus} {sup 3}P{sub 1}, transition at {lambda} = 555.6 nm in {sup 174} Yb; (4) absorption (and gain) of a weak probe, when the probe is a time-delayed replica of the resonant (with the two-level Na transition) pump laser; and (5) four-wave-mixing in a phase-conjugate geometry, in a sodium cell, and, finally, in a diffuse atomic sodium beam. The experimental results from these several studies have provided important confirmation of advanced theoretical methods.

  20. Determination of Hg, Cd, Mn, Pb and Sn in seafood by solid sampling Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detcheva, A.; Grobecker, K. H.

    2006-04-01

    Direct solid sampling Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometric methods were developed and applied to the determination of mercury, cadmium, manganese, lead and tin in seafood. All elements but mercury were measured by a third generation Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry combined with an automatic solid sampler. In 3-field- and dynamic mode the calibrations concentration range was substantially extended and high amounts of analyte were detectable without laborious dilution of solid samples. The measurements were based on calibrations using certified reference materials of organic matrices. In case solid certified reference materials were not available calibration by aqueous standard solutions was proved to be an alternative. No matrix effects were observed under the optimized conditions. Results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values. Solid sampling Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry proved to be a reliable, rapid and low-cost method for the control of trace elements in seafood.

  1. Free-free absorption of infrared radiation in collisions of electrons with neutral rare-gas atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A relationship between the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption cross section and the electron neutral momentum transfer cross section has been utilized to determine the infrared free-free continuum absorption coefficient for the negative ions of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. The values of the momentum transfer cross section for this calculation have been obtained from experimental measurements. Analytical expressions for the absorption coefficient have also been developed. From the results of this calculation, it is possible to determine the absorption coefficient per unit electron density per neutral atom for temperatures in the range from 2500 to 25,000 K. The results are compared with those from tabulations of previous calculations and those computed from theoretical values of the phase shifts for the elastic scattering of electrons by neutral atoms.

  2. Graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of palladium in soil.

    PubMed

    Patel, K S; Sharma, P C; Hoffmann, P

    2000-08-01

    A new and sensitive procedure for the graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrophotometric (GF-AAS) determination of Pd in soil at nanogram level is described. The method is based on prior separation and enrichment of the metal as Pd(II)-SnCl3- -N-butylacetamide (BAA) complex into 1-pentanol (PN) by solvent extraction method. The value of the molar absorptivity of the complex in three solvents, i.e. ethyl acetate, 1-pentanol, chloroform, lie in the range of (0.70-2.75) x 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1) at lambda(max) 360-440 nm. The metal could be enriched into organic solvent, i.e. PN, up to 10-folds. The sensitivity (A = 0.0044) of the method in the term of the peak height was 0.5 ng Pd/mL of the aqueous solution at an enrichment factor (EF) of 5. Optimization of analytical variables during enrichment and GF-AAS determination of the metal are discussed. The method has been applied for the analysis of Pd to soil samples derived from roads and highways in Germany. PMID:11220609

  3. ARECIBO MULTI-EPOCH H I ABSORPTION MEASUREMENTS AGAINST PULSARS: TINY-SCALE ATOMIC STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Stanimirovic, S.; Weisberg, J. M.; Pei, Z.; Tuttle, K.; Green, J. T.

    2010-09-01

    We present results from multi-epoch neutral hydrogen (H I) absorption observations of six bright pulsars with the Arecibo telescope. Moving through the interstellar medium (ISM) with transverse velocities of 10-150 AU yr{sup -1}, these pulsars have swept across 1-200 AU over the course of our experiment, allowing us to probe the existence and properties of the tiny-scale atomic structure (TSAS) in the cold neutral medium (CNM). While most of the observed pulsars show no significant change in their H I absorption spectra, we have identified at least two clear TSAS-induced opacity variations in the direction of B1929+10. These observations require strong spatial inhomogeneities in either the TSAS clouds' physical properties themselves or else in the clouds' galactic distribution. While TSAS is occasionally detected on spatial scales down to 10 AU, it is too rare to be characterized by a spectrum of turbulent CNM fluctuations on scales of 10{sup 1}-10{sup 3} AU, as previously suggested by some work. In the direction of B1929+10, an apparent correlation between TSAS and interstellar clouds inside the warm Local Bubble (LB) indicates that TSAS may be tracing the fragmentation of the LB wall via hydrodynamic instabilities. While similar fragmentation events occur frequently throughout the ISM, the warm medium surrounding these cold cloudlets induces a natural selection effect wherein small TSAS clouds evaporate quickly and are rare, while large clouds survive longer and become a general property of the ISM.

  4. DETERMINATION OF LEAD AND CADMIUM IN FISH AND CLAM TISSUE BY ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY WITH A MOLYBDENUM AND LANTHANUM TREATED PYROLYTIC GRAPHITE ATOMIZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A molybdenum and lanthanum treated pyrolytically coated graphite tube is employed for the furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of lead and cadmium directly in nitric-perchloric acid tissue digests. Lanthanum tends to promote the formation of a smooth lead atomiza...

  5. Determination of trace elements in automotive fuels by filter furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Anna; Tittarelli, Paolo; Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2002-03-01

    The determination of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Ni was performed in gasoline and diesel fuel samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using the Transverse Heated Filter Atomizer (THFA). Thermal conditions were experimentally defined for the investigated elements. The elements were analyzed without addition of chemical modifiers, using organometallic standards for the calibration. Forty-microliter samples were injected into the THFA. Gasoline samples were analyzed directly, while diesel fuel samples were diluted 1:4 with n-heptane. The following characteristic masses were obtained: 0.8 pg Cd, 6.4 pg Cr, 12 pg Cu, 17 pg Pb and 27 pg Ni. The limits of determination for gasoline samples were 0.13 μg/kg Cd, 0.4 μg/kg Cr, 0.9 μg/kg Cu, 1.5 μg/kg Pb and 2.5 μg/kg Ni. The corresponding limit of determination for diesel fuel samples was approximately four times higher for all elements. The element recovery was performed using the addition of organometallic compounds to gasoline and diesel fuel samples and was between 85 and 105% for all elements investigated.

