Science.gov

Sample records for flash lamp pumped

  1. Laser head for simultaneous optical pumping of several dye lasers. [with single flash lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumola, P. B.; Mcalexander, B. T. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    The invention is a laser head for simultaneous pumping several dye lasers with a single flash lamp. The laser head includes primarily a multi-elliptical cylinder cavity with a single flash lamp placed along the common focal axis of the cavity and with capillary tube dye cells placed along each of the other focal axes of the cavity. The inside surface of the cavity is polished. Hence, the single flash lamp supplies the energy to the several dye cells.

  2. Coumarin-4 laser efficiency up to 0. 14% under coaxial flash-lamp pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.G.; Yu, C.L.

    1987-02-01

    Under coaxial flash lamp pumping the laser efficiency of coumarin-4 in slightly basic ethyl alcohol solution as an active medium has reached a value of 0.14%. That is three times higher than that in the basic aqueous solution. Its tunable wavelength range of laser output has extended from 440 to 510 nm with the maximum at 460 nm.

  3. The effect of laser-rod properties on the energy transfer efficiency of pumping cavities using helical flash lamps.

    PubMed

    Skinner, D R

    1969-07-01

    Monte Carlo calculations of energy transfer efficiency are presented for a wide range of configurations typical of practical large ruby laser systems using helical flash lamps. Details of mathematical models used are given. It is shown that the efficiency of the pumping cavity is greatly reduced if the ruby surface is roughened to form a perfect diffuser. Removal of the core of the ruby to form an annular cylinder causes a significant loss of efficiency for smooth rubies only. Also, the efficiency increases significantly with increasing ruby length and diameter, but there is only a marginal improvement with increasing ruby absorption coefficient. PMID:20072455

  4. Flash-lamp pumped Pr:YAP laser operated at wavelengths of 747 nm and 662 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fibrich, Martin; Jelínková, Helena; Šulc, Jan; Nejezchleb, Karel; Škoda, Václav

    2009-02-01

    Successful room-temperature generation of Pr:YAP laser radiation at wavelengths of 747 nm and 662 nm was demonstrated. A flash-lamp pumped Pr:YAP laser was operated in free-running pulsed regime at room temperature. Permanent laser action was reached by means of a special UV color glass plate filter placed directly into the laser cavity. The maximum output energy and pulse length reached at wavelengths of 747 nm and 662 nm were 102 mJ, 92 μs and 6.1 mJ, 47.5 μs, respectively. The laser beam parameter M2 ~ 1.5 was measured when the 662 nm wavelength was generated. In the case of 747 nm wavelength generation, M2 ~ 1.2 was reached with a diaphragm inside the resonator. For different pumped energy values, the line shape and linewidth remained stable for both cases.

  5. Rapid flash lamp

    DOEpatents

    Gavenonis, Thomas L.; Hewitt, William H.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing low peak time and pulse width actinic energy from a lamp by varying the input energy of a capacitive ignition circuit having relatively high voltage to the lamp. The lamp comprises a pair of electrodes disposed within a light transparent envelope in which a combustible and an oxidizing gas reaction combination is located. The combustible is preferably shredded zirconium which is in contact with and provides an electrical discharge path between the electrodes. The gas is preferably pressurized oxygen.

  6. Rapid flash lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Gavenonis, Thomas L.; Hewitt, William H.

    1989-06-06

    A method and apparatus for providing low peak time and pulse width actinic energy from a lamp by varying the input energy of a capacitive ignition circuit having relatively high voltage to the lamp. The lamp comprises a pair of electrodes disposed within a light transparent envelope in which a combustible and an oxidizing gas reaction combination is located. The combustible is preferably shredded zirconium which is in contact with and provides an electrical discharge path between the electrodes. The gas is preferably pressurized oxygen.

  7. Investigation of 2.1-micron lasing properties of Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG crystals under flash-lamp pumping at various operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyong H.; Choi, Young S.; Barnes, Norman P.; Hess, Robert V.; Bair, Clayton H.; Brockman, Philip

    1993-01-01

    Flash-lamp-pumped normal-mode and Q-switched 2.1-micron laser operations of Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG crystals have been evaluated under a wide variety of experimental conditions in order to determine an optimum lasing condition and to characterize the laser outputs. Q-switched laser-output energies equal to, or in some cases exceeding the normal-mode laser energies, were obtained in the form of a strong single spike through an optimization of the opening time of a lithium niobate Q switch. The increase of the normal-mode laser slope efficiency was observed with the increase of the Tm concentration from 2.5 to 4.5 at. pct at operating temperatures from 120 K to near room temperature. Laser transitions were observed only at 2.098 and 2.091 microns under various conditions. The 2.091-micron laser transition appeared to be dominant at high-temperature operations with low-reflective-output couplers.

  8. Multi-lamp laser pumping cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppenheimer, J.D. Jr.

    1987-07-21

    An optically pumped laser comprises: A. a cylindrical laser rod having a longitudinal central rod axis; B. cylindrical lamps for optically pumping the laser rod. The lamps have longitudinal central lamp axes parallel to the rod axis. The lamps being so located with respect to each other and to the laser rod as to define in cross section a base line associated with each lamp and extending between the rod axis and the lamp axis of the associated lamp. The base lines being equal in length and equiangularly spaced; and C. a reflector wall consisting essentially of first and second wall sections associated with each lamp, the cross sections of the first and second wall sections associated with a given lamp essentially following first and second curves extending from a lamp cusp associated with the given lamp to second and first rod cusps, respectively, associated with the given lamp. The first and second curves consist of the loci of points to which the sums of the distances, exterior to the laser rod and the given lamp, from first and second rod starting points, respectively, associated with the given lamp and from first and second lamp starting points, respectively, on the given lamp equal a fixed quantity.

  9. EUV resist processing with flash-lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, Julius Joseph; Kaneyama, Koji; Morita, Akihiko; Fuse, Kazuhiko; Kiyama, Hiroki; Asai, Masaya; Itani, Toshiro

    2012-03-01

    The reduction of line width roughness (LWR) remains a difficult issue for very fine patterns obtained with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Thus, the investigation of LWR-reduction from the viewpoint of resist processing has become necessary. Alternative bake processes, such as the flash-lamp (FL) has been proven feasible as for application in EUV resists. This work focuses on initial investigations for its use in post-development bake (post bake or PB). A polyhydroxystyrene-acryl hybrid EUV model resist was utilized and comparisons with 'no bake' and conventional hot-plate PB conditions were made. As a result, relatively improved LWR was obtained with FL PB with minimal effect on lithographic performance. Moreover, in the course of these experiments, two types of resist reflow mechanisms assumed to be the primary basis for the LWR improvement achieved, are discussed.

  10. CW arc-lamp-pumped alexandrite lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, H.; Walling, J.C.; Wernikowski, T.; Harter, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    The performance characteristics of arc-lamp- (Xe and Hg) pumped, CW alexandrite lasers are described in detail. The modes of operation considered are free running, tuned, and repetitively Q-switched. The experimental arrangement and apparatus are also outlined. The experimental results are discussed in terms of a steady-state model, and the areas of agreement and difficulty are pointed out.

  11. 49 CFR 234.253 - Flashing light units and lamp voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flashing light units and lamp voltage. 234.253 Section 234.253 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD....253 Flashing light units and lamp voltage. (a) Each flashing light unit shall be inspected...

  12. 49 CFR 234.253 - Flashing light units and lamp voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flashing light units and lamp voltage. 234.253 Section 234.253 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD....253 Flashing light units and lamp voltage. (a) Each flashing light unit shall be inspected...

  13. Portable flash lamp reflectance analyzer system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalshoven, James Edward (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The system and method allow spectroscopic analysis of vegetation or the like without effects from changing sun and cloud conditions, undesired portions of the area of interest or atmospheric disturbances. The system (1) includes a light source (5) such as a xenon flash lamp, a telescope (7), a spectrometer (9), an analog/digital converter (11), a memory (13), a display (15), and an on-board microprocessor (17) or a port (19) for attachment to a laptop computer. The system is taken to an area of interest in the woods (step 41), the vegetation is illuminated from below (step 43) and data are taken (step 45).

  14. 49 CFR 234.253 - Flashing light units and lamp voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flashing light units and lamp voltage. 234.253 Section 234.253 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.253 Flashing light units and lamp voltage....

  15. An Electronic Flash Lamp System to Replace the Traditional, Explosively-Driven Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stigman, W L; Kihara, R; Scarpetti, R D

    2002-09-25

    Electronic flash lamps are being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These lamps are intended to replace the traditional explosively driven Argon-gas filled light sources (Argon candles) that are currently used to provide illumination for high speed rotating mirror-framing cameras. At Livermore, we are developing an electronic flash lamp system that can match or exceed the light output of a traditional Argon candle. These systems utilize a Plasma Arc Lamp developed by PRISM Science Inc of Chatham, MA, USA. In the past, high-speed photography requiring explosively driven light sources were a one-time-only event that destroyed fixtures and optical alignment. The electronic flash lamp system, utilizing the Plasma Arc Lamp, will replace the explosively driven lighting systems and provide the capability to dry run experimental setups and repeat tests without damage to the experimental set-up. The electronic flash lamp system eliminates the problem of collateral damage to the experiment and does not add to the overall amount of explosives needed for a single test. Since the Pulsed-Power driver is remotely located, only the flash lamp itself is destroyed when the explosive shot is fired. The flexible geometry of this light source also enables the user to create complex light patterns as well as photograph very large areas with a single lighting system. This electronic flash lamp system will provide an extremely bright, stable, and repeatable light source for rotating-mirror framing cameras operating at one million frames per second, using both black & white or color films. The design of the Pulsed-Power driver and the flash lamp, along with experimental data and results will be discussed.

  16. [Study on the discharge properties of xeon flash lamp and experimental measurement].

    PubMed

    Zhao, You-Quan; Miao, Pei-Liang; He, Feng; Gu, Jian; Zhai, Rui-Wei

    2014-07-01

    The Xenon flash lamp is a new type of light source for analytical instrument. The present paper analyzed the discharge process of xenon flash lamp, presented the discharge test system, and conducted experimental measurement of the voltage, current and optical pulse signal in the process of discharge. The results show that in the preliminary discharge, the free electron concentration was at a low level, so the energy was at a low level, then following the gas discharge, numerous free electrons formed in the lamp, resultin in the increase in the concentration of free electrons, therefore discharge current rised rapidly and voltage reduced. The lamp released photons to generate light pulse in the moment of ionic recombination, The pulse xenon lamp light energy output and spectral characteristic is related to electron energy in recombination and combination level of xenon, if the input energy and the energy consumption of the xenon lamp is inconsistent, it will lead to repeated capacitor charging and discharging and produce oscillation waveform. This paper is very useful for understanding the process of xenon lamp discharge, optimizing the driver circuit and the production of xenon flash lamp. PMID:25269320

  17. Effect of flash lamp annealing on electrical activation in boron-implanted polycrystalline Si thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Woori; Jin, Won-Beom; Choi, Jungwan; Bae, Seung-Muk; Kim, Hyoung-June; Kim, Byung-Kuk; Park, Seungho; Hwang, Jin-Ha

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Intensified visible light irradiation was generated via a high-powered Xe arc lamp. • The disordered Si atomic structure absorbs the intensified visible light. • The rapid heating activates electrically boron-implanted Si thin films. • Flash lamp heating is applicable to low temperature polycrystalline Si thin films. - Abstract: Boron-implanted polycrystalline Si thin films on glass substrates were subjected to a short duration (1 ms) of intense visible light irradiation generated via a high-powered Xe arc lamp. The disordered Si atomic structure absorbs the intense visible light resulting from flash lamp annealing. The subsequent rapid heating results in the electrical activation of boron-implanted Si thin films, which is empirically observed using Hall measurements. The electrical activation is verified by the observed increase in the crystalline component of the Si structures resulting in higher transmittance. The feasibility of flash lamp annealing has also been demonstrated via a theoretical thermal prediction, indicating that the flash lamp annealing is applicable to low-temperature polycrystalline Si thin films.

  18. Optimum flash lamp annealing conditions for fabrication of low dose ion-implanted Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usami, A.; Nishioka, H.; Inoue, Y.

    1984-06-01

    A method to fabricate silicon solar cells was developed around low dose (nonamorphized) ion implantation and Xe flash lamp annealing under assist heating (350-550 C). Solar cells fabricated by low dose B-11/+/ (p+/n-type cell) and P-31/+/ (n+/p-type cell) implantation and flash lamp annealing showing a high efficiency of about 10.4 percent (AM2) without AR coating and BSF structures. The results were compared with those of high dose implanted cells reported previously (in this transaction). Effects of assist heating temperature were also examined.

  19. Rapid measurement of spatial light distribution of a short-arc xenon flash lamp.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youquan; Guo, Dexia; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Lingli; Jiang, Nan; Wang, Xianquan

    2016-08-20

    Small short-arc xenon flash lamps, yielding high energy and ultraviolet radiation without cooling structures, provide ideal analytic-instrument light. Improving instrument designs requires accurately determining spatial optical-flux distribution. Thus, this paper presents rapid scanning of a xenon lamp's central light intensity using a high-sensitivity photodiode to capture short light pulses. Results show two-dimensional optical illumination patterns. In the horizontal mode, the anode and cathode lie in the target plane. In the vertical mode, the two electrodes are centered in a circle. Thus, because the xenon lamp's spatial light flux varies by orientation and main driving voltage, we recommend sampling light horizontally in front of the lamp across small angles. PMID:27556976

  20. 15 KJ FLASH LAMP, POWER CONDITIONING UNIT DESIGNED FOR SAFTY, RELIABILITY & MANUFACTURABILITY*

    SciTech Connect

    James, G; Merritt, B; Dreifuerst, G; Strickland, S

    2007-08-07

    A 15kJoule, Flash Lamp Power Conditioning Unit has been successfully designed, developed, and deployed in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Preamplifier Modules (PAM). The primary design philosophy of this power conditioning unit (PCU) is safety, reliability, and manufacturability. Cost reduction over commercially equivalent systems was also achieved through an easily manufactured packaging design optimized to meet NIF requirements. While still maintaining low cost, the PCU design includes a robust control system, fault diagnostic system, and safety features. The pulsed power design includes 6 PFN modules, each including a dual series injection trigger transformer, that drive a total of 12 flash lamp loads. The lamps are individually triggered via a 20kV pulse produced by a 1kV, MCT switched capacitive discharge unit on the primary side of the trigger transformer. The remote control interface includes an embedded controller that captures flash lamp current wave forms and fault status for each shot. The embedded controller provides the flexibility of remotely adjusting both the main drive voltage from 1.6 to 2.5 kV and the trigger voltage from 0 to 20 kV.

  1. A flash-lamp based device for fluorescence detection and identification of individual pollen grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, Denis; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel optical aerosol particle detector based on Xe flash lamp excitation and spectrally resolved fluorescence acquisition. We demonstrate its performances on three natural pollens acquiring in real-time scattering intensity at two wavelengths, sub-microsecond time-resolved scattering traces of the particles' passage in the focus, and UV-excited fluorescence spectra. We show that the device gives access to a rather specific detection of the bioaerosol particles.

  2. Transient absorption in water-micellar solutions of rhodamine 6G with flash lamp excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.B.; Cherkasov, A.S.

    1986-06-01

    This paper studies the kinetics of transient losses in water-micellar solutions of rhodamine 6G by using flash lamp excitation. During the experiments, the laser radiation energy was measured, the time evolution of stimulated emission spectra was recorded; pulse shape was monitored by an oscillograph. The change of generation characteristics of water-micellar solutions of rhodamine 6G as a function of cyclooctatetraene concentration is shown.

  3. Homogenization of the melting depth in SiC on Si structures during flash lamp irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelskow, Matthias; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Smith, Mark P.; McMahon, Richard A.

    2005-12-01

    Flash lamp annealing of heteroepitaxial silicon carbide on silicon structures involves melting the silicon below the SiC layer but the faceted nature of the liquid-solid interface leads to unacceptable surface roughness. This letter describes a method of controlling melting by using a melt stop created at a controlled depth below the Si /SiC interface by implanting a high dose of carbon, which significantly increases the silicon melting temperature. Results confirm the effectiveness of this approach for increasing surface uniformity, making liquid phase processing compatible with standard device fabrication techniques.

  4. Homogenization of the melting depth in SiC on Si structures during flash lamp irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Voelskow, Matthias; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Smith, Mark P.; McMahon, Richard A.

    2005-12-12

    Flash lamp annealing of heteroepitaxial silicon carbide on silicon structures involves melting the silicon below the SiC layer but the faceted nature of the liquid-solid interface leads to unacceptable surface roughness. This letter describes a method of controlling melting by using a melt stop created at a controlled depth below the Si/SiC interface by implanting a high dose of carbon, which significantly increases the silicon melting temperature. Results confirm the effectiveness of this approach for increasing surface uniformity, making liquid phase processing compatible with standard device fabrication techniques.

  5. Design of multilamp nonimaging laser pump cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppenheimer, J.D. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    A technique has been developed to design single laser rod, multiple flash lamp pump cavities that allow all of the energy generated by the lamp to pass through the laser rod before entering another lamp cavity. The effective lamp and rod perimeters are matched, guaranteeing maximal concentration and uniformity of pumping.

  6. Application of flash-lamp post-exposure baking for EUV resist processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyama, Koji; Itani, Toshiro

    2011-04-01

    The reduction of linewidth roughness (LWR) is considered one of the most critical issues in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photoresists. A possible solution to the LWR issue is shortening the acid-diffusion length of the photoacid via the optimized application of post-exposure bake (PEB) processes. In this study, the development and feasibility of the flash-lamp (FL) PEB process as a replacement for the commonly used hot-plate PEB process is investigated. The results indicate that, using the FL PEB process, the acid-diffusion length is controllable and lithographic patterning results are obtained. Further detailed analysis is necessary to optimize this technology for lithographic patterning applications. However, the present results show the potential of FL PEB for applications in EUV photoresist processing.

  7. Flash Lamp Integrating Sphere Technique for Measuring the Dynamic Reflectance of Shocked Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Gerald; La Lone, Brandon; Veeser, Lynn; Hixson, Rob; Holtkamp, David

    2013-07-08

    Accurate reflectance (R) measurements of metals undergoing shock wave compression can benefit high pressure research in several ways. For example, pressure dependent reflectance measurements can be used to deduce electronic band structure, and discrete changes with pressure or temperature may indicate the occurrence of a phase boundary. Additionally, knowledge of the wavelength dependent emissivity (1 -R, for opaque samples) of the metal surface is essential for accurate pyrometric temperature measurement because the radiance is a function of both the temperature and emissivity. We have developed a method for measuring dynamic reflectance in the visible and near IR spectral regions with nanosecond response time and less than 1.5% uncertainty. The method utilizes an integrating sphere fitted with a xenon flash-lamp illumination source. Because of the integrating sphere, the measurements are insensitive to changes in surface curvature or tilt. The in-situ high brightness of the flash-lamp exceeds the sample’s thermal radiance and also enables the use of solid state detectors for recording the reflectance signals with minimal noise. Using the method, we have examined the dynamic reflectance of gallium and tin subjected to shock compression from high explosives. The results suggest significant reflectance changes across phase boundaries for both metals. We have also used the method to determine the spectral emissivity of shock compressed tin at the interface between tin and a LiF window. The results were used to perform emissivity corrections to previous pyrometry data and obtain shock temperatures of the tin/LiF interface with uncertainties of less than 2%.

  8. Analysis of a four lamp flash system for calibrating multi-junction solar cells under concentrated light

    SciTech Connect

    Schachtner, Michael Prado, Marcelo Loyo; Reichmuth, S. Kasimir; Siefer, Gerald; Bett, Andreas W.

    2015-09-28

    It has been known for a long time that the precise characterization of multi-junction solar cells demands spectrally tunable solar simulators. The calibration of innovative multi-junction solar cells for CPV applications now requires tunable solar simulators which provide high irradiation levels. This paper describes the commissioning and calibration of a flash-based four-lamp simulator to be used for the measurement of multi-junction solar cells with up to four subcells under concentrated light.

  9. Nonconventional Use of Flash-Lamp Pulsed-Dye Laser in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Del Duca, Ester; Bruscino, Nicola; Conti, Rossana; Cannarozzo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Flash-lamp pulsed-dye laser (FPDL) is a nonablative technology, typically used in vascular malformation therapy due to its specificity for hemoglobin. FPDL treatments were performed in a large group of patients with persistent and/or recalcitrant different dermatological lesions with cutaneous microvessel involvement. In particular, 149 patients (73 males and 76 females) were treated. They were affected by the following dermatological disorders: angiokeratoma circumscriptum, genital and extragenital viral warts, striae rubrae, basal cell carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, angiolymphoid hyperplasia, and Jessner-Kanof disease. They all underwent various laser sessions. 89 patients (59.7%) achieved excellent clearance, 32 patients (21.4%) achieved good-moderate clearance, 19 patients (12.7%) obtained slight clearance, and 9 subjects (6.1%) had low or no removal of their lesion. In all cases, FPDL was found to be a safe and effective treatment for the abovementioned dermatological lesions in which skin microvessels play a role in pathogenesis or development. Further and single-indication studies, however, are required to assess a standardized and reproducible method for applying this technology to “off-label” indications.

  10. Blackbody absorption efficiencies for six lamp pumped Nd laser materials.

    PubMed

    Cross, P L; Barnes, N P; Skolaut, M W; Storm, M E

    1990-02-20

    Utilizing high resolution spectra, the absorption efficiency for six Nd laser materials was calculated as functions of the effective blackbody temperature of the lamp and laser crystal size. The six materials were Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, Nd:Q-98 Glass, Nd:YVO(4), Nd:BEL, and Nd:Cr:GSGG. Under the guidelines of this study, Nd:Cr:GSGG's absorption efficiency is twice the absorption efficiency of any of the other laser materials. PMID:20556185

  11. Blackbody absorption efficiencies for six lamp pumped Nd laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Patricia L.; Barnes, Norman P.; Skolaut, Milton W., Jr.; Storm, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Utilizing high resolution spectra, the absorption efficiencies for six Nd laser materials were calculated as functions of the effective blackbody temperature of the lamp and laser crystal size. The six materials were Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, Nd:Q-98 Glass, Nd:YVO4, Nd:BEL, and Nd:Cr:GSGG. Under the guidelines of this study, Nd:Cr:GSGG's absorption efficiency is twice the absorption efficiency of any of the other laser materials.

  12. Boron activation and diffusion in silicon and strained silicon-on-insulator by rapid thermal and flash lamp annealings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerath, F.; Buca, D.; Trinkaus, H.; Goryll, M.; Mantl, S.; Knoch, J.; Breuer, U.; Skorupa, W.; Ghyselen, B.

    2008-08-01

    We present experimental results on the activation and diffusion behaviors of boron in silicon-on-insulator and strained silicon-on-insulator using standard rapid thermal processing treatments as well as flash lamp annealing. After boron implantation at different doses and at a low energy of 1 keV, samples were annealed to activate the dopants, and secondary ion mass spectrometry and Hall measurements were carried out to determine boron diffusion and the amount of activated dopants, respectively. In contrast to rapid thermal annealing, flash lamp annealing enables the activation without significant diffusion of dopants. In addition, we investigated the effect of coating the samples with antireflection layers to increase the absorbed energy during flash annealing. As a result, the activation was increased significantly to values comparable with the activation obtained with standard annealing. Furthermore, the relation between the observed boron diffusion and activation as a function of the implantation and annealing parameters is discussed in terms of the kinetics of the defects involved in these processes.

  13. Active lamp pulse driver circuit. [optical pumping of laser media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, K. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A flashlamp drive circuit is described which uses an unsaturated transistor as a current mode switch to periodically subject a partially ionized gaseous laser excitation flashlamp to a stable, rectangular pulse of current from an incomplete discharge of an energy storage capacitor. A monostable multivibrator sets the pulse interval, initiating the pulse in response to a flash command by providing a reference voltage to a non-inverting terminal of a base drive amplifier; a tap on an emitter resistor provides a feedback signal sensitive to the current amplitude to an inverting terminal of amplifier, thereby controlling the pulse amplitude. The circuit drives the flashlamp to provide a squarewave current flashlamp discharge.

  14. Lamp pumped Nd:YAG laser. Space-qualifiable Nd:YAG laser for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, K. B.

    1973-01-01

    Results are given of a program concerned with the design, fabrication, and evaluation of alkali pump lamps for eventual use in a space qualified Nd:YAG laser system. The study included evaluation of 2mm through 6mm bore devices. Primary emphasis was placed upon the optimization of the 4mm bore lamp and later on the 6mm bore lamp. As part of this effort, reference was made to the Sylvania work concerned with the theoretical modeling of the Nd:YAG laser. With the knowledge gained, a projection of laser performance was made based upon realistic lamp parameters which should easily be achieved during following developmental efforts. Measurements were made on the lamp performance both in and out of the cavity configuration. One significant observation was that for a constant vapor pressure device, the spectral and fluorescent output did not vary for vacuum or argon environment. Therefore, the laser can be operated in an inert environment (eg. argon) with no degradation in output. Laser output of 3.26 watts at 430 watts input was obtained for an optimized 4mm bore lamp.

  15. Implantation-caused open volume defects in Ge after flash lamp annealing (FLA) probed by slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwand, W.; Skorupa, W.; Schumann, Th.; Posselt, M.; Schmidt, B.; Grötzschel, R.; Brauer, G.

    2008-10-01

    B + and P + ions were implanted into Ge wafers covered with a pre-amorphised surface layer of 150 nm. After this, flash lamp annealing (FLA) in Ar atmosphere was used as post-implantation heat treatment. Radiation with Xenon flash lamps, having a spectrum in the visible range of light and a pulse length of 3 ms or 20 ms, allowed an ultra-short heating up of the near surface region. In this way, a modification of the structure of the as-implanted amorphous Ge layer was possible. Depth profiles of defects, especially those of the vacancy-type, were investigated by slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) before and after FLA. It was found that the remaining vacancy-type defect structure depends on the parameters of the process of heat treatment, and that these defects could not be completely removed by FLA. Results are compared with such from SRIM 2006 calculations (stopping and range of ions in matter) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS).

  16. 49 CFR 393.25 - Requirements for lamps other than head lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... lamps; school bus warning lamps; amber warning lamps or flashing warning lamps on tow trucks and... are not required to be steady burning while the turn signal is in use. Amber warning lamps must meet.... Amber flashing warning lamps must meet SAE J595—Directional Flashing Optical Warning Devices...

  17. 49 CFR 393.25 - Requirements for lamps other than head lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... lamps; school bus warning lamps; amber warning lamps or flashing warning lamps on tow trucks and... are not required to be steady burning while the turn signal is in use. Amber warning lamps must meet.... Amber flashing warning lamps must meet SAE J595—Directional Flashing Optical Warning Devices...

  18. Formation of shallow boron emitters in crystalline silicon using flash lamp annealing: Role of excess silicon interstitials

    SciTech Connect

    Riise, Heine Nygard Azarov, Alexander; Svensson, Bengt G.; Monakhov, Edouard

    2015-07-13

    Shallow, Boron (B)-doped p{sup +} emitters have been realized using spin-on deposition and Flash Lamp Annealing (FLA) to diffuse B into monocrystalline float zone Silicon (Si). The emitters extend between 50 and 140 nm in depth below the surface, have peak concentrations between 9 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup –3} and 3 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup –3}, and exhibit sheet resistances between 70 and 3000 Ω/□. An exceptionally large increase in B diffusion occurs for FLA energy densities exceeding ∼93 J/cm{sup 2} irrespective of 10 or 20 ms pulse duration. The effect is attributed to enhanced diffusion of B caused by Si interstitial injection following a thermally activated reaction between the spin-on diffusant film and the silicon wafer.

  19. Femtosecond-precision synchronization of the pump-probe optical laser for user experiments at FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Predki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schlarb, H.; Wegner, U.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present the long-term stable synchronization of the FLASH pump-probe Ti:sapphire oscillator to an optical reference with sub-10 fs (rms) timing jitter employing a balanced optical cross-correlator. The reference pulse train, transmitted over an actively transit time-stabilized 500m long fiber link, is generated by the FLASH master laser oscillator. This laser also provides the reference for several electron bunch arrival time monitors with sub-10 fs resolution, which in turn enables a longitudinal feedback reducing the electron bunch arrival time jitter to below 25 fs (rms). Combining the precise synchronization of the laser and the longitudinal accelerator feedback enabled a proof-of-principle pump-probe experiment at FLASH, ultimately showing a significant reduction of the timing jitter between the optical laser and the XUV pulses generated by the FEL, compared to the present standard operation.

  20. Oxygen uptake occurs faster than sodium pumping in bee retina after a light flash.

    PubMed

    Tsacopoulos, M; Orkand, R K; Coles, J A; Levy, S; Poitry, S

    When neurones are active there is an entry of Na+, which must subsequently be pumped out, and an increase in their oxygen consumption rate (Qo2). The Na+ pump derives its energy from ATP, splitting it into ADP and Pi, and it has reasonably been proposed that the changes in concentrations of ATP, ADP and Pi lead to a stimulation of the O2 consumption by the mitochondria and hence to a restoration of the stock of ATP. Here we present evidence suggesting that Qo2 must be controlled differently in the retinal photoreceptor cells of the honeybee drone. Stimulation of drone photoreceptors with a flash of light causes an entry of Na+ (ref. 4) and a transient increase in Qo2 that indicates respiration of the right order of magnitude to provide ATP to pump the Na+ out. We report intracellular recordings of changes in intracellular sodium (Nai+) and potassium (Ki+) in response to single light flashes and have compared the time course of extra oxygen consumption (delta Qo2) with these ion changes and other indices of Na+ pumping. We found that the time course of pumping seems to lag behind the time course of delta Qo2. It follows that the mitochondrial respiration must be stimulated by some signal which is generated earlier than the rise in ADP produced by the Na+ pump. PMID:6828139

  1. The effect of millisecond flash lamp annealing on electrical and structural properties of ZnO:Al/Si structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, P. F.; Lipp Bregolin, F.; Wiesenhütter, K.; Wiesenhütter, U.; Riise, H. N.; Vines, L.; Prucnal, S.; Skorupa, W.; Svensson, B. G.; Monakhov, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of millisecond flash lamp annealing (FLA) on aluminum doped ZnO (AZO) films and their interface with Si have been studied. The AZO films were deposited by magnetron sputtering on Si (100) substrates. The electrical and structural properties of the film and AZO/Si structures were characterized by current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, and deep level transient spectroscopy measurements, X-ray diffraction, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resistivity of the AZO film is reduced to a close to state-of-the-art value of 2 × 10-4 Ω cm after FLA for 3 ms with an average energy density of 29 J/cm2. In addition, most of the interfacial defects energy levels are simultaneously annealed out, except for one persisting shallow level, tentatively assigned to the vacancy-oxygen complex in Si, which was not affected by FLA. Subsequent to the FLA, the samples were treated in N2 or forming gas (FG) (N2/H2, 90/10%mole) ambient at 200-500 °C. The latter samples maintained the low resistivity achieved after the FLA, but not the former ones. The interfacial defect level persisting after the FLA is removed by the FG treatment, concurrently as another level emerges at ˜0.18 eV below the conduction band. The electrical data of the AZO films are discussed in term of point defects controlling the resistivity, and it is argued that the FLA promotes formation of electrically neutral clusters of Zink vacancies (VZn's) rather than passivating/compensating complexes between the Al donors and VZn's.

  2. Reliability characteristics of microfabricated Rb mini-lamps for optical pumping in miniature atomic clocks and magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatraman, Vinu; Pétremand, Yves; de Rooij, Nico; Shea, Herbert

    2013-03-01

    With the rising need for microfabricated chip-scale atomic clocks to enable high precision timekeeping in portable applications, there has been active interest in developing miniature (lamps, since vapor plasma discharge sources are currently the standard for optical pumping in double-resonance clocks. We reported in 2012 a first microfabricated chip-scale Rubidium dielectric barrier discharge lamp. The device's preliminary results indicated its high potential for optical pumping applications and wafer-scale batch fabrication. The chip-scale plasma light sources were observed to be robust with no obvious performance change after thousands of plasma ignitions, and with no electrode erosion from plasma discharges since the electrodes are external. However, as atomic clocks have strict lamp performance requirements including less than 0.1% sub-second optical power fluctuations, power consumption less than 20 mW and a device lifetime of at least several years, it is important to understand the long-term reliability of these Rb planar mini-lamps, and identify the operating conditions where these devices can be most reliable and stable. In this paper, we report on the reliability of such microfabricated lamps including a continuous several month run of the lamp where the optical power, electrical power consumption and temperature stability were continuously monitored. We also report on the effects of temperature, rf-power and the lamp-drive parasitics on the optical power stability and discuss steps that could be taken to further improve the device's performance and reliability.

  3. Flash!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Govert

    2002-04-01

    About three times a day our sky flashes with a powerful pulse of gamma ray bursts (GRB), invisible to human eyes but not to astronomers' instruments. The sources of this intense radiation are likely to be emitting, within the span of seconds or minutes, more energy than the sun will in its entire 10 billion years of life. Where these bursts originate, and how they come to have such incredible energies, is a mystery scientists have been trying to solve for three decades. The phenomenon has resisted study -- the flashes come from random directions in space and vanish without trace -- until very recently. In what could be called a cinematic conflation of Flash Gordon and The Hunt for Red October, Govert Schilling's Flash!: The Hunt for the Biggest Explosions in the Universe describes the exciting and ever-changing field of GRB research. Based on interviews with leading scientists, Flash! provides an insider's account of the scientific challenges involved in unravelling the enigmatic nature of GRBs. A science writer who has followed the drama from the very start, Schilling describes the ambition and jealousy, collegiality and competition, triumph and tragedy, that exists among those who have embarked on this recherche. Govert Schilling is a Dutch science writer and astronomy publicist. He is a contributing editor of Sky and Telescope magazine, and regularly writes for the news sections of Science and New Scientist. Schilling is the astronomy writer for de Volkskrant, one of the largest national daily newspapers in The Netherlands, and frequently talks about the Universe on Dutch radio broadcasts. He is the author of more than twenty popular astronomy books, and hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles on astronomy.

  4. Flash lamp light slicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, A. J.; Abdel-Wahab, T.; Georgallis, M.

    A light slicing system using a short-arc-length high-power flashlamp as the source is discussed, with application to the observation of fluid phenomena such as gas discharge and fuel injection into engines. The geometrical optics of the method, in addition to the attenuation of luminous intensity in the system, is considered, and varying the relative radius of curvature of the cylindrical lens with respect to the width of the laser beam is shown to change the extension of the light sheet lamina. Light slice system generation using CAD is discussed, and experimental results of the observation of pulsed gas discharges in a small scale valve system designed to simulate large-scale dispersion and mixing of gases in air are reported.

  5. Multiple pass effects in high efficiency laser pumping cavities.

    PubMed

    Evtuhov, V; Neeland, J K

    1967-03-01

    Some effects connected with multiple passes of pump radiation in laser pump cavities are discussed. These effects include changes in mercury arc lamp operating characteristics, when the lamps are used inside the cavities as pump sources, and unexpectedly low pulse (but not cw) thresholds in double elliptical cavities. It is shown analytically that these effects can, at least in part, be attributed to the shapes of the pump light energy distribution curves after multiple passes through the pump cavities, and to the relative opacities of flash and continuous lamps. PMID:20057775

  6. Formation and photoluminescence of GaAs{sub 1−x}N{sub x} dilute nitride achieved by N-implantation and flash lamp annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Kun Helm, M.; Prucnal, S.; Skorupa, W.; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2014-07-07

    In this paper, we present the fabrication of dilute nitride semiconductor GaAs{sub 1−x}N{sub x} by nitrogen-ion-implantation and flash lamp annealing (FLA). N was implanted into the GaAs wafers with atomic concentration of about x{sub imp1} = 0.38% and x{sub imp2} = 0.76%. The GaAs{sub 1−x}N{sub x} layer is regrown on GaAs during FLA treatment in a solid phase epitaxy process. Room temperature near band-edge photoluminescence (PL) has been observed from the FLA treated GaAs{sub 1−x}N{sub x} samples. According to the redshift of the near band-edge PL peak, up to 80% and 44% of the implanted N atoms have been incorporated into the lattice by FLA for x{sub imp1} = 0.38% and x{sub imp2} = 0.76%, respectively. Our investigation shows that ion implantation followed by ultrashort flash lamp treatment, which allows for large scale production, exhibits a promising prospect on bandgap engineering of GaAs based semiconductors.

  7. A high efficiency all-PMOS charge pump for 3D NAND flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyin, Fu; Yu, Wang; Qi, Wang; Zongliang, Huo

    2016-07-01

    For 3D vertical NAND flash memory, the charge pump output load is much larger than that of the planar NAND, resulting in the performance degradation of the conventional Dickson charge pump. Therefore, a novel all PMOS charge pump with high voltage boosting efficiency, large driving capability and high power efficiency for 3D V-NAND has been proposed. In this circuit, the Pelliconi structure is used to enhance the driving capability, two auxiliary substrate bias PMOS transistors are added to mitigate the body effect, and the degradation of the output voltage and boost efficiency caused by the threshold voltage drop is eliminated by dynamic gate control structure. Simulated results show that the proposed charge pump circuit can achieve the maximum boost efficiency of 86% and power efficiency of 50%. The output voltage of the proposed 9 stages charge pump can exceed 2 V under 2 MHz clock frequency in 2X nm 3D V-NAND technology. Our results provide guidance for the peripheral circuit design of high density 3D V-NAND integration.

  8. Passive apparatus for stabilizing a flashlamp-pumped dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    De Wilde, M.A.; Decker, L.J.

    1986-04-29

    A flash lamp pumped, dye laser apparatus is described which consists of a flash lamp and a liquid dye solution in a transparent compartment proximate to the flash lamp. The compartment is also connected to a tubular circulatory system for moving the liquid dye. The dye solution is activated by flashing of the lamp for lasing to emit light, the lamp and compartment enclosed in a cooling first water jacket, the jacket enclosing deionized water for cooling, an improved cooling system wherein the temperature of the deionized water and the liquid dye solution are maintained within 0.5/sup 0/C of one another, enabling the laser for pulsing at a stabilized 10 pulses per second rate.

  9. Deflagration-induced flash of solid pyrotechnics as pumps for high-energy solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xiaoli; Liu, Liming; Tang, Yongjian

    2013-09-01

    Using the flash produced by deflagration of solid pyrotechnics to pump the laser gain medium is a potentially effective way to develop portable high power lasers. The purpose of this work is to examine the effect of some optimization or modifications in terms of compositions and distribution of the pyrotechnic pumping sources on the laser output. The optimization means the transmittance of the output couple. Modifications include: (1) pyrotechnic compositions are improved by adding small amounts of nano Al powders; (2) distribution of pumping light around the laser rod is changed through changing the discrete pyrotechnic tablets into continuous pyrotechnic bars. Results showed that laser output energy reached the maximum of 656 mJ when the transmittance of output mirror raised to10%; after adding nano Al powders into pyrotechnic compositions, laser energy increased by 80% at addition of 2% in the case of discrete distribution, while in the case of continuous distribution, even the mass of pyrotechnics was halved, laser energy still increased to the maximum of 442 mJ with 1% nano Al added. Besides, typical temporal waveform and spot of the laser as well as the light radiation performance of the pyrotechnic tablet are measured to help analyze the laser output performance. It is suggested that the mechanisms of the three modifications we employed are different though they all lead to increase in laser output.

  10. Development of a lamp-pumped Cr:LiSAF laser operating at 20Hz for a terawatt CPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Ricardo E.; Nogueira, Gesse E. C.; Baldochi, Sonia L.; Vieira, Nilson D., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    We report here the development, construction and characterization of a flashlamp pumped Cr:LiSAF rod pumping cavity designed to minimize the thermal load on the crystal. The cavity is a close coupled one with 2 Xe lamps and absorptive filters between the lamps and the Cr:LiSAF rod, and is refrigerated with cooled water. A compact and stable (g I×g II=0.57) resonator was designed for lasers tests and gain medium characterization, and we expected to obtain operation at 20 Hz repetition rate. Nevertheless, the thermal load minimizing design was so successful that allowed laser operation up to 30 Hz with an average power of 20 W. When operating with a 10% transmission output coupler this laser exhibited an overall laser efficiency of 0.6% under 100 J electrical pumping, and a slope efficiency of 0.8%. Under these conditions, a maximum gain per pass of 1.5 was obtained, suitable for regenerative amplifiers. To increase the gain, the intracavity filters were substituted by glass plates, resulting in a gain per pass of 3.6, adequate for multipass amplifiers. In this configuration, and operating as a laser resonator, it showed a maximum overall efficiency of 2.81% under 88 J electrical pumping with a 25% transmission output coupler, and maximum output power of 18 W at 8 Hz. A study of the thermal load on the crystal was conducted by observation of the upper laser level lifetime, and we concluded that there are no noticeable accumulated thermal effects on the Cr:LiSAF emission.