  6. Determination of tellurium in indium antimonide semiconductor material by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shiue, M Y; Sun, Y C; Yang, M H

    2001-08-01

    A method for the determination of the dopant concentration of tellurium in dissolved indium antimonide semiconductor material by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. Efforts were made to investigate the optimal conditions of the furnace heating program and the effect of palladium modifier on the variation of tellurium and the background absorbance. According to the results obtained, the presence of palladium chemical modifier in the analysis of indium antimonide allowed the successful retention of tellurium in the graphite tube, and the optimum mass of palladium modifier was found to be dependent on the sample matrix concentration. The absorbance profile of tellurium and the background level were significantly improved when a pyrolysis temperature of 1100 degrees C and an atomization temperature of 2200 degrees C were employed in the optimized heating program. With the use of this method, a detection limit of 0.8 microg g(-1) tellurium in indium antimonide could be achieved. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated by comparison with two independent methods, i.e. slurry sampling-ETAAS and ICP-MS. From the good agreement between the results, it was demonstrated that the proposed method is suitable for the determination of typical dopant concentrations of tellurium in indium antimonide. PMID:11534624

  7. Preconcentration and determination of tellurium in garlic samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Marcos M; Cerutti, Soledad; Salonia, José A; Gásquez, José A; Martinez, Luis D

    2005-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of traces of total tellurium (Te) in garlic (Allium sativa) is described that combines hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with preconcentration of the analyte by coprecipitation. The samples, each spiked with lanthanum nitrate (20 mg/L), are introduced into an Amberlite XAD-4 resin and mixed with ammonium buffer (pH 9.1). Te is preconcentrated by coprecipitation with the generated lanthanum hydroxide precipitate. The precipitate is quantitatively collected in the resin, eluted with hydrochloric acid, and then transferred into the atomizer device. Considering a sample consumption of 25 mL, an enrichment factor of 10 was obtained. The detection limit (3sigma) was 0.03 microg/L, and the precision (relative standard deviation) was 3.5% (n = 10) at the 10 microg/L level. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for Te was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9993. Satisfactory results were obtained for the analysis of Te in garlic samples. PMID:16152948

  8. Methylmercury determination in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after acid leaching extraction.

    PubMed

    Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Givianrad, Mohammad Hadi; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz

    2006-11-01

    An efficient and sensitive method for the determination of methylmercury in biological samples was developed based on acid leaching extraction of methylmercury into toluene. Methylmercury in the organic phase was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The methylmercury signal was enhanced and the reproducibility increased by formation of certain complexes and addition of Pd-DDC modifier. The complex of methylmercury with DDC produced the optimum analytical signal in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility compared to complexes with dithizone, cysteine, 1,10-phenanthroline, and diethyldithiocarbamate. Method performance was optimized by modifying parameters such as temperature of mineralization, atomization, and gas flow rate. The limit of detection for methylmercury determination was 0.015 mug g(-1) and the RSD of the whole procedure was 12% for human teeth samples (n=5) and 15.8% for hair samples (n=5). The method's accuracy was investigated by using NIES-13 and by spiking the samples with different amounts of methylmercury. The results were in good agreement with the certified values and the recoveries were 88-95%. PMID:16896613

  9. Determination of silicon in serum and urine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhuo-er

    1995-09-01

    A sensitive, simple and accurate method for the routine determination of trace silicon in serum and urine by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The samples are directly determined after 20-fold dilution of serum and 100-fold dilution of urine. No L'vov platform is used. The signal enhancement of silicon atomization in pyrolytic graphite coated graphite tubes is achieved by using a mixture of calcium chloride and lanthanum nitrate as chemical modifier. The interferences arising from the biological matrices have been eliminated by the addition of ammonium dihydrogenphosphate in the sample solutions. The aqueous calibration curve is linear to at least 300 μg l -1, the characteristic mass is 37 pg (integrated absorbance signal), whereas the detection limit (3SD) is 1.5 μg l -1 for silicon in both diluted serum and urine samples. The recoveries of silicon added to the diluted samples are 101 ± 1.8% for sera and 98.2 ± 3.5% for the urine specimens, independent of the dilution ratio. The silicon measurement results for the serum and urine from healthy adults and for the serum from the patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis are presented.

  10. Direct analysis of silica by means of solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, M.; Mozas, E.; Crespo, C.; Pérez, J.; García-Ruiz, E.; Belarra, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports on the use of solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct analysis of synthetic amorphous silica. In particular, determination of hazardous elements such As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sb is investigated, as required by regulations of the food industry. The conclusion of the work is that, after proper optimization of the working conditions, paying particular attention to the atomization temperature and the use of proper modifiers (graphite powder, HNO3 or Pd), it is possible to develop suitable procedures that rely on the use of aqueous standard solutions to construct the calibration curves for all the elements investigated. The proposed method shows important benefits for the cost-effective analysis of such difficult samples in routine labs, permitting fast screening of those elements that are very rarely present in this type of sample, but also accurate quantification of those often found, while offering low limits of detection (always below 0.1 mg g- 1) that comply well with legal requirements, and precision levels that are fit for the purpose (approx. 6-9% R.S.D.).

  11. Direct determination and speciation of mercury compounds in environmental and biological samples by carbon bed atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for the direct determination of mercury in water and biological samples using a unique carbon bed atomizer for atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method avoided sources of error such as loss of volatile mercury during sample digestion and contamination of samples through added reagents by eliminating sample pretreatment steps. The design of the atomizer allowed use of the 184.9 nm mercury resonance line in the vacuum ultraviolet region, which increased sensitivity over the commonly used spin-forbidden 253.7 nm line. The carbon bed atomizer method was applied to a study of mercury concentrations in water, hair, sweat, urine, blood, breath and saliva samples from a non-occupationally exposed population. Data were collected on the average concentration, the range and distribution of mercury in the samples. Data were also collected illustrating individual variations in mercury concentrations with time. Concentrations of mercury found were significantly higher than values reported in the literature for a ''normal'' population. This is attributed to the increased accuracy gained by eliminating pretreatment steps and increasing atomization efficiency. Absorption traces were obtained for various solutions of pure and complexed mercury compounds. Absorption traces of biological fluids were also obtained. Differences were observed in the absorption-temperatures traces of various compounds. The utility of this technique for studying complexation was demonstrated.

  12. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of arsenic in essential lavender and rose oils.

    PubMed

    Karadjova, Irina B; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Tsalev, Dimiter L

    2005-02-28

    Analytical procedures for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) determination of arsenic in essential oils from lavender (Lavendula angustifolia) and rose (Rosa damascena) are described. For direct ETAAS analysis, oil samples are diluted with ethanol or i-propanol for lavender and rose oil, respectively. Leveling off responses of four different arsenic species (arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate and dimethylarsinate) is achieved by using a composite chemical modifier: l-cysteine (0.05gl(-1)) in combination with palladium (2.5mug) and citric acid (100mug). Transverse-heated graphite atomizer (THGA) with longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction and 'end-capped' graphite tubes with integrated pyrolytic graphite platforms, pre-treated with Zr-Ir for permanent modification are employed as most appropriate atomizer. Calibration with solvent-matched standard solutions of As(III) is used for four- and five-fold diluted samples of lavender and rose oil, respectively. Lower dilution factors required standard addition calibration by using aqueous (for lavender oil) or i-propanol (for rose oil) solutions of As(III). The limits of detection (LOD) for the whole analytical procedure are 4.4 and 4.7ngg(-1) As in levender and rose oil, respectively. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for As at 6-30ngg(-1) levels is between 8 and 17% for both oils. As an alternative, procedure based on low temperature plasma ashing in oxygen with ETAAS, providing LODs of 2.5 and 2.7ngg(-1) As in levender and rose oil, respectively, and R.S.D. within 8-12% for both oils has been elaborated. Results obtained by both procedures are in good agreement. PMID:18969904

  13. Matrix elimination method for the determination of precious metals in ores using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bekir; Celikbiçak, Omür; Döker, Serhat; Doğan, Mehmet

    2007-03-28

    Poly(N-(hydroxymethyl)methacrylamide)-1-allyl-2-thiourea) hydrogels, poly(NHMMA-ATU), were synthesized by gamma radiation using (60)Co gamma source in the ternary mixture of NHMMA-ATU-H(2)O. These hydrogels were used for the specific gold, silver, platinum and palladium recovery, pre-concentration and matrix elimination from the solutions containing trace amounts of precious metal ions. Elimination of inorganic matrices such as different transition and heavy metal ions, and anions was performed by adjusting the solution pH to 0.5 that was the selective adsorption pH of the precious metal ions. Desorption of the precious metal ions was performed by using 0.8 M thiourea in 3M HCl as the most efficient desorbing agent with recovery values more than 95%. In the desorption medium, thiourea effect on the atomic signal was eliminated by selecting proper pyrolysis and atomization temperatures for all precious metal ions. Precision and the accuracy of the results were improved in the graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) measurements by applying the developed matrix elimination method performing the adsorption at pH 0.5. Pre-concentration factors of the studied precious metal ions were found to be at least 1000-fold. Detection limits of the precious metal ions were found to be less than 10 ng L(-1) of the all studied precious metal ions by using the proposed pre-concentration method. Determination of trace levels of the precious metals in the sea-water, anode slime, geological samples and photographic fixer solutions were performed using GFAAS clearly after applying the adsorption-desorption cycle onto the poly(NHMMA-UTU) hydrogels. PMID:17386783

  14. Tributyl phosphate as a sensitivity-enhancing solvent for organotin in carbon furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Gong, B; Matsumoto, K

    1996-07-01

    Tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been found to be a sensitivity-enhancing solvent for organotin compounds in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry; (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CCH(3))(2), (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CC(11)H(23))(2), (C(4)H(9))(3)SnCl, and (C(4)H(9))(4)Sn all give 1 order of magnitude higher sensitivities in TBP than in toluene or ethyl acetate. The sensitivities are enhanced further 1-2 orders of magnitude in TBP, when PdCl(2)(CH(3)CN)(2) is added as a matrix modifier in the organic solvent. Among the four organotin compounds, (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CCH(3))(2) and (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CC(11)H(23))(2) give better sensitivities than (C(4)H(9))(3)SnCl and (C(4)H(9))(4)Sn in the absence of palladium in any organic solvent, which suggests that the oxygen atom in the tin compound might form tin oxides that are resistant to volatilization loss during ashing. Scanning electron microscopic, electrothermal vaporization ICPMS, and powder X-ray diffraction studies show that the final products before atomization include phosphorus-containing compounds Sn(2)P(2)O(7), SnP(2)O(7), and Pd(9)P(2), besides tin-palladium alloys, PdSn, Pd(3)Sn, Pd(2)Sn, Pd(3)Sn(2), and PdSn(3). These phosphorus-containing compounds would more efficiently stabilize tin and suppress tin vaporization loss during ashing, to give higher sensitivity. PMID:21619315

  15. Atomic Transition Frequencies, Isotope Shifts, and Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine Structure Constant for Studies of Quasar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; King, J. A.; Kozlov, M. G.; Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest spatial and temporal variation of fundamental "constants" in the Universe. A change in the fine structure constant, α = {e}2/hslash c , could be detected via shifts in the frequencies of atomic transitions in quasar absorption systems. Recent studies using 140 absorption systems from the Keck telescope and 153 from the Very Large Telescope, suggest that α varies spatially (61). That is, in one direction on the sky α seems to have been smaller at the time of absorption, while in the opposite direction it seems to have been larger.

  16. Spectroscopy of 1S0- 3P1 transition of magnesium atom in an external absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Baraulya, V. I.; Bonert, A. E.; Goncharov, A. N.; Seydaliev, M. R.

    2001-09-01

    The results of saturated absorption spectroscopy of the intercombination 1S0- 3P1 transition of magnesium atoms at 457 nm in an external absorption cell are presented. A laser system based on a Ti:Sa laser with frequency doubling in a LBO nonlinear crystal was used in these experiments. Saturated absorption resonances of magnesium in an external cell at the 1S0- 3P1 transition have been obtained for the first time. Pressure broadening of resonances equal to 12.5±1.5 kHz/mTorr has been measured.

  17. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  18. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Linearization of the calibration curves within a broad concentration range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri; Hlongwane, Miranda; Heitmann, Uwe; Florek, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    The calculation algorithm suggested provides linearization of the calibration curves in high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The algorithm is based on the modification of the function wavelength-integrated absorbance vs. concentration of analyte vapor in the absorption volume. According to the suggested approach, the absorption line is represented by a triangle for low and trapezium for high analyte vapor concentration in the absorption volume. The respective semi-empirical formulas include two linearization parameters, which depend on properties of the absorption line and characteristics of the atomizer and spectrometer. The parameters can be approximately evaluated from the theory and determined in practice from the original broad-range calibration curve. The parameters were found and the proposed calculation algorithm verified in the experiments on direct determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb in the solutions within a concentration ranges from 0.15 to 625 μg·L- 1 using tube, platform tube and filter furnace atomizers. The use of various atomizers, lines, elements and atomization temperatures made possible the simulation of various practical analytical conditions. It was found that the algorithm and optimal linearization parameters made it possible to obtain for each line and atomizer linear approximations of the calibration curves within 3-4 orders of magnitude with correlation coefficients close to 0.999. The algorithm makes possible to employ a single line for the direct element determination over a broad concentration range. The sources of errors and the possibility of a priori theoretical evaluation of the linearization parameters are discussed.