  11. 2.3-ps pulses from a Kerr-lens mode-locked lamp-pumped Nd:YLF laser with a microdot mirror.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, M; Gouveia-Neto, A S; Negus, D K; Izatt, J A; Fujimoto, J G

    1993-11-01

    Pulses as short as 2.3 ps have been generated by passive mode locking of a lamp-pumped Nd:YLF laser with a microdot mirror mode locker for Kerr-lens mode-locking (KLM) saturable absorber action and a compact Gires-Tournois interferometer for dispersion compensation. KLM was initiated with an acousto-optic modulator. Average output powers of 800 mW have been achieved. This result demonstrates the potential use of KLM for generating near-bandwidth-limited pulses from high-power lamp-pumped sources. PMID:19829417

  12. Atomic-fluorescence analysis of materials using a lamp-pumped dye LZhI laser as an excitation source

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, L.K.; Loshin, A.F.; Nikiforov, V.G.; Sterlyadkina, E.A.

    1987-12-01

    The use of frequency-tunable dye lasers in atomic-fluorescence analysis has made it possible to lower significantly the limits of detection for most elements. In this work the commercially produced lamp-pumped dye lasers of the type LZhI were used as the excitation source, which made it possible, first of all, to simplify the design of the atomic-fluorescence spectrometer by eliminating the frequency doubling of the laser radiation and, second, to study the analytical possibilities of commercially produced dye lasers with microsecond lasing. The authors studied solutions of sodium, barium, potassium, calcium, nickel, cobalt, copper, and molybdenum salts. These elements were chosen based on the fact that they have absorption lines with different degrees of intensity in the region of generation of the most efficient rhodamine 6G dye laser.

  13. Novel Pb(Ti, Zr)O3(PZT) Crystallization Technique Using Flash Lamp for Ferroelectric RAM (FeRAM) Embedded LSIs and One Transistor Type FeRAM Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koji; Imai, Keitaro; Arisumi, Osamu; Arikado, Tsunetoshi; Yoshioka, Masaki; Owada, Tatsushi; Okumura, Katsuya

    2002-04-01

    A novel method of ferroelectric capacitor formation for Ferroelectrie random access memory (FeRAM) embedded LSIs and one-transistor-type FeRAMs has been developed. Amorphous Pb(Ti, Zr)O3(PZT) films were successfully transformed to the perovskite phase by a flash lamp technique with a crystallization time of 1.2 ms at a substrate temperature of 350°C. A flash lamp energy of 27 J/cm2 was sufficient to form a ferroelectric crystal structure due to rapid thermal effects with little heat diffusion in the depth direction. This technique enabled PZT film crystallization in Pt/PZT/Pt structures on multi-Al wiring layers. Granular PZT grains were observed on Pt, Ru and RuO2 electrodes, which indicates that crystal growth begins from the film surfaces. Ferroelectric property was verified by the process at 350°C maximum temperature. PZT films were also crystallized directly on SiO2. This is useful for the fabrication of embedded FeRAM devices and 1Tr-type FeRAMs. The flash lamp process was found to have great potential for application to dielectric film formation, annealing processes and so on.

  14. Liquid phase epitaxy of binary III–V nanocrystals in thin Si layers triggered by ion implantation and flash lamp annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Wutzler, Rene Rebohle, Lars; Prucnal, Slawomir; Bregolin, Felipe L.; Hübner, Rene; Voelskow, Matthias; Helm, Manfred; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2015-05-07

    The integration of III–V compound semiconductors in Si is a crucial step towards faster and smaller devices in future technologies. In this work, we investigate the formation process of III–V compound semiconductor nanocrystals, namely, GaAs, GaSb, and InP, by ion implantation and sub-second flash lamp annealing in a SiO{sub 2}/Si/SiO{sub 2} layer stack on Si grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford Backscattering spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy were performed to identify the structural and optical properties of these structures. Raman spectra of the nanocomposites show typical phonon modes of the compound semiconductors. The formation process of the III–V compounds is found to be based on liquid phase epitaxy, and the model is extended to the case of an amorphous matrix without an epitaxial template from a Si substrate. It is shown that the particular segregation and diffusion coefficients of the implanted group-III and group-V ions in molten Si significantly determine the final appearance of the nanostructure and thus their suitability for potential applications.

  15. Liquid phase epitaxy of binary III-V nanocrystals in thin Si layers triggered by ion implantation and flash lamp annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wutzler, Rene; Rebohle, Lars; Prucnal, Slawomir; Bregolin, Felipe L.; Hübner, Rene; Voelskow, Matthias; Helm, Manfred; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    The integration of III-V compound semiconductors in Si is a crucial step towards faster and smaller devices in future technologies. In this work, we investigate the formation process of III-V compound semiconductor nanocrystals, namely, GaAs, GaSb, and InP, by ion implantation and sub-second flash lamp annealing in a SiO2/Si/SiO2 layer stack on Si grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford Backscattering spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy were performed to identify the structural and optical properties of these structures. Raman spectra of the nanocomposites show typical phonon modes of the compound semiconductors. The formation process of the III-V compounds is found to be based on liquid phase epitaxy, and the model is extended to the case of an amorphous matrix without an epitaxial template from a Si substrate. It is shown that the particular segregation and diffusion coefficients of the implanted group-III and group-V ions in molten Si significantly determine the final appearance of the nanostructure and thus their suitability for potential applications.

  16. Treatment of Port-Wine Stains with Flash Lamp Pumped Pulsed Dye Laser on Indian Skin: A Six Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Thajudheen, Chandroth Ponnambath; Jyothy, Kannangath; Priyadarshini, Arul

    2014-01-01

    Context: Port-wine stain (PWS) is one of the commonly encountered congenital cutaneous vascular lesions, with an equal sex distribution. Pulsed dye lasers (PDL) have revolutionized the treatment of both congential and acquired cutaneous vascular lesions. The pulsed dye lasers owing to its superior efficacy and safety profile have become the gold standard for the management of port-wine stains. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy and side effects of pulsed dye laser for the management of Port-wine stain on Indian skin. Materials and Methods: Seventy five patients of Fitzpatrick skin types IV&V with PWS underwent multiple treatments with PDL (V beam-Candela) over a period of six years at monthly intervals. Laser parameters were wavelength 595nm, spot sizes 7-10mm, fluence 6-12 j/cm2, pulse duration 0.45-10ms, along with cryogen cooling. Serial photographs were taken before and after every session. Clinical improvement scores of comparable photographs using a quartile grading (o=<20%, 1=21-40%, 2=41-60%, 3=61-80%, 4=>80%) were judged independently by two dermatologists after the series of treatment. Minimum number of treatments was 6 and maximum 17. They were followed up at six monthly intervals to observe re darkening of PWS. Results: No patient showed total clearance.Grade3 improvement was observed in 70 % of children and 50% of adults after 8-10 sessions. Children showed better and faster response than adults. Thirty percent of patients developed post inflammatory hyper pigmentation which resolved over a period of six to eight weeks. Two patients had superficial scarring due to stacking of pulses. None of the patients showed re darkening of PWS till now. Conclusion: Pulsed dye laser is an effective and safe treatment for port-wine stain in Indian skin. PMID:24761097

  17. Investigating two-photon double ionization of D2 by XUV-Pump -- XUV-Probe experiments at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    FLASH Collaboration; Jiang, Y.; Rudenko, A.; Perez-Torres, J.; Foucar, L.; Kurka, M.; Kuhnel, K.; Toppin, M.; Plesiat, E.; Morales, F.; Martin, F.; Herrwerth, O.; Lezius, M.; Kling, M.; Jahnke, T.; Dorner, R.; Sanz-Vicario, J.; van Tilborg, J.; Belkacem, A.; Schulz, M.; Ueda, K.; Zouros, T.; Dusterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Schroter, C.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2010-08-02

    Using a novel split-mirror set-up attached to a Reaction Microscope at the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) we demonstrate an XUV-pump -- XUV-probe ((hbar omega = 38 eV) experiment by tracing the ultra-fast nuclear wave-packet motion in the D2+ (1s sigma g-state) with<10 fs time resolution. Comparison with time-dependent calculations yields excellent agreement with the measured vibrational period of 22+-4 fs in D2+, points to the importance of the inter-nuclear distance dependent ionization probability and paves the way to control sequential and non-sequential two-photon double ionization contributions.

  18. Mode locking of diode- and flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers using semiconductor saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrovsky, Andrej; Kubecek, Vaclav; Zvonicek, K.; Diels, Jean-Claude M.; Stintz, Andreas

    2003-07-01

    Operation of laser diode and flash lamp pumped Nd:YAG lasers mode locked with two different types of semiconductor saturable absorbers is reported. In the first type that is used mainly in diode pumped systems the absorber layers are integrated on highly reflective Bragg mirror. The second type is for use in transmission mode inside the resonator. Different design of semiconductor elements, pumping geometries and resonator configurations were investigated and characteristics of laser operation in mode-locked regime are presented.

  19. The optical pumping of alkali atoms using coherent radiation from semi-conductor injection lasers and incoherent radiation from resonance lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, G.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study for creating population differences in the ground states of alkali atoms (Cesium 133) is presented. Studies made on GaAs-junction lasers and the achievement of population inversions among the hyperfine levels in the ground state of Cs 133 by optically pumping it with radiation from a GaAs diode laser. Laser output was used to monitor the populations in the ground state hyperfine levels as well as to perform the hyperfine pumping. A GaAs laser operated at about 77 K was used to scan the 8521 A line of Cs 133. Experiments were performed both with neon-filled and with paraflint-coated cells containing the cesium vapor. Investigations were also made for the development of the triple resonance coherent pulse technique and for the detection of microwave induced hyperfine trasistions by destroying the phase relationships produced by a radio frequency pulse. A pulsed cesium resonance lamp developed, and the lamp showed clean and reproducible switching characteristics.

  20. Analysis of the energy distribution of interface traps related to tunnel oxide degradation using charge pumping techniques for 3D NAND flash applications

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The degradation tendency extracted by CP technique was almost the same in both the bulk-type and TFT-type cells. - Highlights: • D{sub it} is directly investigated from bulk-type and TFT-type CTF memory. • Charge pumping technique was employed to analyze the D{sub it} information. • To apply the CP technique to monitor the reliability of the 3D NAND flash. - Abstract: The energy distribution and density of interface traps (D{sub it}) are directly investigated from bulk-type and thin-film transistor (TFT)-type charge trap flash memory cells with tunnel oxide degradation, under program/erase (P/E) cycling using a charge pumping (CP) technique, in view of application in a 3-demension stackable NAND flash memory cell. After P/E cycling in bulk-type devices, the interface trap density gradually increased from 1.55 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} to 3.66 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} due to tunnel oxide damage, which was consistent with the subthreshold swing and transconductance degradation after P/E cycling. Its distribution moved toward shallow energy levels with increasing cycling numbers, which coincided with the decay rate degradation with short-term retention time. The tendency extracted with the CP technique for D{sub it} of the TFT-type cells was similar to those of bulk-type cells.

  1. Flickering lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2015-05-01

    Many processes in electromagnetism vary with time. Some of them are well known, in particular those related to line frequencies of 50 Hz or 60 Hz such as fluctuating light output of discharge and incandescent lamps. The flickers of discharge and incandescent lamps have quite different physical principles involved, which are investigated experimentally using high-speed cameras and theoretically using simplified models. The topic is related to other phenomena such as the transient behaviour of phosphor layers covering the screen of oscilloscopes and the time-varying Lorentz force acting on the filament of light bulbs. All studies are well suited for teaching selected aspects of electromagnetism and light at undergraduate level at university.

  2. Lava Lamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leif, Todd R.

    2008-01-01

    This past semester I brought a Lava Lite[R] Lamp into my classroom. Why bring such a thing into class? Many of today's students are part of the "retro" movement. They buy clothes from the '60s, they wear their hair like people did in the '60s, and they look for the ideals and themes related to living in the 1960s. Physics education reform is also…

  3. Probing with randomly interleaved pulse train bridges the gap between ultrafast pump-probe and nanosecond flash photolysis.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tatsuo; Okamoto, Kido; Hanada, Hiroaki; Katoh, Ryuzi

    2016-04-01

    Despite the long-standing importance of transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy, many researchers remain frustrated by the difficulty of measuring the nanosecond range in a wide spectral range. To address this shortcoming, we propose a TA spectrophotometer in which there is no synchronization between a pump pulse and a train of multiple probe pulses from a picosecond supercontinuum light source, termed the randomly-interleaved-pulse-train (RIPT) method. For each pump pulse, many monochromatized probe pulses impinge upon the sample, and the associated pump-probe time delays are determined passively shot by shot with subnanosecond accuracy. By repeatedly pumping with automatically varying time delays, a TA temporal profile that covers a wide dynamic range from subnanosecond to milliseconds is simultaneously obtained. By scanning wavelength, this single, simple apparatus acquires not only wide time range TA profiles, but also broadband TA spectra from the visible through the near-infrared regions. Furthermore, we present a typical result to demonstrate how the RIPT method may be used to correct for fluorescence, which often pollutes TA curves. PMID:27192271

  4. Aperture lamp

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.

    2003-01-01

    A discharge lamp includes means for containing a light emitting fill, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill; means for exciting the fill to cause the fill to emit light; and means for reflecting some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length. Another discharge lamp includes an envelope; a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope; a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light; and a reflective ceramic structure disposed around the envelope and defining an light emitting opening, wherein the structure comprises a sintered body built up directly on the envelope and made from a combination of alumina and silica.

  5. LED lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Galvez, Miguel; Grossman, Kenneth; Betts, David

    2013-11-12

    There is herein described a lamp for providing white light comprising a plurality of light sources positioned on a substrate. Each of said light sources comprises a blue light emitting diode (LED) and a dome that substantially covers said LED. A first portion of said blue light from said LEDs is transmitted through said domes and a second portion of said blue light is converted into a red light by a first phosphor contained in said domes. A cover is disposed over all of said light sources that transmits at least a portion of said red and blue light emitted by said light sources. The cover contains a second phosphor that emits a yellow light in response to said blue light. The red, blue and yellow light combining to form the white light and the white light having a color rendering index (CRI) of at least about 80.

  6. Lava Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Todd R.

    2008-04-01

    This past semester I brought a Lava Lite® Lamp into my classroom. Why bring such a thing into class? Many of today's students are part of the "retro" movement. They buy clothes from the '60s, they wear their hair like people did in the '60s, and they look for the ideals and themes related to living in the 1960s. Physics education reform is also examining ideas from the "retro" world of science. This was the post-Sputnik era, a time when science was done by actually doing it and not necessarily by lecturing about it. Cliff Swartz, former TPT editor, once mentioned during a presentation at a Texas AAPT meeting, "The world of physics teaching is cyclic, like a swinging pendulum. We as physics teachers jump from `new ideas' back to our old ones, each generation testing what works best for them."

  7. Driving lamps by induction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, H. H.; Clough, L. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An electrodeless lamp circuit with a coil surrounding a krypton lamp is driven by an RF input source. A coil surrounding a mercury lamp is tapped across the connection of the input central to the krypton-lamp coil. Each coil is connected in parallel with separate capacitors which form resonant circuits at the input frequency.

  8. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  9. Precision performance lamp technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Dean A.; Kiesa, James E.; Dean, Raymond A.

    1997-09-01

    A principal function of a lamp is to produce light output with designated spectra, intensity, and/or geometric radiation patterns. The function of a precision performance lamp is to go beyond these parameters and into the precision repeatability of performance. All lamps are not equal. There are a variety of incandescent lamps, from the vacuum incandescent indictor lamp to the precision lamp of a blood analyzer. In the past the definition of a precision lamp was described in terms of wattage, light center length (LCL), filament position, and/or spot alignment. This paper presents a new view of precision lamps through the discussion of a new segment of lamp design, which we term precision performance lamps. The definition of precision performance lamps will include (must include) the factors of a precision lamp. But what makes a precision lamp a precision performance lamp is the manner in which the design factors of amperage, mscp (mean spherical candlepower), efficacy (lumens/watt), life, not considered individually but rather considered collectively. There is a statistical bias in a precision performance lamp for each of these factors; taken individually and as a whole. When properly considered the results can be dramatic to the system design engineer, system production manage and the system end-user. It can be shown that for the lamp user, the use of precision performance lamps can translate to: (1) ease of system design, (2) simplification of electronics, (3) superior signal to noise ratios, (4) higher manufacturing yields, (5) lower system costs, (6) better product performance. The factors mentioned above are described along with their interdependent relationships. It is statistically shown how the benefits listed above are achievable. Examples are provided to illustrate how proper attention to precision performance lamp characteristics actually aid in system product design and manufacturing to build and market more, market acceptable product products in the

  10. Wood's lamp illumination (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A Wood's lamp emits ultraviolet light and can be a diagnostic aid in determining if someone has a fungal ... is an infection on the area where the Wood's lamp is illuminating, the area will fluoresce. Normally ...

  11. Wood's lamp examination

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003386.htm Wood's lamp examination To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A Wood's lamp examination is a test that uses ultraviolet ( ...

  12. Wood's Lamp Examination

    MedlinePlus

    ... dermatologists to assist in the diagnosis of various pigment and infectious disorders. The examination is performed in ... lamp. If a fungal or bacterial infection or pigment disorder is present, Wood's lamp examination can strengthen ...

  13. Diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the consequences for solid-state lasers of novel diode laser-pumping technology. Diode laser-pumped neodymium lasers have operated at an electrical-to-optical efficiency of 10 percent in a single spatial mode, with linewidths of less than 10 kHz, and with a spectral power brightness sufficiently great to allow frequency extension by harmonic generation in nonlinear crystals; this has yielded green and blue sources of coherent radiation. Q-switched operation with kW peak powers and mode-locked operation with 10-picosec pulse widths have also been demonstrated. All-solid-state lasers at prices comparable to those of current flash-lamp-pumped laser systems are foreseen, as are power levels exceeding 1 kW, for coherent radar, global satellite sensing, and micromachining.

  14. A system for slit-lamp polaroid photography.

    PubMed

    Miller, D; Taube, J; Miller, R; Gleason, W; Babyn, P; Moon, J; Weiss, J N

    1981-05-01

    A system is described in which a SX-70, Alpha Model II, Polaroid, single lens reflex camera, and photoflash unit can be quickly and sturdily mounted to a slit lamp. Such a system can take sharp anterior segment prints of the eye at all slit-lamp magnifications, with white light and in the flourescein mode. The heart of the unit is the modification of an assembly initially designed to attach the camera to a light microscope. The small flash unit and power supply were designed specifically for slit lamp usage. Examples of "instant" photos of the anterior segment at different magnifications are presented. PMID:7266974

  15. Organic flash cycles for efficient power production

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Tony; Mao, Samuel S.; Greif, Ralph

    2016-03-15

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to an Organic Flash Cycle (OFC). In one aspect, a modified OFC system includes a pump, a heat exchanger, a flash evaporator, a high pressure turbine, a throttling valve, a mixer, a low pressure turbine, and a condenser. The heat exchanger is coupled to an outlet of the pump. The flash evaporator is coupled to an outlet of the heat exchanger. The high pressure turbine is coupled to a vapor outlet of the flash evaporator. The throttling valve is coupled to a liquid outlet of the flash evaporator. The mixer is coupled to an outlet of the throttling valve and to an outlet of the high pressure turbine. The low pressure turbine is coupled to an outlet of the mixer. The condenser is coupled to an outlet of the low pressure turbine and to an inlet of the pump.

  16. Halogen lamp experiment, HALEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, G.; Stapelmann, J.

    1986-01-01

    The main purpose of the Halogen Lamp Experiment (HALEX) was to investigate the operation of a halogen lamp during an extended period in a microgravity environment and to prove its behavior in space. The Mirror Heating Facilities for Crystal Growth and Material Science Experiments in space relies on one or two halogen lamps as a furnace to melt the specimens. The HALEX aim is to verify: full power operation of a halogen lamp for a period of about 60 hours; achievement of about 10% of its terrestrial life span; and operation of the halogen lamp under conditions similar to furnace operation.

  17. Superoxide Flashes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi; Fang, Huaqiang; Shang, Wei; Liu, Lei; Xu, Zhengshuang; Ye, Tao; Wang, Xianhua; Zheng, Ming; Chen, Quan; Cheng, Heping

    2011-01-01

    Irreversible mitochondrial permeability transition and the resultant cytochrome c release signify the commitment of a cell to apoptotic death. However, the role of transient MPT (tMPT) because of flickering opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore remains elusive. Here we show that tMPT and the associated superoxide flashes (i.e. tMPT/superoxide flashes) constitute early mitochondrial signals during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Selenite (a ROS-dependent insult) but not staurosporine (a ROS-independent insult) stimulated an early and persistent increase in tMPT/superoxide flash activity prior to mitochondrial fragmentation and a global ROS rise, independently of Bax translocation and cytochrome c release. Selectively targeting tMPT/superoxide flash activity by manipulating cyclophilin D expression or scavenging mitochondrial ROS markedly impacted the progression of selenite-induced apoptosis while exerting little effect on the global ROS response. Furthermore, the tMPT/superoxide flash served as a convergence point for pro- and anti-apoptotic regulation mediated by cyclophilin D and Bcl-2 proteins. These results indicate that tMPT/superoxide flashes act as early mitochondrial signals mediating the apoptotic response during oxidative stress, and provide the first demonstration of highly efficacious local mitochondrial ROS signaling in deciding cell fate. PMID:21659534

  18. Determination of the rate constants of molecular processes regulating the level of induced absorption in a laser based on an aqueous-micellar solution of rhodamine 6G with lamp pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.B.; Snegov, M.I.; Cherkasov, A.S.

    1987-03-01

    A method of determining the average lifetime tau of the products responsible for inverse induced absorption in aqueous--micellar solutions of rhodamine 6G (R6G) on lamp pumping based on a comparison of threshold intensities of excitation (W/sub th/) in the resonators of a laser with a different Q is proposed. Using the value of tau found (0.2 ..mu..sec) and experimental data on the change in W/sub th/ with the concentration of cyclooctatetraene (COT) added to the solution the rate constant of quenching of the absorbing products by COT molecules (K/sub q/ = 2.6 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/sec/sup -1/) was determined. In the assumption that the absorbing products are triplet dye molecules, the value of the rate constant of interconversion (K/sub 32/) of R6G into an aqueous--micellar solution (K/sub 32/ = 1.3 x 10/sup 7/ sec/sup -1/) was determined. A comparison was made of the values of the constants found with the corresponding values known from the literature.

  19. Discharge lamp technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dakin, James

    1994-01-01

    This talk is an overview of discharge lamp technology commonly employed in general lighting, with emphasis on issues pertinent to lighting for plant growth. Since the audience is primarily from the plant growth community, and this begins the light source part of the program, we will start with a brief description of the discharge lamps. Challenges of economics and of thermal management make lamp efficiency a prime concern in controlled environment agriculture, so we will emphasize science considerations relating to discharge lamp efficiency. We will then look at the spectra and ratings of some representative lighting products, and conclude with a discussion of technological advances.

  20. Atomic Oxygen Lamp Cleaning Facility Fabricated and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sechkar, Edward A.; Stueber, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Atomic Oxygen Lamp Cleaning Facility was designed to produce an atomic oxygen plasma within a metal halide lamp to remove carbon-based contamination. It is believed that these contaminants contribute to the high failure rate realized during the production of these lamps. The facility is designed to evacuate a metal halide lamp and produce a radio frequency generated atomic oxygen plasma within it. Oxygen gas, with a purity of 0.9999 percent and in the pressure range of 150 to 250 mtorr, is used in the lamp for plasma generation while the lamp is being cleaned. After cleaning is complete, the lamp can be backfilled with 0.9999-percent pure nitrogen and torch sealed. The facility comprises various vacuum components connected to a radiation-shielded box that encloses the bulb during operation. Radiofrequency power is applied to the two parallel plates of a capacitor, which are on either side of the lamp. The vacuum pump used, a Leybold Trivac Type D4B, has a pumping speed of 4-m3/hr, has an ultimate pressure of <8x10-4, and is specially adapted for pure oxygen service. The electronic power supply, matching network, and controller (500-W, 13.56-MHz) used to supply the radiofrequency power were purchased from RF Power Products Inc. Initial test results revealed that this facility could remove the carbon-based contamination from within bulbs.

  1. Turning on LAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Bostedt, Christoph

    2014-06-30

    Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

  2. Turning on LAMP

    ScienceCinema

    Bostedt, Christoph

    2014-07-16

    Christoph Bostedt, a senior staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, provides a sneak peek of a powerful new instrument, called LAMP, that is now available for experiments that probe the atomic and molecular realm. LAMP replaces and updates the first instrument at LCLS, dubbed CAMP, which will be installed at an X-ray laser in Germany.

  3. Jacketed lamp bulb envelope

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Bass, Gary K.; Dolan, James T.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang; Levin, Izrail; Roy, Robert J.; Shanks, Bruce; Smith, Malcolm; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

  4. Afterbay, looking north at hydraulic gate check cylinders and lamps. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Afterbay, looking north at hydraulic gate check cylinders and lamps. The gate lift in the foreground is an addition associated with the ca. 1974-1975 regulatory pumps - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Pumping Plant No. 2, Bounded by Interstate 8 to south, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  5. Compact ultrafast orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer for on-line gas analysis by electron impact ionization and soft single photon ionization using an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp as VUV-light source.

    PubMed

    Mühlberger, F; Saraji-Bozorgzad, M; Gonin, M; Fuhrer, K; Zimmermann, R

    2007-11-01

    Orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometers (oaTOFMS), which are exhibiting a pulsed orthogonal extraction of ion bunches into the TOF mass analyzer from a continuous primary ion beam, are well-suited for continuous ionization methods such as electron impact ionization (EI). Recently an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer lamp (EBEL) was introduced, which emits intensive vacuum UV (VUV) radiation at, e.g., 126 nm (argon excimer) and is well suited as the light source for soft single photon ionization (SPI) of organic molecules. In this paper, a new compact oaTOFMS system which allows switching between SPI, using VUV-light from an EBEL-light source, and conventional EI is described. With the oaTOFMS system, EBEL-SPI and EI mass spectral transients can be recorded at very high repetition rates (up to 100 kHz), enabling high duty cycles and therefore good detection efficiencies. By using a transient recorder card with the capability to perform on-board accumulation of the oaTOF transients, final mass spectra with a dynamic range of 106 can be saved to the hard disk at a rate of 10 Hz. As it is possible to change the ionization modes (EI and SPI) rapidly, a comprehensive monitoring of complex gases with highly dynamic compositions, such as cigarette smoke, is possible. In this context, the EI based mass spectra address the bulk composition (compounds such as water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, etc. in the up to percentage concentration range) as well as some inorganic trace gases such as argon, sulfur dioxide, etc. down to the low ppm level. The EBEL-SPI mass spectra on the other hand are revealing the organic composition down to the lower ppb concentration range. PMID:17900147

  6. Excimer lamp stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Saburoh; Tanaka, Takao; Ihara, Satoshi; Yamabe, Chobei

    2000-06-01

    For the laser stereo-lithography, a XeCl excimer lamp with cylindrical tube has been adopted to achieve a lower cost type UV light source. Because of excellent high output efficiency, it is possible to be down sizing of a power supplier and a lamp head and to be air-cooling. And moreover to extract the maximum output power and efficiency, we applied an optical fiber system for its lithography optics. With this excimer lamp the maximum UV emission per pulse 25 (mu) J at 100 Hz and the maximum average power 10 mW at 1000 Hz were obtained.

  7. Physics of Incandescent Lamp Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul; King, John

    2008-01-01

    Incandescent lamps with tungsten filaments have been in use for about a century while being gradually replaced by fluorescent lamps; in another generation both will quite probably be largely replaced by light-emitting diodes. Incandescent lamps (simply called "lamps" in what follows) burn out after a lifetime that depends mostly on the temperature…

  8. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  9. Slit-lamp exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... to light for a few hours after the exam if dilating drops are used. ... The slit lamp exam may detect many diseases of the eye, including: Clouding of the lens of the eye ( cataract ) Injury to the ...

  10. Wood's lamp examination

    MedlinePlus

    A Wood's lamp examination is a test that uses ultraviolet (UV) light to look at the skin closely. ... Gebhard RE. Wood's light examination. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowler GC, eds. ... Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2010:chap ...

  11. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    DOEpatents

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  12. 49 CFR 393.24 - Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... specifications in FMVSS No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), SAE J581, and SAE J583, respectively. ... lamps and front fog lamps. 393.24 Section 393.24 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.24 Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front...

  13. Integrity Monitoring of Mercury Discharge Lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Mercury discharge lamps are critical in many trapped ion frequency standard applications. An integrity monitoring system can be implemented using end-of-life signatures observed in operational mercury discharge lamps, making it possible to forecast imminent failure and to take action to mitigate the consequences (such as switching to a redundant system). Mercury lamps are used as a source of 194-nm ultraviolet radiation for optical pumping and state selection of mercury trapped ion frequency standards. Lamps are typically fabricated using 202Hg distilled into high-purity quartz, or other 194-nm transmitting material (e.g., sapphire). A buffer gas is also placed into the bulb, typically a noble gas such as argon, neon, or krypton. The bulbs are driven by strong RF fields oscillating at .200 MHz. The lamp output may age over time by two internal mechanisms: (1) the darkening of the bulb that attenuates light transmission and (2) the loss of mercury due to migration or chemical interactions with the bulb surface. During fabrication, excess mercury is placed into a bulb, so that the loss rate is compensated with new mercury emanating from a cool tip or adjacent reservoir. The light output is nearly constant or varies slightly at a constant rate for many months/years until the mercury source is depleted. At this point, the vapor pressure abruptly falls and the total light output and atomic clock SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) decrease. After several days to weeks, the light levels decrease to a point where the atomic clock SNR is no longer sufficient to stay in lock, or the lamp self-extinguishes. This signature has been observed in four separate end-of-life lamp failures while operating in the Deep Space Network (DSN). A simple integrator circuit can observe and document steady-state lamp behavior. When the light levels drop over a predetermined time interval by a specified amount (e.g., 20 percent), an alarm is set. For critical operational applications, such as the DSN

  14. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  15. Improved ultraviolet resonance lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, A. M.

    1970-01-01

    Removal of the seal area from the path of the lamp discharge eliminates the gradual deterioration of lithium fluoride window surfaces from condensation of products formed by interaction of a resonant rare-gas discharge with window sealing materials. The discharge is confined to the inner tube.

  16. The fundus slit lamp.

    PubMed

    Gellrich, Marcus-Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Fundus biomicroscopy with the slit lamp as it is practiced widely nowadays was not established until the 1980-es with the introduction of the Volk lenses +90 and +60D. Thereafter little progress has been made in retinal imaging with the slit lamp. It is the aim of this paper to fully exploit the potential of a video slit lamp for fundus documentation by using easily accessible additions. Suitable still images are easily retrieved from videorecordings of slit lamp examinations. The effects of changements in the slit lamp itself (slit beam and apertures) and its examination equipment (converging lenses from +40 to +90D) on quality and spectrum of fundus images are demonstrated. Imaging software is applied for reconstruction of larger fundus areas in a mosaic pattern (Hugin®) and to perform the flicker test in order to visualize changes in the same fundus area at different points of time (Power Point®). The three lenses +90/+60/+40D are a good choice for imaging the whole spectrum of retinal diseases. Displacement of the oblique slit light can be used to assess changes in the surface profile of the inner retina which occurs e.g. in macular holes or pigment epithelial detachment. The mosaic function in its easiest form (one strip macula adapted to one strip with the optic disc) provides an overview of the posterior pole comparable to a fundus camera's image. A reconstruction of larger fundus areas is feasible for imaging in vitreoretinal surgery or occlusive vessel disease. The flicker test is a fine tool for monitoring progressive glaucoma by changes in the optic disc, and it is also a valuable diagnostic tool in macular disease. Nearly all retinal diseases can be imaged with the slit lamp - irrespective whether they affect the posterior pole, mainly the optic nerve or the macula, the whole retina or only its periphery. Even a basic fundus controlled perimetry is possible. Therefore fundus videography with the slit lamp is a worthwhile approach especially for the

  17. Lunar Impact Flash Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. E.; Suggs, R. M.; Kupferschmidt, L.; Feldman, J.

    2015-01-01

    A bright impact flash detected by the NASA Lunar Impact Monitoring Program in March 2013 brought into focus the importance of determining the impact flash location. A process for locating the impact flash, and presumably its associated crater, was developed using commercially available software tools. The process was successfully applied to the March 2013 impact flash and put into production on an additional 300 impact flashes. The goal today: provide a description of the geolocation technique developed.

  18. Dimming of metal halide lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    We ran some tests on the effect of dimming of metal halide (MH) lamps upon the stability and the spectral quality of the light output. Lamps used were a new Philips lamp HPI-T 250W, a similar Philips lamp with a few thousand burning hours and a new Osram lamp HQI-T 250W/D. The ballast was a BBC type DJ 250/2KS, the starter a BAS TORGI type MZN 250 SE and the dimmer an Elstrom Control System type ERHQ-T 250. Power was derived from a Philips stabilizer, type PE 1602. Lamp output was monitored with a PAR meter. Spectra were taken at 100% and at 50% output as measured with the PAR meter. Lamps were allowed to stabilize at any setting for 30 minutes before measurements were made. Lamp manufacturers advise against dimming for fear of poor stability and intolerable changes of the spectrum. However, none of the lamps showed a decrease in stability, no flicker or wandering of the discharge, and the changes of the spectrum were not negligible, but certainly not dramatic. Lamps of either manufacture retain their white color, relative peak heights of spectral lines did shift, but no gaps in the spectrum occurred. Spectra taken at 50% with 30 minutes intervals coincided. Differences between the new and the older Philips lamp were noticeable, but not really significant.

  19. The orthoptic slit lamp.

    PubMed

    Gellrich, Marcus-Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Recently we presented our concept of "videography with the slit lamp," which provides an imaging solution for nearly every pathological finding in ophthalmology. This paper deals with the changes that must be made to prepare the slit lamp for documenting squint. To achieve this goal we propose: 1. Changes in the observation system: minus lenses in front of the objective of the slit lamp to achieve a sharp image of both eyes (eg, -8 diopters [dpt] if the patient sits at a distance of 50 cm). 2. Changes in the illumination system: minimizing the narrowed angle between illumination and observation axis by holding a "recentration" prism of 14 dpt horizontally in front of the slit light. This procedure creates equally sufficient illumination of the patient's face and central corneal reflexes. 3. Recording clinical findings with a digital recorder. This enables us to identify binocular eye positions, which sometimes last only part of a second, eg, in latent or intermittent strabism. 4. Visualizing clinical findings by using Microsoft PowerPoint® to build up 9-gaze composites or adjust corneal reflexes on subsequent foils. Changes in binocular eye positions (eg, after surgery, but also during diagnostic covering) can be made visible by flickering between the foils to compare. PMID:24090104

  20. Wedge Heat-Flux Indicators for Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2003-01-01

    Wedge indicators have been proposed for measuring thermal radiation that impinges on specimens illuminated by flash lamps for thermographic inspection. Heat fluxes measured by use of these indicators would be used, along with known thermal, radiative, and geometric properties of the specimens, to estimate peak flash temperatures on the specimen surfaces. These indicators would be inexpensive alternatives to high-speed infrared pyrometers, which would otherwise be needed for measuring peak flash surface temperatures. The wedge is made from any suitable homogenous material such as plastic. The choice of material is governed by the equation given. One side of the wedge is covered by a temperature sensitive compound that decomposes irreversibly when its temperature exceeds a rated temperature (T-rated). The uncoated side would be positioned alongside or in place of the specimen and exposed to the flash, then the wedge thickness at the boundary between the white and blackened portions measured.

  1. Investigations on the potential of a novel diode pumped Er:YAG laser system for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Karl; Hausladen, Florian; Hibst, Raimund

    2012-01-01

    The successful clinical application of the Er:YAG-laser in dentistry is well known, documented by numerous published studies. These lasers are flash lamp pumped systems and emit pulses of typically some 100 μs duration with energies of up to 1 J. Pulse repetition rates can reach up to 100Hz, and mean powers are up to about 8W. As an alternative to these laser systems recently a novel diode pumped Er:YAG laser system (Pantec Engineering AG) became available. This laser can provide a pulse repetition rate up to 2kHz and a mean laser power up to 15W. The aim of the presented study is to investigate the effect of this laser system on dental hard and soft tissue at various irradiation parameters, particular at repetition rates more than 100 Hz. At first an appropriate experimental set-up was realized with a beam delivery and focusing unit, a computer controlled stepper unit with sample holder, and a shutter unit. The stepper unit allows to move the samples (dentin or enamel slides of extracted human teeth, chicken breast, pig bone) with a defined velocity during irradiation by various laser parameters. For rinsing the sample surface a water spray was also included. The laser produced grooves and cuts were analyzed by light microscopy and laser scanning microscopy regarding to the ablation quality, geometry, ablation efficacy, and thermal effects. The grooves in dentin and enamel show a rough surface, typical for Er:YAG laser ablation. The craters are slightly cone shaped with sharp edges on the surface. Water cooling is essential to prevent thermal injury. The ablation efficacy in dentin is comparable to literature values of the flash lamp pumped Er:YAG laser. The cutting of bone and soft tissue is excellent and appears superior to earlier results obtained with flash lamp pumped system. As a further advantage, the broad range of repetition rates allows to widely vary the thermal side effects. In conclusion, these first experiments with a diode pumped Er:YAG laser

  2. Physics of Incandescent Lamp Burnout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluck, Paul; King, John

    2008-01-01

    Incandescent lamps with tungsten filaments have been in use for about a century while being gradually replaced by fluorescent lamps; in another generation both will quite probably be largely replaced by light-emitting diodes. Incandescent lamps (simply called lamps in what follows) burn out after a lifetime that depends mostly on the temperature of the filament and hence the applied voltage. A full-term project (about 100 hours) on lamp burnout was carried out by two students in 1965 and has been briefly described. Many aspects of the physics of lamps have been dealt with in articles that have appeared in this journal, in the American Journal of Physics, and in Physics Education.2,3

  3. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  4. Inductive tuners for microwave driven discharge lamps

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, James E.

    1999-01-01

    An RF powered electrodeless lamp utilizing an inductive tuner in the waveguide which couples the RF power to the lamp cavity, for reducing reflected RF power and causing the lamp to operate efficiently.

  5. Inductive tuners for microwave driven discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.E.

    1999-11-02

    An RF powered electrodeless lamp utilizing an inductive tuner in the waveguide which couples the RF power to the lamp cavity, for reducing reflected RF power and causing the lamp to operate efficiently.

  6. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; McDonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-02-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  7. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; Mcdonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-01-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  8. Evaluation of GOES encoder lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Helmold, N.

    1983-01-01

    Aging characteristics and life expectancies of flight quality, tungsten filament, encoder lamps are similar to those of 'commercial' grade gas filled lamps of similar construction, filament material and filament temperature. The aging and final failure by filament burnout are caused by single crystal growth over large portions of the filament with the concomitant development of facets and notches resulting in reduction of cross section and mechanical weakening of the filament. The life expectancy of presently produced lamps is about one year at their nominal operating voltage of five volts dc. At 4.5 volts, it is about two years. These life times are considerably shorter, and the degradation rates of lamp current and light flux are considerably higher, than were observed in the laboratory and in orbit on lamps of the same type manufactured more than a decade ago. It is speculated that the filaments of these earlier lamps contained a crystallization retarding dopant, possibly thorium oxide. To obtain the desired life expectancy of or = to four years in present lamps, operating voltages of or = to four volts dc would be required.

  9. TIR lenses for fluorescent lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkyn, William A.; Pelka, David G.

    1995-08-01

    The total internal reflection lens has been successfully applied to the efficient collimation of light from incandescent lamps and light-emitting diodes, and it is currently being marketed in several retail products. These circularly symmetric designs operated with relatively small sources. Two new forms of the TIR lens have been designed, and prototypes fabricated, for forming beams from fluorescent lamps. The toroidal fluorescent lamp is formed by circularly sweeping a faceted profile about its outer edge. A 5 inch diameter prototype lens has been diamond turned, and has 80% efficiency. When covering a 2.5 inch toroidal source of 0.25 inch minor diameter, it forms a smooth structureless beam of 40 degrees FWHM. The linear TIR lens has a faceted profile that is extended in cylindrical symmetry. In conjunction with a planar back mirror, a 6 inch diameter lens collects 85% of the light from a 5/8 inch lamp. The full width at half maximum is 30 degrees transversely and 120 degrees longitudinally, in a stripe pattern with twin peaks at +/- 47 degrees parallel to the lamp axis. These designs are applicable to other tubular light sources: discharge lamps, such as aircraft strobes and camera flashlamps, as well as neon lamps. They offer greater efficiency, narrower beamwidths, and much more compact profiles than conventional relfector designs.