  19. Respiratory tract retention of inhaled air pollutants: report 1: mercury absorption by inhaling through the nose and expiring through the mouth at various concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuo, O.; Saito, H.; Kifune, I.; Ohshina, T.; Fujii, M.; Takizawa, Y.

    1982-01-01

    To study atmospheric mercury absorption in human respiratory passage-ways, mercury in expired air was measured in three different states of breathing: steady breathing, deep breathing and breath held after inspiration. In this study, air containing mercury was inhaled through the nose and expired through the mouth. The concentration of mercury in the exhaled air was determined by the technique of gold-amalgam trapping, heat vaporization, and flameless atomic absorption measurement. The subjects were 13 male adults, aged 25-62 years, and 38 cases were observed. Four different concentrations of mercury, 1-3, 4-6, 10-11, and 20-30 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ were used, and absorption for each was determined, when the concentration was 1-3 ..mu../m/sup 3/, the absorption was 74-92%, the average being 82.5%. At concentrations of 4-6, 10-11, and 20-30 ..mu../m/sup 3/, the absorption was 76.6-100%, 75.5-99.2%, 70.9-95.9% respectively, and the average was 88.8%, 85.2%, and 87.7% respectively. A slightly higher rate of mercury absorption was observed in deep breathing than in steady breathing, and when expiration was suppressed for some time after inspiration, the rate increased remarkably to 97.4-99.7%. Prolonged retention of inhaled air containing mercury in the respiratory tract is believed to have caused the increased absorption.

  20. Simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead in wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freschi, Gian P. G.; Dakuzaku, Carolina S.; de Moraes, Mercedes; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Gomes Neto, José A.

    2001-10-01

    A method has been developed for the direct simultaneous determination of Cd and Pb in white and red wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) using a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer (THGA) with longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction. The thermal behavior of both analytes during pyrolysis and atomization stages were investigated in 0.028 mol l -1 HNO 3 and in 1+1 v/v diluted wine using mixtures of Pd(NO 3) 2+Mg(NO 3) 2 and NH 4H 2PO 4+Mg(NO 3) 2 as chemical modifiers. With 5 μg Pd+3 μg Mg as the modifiers and a two-step pyrolysis (10 s at 400°C and 10 s at 600°C), the formation of carbonaceous residues inside the atomizer was avoided. For 20 μl of sample (wine+0.056 mol l -1 HNO 3, 1+1, v/v) dispensed into the graphite tube, analytical curves in the 0.10-1.0 μg l -1 Cd and 5.0-50 μg l -1 Pb ranges were established. The characteristic mass was approximately 0.6 pg for Cd and 33 pg for Pb, and the lifetime of the tube was approximately 400 firings. The limits of detection (LOD) based on integrated absorbance (0.03 μg l -1 for Cd, 0.8 μg l -1 for Pb) exceeded the requirements of Brazilian Food Regulations (decree #55871 from Health Department), which establish the maximum permissible level for Cd at 200 μg l -1 and for Pb at 500 μg l -1. The relative standard deviations ( n=12) were typically <8% for Cd and <6% for Pb. The recoveries of Cd and Pb added to wine samples varied from 88 to 107% and 93 to 103%, respectively. The accuracy of the direct determination of Cd and Pb was checked for 10 table wines by comparing the results with those obtained for digested wine using single-element ET-AAS, which were in agreement at the 95% confidence level.

  1. VUV absorption spectroscopy measurements of the role of fast neutral atoms in high-power gap breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    FILUK,A.B.; BAILEY,JAMES E.; CUNEO,MICHAEL E.; LAKE,PATRICK WAYNE; NASH,THOMAS J.; NOACK,DONALD D.; MARON,Y.

    2000-03-20

    The maximum power achieved in a wide variety of high-power devices, including electron and ion diodes, z pinches, and microwave generators, is presently limited by anode-cathode gap breakdown. A frequently-discussed hypothesis for this effect is ionization of fast neutral atoms injected throughout the anode-cathode gap during the power pulse. The authors describe a newly-developed diagnostic tool that provides the first direct test of this hypothesis. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy is used to directly probe fast neutral atoms with 1 mm spatial resolution in the 10 mm anode-cathode gap of the SABRE 5 MV, 1 TW applied-B ion diode. Absorption spectra collected during Ar RF glow discharges and with CO{sub 2} gas fills confirm the reliability of the diagnostic technique. Throughout the 50--100 ns ion diode pulses no measurable neutral absorption is seen, setting upper limits of 0.12--1.5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} for ground state fast neutral atom densities of H, C, N, O, F. The absence of molecular absorption bands also sets upper limits of 0.16--1.2 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} for common simple molecules. These limits are low enough to rule out ionization throughout the gap as a breakdown mechanism. This technique can now be applied to quantify the role of neutral atoms in other high-power devices.

  2. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  3. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  4. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  5. Assessing the Engagement, Learning, and Overall Experience of Students Operating an Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer with Remote Access Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erasmus, Daniel J.; Brewer, Sharon E.; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The use of internet-based technologies in the teaching of laboratories has emerged as a promising education tool. This study evaluated the effectiveness of using remote access technology to operate an atomic absorption spectrophotometer in analyzing the iron content in a crude myoglobin extract. Sixty-two students were surveyed on their level of…

  6. SPECIATION OF SELENIUM(IV) AND SELENIUM(VI) USING COUPLED ION CHROMATOGRAPHY: HYDRIDE GENERATION ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple method was developed to speciate inorganic selenium in the microgram per liter range using coupled ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Because of the differences in toxicity and adsorption behavior, determination of the redox states selenite, Se(IV), and s...

  7. Manganese dioxide causes spurious gold values in flame atomic-absorption readings from HBr-Br2 digestions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    False readings, apparently caused by the presence of high concentrations of manganese dioxide, have been observed in our current flame atomic-absorption procedure for the determination of gold. After a hydrobromic acid (HBr)-bromine (Br2) leach, simply heating the sample to boiling to remove excess Br2 prior to extraction with methyl-isobutyl-ketone (MIBK) eliminates these false readings. ?? 1981.

  8. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Analysis of Trace Elements in Degenerated Intervertebral Disc Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Frankowski, Marcin; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Czabak-Garbacz, Róża; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek; Gasik, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated trace elements (TE) in human intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue. Trace element presence can have diverse meanings: essential TE show the metabolic modalities of the tissue, while environmentally-related TE indicate pollution and tissue-specific absorption and accumulation. IVD is a highly specific compartment with impaired communication with adjacent bone. Analysis of TE in IVD provides new insights regarding tissue metabolism and IVD communication with other tissues. Material/Methods Thirty intervertebral discs were acquired from 22 patients during surgical treatment for degenerative disease. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to evaluate the concentrations of Al, Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, Mo, Mg, and Zn. Results Al, Pb, Cu, Mg, and Zn were detected in all samples. Pb was significantly positively correlated with age, and Ni concentration was weakly correlated with population count in the patient’s place of residence. Only Cu was observed in higher concentrations in IVD compared to in other tissues. Significant positive correlations were observed between the following pairs: Mg/Zn, Mg/Al, Mg/Pb, Zn/Al, Zn/Pb, and Al/Pb. Negative correlations were observed between Mg/Cd, Zn/Cd, Mg/Mo, and Mo/Pb. Conclusions This study is one of few to profile the elements in intervertebral discs in patients with degenerative changes. We report significant differences between trace element concentrations in intervertebral discs compared to in other tissues. Knowledge of the TE accumulation pattern is vital for better understanding intervertebral disc nutrition and metabolism. PMID:25366266

  9. [Determination of nine mineral elements in hulless barley by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Zhang, Huai-Gang

    2010-04-01

    The contents of nine mineral elements, including sulphur, zinc, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, iron, copper and manganese in five hulless barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var. nudum Hook. f.) lines were determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and flames atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). For the determination of sulphur, the samples were dissolved by magnesia and anhydrous sodium carbonate at 250 degrees C for 0. 5 h and at 550 degrees C for 3 h in the muffle furnace, and then a certain amount of barium chloride was put into the sample solution for colorimetry of the UV-Vs spectrophotometer. For the determination of other eight mineral elements, all of the samples were dissolved by a kind of incinerating method: first, the sample was put into the muffle furnace at 250 degrees C for 0. 5 h and at 550 degrees C for 2.5 h, then two droplets of 50%HNO3 were distributed into each sample, and the last step was putting the sample into the muffle furnace at 550 degrees C for 0.5 h. And then all of the ash was dissolved by 50%HNO3 to 50 milliliter and determined by flames atomic absorption spectrometry. The precision, accuracy, repeatability and stability of the method were discussed too. The results showed that the relative standard deviations (RSD) were between 1.2% and 3.7%; The average recoveries were 97.44%-101.52% and the relative standard deviations (RSD) of sample determination were 1.3%-3.8%. The repeatability experiment showed that the relative standard deviations (RSD) were 2.6%-6.1%. And the content of each mineral element was the same after 24 hours; All these showed that the method has a good precision, accuracy, repeatability and stability. In all the hulless barley samples, the average contents were in the order of K > S > Mg > Ca > Fe > Na > Zn > Mn > Cu, and the contents of zinc, iron and manganese closely related to people's health were relatively higher than other crops. The data of the experiment could provide an accurate and credible evidence

  10. Mapping atomic and diffuse interstellar band absorption across the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mandy; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Sarre, Peter J.; Beckman, John E.

    2015-12-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) trace warm neutral and weakly ionized diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Here we present a dedicated, high signal-to-noise spectroscopic survey of two of the strongest DIBs, at 5780 and 5797 Å, in optical spectra of 666 early-type stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, along with measurements of the atomic Na I D and Ca II K lines. The resulting maps show for the first time the distribution of DIB carriers across large swathes of galaxies, as well as the foreground Milky Way ISM. We confirm the association of the 5797 Å DIB with neutral gas, and the 5780 Å DIB with more translucent gas, generally tracing the star-forming regions within the Magellanic Clouds. Likewise, the Na I D line traces the denser ISM whereas the Ca II K line traces the more diffuse, warmer gas. The Ca II K line has an additional component at ˜200-220 km s-1 seen towards both Magellanic Clouds; this may be associated with a pan-Magellanic halo. Both the atomic lines and DIBs show sub-pc-scale structure in the Galactic foreground absorption; the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs show very little correlation on these small scales, as do the Ca II K and Na I D lines. This suggests that good correlations between the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs, or between Ca II K and Na I D, arise from the superposition of multiple interstellar structures. Similarity in behaviour between DIBs and Na I in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Milky Way suggests the abundance of DIB carriers scales in proportion to metallicity.

  11. Determination of arsenic and cadmium in crude oil by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, Alexandre; Zmozinski, Ariane Vanessa; Damin, Isabel Cristina Ferreira; Silva, Márcia Messias; Vale, Maria Goreti Rodrigues

    2012-05-01

    In this work, a direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry method has been developed for the determination of arsenic and cadmium in crude oil samples. The samples were weighed directly on the solid sampling platforms and introduced into the graphite tube for analysis. The chemical modifier used for both analytes was a mixture of 0.1% Pd + 0.06% Mg + 0.06% Triton X-100. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were obtained for both analytes using standards and samples. Calibration curves with aqueous standards could be used for both analytes. The limits of detection obtained were 5.1 μg kg- 1 for arsenic and 0.2 μg kg- 1 for cadmium, calculated for the maximum amount of sample that can be analyzed (8 mg and 10 mg) for arsenic and cadmium, respectively. Relative standard deviations lower than 20% were obtained. For validation purposes, a calibration curve was constructed with the SRM 1634c and aqueous standards for arsenic and the results obtained for several crude oil samples were in agreement according to paired t-test. The result obtained for the determination of arsenic in the SRM against aqueous standards was also in agreement with the certificate value. As there is no crude oil or similar reference material available with a certified value for cadmium, a digestion in an open vessel under reflux using a "cold finger" was adopted for validation purposes. The use of paired t-test showed that the results obtained by direct sampling and digestion were in agreement at a 95% confidence level. Recovery tests were carried out with inorganic and organic standards and the results were between 88% and 109%. The proposed method is simple, fast and reliable, being appropriated for routine analysis.