  10. Flash Diffusivity Technique Applied to Individual Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Yowell, Leonard; Wang, Hsin

    2007-01-01

    A variant of the flash diffusivity technique has been devised for determining the thermal diffusivities, and thus the thermal conductivities, of individual aligned fibers. The technique is intended especially for application to nanocomposite fibers, made from narrower fibers of polyphenylene benzobisthiazole (PBZT) and carbon nanotubes. These highly aligned nanocomposite fibers could exploit the high thermal conductivities of carbon nanotubes for thermal-management applications. In the flash diffusivity technique as practiced heretofore, one or more heat pulse(s) is (are) applied to the front face of a plate or disk material specimen and the resulting time-varying temperature on the rear face is measured. Usually, the heat pulse is generated by use of a xenon flash lamp, and the variation of temperature on the rear face is measured by use of an infrared detector. The flash energy is made large enough to produce a usefully high temperature rise on the rear face, but not so large as to significantly alter the specimen material. Once the measurement has been completed, the thermal diffusivity of the specimen is computed from the thickness of the specimen and the time dependence of the temperature variation on the rear face. Heretofore, the infrared detector used in the flash diffusivity technique has been a single-point detector, which responds to a spatial average of the thermal radiation from the rear specimen surface. Such a detector cannot distinguish among regions of differing diffusivity within the specimen. Moreover, two basic assumptions of the thermaldiffusivity technique as practiced heretofore are that the specimen is homogeneous and that heat flows one-dimensionally from the front to the rear face. These assumptions are not valid for an inhomogeneous (composite) material.

  11. Apollo light flash investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, W. Z.; Pinsky, L. S.; Bailey, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    The visual phenomenon of light flashes resulting from high energy, heavy cosmic rays penetrating the command module structure and crewmembers' eyes is investigated. Light flash events observed during dedicated sessions on Apollo 15, 16, 17 are described along with a Monte Carlo simulation of the exposure of an astronaut to cosmic radiation during a mission. Results of the Apollo Light Flash Moving Emulsion Detector experiment developed for Apollo 16 and 17 to obtain a direct record of incident cosmic ray particles are correlated with crewmembers' reports of light flashes.

  12. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, Lee K.

    1981-01-01

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  13. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, L.K.

    1979-12-07

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  14. Custom blending of lamp phosphors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemm, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Spectral output of fluorescent lamps can be precisely adjusted by using computer-assisted analysis for custom blending lamp phosphors. With technique, spectrum of main bank of lamps is measured and stored in computer memory along with emission characteristics of commonly available phosphors. Computer then calculates ratio of green and blue intensities for each phosphor according to manufacturer's specifications and plots them as coordinates on graph. Same ratios are calculated for measured spectrum. Once proper mix is determined, it is applied as coating to fluorescent tubing.

  15. Possibilities of increasing the pumping efficiency of solid active medium laser generators by optimizing the pumping cavity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontu, O.; Ganatsios, S.; Alexandrescu, N.

    2008-03-01

    The paper presents some design elements concerning the optical pumping cavities of the laser generators with active solid medium, as well as the way of increasing their performance. We start from the fact that the laser cavity is a closed optical system, where the active laser medium and the pumping source are conjugated, in order to achieve a maximum concentration of the light flux of the pumping source towards the active medium. We discuss the simple elliptical section laser pumping cavities (with one pumping lamp) and triple elliptical (with three lamps), also presenting a series on calculus nomograms, very useful to those who design the laser generation optical pumping cavities.

  16. LAMP Observes the LCROSS Plume

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows LAMP’s view of the LCROSS plume. The first half of the animation shows the LAMP viewport scanning across the horizon, passing through the plume, and moving on. The second half of...

  17. Lamp for generating high power ultraviolet radiation

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Gary L.; Potter, James M.

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus is a gas filled ultraviolet generating lamp for use as a liquid purifier. The lamp is powred by high voltage AC, but has no metallic electrodes within or in contact with the gas enclosure which is constructed as two concentric quartz cylinders sealed together at their ends with the gas fill between the cylinders. Cooling liquid is pumped through the volume inside the inner quartz cylinder where an electrically conductive pipe spaced from the inner cylinder is used to supply the cooling liquid and act as the high voltage electrode. The gas enclosure is enclosed within but spaced from a metal housing which is connected to operate as the ground electrode of the circuit and through which the treated fluid flows. Thus, the electrical circuit is from the central pipe, and through the cooling liquid, the gas enclosure, the treated liquid on the outside of the outer quartz cylinder, and to the housing. The high voltage electrode is electrically isolated from the source of cooling liquid by a length of insulated hose which also supplies the cooling liquid.

  18. 49 CFR 393.25 - Requirements for lamps other than head lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for lamps other than head lamps. 393.25 Section 393.25 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Wiring § 393.25 Requirements for lamps other than head lamps. (a) Mounting. All lamps shall be...

  19. 49 CFR 393.25 - Requirements for lamps other than head lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for lamps other than head lamps. 393.25 Section 393.25 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Wiring § 393.25 Requirements for lamps other than head lamps. (a) Mounting. All lamps shall be...

  20. Flash-Type Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the significant progress made in the flash-type discrimination algorithm development. The contents include: 1) Highlights of Progress for GLM-R3 Flash-Type discrimination Algorithm Development; 2) Maximum Group Area (MGA) Data; 3) Retrieval Errors from Simulations; and 4) Preliminary Global-scale Retrieval.

  1. Comparison of TID Response and SEE Characterization of Single and Multi Level High Density NAND Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Nguyen, Duc N.; Harboe-Sorensen, Reno; Virtanen, Ari

    2009-01-01

    Heavy ion single-event measurements and TID response for 8Gb commercial NAND flash memories are reported. Radiation results of multi-level flash technology are compared with results from single-level flash technology. In general, these commercial high density memories appear to be much less susceptible to SEE and have better TID response compared to older generations of flash memories. The charge pump survived up to 600 krads.

  2. Note: Hollow cathode lamp with integral, high optical efficiency isolation valve: A modular vacuum ultraviolet source

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan Roberts, F.; Anderson, Scott L.

    2013-12-15

    The design and operating conditions of a hollow cathode discharge lamp for the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation, suitable for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application, are described in detail. The design is easily constructed, and modular, allowing it to be adapted to different experimental requirements. A thin isolation valve is built into one of the differential pumping stages, isolating the discharge section from the UHV section, both for vacuum safety and to allow lamp maintenance without venting the UHV chamber. The lamp has been used both for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces and as a “soft” photoionization source for gas-phase mass spectrometry.

  3. Note: Hollow cathode lamp with integral, high optical efficiency isolation valve: a modular vacuum ultraviolet source.

    PubMed

    Roberts, F Sloan; Anderson, Scott L

    2013-12-01

    The design and operating conditions of a hollow cathode discharge lamp for the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation, suitable for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application, are described in detail. The design is easily constructed, and modular, allowing it to be adapted to different experimental requirements. A thin isolation valve is built into one of the differential pumping stages, isolating the discharge section from the UHV section, both for vacuum safety and to allow lamp maintenance without venting the UHV chamber. The lamp has been used both for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces and as a "soft" photoionization source for gas-phase mass spectrometry. PMID:24387477

  4. NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

    1962-09-01

    A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

  5. Understanding Green Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Andrew T.

    1998-05-01

    Most astronomers learn about green flashes from either Minnaert's old book (Dover, 1954) or O'Connell's ``The Green Flash....'' Both have defects. Minnaert's account mostly represents what was known in the 1920s; it repeats Mulder's 3-fold classification, which omits Joule's second type of flash --- the one most commonly seen from mountain observatories. O'Connell searched only the astronomical literature, missing Dietze's crucially important paper (Z.f.Met. 9, 169 (1955)) showing that the ``textbook'' mechanism cannot produce flashes visible to the naked eye. He also erred in thinking that distortions of the setting Sun arise in the upper atmosphere (they are due to the marine boundary layer), and copied an error from Feenstra Kuiper's thesis that misidentified a common mirage-like phenomenon as Wegener's ``blank strip'' (Young et al., Appl. Opt. 36, 2689 (1997).) Most phenomena shown in O'Connell's book are caused by inversion layers below eye level, not above as in Wegener's phenomenon. The two commonest forms of green flash are associated with the inferior mirage and the mock mirage, corresponding to Fisher's Type A and Type B sunsets, respectively. Superrefraction, advocated by Wood and by Rayleigh as the cause of large flashes, actually suppress them: the airmass is proportional to the refraction (by Laplace's extinction theorem), so no green is transmitted when refraction is much larger than average. Although there is a physical green flash that can be photographed, the colors seen at sunset are strongly modified by bleaching of the L cones. Most ``green'' sunset flashes are actually yellow. Writers should stop representing Jules Verne's ``ancient legend'' as fact, as it was invented by Verne as a plot device for his novel ``Le Rayon Vert.'' Green-flash photos and simulations will be shown. This material is based upon work supported by the NSF under Award No. ATM-9714357.

  6. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  7. Flash Bulletin: Fireflies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Debbie

    1984-01-01

    Explains the flashes of light emitted by fireflies as competition, species-specific code, species identification and mating behavior and ecology. Suggests activities to conduct to study the insects and their behavior. (ERB)

  8. Flashes and Floaters

    MedlinePlus

    ... either in the form of lightening bolts, shooting stars, sparks, or an arc of light to the ... against it that causes the sparks and shooting stars phenomenon. But flashes and floaters may have more ...

  9. Floods and Flash Flooding

    MedlinePlus

    Floods and flash flooding Now is the time to determine your area’s flood risk. If you are not sure whether you ... If you are in a floodplain, consider buying flood insurance. Do not drive around barricades. If your ...

  10. A polychromatic flash photolysis apparatus (PFPA).

    PubMed

    Uhl, R; Meyer, B; Desel, H

    1984-11-01

    A wide variety of biologically relevant chemical intermediates have been identified and characterised by their spectral properties. When rapid kinetics, i.e. rapid changes in these spectral properties are studied, the equipment designed for these studies (flash photolysis-, T-jump apparatus) usually allows only the registration of intensity changes of the monitoring light beam at one particular wavelength. Quite frequently, however, particularly in biological systems, the reactions of interest are too complex to be fully understood using single wavelength techniques. We have therefore designed and built a flash photolysis apparatus which permits the simultaneous recording of absorbance changes at 32 wavelengths, freely selectable between 300 and 1000 nm, as well as changes in fluorescence, luminescence, birefringence and light scattering. The apparatus, which we have called Polychromatic Flash Photolysis Apparatus (PFPA), acquires up to 8000 difference spectra per second with an amplitude resolution of better than 0.0001 absorbance unit. Data acquisition and activation of an actinic xenon flash unit occurs under computer control. The same computer is responsible for data storage, handling and graphic display. This communication describes the PFPA, its performance, and, as a demonstration of its potential usefulness, its application to the measurement of the light driven photocycle of bacterial rhodopsin, the proton pumping protein of Halobacterium halobium. PMID:6520324

  11. LAMP: Peering Into the Lunar Dark

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) is an instrument on NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission to map and study the moon. LAMP is a spectrograph that images the ultraviolet region of the...

  12. Single photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with a pulsed electron beam pumped excimer VUV lamp for on-line gas analysis: setup and first results on cigarette smoke and human breath.

    PubMed

    Mühlberger, F; Streibel, T; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A; Zimmermann, R

    2005-11-15

    Single-photon ionization (SPI) using vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light produced by an electron beam pumped rare gas excimer source has been coupled to a compact and mobile time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). The novel device enables real-time on-line monitoring of organic trace substances in complex gaseous matrixes down to the ppb range. The pulsed VUV radiation of the light source is employed for SPI in the ion source of the TOFMS. Ion extraction is also carried out in a pulsed mode with a short time delay with respect to ionization. The experimental setup of the interface VUV light source/time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described, and the novel SPI-TOFMS system is characterized by means of standard calibration gases. Limits of detection down to 50 ppb for aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons were achieved. First on-line applications comprised real-time measurements of aromatic and aliphatic trace compounds in mainstream cigarette smoke, which represents a highly dynamic fluctuating gaseous matrix. Time resolution was sufficient to monitor the smoking process on a puff-by-puff resolved basis. Furthermore, human breath analysis has been carried out to detect differences in the breath of a smoker and a nonsmoker, respectively. Several well-known biomarkers for smoke could be identified in the smoker's breath. The possibility for even shorter measurement times while maintaining the achieved sensitivity makes this new device a promising tool for on-line analysis of organic trace compounds in process gases or biological systems. PMID:16285693

  13. Thermal analysis of a linear infrared lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis of an infrared lamp is presented based on radiant heat transfer theory. The analysis is performed on a specific type of linear lamp which has a coiled tungsten filament surrounded by a fused quartz envelope. The purpose of the study was to model the lamp thermally, not electrically, to arrive at a better understanding of the operation of the lamp.

  14. Vibration-Resistant Support for Halide Lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J.

    1987-01-01

    Lamp envelope protected against breakage. Old and new mounts for halide arc lamp sealed in housing with parabolic refector and quartz window. New version supports lamp with compliant garters instead of rigid brazed joint at top and dimensionally unstable finger stock at bottom.

  15. 21 CFR 890.5500 - Infrared lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infrared lamp. 890.5500 Section 890.5500 Food and... PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5500 Infrared lamp. (a) Identification. An infrared lamp is a device intended for medical purposes that emits energy at...

  16. 21 CFR 890.5500 - Infrared lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Infrared lamp. 890.5500 Section 890.5500 Food and... PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5500 Infrared lamp. (a) Identification. An infrared lamp is a device intended for medical purposes that emits energy at...

  17. 21 CFR 890.5500 - Infrared lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Infrared lamp. 890.5500 Section 890.5500 Food and... PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5500 Infrared lamp. (a) Identification. An infrared lamp is a device intended for medical purposes that emits energy at...

  18. 21 CFR 890.5500 - Infrared lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Infrared lamp. 890.5500 Section 890.5500 Food and... PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5500 Infrared lamp. (a) Identification. An infrared lamp is a device intended for medical purposes that emits energy at...

  19. 21 CFR 890.5500 - Infrared lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Infrared lamp. 890.5500 Section 890.5500 Food and... PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5500 Infrared lamp. (a) Identification. An infrared lamp is a device intended for medical purposes that emits energy at...

  20. 30 CFR 57.17010 - Electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric lamps. 57.17010 Section 57.17010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....17010 Electric lamps. Individual electric lamps shall be carried for illumination by all...

  1. 30 CFR 57.17010 - Electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric lamps. 57.17010 Section 57.17010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....17010 Electric lamps. Individual electric lamps shall be carried for illumination by all...

  2. 30 CFR 57.17010 - Electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric lamps. 57.17010 Section 57.17010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....17010 Electric lamps. Individual electric lamps shall be carried for illumination by all...

  3. 30 CFR 57.17010 - Electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric lamps. 57.17010 Section 57.17010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....17010 Electric lamps. Individual electric lamps shall be carried for illumination by all...

  4. 30 CFR 57.17010 - Electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric lamps. 57.17010 Section 57.17010 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE....17010 Electric lamps. Individual electric lamps shall be carried for illumination by all...

  5. Flash fire propensity of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Flash fire test results on 86 materials, evaluated using the USF flash fire screening test, are presented. The materials which appear least prone to flash fires are PVC, polyphenylene oxide and sulfide, and polyether and polyaryl sulfone; these did not produce flash fires under these particular test conditions. The principal value of these screening tests at the present time is in identifying materials which appear prone to flash fires, and in identifying which formulations of a generic material are more or less prone to flash fires.

  6. An artificial molecular pump.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuyang; McGonigal, Paul R; Schneebeli, Severin T; Li, Hao; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A; Ke, Chenfeng; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2015-06-01

    Carrier proteins consume fuel in order to pump ions or molecules across cell membranes, creating concentration gradients. Their control over diffusion pathways, effected entirely through noncovalent bonding interactions, has inspired chemists to devise artificial systems that mimic their function. Here, we report a wholly artificial compound that acts on small molecules to create a gradient in their local concentration. It does so by using redox energy and precisely organized noncovalent bonding interactions to pump positively charged rings from solution and ensnare them around an oligomethylene chain, as part of a kinetically trapped entanglement. A redox-active viologen unit at the heart of a dumbbell-shaped molecular pump plays a dual role, first attracting and then repelling the rings during redox cycling, thereby enacting a flashing energy ratchet mechanism with a minimalistic design. Our artificial molecular pump performs work repetitively for two cycles of operation and drives rings away from equilibrium toward a higher local concentration. PMID:25984834

  7. An artificial molecular pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuyang; McGonigal, Paul R.; Schneebeli, Severin T.; Li, Hao; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A.; Ke, Chenfeng; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2015-06-01

    Carrier proteins consume fuel in order to pump ions or molecules across cell membranes, creating concentration gradients. Their control over diffusion pathways, effected entirely through noncovalent bonding interactions, has inspired chemists to devise artificial systems that mimic their function. Here, we report a wholly artificial compound that acts on small molecules to create a gradient in their local concentration. It does so by using redox energy and precisely organized noncovalent bonding interactions to pump positively charged rings from solution and ensnare them around an oligomethylene chain, as part of a kinetically trapped entanglement. A redox-active viologen unit at the heart of a dumbbell-shaped molecular pump plays a dual role, first attracting and then repelling the rings during redox cycling, thereby enacting a flashing energy ratchet mechanism with a minimalistic design. Our artificial molecular pump performs work repetitively for two cycles of operation and drives rings away from equilibrium toward a higher local concentration.

  8. Adiabatically driven Brownian pumps.

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, Viktor M; Makhnovskii, Yurii A; Shapochkina, Irina V; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2013-07-01

    We investigate a Brownian pump which, being powered by a flashing ratchet mechanism, produces net particle transport through a membrane. The extension of the Parrondo's approach developed for reversible Brownian motors [Parrondo, Phys. Rev. E 57, 7297 (1998)] to adiabatically driven pumps is given. We demonstrate that the pumping mechanism becomes especially efficient when the time variation of the potential occurs adiabatically fast or adiabatically slow, in perfect analogy with adiabatically driven Brownian motors which exhibit high efficiency [Rozenbaum et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 041116 (2012)]. At the same time, the efficiency of the pumping mechanism is shown to be less than that of Brownian motors due to fluctuations of the number of particles in the membrane. PMID:23944411

  9. 14. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF TRIMMED FLASH; FLASH IS EXCESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF TRIMMED FLASH; FLASH IS EXCESS METAL EXTRUDED BETWEEN THE DIES USED TO FORGE THE BLADE END OF THE POST HOLE DIGGER - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  10. Selective removal of dental caries with a diode-pumped Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ruth; Chan, Kenneth H.; Tom, Henry; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Selective removal of caries lesions with high precision is best accomplished using lasers operating at high pulse repetition rates utilizing small spot sizes. Conventional flash-lamp pumped Er:YAG lasers are poorly suited for this purpose, but new diode-pumped Er:YAG lasers have become available operating at high pulse repetition rates. The purpose of this study was to measure the ablation rate and selectivity of sound and demineralized enamel and dentin for a 30 W diode-pumped Er:YAG laser operating with a pulse duration of 20-30-μs and evaluate it's potential for the selective removal of natural occlusal lesions on extracted teeth. Microradiography was used to determine the mineral content of the demineralized enamel and dentin of 300-μm thick sections with natural caries lesions prior to laser ablation. The ablation rate was calculated for varying mineral content. In addition, near-IR reflectance measurements at 1500-1700- nm were used to guide the laser for the selective ablation of natural occlusal caries lesions on extracted teeth.

  11. Selective removal of dental composite with a diode-pumped Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, William A.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Selective removal of dental composite with high precision is best accomplished using lasers operating at high pulse repetition rates focused to a small spot size. Conventional flash-lamp pumped Er:YAG lasers are poorly suited for this purpose, but new diode-pumped Er:YAG lasers have become available operating at high pulse repetition rates. The purpose of this study was to compare the ablation rates and selectivity of enamel and composite for a 30 W diode-pumped Er:YAG laser operating with a pulse duration of 30-50-μs and evaluate it's suitability for the selective removal of composite from tooth surfaces. The depth of ablation and changes in surface morphology were assessed using digital microscopy. The fluence range of 30-50 J/cm2 appeared optimal for the removal of composite, and damage to sound enamel was limited to less than 100-μm after the removal of composite as thick as 700-800-μm. Future studies will focus on the use of methods of feedback to further increase selectivity.

  12. Selective removal of dental composite with a diode-pumped Er:YAG laser

    PubMed Central

    Fried, William A.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Selective removal of dental composite with high precision is best accomplished using lasers operating at high pulse repetition rates focused to a small spot size. Conventional flash-lamp pumped Er:YAG lasers are poorly suited for this purpose, but new diode-pumped Er:YAG lasers have become available operating at high pulse repetition rates. The purpose of this study was to compare the ablation rates and selectivity of enamel and composite for a 30 W diode-pumped Er:YAG laser operating with a pulse duration of 30–50-μs and evaluate it’s suitability for the selective removal of composite from tooth surfaces. The depth of ablation and changes in surface morphology were assessed using digital microscopy. The fluence range of 30–50 J/cm2 appeared optimal for the removal of composite, and damage to sound enamel was limited to less than 100-μm after the removal of composite as thick as 700–800-μm. Future studies will focus on the use of methods of feedback to further increase selectivity. PMID:26997741

  13. 49 CFR 393.24 - Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... specifications in FMVSS No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), SAE J581, and SAE J583, respectively. ... § 393.11(a). The headlamps shall provide an upper and lower beam distribution of light, selectable at... of the required headlamps. Auxiliary driving lamps shall meet SAE Standard J581 Auxiliary Upper...

  14. 49 CFR 393.24 - Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... specifications in FMVSS No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), SAE J581, and SAE J583, respectively. ... § 393.11(a). The headlamps shall provide an upper and lower beam distribution of light, selectable at... of the required headlamps. Auxiliary driving lamps shall meet SAE Standard J581 Auxiliary Upper...

  15. 49 CFR 393.24 - Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... specifications in FMVSS No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), SAE J581, and SAE J583, respectively. ... § 393.11(a). The headlamps shall provide an upper and lower beam distribution of light, selectable at... of the required headlamps. Auxiliary driving lamps shall meet SAE Standard J581 Auxiliary Upper...

  16. 49 CFR 393.24 - Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... specifications in FMVSS No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), SAE J581, and SAE J583, respectively. ... § 393.11(a). The headlamps shall provide an upper and lower beam distribution of light, selectable at... of the required headlamps. Auxiliary driving lamps shall meet SAE Standard J581 Auxiliary Upper...

  17. Methods for reducing the divergence of lamp-excited rhodamine 6G solution lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, V.S.

    1980-11-01

    Different methods for reducing the divergence of rhodamine 6G solution lasers with lamp pumping are studied experimentally. A reduction of divergence to 2--4 mrad is achieved. It is shown that some methods provide such low divergence for comparatively low losses of lasing energy.

  18. Theory of optical flashes

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.

    1983-09-30

    The theory of optical flashes created by x- and ..gamma..-ray burst heating of stars in binaries is reviewed. Calculations of spectra due to steady-state x-ray reprocessing and estimates of the fundamental time scales for the non-steady case are discussed. The results are applied to the extant optical data from x-ray and ..gamma..-ray bursters. Finally, I review predictions of flashes from ..gamma..-ray bursters detectable by a state of the art all-sky optical monitor.

  19. Evaluating fluorescent lamp options under EPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Palko, E.

    1994-02-01

    The National Energy Policy Act (EPACT) sweeps the full spectrum of energy use in all forms, prescribing minimum efficiency standards for energy-consuming products. Notable among the products covered under EPACT are general-purpose fluorescent lamps commonly used to illuminate manufacturing, storage, laboratory, and office areas of industrial plants. Some specialty fluorescent lamp categories are exempt from the provisions of EPACT. Included in this specialty group are plant-growth, reflectorized or aperture, colored, reprographic, cold-temperature, and impact-resistant lamps. EPACT decrees moratorium dates on the manufacture of many types of lamps in common use in plants today. Lamps proscribed by EPACT, and their effective manufacturing cutoff dates, are given in the accompanying section, Fluorescent Lamps Outlawed Under EPACT. Noncomplying lamps, however, are permitted to remain in service, and can continue to be sold until stock is depleted. This paper explains the provisions of the Act.

  20. Microwave lamp with multi-purpose rotary motor

    DOEpatents

    Ury, Michael G.; Turner, Brian; Wooten, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    In a microwave powered electrodeless lamp, a single rotary motor is used to a) rotate the bulb and b) provide rotary motion to a blower or pump means for providing cooling fluid to the magnetron and/or to a forced gas cooling for providing cooler gas to the bulb. The blower may consist of only of an impeller without the usual blower housing. The motor, bulb stem and bulb, or motor, bulb stem, bulb and blower may be formed as an integral unit so as to facilitate replacement.

  1. Microwave lamp with multi-purpose rotary motor

    DOEpatents

    Ury, M.G.; Turner, B.; Wooten, R.D.

    1999-02-02

    In a microwave powered electrodeless lamp, a single rotary motor is used to (a) rotate the bulb and (b) provide rotary motion to a blower or pump means for providing cooling fluid to the magnetron and/or to a forced gas cooler for providing cooling gas to the bulb. The blower may consist of only of an impeller without the usual blower housing. The motor, bulb stem and bulb, or motor, bulb stem, bulb and blower may be formed as an integral unit so as to facilitate replacement. 8 figs.

  2. A flash photographic method for droplet impingement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, V.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes an experimental method to visualize the impingement process of a liquid droplet onto a solid surface with sufficient clarity to reveal fine details of the droplet surface structure and rim jet produced during the impingement process. The method incorporates a 35 mm SLR camera with bellows, motor drive, macro lens, backlighting by a short duration flash lamp, diffusers and a commercially available timing control unit to trigger the flash. Results using the experimental arrangement are demonstrated for a water droplet striking a horizontal surface at a velocity of about 1 m/s, though the photographic method may be applied to any other condition and liquid. A series of photographs are presented that show the repeatability of the impingement process, image clarity, surface structure of the droplet during impingement.

  3. Flashing anomalous color contrast.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S

    2004-01-01

    A new visual phenomenon that we call flashing anomalous color contrast is described. This phenomenon arises from the interaction between a gray central disk and a chromatic annulus surrounded by black radial lines. In an array of such figures, the central gray disk no longer appears gray, but assumes a color complementary to that of the surrounding annulus. The induced color appears: (1) vivid and saturated; (2) self-luminous, not a surface property; (3) flashing with eye or stimulus movement; (4) floating out of its confines; and (5) stronger in extrafoveal than in foveal vision. The strength of the effect depends on the number, length, width, and luminance contrast of the radial lines. The results suggest that the chromatic ring bounding the inner tips of the black radial lines induces simultaneous color contrast, whereas the radial lines elicit, in conjunction with the gray disk and the ring, the flashing, vividness, and high saturation of the effect. The stimulus properties inducing the illusion suggest that flashing anomalous color contrast may be based on asynchronous interactions among multiple visual pathways. PMID:15518215

  4. Measuring and Estimating Normalized Contrast in Infrared Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared flash thermography (IRFT) is used to detect void-like flaws in a test object. The IRFT technique involves heating up the part surface using a flash of flash lamps. The post-flash evolution of the part surface temperature is sensed by an IR camera in terms of pixel intensity of image pixels. The IR technique involves recording of the IR video image data and analysis of the data using the normalized pixel intensity and temperature contrast analysis method for characterization of void-like flaws for depth and width. This work introduces a new definition of the normalized IR pixel intensity contrast and normalized surface temperature contrast. A procedure is provided to compute the pixel intensity contrast from the camera pixel intensity evolution data. The pixel intensity contrast and the corresponding surface temperature contrast differ but are related. This work provides a method to estimate the temperature evolution and the normalized temperature contrast from the measured pixel intensity evolution data and some additional measurements during data acquisition.

  5. Lamp with a truncated reflector cup

    DOEpatents

    Li, Ming; Allen, Steven C.; Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel

    2013-10-15

    A lamp assembly, and method for making same. The lamp assembly includes first and second truncated reflector cups. The lamp assembly also includes at least one base plate disposed between the first and second truncated reflector cups, and a light engine disposed on a top surface of the at least one base plate. The light engine is configured to emit light to be reflected by one of the first and second truncated reflector cups.

  6. The low-pressure sodium lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, J.D.

    1997-12-31

    For many years before the introduction of the sodium vapor lamp, scientists had been aware of the remarkably high luminous efficacy of the sodium discharge. However, many technical problems had to be overcome before these lamps could be marketed. The first commercial low pressure sodium lamps were introduced in the early 1930s and to this day they remain the most efficient light sources available. The high efficacy is due partly to the fact that these lamps emit nearly monochromatic yellow light, which is very close to the peak sensitivity of the human eye. Sodium lamps have come a long way since their introduction, and efficacies are now approaching 200 lumens per watt. Despite increasing competition from other types of discharge lamp, low pressure sodium lamps of the SOX type find widespread use in road and security lighting, particularly in Great Britain and many other parts of Europe. This paper reviews the operation and development of the low pressure sodium lamp, and shows what makes it different from the many other types of discharge lamp available.

  7. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Class 2 lamps. 20.9 Section 20.9 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MINE LAMPS OTHER THAN STANDARD CAP LAMPS § 20.9 Class 2 lamps. (a) Safety. (1) Unless special features of the lamp...

  8. Lamp bulb with integral reflector

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Izrail; Shanks, Bruce; Sumner, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

  9. Flash Lidar Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergkoetter, M. D.; Ruppert, L.; Weimer, C. S.; Ramond, T.; Lefsky, M. A.; Burke, I. C.; Hu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Late last year, a prototype Flash LIDAR instrument flew on a series of airborne tests to demonstrate its potential for improved vegetation measurements. The prototype is a precursor to the Electronically Steerable Flash LIDAR (ESFL) currently under development at Ball Aerospace and Technology Corp. with funding from the NASA Earth Science Technology Office. ESFL may soon significantly expand our ability to measure vegetation and forests and better understand the extent of their role in global climate change and the carbon cycle - all critical science questions relating to the upcoming NASA DESDynI and ESA BIOMASS missions. In order to more efficiently exploit data returned from the experimental Flash Lidar system and plan for data exploitation from future flights, Ball funded a graduate student project (through the Ball Summer Intern Program, summer 2009) to develop and implement algorithms for post-processing of the 3-Dimensional Flash Lidar data. This effort included developing autonomous algorithms to resample the data to a uniform rectangular grid, geolocation of the data, and visual display of large swaths of data. The resampling, geolocation, surface hit detection, and aggregation of frame data are implemented with new MATLAB code, and the efficient visual display is achieved with free commercial viewing software. These efforts directly support additional tests flights planned as early as October 2009, including possible flights over Niwot Ridge, CO, for which there is ICESat data, and a sea-level coastal area in California to test the effect of higher altitude (above ground level) on the divergence of the beams and the beam spot sizes.

  10. 10 CFR 429.27 - General service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and incandescent reflector...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and incandescent reflector lamps. 429.27 Section 429.27 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification §...

  11. Investigations on the potential of a low power diode pumped Er:YAG laser system for oral surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Karl; Wurm, Holger; Hausladen, Florian; Wagner, Sophia; Hibst, Raimund

    2015-02-01

    Flash lamp pumped Er:YAG-lasers are used in clinical practice for dental applications successfully. As an alternative, several diode pumped Er:YAG laser systems (Pantec Engineering AG) become available, with mean laser power of 2W, 15W, and 30W. The aim of the presented study is to investigate the potential of the 2W Er:YAG laser system for oral surgery. At first an appropriate experimental set-up was realized with a beam delivery and both, a focusing unit for non-contact tissue cutting and a fiber tip for tissue cutting in contact mode. In order to produce reproducible cuts, the samples (porcine gingiva) were moved by a computer controlled translation stage. On the fresh samples cutting depth and quality were determined by light microscopy. Afterwards histological sections were prepared and microscopically analyzed regarding cutting depth and thermal damage zone. The experiments show that low laser power ≤ 2W is sufficient to perform efficient oral soft tissue cutting with cut depth up to 2mm (sample movement 2mm/s). The width of the thermal damage zone can be controlled by the irradiation parameters within a range of about 50μm to 110μm. In general, thermal injury is more pronounced using fiber tips in contact mode compared to the focused laser beam. In conclusion the results reveal that even the low power diode pumped Er:YAG laser is an appropriate tool for oral surgery.

  12. Effective Fluorescence Lifetime and Stimulated Emission Cross-Section of Nd/Cr:YAG Ceramics under CW Lamplight Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiki, Taku; Motokoshi, Shinji; Imasaki, Kazuo; Fujioka, Kana; Fujita, Hisanori; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Izawa, Yasukazu; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    2008-10-01

    Remarkable improvements in the lifetime of the Nd upper level and in the effective stimulated emission cross-section of Nd/Cr:YAG ceramics have been theoretically and experimentally studied. Until recently, it had been thought that the long energy transition time from Cr ions to Nd ions of Nd/Cr:YAG adversely affects laser action, degrading optical-optical conversion efficiency under CW and flash lamp pumping. However, current research showed that high-efficiency energy transition has a positive effect on laser action. The effective lifetime is increased from 0.23 to 1.1 ms and the emission cross-section is effectively increased to three times for that of the conventional Nd:YAG. A small signal gain is significantly improved, and the saturation power density is reduced to 1/10 that of the Nd:YAG for the same pumping power density. A CW laser light generated in a laser diode (LD)-pumped 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser oscillator was amplified, and the measured output power was saturated. The output laser power calculated using theoretical saturation power density was consistent with the experimental results.

  13. Optimal flash rate and duty cycle for flashing visual indicators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, J.

    1971-01-01

    This experiment examined the ability of observers to determine, as quickly as possible, whether a visual indicator was steadily on or flashing. Six flash rates (periods) were combined factorially with three duty cycles (on-off ratios) to define 18 ?types' of intermittent signals. Experimental sessions were divided into six runs of 100 trials, each run utilizing one of the six flash rates. On any given trial in a run, the probability of a steady signal occurring was 0.5 and the probability of a flashing signal occurring was 0.5. A different duty cycle was employed daily for each experimental session. In all, 400 trials were devoted to each of the flash rates at each duty cycle. Accuracy and latency of response were the dependent variables of interest. The results show that the observers view the light for an interval of time appropriate to the expected flash rate and duty cycle; whether they judge the light to be steady or intermittent depends upon whether the light is extinguished during the predetermined waiting period. Adoption of this temporal criterion delays responding in comparison to those tasks involving responses to light onset. The decision or response criteria held by the observers are also sensitive to the parameters of the flashing light: observers become increasingly willing to call a flashing light ?steady' as flash duration increases.

  14. Discharge lamp with reflective jacket

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Kipling, Kent

    2001-01-01

    A discharge lamp includes an envelope, a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope, a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed around the envelope and defining an opening, the reflector being configured to reflect some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit through the opening. The reflector may be made from a material having a similar thermal index of expansion as compared to the envelope and which is closely spaced to the envelope. The envelope material may be quartz and the reflector material may be either silica or alumina. The reflector may be formed as a jacket having a rigid structure which does not adhere to the envelope. The lamp may further include an optical clement spaced from the envelope and configured to reflect an unwanted component of light which exited the envelope back into the envelope through the opening in the reflector. Light which can be beneficially recaptured includes selected wavelength regions, a selected polarization, and selected angular components.

  15. PNNL 331 Building Arc Flash Team Investigation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Deichman, Mark L.; Drewrey, John C.; Hodges, Hurtis; Madson, Vernon J.; Minton, Allen L.; Montgomery, Daniel M.; Olson, Marvin E.; Rojas, Pedro H.; Sanan, Sanjay K.; Sharp, Reed D.; Sparks, Bobby R.; Swearingen, Gary L.

    2006-06-06

    On Friday, April 21, 2006, a PNNL electrician was performing repair of an electrical system for the 331 Building chilled water pump (CHWP) No.2, when an electrical arc flash occurred inside a 480V combination motor starter. The electrician was taken to the on-site medical provider for evaluation and was released for return to work without restriction. The electrician was not shocked, but did receive a minor, superficial (first degree) burn on the left wrist. This report, the result of a thorough review by the 331 Building Arc Flash Assessment Team, provides an in-depth look at the steps leading up to the arc-flash and recommendations and opportunities for improvement.

  16. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Signature Identification Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-03-17

    This is an extendable open-source Loop-mediated isothermal AMPlification (LAMP) signature design program called LAVA (LAMP Assay Versatile Analysis). LAVA was created in response to limitations of existing LAMP signature programs.

  17. 200-W InGaAlAs/GaAs diode laser bars for pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acklin, Bruno D.; Behringer, Martin; Herrmann, Gerhard; Luft, Johann; Hanke, Christian; Korte, Lutz; Marchiano, Marcel; Wilhelmi, Jens; De Odorico, B.

    2000-04-01

    Solid state laser pumping is an important application for high power semiconductor lasers. The higher electro-optical conversion efficiency (50%), and narrower spectral emission (2 - 5 nm) of laser diodes allow for more efficient pumping compared to flash lamps, and consequently lead to superior thermal and optical properties of the solid state laser. A further performance increase and thus price reduction, especially for pulsed and qcw operation, is conceivable using a promising approach proposed almost 20 years ago which we dubbed 'micro-stack lasers.' It consists in vertically integrating multiple active laser junctions in one -- structure using degenerately doped tunnel junctions to electrically connect the intermediate reverse junctions. By stacking 2 to 4 emitters in this way, the output power of semiconductor lasers could theoretically be increased by a factor of 2 to 4 as the reliable output power is mainly limited by the power density at the laser facets. Modern growth technology can provide the necessary 10 to 20 micrometer thick high quality epitaxial layers. The limiting factors rather originate from the additional electrical and thermal resistance, and from current spreading towards the deeper junctions.

  18. Laser flash effects on laser speckle shift visual evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, E T

    1985-10-01

    Steady-state visual evoked potentials (VEP's) were recorded from four cynomolgus monkeys in response to a sinusoidally oscillating 10 degrees helium-neon laser speckle field (632.8 nm), moving vertically 2.5 degrees at 8 shifts per second. A 5-pulse flash train at the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) dose from a collimated Q-switched frequency-doubled neodymium laser (532 nm) was superimposed on the foveal stimulus and the subsequent disruption and recovery of the VEP measured. Minimal disruption of the response signal magnitude was demonstrated (0.1 greater than p greater than 0.05) which recovered within 300 ms of the termination of the pulse train. A small but significant (p less than 0.01) disruption of phase entrainment was also noted that recovered within the same period. This is contrasted with a second experiment with three monkeys in which an argon (514 nm) laser served both as the speckle stimulus source and as the shuttered flash. Exposure to collimated MPE argon radiation for 250 ms immediately depressed the VEP (97%, p less than 0.01) and showed recovery to 70% of the pre-flash baseline only after 3 s. Phase lock was also severely degraded for several seconds. These results imply that visual processing of nonacuity-limited medium contrast stimuli with broad spatial frequency content will probably not be materially affected by ultra-short pulsed laser exposure at these energy levels and frequencies. However, even safe levels of collimated continuous laser light may have severe effects on vision that could parallel flash effects seen with Xenon discharge flash lamps. PMID:4073205

  19. Primer of School Lighting Lamps and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allphin, Willard

    The basic principles of the most commonly used lamp types and the circuitry which makes them operate are discussed. The two objectives of this book are to serve as a--(1) guide to economical lighting, and (2) a permanent reference source for troubleshooting. Areas dealt with include--(1) lighting fundamentals, (2) incandescent lamps, (3)…

  20. 21 CFR 878.4580 - Surgical lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Surgical lamp. 878.4580 Section 878.4580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4580 Surgical lamp. (a) Identification....

  1. 21 CFR 878.4580 - Surgical lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Surgical lamp. 878.4580 Section 878.4580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4580 Surgical lamp. (a) Identification....

  2. 21 CFR 878.4580 - Surgical lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Surgical lamp. 878.4580 Section 878.4580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4580 Surgical lamp. (a) Identification....

  3. 21 CFR 878.4580 - Surgical lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Surgical lamp. 878.4580 Section 878.4580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4580 Surgical lamp. (a) Identification....

  4. 21 CFR 878.4580 - Surgical lamp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgical lamp. 878.4580 Section 878.4580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4580 Surgical lamp. (a) Identification....

  5. General service incandescent lamp with improved efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Berlec, I.

    1985-06-18

    A high efficiency general service incandescent lamp is disclosed. The disclosed improved general service incandescent lamp has an outer and an inner envelope. The inner envelope has a relatively small housing containing a halogen gas and a relatively high pressure efficient fill-gas and in which a low voltage filament is spatially disposed therein.

  6. Temperature and Color of Incandescent Lamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, William S.

    1991-01-01

    Two different methods of measuring the temperature of an incandescent lamp at various voltage levels are described. By observing the color produced at a particular voltage levels, the lamp's color as a function of temperature can be determined. Needed equipment include a variac, a voltmeter, and an ammeter. (KR)

  7. Lamp modulator provides signal magnitude indication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    Lamp modulator provides visible indication of presence and magnitude of an audio signal carrying voice or data. It can be made to reflect signal variations of up to 32 decibels. Lamp life is increased by use of a bypass resistor to prevent filament failure.

  8. Gun muzzle blast and flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingenberg, Guenter; Heimerl, Joseph M.

    A repository of fundamental experimental and analytical data concerning the complex phenomena associated with gun-muzzle blast and flash effects is presented, proceeding from gun muzzle signatures to modern gun-propulsion concepts, interior and transitional ballistics, and characterizations of blast-wave research and muzzle flash. Data are presented in support of a novel hypothesis which explains the ignition of secondary flash and elucidates the means for its suppression. Both chemical and mechanical (often competing) methods of flash suppression are treated. The historical work of Kesslau and Ladenburg is noted, together with French, British, Japanese and American research efforts and current techniques of experimental characterization for gun muzzle phenomena.

  9. High efficiency fluorescent excimer lamps: an alternative to mercury based UVC lamps.

    PubMed

    Masoud, N M; Murnick, D E

    2013-12-01

    A high efficiency xenon excimer lamp radiating at 172 nm, with an internal phosphor coating shifting to UVC has been demonstrated, showing the feasibility of a cost effective alternative to UVC mercury lamps. Fluorescent lamps so designed can be fabricated in various geometries with high efficiency. Unlike other xenon excimer lamps based on dielectric barrier discharges this new system is highly compatible with existing and proposed phosphors as it operates in an inert gas environment at modest temperature and is subject only to 172 nm primary radiation. Using a lamp coated with a UVC phosphor we have demonstrated the feasibility of germicidal and curing lamps with 40% energy conversion efficiency and high power density. These lamps are rapidly switchable, have long projected lifetimes and are compatible with dimmers. PMID:24387421

  10. High efficiency fluorescent excimer lamps: An alternative to mercury based UVC lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Masoud, N. M.; Murnick, D. E.

    2013-12-15

    A high efficiency xenon excimer lamp radiating at 172 nm, with an internal phosphor coating shifting to UVC has been demonstrated, showing the feasibility of a cost effective alternative to UVC mercury lamps. Fluorescent lamps so designed can be fabricated in various geometries with high efficiency. Unlike other xenon excimer lamps based on dielectric barrier discharges this new system is highly compatible with existing and proposed phosphors as it operates in an inert gas environment at modest temperature and is subject only to 172 nm primary radiation. Using a lamp coated with a UVC phosphor we have demonstrated the feasibility of germicidal and curing lamps with 40% energy conversion efficiency and high power density. These lamps are rapidly switchable, have long projected lifetimes and are compatible with dimmers.

  11. Optimized design of LED plant lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-sheng; Cai, Ruhai; Zhao, Yunyun; Zhao, Fuli; Yang, Bowen

    2014-12-01

    In order to fabricate the optimized LED plant lamp we demonstrated an optical spectral exploration. According to the mechanism of higher plant photosynthesis process and the spectral analysis we demonstrate an optical design of the LED plant lamp. Furthermore we built two kins of prototypes of the LED plant lamps which are suitable for the photosynthesis of higher green vegetables. Based on the simulation of the lamp box of the different alignment of the plants we carried out the growing experiment of green vegetable and obtain the optimized light illumination as well as the spectral profile. The results show that only blue and red light are efficient for the green leave vegetables. Our work is undoubtedly helpful for the LED plant lamping design and manufacture.

  12. Optimization of white polychromatic semiconductor lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žukauskas, A.; Vaicekauskas, R.; Ivanauskas, F.; Gaska, R.; Shur, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    A stochastic method of optimization of a white-light source that relies on additive color mixing of the emissions from colored light-emitting diodes (LEDs) was developed. The method allows for finding the optimal wavelengths of LEDs in order to obtain the best possible trade off between luminous efficacy and the general color rendering index (CRI) of the white source for an arbitrary number of primary LEDs. Optimal solid-state lamps composed of two, three, four, and five different LEDs were analyzed. We show that a dichromatic LED lamp can only provide high efficacy with a general CRI close to zero, whereas trichromatic and quadrichromatic lamps are able to cover the entire range of reasonable general CRI values. The optimization of quintichromatic LED lamps and lamps with a higher number of primary color LEDs yields a negligible benefit in improving CRI but provides for quasicontinuous spectra that might be required for special lighting needs.

  13. Portable lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik R.

    2001-01-01

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) arranged vertically with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum insures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  14. Flash Proton Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Frank E.

    Protons were first investigated as radiographic probes as high energy proton accelerators became accessible to the scientific community in the 1960s. Like the initial use of X-rays in the 1800s, protons were shown to be a useful tool for studying the contents of opaque materials, but the electromagnetic charge of the protons opened up a new set of interaction processes which complicated their use. These complications in combination with the high expense of generating protons with energies high enough to penetrate typical objects resulted in proton radiography becoming a novelty, demonstrated at accelerator facilities, but not utilized to their full potential until the 1990s at Los Alamos. During this time Los Alamos National Laboratory was investigating a wide range of options, including X-rays and neutrons, as the next generation of probes to be used for thick object flash radiography. During this process it was realized that the charge nature of the protons, which was the source of the initial difficulty with this idea, could be used to recover this technique. By introducing a magnetic imaging lens downstream of the object to be radiographed, the blur resulting from scattering within the object could be focused out of the measurements, dramatically improving the resolution of proton radiography of thick systems. Imaging systems were quickly developed and combined with the temporal structure of a proton beam generated by a linear accelerator, providing a unique flash radiography capability for measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technique has now been employed at LANSCE for two decades and has been adopted around the world as the premier flash radiography technique for the study of dynamic material properties.

  15. Dispenser printed electroluminescent lamps on textiles for smart fabric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Marc; Torah, Russel; Tudor, John

    2016-04-01

    Flexible electroluminescent (EL) lamps are fabricated onto woven textiles using a novel dispenser printing process. Dispenser printing utilizes pressurized air to deposit ink onto a substrate through a syringe and nozzle. This work demonstrates the first use of this technology to fabricate EL lamps. The luminance of the dispenser printed EL lamps is compared to screen-printed EL lamps, both printed on textile, and also commercial EL lamps on polyurethane film. The dispenser printed lamps are shown to have a 1.5 times higher luminance than the best performing commercially available lamp, and have a comparable performance to the screen-printed lamps.

  16. Methods of flash sintering

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Cologna, Marco; Francis, John S.

    2016-05-10

    This disclosure provides methods of flash sintering and compositions created by these methods. Methods for sintering multilayered bodies are provided in which a sintered body is produced in less than one minute. In one aspect, each layer is of a different composition, and may be constituted wholly from a ceramic or from a combination of ceramic and metallic particles. When the body includes a layer of an anode composition, a layer of an electrolyte composition and a layer of a cathode composition, the sintered body can be used to produce a solid oxide fuel cell.

  17. Flash evaporator systems test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    A flash evaporator heat rejection system representative of that proposed for the space shuttle orbiter underwent extensive system testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to determine its operational suitability and to establish system performance/operational characteristics for use in the shuttle system. During the tests the evaporator system demonstrated its suitability to meet the shuttle requirements by: (1) efficient operation with 90 to 95% water evaporation efficiency, (2) control of outlet temperature to 40 + or - 2 F for partial heat load operation, (3) stability of control system for rapid changes in Freon inlet temperature, and (4) repeated dormant-to-active device operation without any startup procedures.

  18. Laboratory prototype flash evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A laboratory prototype flash evaporator that is being developed as a candidate for the space shuttle environmental control system expendable heat sink is described. The single evaporator configuration uses water as an evaporant to accommodate reentry and on-orbit peak heat loads, and Freon 22 for terrestrial flight phases below 120,000 feet altitude. The design features, fabrication techniques used for the prototype unit, redundancy considerations, and the fluid temperature control arrangement are reported in detail. The results of an extensive test program to determine the evaporator operational characteristics under a wide variety of conditions are presented.

  19. Network of LAMP systems for atmospheric monitoring in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar; Jayaraman, Achuthan

    2012-07-01

    A systematic knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is required for understanding many atmospheric processes such as dynamics of boundary layer, pollution transport, modification of cloud microphysics etc. At present, the information on the particle distribution in the atmosphere is far from sufficient to estimate properly the load of aerosols in the atmosphere. Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) has been demonstrated to be a reliable remote sensing technique to obtain altitude profiles of atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering. A LIDAR network is being implemented by National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a Department of Space unit, in India for the measurement and monitoring of the atmospheric aerosols and clouds. Towards this, the technology of boundary layer lidar (BLL) (Bhavani Kumar, 2006) has been exploited. Several industrial grade BLL systems are being fabricated at a private industry in India through technological transfer from NARL. The industrial BLL lidar is named as LAMP, stands for LIDAR for Atmospheric Measurement and Probing. Five LAMP systems have already been fabricated and deployed at several locations of the country for continuous monitoring of aerosols and clouds under the Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. The LAMP system employs a single barrel construction so that no realignment is required in future. Moreover, the network lidar system employs several features like rotation facility about the elevation (EL) axis, a provision of front window for environmental protection to the telescope optics and a silica gel pocket for desiccation (for transmit and receive assembly) and a provision of nitrogen purging to overcome the humidity effects. The LAMP system is an autonomous system equipped with a diode pumped Nd-YAG laser, a PMT for the detection of the backscattered photons, and a PC based photon counting electronics for recording the photon returns. In this paper, a report describing

  20. NAND FLASH Radiation Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS FLASH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Charles; Wang, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    The NAND Flash Radiation Tolerant and Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS FLASH) is a User's Friendly, Plug-and- Play and Radiation Protected high density NAND Flash Memory. It provides a very high density, radiation hardened by design and non-volatile memory module suitable for all space applications such as commercial or scientific geo-stationary missions, earth observation, navigation, manned space vehicles and deep space scientific exploration. The Intelligent Memory Module embeds a very high density of non-volatile NAND Flash memory and one Intelligent Flash Memory Controller (FMC). The FMC provides the module with a full protection against the radiation effects such as SEL, SEFI and SEU. It's also granting the module with bad block immunity as well as high level service functions that will benefit to the user's applications.

  1. FLASH: a rapid method for prototyping paper-based microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Andres W; Phillips, Scott T; Wiley, Benjamin J; Gupta, Malancha; Whitesides, George M

    2008-12-01

    This article describes FLASH (Fast Lithographic Activation of Sheets), a rapid method for laboratory prototyping of microfluidic devices in paper. Paper-based microfluidic devices are emerging as a new technology for applications in diagnostics for the developing world, where low cost and simplicity are essential. FLASH is based on photolithography, but requires only a UV lamp and a hotplate; no clean-room or special facilities are required (FLASH patterning can even be performed in sunlight if a UV lamp and hotplate are unavailable). The method provides channels in paper with dimensions as small as 200 microm in width and 70 microm in height; the height is defined by the thickness of the paper. Photomasks for patterning paper-based microfluidic devices can be printed using an ink-jet printer or photocopier, or drawn by hand using a waterproof black pen. FLASH provides a straightforward method for prototyping paper-based microfluidic devices in regions where the technological support for conventional photolithography is not available. PMID:19023478

  2. FLASH: A rapid method for prototyping paper-based microfluidic devices‡

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Andres W.; Phillips, Scott T.; Wiley, Benjamin J.; Gupta, Malancha

    2011-01-01

    This article describes FLASH (Fast Lithographic Activation of Sheets), a rapid method for laboratory prototyping of microfluidic devices in paper. Paper-based microfluidic devices are emerging as a new technology for applications in diagnostics for the developing world, where low cost and simplicity are essential. FLASH is based on photolithography, but requires only a UV lamp and a hotplate; no clean-room or special facilities are required (FLASH patterning can even be performed in sunlight if a UV lamp and hotplate are unavailable). The method provides channels in paper with dimensions as small as 200 μm in width and 70 μm in height; the height is defined by the thickness of the paper. Photomasks for patterning paper-based microfluidic devices can be printed using an ink-jet printer or photocopier, or drawn by hand using a waterproof black pen. FLASH provides a straightforward method for prototyping paper-based microfluidic devices in regions where the technological support for conventional photolithography is not available. PMID:19023478

  3. High concentration (2500 suns), high throughput, automated flash tester with calibrated color balance and intensity control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludowise, Michael; Taylor, Sean; Lucow, Ewelina; Chan, Hing

    2008-08-01

    SolFocus has designed and built a flexible and adaptable solar flash tester capable of reaching in excess of 2500x suns flux using a commercially available Xenon flash and power supply. Using calibrated isotype cells and photodetectors, the intensity and color balance of the flash are controlled through software algorithms that compensate for tube aging and thermal drift. The data acquisition system dynamically normalizes each of the 1600 I-V data pairs to the lamp intensity during each flash. Up to 32 cells can be measured simultaneously, with a flash re-cycle time of 3 seconds. The dynamic current range is 100μA to 10A over 0 to 5V. Test ranges are limited by user input through a modern GUI screen. The system is mated to a commercially available probe station tester which allows automated testing of up to 150mm diameter wafers, and is capable of testing a 4000 cell wafer in less than 8 minutes. The core software and optical components are easily adaptable to receiver and full panel testing as well. Data on the calibration and performance of the flash tester, the dynamic range achieved in test, and throughputs obtained during operation are presented.

  4. Flash xenon CPV simulator with low-cost elastic bent-trough mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Noboru; Okamoto, Kazuya; Ijiro, Toshikazu; Kiryu, Mitsugu; Yoshida, Takanori

    2013-09-01

    In the research and development of concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) systems, a highly collimated artificial sunlight source with a wide irradiated area is very helpful in the reliable evaluation of module efficiency and optical performance. To collimate the light, a conventional flash xenon CPV simulator uses an expensive large concave mirror. This paper introduces a new flash xenon CPV simulator that consists of two low-cost elastic bent-trough mirrors. The prototype simulator achieved an irradiance deviation of less than 10%, collimation of 0.228° - 0.330°, and good spectral matching at an irradiated area of 700 mm × 500 mm. The major drawback of the present concept is that the flash lamp must provide higher emissive power than the conventional method because of the light attenuation caused by the two reflections from the mirrors.

  5. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  6. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  7. Geometric Modelling of Octagonal Lamp Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. O.; Lichti, D. D.

    2014-06-01

    Lamp poles are one of the most abundant highway and community components in modern cities. Their supporting parts are primarily tapered octagonal cones specifically designed for wind resistance. The geometry and the positions of the lamp poles are important information for various applications. For example, they are important to monitoring deformation of aged lamp poles, maintaining an efficient highway GIS system, and also facilitating possible feature-based calibration of mobile LiDAR systems. In this paper, we present a novel geometric model for octagonal lamp poles. The model consists of seven parameters in which a rotation about the z-axis is included, and points are constrained by the trigonometric property of 2D octagons after applying the rotations. For the geometric fitting of the lamp pole point cloud captured by a terrestrial LiDAR, accurate initial parameter values are essential. They can be estimated by first fitting the points to a circular cone model and this is followed by some basic point cloud processing techniques. The model was verified by fitting both simulated and real data. The real data includes several lamp pole point clouds captured by: (1) Faro Focus 3D and (2) Velodyne HDL-32E. The fitting results using the proposed model are promising, and up to 2.9 mm improvement in fitting accuracy was realized for the real lamp pole point clouds compared to using the conventional circular cone model. The overall result suggests that the proposed model is appropriate and rigorous.

  8. Intensified phototherapy using daylight fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    De Carvalho, M; De Carvalho, D; Trzmielina, S; Lopes, J M; Hansen, T W

    1999-07-01

    Jaundice is a common reason for therapeutic intervention in newborn infants and phototherapy is effective treatment if enough light energy is delivered to a skin surface area of sufficient size. Narrow spectrum blue light is superior to white light, but in developing countries fluorescent blue lamps often have to be imported and are much more expensive than white lamps. We developed a phototherapy unit in which seven daylight fluorescent tubes are placed immediately under the floor of a transparent plexiglass crib. The efficacy of this unit, delivering approximately 19 microW/cm2/nm, was compared with that of two conventional phototherapy units using overhead lamps placed 35 cm above the infants. One unit used daylight fluorescent tubes and delivered approximately 4 microW/cm2/nm, the other unit used special blue fluorescent tubes and delivered approximately 22 microW/cm2/nm. Fifty-one infants were included in the analyses, all of them breastfed on demand. Serum bilirubin levels were determined spectrophotometrically at 0, 12 and 24 h. The decrement in serum bilirubin concentrations was significantly greater in infants undergoing phototherapy with the new device or with special blue lamps compared to conventional overhead daylight lamps (p < 0.001 both at 12 and at 24 h). We conclude that highly efficient phototherapy may be delivered with daylight fluorescent lamps placed in very close proximity to the patient. Thus, lack of access to expensive imported special blue lamps does not preclude delivery of effective phototherapy in developing countries. PMID:10447138

  9. Primary investigations on the potential of a novel diode pumped Er:YAG laser system for middle ear surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Karl; Wurm, Holger; Hausladen, Florian

    2016-02-01

    Flashlamp pumped Er:YAG lasers are successfully used clinically for both precise soft and hard tissue ablation. Since several years a novel diode pumped Er:YAG laser system (Pantec Engineering AG) is available, with mean laser power up to 40 W and pulse repetition rate up to 1 kHz. The aim of the study was to investigate the suitability of the laser system specifically for stapedotomy. Firstly an experimental setup was realized with a beam focusing unit and a computer controlled translation stage to move the samples (slices of porcine bone) with a defined velocity while irradiation with various laser parameters. A microphone was positioned in a defined distance to the ablation point and the resulting acoustic signal of the ablation process was recorded. For comparison, measurements were also performed with a flash lamp pumped Er:YAG laser system. After irradiation the resulting ablation quality and efficacy were determined using light microscopy. Using a high speed camera and "Töpler-Schlierentechnik" the cavitation bubble in water after perforation of a bone slice was investigated. The results show efficient bone ablation using the diode pumped Er:YAG laser system. Also a decrease of the sound level and of the cavitation bubble volume was observed with decreasing pulse duration. Higher repetition rates lead to a slightly increase of thermal side effects but have no influence on the ablation efficiency. In conclusion, these first experiments demonstrate the high potential of the diode pumped Er:YAG laser system for use in middle ear surgery.

  10. Compact fluorescent lamp applications in luxury hotels

    SciTech Connect

    Gilleskie, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Over the past several years, consumers, lighting designers, and energy conservationists have paid increasing attention to the special characteristics of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). CFLs can typically be used to replace incandescent lamps of three to four times their own wattage, and their color rendering indices (CRIs)-80 to 85-make them virtually indistinguishable from incandescents. The typical 10,0000-hour life of a CFL often makes savings in labor its most desirable feature when compared to a shorter-lived incandescent lamp.

  11. Lamp system for uniform semiconductor wafer heating

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Luis E.; Hackel, Lloyd

    2001-01-01

    A lamp system with a very soft high-intensity output is provided over a large area by water cooling a long-arc lamp inside a diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) white pigment. The water is kept clean and pure by a one micron particulate filter and an activated charcoal/ultraviolet irradiation system that circulates and de-ionizes and biologically sterilizes the coolant water at all times, even when the long-arc lamp is off.

  12. Lasing studies of new coumarin derivatives under laser and lamp excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, A. V.; Veselova, T. V.; Kozlovskii, D. A.; Komlev, I. V.; Levin, M. B.; Reznichenko, A. V.; Tavrizova, M. A.; Cherkasov, A. S.

    1988-09-01

    The luminescence characteristics and results of a study of the comparative laser efficiency of ethanol solutions of a series of coumarin derivatives and rhodamine 6G are presented. It is shown that under laser excitation (neodymium laser third harmonic) and lamp excitation, the solutions of certain coumarins match rhodamine 6G in lasing efficiency values. A comparatively low photostability of the investigated coumarin solutions and its weak dependence on the spectral composition of the pumping radiation have been observed.

  13. 49 CFR 393.23 - Power supply for lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.23 Power supply for lamps. All required lamps must be powered by the electrical system of the motor vehicle with the exception of battery powered lamps used on projecting loads....

  14. 49 CFR 393.23 - Power supply for lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.23 Power supply for lamps. All required lamps must be powered by the electrical system of the motor vehicle with the exception of battery powered lamps used on projecting loads....

  15. 49 CFR 393.23 - Power supply for lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.23 Power supply for lamps. All required lamps must be powered by the electrical system of the motor vehicle with the exception of battery powered lamps used on projecting loads....

  16. 30 CFR 75.522-1 - Incandescent and fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Incandescent and fluorescent lamps. 75.522-1...-1 Incandescent and fluorescent lamps. (a) Except for areas of a coal mine inby the last open crosscut, incandescent lamps may be used to illuminate underground areas. When incandescent lamps are...

  17. 30 CFR 75.522-1 - Incandescent and fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Incandescent and fluorescent lamps. 75.522-1...-1 Incandescent and fluorescent lamps. (a) Except for areas of a coal mine inby the last open crosscut, incandescent lamps may be used to illuminate underground areas. When incandescent lamps are...

  18. 30 CFR 75.522-1 - Incandescent and fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Incandescent and fluorescent lamps. 75.522-1...-1 Incandescent and fluorescent lamps. (a) Except for areas of a coal mine inby the last open crosscut, incandescent lamps may be used to illuminate underground areas. When incandescent lamps are...

  19. 30 CFR 75.522-1 - Incandescent and fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Incandescent and fluorescent lamps. 75.522-1...-1 Incandescent and fluorescent lamps. (a) Except for areas of a coal mine inby the last open crosscut, incandescent lamps may be used to illuminate underground areas. When incandescent lamps are...

  20. FLASH LIDAR Based Relative Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazzel, Jack; Clark, Fred; Milenkovic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Relative navigation remains the most challenging part of spacecraft rendezvous and docking. In recent years, flash LIDARs, have been increasingly selected as the go-to sensors for proximity operations and docking. Flash LIDARS are generally lighter and require less power that scanning Lidars. Flash LIDARs do not have moving parts, and they are capable of tracking multiple targets as well as generating a 3D map of a given target. However, there are some significant drawbacks of Flash Lidars that must be resolved if their use is to be of long-term significance. Overcoming the challenges of Flash LIDARs for navigation-namely, low technology readiness level, lack of historical performance data, target identification, existence of false positives, and performance of vision processing algorithms as intermediaries between the raw sensor data and the Kalman filter-requires a world-class testing facility, such as the Lockheed Martin Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC). Ground-based testing is a critical step for maturing the next-generation flash LIDAR-based spacecraft relative navigation. This paper will focus on the tests of an integrated relative navigation system conducted at the SOSC in January 2014. The intent of the tests was to characterize and then improve the performance of relative navigation, while addressing many of the flash LIDAR challenges mentioned above. A section on navigation performance and future recommendation completes the discussion.

  1. LED lamp power management system and method

    DOEpatents

    Gaines, James; Clauberg, Bernd; Van Erp, Josephus A. M.

    2013-03-19

    An LED lamp power management system and method including an LED lamp having an LED controller 58; a plurality of LED channels 60 operably connected to the LED controller 58, each of the plurality of LED channels 60 having a channel switch 62 in series with at least one shunted LED circuit 83, the shunted LED circuit 83 having a shunt switch 68 in parallel with an LED source 80. The LED controller 58 reduces power loss in one of the channel switch 62 and the shunt switch 68 when LED lamp electronics power loss (P.sub.loss) exceeds an LED lamp electronics power loss limit (P.sub.lim); and each of the channel switches 62 receives a channel switch control signal 63 from the LED controller 58 and each of the shunt switches 68 receives a shunt switch control signal 69 from the LED controller 58.

  2. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2014-02-01

    The CALiPER program first began investigating LED lamps sold at retail stores in 2010, purchasing 33 products from eight retailers and covering six product categories. The findings revealed a fragmented marketplace, with large disparities in performance of different products, accuracy of manufacturer claims, and offerings from different retail outlets. Although there were some good products, looking back many would not be considered viable competitors to other available options, with too little lumen output, not high enough efficacy, or poor color quality. CALiPER took another look in late 2011purchasing 38 products of five different types from nine retailers and the improvement was marked. Performance was up; retailer claims were more accurate; and the price per lumen and price per unit efficacy were down, although the price per product had not changed much. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of room for improvement, with the performance of LED lamps not yet reaching that of well-established classes of conventional lamps (e.g., 75 W incandescent A19 lamps). Since the second retail lamp study was published in early 2012, there has been substantial progress in all aspects of LED lamps available from retailers. To document this progress, CALiPER again purchased a sample of lamps from retail stores 46 products in total, focusing on A19, PAR30, and MR16 lamps but instead of a random sample, sought to select products to answer specific hypotheses about performance. These hypotheses focused on expanding ranges of LED equivalency, the accuracy of lifetime claims, efficacy and price trends, as well as changes to product designs. Among other results, key findings include: There are now very good LED options to compete with 60 W, 75 W, and 100 W incandescent A19 lamps, and 75 W halogen PAR30 lamps. MR16 lamps have shown less progress, but there are now acceptable alternatives to 35 W, 12 V halogen MR16 lamps and 50 W, 120 V halogen MR16 lamps for some applications. Other

  3. UVIS tungsten lamp cross-check

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia

    2009-07-01

    This proposal will verify the operation of the spare UVIS channel calsystem tungsten lamp. Internal flatfields will be obtained in one filter from each of the twelve filter wheels, providing an initial baseline and comparison for those taken with the primary lamp {WF09, 11422}. Filters for this proposal were chosen based upon a balance of multiple factors: reasonable countrate with calsystem tungsten lamp {no long exposure times}, science priority of the filter, overall coverage of UVIS wavelength regime, and slot location in the wheel. Exposures will be taken in the default full-frame, four-amp, unbinned readout mode.This proposal corresponds to the spare lamp portion of SMOV activity id WFC3-09.

  4. WFC3 SS UVIS Spare Tungsten Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    2012-10-01

    Part of side switch activities.This proposal will verify the operation of the spare UVIS channel calsystem tungsten lamp. Internal flatfields will be obtained in one filter from each of the twelve filter wheels, providing an initial baseline and comparison for those taken with the primary lamp {WF09}. Filters for this proposal were chosen based upon a balance of multiple factors: reasonable countrate with calsystem tungsten lamp {no long exposure times}, science priority of the filter, overall coverage of UVIS wavelength regime, and slot location in the wheel. Exposures will be taken in the default full-frame, four-amp, unbinned readout mode.This proposal corresponds to the spare lamp portion of SS SMOV activity ID: WF09b

  5. Spectral comparisons of sunlight and different lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deitzer, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    The tables in this report were compiled to characterize the spectra of available lamp types and provide comparison to the spectra of sunlight. Table 1 reports the spectral distributions for various lamp sources and compares them to those measured for sunlight. Table 2 provides the amount of energy in Wm(exp -2) relative to the number of photons of PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) (400-700 nm) for each light source.

  6. Electrodeless-discharge-vapor-lamp-based Faraday anomalous-dispersion optical filter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qinqing; Zhuang, Wei; Liu, Zhiwen; Chen, Jingbiao

    2011-12-01

    We report an excited-state Faraday anomalous-dispersion optical filter operating on the rubidium 5P(3/2)-5D(5/2) transition (775.9 nm in vacuum) without the use of a pump laser. An electrodeless discharge vapor lamp is employed to replace the Rb vapor cell in a traditional Faraday anomalous-dispersion optical filter system. Atoms can be excited by power rather than a complex frequency-locked pump laser. A proof-of-concept experimental demonstration with a maximum transmission of 1.9% and a filter bandwidth of 650 MHz is presented. PMID:22139259

  7. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  8. PUMP CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Strickland, G.; Horn, F.L.; White, H.T.

    1960-09-27

    A pump which utilizes the fluid being pumped through it as its lubricating fluid is described. This is achieved by means of an improved bearing construction in a pump of the enclosed or canned rotor type. At the outlet end of the pump, adjacent to an impeller mechanism, there is a bypass which conveys some of the pumped fluid to a chamber at the inlet end of the pump. After this chamber becomes full, the pumped fluid passes through fixed orifices in the top of the chamber and exerts a thrust on the inlet end of the pump rotor. Lubrication of the rotor shaft is accomplished by passing the pumped fluid through a bypass at the outlet end of the rotor shaft. This bypass conveys Pumped fluid to a cooling means and then to grooves on the surface of the rotor shait, thus lubricating the shaft.

  9. Industrial Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A flow inducer is a device that increases the pump intake capacity of a Worthington Centrifugal pump. It lifts the suction pressure sufficiently for the rotating main impeller of the centrifugal pump to operate efficiently at higher fluid intake levels. The concept derives from 1960's NASA technology which was advanced by Worthington Pump Division. The pumps are used to recirculate wood molasses, a highly viscous substance.

  10. Corrosion testing in flash tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.J.; Stead, N.J.

    1999-07-01

    As kraft pulp mills adopt modified cooking processes, an increasing amount of corrosion of carbon steel digester systems is being encountered. Many mills have had severe corrosion in the flash tanks, in particular, the first ({number{underscore}sign}1) flash tank. The work described in this report was aimed at characterizing the corrosion. Coupons of carbon steel, several stainless steels and titanium were exposed at two mills. At mill A, identical sets of coupons were exposed in the {number{underscore}sign}1 and {number{underscore}sign}2 flash tank. At mill B, three identical sets of coupons were placed in flash tank {number{underscore}sign}1. The results of the exposures showed that both carbon steel and titanium suffered high rates of general corrosion, while the stainless steels suffered varying degrees of localized attack. The ranking of the resistance of corrosion in the flash tank was the same ranking as would be expected in a reducing acid environment. In the light of the coupon results, organic acids is concluded to be the most likely cause of corrosion of the flash tanks.

  11. 10 CFR 429.40 - Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base incandescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base incandescent lamps. 429.40 Section 429.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification §...

  12. 10 CFR 429.40 - Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base incandescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base incandescent lamps. 429.40 Section 429.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification §...

  13. 10 CFR 429.40 - Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base incandescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Candelabra base incandescent lamps and intermediate base incandescent lamps. 429.40 Section 429.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification §...

  14. 49 CFR 393.25 - Requirements for lamps other than head lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... have each lamp located so that it meets the visibility requirements specified in the SAE standards..., and all lamps on converter dollies and pole trailers must meet the following applicable SAE standards... SAE J845—Optical Warning Devices for Authorized Emergency, Maintenance and Service Vehicles, May...

  15. Dual-energy flash x-ray generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Takahashi, Kei; Shikoda, Arimitsu; Oizumi, Teiji; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru; Fujiwara, Akihiro; Mitoya, Kanji

    1995-05-01

    The fundamental studies on a dual-energy flash x-ray generator for performing the energy-selective two-direction radiography are described. This generator consisted of the following components: a negative high- voltage power supply, a polarity-inversion-type high-voltage pulser having a 5 nF combined ceramic condenser, a turbo molecular pump, and two flash x-ray tubes. The condenser in the pulser was charged from -60 to -80 kV, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to two x-ray tubes. The maximum output voltage from the pulser was about -1.5 times the charged voltage because the cable transmission line was employed. Using a tube, the maximum tube voltage was about 110 kV. The maximum tube current and the x-ray intensity were less than 3 kA and 5 (mu) C/kg at 0.5 m per pulse, respectively. In contrast, the tube current and the intensity has approximately half the above values when two tubes were employed. The pulse widths were less than 200 ns, and two shots of flash x rays were obtained simultaneously. Each photon energy of flash x rays can be changed by controlling the space between the anode and cathode electrodes.

  16. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:27463140

  17. COS/FUV Mapping of Stray PtNe Lamp Light Through FCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Cristina

    2010-09-01

    order.LAMP2 with CURRENT=LOW is used in all of these visits. In addition, at each position, one exposure with LAMP1 CURRENT=MED is also taken with the G130M/1055 setting, which leads to total counts in 10 sec more than a factor of 10 below the 600,000 limit. This exposure is used so that the ratio of LAMP1/MED to LAMP2/LOW can be calculated for the FCA at each position {in conjunction with the data obtained in visits 11, 12, and 13; see below}. In addition, the G130M/1055 exposures with LAMP1/MED and LAMP2/LOW will be used to determine if the lamp spot size is changing at each position.Depending on the total counts estimated for each setting, either a typical wave exposure is taken or special flash commands are used. Details are given in each visit.Exposures obtained with LAMP1/CURRENT=LOW are expected to have a 20% smaller count rate than exposures obtained with LAMP1/CURRENT=MED. Exposures obtained with LAMP2/CURRENT=MED are expected to have count rates similar to those obtained with LAMP1/CURRENT=MED, and exposures obtained with LAMP2/CURRENT=LOW are expected to have a count rate which is 1/7 of that obtainedwith LAMP2/CURRENT=MED.VISIT 10 OBTAINS LAMP1/CURRENT=MED+ LOW SPECTRA AT ALL THE M SETTINGS USED IN THIS PROGRAM, AT THE NOMINAL POSITION {0.0"}.VISIT 11 OBTAINS LAMP2/CURRENT=MED SPECTRA AT ALL THE M SETTINGS USED IN THIS PROGRAM, AT THE NOMINAL POSITION {0.0"}.VISIT 12 OBTAINS LAMP2/CURRENT=LOW SPECTRA AT ALL THE M SETTINGS USED IN THIS PROGRAM, AT THE NOMINAL POSITION {0.0"}.VISIT 13 OBTAINS LAMP1/CURRENT=MED, LOW AND LAMP2/CURRENT=MED, LOW SPECTRA AT ALL OF THE L SETTINGS USED IN THIS PROGRAM, AT THE NOMINAL POSITION {0.0"}.THE GOAL OF THESE VISITS IS TO DETERMINE THE RATIOS OF THE DIFFERENT LAMP SETTINGS AT DIFFERENT WAVELENGTHS, TO HELP IN ANALYZING THE DATA OBTAINED IN VISITS WHERE ONLY LAMP2/LOW IS USED.ALSO, THESE DATA WILL BE USED TO PREDICT WHAT THE COUNTS WOULD BE WITH G140L/1280/LAMP1/MED AT THE +6.0" POSITION {VIS6N, WHERE LAMP2/LOW IS USED}. THESE

  18. LED solution for E14 candle lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Liu, Ye; Boonekamp, Erik P.; Shi, Lei; Mei, Yi; Jiang, Tan; Guo, Qing; Wu, Huarong

    2009-08-01

    On a short to medium term, energy efficient retrofit LED products can offer an attractive solution for traditional lamps replacement in existing fixtures. To comply with user expectations, LED retrofit lamps should not only have the same mechanical interface to fit (socket and shape), but also have the similar light effect as the lamps they replace. The decorative lighting segment shows the best conditions to meet these requirements on short term. In 2008, Philips Lighting Shanghai started with the development of an LED candle lamp for the replacement of a 15W Candle shape (B35 E14) incandescent bulb, which is used in e.g. chandeliers. In this decorative application the main objective is not to generate as much light as possible, but the application requires the lamp to have a comparable look and, primarily, the same light effect as the incandescent candle lamp. This effect can be described as sparkling light, and it has to be directed sufficiently downwards (i.e., in the direction of the base of the lamp). These requirements leave very limited room for optics, electronics, mechanics and thermal design to play with in the small outline of this lamp. The main voltage AC LED concept is chosen to save the space for driver electronics. However the size of the AC LED is relatively big, which makes the optical design challenging. Several optical solutions to achieve the required light effect, to improve the optical efficiency, and to simplify the system are discussed. A novel prismatic lens has been developed which is capable of transforming the Lambertian light emission from typical high power LEDs into a butter-fly intensity distribution with the desired sparkling light effect. Thanks to this lens no reflecting chamber is needed, which improves the optical efficiency up to 70%, while maintaining the compact feature of the original optics. Together with advanced driver solution and thermal solution, the resulting LED candle lamp operates at 230V, consumes 1.8W, and

  19. Online inspection of circular fluorescent lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Beng-Hoe

    1998-10-01

    One step in the manufacture of circular fluorescent lamps is the mercury (Hg) injection process in which a small amount of mercury approximately 20 mg is injected into the fluorescent tube. An on-line detection of mercury is required to ensure that the amount of mercury residual inside the tube is within the acceptable tolerance. This critical operation is to reduce manufacturing overhead by controlling cost and reducing waste of materials. In view of this, an attempt has been made to design and develop an on- line mercury detection system with important benefits to the manufacturers, such as increased throughput, accuracy, reliability and consistency. This paper presents the configuration and development works of the on-line circular fluorescent lamp inspection system developed by Industrial Project Group--Machine Vision Center of Nanyang Polytechnic. The inspection system performs on-line detection of mercury particles (Hg) inside the circular fluorescent lamp. Taking the orientation and translation offsets of the lamp into consideration, it detects the presence/absence as well as the size of the injected mercury. The system has been successfully operating 15 hours per day and inspecting more than 22 thousands lamps in the production plant.

  20. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube diameter and other design attributes. The most efficient commercially available fluorescent lamp is the 25 Watt T5 lamp. This lamp operates at 114-116 lumens per watt while also providing good color rendering and more than 20,000 hours of operating life. Industry experts interviewed indicated that while this lamp is the most efficient in the market today, there is still a further 10 to 14% of potential improvements that may be introduced to the market over the next 2 to 5 years. These improvements include further developments in phosphors, fill-gas, cathode coatings and ultraviolet (UV) reflective glass coatings. The commercialization of these technology improvements will combine to bring about efficacy improvements that will push the technology up to a maximum 125 to 130 lumens per watt. One critical issue raised by researchers that may present a barrier to the realization of these improvements is the fact that technology investment in fluorescent lamps is being reduced in order to prioritize research into light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Thus, it is uncertain whether these potential efficacy improvements will be developed, patented and commercialized. The emphasis for premium efficacy will continue to focus on T5 lamps, which are expected to continue to be marketed along with the T8 lamp. Industry experts highlighted the fact that an advantage of the T5 lamp is the fact that it is 40% smaller and yet provides an equivalent lumen output to that of a T8 or T12 lamp. Due to its smaller form factor, the T5 lamp

  1. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  2. Menopausal hot flashes: Randomness or rhythmicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Fredi

    1991-10-01

    Menopausal hot flashes are episodes of flushing, increased heart rate, skin blood flow and skin temperature, and a sensation of heat. The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular concomitants of hot flashes are associated with peaks in the levels of various hormones and neurotransmitters in the peripheral circulation. Although hot flashes affect about 75% of women, and are the primary reason that women at menopause seek medical attention, the mechanism of hot flashes is still not understood. Hot flashes vary in frequency and intensity both within and between individuals, and have been thought of as occurring randomly. Yet, some women report that their hot flashes are worse at a particular time of day or year. Initial examination of subjects' recordings of their hot flashes showed diurnal patterns of hot flash occurrence. There also seems to be a diurnal rhythm of hot flash intensity. Continuous physiological monitoring of hot flashes is facilitating the analysis of these patterns, which is revealing circadian and ultradian periodicities. The occurrence of hot flashes can be modulated by external and internal factors, including ambient temperature and fever. Rhythms of thermoregulatory and endocrine functions also may influence hot flash patterns. Examination of the interrelationships between the various systems of the body involved in hot flashes, and a multidisciplinary approach to the analysis of hot flash patterns, will aid our understanding of this complex phenomenon.

  3. Electronic Flash In Data Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. E.

    1982-02-01

    Photographic acquisition of data often may be simplified, or the data quality improved upon by employing electronic flash sources with traditional equipment or techniques. The relatively short flash duration compared to movie camera shutters, or to the long integration time of video camera provides improved spatial resolution through blur reduction, particularly important as image movement becomes a significant fraction of film format dimension. Greater accuracy typically is achieved in velocity and acceleration determinations by using a stroboscopic light source rather than a movie camera frame-rate control as a time standard. Electrical efficiency often is an important advantage of electronic flash sources since almost any necessary light level for exposure may be produced, yet the source typically is "off" most of the time. Various synchronization techniques greatly expand the precise control of exposure. Biomechanical and sports equipment studies may involve velocities up to 200 feet-per-second, and often will have associated very rapid actions of interest. The need for brief exposures increases H.s one "ZOOMS in on the action." In golf, for example, the swing may be examined using 100 microsecond (Us) flashes at rates of 60 or 120 flashes-per-second (FPS). Accurate determination of linear and rotational velocity of the ball requires 10 Us flashes at 500-1,000 FPS, while sub-Us flashes at 20,000-50,000 FPS are required to resolve the interaction of the ball and the club, head. Some seldom. used techniques involving streak photography are described, with enhanced results obtained by combining strobe with the usual continuous light source. The combination of strobe and a fast electro-mechanical shutter is considered for Us photography under daylight conditions.

  4. Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps.

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Brown, Charles C.

    2014-12-14

    To date, all three reports in the retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality. This report goes a step further, examining the photoelectric characteristics (i.e., dimming and flicker) of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retails Lamps Study 3. Specifically, this report focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers. The results demonstrate notable variation across the various lamps, but little variation between the four dimmers. Overall, the LED lamps: ~tended to have higher relative light output compared to the incandescent and halogen benchmark at the same dimmer output signal (RMS voltage). The lamps’ dimming curves (i.e., the relationship between control signal and relative light output) ranged from linear to very similar to the square-law curve typical of an incandescent lamp. ~generally exhibited symmetrical behavior—the same dimming curve—when measured proceeding from maximum to minimum or minimum to maximum control signal. ~mostly dimmed below 10% of full light output, with some exceptions for specific lamp and dimmer combinations ~exhibited a range of flicker characteristics, with many comparing favorably to the level typical of a magnetically-ballasted fluorescent lamp through at least a majority of the dimming range. ~ always exceeded the relative (normalized) efficacy over the dimming range of the benchmark lamps, which rapidly decline in efficacy when they are dimmed. This report generally does not attempt to rank the performance of one product compared to another, but instead focuses on the collective performance of the group versus conventional incandescent or halogen lamps, the performance of which is likely to be the baseline for a majority of consumers. Undoubtedly, some LED lamps perform better—or more similar to conventional lamps—than others. Some perform desirably for one

  5. Experimental study of high-speed photonic imaging using a flash-lamp system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Yutaka

    1997-05-01

    A flashlight system has been developed to generate high intensity luminance which would allow high speed imaging up to 10,000 frames per second in the field where there was no power supply or in a room with restricted power capacity. It gives higher luminance than continuous light sources thus making it possible to set shorter exposure times and use a smaller aperture lens at the same framing rate. We have obtained many successful color images by using a combination of this light source and a 16 mm rotating prism camera. This paper outlines the features of the flashlight system, and describes some applications that make best use of this system.