  12. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  13. Use of atomic absorption spectrometry in assessment of biomonitor plants for lead, cadmium and copper pollution.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Kaya; Mehmet, Yaman

    2012-01-01

    Eleven plant species were collected from the vicinity of lead-battery plant in the city of Gaziantep, Turkey. Lead, cadmium and copper concentrations in the soil and leaves of plants were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead, Cd and Cu concentrations in the soil samples taken from battery area were found to be in the ranges of 304-602, 0.4-0.44 and 31-37 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Significantly increased lead concentration up to 2 750 mg x kg(-1) was found in the leaves of Eleagnus angustifolia L. plant. The lead concentrations in the other plant leaves taken from 50 m around battery factory followed the order Ailanthus altissima > Morus sp. > Juglans regia L. > Ficus carica L. > Cydonia oblonga Miller > Prunus x domestica L. The plants, Populus nigra L. , Eleagnus angustifolia L. and Salix sp. were found useful for Cd, and the plant, Eleagnus angusti folia L. for Pb, to be considered as potential biomonitor. Especially, leaves of trees and plants taken from the distance of 50 m from battery plant have relatively higher Pb concentrations. Therefore, people who and animals which live in this area and benefit from these soil and plants have vital risks. PMID:22497165

  14. Analysis of the Release Characteristics of Cu-Treated Antimicrobial Implant Surfaces Using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zietz, Carmen; Fritsche, Andreas; Finke, Birgit; Stranak, Vitezslav; Haenle, Maximilian; Hippler, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    New developments of antimicrobial implant surfaces doped with copper (Cu) ions may minimize the risk of implant-associated infections. However, experimental evaluation of the Cu release is influenced by various test parameters. The aim of our study was to evaluate the Cu release characteristics in vitro according to the storage fluid and surface roughness. Plasma immersion ion implantation of Cu (Cu-PIII) and pulsed magnetron sputtering process of a titanium copper film (Ti-Cu) were applied to titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) samples with different surface finishing of the implant material (polished, hydroxyapatite and corundum blasted). The samples were submersed into either double-distilled water, human serum, or cell culture medium. Subsequently, the Cu concentration in the supernatant was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. The test fluid as well as the surface roughness can alter the Cu release significantly, whereby the highest Cu release was determined for samples with corundum-blasted surfaces stored in cell medium. PMID:22162672

  15. Slurry sampling for hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric determination of arsenic in cigarette tobaccos.

    PubMed

    Mierzwa, J; Adeloju, S B; Dhindsa, H S

    1997-06-01

    The development of a slurry sampling hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometric (HGAAS) method for the determination of arsenic in cigarette tobacco samples is described. The method is relatively simple and has been shown to give values of total arsenic close to those obtained using methods requiring total dissolution and decomposition of all vegetable matter before analysis. Pre-treatment of samples slurried in nitric acid by ultrasonication permitted the extraction of about 90% of the total arsenic from tobacco samples. Further improvement in the recovery efficiency (up to 93-94%) was accomplished by the use of an additional step of short microwave-accelerated treatment. L-Cysteine was used as a pre-reduction agent. The accuracy and precision of the slurry sampling HGAAS method were studied using the certified reference material (CRM) CTA-OTL-1 Oriental Tobacco Leaves. Under the optimum conditions, as little as 2.6 ng of arsenic can be detected. The relative standard deviation of the overall procedure was calculated to be below 7.6% at arsenic concentration levels of 0.5-0.9 mg kg-1 and the analytical results obtained for the CRM agreed with the certified value. The main factors that influenced the reliability of the method were sample homogeneity, particle size and slurry concentration. PMID:9282401

  16. Speciation of methylmercury in market seafood by thermal degradation, amalgamation and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-de-Cenzano, Manuela; Rochina-Marco, Arancha; Cervera, M Luisa; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    Sample thermal decomposition followed by mercury amalgamation and atomic absorption has been employed for the determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in fish. The method involves HBr leaching of MeHg, extraction into toluene, and back-extraction into an aqueous l-cysteine solution. Preliminary studies were focused on the extraction efficiency, losses, contaminations, and species interconversion prevention. The limit of detection was 0.018µgg(-1) (dry weight). The intraday precision for three replicate analysis at a concentration of 4.2µgg(-1) (dry weight) was 3.5 percent, similar to the interday precision according to analysis of variance (ANOVA). The accuracy was guaranteed by the use of fortified samples involving 83-105 percent recoveries, and certified reference materials TORT-2 (lobster hepatopancreas) and DORM-3 (dogfish liver), providing 107 and 98 percent recovery of certified values. The greenness of the method was also evaluated with the analytical eco-scale being obtained a final score of 73 points which means an acceptable green analysis. The method was applied to fifty-seven market samples of different fish acquired from local markets in several sampling campaigns. The content of MeHg found varied between 0.0311 and 1.24µgg(-1) (wet weight), with values that involve 33-129 percent of the total mercury content. Some considerations about food safety were also done taking into account data about Spanish fish consume and Tolerable Weekly Intake (TWI) established for MeHg. PMID:24927385

  17. Acid effects on the measurement of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adeloju, S.B.; Mann, T.F.

    1987-07-01

    The influence of nitric, hydrochloric and sulfuric acids on the measurement of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry has been investigated. Small pre-reduction peaks associated with the instability of mercury were observed in solutions containing less than or equal to 12.5, < 2 and less than or equal to 12.5% v/v of each acid, respectively. Mercury was found to be most stable in greater than or equal to 2% v/v hydrochloric acid and the measured absorbance was not greatly influenced by varying concentration of the acid. The mercury absorbance measurements were more sensitive in solutions containing less than or equal to 6.3% v/v hydrochloric acid than in similar concentrations of nitric and sulfuric acids. The use of the three acids as a digestion mixture result in serious interference from nitrogen oxides. The interference was removed by use of expelling agents such as urea and sulfamic acid or overcome by use of excess stannous chloride, prior to the reduction of mercury(II) ions. The determination of mercury in NBS albacore tuna using both of these approaches to overcome the interference problem proved to be successful.