  6. Optical radiation emissions from compact fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Khazova, M; O'Hagan, J B

    2008-01-01

    There is a drive to energy efficiency to mitigate climate change. To meet this challenge, the UK Government has proposed phasing out incandescent lamps by the end of 2011 and replacing them with energy efficient fluorescent lighting, including compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) with integrated ballasts. This paper presents a summary of an assessment conducted by the Health Protection Agency in March 2008 to evaluate the optical radiation emissions of CFLs currently available in the UK consumer market. The study concluded that the UV emissions from a significant percentage of the tested CFLs with single envelopes may result in foreseeable overexposure of the skin when these lamps are used in desk or task lighting applications. The optical output of all tested CFLs, in addition to high-frequency modulation, had a 100-Hz envelope with modulation in excess of 15%. This degree of modulation may be linked to a number of adverse effects. PMID:18757896

  7. Optical pumping in a microfabricated Rb vapor cell using a microfabricated Rb discharge light source

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, V.; Kang, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.; Shea, H.

    2014-02-03

    Miniature (pumping of alkali atoms, such as atomic clocks and magnetometers, today mostly employ vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers as pump light sources. Here, we report on the demonstration of optical pumping in a microfabricated alkali vapor resonance cell using (1) a microfabricated Rb discharge lamp light source, as well as (2) a conventional glass-blown Rb discharge lamp. The microfabricated Rb lamp cell is a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) light source, having the same inner cell volume of around 40 mm{sup 3} as that of the resonance cell, both filled with suitable buffer gases. A miniature (∼2 cm{sup 3} volume) test setup based on the M{sub z} magnetometer interrogation technique was used for observation of optical-radiofrequency double-resonance signals, proving the suitability of the microfabricated discharge lamp to introduce efficient optical pumping. The pumping ability of this light source was found to be comparable to or even better than that of a conventional glass-blown lamp. The reported results indicate that the micro-fabricated DBD discharge lamp has a high potential for the development of a new class of miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and quantum sensors.

  8. LAMP proteins are required for fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Kassidy K; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Scott, Cameron C; Malevanets, Anatoly; Saftig, Paul; Grinstein, Sergio

    2007-01-24

    Lysosome-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) are delivered to phagosomes during the maturation process. We used cells from LAMP-deficient mice to analyze the role of these proteins in phagosome maturation. Macrophages from LAMP-1- or LAMP-2-deficient mice displayed normal fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes. Because ablation of both the lamp-1 and lamp-2 genes yields an embryonic-lethal phenotype, we were unable to study macrophages from double knockouts. Instead, we reconstituted phagocytosis in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) by transfection of FcgammaIIA receptors. Phagosomes formed by FcgammaIIA-transfected MEFs obtained from LAMP-1- or LAMP-2- deficient mice acquired lysosomal markers. Remarkably, although FcgammaIIA-transfected MEFs from double-deficient mice ingested particles normally, phagosomal maturation was arrested. LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 double-deficient phagosomes acquired Rab5 and accumulated phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, but failed to recruit Rab7 and did not fuse with lysosomes. We attribute the deficiency to impaired organellar motility along microtubules. Time-lapse cinematography revealed that late endosomes/lysosomes as well as phagosomes lacking LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 had reduced ability to move toward the microtubule-organizing center, likely precluding their interaction with each other. PMID:17245426

  9. Blackbody Radiation from an Incandescent Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, C. I.

    2014-09-01

    In this article we propose an activity aimed at introductory students to help them understand the Stefan-Boltzmann and Wien's displacement laws. It only requires simple materials that are available at any school: an incandescent lamp, a variable dc energy supply, and a computer to run an interactive simulation of the blackbody spectrum. Essentially, the activity consists of calculating the filament's temperature for different values of electric power and comparing the color and brightness of the lamp's light, as seen by the eye, with the correspondent (simulated) black-body spectrum. Although the comparison is only qualitative, we find that the activity provides a tangible introduction to blackbody radiation.

  10. Fundamental studies on a heat driven lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed theoretical study of a heat-driven lamp has been performed. This lamp uses a plasma produced in a thermionic diode. The light is produced by the resonance transition of cesium. An important result of this study is that up to 30% of the input heat is predicted to be converted to light in this device. This is a major improvement over ordinary thermionic energy converters in which only approx. 1% is converted to resonance radiation. Efficiencies and optimum inter-electrode spacings have been found as a function of cathode temperature and the radiative escape factor. The theory developed explains the operating limits of the device.

  11. Orienting Arc Lamps for Longest Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature distribution strongly affects performance. Tests on floodlights for Space Shuttle payload bay show useful life of metal halide dc arc lamp prolonged by mounting "anode down" and wiring for maximum heat conduction away from electrodes. Anode-down configuration, anode and cathode temperatures stabilize at 333 degrees and 313 degrees C, respectively, after 1 hour of operation. Temperatures both below limit for quartz-to-metal seals, and lamps able to withstand a 2,000-hour life test with satisfactory light output at end.

  12. Oxygen pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Special considerations to be given to the design, fabrication, and use of centrifugal pumps for liquid O2 to avoid conditions that lead to system failure are given. Emphasis was placed on turbine pumps for flight applications.

  13. Casing pump

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, H.E.; Bass, R.E.

    1987-09-29

    A natural gas operated pump is described for use in the casing of an oil well, comprising: a tubular pump body having an open lower end for admitting well fluids to the interior of the pump body and an open upper end, wherein a downwardly facing seating surface is formed on the inner periphery of the pump body adjacent the upper end thereof; means for forming a seal between the pump body and the casing of the well; a rod extending longitudinally through the seating surface formed in the pump body and protruding from the upper end of the pump body; a valve member mounted on the rod below the seating surface and shaped to mate with the seating surface; and means for vertically positioning the rod in proportion to fluid pressure within the pump body.

  14. Magnetocaloric pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1973-01-01

    Very cold liquids and gases such as helium, neon, and nitrogen can be pumped by using magnetocaloric effect. Adiabatic magnetization and demagnetization are used to alternately heat and cool slug of pumped fluid contained in closed chamber.

  15. The soft x-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY: beamlines, diagnostics and end-stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedtke, K.; Azima, A.; von Bargen, N.; Bittner, L.; Bonfigt, S.; Düsterer, S.; Faatz, B.; Frühling, U.; Gensch, M.; Gerth, Ch; Guerassimova, N.; Hahn, U.; Hans, T.; Hesse, M.; Honkavaar, K.; Jastrow, U.; Juranic, P.; Kapitzki, S.; Keitel, B.; Kracht, T.; Kuhlmann, M.; Li, W. B.; Martins, M.; Núñez, T.; Plönjes, E.; Redlin, H.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Schneider, J. R.; Schreiber, S.; Stojanovic, N.; Tavella, F.; Toleikis, S.; Treusch, R.; Weigelt, H.; Wellhöfer, M.; Wabnitz, H.; Yurkov, M. V.; Feldhaus, J.

    2009-02-01

    FLASH, the Free-electron LASer in Hamburg, is a worldwide unique source for extremely bright ultra-short laser-like pulses tunable in a wide spectral range in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray region (Ackermann et al 2007 Nat. Photonics 1 336-42). To fully exploit the features of this new generation of light sources, a user facility with efficient radiation transport to the experimental area and novel online photon diagnostics capable of characterizing the unique parameters of the FLASH radiation has been built. It serves a broad user community active in many scientific fields ranging from atomic and molecular physics to plasma and solid state physics as well as chemistry and biology. A special focus is placed on the exploitation of the ultra-short FLASH pulses using pump-probe techniques. Thus, the facility is equipped with optical and THz sources synchronized to FLASH. This paper gives a detailed overview of the FLASH user facility.

  16. ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, O.O.

    1954-08-17

    This patent reiates to electromagnetic pumps for electricity-conducting fluids and, in particular, describes several modifications for a linear conduction type electromagnetic interaction pump. The invention resides in passing the return conductor for the current traversing the fiuid in the duct back through the gap in the iron circuit of the pump. Both the maximum allowable pressure and the efficiency of a linear conduction electromagnetic pump are increased by incorporation of the present invention.

  17. Flashing light in microalgae biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghosh, Said; Fixler, Dror; Dubinsky, Zvy; Iluz, David

    2016-03-01

    Flashing light can enhance photosynthesis and improve the quality and quantity of microalgal biomass, as it can increase the products of interest by magnitudes. Therefore, the integration of flashing light effect into microalgal cultivation systems should be considered. However, microalgae require a balanced mix of the light/dark cycle for higher growth rates, and respond to light intensity differently according to the pigments acquired or lost during the growth. This review highlights recently published results on flashing light effect on microalgae and its applications in biotechnology, as well as the recently developed bioreactors designed to fulfill this effect. It also discusses how this knowledge can be applied in selecting the optimal light frequencies and intensities with specific technical properties for increasing biomass production and/or the yield of the chemicals of interest by microalgae belonging to different genera. PMID:26747205

  18. New developments in flash radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Arne

    2007-01-01

    The paper will review some of the latest developments in flash radiography. A series of multi anode tubes has been developed. These are tubes with several x-ray sources within the same vacuum enclosure. The x-ray sources are closely spaced, to come as close as possible to a single source. The x-ray sources are sequentially pulsed, at times that can be independently chosen. Tubes for voltages in the range 150 - 500 kV, with up to eight x-ray sources, will be described. Combining a multi anode tube with an intensified CCD camera, will make it possible to generate short "x-ray movies". A new flash x-ray control system has been developed. The system is operated from a PC or Laptop. All parameters of a multi channel flash x-ray system can be remotely set and monitored. The system will automatically store important operation parameters.

  19. Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer treatments can cause hot flashes and night sweats. Hot flashes are when your body suddenly feels ... In some cases, hot flashes can make you sweat. Night sweats are hot flashes with sweating at ...

  20. Detail view of lamp in law library; Jennewein modeled symbols ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of lamp in law library; Jennewein modeled symbols of the four seasons on the lamp's aluminum supports - United States Department of Justice, Constitution Avenue between Ninth & Tenth Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. Lamp automatically switches to new filament on burnout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingle, W. B.

    1966-01-01

    Lamp with primary and secondary filaments has a means for automatic switching to the secondary filament at primary filament burnout. Lamp failures and resultant expenses during oscillograph printing are appreciably reduced.

  2. Nd:LNA laser optical pumping of He-4 - Application to space magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. E.; Schearer, L. D.; Tin, P.; Marquedant, R.

    1988-01-01

    Results obtained from laser pumping in a helium magnetometer sensor, using a tunable Nd:LNA laser pumped with a high-power diode laser, are reported. It is shown that it was possible to observe both the Hanle signals and the n = 0, p = 1 parametric resonance by monitoring the pumping radiation passing through the cell. As the diode laser-pumped Nd:LNA laser was tuned through the D0, D1, and D2 transitions, three distinct resonance signals were produced. A comparison of the slope of lamp-pumped signals and laser-pumped D1 signals showed that, under otherwise identical conditions, the slope of the D1 laser signal was 45 times greater than the lamp-pumped signal.

  3. Nd:LNA laser optical pumping of He-4 - Application to space magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slocum, R. E.; Schearer, L. D.; Tin, P.; Marquedant, R.

    1988-12-01

    Results obtained from laser pumping in a helium magnetometer sensor, using a tunable Nd:LNA laser pumped with a high-power diode laser, are reported. It is shown that it was possible to observe both the Hanle signals and the n = 0, p = 1 parametric resonance by monitoring the pumping radiation passing through the cell. As the diode laser-pumped Nd:LNA laser was tuned through the D0, D1, and D2 transitions, three distinct resonance signals were produced. A comparison of the slope of lamp-pumped signals and laser-pumped D1 signals showed that, under otherwise identical conditions, the slope of the D1 laser signal was 45 times greater than the lamp-pumped signal.

  4. OSCILLATORY PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, N.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to a pump suitable fur pumping highly corrosive gases wherein no lubricant is needed in the pumping chamber thus eliminating possible contamination sources. The chamber contains a gas inlet and outlet in each side, with a paddle like piston suspended by a sylphon seal between these pcrts. An external arrangement causes the paddle to oscillate rapidly between the ports, alternately compressing and exhausting the gas trapped on each side of the paddle. Since the paddle does nnt touch the chamber sides at any point, no lubricant is required. This pump is useful for pumping large quantities of uranium hexafluorine.

  5. Flight vehicle thermal testing with infrared lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Roger A.

    1992-01-01

    The verification and certification of new structural material concepts for advanced high speed flight vehicles relies greatly on thermal testing with infrared quartz lamps. The basic quartz heater system characteristics and design considerations are presented. Specific applications are illustrated with tests that were conducted for the X-15, the Space Shuttle, and YF-12 flight programs.

  6. Illuminating the Mathematics of Lamp Shades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Michael E.; Gross, Greg

    2008-01-01

    The problem of creating lamp shades to specific design parameters allows rich and interesting explorations in the mathematics of circles and triangles. This interactive project helps students build their spatial reasoning and is especially appropriate during a unit on either the Pythagorean theorem or similar triangles. (Contains 7 figures and 1…

  7. Heat Lamps Solder Solar Array Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, P. J.; Crouthamel, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Interconnection tabs in a nine-solar-cell array have been soldered simultaneously with radiant heat. Cells and tabs are held in position for soldering by sandwiching them between compliant silicone-rubber vacuum platen and transparent polyimide sealing membrane. Heat lamps warm cells, producing smooth, flat solder joints of high quality.

  8. Breakdown characteristics of xenon HID Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Sato, Ayumu; Brates, Nanu; Noro, Koji; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The breakdown characteristics of mercury free xenon high intensity discharge (HID) lamps exhibit a large statistical time lag often having a large scatter in breakdown voltages. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the processes which determine the ignition voltages for positive and negative pulses in commercial HID lamps having fill pressures of up to 20 atm. Steep voltage rise results in higher avalanche electron densities and earlier breakdown times. Circuit characteristics also play a role. Large ballast resistors may limit current to the degree that breakdown is quenched. The breakdown voltage critically depends on cathode charge injection by electric field emission (or other mechanisms) which in large part controls the statistical time lag for breakdown. For symmetric lamps, ionization waves (IWs) simultaneously develop from the bottom and top electrodes. Breakdown typically occurs when the top and bottom IWs converge. Condensed salt layers having small conductivities on the inner walls of HID lamps and on the electrodes can influence the ignition behavior. With these layers, IWs tend to propagate along the inner wall and exhibit a different structure depending on the polarity.

  9. Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) Brightness Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Gladstone, G.; Stern, S.; Egan, A. F.; Miles, P. F.; Parker, J. W.; Greathouse, T. K.; Davis, M. W.; Slater, D. C.; Kaufmann, D. E.; Versteeg, M. H.; Feldman, P. D.; Hurley, D. M.; Pryor, W. R.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2010-10-01

    The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) is an ultraviolet (UV) spectrograph on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) that is designed to map the lunar albedo at far-UV wavelengths. LAMP primarily measures interplanetary Hydrogen Lyman-alpha sky-glow and far-UV starlight reflected from the night-side lunar surface, including permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) near the poles. Dayside observations are also obtained. Brightness maps sorted by wavelength (including the Lyman-alpha wavelength of 121.6 nm) are reported for the polar regions, with a few regions of interest reported in more detail. LAMP's spectral range of 58 nm to 196 nm includes a water ice spectral feature near 160 nm, which provides a diagnostic tool for detecting water on the lunar surface that is complementary to recent discoveries using infrared and radio frequency techniques. Progress towards producing far-UV albedo maps and searching for water ice signatures will be reported. We'll discuss how LAMP data may address questions regarding how water is formed on the moon, transported through the lunar atmosphere, and deposited in the PSRs.

  10. A prototype high power portable lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammis, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    Portable lighting system serves the combined work and photographic needs of manned spacecraft efforts. This system enables the lamps to be momentarily brightened while the camera shutter is opened. The brightness is adequate for black and white or color photography and yet the increased heat load is nil.

  11. Scanning For Hotspots In Lamp Filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Charles E.; Van Sant, Tim; Leidecker, Henning

    1993-01-01

    Scanning photometer designed for use in investigation of failures of incandescent lamp filaments. Maps brightness as function of position along each filament to identify bright (hot) spots, occurring at notches and signifying incipient breaks or rewelds. Also used to measure nonuniformity in outputs of such linear devices as light-emitting diodes, and to measure diffraction patterns of lenses.

  12. Energy-reduction concept for incandescent lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorhaben, K. H.

    1981-01-01

    Reusable infrared reflector maintains filament temperature and reduces power requirements. Fixed installed over light bulb directs energy formerly lost back to lamp filament. This energy aids electric current in heating filament, allowing lower-wattage bulb to produce same amount of light as higher-wattage bulb in ordinary fixture.

  13. Blackbody Radiation from an Incandescent Lamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, C. I.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we propose an activity aimed at introductory students to help them understand the Stefan-Boltzmann and Wien's displacement laws. It only requires simple materials that are available at any school: an incandescent lamp, a variable dc energy supply, and a computer to run an interactive simulation of the blackbody spectrum.…

  14. Visual light flash observations on Skylab 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Pinsky, L. S.; Osborne, W. Z.; Bailey, J. V.

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation of light flashes observed in earth orbit establishes: (1) a strong correlation of very high flash rates with passage through the South Atlantic anomaly; (2) evidence for a predicted latitude effect; and (3) an increased flash rate outside the anomaly during a second observation period. Event rates and flash descriptions during South Atlantic anomaly passes indicate that there may be particles heavier than protons in the inner belt of trapped radiation.

  15. 30 CFR 20.8 - Class 1 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MINE LAMPS OTHER THAN STANDARD CAP LAMPS § 20.8 Class 1 lamps. (a) Protection... glass is accidentally broken, and ignition by electric sparks or arcs from the battery or connections..., the maximum possible current flow through that part shall be limited by battery design, or by...

  16. 30 CFR 20.8 - Class 1 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MINE LAMPS OTHER THAN STANDARD CAP LAMPS § 20.8 Class 1 lamps. (a) Protection... glass is accidentally broken, and ignition by electric sparks or arcs from the battery or connections..., the maximum possible current flow through that part shall be limited by battery design, or by...

  17. 30 CFR 20.8 - Class 1 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MINE LAMPS OTHER THAN STANDARD CAP LAMPS § 20.8 Class 1 lamps. (a) Protection... glass is accidentally broken, and ignition by electric sparks or arcs from the battery or connections..., the maximum possible current flow through that part shall be limited by battery design, or by...

  18. 30 CFR 20.8 - Class 1 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MINE LAMPS OTHER THAN STANDARD CAP LAMPS § 20.8 Class 1 lamps. (a) Protection... glass is accidentally broken, and ignition by electric sparks or arcs from the battery or connections..., the maximum possible current flow through that part shall be limited by battery design, or by...

  19. 30 CFR 20.8 - Class 1 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MINE LAMPS OTHER THAN STANDARD CAP LAMPS § 20.8 Class 1 lamps. (a) Protection... glass is accidentally broken, and ignition by electric sparks or arcs from the battery or connections..., the maximum possible current flow through that part shall be limited by battery design, or by...

  20. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass....

  1. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass....

  2. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass....

  3. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Water glass lamps. 230.56 Section 230.56... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.56 Water glass lamps. All water glasses must be supplied with a suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass....

  4. 146. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING STRAIGHT ON, OF CAST IRON LAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    146. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING STRAIGHT ON, OF CAST IRON LAMP STANDARD. THIS AND OTHER LAMP STANDARDS WERE REMOVED FROM THE LAMP COLUMNS ON THE PARAPET WALLS DURING WORLD WAR II AND STORED INSIDE THE DAM (January 1991) - Coolidge Dam, Gila River, Peridot, Gila County, AZ

  5. 30 CFR 75.1703 - Portable electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Portable electric lamps. 75.1703 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1703 Portable electric lamps. Persons underground shall use only permissible electric lamps approved by the Secretary for...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1703 - Portable electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Portable electric lamps. 75.1703 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1703 Portable electric lamps. Persons underground shall use only permissible electric lamps approved by the Secretary for...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1703 - Portable electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Portable electric lamps. 75.1703 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1703 Portable electric lamps. Persons underground shall use only permissible electric lamps approved by the Secretary for...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1703 - Portable electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Portable electric lamps. 75.1703 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1703 Portable electric lamps. Persons underground shall use only permissible electric lamps approved by the Secretary for...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1703 - Portable electric lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Portable electric lamps. 75.1703 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1703 Portable electric lamps. Persons underground shall use only permissible electric lamps approved by the Secretary for...

  10. 40 CFR 273.5 - Applicability-lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT General § 273.5 Applicability—lamps. (a) Lamps covered under this... wastes under part 261 of this chapter as provided in paragraph (c) of this section. (2) Lamps that...

  11. 40 CFR 273.5 - Applicability-lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT General § 273.5 Applicability—lamps. (a) Lamps covered under this... wastes under part 261 of this chapter as provided in paragraph (c) of this section. (2) Lamps that...

  12. 46 CFR 72.03-15 - Lamp room construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lamp room construction. 72.03-15 Section 72.03-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT General Fire Protection § 72.03-15 Lamp room construction. (a) Lamp, paint, and oil lockers...

  13. 46 CFR 92.05-10 - Lamp room construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lamp room construction. 92.05-10 Section 92.05-10... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT General Fire Protection § 92.05-10 Lamp room construction. (a) Lamp, paint, and oil lockers and similar compartments shall be constructed of steel or shall be wholly lined with metal....

  14. 46 CFR 72.03-15 - Lamp room construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lamp room construction. 72.03-15 Section 72.03-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT General Fire Protection § 72.03-15 Lamp room construction. (a) Lamp, paint, and oil lockers...

  15. 46 CFR 92.05-10 - Lamp room construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lamp room construction. 92.05-10 Section 92.05-10... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT General Fire Protection § 92.05-10 Lamp room construction. (a) Lamp, paint, and oil lockers and similar compartments shall be constructed of steel or shall be wholly lined with metal....

  16. 30 CFR 75.522-1 - Incandescent and fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Incandescent and fluorescent lamps. 75.522-1...-1 Incandescent and fluorescent lamps. (a) Except for areas of a coal mine inby the last open... or fluorescent lamps may be used inside underground structures (except magazines used for the...

  17. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  18. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  19. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  20. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  1. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  2. 49 CFR 393.11 - Lamps and reflective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., meet the applicable requirements of 49 CFR 571.108 (FMVSS No. 108) in effect at the time of manufacture... of 49 CFR 571.108, Equipment combinations. Footnote—1Identification lamps may be mounted on the... reflectors). (c) Prohibition on the use of amber stop lamps and tail lamps. No commercial motor vehicle...

  3. 49 CFR 393.11 - Lamps and reflective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., meet the applicable requirements of 49 CFR 571.108 (FMVSS No. 108) in effect at the time of manufacture... of 49 CFR 571.108, Equipment combinations. Footnote—1Identification lamps may be mounted on the... reflectors). (c) Prohibition on the use of amber stop lamps and tail lamps. No commercial motor vehicle...

  4. [Possibility of using halogen lamps in surgical light sources].

    PubMed

    Mel'kin, A A; Kopli, V A

    1980-01-01

    For higher efficiency of surgical light-sources the halogen lamps are recommended for them instead of incandescent lamps. First experimental results indicated the following advantages of halogen lamps: lesser consumption of electrical power per unit of illumination, prolonged service term, and lower temperature of operative field. PMID:7402019

  5. Electrodeless discharge lamp is easily started, has high stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, W. E.; Bloom, A. L.

    1966-01-01

    Electrodeless discharge borosilicate glass lamp is used in various high-resolution optical systems. It is partially charged with krypton, contains small amounts of rubidium, and is enclosed in a hermetically sealed envelope that maintains the lamp at an optimum temperature during discharge. The lamp is quickly started by its excitation coil.

  6. Undergraduate Separations Utilizing Flash Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, G.

    2000-02-01

    This article describes the procedures used to carry out four flash chromatography experiments: the isolation of the carotenes, chlorophylls and xanthophylls from a spinach extract; the separation of ß-carotene from tetraphenyl cyclopentadienone; the isolation of (+) and (-) carvone from caraway and spearmint oil; and the purification of benzil from benzoin. Apparatus used is nonbreakable, easy to use, and inexpensive.

  7. Multi-stage flash degaser

    DOEpatents

    Rapier, P.M.

    1980-06-26

    A multi-stage flash degaser is incorporated in an energy conversion system having a direct-contact, binary-fluid heat exchanger to remove essentially all of the noncondensable gases from geothermal brine ahead of the direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchanger in order that the heat exchanger and a turbine and condenser of the system can operate at optimal efficiency.

  8. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-12-31

    This CALiPER report examines the characteristics of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3 in more detail. Specifically, it focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers.

  9. Controlling the vapor pressure of a mercury lamp

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1988-01-01

    The invention described herein discloses a method and apparatus for controlling the Hg vapor pressure within a lamp. This is done by establishing and controlling two temperature zones within the lamp. One zone is colder than the other zone. The first zone is called the cold spot. By controlling the temperature of the cold spot, the Hg vapor pressure within the lamp is controlled. Likewise, by controlling the Hg vapor pressure of the lamp, the intensity and linewidth of the radiation emitted from the lamp is controlled.

  10. Controlling the vapor pressure of a mercury lamp

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1988-05-24

    The invention described herein discloses a method and apparatus for controlling the Hg vapor pressure within a lamp. This is done by establishing and controlling two temperature zones within the lamp. One zone is colder than the other zone. The first zone is called the cold spot. By controlling the temperature of the cold spot, the Hg vapor pressure within the lamp is controlled. Likewise, by controlling the Hg vapor pressure of the lamp, the intensity and linewidth of the radiation emitted from the lamp is controlled. 2 figs.

  11. Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Alok Srivatava

    2007-03-31

    This is the Final Report of the Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program is to develop novel hybrid phosphors by coating commercially available lamp phosphors with highly stable wide band-gap nanocrystalline phosphors (NCP). The prime technical approach is the development of NCP quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) and ultra-violet (UV) emitting phosphors with quantum efficiencies exceeding that of the conventional phosphors at 185 nm. The novel hybrid phosphors will increase the efficiency of the fluorescent lamps by up to 32%, enabling total energy savings of 0.26 quads, the reduction in the U.S. energy bill by $6.5 billion and the reduction of the annual carbon emission by 4.1 billion kilogram. Our work started by investigating through modeling calculations the requirement for the particle size of the NCP. Our work to develop suitable nanocrystalline phosphors started with the known oxide quantum splitting and UV emitting phosphors. We demonstrated several synthesis techniques for the production of high quality nanocrystalline materials that crystallizes in the desired phase and with the desired particle size. In collaboration with our subcontractor we demonstrated the feasibility for the manufacture of NC phosphors. We also demonstrated novel techniques of coating the NCP on the surface of micron sized phosphors. Our chief achievement pertains to the successful testing of the coated hybrid phosphor systems in linear fluorescent lamps. In linear fluorescent lamp tests, we have demonstrated up to 7% increase in the efficacy of hybrid phosphors over the conventional (uncoated) phosphors. We have also demonstrated the improvement in the lumen maintenance of the coated phosphors. A hybrid phosphor system based on the commercial red emitting phosphor, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} did not show the anticipated improvement in lamp efficacy. We explored the reasons for this observation

  12. Ultrasfast Dynamics in Dense Hydrogen Explored at Flash

    SciTech Connect

    Hilbert, V; Zastrau, U; Neumayer, P; Hochhaus, D; Toleikis, S; Harmand, M; Przystawik, A; Tschentscher, T; Glenzer, S H; Doeppner, T; Fortmann, C; White, T; Gregori, G; Gode, S; Tiggesbaumker, J; Skruszewicz, S; Meiwes-Broer, K H; Sperling, P; Redmer, R; Forster, E

    2011-08-01

    The short pulse duration and high intensity of the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) allows us to generate and probe homogeneous warm dense non-equilibrium hydrogen within a single extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light pulse. By analyzing the spectrum of the 13.5 nm Thomson scattered light we determine the plasma temperature and density. We find that classical models of this interaction are in good agreement with our dense plasma conditions. In a FEL-pump FEL-probe experiment droplets of liquid hydrogen and their scattering behavior for different pump-probe setups were observed under 20{sup o} and 90{sup o}. We find that the scattering behavior of the scattered intensity depends on the scattering angle.

  13. Ultra high brightness laser diode arrays for pumping of compact solid state lasers and direct applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Andreas; Fillardet, Thierry; Laugustin, Arnaud; Rabot, Olivier

    2012-10-01

    High Power Laser Diodes (HPLD) are increasingly used in different fields of applications such as Industry, Medicine and Defense. Our significant improvements of performances (especially in power and efficiency) and a reproducible manufacturing process have led to reliable, highly robust components. For defense and security applications these devices are used predominantly for pumping of solid state lasers (ranging, designation, countermeasures, and sensors). Due to the drastically falling price per watt they are more and more replacing flash lamps as pump sources. By collimating the laser beam even with a bar to bar pitch of only 400μm. cutting edge brightness of our stacks.is achieved Due the extremely high brightness and high power density these stacks are an enabling technology for the development of compact highly efficient portable solid state lasers for applications as telemeters and designators on small platforms such as small UAVs and handheld devices. In combination with beam homogenizing optics their compact size and high efficiency makes these devices perfectly suited as illuminators for portable active imaging systems. For gated active imaging systems a very short pulse at high PRF operation is required. For this application we have developed a diode driver board with an efficiency several times higher than that of a standard driver. As a consequence this laser source has very low power consumption and low waste heat dissipation. In combination with its compact size and the integrated beam homogenizing optics it is therefore ideally suited for use in portable gated active imaging systems. The kWatt peak power enables a range of several hundred meters. The devices described in this paper mostly operate at wavelength between 800 nm and 980nm. Results from diodes operating between 1300 nm and 1550 nm are presented as well.

  14. Energy-efficient compact screw-in fluorescent lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, E. W.

    1982-11-01

    A compact fluorescent lamp has been designed and constructed which can replace an incandescent lamp. The lamp is slightly larger than a standard lamp (8 3/4 in. x 3 1/4 in.), but is designed to fit a majority of portable lamp applications. This version, with a core-coil ballast, results in a system efficacy of 54 lumens per watt, with a light output of more than 1800 lumens. This compares favorably with a 100-watt incandescent (17.5 lumens per watt and 1750 lumens light output). The color temperature of 30000K is compatible with an incandescent lamp (28000K). The color rendition index (CRI) is 84. With a solid-state ballast, the efficacy and light output could be increased by 20% (65 l/w, 2200 lumens) and could provide a direct replacement for a three-way, 150-watt incandescent lamp (15 l/w, 2200 lumens).

  15. Lamp reliability studies for improved satellite rubidium frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frueholz, R. P.; Wun-Fogle, M.; Eckert, H. U.; Volk, C. H.; Jones, P. F.

    1982-01-01

    In response to the premature failure of Rb lamps used in Rb atomic clocks onboard NAVSTAR GPS satellites experimental and theoretical investigations into their failure mechanism were initiated. The primary goal of these studies is the development of an accelerated life test for future GPS lamps. The primary failure mechanism was identified as consumption of the lamp's Rb charge via direct interaction between Rb and the lamp's glass surface. The most effective parameters to accelerate the interaction between the Rb and the glass are felt to be RF excitation power and lamp temperature. Differential scanning calorimetry is used to monitor the consumption of Rb within a lamp as a function of operation time. This technique yielded base line Rb consumption data for GPS lamps operating under normal conditions.

  16. Image simulation system for flash x-ray diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kei; Sato, Eiichi; Oizumi, Teiji; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1993-10-01

    Radiographic image simulations using a spectrum simulation system SPECTRA are presented. SPECTRA calculated the x-ray spectra using the data of tube voltage and current obtained from a soft flash x-ray generator. The x-ray generator used in the present work consisted of a high-voltage power supply, an oil condenser of 10 nF, a turbo molecular pump, a thyristor pulser as a trigger device, and a cold-cathode triode. After the main condenser was charged from 60 to 80 kV, the electric charges in the condenser were discharged. We obtained the maximum tube voltage which was equivalent to the initial charged voltage in the condenser. Bremsstrahlung x-ray intensities were derived from the Kramers' empirical equation and the intensities of the characteristic x rays were approximately calculated on the basis of the experimental results by Birch and Marshall. In the present work, we used two 3-dimensional models provided by SPECTRA as radiographed objects. We saved the measured data of the tube voltage and current for the flash x rays with charged voltages of 60, 70, and 80 kV. Then, assuming that these flash x rays were applied to the above models at a distance of 1 m, we obtained simulated images with filtration of aluminum. The obtained images fairly agreed with real radiographs which were achieved with a Computed Radiography system.

  17. A Computer Program for Flow-Log Analysis of Single Holes (FLASH)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Johnson, C.D.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Halford, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    A new computer program, FLASH (Flow-Log Analysis of Single Holes), is presented for the analysis of borehole vertical flow logs. The code is based on an analytical solution for steady-state multilayer radial flow to a borehole. The code includes options for (1) discrete fractures and (2) multilayer aquifers. Given vertical flow profiles collected under both ambient and stressed (pumping or injection) conditions, the user can estimate fracture (or layer) transmissivities and far-field hydraulic heads. FLASH is coded in Microsoft Excel with Visual Basic for Applications routines. The code supports manual and automated model calibration. ?? 2011, The Author(s). Ground Water ?? 2011, National Ground Water Association.

  18. Lamp-life predictive model for avionics backlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Richard P.; Nelson, Leonard Y.

    1998-09-01

    Active Matrix Liquid Crystal Displays (AMLCDs) used in avionics applications require high luminance, high efficacy, and long-life backlights. Currently, fluorescent lamps are the favored light sources for these high performance avionics backlights. Their spectral characteristics and high electrical efficiency are well suited to illuminating AMLCDs used in avionics applications. Fluorescent lamps, however, suffer gradual reduction in luminance output caused by various degradation mechanisms. Korry Electronics Co. recently developed a mathematical model for predicting fluorescent lamp life. The model's basis is the well characterized exponential decay of the phosphor output. The primary luminance degradation mechanism of a fluorescent lamp is related to the arc discharge. Consequently, phosphor depreciation is proportional to the discharge arc power divided by the phosphor surface area. This 'wall loading' is a parameter in the computer model developed to extrapolate long-term luminance performance. Our model predicts a rapidly increasing decay rate of the lamp output as the input power is increased to sustain constant luminance. Eventually, a run-away condition occurs -- lamp arc power must be increased by unrealistically large factors (greater than 5x) to maintain the required luminance output. This condition represents the end of the useful lamp life. The lamp life model requires the definition of several key parameters in order to accurately predict the useful lamp life of an avionics backlight. These important factors include the construction of the lamp, lamp arc power, a decay constant based on the phosphor loading, and the operational profile. Based on the above-mentioned factors, our model approximates the useful lamp life of an avionics backlight using fluorescent lamp technology. Comparisons between calculated and experimental lamp depreciation are presented.

  19. LED lamp color control system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, James; Clauberg, Bernd; Van Erp, Josephus A.M.

    2013-02-05

    An LED lamp color control system and method including an LED lamp having an LED controller 58; and a plurality of LED channels 60 operably connected to the LED controller 58, each of the plurality of LED channels 60 having a channel switch 62 in series with at least one shunted LED circuit 83, the shunted LED circuit 83 having a shunt switch 68 in parallel with an LED source 80. The LED controller 58 determines whether the LED source 80 is in a feedback controllable range, stores measured optical flux for the LED source 80 when the LED source 80 is in the feedback controllable range, and bypasses storing the measured optical flux when the LED source 80 is not in the feedback controllable range.

  20. LAMP Joining between Ceramic and Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Nishimoto, Kouji; Katayama, Seiji

    Joining of dissimilar materials is necessary and important from a manufacturing viewpoint. Therefore, the authors have developed a new laser direct joining method between a metal and a plastic which is named Laser Assisted Metal and Plastic (LAMP) joining method. In this research, LAMP joining was applied to join silicon nitride Si3N4 ceramic and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) engineering plastic, although metal was replaced by ceramic. The tensile shear strength of obtained joints was 3100 N at the maximum, which was strong enough to elongate a PET base plate of 2 mm in thickness and 30 mm in width. Moreover, transmission electron microscopes (TEM) observation demonstrates that the ceramic and the plastic are tightly bonded on atomic or molecular sized level.

  1. High intensity discharge lamp self-adjusting ballast system sensitive to the radiant energy or heat of the lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhnel, D.S.; Ottenstein, S.A.

    1987-07-21

    This patent describes a self-adjusting ballast system for mercury vapor, high intensity discharge lamps having outputs of 100 watts or greater, comprising: a direct current source; a lamp circuit containing a high intensity discharge lamp; sensing means for sensing the radiant energy output of the lamp; a pulse width modulator which, in response to the output of the sensing means, varies the width of the pulses that power the lamp during warm-up of the lamp; a high frequency oscillator; a DC to AC converter that converts current from the direct source to pulses of alternating current for powering the lamp, the converter comprising: at least one switch for gating current to the lamp; a switch control means, responsive to the high frequency oscillator, for controlling the switch and controlling the frequency of the alternating current pulses that power the lamp; current sensing means for sensing the current being supplied to the lamp; and current control means for limiting the current through the lamp to a predetermined safe level when the current sensed by the current sensing means exceeds a reference value.

  2. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-02-01

    This is a special CALiPER report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. It follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012 (products purchased in 2010 and 2011), and is intended as a continuation that identifies long-term trends. For this report, products were selected to investigate specific hypotheses, rather than represent a sample of the increasingly large retail LED market.

  3. Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, D.A.; Turner, B.; Kipling, K.

    1999-05-11

    A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible is disclosed. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture. 20 figs.

  4. Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian; Kipling, Kent

    1999-01-01

    A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture.

  5. Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Alok M. Srivastava

    2005-09-30

    This is the Yearly Report of the Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program is to develop novel hybrid phosphors by coating commercially available lamp phosphors with highly stable wide band-gap nanocrystalline phosphors (NCP). The novel hybrid phosphors will increase the efficiency of the fluorescent lamps by up to 32%, enabling total energy savings of 0.26 quads, the reduction in the U.S. energy bill by $6.5 billion and the reduction of the annual carbon emission by 4.1 billion kilogram. The prime technical approach is the development of NCP quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) and ultra-violet emitting phosphors with quantum efficiencies exceeding that of the conventional phosphors at 185 nm. Our chief achievement, during the current contract period, pertains to the successful synthesis and characterization of coated phosphors. We demonstrated several synthesis techniques for the coating of micron sized commercial phosphors with quantum-splitting and UV emitting nanophosphors. We have also continued our fundamental investigations into the physical processes that determine the quantum efficiency of the nanophosphors and this has further helped codify a set of rules for the host lattice that support efficient quantum splitting and UV emission at room temperature. In this report we summarize the technical work completed under the Program, summarize our findings about the performance limits of the various technologies we investigated, and outline promising paths for future work.

  6. Raman lidar characterization using a reference lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landulfo, Eduardo; da Costa, Renata F.; Rodrigues, Patricia F.; da Silva Lopes, Fábio J.

    2014-10-01

    The determination of the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere using lidar is a calibration dependent technique. Different collocated instruments are used for this purpose, like radiossoundings and microwave radiometers. When there are no collocated instruments available, an independente lamp mapping calibration technique can be used. Aiming to stabilish an independ technique for the calibration of the six channels Nd-YAG Raman lidar system located at the Center for Lasers and Applications (CLA), S˜ao Paulo, Brazil, an optical characterization of the system was first performed using a reference tungsten lamp. This characterization is useful to identify any possible distortions in the interference filters, telescope mirror and stray light contamination. In this paper we show three lamp mapping caracterizations (01/16/2014, 01/22/2014, 04/09/2014). The first day is used to demostrate how the tecnique is useful to detect stray light, the second one how it is sensible to the position of the filters and the third one demostrates a well optimized optical system.

  7. Energy-efficient incandescent lamp. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The status of the Energy Efficient Light Bulb (EELB) development at the beginning of the subcontract was characterized by a newly introduced lamp construction based on an optimum optical quality envelope consisting of two hemispheres or hemi-ellipsoids bonded together. Considerable progress was made concerning the output of the continuous process heat mirror coating machine, the reproducibility of the film characteristics, and the durability of the coating over long periods of lamp operation. The bonding assembly processes were improved to the point where they are suitable for full mechanization and high speed production. A new concept for dimensioning the required compact and mechanically stable filaments was introduced by using diodes in series that reduce the effective operating voltage to 83 volts. This has led to filament designs of greater stability and greater compactness than any obtained before. The efficacy and energy saving data of the prototype lamps delivered at the end of the subcontract were close to the target values established at the beginning.

  8. High output lamp with high brightness

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Bass, Gary K.; Copsey, Jesse F.; Garber, Jr., William E.; Kwong, Vincent H.; Levin, Izrail; MacLennan, Donald A.; Roy, Robert J.; Steiner, Paul E.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2002-01-01

    An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

  9. Thermal Lensing in a High Power Diode-Pumped Continuous Wave Yb+3:KY(WO4)2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaeian, Hamidreza

    High power diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) lasers are a rapidly growing technology that is attractive for various applications in scientific and industrial fields. DPSS lasers are highly efficient, reliable and durable with superior beam quality when compared to flash-lamp pumped lasers. Double-tungstate crystals such as potassium yttrium tungstate Yb:KY(WO4)2 (Yb:KYW) are one of the most popular active materials used in DPSS lasers for generation of continuous wave radiation and ultrashort (i.e. femtosecond, 10-15 s) pulses with high average output power. The high pump power of laser diodes results in considerable heat generation in a laser crystal that in turn causes thermal lensing effect. Thermal lensing affects the performance and stability of a resonator, and plays an important role in limiting the output power and degrading the beam quality of solid state lasers. Despite these facts, no detailed studies of thermal effects in Yb:KYW lasers were reported to date. In this work thermal lensing in a diode-pumped Ng-cut Yb:KYW laser operating at the wavelength of 1.04 ?m was characterized. A maximum output power of 3.5 W with a nearly diffraction limited output beam (M 2 < 1.2) was achieved under the absorbed pump power of 13.8 W. The focal lengths of the induced thermal lenses were obtained from the laser output beam size measurements at various incident pump power levels and ABCD matrix analysis. At maximum output power the focal length of the induced thermal lens was found to be 814 mm for the Nm direction (horizontal) and 144 mm for the Np direction (vertical). Thermal lens sensitivity factors were 1.26 m-1/W and 0.32 m-1/W for the Np and Nm directions, respectively. This highly astigmatic thermal lensing can be explained by strong anisotropy of thermo-optical properties of the crystal and its cooling geometry. In addition, the finite element analysis (FEA) method was employed to obtain the focal lengths of the induced thermal lens inside the crystal

  10. Multi-stage flash degaser

    DOEpatents

    Rapier, Pascal M.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-stage flash degaser (18) is incorporated in an energy conversion system (10) having a direct-contact, binary-fluid heat exchanger to remove essentially all of the noncondensable gases from geothermal brine ahead of the direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchanger (22) in order that the heat exchanger (22) and a turbine (48) and condenser (32) of the system (10) can operate at optimal efficiency.

  11. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  12. Ferroelectric Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A ferroelectric pump has one or more variable volume pumping chambers internal to a housing. Each chamber has at least one wall comprising a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature and a dome height that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and outside surface of the actuator. A pumped medium flows into and out of each pumping chamber in response to displacement of the ferroelectric actuator. The ferroelectric actuator is mounted within each wall and isolates each ferroelectric actuator from the pumped medium, supplies a path for voltage to be applied to each ferroelectric actuator, and provides for positive containment of each ferroelectric actuator while allowing displacement of the entirety of each ferroelectric actuator in response to the applied voltage.

  13. Characterization of halogen lamps as secondary standard of luminous flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. A. R.; Sanchez, O., Jr.; Ferreira, A. F. G., Jr.

    2011-09-01

    This work presents a study of lamps characterization concerning its lamp output, current and voltage drift during seasoning and regarding the use of theses lamps as luminous flux secondary standard. The 200W halogen lamps are seasoned for 30 hours and during the seasoning period the relative drift of the lamp illuminance, current and voltage are measured at each 3 minutes. The illuminance is measured using a photometer with detector head, the lamp voltage is measured using a 6.5 digits voltmeter and the current is measured using a 6.5 digits voltmeter and 0.1 Ohms standard resistor. The lamp current is controlled by a calibrated current power source with stability better than 1 mA. To reduce the stray light, baffles are positioned between the lamp and the detector head. The alignment of experimental assembly is made by a He-Ne Laser. Data of illuminance, current and voltage is acquired by software built in Labview database. Among the 5 lamps seasoned, the best result presents the variation of illuminance of 0.04% per hour. This lamp is chosen to become the secondary standard and its luminous flux is measured using an Ulbricht integrating sphere. This method allows the laboratory to create secondary standard of luminous flux for its routine test and measurements and to supply theses standards for Brazilian industry.

  14. Flash photography-induced maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Veugelen, Tim; Coutteel, Carine; Leys, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report a flash photography-induced maculopathy. Methods: A professional photographer blinded himself accidentally and he consulted 3 days after the event with a scotoma in his dominant left eye. A unilateral acute light-induced maculopathy with hemorrhage was observed. The lesion was studied with colour photography, fluorescein and indocyanin angiography, autofluorescence imaging and repeated optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Results: At age 43, this professional photographer was blinded by the flash light of his camera and subsequently realized he had a scotoma in his dominant eye. Three days after the event visual acuity (VA) was 20/70 and an acute light-induced maculopathy was noted. Another three days later, VA was 20/50 and the lesions were less prominent. After one month, the photographer still had problems making sharp pictures, VA was 20/25 and a macular scar was observed. During further follow-up, he regained full vision and experienced no professional problems. Conclusions: This case illustrates that the light of flash photography can accidentally hit an eye and induce a light-induced maculopathy.

  15. Composite-type Rb-87 optical-pumping light source for the rubidium frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oura, N.; Kuramochi, N.; Naritsuka, S.; Hayashi, T.

    1982-01-01

    The light source is composed of a cylindrical Rb-87 lamp 10 mm diameter and a Rb-85 filter cell 3-7 mm long attached to the front flat face of the lamp. This composite type device is operated in an oven at about 100 C. Thus a light source for Rb-87 hyperfine optical pumping less than 4 cm long by 3 cm diameter was constructed.

  16. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01

    High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and

  17. Optics designs for an innovative LED lamp family system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Herbert; Muschaweck, Julius; Hadrath, Stefan; Kudaev, Sergey

    2011-10-01

    On the general lighting market of LED lamps for professional applications there are still mainly products for single purpose solutions existing. There is a lack of standardised lamp systems like they are common for conventional lighting technologies. Therefore, an LED lamp family system was studied using high power LED with the objective to entirely substitute standard conventional lamp families in general lighting applications in the professional market segment. This comprises the realization of sets of lamp types with compact and linear shapes as well as with light distribution characteristics ranging from diffuse to extreme collimation and exceptionally high candle power. Innovative secondary optics concepts are discussed which allow both, the design of lamps with non-bulky shape and to obtain sufficient colour mixing when using multicolour LED combinations in order to achieve a very high colour rendering quality.

  18. Philips' 2nd generation Novallure LED candle lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Pei, Zhigang; Yuan, Chuan; Jiang, Tan; Lu, Zhengsong; Wang, Yuqian; Duan, Xiaoqing; Xiong, Yan; Zhong, Hong; Liu, Ye

    2010-08-01

    Finding an energy efficient replacement of incandescent candle lamp has been a technical challenge. Compact fluorescent lamps, for example, can be miniaturized to fit the form factor of a candle lamp but they fail to reproduce its "sparkle" effect. Empowered by solid state lighting technology along with original optical design, Philips has successfully developed LED-powered candle lamps "Novallure" with great energy savings (2W power consumption with lumen output of 55 lumen) and the "butterfly" radiation pattern that mimics the sparkle effect from an incandescent candle lamp. With new high performance LED packages, novel under-cut prismatic optics and state-of-the-art electronic driver solution and thermal solution, we have developed a 2nd generation Novallure with breakthrough performance: a dimmable 2700K 136 lumen LED candle lamp with CRI 90.

  19. High power, diode pumped Er:YAG for dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, C.; Heinrich, A.; Nussbaumer, B.

    2011-03-01

    Pantec Medical Laser presents a diode pumped Er:YAG laser for dental and hard tissue applications. The diode pumped laser is practically maintenance free and ensures reliable operation over several thousand hours. The high repetition rate with up to 15 W average output power, allows treatments otherwise not feasible with low repetition rate, lamp pumped Er:YAG systems. The variable pulse duration of 10 to 200 μs combined with the good beam quality ensures precise and fast treatment. First results on enamel ablation as well as the power scalability of the technology to 200 mJ and 30 W average power are also shown.

  20. Submersible pump

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, D. B.

    1985-08-27

    A method and apparatus for using a submersible pump to lift reservoir fluids in a well while having the tubing/casing annulus isolated from the produced fluids. The apparatus allows the submersible pump to be positioned above the annular packoff device. The apparatus comprises an outer shield that encloses the pump and can be attached to the production tubing. The lower end of the shield attaches to a short tubing section that seals with the annular packoff device or a receptacle above the annular packoff device.

  1. Visual light flash phenomenon. [Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsky, L. S.; Osborne, W. Z.; Bailey, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    Light flash phenomenon observed by crewmen on Apollo 14, 15, 16, and 17 are analyzed. The passage of cosmic rays through the crewman's head and eyes was recorded by the Apollo light flash moving emulsion detector. Events of all the light flash observations are tabulated. It is suggested that the most probable explanation of the phenomenon is that it is caused by cosmic rays penetrating the eyes and retinas of the observers.

  2. Efficient Wear Leveling in NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Hao; Chang, Li-Pin

    In the recent years, flash storage devices such as solid-state drives (SSDs) and flash cards have become a popular choice for the replacement of hard disk drives, especially in the applications of mobile computing devices and consumer electronics. However, the physical constraints of flash memory pose a lifetime limitation on these storage devices. New technologies for ultra-high density flash memory such as multilevel-cell (MLC) flash further degrade flash endurance and worsen this lifetime concern. As a result, flash storage devices may experience a unexpectedly short lifespan, especially when accessing these devices with high frequencies. In order to enhance the endurance of flash storage device, various wear leveling algorithms are proposed to evenly erase blocks of the flash memory so as to prevent wearing out any block excessively. In this chapter, various existing wear leveling algorithms are investigated to point out their design issues and potential problems. Based on this investigation, two efficient wear leveling algorithms (i.e., the evenness-aware algorithm and dual-pool algorithm) are presented to solve the problems of the existing algorithms with the considerations of the limited computing power and memory space in flash storage devices. The evenness-aware algorithm maintains a bit array to keep track of the distribution of block erases to prevent any cold data from staying in any block for a long period of time. The dual-pool algorithm maintains one hot pool and one cold pool to maintain the blocks that store hot data and cold data, respectively, and the excessively erased blocks in the hot pool are exchanged with the rarely erased blocks in the cold pool to prevent any block from being erased excessively. In this chapter, a series of explanations and analyses shows that these two wear leveling algorithms could evenly distribute block erases to the whole flash memory to enhance the endurance of flash memory.

  3. Ray tracing software application in VIP lamp design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehn, Henning

    2002-08-01

    In our contribution we demonstrate a wide variety of ray tracing software applications for the design of VIP short-arc discharge video projection lamps. On the basis of simulations we derive design rules for the lamp itself and for its optical environment. Light Tools software acts as a means to understand the collection efficiency of a VIP lamp with an elliptical reflector and as an instrument to prove the conclusions.

  4. Photonic Flash Sintering of Ink-Jet-Printed Back Electrodes for Organic Photovoltaic Applications.

    PubMed

    Polino, Giuseppina; Shanmugam, Santhosh; Bex, Guy J P; Abbel, Robert; Brunetti, Francesca; Di Carlo, Aldo; Andriessen, Ronn; Galagan, Yulia

    2016-01-27

    A study of the photonic flash sintering of a silver nanoparticle ink printed as the back electrode for organic solar cells is presented. A number of sintering settings with different intensities and pulse durations have been tested on both full-area and grid-based silver electrodes, using the complete emission spectrum of the flash lamps from UV-A to NIR. However, none of these settings was able to produce functional devices with performances comparable to those of reference cells prepared using thermally sintered ink. Different degradation mechanisms were detected in the devices with a flash-sintered back electrode. The P3HT:PCBM photoactive layer appears to be highly heat-sensitive and turned out to be severely damaged by the high temperatures generated in the silver layer during the sintering. In addition, UV-induced photochemical degradation of the functional materials was identified as another possible source of performance deterioration in the devices with grid-based electrodes. Reducing the light intensity does not provide a proper solution because in this case the Ag electrode is not sintered sufficiently. For both types of devices, with full-area and grid-based electrodes, these problems could be solved by excluding the short wavelength contribution from the flash light spectrum using a filter. Optimized sintering parameters allowed manufacture of OPV devices with performance equal to those of the reference devices. Photonic flash sintering of the top electrode in organic solar cells was demonstrated for the first time. It reveals the great potential of this sintering method for the future roll-to-roll manufacturing of organic solar cells from solution. PMID:26704172

  5. ION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1961-01-01

    An ion pump and pumping method are given for low vacuum pressures in which gases introduced into a pumping cavity are ionized and thereafter directed and accelerated into a quantity of liquid gettering metal where they are absorbed. In the preferred embodiment the metal is disposed as a liquid pool upon one electrode of a Phillips ion gauge type pump. Means are provided for continuously and remotely withdrawing and degassing the gettering metal. The liquid gettering metal may be heated if desired, although various combinations of gallium, indium, tin, bismuth, and lead, the preferred metals, have very low melting points. A background pressure of evaporated gettering metal may be provided by means of a resistance heated refractory metal wick protruding from the surface of the pcol of gettering metal.

  6. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2007-11-20

    A method for altering the surface properties of a particle bed. In application, the method pertains particularly to an electrokinetic pump configuration where nanoparticles are bonded to the surface of the stationary phase to alter the surface properties of the stationary phase including the surface area and/or the zeta potential and thus improve the efficiency and operating range of these pumps. By functionalizing the nanoparticles to change the zeta potential the electrokinetic pump is rendered capable of operating with working fluids having pH values that can range from 2-10 generally and acidic working fluids in particular. For applications in which the pump is intended to handle highly acidic solutions latex nanoparticles that are quaternary amine functionalized can be used.

  7. Fluorescent lamp unit with magnetic field generating means

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1989-08-08

    A fluorescent lamp unit having a magnetic field generating means for improving the performance of the fluorescent lamp is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment the fluorescent lamp comprises four longitudinally extending leg portions disposed in substantially quadrangular columnar array and joined by three generally U-shaped portions disposed in different planes. In another embodiment of the invention the magnetic field generating means comprises a plurality of permanent magnets secured together to form a single columnar structure disposed within a centrally located region defined by the shape of lamp envelope. 4 figs.

  8. Fluorescent lamp unit with magnetic field generating means

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1989-01-01

    A fluorescent lamp unit having a magnetic field generating means for improving the performance of the fluorescent lamp is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment the fluorescent lamp comprises four longitudinally extending leg portions disposed in substantially quadrangular columnar array and joined by three generally U-shaped portions disposed in different planes. In another embodiment of the invention the magnetic field generating means comprises a plurality of permanent magnets secured together to form a single columnar structure disposed within a centrally located region defined by the shape of lamp envelope.

  9. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Rubenstein, Francis M.; Whitman, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure.

  10. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubenstein, F.M.; Whitman, R.E.

    1992-12-29

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure. 11 figs.

  11. The National Energy Policy Act and lamp replacement options

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, C.

    1995-06-01

    The National Policy Act of 1992 involves the creation of energy efficiency standards for a wide range of products including fluorescent and incandescent lamps. Minimum efficacy (lumens per watt) and color rendering index (CRI) standards are mandated for the popular fluorescent lamps: four-foot medium bi-pin, two-foot U-bent, eight-foot slimline and eight-foot high output. Minimum efficacies are mandated for specific incandescent R and PAR reflector lamps. These standards will affect selected colors and designs of fluorescent lamps, the most significant being the standard lamps in the cool white and warm white colors. The incandescent reflector lamps will include the R-30, R-40, PAR-38 lamps above 40 watts, excluding the halogen types. These efficiency and color rendering standards will require end-users and specifiers to select replacement fluorescent lamps from a range of performance characteristics (lumen output, efficacy, CRI and price). The choice of replacement for the R and PAR incandescent lamps will include the halogen designs and compact fluorescent designs. In this paper, replacement options will be analyzed and discussed and the effect of these options on the performance of the lighting system will be explored in detail.

  12. Hazards from High Intensity Lamps and Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    The principal occupational health problem generally associated with high intensity arc lamps results from exposure of the eye and skin to ultraviolet radiation. Occasionally, the chorioretinal burns are of concern. The eye is generally more susceptible than the skin to injury from high intensity optical radiation sources whether ultraviolet, visible or infrared. Recent developments in technology have shown that some high intensity optical radiation sources which have output parameters greatly different from those encountered in the natural environment present a serious chorioretinal burn hazard.

  13. Moving Forward: College and Career Transitions of LAMP Graduates. Findings from the LAMP Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacAllum, Keith; Yoder, Karla; Kim, Scott; Bozick, Robert

    A longitudinal study examined the college and career transitions of graduates of the Lansing Area Manufacturing Partnership (LAMP) program, which is a school-to-career (STC) program sponsored by the United Auto Workers, General Motors Corporation, and Michigan's Ingham County Intermediate School District. The progress of three cohorts of LAMP…

  14. Compact microwave lamp having a tuning block and a dielectric located in a lamp cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.E.

    2000-02-29

    A microwave lamp having a compact structure utilizing a coupling slot which has a dielectric member extending there through and a tuning block adjoining the coupling slot. A non-conventional waveguide is used which has about the width of a WR-284 waveguide and about the length of a WR-340 waveguide.

  15. RF driven sulfur lamp having driving electrodes arranged to cool the lamp

    DOEpatents

    Gabor, G.; Orr, T.R.; Greene, C.M.; Crawford, D.G.; Berman, S.M.

    1998-10-20

    A high intensity discharge lamp without mercury is disclosed radiating a selected spectrum of which can be almost entirely in the visible range from an envelope that contains a sulfur containing substance. The lamp utilizes a signal source that generates an excitation signal that is externally coupled to the exterior surface of the envelope to excite the enclosed sulfur containing substance. Various embodiments of the lamp use electrodes adjacent the envelope to couple the excitation signal thereto with the face of the electrodes shaped to complement the shape of the exterior surface of the envelope. Two shapes discussed are spherical and cylindrical. To minimize filamentary discharges each envelope may include an elongated stem affixed to the exterior thereof whereby a rotational subsystem spins the envelope. In yet another embodiment the envelope has a Dewar configuration with two electrodes, one positioned near the external curved side surface of the body, and a second to the inner surface of the hole through the envelope. Further, the envelope may contain a backfill of a selected inert gas to assist in the excitation of lamp with that backfill at a pressure of less than 1 atmosphere, wherein the backfill pressure is directly related to the increase or decrease of peak output and inversely related to the increase and decrease of the emitted spectrum from the envelope. The emitting fill can be less than 6 mg/cc, or at least 2 mg/cc of the envelope of a sulfur containing substance. 17 figs.

  16. RF driven sulfur lamp having driving electrodes arranged to cool the lamp

    DOEpatents

    Gabor, George; Orr, Thomas Robert; Greene, Charles Maurice; Crawford, Douglas Gordon; Berman, Samuel Maurice

    1998-01-01

    A high intensity discharge lamp without mercury is disclosed radiating a selected spectrum of which can be almost entirely in the visible range from an envelope that contains a sulfur containing substance. The lamp utilizes a signal source that generates an excitation signal that is externally coupled to the exterior surface of the envelope to excite the enclosed sulfur containing substance. Various embodiments of the lamp use electrodes adjacent the envelope to couple the excitation signal thereto with the face of the electrodes shaped to complement the shape of the exterior surface of the envelope. Two shapes discussed are spherical and cylindrical. To minimize filamentary discharges each envelope may include an elongated stem affixed to the exterior thereof whereby a rotational subsystem spins the envelope. In yet another embodiment the envelope has a Dewar configuration with two electrodes, one positioned near the external curved side surface of the body, and a second to the inner surface of the hole through the envelope. Further, the envelope may contain a backfill of a selected inert gas to assist in the excitation of lamp with that backfill at a pressure of less than 1 atmosphere, wherein the backfill pressure is directly related to the increase or decrease of peak output and inversely related to the increase and decrease of the emitted spectrum from the envelope. The emitting fill can be less than 6 mg/cc, or at least 2 mg/cc of the envelope of a sulfur containing substance.

  17. LAMP Whys? LAMP Wise! A Practical Guide to the Lansing Area Manufacturing Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacAllum, Keith; McDonald, Deanne; Johnson, Amy Bell

    This document profiles the Lansing Area Manufacturing Partnership (LAMP), which is a model school-to-career initiative featuring an innovative integrated, employer-driven curriculum that was designed, developed, and implemented through the joint efforts of the Ingham Intermediate School District in Lansing, Michigan, the United Auto Workers (UAW),…

  18. Compact microwave lamp having a tuning block and a dielectric located in a lamp cavity

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, James E.

    2000-01-01

    A microwave lamp having a compact structure utilizing a coupling slot which has a dielectric member extending therethrough and a tuning block adjoining the coupling slot. A non-conventional waveguide is used which has about the width of a WR-284 waveguide and about the length of a WR-340 waveguide.

  19. Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000826.htm Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats To use the sharing ... JavaScript. Certain types of cancer treatments can cause hot flashes and night sweats. Hot flashes are when ...

  20. Low-photon-energy plasma flash x-ray generator (LPFXG-2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Makoto; Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Usuki, Tatsumi; Sato, Koetsu; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2003-07-01

    In this study, we have made a low photon energy flash x-ray generator with a titanium target and have measured the radiographic characteristics. The flash x-ray generator consists of a high-voltage power supply, a high-voltage condenser, a turbo molecular pump and a flash x-ray tube. The condenser is charged up to about 30 kV, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged to the tube after triggering the cathode. The linear plasma x-ray source forms from the target evaporation, and then the flash x-rays are generated from the plasma in the axial direction. K-series emission of titanium has been confirmed in experiments qualitatively and characteristics of the generator have been measured. K-series x-ray of titanium had a high resolution and enable us to take radiographs of a thin rabbit's ear clearly using the CR (Computed Radiography) system. The effect of titanium on the target of the soft flash x-ray tube has been indicated accordingly.

  1. Measurement of SRS reactor recirculation pump performance using pump motor power

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    In order to accurately predict reactor hydraulic behavior during a hypothetical Loss-of-Coolant-Accident (LOCA) the performance of reactor coolant pumps under off-design conditions must be understood. The LOCA of primary interest for the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors involves the aspiration of air into the recirculated heavy water flow as reactor tank inventory is lost (system temperatures are too low to result in significant flashing of water coolant into steam). Entrained air causes degradation in the performance of the large recirculation pumps. The amount of degradation is a parameter used in computer codes which predict the course of the accident. This paper describes the analysis of data obtained during in-reactor simulated LOCA tests, and presents the head degradation curve for the SRS reactor recirculation pumps. The greatest challenge of the analysis was to determine a reasonable estimate of mixture density at the pump suction. Specially designed three-beam densitometers were used to determine mixture density. Since it was not feasible to place them in the most advantageous location the measured pump motor power, along with other techniques (pressure corrected gamma densitometer void fraction), were used to calculate the average mixture density at the pump impeller. These techniques provided good estimates of pump suction mixture density. Measurements from more conventional instruments were used to arrive at the value of pump two-component head over a wide range of flows. The results were significantly different from previous work with commercial reactor recirculation pumps.

  2. Photobiological safety evaluation of UV nail lamps.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, John C; Sayre, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated six UV nail lamps representative of major US manufacturers to evaluate radiant hazards as defined in ANSI/IESNA RP-27 Recommended Practice for Photobiological Safety. Lamps were evaluated at three positions, 1 cm above the inner surface approximating exposure to the hand and the 20 cm RP-27 non-general light source distance, oriented normal and 45° to the opening. Hazard to skin at intended use distance classified these devices into Risk Group 1 or 2 (Low to Moderate) with S(λ) weighted Actinic UV ranging 1.2-1.7 μW cm(-2) and 29.8-276.25 min permissible daily exposure. At 20 cm on center and 45° UV risk to skin and eyes were all within Exempt classification. Actinic UV ranged 0.001-0.078 μW cm(-2) and unweighted near UV (320-400 nm) ranged 0.001-0.483 mW cm(-2). Likewise the retinal photochemical blue light hazard and retinal thermal and cornea/lens IR were also Exempt. One device had aphakic eye hazard slightly rising into Risk Group 1 (Low). There were no other photobiological risks to normal individuals. Total exposure following programmed times and steps accumulate to only a small fraction of RP-27 permissible daily occupational exposure. These risks are further mitigated in realistic nonoccupational use scenarios as it is unlikely to be a daily occurrence. PMID:23550905

  3. [Near infrared light irradiator using halogen lamp].

    PubMed

    Ide, Yasuo

    2012-07-01

    The practical electric light bulb was invented by Thomas Alva Edison in 1879. Halogen lamp is the toughest and brightest electric light bulb. With light filter, it is used as a source of near infrared light. Super Lizer and Alphabeam are made as near infrared light irradiator using halogen lamp. The light emmited by Super Lizer is linear polarized near infrared light. The wave length is from 600 to 1,600 nm and strongest at about 1,000 nm. Concerning Super Lizer, there is evidence of analgesic effects and normalization of the sympathetic nervous system. Super Lizer has four types of probes. SG type is used for stellate ganglion irradiation. B type is used for narrow area irradiation. C and D types are for broad area irradiation. The output of Alphabeam is not polarized. The wave length is from 700 to 1,600 nm and the strongest length is about 1,000nm. Standard attachment is used for spot irradiation. Small attachment is used for stellate ganglion irradiation. Wide attachment is used for broad area irradiation. The effects of Alphabeam are thought to be similar to that of Super Lizer. PMID:22860296

  4. Flash Photolysis of Caged Compounds in the Cilia of Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccio, Anna; Sagheddu, Claudia; Menini, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Photolysis of caged compounds allows the production of rapid and localized increases in the concentration of various physiologically active compounds1. Caged compounds are molecules made physiologically inactive by a chemical cage that can be broken by a flash of ultraviolet light. Here, we show how to obtain patch-clamp recordings combined with photolysis of caged compounds for the study of olfactory transduction in dissociated mouse olfactory sensory neurons. The process of olfactory transduction (Figure 1) takes place in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons, where odorant binding to receptors leads to the increase of cAMP that opens cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels2. Ca entry through CNG channels activates Ca-activated Cl channels. We show how to dissociate neurons from the mouse olfactory epithelium3 and how to activate CNG channels or Ca-activated Cl channels by photolysis of caged cAMP4 or caged Ca5. We use a flash lamp6,7 to apply ultraviolet flashes to the ciliary region to uncage cAMP or Ca while patch-clamp recordings are taken to measure the current in the whole-cell voltage-clamp configuration8-11. PMID:22064384

  5. Flash Expansion Threshold in Whirligig Swarms

    PubMed Central

    Romey, William L.; Lamb, Alicia R.

    2015-01-01

    In the selfish herd hypothesis, prey animals move toward each other to avoid the likelihood of being selected by a predator. However, many grouped animals move away from each other the moment before a predator attacks. Very little is known about this phenomenon, called flash expansion, such as whether it is triggered by one individual or a threshold and how information is transferred between group members. We performed a controlled experiment with whirligig beetles in which the ratio of sighted to unsighted individuals was systematically varied and emergent flash expansion was measured. Specifically, we examined: the percentage of individuals in a group that startled, the resulting group area, and the longevity of the flash expansion. We found that one or two sighted beetles in a group of 24 was not enough to cause a flash expansion after a predator stimulus, but four sighted beetles usually initiated a flash expansion. Also, the more beetles that were sighted the larger the resulting group area and the longer duration of the flash expansion. We conclude that flash expansion is best described as a threshold event whose adaptive value is to prevent energetically costly false alarms while quickly mobilizing an emergent predator avoidance response. This is one of the first controlled experiments of flash expansion, an important emergent property that has applications to understanding collective motion in swarms, schools, flocks, and human crowds. Also, our study is a convincing demonstration of social contagion, how the actions of one individual can pass through a group. PMID:26301958

  6. Sun characteristics of flashed photochromic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Zyabnev, A.M.; Mashir, Yu.I.; Kraevskii, S.L.

    1995-07-01

    The energy coefficients of attenuation of solar radiation were calculated for several types of windows, including for flashed photochromic heat-absorbing glass, which has the highest efficiency of protection from intense solar radiation. The dynamics of the change in the characteristics of flashed photochromic glass in different conditions of use were calculated with specially developed programs.

  7. Au Contraire: Gifted in a Flash (Mob)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delisle, James R.

    2012-01-01

    A "flash mob" is defined by Wikipedia as "a large group of people who assemble suddenly in a public place, perform an unusual and pointless act for a brief time, then disperse." Fueled by social media and Smartphones, flash mobs have been used, primarily, as entertaining diversions by addicted techies with (apparently) tons of time on their hands.…

  8. Luminescent light source for laser pumping and laser system containing same

    DOEpatents

    Hamil, Roy A.; Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a pumping lamp for use with lasers comprising a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting light upon interaction of the component with exciting radiation and a source of exciting radiation. Preferably, the pumping lamp comprises a source of exciting radiation, such as an electron beam, and an aerogel or xerogel substrate loaded with a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce light, e.g., visible light, of a suitable band width and of a sufficient intensity to generate a laser beam from a laser material.

  9. 78 FR 14357 - Certain Compact Fluorescent Reflector Lamps, Products Containing Same and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... COMMISSION Certain Compact Fluorescent Reflector Lamps, Products Containing Same and Components Thereof... importation of certain compact fluorescent reflector lamps, products containing same and components thereof by... importation of certain compact fluorescent reflector lamps, products containing same and components thereof...

  10. Necessary Clearance to Prevent Side Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Takatoshi; Asakawa, Akira; Honda, Hideki; Sakae, Maki; Tanaka, Shuusaku

    Side flashes often occur when lightning strikes a tree and cause injury or death of human beings staying nearby the tree. Necessary clearance to prevent the side flash has been said to be 2 m, but the physical meaning of the value is unclear. In this paper, we have proposed a model of side flashes based on the physics of discharges and necessary clearance has been calculated. Furthermore, we have carried out model experiments of the side flash using real trees of a heights of 3.5 m and a naturally growing tree of a height of more than 10 m. The results of the model experiments have verified the proposed theory and it is concluded that clearance of more than 3 m from a tree is necessary to prevent side flashes from the tree.

  11. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOEpatents

    Moskowitz, Philip E.; Maya, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed.

  12. 49 CFR 393.23 - Power supply for lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power supply for lamps. 393.23 Section 393.23 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Electrical Wiring § 393.23 Power supply...

  13. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOEpatents

    Pelton, Bruce A.; Siminovitch, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures.

  14. 30 CFR 20.9 - Class 2 lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... prevent unauthorized and unsafe opening of the compartments in a mine. (c) Locks or seals (battery). The battery shall be enclosed in a locked or sealed container that will prevent exposure of live terminals. (d) Temperature of lamp. The temperature of the lamp under conditions of use shall not be such that a person...

  15. 21 CFR 878.4635 - Ultraviolet lamp for tanning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation to tan the skin. See § 1040.20 of this chapter. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for tanning. 878.4635 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4635 Ultraviolet lamp...

  16. 21 CFR 878.4635 - Ultraviolet lamp for tanning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation to tan the skin. See § 1040.20 of this chapter. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for tanning. 878.4635 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4635 Ultraviolet lamp...

  17. 21 CFR 878.4635 - Ultraviolet lamp for tanning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation to tan the skin. See § 1040.20 of this chapter. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for tanning. 878.4635 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4635 Ultraviolet lamp...

  18. 21 CFR 878.4635 - Ultraviolet lamp for tanning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation to tan the skin. See § 1040.20 of this chapter. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for tanning. 878.4635 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4635 Ultraviolet lamp...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4635 - Ultraviolet lamp for tanning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation to tan the skin. See § 1040.20 of this chapter. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for tanning. 878.4635 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4635 Ultraviolet lamp...

  20. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOEpatents

    Pelton, B.A.; Siminovitch, M.

    1997-07-29

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures. 12 figs.

  1. Lighting Lamps: Technical Terminology Bulletin. Terminotech, Vol. 2, No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Electric Co. of Canada, Ltd., Montreal, Quebec.

    This issue of a bulletin of technological terminology is devoted to lighting lamps, and specifically to the incandescent lamp. A brief narrative on the subject is included in both French and English. An English-French dictionary of terms comprises the bulk of the document. Explanatory illustrations are appended. (JB)

  2. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOEpatents

    Moskowitz, P.E.; Maya, J.

    1987-09-08

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed. 2 figs.

  3. 49 CFR 393.11 - Lamps and reflective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., meet the applicable requirements of 49 CFR 571.108 (FMVSS No. 108) in effect at the time of manufacture... of 49 CFR 571.108, Equipment combinations. Footnote—1Identification lamps may be mounted on the... reflective devices. (a)(1) Lamps and reflex reflectors. Table 1 specifies the requirements for...

  4. 49 CFR 393.11 - Lamps and reflective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., meet the applicable requirements of 49 CFR 571.108 (FMVSS No. 108) in effect at the time of manufacture... of 49 CFR 571.108, Equipment combinations. Footnote—1Identification lamps may be mounted on the... reflective devices. (a)(1) Lamps and reflex reflectors. Table 1 specifies the requirements for...

  5. 49 CFR 393.11 - Lamps and reflective devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., meet the applicable requirements of 49 CFR 571.108 (FMVSS No. 108) in effect at the time of manufacture... of 49 CFR 571.108, Equipment combinations. Footnote—1Identification lamps may be mounted on the... reflective devices. (a)(1) Lamps and reflex reflectors. Table 1 specifies the requirements for...

  6. Direct current ballast circuit for metal halide lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutus, P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A direct current ballast circuit for a two electrode metal halide lamp is described. Said direct current ballast circuit includes a low voltage DC input and a high frequency power amplifier and power transformer for developing a high voltage output. The output voltage is rectified by diodes and filtered by inductor and capacitor to provide a regulated DC output through commutating diodes to one terminal of the lamp at the output terminal. A feedback path from the output of the filter capacitor through the bias resistor to power the high frequency circuit which includes the power amplifier and the power transformer for sustaining circuit operations during low voltage transients on the input DC supply is described. A current sensor connected to the output of the lamp through terminal for stabilizing lamp current following breakdown of the lamp is described.

  7. Frequency domain fluorimetry using a mercury vapor lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Matthew J.; Lundin, Michael A.; Marciniak, Michael A.

    2009-04-01

    Frequency Domain (FD) fluorimetry, capitalizes on the frequency response function of a fluorophore and offers independence from light scatter and excitation/emission intensity variations in order to extract the sample's fluorescent lifetime. Mercury vapor lamps, a common source of industrial facility lighting, emit radiation that overlaps the UV/blue absorption spectrum of many fluorophores and may be used as an efficient and portable excitation source. The AC power modulation of mercury vapor lamps modulates the lamp's intensity at 120 Hz (in the United States) and higher harmonics. The fluorescent lifetimes for 3 different materials (willemite, uranium doped glass and U3O8) are measured with conventional techniques and compared with the FD technique using the power harmonics from a mercury vapor lamp. The mercury lamp measurements agree to within 25% of the conventional methods.

  8. Tanning lamps ultraviolet emissions and compliance with technical standards.

    PubMed

    Bonino, A; Facta, S; Saudino, S; Anglesio, L; D'Amore, G

    2009-12-01

    In this work the compliance of tanning lamps with technical standards EN 60335-2-27 'Household and similar electrical appliances-Safety. Part 2: Particular requirements for appliances for skin exposure to ultraviolet and infrared radiation' was analysed. Results of this analysis showed that none of the examined technical documentation produced by the lamps manufacturers is fully compliant with the standard technique. Furthermore data reported in the same manuals, such as effective radiant exposure or irradiance, would indicate that these sources may be the cause of undue exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. For this reason a measurement campaign on UV lamps used in tanning salons was organised. The first results of these measurements seem to confirm the doubts raised from the analysis of the lamp manuals: the use of a tanning lamp can lead to UV radiation exposure levels higher than reference maximum values recommended by EN 60335-2-27. PMID:19880416

  9. Electrodeless HID lamp study. Final report. [High intensity discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.M.; Johnson, P.D.; Jones, C.E.; Rautenberg, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    High intensity discharge lamps excited by solenoidal electric fields (SEF/HID) were examined for their ability to give high brightness, high efficacy and good color. Frequency of operation was 13.56 MHz (ISM Band) and power to the lamp plasma ranged from about 400 to 1000 W. Radio frequency transformers with air cores and with air core complemented by ferrite material in the magnetic path were used to provide the voltage for excitation. Electrical properties of the matching network and the lamp plasma were measured or calculated and total light from the lamp was measured by an integrating sphere. Efficacies calculated from measurement were found to agree well with the positive column efficacies of conventional HID lamps containing only mercury, and with additives of sodium, thallium, and scandium iodide. Recommendations for future work are given.

  10. Mobilizing slit lamp to the field: A new affordable solution.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Javed Hussain; Jorgenson, Richard; Gomaa, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    We are describing a simple and affordable design to pack and carry the slit lamp to the field. Orbis staff working on the Flying Eye Hospital (FEH) developed this design to facilitate mobilization of the slit lamp to the field during various FEH programs. The solution involves using a big toolbox, a central plywood apparatus, and foam. These supplies were cut to measure and used to support the slit lamp after being fitted snuggly in the box. This design allows easy and safe mobilization of the slit lamp to remote places. It was developed with the efficient use of space in mind and it can be easily reproduced in developing countries using same or similar supplies. Mobilizing slit lamp will be of great help for staff and institutes doing regular outreach clinical work. PMID:26669342

  11. Mobilizing slit lamp to the field: A new affordable solution

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Javed Hussain; Jorgenson, Richard; Gomaa, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    We are describing a simple and affordable design to pack and carry the slit lamp to the field. Orbis staff working on the Flying Eye Hospital (FEH) developed this design to facilitate mobilization of the slit lamp to the field during various FEH programs. The solution involves using a big toolbox, a central plywood apparatus, and foam. These supplies were cut to measure and used to support the slit lamp after being fitted snuggly in the box. This design allows easy and safe mobilization of the slit lamp to remote places. It was developed with the efficient use of space in mind and it can be easily reproduced in developing countries using same or similar supplies. Mobilizing slit lamp will be of great help for staff and institutes doing regular outreach clinical work. PMID:26669342

  12. Contrast between the vertical and horizontal mercury discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Hamida, M. B.; Helali, H.; Araoud, Z.; Charrada, K.

    2011-06-15

    This paper discusses the thermal behavior of a high pressure mercury lamp in a horizontal position, compared with that of a vertical lamp. The model adopted is three-dimensional, steady, and powered DC. After the model validation, we analyzed temperature fields and velocities for the case of the lamp in a horizontal position by comparing it with those of a lamp in vertical position. This setting initially fixed the wall temperature equal to 1000 K. However, the morphology of the temperature profile in the case of the horizontal lamp indicates that the temperature of the wall cannot be uniform. Thus, we have, in a second time, performed an energy balance at the wall to calculate its temperature. This aims to understand the influence of convection on the thermal properties of the source.

  13. Commercially available sun lamps and vitamin D formation

    PubMed Central

    Devgun, M. S.; Johnson, B. E.; Cruickshank, Alison J. M.; Paterson, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Four commercially available, medium pressure mercury sun lamps were used to assess their effects on promoting vitamin D synthesis in the skin. It was found that all the lamps studied had vitamin D synthesizing spectral wavelengths and caused an increase in the serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. However, the ultraviolet and visible irradiance measurements showed that a considerable proportion of the ultraviolet radiation was below 290 nm. It was not surprising, therefore, to find that these lamps caused adverse skin reactions. While a useful rise in vitamin D production can be obtained with these sun lamps, the difficulty involved in avoiding skin reaction limits their usefulness. Such lamps are unlikely to provide a safe practical routine method for the prevention of vitamin D deficiency in the home. PMID:7329878

  14. Insulin pumps.

    PubMed

    Pickup, J

    2011-02-01

    The last year has seen a continued uptake of insulin pump therapy in most countries. The USA is still a leader in pump use, with probably some 40% of type 1 diabetic patients on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), but the large variation in usage within Europe remains, with relatively high use (> 15%) in, for example, Norway, Austria, Germany and Sweden and low use (< 5%) in Spain, the UK, Finland and Portugal. There is much speculation on the factors responsible for this variation, and the possibilities include physician attitudes to CSII and knowledge about its benefits and indications for its use (and inappropriate beliefs about dangers), the availability of reimbursement from insurance companies or funding from national health services, the availability of sufficient diabetes nurse educators and dietitians trained in pump procedures, and clear referral pathways for the pump candidate from general practitioner or general hospital to specialist pump centre. There are now several comprehensive national guidelines on CSII use (see ATTD Yearbook 2009) but more work needs to be done in unifying uptake and ensuring all those who can benefit do so. Technology developments recently include increasing use of pumps with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) connectivity (see elsewhere in this volume) and the emergence of numerous manufacturers developing so-called 'patch pumps', often for the type 2 diabetes market. Interestingly, the evidence base for CSII in this group is not well established, and for this reason the selected papers on CSII in this section include several in this area. The use of CSII in diabetic pregnancy is a long-established practice, in spite of the lack of evidence that it is superior to multiple daily injections (MDI), and few randomised controlled trials have been done in recent years. Several papers in this field this year continue the debate about the usefulness of CSII in diabetic pregnancy and are reviewed here. It is pleasing

  15. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth R.; Sartor, George B.