  18. Determination of gold in geological materials by carbon slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Kuryło, Michał; Otto, Magdalena; Mróz, Agnieszka

    2012-09-15

    A simple and cost effective preconcentration method on modified activated carbons is described for the determination of traces of gold (Au) in geological samples by carbon slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The basic parameters affecting the adsorption capacity of Au(III) ions on modified activated carbons were studied in detail and the effect of activated carbons modification has been determined by studying the initial runs of adsorption isotherms. The influence of chlorides and nitrates on adsorption ability of Au(III) ions onto the modified activated carbons for diluted aqueous solution was also studied in detail in respect to the determination of gold in solid materials after digestion steps in the analytical procedure, which usually involves the application of aqua regia. SEM-EDX and XPS studies confirmed that the surface reduction of Au(III) ions to Au(0) is the main gold adsorption mechanism on the activated carbon. Determination of gold after its preconcentration on the modified activated carbon was validated by applying certified reference materials. The experimental results are in good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the determination of Au in real samples using aqueous standards. PMID:22967620

  19. Determination of cobalt in samples containing cobalt and tungsten carbide by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Firriolo, J.M.; Kutzman, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    A method has been developed to determine the amount of cobalt (Co) in atmospheric dust samples which include free and sintered Co. Cobalt and tungsten carbide (WC) mixtures ranging from 0-100% Co were prepared for atomic absorption analysis by dissolving the Co in aqua regia. Using this method, the amount of Co in the samples assayed ranged from 90.9-100.1% of that gravimetrically added to the mixtures. The results of this aqua regia dissolution procedure for Co were compared to a hydrofluoric acid method which solubilized both the Co and the WC. Application of the aqua regia dissolution method to samples of sintered WC and Co dust resulted in complete recovery of the Co from these materials. These results were supported by x-ray analysis of the samples before and after dissolution of the Co with aqua regia. The described procedure is advantageous because it avoids the use of highly-caustic hydrofluoric acid and the results are quickly available.

  20. Stabilizing Agents for Calibration in the Determination of Mercury Using Solid Sampling Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zelinková, Hana; Červenka, Rostislav; Komárek, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Tetramethylene dithiocarbamate (TMDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and thiourea were investigated as stabilizing agents for calibration purposes in the determination of mercury using solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ETAAS). These agents were used for complexation of mercury in calibration solutions and its thermal stabilization in a solid sampling platform. The calibration solutions had the form of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extracts or MIBK-methanol solutions with the TMDTC and DEDTC chelates and aqueous solutions with thiourea complexes. The best results were obtained for MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of 2.5 g L−1 TMDTC. The surface of graphite platforms for solid sampling was modified with palladium or rhenium by using electrodeposition from a drop of solutions. The Re modifier is preferable due to a higher lifetime of platform coating. A new SS-ETAAS procedure using the direct sampling of solid samples into a platform with an Re modified graphite surface and the calibration against MIBK-methanol solutions in the presence of TMDTC is proposed for the determination of mercury content in solid environmental samples, such as soil and plants. PMID:22654606

  1. Evaluation of metal contents of household detergent samples from Turkey by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Unsal, Yunus Emre; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2013-11-01

    The concentrations of cadmium, copper, chromium, cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, and zinc in detergent samples from Kayseri, Turkey were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. HClO₄ (10 mL)/HNO₃ (10 mL) mixture was used for the digestion of household detergent samples. The correctness of the analytical procedures was checked with standard addition-recovery tests in different detergent samples for the investigated metal ions. The concentration ranges of the elements in the detergent samples were found as 17.2-60.1, 11.1-40.1, 2.5-32.3, 8.1-10.5, 7.2-21.6, 9.8-17.9, 1.7-3.8, 12.5-22.5, and 2.0-5.8 μg/g for iron, manganese, zinc, copper, lead, cobalt, cadmium, nickel, and chromium, respectively. The values found in this work were compared with some other studies around the world conducted on detergent samples. PMID:23722641

  2. Stability of low concentration calibration standards for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, D A; TenKate, L B

    1993-11-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS) is used for determination of ultra-trace metals in environmentally important samples. In the generation of GFAAS calibration curves for many environmental applications, low concentration calibration standards must be prepared dally, as required by the Statement of Work (SOW) for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Contract Laboratory Program (CLP). This results in significant time and work for the analyst and significant cost to the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) for chemicals and waste management. While EPA SW 846 is less prescriptive than the CLP SOW, ACL has been following the CLP guidelines because in-house criteria regarding the stability of GFAAS standards have not been established. A study was conducted to determine the stability of GFAAS standards for analytes commonly used in the ACL (single and mixed) as a function of time. Data were collected over nine months. The results show that GFAAS standards for Sb, Pb, Se, Ag, and TI are stable for a longer period of time than currently assumed by the CLP SOW. Reducing the frequency of preparing these standards will increase efficiency, decrease the handling of hazardous the quantity of hazardous waste generated, and decrease the quantity of hazardous substances to be ordered and stocked by the laboratory. These benefits will improve GFAAS analysis quality, reduce costs, enhance safety, and lower environmental concerns.

  3. Germanium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry: an increased vapor pressure-chloride generation system.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Volkan, Mürvet

    2011-03-15

    A new chloride generation system was designed for the direct, sensitive, rapid and accurate determination of the total germanium in complex matrices. It was aimed to improve the detection limit of chloride generation technique by increasing the vapor pressure of germanium tetrachloride (GeCl(4)). In order to do so, a novel joint vapor production and gas-liquid separation unit equipped with a home-made oven was incorporated to an ordinary nitrous oxide-acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Several variables such as reaction time, temperature and acid concentration have been investigated. The linear range for germanium determination was 0.1-10 ng mL(-1) for 1 mL sampling volume with a detection limit (3s) of 0.01 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.4% for nine replicates of a 1 ng mL(-1) germanium solution. The method was validated by the analysis of one non-certified and two certified geochemical reference materials, respectively, CRM GSJ-JR-2 (Rhyolite), and GSJ-JR-1 (Rhyolite), and GBW 07107 (Chinese Rock). Selectivity of the method was investigated for Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Ga(3+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(2+), and Zn(2+) ions and ionic species of As(III), Sb(III), Te(IV), and Se(IV). PMID:21315908

  4. Determination of total tin in silicate rocks by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsheimer, H.N.; Fries, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of total tin in silicate rocks utilizing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer with a stabilized-temperature platform furnace and Zeeman-effect background correction. The sample is decomposed by lithium metaborate fusion (3 + 1) in graphite crucibles with the melt being dissolved in 7.5% hydrochloric acid. Tin extractions (4 + 1 or 8 + 1) are executed on portions of the acid solutions using a 4% solution of tricotylphosphine oxide in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Ascorbic acid is added as a reducing agent prior to extraction. A solution of diammonium hydrogenphosphate and magnesium nitrate is used as a matrix modifier in the graphite furnace determination. The limit of detection is > 10 pg, equivalent to > 1 ??g l-1 of tin in the MIBK solution or 0.2-0.3 ??g g-61 in the rock. The concentration range is linear between 2.5 and 500 ??g l-1 tin in solution. The precision, measured as relative standard deviation, is < 20% at the 2.5 ??g l-1 level and < 7% at the 10-30 ??g l-1 level of tin. Excellent agreement with recommended literature values was found when the method was applied to the international silicate rock standards BCR-1, PCC-1, GSP-1, AGV-1, STM-1, JGb-1 and Mica-Fe. Application was made to the determination of tin in geological core samples with total tin concentrations of the order of 1 ??g g-1 or less.