    2004-08-03

    An electrokinetic pump in which the porous dielectric medium of conventional electrokinetic pumps is replaced by a patterned microstructure. The patterned microstructure is fabricated by lithographic patterning and etching of a substrate and is formed by features arranged so as to create an array of microchannels. The microchannels have dimensions on the order of the pore spacing in a conventional porous dielectric medium. Embedded unitary electrodes are vapor deposited on either end of the channel structure to provide the electric field necessary for electroosmotic flow.

  16. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  17. Plasma-flash radiography utilizing a molybdenum target in dentistry

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Mariko; Takabe, Akihito; Sakamaki, Kimio

    1995-12-31

    The construction and the radiographic characteristics of a plasma flash x-ray generator having a molybdenum-target (anode tip) triode are described. This generator was primarily designed in order to perform soft radiography in dental medicine and employed the following essential components: a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line with a gap switch, a coaxial oil condenser of 0.2 {micro}F, a turbo-molecular pump, a Krytron pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser of 0.2 {micro}F was charged from 40 to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the tube after closing the gap switch. Because this tube employed a long target, the plasma x-ray source which consists of molybdenum ions and electrons was easily produced by the target evaporating. The maximum tube voltage was nearly equivalent to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the maximum current had a value of about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. The average width of flash x rays was less than 1 {micro}s, and the time-integrated x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 60 kV was approximately 20 {micro}C/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. The characteristic K-series intensity substantially increased according to increases in the charging voltage. High-speed dental radiography was performed by using a laser timing switch and a trigger-delay device.

  18. Plasma-flash radiography utilizing a molybdenum target in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mariko; Takabe, Akihito; Sakamaki, Kimio; Sato, Eiichi; Takahashi, Kei; Sagae, Michiaki; Oizumi, Teiji; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Sasaki, Katsuaki; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1995-09-01

    The construction and the radiographic characteristics of a plasma flash x-ray generator having a molybdenum-target (anode tip) triode are described. This generator was primarily designed in order to perform soft radiography in dental medicine and employed the following essential components: a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line with a gap switch, a coaxial oil condenser of 0.2 (mu) F, a turbo-molecular pump, a Krytron pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser of 0.2 (mu) F was charged from 40 to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the tube after closing the gap switch. Because this tube employed a long target, the plasma x-ray source which consists of molybdenum ions and electrons was easily produced by the target evaporating. The maximum tube voltage was nearly equivalent to the initial charge voltage of the main condenser, and the maximum current had a value of about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. The average width of flash x rays was less than 1 microsecond(s) , and the time-integrated x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 60 kV was approximately 20 (mu) C/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. The characteristic K-series intensity substantially increased according to increases in the charged voltage. High-speed dental radiography was performed using a laser timing switch and a trigger-delay device.

  19. Coatings for Energy Efficient Lamps with Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rancourt, James; Martin, Robert

    1986-09-01

    During the past several years, a high level of activity has been directed toward developing more efficient lighting products to meet consumer demand in the face of energy scarcity and its high cost. Without major redesign of lamps, manufacturers have been able to achieve modest gains of 5 to 10 percent in incandescent lamp efficacy by optimizing standard features such as filament design, gas fill, etc. What was desired for incandescent lamps was a major jump in efficacy of 30% or more. Much encouraging work, notably by Philips in the Netherlands, has already been accomplished in the laboratory using thin film reflectors to recycle the wasted infrared radiation from incandescent lamps. Indium tin oxide (ITO) films, which are transparent in the visible and reflect well at wavelengths greater than 2 micrometers, is a most attractive material for its simplicity and apparent high performance. It °has a serious drawback, however, in its inability to reflect adequately when its temperature exceeds 800 C. A separate outer jacket surrounding the lamp itself is required in order to keep the ITO coating cool and thereby take advantage of its properties. The use of this extra component makes this solution to the energy problem more expensive and complex. In the United States, the Duratest Corporation has developed a sophisticated silver coating which is deposited inside domestic type A-line lamps. About six years ago, the General Electric Co., a major U.S. lamp manufacturer, approached 0.C.L.I. and requested assistance in improving the quartz-halogen lamp. The G.E.-0.C.L.I. method that was developed for improving the efficacy of an incandescent lamp product consists of coating quartz-halogen lamps with infrared reflectors. These reflectors are interference reflector stacks made of refractory metal oxides using conventional thermal evaporation technology. These products have been available commercially for about three years.

  20. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of Incandescent A Type and Decorative Lamps and LED Replacements

    SciTech Connect

    Lingard, R. D.; Myer, M. A.; Paget, M. L.

    2008-11-01

    This benchmark report addresses common omnidirectional incandescent lamps - A-type and small decorative, candelabra-type lamps - and their commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) replacements.

  1. Statistical Evolution of the Lightning Flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoghzoghy, F. G.; Cohen, M.; Said, R.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Natural lightning is one of the most fascinating and powerful electrical processes on Earth. To date, the physics behind this natural phenomenon are not fully understood, due primarily to the difficulty of obtaining measurements inside thunderstorms and to the wide range of timescales involved (from nanoseconds to seconds). Our aim is to use accurate lightning geo-location data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) to study statistical patterns in lightning, taking advantage of the fact that millions of lightning flashes occur around the globe every day. We present two sets of results, one involving the patterns of flashes in a storm, and a second involving the patterns of strokes in a flash. These patterns can provide a surrogate measure of the timescales and the spatial extents of the underlying physical processes. First, we study the timescales of charge buildup inside thunderstorms. We find that, following a lightning flash, the probability of another neighboring flash decreases and takes tens of seconds to recover. We find that this suppression effect is a function of flash type, stroke peak current, cloud-to-ground (CG) stroke multiplicity, and other lightning and geographical parameters. We find that the probabilities of subsequent flashes are more suppressed following oceanic lightning, or following flashes with higher peak currents and/or higher multiplicities (for CG flashes). Second, we use NLDN data to study the evolution of the strokes within a CG flash. A CG flash typically includes multiple return strokes, which can occur in the same channel or in multiple channels within a few kilometers. We cluster NLDN stroke data into flashes and produce the probability density function of subsequent strokes as a function of distance and time-delays relative to the previous stroke. Using this technique, we investigate processes which occur during the CG lightning flash with nanosecond to millisecond timescales. For instance, our results suggest

  2. Prophylactic UV Radiation and CIE Standard on Photobiological Safety of Lamps and Lamp Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, Genrih; Gavrilkina, Galina

    Two aspects of UV photobiology have come up almost simultaneously for discussion. On the one hand, the CIE has, for all practical purposes, completed discussions of a new standard “CIE S 009/E: 2002 Photobiological Safety of Lamps and Lamp Systems”1), and it was adopted without any amendments. On the other hand, some national standards (for example, in Russia) have for decades insisted on UVA+UVB radiation being used for prophylactic purposes at actinic erythemal doses (around 140 J m-2 per 8 hours of irradiation), which are significantly higher than prohibitive doses of actinic UV hazard (30 J m-2) suggested in the CIE standard. It seems that this arisen situation is to be thought about more carefully.

  3. Plasma flash x-ray generator (PFXG-02)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Germer, Rudolf K.; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Usuki, Tatsumi; Sato, Koetsu; Obara, Haruo; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2003-07-01

    In the plasma flash x-ray generator, high-voltage main condenser of about 200 nF is charged up to 50 kV by a power supply, and electric charges in the condenser are discharged to an x-ray tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The flash x-rays are then produced. The x-ray tube is of a demountable triode that is connected to a turbo molecular pump with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. As electron flows from the cathode electrode are roughly converged to a rod iron target of 3.0 mm in diameter by electric field in the x-ray tube, the weakly ionized linear plasma, which consists of iron ions and electrons, forms by target evaporating. At a charging voltage of 50 kV, the maximum tube voltage was almost equal to the charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current was about 20 kA. When the charging voltage was increased, the linear plasma formed, and the K-series characteristic x-ray intensities increased. The x-ray pulse widths were about 800 ns, and the time-integrated x-ray intensity had a value of about 10 μC/kg at 1.0 m from x-ray source with a charging voltage of 50 kV. The plasma x-rays were diffused after passing through two lead slits.

  4. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    PubMed

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions. PMID:23307357

  5. Automatic multidiagnosis system for slit lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Liliane; Chiaradia, Caio; Vieira Messias, Andre M.; Faria de Sousa, Sidney J.; Isaac, Flavio; Caetano, Cesar A. C.; Rosa Filho, Andre B.

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a system for several automatic diagnose in Slit Lamp in order to provide 04 additional measurements to the biomicroscope: (1) counting of the endothelial cells of donated corneas; (2) automatic keratometry; (3) corneal ulcer evaluation; (4) measurement of linear distances and areas of the ocular image. The system consists in a Slit Lamp, a beam-splitter, some optical components, a CCD detector, a frame grabber and a PC. The optical components attached to the beam-splitter are the same for all the functions, except for 1. For function 1, we have developed an optical system that magnifies the image 290X and a software that counts the cells interactively and automatically. Results are in good agreement with commercial specular microscopes (correlation coefficient is 0,98081). The automatic keratometry function is able to measure cylinders over 30 di and also irregular astigmatisms. The system consists of projecting a light ring at the patient's cornea and the further analysis of the deformation of the ring provides the radius of curvature as well as the axis of the astigmatism. The nominal precision is 0,005 mm for the curvature radius and 2 degree(s) for the axis component. The results are in good agreement with commercial systems (correlation coefficient of 0,99347). For function 3, the ulcer is isolated by the usual clinical ways and the image of the green area is automatically detected by the developed software in order to evaluate the evolution of the disease. Function 4 simply allows the clinician do any linear or area measurement of the ocular image. The system is a low cost multi evaluation equipment and it is being used in a public hospital in Brazil.

  6. In situ monitoring of a flash light sintering process using silver nano-ink for producing flexible electronics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wan-Ho; Hwang, Hyun-Jun; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2013-01-25

    In this work, a flash light sintering process using silver nano-inks is investigated. A silver nano-ink pattern was printed on a flexible PET (polyethylene terephthalate) substrate using a gravure-offset printing system. The printed silver nano-ink was sintered at room temperature and under ambient conditions using a flash of light from a xenon lamp using an in-house flash light sintering system. In order to monitor the light sintering process, a Wheatstone bridge electrical circuit was devised and changes in the voltage difference of the silver nano-ink were recorded during the sintering process using an oscilloscope. The sheet resistance changes during the sintering process were monitored using the in situ monitoring system devised, under various light conditions (e.g. light energy, on-time and off-time duration, and pulse numbers). The microstructure of the sintered silver film and the interface between the silver film and the PET substrate were observed using a scanning electron microscope, a focused ion beam and an optical microscope. The electrical sheet resistances of the sintered silver films were measured using a four-point probe method. Using the in situ monitoring system devised, the flash light sintering mechanism was studied for each type of light pulse (e.g. evaporation of organic binder followed by the forming of a neck-like junction and its growth, etc).The optimal flash light sintering condition is suggested on the basis of the in situ monitoring results. The optimized flash light sintering process produces a silver film with a lower sheet resistance (0.95 Ω/sq) compared with that of the thermally sintered silver film (2.03 Ω/sq) without damaging the PET substrate or allowing interfacial delamination between the silver film and the PET substrate. PMID:23263030

  7. In situ monitoring of a flash light sintering process using silver nano-ink for producing flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Wan-Ho; Hwang, Hyun-Jun; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a flash light sintering process using silver nano-inks is investigated. A silver nano-ink pattern was printed on a flexible PET (polyethylene terephthalate) substrate using a gravure-offset printing system. The printed silver nano-ink was sintered at room temperature and under ambient conditions using a flash of light from a xenon lamp using an in-house flash light sintering system. In order to monitor the light sintering process, a Wheatstone bridge electrical circuit was devised and changes in the voltage difference of the silver nano-ink were recorded during the sintering process using an oscilloscope. The sheet resistance changes during the sintering process were monitored using the in situ monitoring system devised, under various light conditions (e.g. light energy, on-time and off-time duration, and pulse numbers). The microstructure of the sintered silver film and the interface between the silver film and the PET substrate were observed using a scanning electron microscope, a focused ion beam and an optical microscope. The electrical sheet resistances of the sintered silver films were measured using a four-point probe method. Using the in situ monitoring system devised, the flash light sintering mechanism was studied for each type of light pulse (e.g. evaporation of organic binder followed by the forming of a neck-like junction and its growth, etc). The optimal flash light sintering condition is suggested on the basis of the in situ monitoring results. The optimized flash light sintering process produces a silver film with a lower sheet resistance (0.95 Ω/sq) compared with that of the thermally sintered silver film (2.03 Ω/sq) without damaging the PET substrate or allowing interfacial delamination between the silver film and the PET substrate.

  8. Application Summary Report 22: LED MR16 Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.

    2014-07-23

    This report analyzes the independently tested photometric performance of 27 LED MR16 lamps. It describes initial performance based on light output, efficacy, distribution, color quality, electrical characteristics, and form factor, with comparisons to a selection of benchmark halogen MR16s and ENERGY STAR qualification thresholds. Three types of products were targeted. First, CALiPER sought 3000 K lamps with the highest rated lumen output (i.e., at least 500 lm) or a claim of equivalency to a 50 W halogen MR16 or higher. The test results indicate that while the initial performance of LED MR16s has improved across the board, market-available products still do not produce the lumen output and center beam intensity of typical 50 W halogen MR16 lamps. In fact, most of the 18 lamps in this category had lower lumen output and center beam intensity than a typical 35 W halogen MR16 lamp. Second, CALiPER sought lamps with a CRI of 90 or greater. Only four manufacturers were identified with a product in this category. CALiPER testing confirmed the performance of these lamps, which are a good option for applications where high color fidelity is needed. A vast majority of the LED MR16 lamps have a CRI in the low 80s; this is generally acceptable for ambient lighting, but may not always be acceptable for focal lighting. For typical LED packages, there is a fundamental tradeoff between CRI and efficacy, but the lamps in the high-CRI group in this report still offer comparable performance to the rest of the Series 22 products in other performance areas. Finally, CALiPER sought lamps with a narrow distribution, denoted as a beam angle less than 15°. Five such lamps were purchased. Notably, no lamp was identified as having high lumen output (500 lumens or greater), high CRI (90 or greater), a narrow distribution (15° or less), and an efficacy greater than 60 lm/W. This would be an important achievement for LED MR16s especially if output could reach approximately 700 800 lumens

  9. Flash Droughts over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettenmaier, D. P.; Mo, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    Flash drought refers to relatively short periods of warm surface temperature and anomalously low and rapid decreasing soil moisture (SM). Based on the physical mechanisms associated with flash droughts, we classify them into two categories: heat wave and precipitation (P) deficit flash droughts. We analyze the flash droughts based on the observations and the land surface model reconstructed soil moisture (SM) and evaporation (ET) from 1916 to 2013. Heat wave flash droughts are most likely to occur over the Midwest and the Pacific Northwest during the growing season. They do not occur often. The maximum frequency of occurrence is only 4%. Heat wave flash drought is temperature driven. High temperatures increase the transpiration and drive down soil moisture and cause drought to occur. The P deficit flash droughts are more common than the heat wave droughts and the maximum frequency of occurrence is about 8- 10 %. They are most likely to occur over the southern United States with a maximum over the Southern Plains. They are P driven. Heat waves are caused by P deficits. P deficits drive down SM and cause ET to decreases and temperature to increase.

  10. Fluorescence Lyman-Alpha Stratospheric Hygrometer (FLASH): application on meteorological balloons, long duration balloons and unmanned aerial vehicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykov, Alexey; Khaykin, Sergey; Yushkov, Vladimir; Efremov, Denis; Formanyuk, Ivan; Astakhov, Valeriy

    The FLASH instrument is based on the fluorescent method, which uses H2O molecules photodissociation at a wavelength lambda=121.6 nm (Lalpha - hydrogen emission) followed by the measurement of the fluorescence of excited OH radicals. The source of Lyman-alpha radiation is a hydrogen discharge lamp while the detector of OH fluorescence at 308 -316 nm is a photomultiplier run in photon counting mode. The intensity of the fluorescent light as well as the instrument readings is directly proportional to the water vapor mixing ratio under stratospheric conditions with negligible oxygen absorption. Initially designed for rocket-borne application, FLASH has evolved into a light-weight balloon sonde (FLASH-B) for measurements in the upper troposphere and stratosphere on board meteorological and small plastic balloons. This configuration has been used in over 100 soundings at numerous tropical mid-latitude and polar locations within various international field campaigns. An airborne version of FLASH instrument is successfully utilized onboard stratospheric M55-Geophysica aircraft and tropospheric airborne laboratory YAK42-Roshydromet. The hygrometer was modified for application onboard stratospheric long-duration balloons (FLASH-LDB version). This version was successfully used onboard CNES super-pressure balloon launched from SSC Esrange in March 2007 and flown during 10 days. Special design for polar long duration balloon PoGOLite was created for testing work during polar day in June 2013. Installation and measurement peculiarities as well as observational results are presented. Observations of water vapour using FLASH-B instrument, being of high quality are rather costly as the payload recovery is often complicated and most of the time impossible. Following the goal to find a cost-efficient solution, FLASH was adapted for use onboard Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). This solution was only possible thanks to compactness and light-weight (0.5 kg) of FLASH instrument. The

  11. 18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps in background formerly drew water from the clear well. They went out of service when use of the beds was discontinued. Pumps in the foreground provide high pressure water to Hamden. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Armory Street Pumphouse, North side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  12. Extended Word-Line NAND Flash Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Jang-Gn; Park, Il Han; Kim, Wandong; Lee, Jong Duk; Park, Byung-Gook

    2009-08-01

    A NAND flash memory array having extended word-lines is proposed. Without scarifying areal density, both physical gate length and charge storage node size are increased through the word-line extension process. Simple fabrication flow is delivered and device performances in a viewpoint of the short channel effect are simulated. The effect of gate length variation on the cell threshold voltage (VTH) distribution is addressed. Programming characteristics in the inversion-type source/drain NAND flash memory are also described. Some side effects concerned with the program disturbance and cell-to-cell interference are investigated in comparison with the conventional NAND flash memory.

  13. Non Volatile Flash Memory Radiation Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Nguyen, Duc N.; Allen, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Commercial flash memory industry has experienced a fast growth in the recent years, because of their wide spread usage in cell phones, mp3 players and digital cameras. On the other hand, there has been increased interest in the use of high density commercial nonvolatile flash memories in space because of ever increasing data requirements and strict power requirements. Because of flash memories complex structure; they cannot be treated as just simple memories in regards to testing and analysis. It becomes quite challenging to determine how they will respond in radiation environments.

  14. Highly Efficient Small Form Factor LED Retrofit Lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Allen; Fred Palmer; Ming Li

    2011-09-11

    This report summarizes work to develop a high efficiency LED-based MR16 lamp downlight at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-EE0000611. A new multichip LED package, electronic driver, and reflector optic were developed for these lamps. At steady-state, the lamp luminous flux was 409 lumens (lm), luminous efficacy of 87 lumens per watt (LPW), CRI (Ra) of 87, and R9 of 85 at a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3285K. The LED alone achieved 120 lumens per watt efficacy and 600 lumen flux output at 25 C. The driver had 90% electrical conversion efficiency while maintaining excellent power quality with power factor >0.90 at a power of only 5 watts. Compared to similar existing MR16 lamps using LED sources, these lamps had much higher efficacy and color quality. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a LED-based MR16 retrofit lamp for replacement of 35W halogen MR16 lamps having (1) luminous flux of 500 lumens, (2) luminous efficacy of 100 lumens per watt, (3) beam angle less than 40{sup o} and center beam candlepower of at least 1000 candelas, and (4) excellent color quality.

  15. 49 CFR 234.217 - Flashing light units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flashing light units. 234.217 Section 234.217..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.217 Flashing light units. (a) Each flashing light unit.... (b) Each flashing light unit shall be maintained to prevent dust and moisture from entering...

  16. 49 CFR 234.217 - Flashing light units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flashing light units. 234.217 Section 234.217..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.217 Flashing light units. (a) Each flashing light unit.... (b) Each flashing light unit shall be maintained to prevent dust and moisture from entering...

  17. Pulse modulated high-pressure caesium discharge lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, H.; Muzeroll, M. E.; Chamberlain, J. C.; Maya, J.

    2001-02-01

    The high-pressure caesium discharge has a favourable spectral distribution consisting of a smooth recombination continuum in the visible range. When operated on a continuous power source, the spectrum in the visible region is close to blackbody radiation; however, the lamp efficacy is restrained by the self-reversed resonance lines occurring at 825 nm and 894 nm. Pulse modulation significantly increases the core plasma temperature, suppresses the near-infrared segment of the spectrum, strongly enhances the continuous radiation in the visible region, and successfully avoids overloading (<40 W cm-2) the arc tubes. The spectrum in the visible appears to have the same shape as blackbody radiation when the lamp is operated on a multiple pulse modulated power source. The arc tube geometry, caesium/mercury compositions, and power supply waveforms were optimized for photometric performance through a series of comparison tests. The lamp efficacy increased with narrower diameter arc tubes, higher lamp currents, as well as higher current crest factors (ratio of current pulse peak to RMS current). The highest efficacy achieved for the lamp operated on the pulse modulated power supply was 46 lpw. The lamp exhibits excellent dimming characteristics and has a colour rendering index (CRI) very close to a thermal source such as a tungsten halogen lamp. This study provides a framework for the design of a new lamp/ballast system which features excellent dimming characteristics, a near-perfect CRI, an efficacy above 40 lpw, and long life. The application for this light source could be a replacement for a high-end tungsten halogen or a white high-pressure sodium lamp.

  18. REVIEW ARTICLE: UHP lamp systems for projection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derra, Guenther; Moench, Holger; Fischer, Ernst; Giese, Hermann; Hechtfischer, Ulrich; Heusler, Gero; Koerber, Achim; Niemann, Ulrich; Noertemann, Folke-Charlotte; Pekarski, Pavel; Pollmann-Retsch, Jens; Ritz, Arnd; Weichmann, Ulrich

    2005-09-01

    Projection systems have found widespread use in conference rooms and other professional applications during the last decade and are now entering the home TV market at a considerable pace. Projectors as small as about one litre are able to deliver several thousand screen lumens and are, with a system efficacy of over 10 lm W-1, the most efficient display systems realized today. Short arc lamps are a key component for projection systems of the highest efficiency for small-size projection displays. The introduction of the ultra high performance (UHP) lamp system by Philips in 1995 can be identified as one of the key enablers of the commercial success of projection systems. The UHP lamp concept features outstanding arc luminance, a well suited spectrum, long life and excellent lumen maintenance. For the first time it combines a very high pressure mercury discharge lamp with extremely short and stable arc gap with a regenerative chemical cycle keeping the discharge walls free from blackening, leading to lifetimes of over 10 000 h. Since the introduction of the UHP lamp system, many important new technology improvements have been realized: burner designs for higher lamp power, advanced ignition systems, miniaturized electronic drivers and innovative reflector concepts. These achievements enabled the impressive increase of projector light output, a remarkable reduction in projector size and even higher optical efficiency in projection systems during the last years. In this paper the concept of the UHP lamp system is described, followed by a discussion of the technological evolution the UHP lamp has undergone so far. Last, but not least, the important improvements of the UHP lamp system including the electronic driver and the reflector are discussed.

  19. New slim automotive taillight using HiPerVision lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haenen, Ludo; Ansems, Johan; Schuurmans, Jelle; de Montureux, Philippe

    2002-08-01

    HiPerVision is a new automotive signaling range of lamps (clear and colored) developed by Philips. These lamps offer car life service, reduced size and - consequently - new design opportunities. HiPerVision aims at progressively replacing P21W lamps and at being an economic alternative to LEDs. All lamp dimensions are significantly smaller than P21W's. The HiPerVision 16W lamp produces less heat than the P21W lamp (9 W less dissipation at 13.5 V), what enables a reduced reflector size, the use of low cost plastic or a combination of both. With a luminous flux of 300 lm (instead of 460 lm for P21W), the legal requirements can be easily fulfilled because of the smaller dimensions and tolerances. In order to illustrate the lamps benefits, a complete automotive taillight with 4 functions was designed and made. This paper describes the reflector design process for that taillight with HiPerVision. According to a current styling trend, the reflectors are based on Pillow Shaped Facets and on a clear front lens with no optical structure. With this design method, the whole reflector area is filled with sparkling light. The basic shape of the reflector was used to optimize heat management. By changing the shape and/or number of the pillows the desired light distribution was made. The HiPerVision lamp was measured with a Luminance Goniometer. The measurements were converted to ASAP ray sets as input for accurate simulations. The legal requirements were easily met which was confirmed by actual measurements. The total depth of the complete designed taillight was 53 mm, which is small compared to existing P21W based designs. If the lamp is placed transversal the requirements are still met and the depth of the complete taillight could be reduced to 33 mm, which is comparable with a taillight based on LEDs.

  20. Lightweight LED Fluorescent lamp using engineering poly carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Jong-Phil

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we developed lightweight LED fluorescent lamp using thermally conductive engineering PC a heat sink instead of metal. In order to secure price competitiveness, we used double extrusion molding which extrude both the heat sink plate and diffuser plate simultaneously. Fabricated fluorescent lamp has less than 20% of weight as compare to glass fluorescent lamp and power consumption is 20.2 watts, luminous efficiency 123.9 lm/W, respectively. Despite the heat conductive plastic is adopted, the system temperature is maintained less than 35° and the thermal resistance is 25 °/W.

  1. Arc lamp power supply using a voltage multiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, Bradley D.

    1988-01-01

    A power supply is provided for an arc discharge lamp which includes a relatively low voltage high current power supply section and a high voltage starter circuit. The low voltage section includes a transformer, rectifier, variable resistor and a bank of capacitors, while the starter circuit comprises several diodes and capacitors connected as a Cockcroft-Walton multiplier. The starting circuit is effectively bypassed when the lamp arc is established and serves to automatically provide a high starting voltage to re-strike the lamp arc if the arc is extinguished by a power interruption.

  2. Determination of non-gaseous and gaseous mercury fractions in unused fluorescent lamps: a study of different lamp types.

    PubMed

    Figi, Renato; Nagel, Oliver; Schreiner, Claudia; Hagendorfer, Harald

    2015-03-01

    Since incandescent light bulbs have been phased out in the European Union from 2009, the use of fluorescent lamps has drastically increased as a reliable, more energy-efficient and cost-effective alternative. State-of-the-art fluorescent lamps are dependent on mercury/mercury alloys, posing a risk for the consumer and the environment, and appropriate waste management is challenging. Consequently analytical methods to determine possible mercury species (non-gaseous/gaseous) in these lamps are of need. Here, a straightforward and wet-chemistry-based analytical strategy for the determination of gaseous and non-gaseous mercury in commercially available fluorescent lamps is presented. It can be adapted in any analytical laboratory, without or with only minimum modifications of already installed equipment. The analytical figures of merit, as well as application of the method to a series of commercially available fluorescent lamps, are presented. Out of 14 analysed and commercially available lamp types, results from this study indicate that only one contains a slightly higher amount of mercury than set by the legislative force. In all new lamps the amount of gaseous mercury is negligible compared with the non-gaseous fraction (88%-99% of total mercury). PMID:25698790

  3. An Inexpensive, Foolproof Apparatus for Flash Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Wayne J.; Hanson, Bryan A.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a new, modified "flash chromatography" apparatus which overcomes difficulties found in conventional apparatus. For example, an expensive teflon pressure valve is not necessary in the modified version. The apparatus is suitable as an instructional tool in undergraduate courses. (JN)

  4. Quality control in the "flash" process.

    PubMed

    1985-03-01

    This article has briefly discussed the three basic types of sterilization monitoring systems--mechanical, chemical, and biological. Mechanical indicators help tell you that the sterilizer is working. Chemical indicators provide you with immediate information in each "flash" load that the conditions necessary for steam sterilization were present. Biological indicators tell you that microorganisms were killed. For maximum assurance that the conditions necessary for steam sterilization are present and that non-sterile instruments are not inadvertently used, each "flash" sterilizer should be monitored daily with biological indicators and each "flash" load with chemical indicators. This quality control monitoring program should give the O.R. staff confidence that their "flash" sterilization process is working. PMID:10271096

  5. A Simple Lightning Flash Polarity Discriminating Counter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devan, K. R. S.; Jayaratne, E. R.

    1990-01-01

    Described are the apparatus and procedures needed for a demonstration of a determination of the polarity of charges carried by individual ground flashes of lightning. Discussed are materials, apparatus construction, and experimental results. (CW)

  6. Mini Drug Pump for Ophthalmic Use

    PubMed Central

    Saati, Saloomeh; Lo, Ronalee; Li, Po-Ying; Meng, Ellis; Varma, Rohit; Humayun, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of developing a novel mini drug pump for ophthalmic use. Methods: Using principles of microelectromechanical systems engineering, a mini drug pump was fabricated. The pumping mechanism is based on electrolysis, and the pump includes a drug refill port as well as a check valve to control drug delivery. Drug pumps were tested first on the benchtop and then after implantation in rabbits. For the latter, we implanted 4 elliptical (9.9 × 7.7 × 1.8 mm) non-electrically active pumps into 4 rabbits. The procedure is similar to implantation of a glaucoma seton. To determine the ability to refill and also the patency of the cannula, at intervals of 4 to 6 weeks after implantation, we accessed the drug reservoir with a transconjunctival needle and delivered approximately as low as 1 μL of trypan blue solution (0.06%) into the anterior chamber. Animals were followed up by slit-lamp examination, photography, and fluorescein angiography. Results: Benchtop testing showed 2.0 μL/min delivery when using 0.4 mW of power for electrolysis. One-way valves showed reliable opening pressures of 470 mm Hg. All implanted devices refilled at 4- to 6-week intervals for 4 to 6 months. No infection was seen. No devices extruded. No filtering bleb formed over the implant. Conclusions: A prototype ocular mini drug pump was built, implanted, and refilled. Such a platform needs more testing to determine the long-term biocompatibility of an electrically controlled implanted pump. Testing with various pharmacologic agents is needed to determine its ultimate potential for ophthalmic use. PMID:20126483

  7. A global flash flood forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugh, Calum; Pappenberger, Florian; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Hewson, Tim; Zsoter, Ervin

    2016-04-01

    The sudden and devastating nature of flash flood events means it is imperative to provide early warnings such as those derived from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) forecasts. Currently such systems exist on basin, national and continental scales in Europe, North America and Australia but rely on high resolution NWP forecasts or rainfall-radar nowcasting, neither of which have global coverage. To produce global flash flood forecasts this work investigates the possibility of using forecasts from a global NWP system. In particular we: (i) discuss how global NWP can be used for flash flood forecasting and discuss strengths and weaknesses; (ii) demonstrate how a robust evaluation can be performed given the rarity of the event; (iii) highlight the challenges and opportunities in communicating flash flood uncertainty to decision makers; and (iv) explore future developments which would significantly improve global flash flood forecasting. The proposed forecast system uses ensemble surface runoff forecasts from the ECMWF H-TESSEL land surface scheme. A flash flood index is generated using the ERIC (Enhanced Runoff Index based on Climatology) methodology [Raynaud et al., 2014]. This global methodology is applied to a series of flash floods across southern Europe. Results from the system are compared against warnings produced using the higher resolution COSMO-LEPS limited area model. The global system is evaluated by comparing forecasted warning locations against a flash flood database of media reports created in partnership with floodlist.com. To deal with the lack of objectivity in media reports we carefully assess the suitability of different skill scores and apply spatial uncertainty thresholds to the observations. To communicate the uncertainties of the flash flood system output we experiment with a dynamic region-growing algorithm. This automatically clusters regions of similar return period exceedence probabilities, thus presenting the at-risk areas at a spatial

  8. Method for programming a flash memory

    DOEpatents

    Brosky, Alexander R.; Locke, William N.; Maher, Conrado M.

    2016-08-23

    A method of programming a flash memory is described. The method includes partitioning a flash memory into a first group having a first level of write-protection, a second group having a second level of write-protection, and a third group having a third level of write-protection. The write-protection of the second and third groups is disabled using an installation adapter. The third group is programmed using a Software Installation Device.

  9. New continuous-input current charge pump power-factor-correction electronic ballast

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, J.; Lee, F.C.; Yamauchi, Tokushi

    1999-03-01

    Continuous-input current charge pump power-factor-correction (CIC-CPPFC) electronic ballasts are proposed in this paper. The CPPFC circuit and unity power factor condition using the charge pump concept are derived and analyzed. The average lamp current control with switching frequency modulation was developed so that the low crest factor and constant lamp power operation can be achieved. The developed electronic ballast has continuous input current, so that a small line input filter can be used. The proposed CIC-CPPFC electronic ballast was implemented and tested with two 45-W fluorescent lamps. It is shown that the measured line input current harmonics satisfy IEC 1000-3-2 Class C requirements.

  10. Super-resolution for flash LADAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shuowen; Young, S. Susan; Hong, Tsai; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Krapels, Keith; Miller, Brian; Thomas, Jim; Nguyen, Oanh

    2009-05-01

    Flash laser detection and ranging (LADAR) systems are increasingly used in robotics applications for autonomous navigation and obstacle avoidance. Their compact size, high frame rate, wide field of view, and low cost are key advantages over traditional scanning LADAR devices. However, these benefits are achieved at the cost of spatial resolution. Super-resolution enhancement can be applied to improve the resolution of flash LADAR devices, making them ideal for small robotics applications. Previous work by Rosenbush et al. applied the super-resolution algorithm of Vandewalle et al. to flash LADAR data, and observed quantitative improvement in image quality in terms of number of edges detected. This study uses the super-resolution algorithm of Young et al. to enhance the resolution of range data acquired with a SwissRanger SR-3000 flash LADAR camera. To improve the accuracy of sub-pixel shift estimation, a wavelet preprocessing stage was developed and applied to flash LADAR imagery. The authors used the triangle orientation discrimination (TOD) methodology for a subjective evaluation of the performance improvement (measured in terms of probability of target discrimination and subject response times) achieved with super-resolution. Super-resolution of flash LADAR imagery resulted in superior probabilities of target discrimination at the all investigated ranges while reducing subject response times.

  11. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, M.

    1998-02-10

    A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

  12. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A novel design for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment.

  13. 46 CFR 32.85-1 - Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms-T/ALL. 32.85-1..., MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Lamp and Paint Rooms and Similar Compartments on Tankships § 32.85-1 Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms—T/ALL. Lamp, oil and paint rooms shall be wholly and tightly...

  14. 46 CFR 32.85-1 - Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms-T/ALL. 32.85-1..., MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Lamp and Paint Rooms and Similar Compartments on Tankships § 32.85-1 Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms—T/ALL. Lamp, oil and paint rooms shall be wholly and tightly...

  15. 46 CFR 32.85-1 - Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms-T/ALL. 32.85-1..., MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Lamp and Paint Rooms and Similar Compartments on Tankships § 32.85-1 Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms—T/ALL. Lamp, oil and paint rooms shall be wholly and tightly...

  16. 46 CFR 32.85-1 - Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms-T/ALL. 32.85-1..., MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Lamp and Paint Rooms and Similar Compartments on Tankships § 32.85-1 Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms—T/ALL. Lamp, oil and paint rooms shall be wholly and tightly...

  17. 46 CFR 32.85-1 - Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms-T/ALL. 32.85-1..., MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Lamp and Paint Rooms and Similar Compartments on Tankships § 32.85-1 Fireproofing of lamp, oil and paint rooms—T/ALL. Lamp, oil and paint rooms shall be wholly and tightly...

  18. Visualization study of enhanced flash boiling of R-22 with 5 mm steel and glass spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, D.W.; O`Neal, D.L.

    1998-10-01

    This paper presents the qualitative results and discussion from an experimental investigation of passive enhanced flash boiling of R-22 (an HCFC) from a small vessel. A bench-top experimental apparatus was used to conduct enhanced flash boiling tests with 5.0 mm diameter steel and glass spheres placed at the base of the glass vessel. Sixty-second experiments were conducted with initial refrigerant amounts of 0.23 kg and 0.68 (0.5 lbm and 1.5 lbm), exiting orifices of 1.59 mm and 5.56 mm in diameter (0.063 in. and 0.219 in.), and with an initial pressure of 840 kPa (122 psia). The experiments were designed to simulate the flash boiling process that occurs within the refrigerant accumulator of air-source heat pumps during the reverse-cycle defrost. Results from the visualization study include a complete description of the flashing process with added steel and glass spheres. It was also shown that the enhancement method significantly increased the rate of total vapor production by 24--55% when exposed to a rapid depressurization.

  19. 25. Detail of cast iron lamp post base with fluted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Detail of cast iron lamp post base with fluted wooded post at top, located at north end of bridge. VIEW NORTHEAST - Chelsea Street Bridge & Draw Tender's House, Spanning Chelsea River, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  20. High-luminance LEDs replace incandescent lamps in new applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David L.

    1997-04-01

    The advent of high luminance AlInGaP and InGaN LED technologies has prompted the use of LED devices in new applications formally illuminated by incandescent lamps. The luminous efficiencies of these new LED technologies equals or exceeds that attainable with incandescent sources, with reliability factors that far exceed those of incandescent sources. The need for a highly efficient, dependable, and cost effective replacement for incandescent lamps is being fulfilled with high luminance LED lamps. This paper briefly described some of the new applications incorporating high luminance LED lamps, traffic signals and roadway signs for traffic management, automotive exterior lighting, active matrix and full color displays for commercial advertising, and commercial aircraft panel lighting and military aircraft NVG compatible lighting.

  1. 49 CFR 230.56 - Water glass lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances... suitable lamp properly located to enable the engine crew to easily see the water in the glass....

  2. 31. 'LAMP STANDARD, DETAIL OF UPPER PART,' drawn by project ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. 'LAMP STANDARD, DETAIL OF UPPER PART,' drawn by project architect Alfred Eichler, April 2, 1934, revised April 23, 1934. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  3. 30. DETAIL, TOP OF LAMP STANDARD, drawn by project architect ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. DETAIL, TOP OF LAMP STANDARD, drawn by project architect Alfred Eichler, February 15, 1934. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  4. 29. 'LAMP STANDARD ON CONCRETE PARAPET,' drawn by project architect ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. 'LAMP STANDARD ON CONCRETE PARAPET,' drawn by project architect Alfred Eichler, April 14, 1934. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  5. Purging means and method for Xenon arc lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    High pressure Xenon short-arc lamp with two reservoirs which are selectively connectable to the lamp's envelope is described. One reservoir contains an absorbent which will absorb both Xenon and contaminant gases such as CO2 and O2. The absorbent temperature is controlled to evacuate the envelope of both the Xenon and the contaminant gases. The temperature of the absorbent is then raised to desorb only clean Xenon while retaining the contaminant gases, thereby clearing the envelope of the contaminant gases. The second reservoir contains a gas whose specific purpose is, to remove the objectional metal film which deposits gradually on the interior surface of the lamp envelope during normal arc operation. The origin of the film is metal transferred from the cathode of the arc lamp by sputtering or other gas transfer processes.

  6. Interior view, law library (note one of aluminum lamps designed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view, law library (note one of aluminum lamps designed by Jennwein is in the foreground; the murals were painted by Maurice Sterne) - United States Department of Justice, Constitution Avenue between Ninth & Tenth Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. Closeup view of EPA Farm cattle shelter lamp, facing west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of EPA Farm cattle shelter lamp, facing west - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Shelter Unit Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  8. 34. VIEW TO EAST; DETAIL OF LAMP ON VEHICULAR RAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VIEW TO EAST; DETAIL OF LAMP ON VEHICULAR RAMP LIGHTING PYLON (Dobson) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. One piece microwave container screens for electrodeless lamps

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Brian; Ury, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. Replacing mesh material by solid metal material as part of the screen unit significantly reduces leakage of microwave energy from the lamp. The solid section has multiple compliant fingers defined therein for engaging the periphery of a flange on the waveguide unit so that a hose clamp can easily secure the screen to the assembly. Screen units of this type having different mesh section configurations can be interchanged in the lamp assembly to produce different respective illumination patterns.

  10. VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LAMP FIXTURE (EXTERIOR) ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE AT SOUTHWEST CORNER OF BUILDING 23, FACING NORTH - Roosevelt Base, Auditorium-Gymnasium, West Virginia Street between Richardson & Reeves Avenues, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Light shield and cooling apparatus. [high intensity ultraviolet lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, T. G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A light shield and cooling apparatus was developed for a high intensity ultraviolet lamp including water and high pressure air for cooling and additional apparatus for shielding the light and suppressing the high pressure air noise.

  12. 11. Detail of horse lamp fixture in original Clubhouse bar. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of horse lamp fixture in original Clubhouse bar. Fixture is at north end of bar. Camera pointed up and NW. (July 1993) - Longacres, Clubhouse & Additions, 1621 Southwest Sixteenth Street, Renton, King County, WA

  13. 10. Detail view of pendant lamps, laminated arch beams and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail view of pendant lamps, laminated arch beams and ceiling structure, facing north - Mountain Home Air Force Base, Base Chapel, 350 Willow Street, Cantonment Area, Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  14. 214. RUSTIC BUS SHELTER, GUARDRAILS AND LAMP POST BELLE HAVEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    214. RUSTIC BUS SHELTER, GUARDRAILS AND LAMP POST BELLE HAVEN BUS STOP WIDENING, 1932. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  15. Dysprosium oxide ceramic arc tube for HID lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, G. C.; Lapatovich, W. P.; Browne, J.; Snellgrove, R.

    2008-07-01

    Polycrystalline dysprosium oxide is a candidate arc tube material for advanced metal halide lamps because of high transparency, low thermodynamic driving potentials for corrosion and reaction with the salt fills, satisfactory mechanical strength and resistance to thermal shock. This material is cubic and can be polished to achieve higher in-line transmittance than the conventional polycrystalline alumina arc tubes. Rare-earth halide fills, glass frit seals and niobium leads were used in the construction of the Dy2O3 lamps. The experimental lamps exhibited a colour temperature of ~2500 K and CRI of ~90 with rapid warm-up behaviour. The transparent Dy2O3 ceramic offers opportunities to push the limit of ceramic envelopes for improved discharge lamps.

  16. Studies on Temperature Dependence of Rubidium Lamp for Atomic Frequency Standard

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Bikash; Banik, Alak; Vats, Vaibhav; Pal, Sukamal; Bahl, R. K

    2011-10-20

    Rb lamp is a very critical component of the Rb atomic clock's Physics Package. The Rb lamp's performance is very sensitive to temperature and its stability. In this paper we discuss the behaviors of Rb Lamp with temperature. The Rb lamp exciter power and temperature of Rb bulb are very important parameters in controlling the performance of the Rb Lamp. It is observed that at temperatures beyond 110 deg. C, the lamp mode changes from the ring to red mode resulting in abnormal broadening of emission lines and self reversal. The results of our studies on spectral analysis of Rb lamp under various operating conditions are reported in the paper.

  17. Life of fluorescent lamps operated at high frequencies with solid-state ballasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verderber, R. R.; Morse, O.; Rubinstein, F. M.

    1985-07-01

    Standard 40-watt, F-40, rapid-start, fluorescent lamps were operated with solid-state ballasts following the standard life-testing cycle of 3 hours on and 20 minutes off for more than 20,000 hours at high frequency. Lamp operating characteristics (starting voltage, filament voltage, arc current, and current-crest factor) were studied as factors affecting lamp life. Measurements show that fluorescent lamps can attain rated life at high frequency using solid-state ballasts. When lamps are operated in the dimmed mode, full filament power is required to sustain lamplife. The rate of lamp lumen depreciation is dependent on the lamp loading and not the operating frequency.

  18. Corneal astigmatism measuring module for slit lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, L.; Riul, C.; Sousa, S. J. F.; DeGroote, J. G. S.; Rosa Filho, A. B.; Oliveira, G. C. D.

    2006-06-01

    We have developed an automatic keratometer module for slit lamps that provides automatic measurements of the radii of the corneal curvature. The system projects 72 light spots displayed in a precise circle at the examined cornea. The displacement and deformation of the reflected image of these light spots are analysed providing the keratometry. Measurements in the range of 26.8-75 D can be obtained and a self-calibration system has been specially designed in order to keep the system calibrated. Infrared LEDs indicate automatically which eye is being examined. Volunteer patients (492) have been submitted to the system and the results show that our system has a high correlation factor with the commercially available manual keratometers and the keratometry measurements from a topographer. Our developed system is 95% in agreement with the corneal topographer (Humphrey—Atlas 995 CZM) and the manual keratometer (Topcon OM-4). The system's nominal precision is 0.05 mm for the radii of curvature and 1° for the associated axis. This research has been supported by Fundação de Apoio à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP).

  19. Composite body for gas discharge lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Driessen, A. J. G. C.; Geertsema, E. B.; Oomen, J. J. C.; Rouwendal, J. W.

    1985-02-26

    Composite body, a gas discharge lamp having a sodium pressure from 300-600 torr in particular, having an envelope of densely sintered aluminium oxide or of other sodium vapor-resistant materials and a feed-through member of tantalum, niobium or other metals equivalent thereto, The bonding material consisting of a finely dispersed polycrystalline product having a composition in mole % between the following limits: Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-5-70 at least one oxide chosen from Sc/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Ti/sub 2/O /SUB x/ , wherein 2

  20. The LAMP instrument at the LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Timur; Castagna, Jean-Charles; Bostedt, Christoph; Xiong, Hui; Ferguson, Ken; Bucher, Maximilian; Berrah, Nora

    2015-05-01

    We have commissioned and used a new instrument at the Linac Coherent Light (LCLS) Source at SLAC National Laboratory called LAMP. It consists of several detectors housed in a double chambered vacuum system. One detection scheme offered relies on the use of a double velocity map imaging (VMI) spectrometer which enables research in the gas phase such as molecular dynamics experiments. The latter are monitored via the detection of electron and ionic fragments resulting from x-ray photo-absorption of x-ray photons. With this new tool, we can record the different fragmentation pathways by measuring multi-particles ion-ion coincidences/multi-particle correlations. We can also simultaneously image the electrons momenta to capture the most detailed x-ray induced reaction in molecules and nano-systems. The other detection scheme offered consists of two imaging detectors of the pnCCD type for diffraction experiments of clusters and bio-specimens. This instrument, available to any users, has the possibility to uncover new mechanisms in physics, chemistry and biology. This work is funded in part by the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences under a SISGR grant and funds from the LCLS, funded by DOE-BES.

  1. Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes an envelope with a discharge forming fill disposed therein which emits light, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the absorbed light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill, a source of microwave energy coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity and configured to reflect at least some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length.

  2. Casting copper to tungsten for high power arc lamp cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H. A.

    1973-01-01

    A method for making 400-kW arc lamp cathodes is described. The cathodes are made by casting a 1.75-in. diameter copper body onto a thoriated tungsten insert. The addition of 0.5-percent nickel to the copper prevents voids from forming at the copper-tungsten interface. Cathodes made by this process have withstood more than 110 hours of operation in a 400-kW arc lamp.

  3. Management of fluorescent lamps in controlled environment chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romer, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Management of fluorescent lights is recommended to (1) maintain uniformity of light intensity over time and (2) permit reproducibility of lighting conditions during experimental replications. At the McGill Phytotron, the lighting intensity can be controlled to desired level because any individual pair of the 40 lamps in each chamber can be set to be 'on' at any particular time. A lamp canopy service history is maintained for each experiment permitting accurate replication of lighting conditions for subsequent replicate trials.

  4. Magnetic fluorescent lamp having reduced ultraviolet self-absorption

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Samuel M.; Richardson, Robert W.

    1985-01-01

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly (10) is enhanced by providing means (30) for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb (12) of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  5. Rapid annealing using the water-wall arc lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelpey, Jeffrey C.; Stump, Paul O.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid annealing techniques using graphite strip heaters [1], tungsten-halogen lamps [2], and conventional arc lamps [3] have been gaining favor to provide controllable activation of ion implants while minimizing the diffusion of the implanted dopant. These conventional heat sources have given good results, but they all suffer from limitations in power output and/or the ability to change power levels rapidly. The water-wall d.c. arc lamp overcomes these limitations and allows precise control and excellent reproducability of the anneal cycle. The high power output and excellent optical coupling of the water-wall lamp allows ilumination from one side of the sample. The wafer temperature can then be directly monitored with a pyrometer and the fast response time of the lamp allows the pyrometer output to control the lamp power and, hence, provide direct feedback control of the wafer temperature. Direct control is important to overcome variations caused by different doping levels or dielectric coatings on the wafers. Annealing experiments using the water-wall lamp have shown that good activation and essentially complete removal of implant damage can be achieved while moving the junction only minimally [4,5]. The degree of dopant diffusion (generally on the order of 1000 Å) is small compared to device dimensions but is somewhat more than would be expected from classical diffusion theory using published diffusion coefficients. The differences depend on the implanted species and models are being developed to explain the discrepancies. The vary rapid heating and cooling rates obtainable with the water-wall lamp offer a great deal of flexibility in the time/temperature cycles used for annealing (or other rapid thermal processes). There are indications that the ability to achieve a rapid cooling rate allows more complete activation of high dose implants and rapid heating rates may reduce the residual damage and amount of diffusion.

  6. An ultraviolet barrier-discharge OH molecular lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Sosnin, E A; Erofeev, M V; Avdeev, S M; Panchenko, Aleksei N; Panarin, V A; Skakun, V S; Tarasenko, Viktor F; Shitts, D V

    2006-10-31

    The energy and spectral parameters of a barrier discharge in a mixture of argon with hydroxyl {sup .}OH are studied experimentally. A sealed lamp with the radiation intensity maximum at {lambda} = 309.2 nm, an emitting surface area of {approx}700 cm{sup 2}, and a radiant excitance of 1.5 mW cm{sup -2} has been fabricated. The radiant power of the lamp is 1.1 W. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  7. Application of principles of nonimaging optics to the construction of solid state laser pump cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janevski, Zoran; Pantelic, Dejan V.

    1990-07-01

    In laser systems where it is impossible or impractical to use lamps and rod whose effective perimeters are matched, some elements of construction of cavities using nonimaging optical concentrators can be used to achieve improved designs in regard to efficiency and pumping uniformity.

  8. Implementation of Energy Saving Controller for Electromagnetic Ballast Fluorescent Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhi; Barsoum, Cheong; Barsoum, N. N.

    2010-06-01

    Fluorescent lamps have proven to be the most efficient lighting device. However, energy losses have been found in electromagnetic ballast due to high harmonic distortion and low power factor so energy is consumed unnecessarily. In today's energy demanding environment, energy efficiency of fluorescent lamps can be improved by introducing an energy saving controller in the electromagnetic ballast. The energy saving controller limits the supply voltage to an optimum level which tends to reduce the power losses in electromagnetic ballasts and fluorescent lamps. It is also anticipated that the energy saving controller has desirable characteristics of high power factor with dimmable illuminance level control. In comparison to electronic dimmable ballast, integration an energy saving controller with electromagnetic ballast fluorescent lamps results in less power consumption, dimmable illuminance control and longer life span at a much lower installation cost. Furthermore, there is no replacement cost for integrating the energy saving controller with existing electromagnetic fluorescent lamps system. In this paper, experimental works have been performed to investigate hardware implementation of the system which further supported by simulation on MATLAB Simulink. Experimental results based on the proposed energy saving controller showed that electromagnetic ballast fluorescent lamps can be dimmed without any problems down to 50% illuminance level output. In addition, experimental results show that 37.5% power consumption can be saved by reducing 15% of the supply voltage.

  9. Mercury mass measurement in fluorescent lamps via neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Vinš, M.; Lahodová, Z.; Fuksa, A.; Kučera, J.; Koleška, M.; Voljanskij, A.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury is an essential component of fluorescent lamps. Not all fluorescent lamps are recycled, resulting in contamination of the environment with toxic mercury, making measurement of the mercury mass used in fluorescent lamps important. Mercury mass measurement of lamps via instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) was tested under various conditions in the LVR-15 research reactor. Fluorescent lamps were irradiated in different positions in vertical irradiation channels and a horizontal channel in neutron fields with total fluence rates from 3×108 cm-2 s-1 to 1014 cm-2 s-1. The 202Hg(n,γ)203Hg nuclear reaction was used for mercury mass evaluation. Activities of 203Hg and others induced radionuclides were measured via gamma spectrometry with an HPGe detector at various times after irradiation. Standards containing an Hg2Cl2 compound were used to determine mercury mass. Problems arise from the presence of elements with a large effective cross section in luminescent material (europium, antimony and gadolinium) and glass (boron). The paper describes optimization of the NAA procedure in the LVR-15 research reactor with particular attention to influence of neutron self-absorption in fluorescent lamps.

  10. Well pump

    DOEpatents

    Ames, Kenneth R.; Doesburg, James M.

    1987-01-01

    A well pump includes a piston and an inlet and/or outlet valve assembly of special structure. Each is formed of a body of organic polymer, preferably PTFE. Each includes a cavity in its upper portion and at least one passage leading from the cavity to the bottom of the block. A screen covers each cavity and a valve disk covers each screen. Flexible sealing flanges extend upwardly and downwardly from the periphery of the piston block. The outlet valve block has a sliding block and sealing fit with the piston rod.

  11. Lightning channel length and flash energy determined from moments of the flash area distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruning, Eric C.; Thomas, Ronald J.

    2015-09-01

    A widely used approach in observational and modeling studies of NOx produced by lightning is to relate NOx production to the number of flashes, without regard for the distribution of lightning flash sizes. Recent studies have begun to consider channel length and flash size, which is now observable with VHF Lightning Mapping Array data. This study uses a capacitor model for flash energy based on the flash coverage area, which defines a size scale. This flash area is then filled with channel using a fractal method and compared to other methods that estimate length directly from the VHF source locations. In the presence of instrument measurement errors, area- and fractal-based estimates are shown to be more stable estimators of flash length than connect-the-dots approaches and therefore are better suited for comparison to NOx production. A geometric interpretation of using vertical profiles of VHF source density to weight the altitude distribution of total channel length is developed. An example of the time series of moments of the lightning flash size distribution is shown for an example case, and some meteorological interpretation is given.

  12. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of T12 and T8 Fluorescent Lamps and Troffers and LED Linear Replacement Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, M. A.; Paget, M. L.; Lingard, R. D.

    2009-01-01

    This report examines standard fluorescent lamps, the recessed troffers they are commonly used in, and available LED replacements for T12 and T8 fluorescent lamps and their application in fluorescent troffers.

  13. FPGA Flash Memory High Speed Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, April

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design and implement a VHDL ONFI Controller module for a Modular Instrumentation System. The goal of the Modular Instrumentation System will be to have a low power device that will store data and send the data at a low speed to a processor. The benefit of such a system will give an advantage over other purchased binary IP due to the capability of allowing NASA to re-use and modify the memory controller module. To accomplish the performance criteria of a low power system, an in house auxiliary board (Flash/ADC board), FPGA development kit, debug board, and modular instrumentation board will be jointly used for the data acquisition. The Flash/ADC board contains four, 1 MSPS, input channel signals and an Open NAND Flash memory module with an analog to digital converter. The ADC, data bits, and control line signals from the board are sent to an Microsemi/Actel FPGA development kit for VHDL programming of the flash memory WRITE, READ, READ STATUS, ERASE, and RESET operation waveforms using Libero software. The debug board will be used for verification of the analog input signal and be able to communicate via serial interface with the module instrumentation. The scope of the new controller module was to find and develop an ONFI controller with the debug board layout designed and completed for manufacture. Successful flash memory operation waveform test routines were completed, simulated, and tested to work on the FPGA board. Through connection of the Flash/ADC board with the FPGA, it was found that the device specifications were not being meet with Vdd reaching half of its voltage. Further testing showed that it was the manufactured Flash/ADC board that contained a misalignment with the ONFI memory module traces. The errors proved to be too great to fix in the time limit set for the project.

  14. Characterization of a FEL lamp type source towards a blue light irradiance intercomparison in medical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A. F. G., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the characterization of modified FEL 1000W lamp housing to be used as a transference standard in the blue light irradiance intercomparison. It aims to support the metrological issues of medical equipment manufactures concerning the phototherapy treatment stated on the standard NBR/IEC 60601-2-50. The light source characterization consists of lamp seasoning, lamp short-term drift and lamp irradiance relative spatial distribution at the plane of measurement. The lamp seasoning is performed by a software developed in LabView® which measures the lamp voltage, current and irradiance at each 5 minutes during 25 hours of seasoning. The lamp short-term drift is evaluated by measuring the lamp irradiance during a sequence of 2 hours of lamp using. The lamp irradiance relative spatial distribution is verified using a radiometer head with a reduced aperture attached to an YZ positing system at each 2 mm in an interval of 24 mm. The lamp presented variation of about 0.1%/h during seasoning. Short-term drift for the lamp after a warm-up of 20 minutes was less than 0.9% for series of 4 lamp switching cycles. Lamp irradiance relative spatial distribution showed a variation of ±1.25% for a circular diameter of 20 mm. The overall uncertainty for lamp irradiance was 3.65%.

  15. Single Particle Difraction at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, M.; Boutet, S.; Starodub, Dmitri; Decorwin-Martin, Philippe; Chapman, H.; Bajt, S.; Schulz, J.; Hajdu, Janos; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Marchesini, Stefano; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Woods, Bruce; Rohner, Urs; /Tofwerk AG, Thun

    2010-06-11

    Single-pulse coherent diffraction patterns have been collected from randomly injected single particles with a soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL). The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high-resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of the object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. A diffraction pattern of a single particle will only be recorded when the particle arrival into the FEL interaction region coincides with FEL pulse arrival and detector integration. The properties of the experimental apparatus coinciding with these three events set the data acquisition rate. For our single particle FLASH diffraction imaging experiments: (1) an aerodynamic lens stack prepared a particle beam that consisted of particles moving at 150-200 m/s positioned randomly in space and time, (2) the 10 fs long FEL pulses were delivered at a fixed rate, and (3) the detector was set to integrate and readout once every two seconds. The effect of these experimental parameters on the rate of data acquisition using randomly injected particles will be discussed. Overall, the ultrashort FEL pulses do not set the limit of the data acquisition, more important is the effective interaction time of the particle crossing the FEL focus, the pulse sequence structure and the detector readout rate. Example diffraction patterns of randomly injected ellipsoidal iron oxide nanoparticles in different orientations are presented. This is the first single particle diffraction data set of identical particles in different orientations collected on a shot-to-shot basis. This data set will be used to test algorithms for recovering 3D structure from single particle diffraction.

  16. What quenches the helium shell flashes. [thermonuclear reactions in stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackmann, I.-J.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of a typical stellar helium shell flash cycle. A sequence of 12 flashes for a population I star is considered. The changes taking place at a constant mass layer in the helium-burning shell are studied as the flash develops. A highly simplified mathematical description is presented, taking into account the three necessary conditions for the occurrence of the flash and the pressure-density and temperature-density relationships. Quantities which are helpful in explaining what triggers the flash are found to be useful in explaining what quenches the flash.

  17. Daily Physical Activity and Hot Flashes in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation FLASHES Study

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Carolyn; Matthews, Karen; Thurston, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the role of physical activity in menopausal hot flashes. Competing models conceptualize physical activity as a risk or protective factor for hot flashes. Few studies have examined this relationship prospectively using physiologic measures of hot flashes and physical activity. Design Over two 48 hour-periods, 51 participants wore a physiologic hot flash monitor and activity monitor, and reported their hot flashes in an electronic diary. Physiologic hot flashes, reported hot flashes and reported hot flashes without physiological corroboration were related to activity changes using hierarchical generalized linear modeling, adjusting for potential confounders. Setting Community. Patients Midlife women. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Physiologically-detected hot flashes and reported hot flashes with and without physiologic corroboration. Results Hot flash reports without physiologic corroboration were more likely after activity increases (OR 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00-1.10, p=.01), particularly among women with higher levels of depressive symptoms (interaction p=.02). No other types of hot flashes were related to physical activity. Conclusion Acute increases in physical activity were associated with increased reporting of hot flashes lacking physiologic corroboration, particularly among women with depressive symptoms. Clinicians should consider the role of symptom perception and reporting in relations between physical activity and hot flashes. PMID:24491454

  18. Comparison of direct and alternating current vacuum ultraviolet lamps in atmospheric pressure photoionization.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Haapala, Markus; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten; Kostiainen, Risto; Kauppila, Tiina J

    2012-02-01

    A direct current induced vacuum ultraviolet (dc-VUV) krypton discharge lamp and an alternating current, radio frequency (rf) induced VUV lamp that are essentially similar to lamps in commercial atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) ion sources were compared. The emission distributions along the diameter of the lamp exit window were measured, and they showed that the beam of the rf lamp is much wider than that of the dc lamp. Thus, the rf lamp has larger efficient ionization area, and it also emits more photons than the dc lamp. The ionization efficiencies of the lamps were compared using identical spray geometries with both lamps in microchip APPI mass spectrometry (μAPPI-MS) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS). A comprehensive view on the ionization was gained by studying six different μAPPI solvent compositions, five DAPPI spray solvents, and completely solvent-free DAPPI. The observed reactant ions for each solvent composition were very similar with both lamps except for toluene, which showed a higher amount of solvent originating oxidation products with the rf lamp than with the dc lamp in μAPPI. Moreover, the same analyte ions were detected with both lamps, and thus, the ionization mechanisms with both lamps are similar. The rf lamp showed a higher ionization efficiency than the dc lamp in all experiments. The difference between the lamp ionization efficiencies was greatest when high ionization energy (IE) solvent compositions (IEs above 10 eV), i.e., hexane, methanol, and methanol/water, (1:1 v:v) were used. The higher ionization efficiency of the rf lamp is likely due to the larger area of high intensity light emission, and the resulting larger efficient ionization area and higher amount of photons emitted. These result in higher solvent reactant ion production, which in turn enables more efficient analyte ion production. PMID:22229729

  19. Harmonic distortion and power factor assessment in city street gas discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, S.; Castaneda, R.; Veas, D.

    1996-04-01

    The current and voltage harmonic spectrum, and power factor in gas discharge lamps: Sodium (Na)-high pressure and Mercury (Hg) in actual use in public street lighting have been measured. A sample of nearby 360 gas discharge lamps (Na, Hg) of different rated power was obtained by simple random sampling over a universe of approximately 15,000 lamps. An equivalent current harmonic spectrum for gas discharge lamps is proposed, which is independent of the type of gas and the lamp rated power. This current spectrum can be used to integrate gas discharge lamp models for harmonic distortion level assessment in distribution networks. The relation of this equivalent current harmonic spectrum with: (1) lamp voltage waveform, (2) type of lamp (Na, Hg), and (3) power factor-capacitor lamp, is analyzed.

  20. Firefly Light Flashing: Oxygen Supply Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yueh-Lin; Li, Chia-Wei; Hong, Tzay-Ming; Ho, Jen-Zon; Yang, En-Cheng; Wu, Wen-Yen; Margaritondo, G.; Hsu, Su-Ting; Ong, Edwin B. L.; Hwu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Firefly luminescence is an intriguing phenomenon with potential technological applications, whose biochemistry background was only recently established. The physics side of this phenomenon, however, was still unclear, specifically as far as the oxygen supply mechanism for light flashing is concerned. This uncertainty is due to the complex microscopic structure of the tracheal system: without fully knowing its geometry, one cannot reliably test the proposed mechanisms. We solved this problem using synchrotron phase contrast microtomography and transmission x-ray microscopy, finding that the oxygen consumption corresponding to mitochondria functions exceeds the maximum rate of oxygen diffusion from the tracheal system to the photocytes. Furthermore, the flashing mechanism uses a large portion of this maximum rate. Thus, the flashing control requires passivation of the mitochondria functions, e.g., by nitric oxide, and switching of the oxygen supply from them to photoluminescence.

  1. Process for energy reduction with flash fusing

    SciTech Connect

    Berkes, J.S.

    1987-10-06

    This patent describes a process for affecting a reduction in the energy needed for accomplishing the flash fusing of a developed image which comprises (1) providing a toner composition with resin particles, pigment articles, and wax. The wax possesses a lower melting temperature than the resin particles and is selected from the group consisting of polyethylene and polypropylene with a molecular weight of less than about 6,000; (2) introducing the aforementioned toner composition into a xerographic imaging apparatus having incorporated therein a flash fusing device; (3) generating an electrostatic latent image in the imaging apparatus, and subsequently developing this image with the toner composition; (4) transferring the image to a supporting substrate; and (5) permanently attaching the image to the substrate with energy emitted from a flash fusing device, and wherein there is formed between the supporting substrate and the toner composition during fusing a wax layer.

  2. Multidimensional flash diffusivity measurements of orthotropic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, S.; McDowell, D.L.; Dinwiddie, R.B.

    1999-03-01

    A generalization of the radial flash technique is presented whereby the thermal diffusivity of an orthotropic solid is measured in directions parallel and perpendicular to the flash source. The theoretical formulation is based on a Green`s function approach which assumes a general orthotropic solid with three mutually orthogonal thermal diffusivities (or conductivities). Using this approach, a solution to this problem is presented which can be used to develop solutions for arbitrary pulse waveforms and incident geometries. Analytical and numerical results are presented for two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases of finite and semiinfinite solids. Characteristic equations which describe the ratio of the temperatures at two points along a principal axis are given. The equations show excellent agreement with numerical predictions as well as experimental results. A parameter estimation approach is given which improves on the accuracy of the radial flash technique in the determination of thermal diffusivity from experimental data.

  3. A void distribution model-flashing flow

    SciTech Connect

    Riznic, J.; Ishii, M.; Afgan, N.

    1987-01-01

    A new model for flashing flow based on wall nucleations is proposed here and the model predictions are compared with some experimental data. In order to calculate the bubble number density, the bubble number transport equation with a distributed source from the wall nucleation sites was used. Thus it was possible to avoid the usual assumption of a constant bubble number density. Comparisons of the model with the data shows that the model based on the nucleation site density correlation appears to be acceptable to describe the vapor generation in the flashing flow. For the limited data examined, the comparisons show rather satisfactory agreement without using a floating parameter to adjust the model. This result indicated that, at least for the experimental conditions considered here, the mechanistic predictions of the flashing phenomenon is possible on the present wall nucleation based model.

  4. ACOUSTIC SIGNATURES OF THE HELIUM CORE FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Moore, Kevin; Macias, Phillip J.

    2012-01-15

    All evolved stars with masses M {approx}< 2 M{sub Sun} undergo an initiating off-center helium core flash in their M{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 0.48 M{sub Sun} He core as they ascend the red giant branch (RGB). This off-center flash is the first of a few successive helium shell subflashes that remove the core electron degeneracy over 2 Myr, converting the object into a He-burning star. Though characterized by Thomas over 40 years ago, this core flash phase has yet to be observationally probed. Using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) code, we show that red giant asteroseismology enabled by space-based photometry (i.e., Kepler and CoRoT) can probe these stars during the flash. The rapid ({approx}< 10{sup 5} yr) contraction of the red giant envelope after the initiating flash dramatically improves the coupling of the p-modes to the core g-modes, making the detection of l = 1 mixed modes possible for these 2 Myr. This duration implies that 1 in 35 stars near the red clump in the H-R diagram will be in their core flash phase. During this time, the star has a g-mode period spacing of {Delta}P{sub g} Almost-Equal-To 70-100 s, lower than the {Delta}P{sub g} Almost-Equal-To 250 s of He-burning stars in the red clump, but higher than the RGB stars at the same luminosity. This places them in an underpopulated part of the large frequency spacing ({Delta}{nu}) versus {Delta}P{sub g} diagram that should ease their identification among the thousands of observed red giants.

  5. Red phosphors for use in high CRI fluorescent lamps

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Alok; Comanzo, Holly; Manivannan, Vankatesan; Setlur, Anant Achyut

    2005-11-15

    Novel red emitting phosphors for use in fluorescent lamps resulting in superior color rendering index values compared to conventional red phosphors. Also disclosed is a fluorescent lamp including a phosphor layer comprising blends of one or more of a blue phosphor, a blue-green phosphor, a green phosphor and a red a phosphor selected from the group consisting of SrY.sub.2 O.sub.4 :Eu.sup.3+, (Y,Gd)Al.sub.3 B.sub.4 O.sub.12 :Eu.sup.3+, and [(Y.sub.1-x-y-m La.sub.y)Gd.sub.x ]BO.sub.3 :Eu.sub.m wherein y<0.50 and m=0.001-0.3. The phosphor layer can optionally include an additional deep red phosphor and a yellow emitting phosphor. The resulting lamp will exhibit a white light having a color rendering index of 90 or higher with a correlated color temperature of from 2500 to 10000 Kelvin. The use of the disclosed red phosphors in phosphor blends of lamps results in high CRI light sources with increased stability and acceptable lumen maintenance over the course of the lamp life.

  6. Color perception under illumination by quadrichromatic solid-state lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanikunas, Rytis; Vaitkevicius, Henrikas; Svegzda, Algimantas; Viliunas, Vilius; Bliznikas, Zenius; Breive, Kestutis; Vaicekauskas, Rimantas; Novickovas, Algirdas; Kurilcik, Genadij; Zukauskas, Arturas; Gaska, Remis; Shur, Michael S.

    2004-10-01

    Lighting based on sources of light composed of colored light-emitting diodes (LEDs) offers versatile control of color and a possibility of trade-off between efficiency and color rendering. However, psychophysical issues related to such polychromatic solid-state sources have to be addressed. In this work, studies of the perception of standard colors under illumination with a quadrichromatic red-amber-green-blue (RAGB) solid-state source were carried out. An RAGB lamp containing primary LEDs with the emission peaks at 638 nm, 594 nm, 523 nm, and 441 nm and optimized for the highest value of the general color rendering index (86 points) was investigated and compared to a tungsten lamp. 40 standard Munsell samples of value 6, chroma /6, and hue incremented by 2.5 were used in the investigation. Changes in the saturation and hue of the Munsell samples illuminated by the RAGB lamp versus tungsten lamp (both with the correlated temperature of 2600 K) were obtained by colorimetric calculation comparisons and by psychophysical experiments on subjective matching of the samples. Subjective differences in hue and subjective color discrimination differences under the tungsten and RAGB lamps were found in the wavelength range of 440-500 nm and 560-580 nm. We attribute these differences to non-optimal peak wavelengths of the primary LEDs and to the narrow-band components of the RAGB spectrum.

  7. Optical design of LED-based automotive tail lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domhardt, André; Rohlfing, Udo; Klinger, Karsten; Manz, Karl; Kooß, Dieter; Lemmer, Uli

    2007-09-01

    The application of ultra bright monochromatic and white High-Power-LEDs in the range of automotive lighting systems is now state of the art. These LEDs offer new possibilities in optical design and engineering within different fields of automotive lighting, e.g., tail lamps, signal lamps, headlamps and interior lighting. This contribution describes the process of the optical design of an automotive LED tail lamp based on a practical example. We will elaborate the principal geometric approach, the radiometric conditions and the optical design by using standard and advanced mathematical optimization methods. Special attention will be paid to the following topics: efficient light coupling from the LED into the optical device, adaptation of the illuminance and optimization with respect to the requirements from SAE/ECE regulations. It will be shown that the development of LED-lamps requires the complex interaction of several factors. The challenge for the optical designer is to fulfill the technical demands while also considering the appearance of the final product desired by the customer. Further design specifications emerge from the electrical and thermal layout of the lamp.

  8. LED Light Characteristics for Surgical Shadowless Lamps and Surgical Loupes

    PubMed Central

    Kinugawa, Yoshitaka; Nobae, Yuichi; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Toda, Ikuko; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blue light has more energy than longer wavelength light and can penetrate the eye to reach the retina. When surgeons use magnifying loupes under intensive surgical shadowless lamps for better view of the surgical field, the total luminance is about 200 times brighter than that of typical office lighting. In this study, the effects of 2 types of shadowless lamps were compared. Moreover, the effect of various eyeglasses, which support magnifying loupes, on both the light energy and color rendering was considered. Methods: The light intensity and color rendering were measured on 3 variables: light transmittance, light intensity, and color rendering. Results: Under shadowless lamps, the light energy increased with low-magnification loupes and decreased with high-magnification loupes. Filtering eyeglasses reduced the energy, especially in conditions where the low-magnification loupe was used. The best color-rendering index values were obtained with computer eyeglasses under conventional light-emitting diode shadowless lamps and with no glass and with lightly yellow-tinted lenses under less-blue light-emitting diode. Conclusions: Microsurgeons are exposed to strong lighting throughout their career, and proper color rendering must be considered for easier recognition. Light toxicity and loss of color rendering can be reduced with an appropriate combination of shadowless lamps and colored eyeglasses. PMID:26893987

  9. Compact fluorescent lamp phosphors in accidental radiation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Murthy, K V R; Pallavi, S P; Ghildiyal, Rahul; Parmar, Manish C; Patel, Y S; Ravi Kumar, V; Sai Prasad, A S; Natarajan, V; Page, A G

    2006-01-01

    The application of lamp phosphors for accidental dosimetry is a new concept. Since the materials used in fluorescent lamps are good photo luminescent materials, if one can either use the inherent defects present in the phosphor or add suitable modifiers to induce thermoluminescence (TL) in these phosphors, then the device (fluorescent lamp) can be used as an accidental dosemeter. In continuation of our search for a suitable phosphor material, which can serve both as an efficient lamp phosphor and as a good radiation monitoring device, detailed examination has been carried out on cerium and terbium-doped lanthanum phosphate material. A (90)Sr beta source with 50 mCi strength (1.85 GBq) was used as the irradiation source for TL studies. The TL response as a function of dose received was examined for all phosphors used and it was observed that the intensity of the TL peak vs. dose received was a linear function in the dose range 0.1-200 Gy in each case. Incidentally LaPO(4): Ce,Tb is a component of the compact fluorescent lamp marketed recently as an energy bright light source. Besides having very good luminescence efficiency, good dosimetric properties of these phosphors render them useful for their use in accidental dosimetry also. PMID:16816401

  10. The instantaneous light-intensity function of a fluorescent lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluskin, Emanuel; Topalis, Frangiskos V.; Kateri, Ifigenia; Bisketzis, Nikolas

    2006-05-01

    Using some simple physics and “system” considerations, the instantaneous light intensity function ψ(t) of a fluorescent lamp fed via a regular ballast from the 50 60 Hz line is argued to be ψ(t)=ψ+bp(t), where p(t) is the instantaneous power function of the lamp, and b is a constant, and experiment confirms this formula well. The main frequency of ψ(t), the very significant singularity of its waveform, and the relative intensity of the ripple, i.e., the depth of the modulation, are the focus. The results are important for research into the vision problem that some humans (autistic, but others, too) experience regarding fluorescent light. The inertia of the processes in the lamp which are responsible for the light emission, provides some nonzero emission at the instants when p(t) has zeros. The smaller the volume of the tube and the mass of the gas are, the more weakly the inertia of the processes is expressed, and the relatively smaller is ψ. However, it should be very difficult to theoretically obtain ψ(t), in particular ψ, from the very complicated physics of the low-pressure discharge in the tube. We conclude that ψ has to be connected with the (also easily measured) lamp's inductance. The work should attract more attention of the physicists to the properties of the common fluorescent lamps.

  11. Spectroscopic imaging of metal halide high-intensity discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvallet, Geoffrey A.

    The body of this work consists of three main research projects. An optical- and near-ultraviolet-wavelength absorption study sought to determine absolute densities of ground and excited level Sc atoms, ground level Sc + ions, and ground level Na atoms in a commercial 250 W metal halide high intensity discharge lamp during operation. These measurements also allowed the determination of the arc temperature and absolute electron density as functions of radius. Through infrared emission spectroscopy, relative densities of sodium and scandium were determined as functions of radius. Using the absolute densities gained from the optical experiment, these relative densities were calibrated. In addition, direct observation of the infrared emission allowed us to characterize the infrared power losses of the lamp. When considered as a fraction of the overall power consumption, the near-infrared spectral power losses were not substantial enough to warrant thorough investigation of their reduction in these lamps. The third project was an attempt to develop a portable x-ray diagnostic experiment. Two-dimensional spatial maps of the lamps were analyzed to determine absolute elemental mercury densities and the arc temperature as a function of radius. Two methods were used to improve the calibration of the density measurements and to correct for the spread in x-ray energy: known solutions of mercury in nitric acid, and an arc lamp which was uniformly heated to evaporate the mercury content. Although many complexities arose in this experiment, its goal was successfully completed.

  12. Longitudinal Diagnostics of Short Bunches at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shaukat

    2009-01-22

    Novel acceleration concepts such as laser- or beam-driven plasma acceleration require advanced diagnostic techniques to characterize and monitor the beam. A particular challenge is to measure bunch lengths of the order of 10 femtoseconds. Several methods are currently explored at the free-electron laser FLASH at DESY/Hamburg and will be discussed it this paper, such as electro-optical sampling, streaking bunches with a transversely deflecting cavity, and -most recently implemented at FLASH--the optical-replica synthesizer, a laser-based technique promising a time resolution of a few femtoseconds.

  13. Probabilistic Flash Flood Forecasting using Stormscale Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J.; Gourley, J. J.; Kain, J. S.; Clark, A.; Novak, D.; Hong, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Flash flooding is one of the most costly and deadly natural hazards in the US and across the globe. The loss of life and property from flash floods could be mitigated with better guidance from hydrological models, but these models have limitations. For example, they are commonly initialized using rainfall estimates derived from weather radars, but the time interval between observations of heavy rainfall and a flash flood can be on the order of minutes, particularly for small basins in urban settings. Increasing the lead time for these events is critical for protecting life and property. Therefore, this study advances the use of quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) from a stormscale NWP ensemble system into a distributed hydrological model setting to yield basin-specific, probabilistic flash flood forecasts (PFFFs). Rainfall error characteristics of the individual members are first diagnosed and quantified in terms of structure, amplitude, and location (SAL; Wernli et al., 2008). Amplitude and structure errors are readily correctable due to their diurnal nature, and the fine scales represented by the CAPS QPF members are consistent with radar-observed rainfall, mainly showing larger errors with afternoon convection. To account for the spatial uncertainty of the QPFs, we use an elliptic smoother, as in Marsh et al. (2012), to produce probabilistic QPFs (PQPFs). The elliptic smoother takes into consideration underdispersion, which is notoriously associated with stormscale ensembles, and thus, is good for targeting the approximate regions that may receive heavy rainfall. However, stormscale details contained in individual members are still needed to yield reasonable flash flood simulations. Therefore, on a case study basis, QPFs from individual members are then run through the hydrological model with their predicted structure and corrected amplitudes, but the locations of individual rainfall elements are perturbed within the PQPF elliptical regions using Monte

  14. OTD Observations of Continental US Ground and Cloud Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William

    2007-01-01

    Lightning optical flash parameters (e.g., radiance, area, duration, number of optical groups, and number of optical events) derived from almost five years of Optical Transient Detector (OTD) data are analyzed. Hundreds of thousands of OTD flashes occurring over the continental US are categorized according to flash type (ground or cloud flash) using US National Lightning Detection Network TM (NLDN) data. The statistics of the optical characteristics of the ground and cloud flashes are inter-compared on an overall basis, and as a function of ground flash polarity. A standard two-distribution hypothesis test is used to inter-compare the population means of a given lightning parameter for the two flash types. Given the differences in the statistics of the optical characteristics, it is suggested that statistical analyses (e.g., Bayesian Inference) of the space-based optical measurements might make it possible to successfully discriminate ground and cloud flashes a reasonable percentage of the time.

  15. Acupuncture May Ease Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_157996.html Acupuncture May Ease Hot Flashes for Breast Cancer Patients Italian trial finds ... News) -- Acupuncture can help alleviate the often-debilitating hot flashes that afflict many breast cancer patients, new ...

  16. LMFBR with booster pump in pumping loop

    DOEpatents

    Rubinstein, H.J.

    1975-10-14

    A loop coolant circulation system is described for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) utilizing a low head, high specific speed booster pump in the hot leg of the coolant loop with the main pump located in the cold leg of the loop, thereby providing the advantages of operating the main pump in the hot leg with the reliability of cold leg pump operation.

  17. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, Gerald B.; Brynsvold, Glen V.; Jahns, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium is disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet.

  18. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, G.B.; Brynsvold, G.V.; Jahns, T.M.

    1989-08-22

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium are disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet. 4 figs.

  19. Liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.

    1982-01-01

    The liquid metal pump comprises floating seal rings and attachment of the pump diffuser to the pump bowl for isolating structural deflections from the pump shaft bearings. The seal rings also eliminate precision machining on large assemblies by eliminating the need for a close tolerance fit between the mounting surfaces of the pump and the seals. The liquid metal pump also comprises a shaft support structure that is isolated from the pump housing for better preservation of alignment of shaft bearings. The shaft support structure also allows for complete removal of pump internals for inspection and repair.

  20. Test plane uniformity analysis for the MSFC solar simulator lamp array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary analysis was made on the solar simulator lamp array. It is an array of 405 tungsten halogen lamps with Fresnel lenses to achieve the required spectral distribution and collimation. A computer program was developed to analyze lamp array performance at the test plane. Measurements were made on individual lamp lens combinations to obtain data for the computer analysis. The analysis indicated that the performance of the lamp array was about as expected, except for a need to position the test plane within 2.7 m of the lamp array to achieve the desired 7 percent uniformity of illumination tolerance.