  5. Determination of arsenic in a nickel alloy by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, C. P.; Tyson, J. F.; Offley, S. G.

    1992-08-01

    The development of a method for the direct determination of trace arsenic quantities in nickel alloy digests, by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, is described. An optimization study of the manifold and chemical parameters produced system performance, in terms of tolerance of the nickel matrix and sensitivity, such that matrix removal and pre-reduction of As(V) to As (III) prior to arsine generation were eliminated. Full recovery of the As(V) signal from a solution containing 5 ng ml -1 in the presence of 60 μg ml -1 nickel was obtained. Validation of the method was achieved by analyzing a British Chemical Standard (BCS) Certified Reference Material (CRM) #346 IN nickel alloy containing arsenic at a concentration of 50 μg g -1. Following dissolution in nitric and hydrofluoric acids by a microwave assisted procedure, the only subsequent preparation required was dilution by the appropriate factor. Up to 60 injections h -1 may be made, with a detection limit of 0.5 ng ml -1 arsenic (250 pg absolute) as As(V) in a 500 μl sample. The peak height characteristic concentration is 0.46 ng ml -1, with a relative standard deviation of 3.5% for a 10 ng ml -1 As(V) standard ( n = 6).

  6. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum. PMID:27427698

  7. Determination of rhodium: Since the origins until today Atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bosch Ojeda, C; Sánchez Rojas, F

    2006-02-28

    Rhodium is present at about 0.001ppm in the earths crust. Rhodium metal is known for its stability in corrosive environments, physical beauty and unique physical and chemical properties. Recent interest in the medical and industrial significance of platinum and to a lesser extent palladium and rhodium has been accompanied by an increasing interest in their determination at low levels. Platinum group elements (PGEs: Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os) play a decisive role in the performance of catalytic converters, world-wide applied in vehicles and in some household utensils, to reduce the emission of gaseous pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons. Since then, approximately 73% of the world production of rhodium is consumed in the production of autocatalyst. However, the hot exhaust gases flowing through the converter cause abrasion of these units, leading to the emission of these elements to the environment. The concentration level of rhodium (also platinum and palladium) is still very low in the nature; accordingly, their determination in environmental samples specially appears to be a challenging task for analytical chemists. In recent years, the development of analytical methods for the determination of rhodium has increased. The aim of the present review is to evaluate the utility of atomic absorption spectrometry, applied for the quantification of rhodium in different materials, such as environmental, biological, metallurgical and geological samples. PMID:18970480

  8. Atomic Structure of Pt3Ni Nanoframe Electrocatalysts by in Situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Becknell, Nigel; Kang, Yijin; Chen, Chen; Resasco, Joaquin; Kornienko, Nikolay; Guo, Jinghua; Markovic, Nenad M; Somorjai, Gabor A; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Yang, Peidong

    2015-12-23

    Understanding the atomic structure of a catalyst is crucial to exposing the source of its performance characteristics. It is highly unlikely that a catalyst remains the same under reaction conditions when compared to as-synthesized. Hence, the ideal experiment to study the catalyst structure should be performed in situ. Here, we use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as an in situ technique to study Pt3Ni nanoframe particles which have been proven to be an excellent electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The surface characteristics of the nanoframes were probed through electrochemical hydrogen underpotential deposition and carbon monoxide electrooxidation, which showed that nanoframe surfaces with different structure exhibit varying levels of binding strength to adsorbate molecules. It is well-known that Pt-skin formation on Pt-Ni catalysts will enhance ORR activity by weakening the binding energy between the surface and adsorbates. Ex situ and in situ XAS results reveal that nanoframes which bind adsorbates more strongly have a rougher Pt surface caused by insufficient segregation of Pt to the surface and consequent Ni dissolution. In contrast, nanoframes which exhibit extremely high ORR activity simultaneously demonstrate more significant segregation of Pt over Ni-rich subsurface layers, allowing better formation of the critical Pt-skin. This work demonstrates that the high ORR activity of the Pt3Ni hollow nanoframes depends on successful formation of the Pt-skin surface structure. PMID:26652294

  9. Determination of chromium and molybdenum in medical foods by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Phifer, E C

    1995-01-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to determine chromium and molybdenum in 7 medical foods from 5 manufacturers. Linear standard curves were obtained for both elements for concentrations between 5 and 25 ng/mL. Detection limits were 0.24 ng/mL for Cr and 0.67 ng/mL for Mo. Characteristic masses were 3.1 and 14.7 pg for Cr and Mo, respectively. No difference was detected between wet and dry ashing methods, and dry ashing was used to complete the study. The method was validated by assaying various National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference materials. Analysis of these products for Cr and Mo were within certified values. One product was evaluated by this method for reproducibility (n = 5). Relative standard deviations were 6.8 and 4.8% for Cr and Mo, respectively. This product contained 0.31 +/= 0.02 micrograms Cr/g and 0.63 +/- 0.03 micrograms Mo/g. The remaining products contained 0.09-1.28 micrograms Cr/g and 0.07-2.3 micrograms Mo/g. Mean recovery values were 98 +/- 14% (n = 14) for Cr at spike levels of 0.20-1.89 micrograms/g and 102 +/- 24% (n = 10) for Mo at spike levels of 0.30-1.89 micrograms/g. PMID:8664588

  10. Atomic absorption spectrometric determination of copper, zinc, and lead in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1976-01-01

    An atomic absorption spectrometric method is described for the determination of copper, zinc, and lead in geological materials. The sample is digested with HF-HCl-H2O2; the final solution for analysis is in 10 % (v/v) HCl. Copper and zinc are determined directly by aspirating the solution into an air-acetylene flame. A separate aliquot of the solution is used for determination of lead; lead is extracted into TOPO-MIBK from the acidic solution in the presence of iodide and ascorbic acid. For a 0.50-g sample, the limits of determination are 10-2000 p.p.m. for Cu and Zn, and 5-5000 p.p.m. for Pb. As much as 40 % Fe or Ca. and 10 % Al, Mg, or Mn in the sample do not interfere. The proposed method can be applied to the determination of copper, zinc, and lead in a wide range of geological materials including iron- and manganese-rich, calcareous and carbonate samples. ?? 1976.